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Sample records for presynaptic cholinergic nerve

  1. Deformation of attractor landscape via cholinergic presynaptic modulations: a computational study using a phase neuron model.

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    Takashi Kanamaru

    Full Text Available Corticopetal acetylcholine (ACh is released transiently from the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM into the cortical layers and is associated with top-down attention. Recent experimental data suggest that this release of ACh disinhibits layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons (PYRs via muscarinic presynaptic effects on inhibitory synapses. Together with other possible presynaptic cholinergic effects on excitatory synapses, this may result in dynamic and temporal modifications of synapses associated with top-down attention. However, the system-level consequences and cognitive relevance of such disinhibitions are poorly understood. Herein, we propose a theoretical possibility that such transient modifications of connectivity associated with ACh release, in addition to top-down glutamatergic input, may provide a neural mechanism for the temporal reactivation of attractors as neural correlates of memories. With baseline levels of ACh, the brain returns to quasi-attractor states, exhibiting transitive dynamics between several intrinsic internal states. This suggests that top-down attention may cause the attention-induced deformations between two types of attractor landscapes: the quasi-attractor landscape (Q-landscape, present under low-ACh, non-attentional conditions and the attractor landscape (A-landscape, present under high-ACh, top-down attentional conditions. We present a conceptual computational model based on experimental knowledge of the structure of PYRs and interneurons (INs in cortical layers 1 and 2/3 and discuss the possible physiological implications of our results.

  2. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

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    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction.

  3. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

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    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction

  4. N-cadherin induces partial differentiation of cholinergic presynaptic terminals in heterologous cultures of brainstem neurons and CHO cells

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    Richard J Flannery

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available N-cadherin is a calcium-sensitive cell adhesion molecule commonly expressed at synaptic junctions and contributes to formation and maturation of synaptic contacts. This study used heterologous cell cultures of brainstem cholinergic neurons and transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells to examine whether N-cadherin is sufficient to induce differentiation of cholinergic presynaptic terminals. Brainstem nuclei isolated from transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of choline acetyltransferase transcriptional regulatory elements (ChATBACEGFP were cultured as tissue explants for five days and cocultured with transfected CHO cells for an additional two days. Immunostaining for synaptic vesicle proteins SV2 and synapsin I revealed a ~3-fold increase in the area of SV2 immunolabeling over N-cadherin expressing CHO cells, and this effect was enhanced by coexpression of p120-catenin. Synapsin I immunolabeling per axon length was also increased on N-cadherin expressing CHO cells but required coexpression of p120-catenin. To determine whether N-cadherin induces formation of neurotransmitter release sites, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings of CHO cells expressing alpha-3 and beta-4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunits in contact with cholinergic axons were used to monitor excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and miniature EPSPs (mEPSPs. EPSPs and mEPSPs were not detected in both, control and in N-cadherin expressing CHO cells in the absence or presence of tetrodotoxin. These results indicate that expression of N-cadherin in non-neuronal cells is sufficient to initiate differentiation of presynaptic cholinergic terminals by inducing accumulation of synaptic vesicles; however, development of readily detectable mature cholinergic release sites and/or clustering of postsynaptic nAChR may require expression of additional synaptogenic proteins.

  5. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Choi, Sung W; Gerencser, Akos A; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R; Gibson, Bradford W; Nicholls, David G; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D

    2012-11-21

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months, and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to age-matched controls. No consistent bioenergetic deficiencies were detected in synaptosomes from the three models; only APP/PS cortical synaptosomes from 14-month-old mice showed an increase in respiration associated with proton leak. J20 mice were chosen for a highly stringent investigation of mitochondrial function and content. There were no significant differences in the quality of the synaptosomal preparations or the mitochondrial volume fraction. Furthermore, respiratory variables, calcium handling, and membrane potentials of synaptosomes from symptomatic J20 mice under calcium-imposed stress were not consistently impaired. The recovery of marker proteins during synaptosome preparation was the same, ruling out the possibility that the lack of functional bioenergetic defects in synaptosomes from J20 mice was due to the selective loss of damaged synaptosomes during sample preparation. Our results support the conclusion that the intrinsic bioenergetic capacities of presynaptic nerve terminals are maintained in these symptomatic AD mouse models.

  6. Local synthesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins in the presynaptic nerve terminal.

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    Gioio, A E; Eyman, M; Zhang, H; Lavina, Z S; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    2001-06-01

    One of the central tenets in neuroscience has been that the protein constituents of distal compartments of the neuron (e.g., the axon and nerve terminal) are synthesized in the nerve cell body and are subsequently transported to their ultimate sites of function. In contrast to this postulate, we have established previously that a heterogeneous population of mRNAs and biologically active polyribosomes exist in the giant axon and presynaptic nerve terminals of the photoreceptor neurons in squid. We report that these mRNA populations contain mRNAs for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to include: cytochrome oxidase subunit 17, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.3), dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.8.1.4), and coenzyme Q subunit 7. The mRNA for heat shock protein 70, a chaperone protein known to be involved in the import of proteins into mitochondria, has also been identified. Electrophoretic gel analysis of newly synthesized proteins in the synaptosomal fraction isolated from the squid optic lobe revealed that the large presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neuron contain a cytoplasmic protein synthetic system. Importantly, a significant amount of the cycloheximide resistant proteins locally synthesized in the terminal becomes associated with mitochondria. PCR analysis of RNA from synaptosomal polysomes establishes that COX17 and CoQ7 mRNAs are being actively translated. Taken together, these findings indicate that proteins required for the maintenance of mitochondrial function are synthesized locally in the presynaptic nerve terminal, and call attention to the intimacy of the relationship between the terminal and its energy generating system. J. Neurosci. Res. 64:447-453, 2001. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

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    Choi, Sung W.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M.; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Nicholls, David G.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to ag...

  8. Distribution of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibres within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum.

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    Petraitiene, Viktorija; Pauza, Dainius H; Benetis, Rimantas

    2014-06-01

    The disbalance between adrenergic (sympathetic) and cholinergic (parasympathetic) cardiac inputs facilitates cardiac arrhythmias, including the lethal ones. In spite of the fact that the morphological pattern of the epicardiac ganglionated subplexuses (ENsubP) has been previously described in detail, the distribution of functionally distinct axons in human intrinsic nerves was not investigated thus far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)- and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive axons within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum (HH), since they are of pivotal importance for determining proper treatment options for different arrhythmias. Tissue samples containing the intrinsic nerves from seven epicardiac subplexuses were obtained from nine human hearts without cardiac pathology and processed for immunofluorescent detection of TH and ChAT. The nerve area was measured and the numbers of axons were counted using microphotographs of nerve profiles. The densities of fibres were extrapolated and compared between subplexuses. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) fibres were evidently predominant (>56%) in nerves of dorsal (DRA) and ventral right atrial (VRA) ENsubP. Within both left (LC) and right coronary ENsubP, the most abundant (70.9 and 83.0%, respectively) were TH-IR axons. Despite subplexal dependence, ChAT-IR fibres prevailed in comparatively thinner nerves, whereas TH-IR fibres in thicker ones. Morphometry showed that at the level of HH: (i) LC subplexal nerves were found to be the thickest (25 737 ± 4131 μm(2)) ones, whereas the thinnest (2604 ± 213 μm(2)) nerves concentrated in DRA ENsubP; (ii) the density of ChAT-IR axons was highest (6.8 ± 0.6/100 μm(2)) in the ventral left atrial nerves and lowest (3.2 ± 0.1/100 μm(2)) in left dorsal ENsubP and (iii) the density of TH-IR fibres was highest (15.9 ± 2.1/100 μm(2)) in LC subplexal nerves and lowest (4.4 ± 0

  9. Endothelin-1 increases cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction of human bronchi via tachykinin synthesis induction

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    D'Agostino, Bruno; Advenier, Charles; Falciani, Maddalena; Gallelli, Luca; Marrocco, Giuseppina; Piegari, Elena; Filippelli, Amelia; Rossi, Francesco

    2001-01-01

    In some asthmatics, muscarinic receptor antagonists are effective in limiting bronchoconstrictor response, suggesting an abnormal cholinergic drive in these subjects. There is a growing body of evidences indicating that cholinergic neurotransmission is also enhanced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) in rabbit bronchi, mouse trachea and in human isolated airway preparations.We investigated the role of secondary mediators in ET-1 induced potentiation of cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction in human bronchi, in particular the possible role of neuropeptides in this phenomenon.Bronchial tissues after endothelin treatment were exposed to a standard electrical field stimulation (EFS) (30% of EFS 30Hz)-induced contraction. In addition, in some experiments, preparations were treated with a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist and subsequently exposed to the same protocol. HPLC and RIA were performed on organ bath fluid samples. Moreover, the human bronchi were used for the β-PPT (preprotachykinin) mRNA extraction and semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT – PCR), prior to and 30 – 40 min following ET-1 challenge.The selective tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist, SR48968, was effective to reduce ET-1 potentiation of EFS mediated contraction. HPLC or RIA showed significant increased quantities of NKA in organ bath effluents after EFS stimulation in bronchi pretreated with ET-1. Finally, β-PPT mRNA level after stimulation of bronchi with ET-1 was increased about 2 fold respect to control untreated bronchi.In conclusion, this study demonstrated that, at least in part, the ET-1 potentiation of cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction is mediated by tachykinin release, suggesting that in addition to nerves, several type of cells, such as airway smooth muscle cell, may participate to neuropeptide production. PMID:11724750

  10. Cholinergic Potentiation of Restoration of Visual Function after Optic Nerve Damage in Rats

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    Mira Chamoun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing cortical plasticity and brain connectivity may improve residual vision following a visual impairment. Since acetylcholine plays an important role in attention and neuronal plasticity, we explored whether potentiation of the cholinergic transmission has an effect on the visual function restoration. To this end, we evaluated for 4 weeks the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on brightness discrimination, visually evoked potentials, and visual cortex reactivity after a bilateral and partial optic nerve crush in adult rats. Donepezil administration enhanced brightness discrimination capacity after optic nerve crush compared to nontreated animals. The visually evoked activation of the primary visual cortex was not restored, as measured by evoked potentials, but the cortical neuronal activity measured by thallium autometallography was not significantly affected four weeks after the optic nerve crush. Altogether, the results suggest a role of the cholinergic system in postlesion cortical plasticity. This finding agrees with the view that restoration of visual function may involve mechanisms beyond the area of primary damage and opens a new perspective for improving visual rehabilitation in humans.

  11. Cholinergic Potentiation of Restoration of Visual Function after Optic Nerve Damage in Rats

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    Chamoun, Mira; Sergeeva, Elena G.; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Jia, Shaobo; Grigartzik, Lisa; Ma, Jing; You, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing cortical plasticity and brain connectivity may improve residual vision following a visual impairment. Since acetylcholine plays an important role in attention and neuronal plasticity, we explored whether potentiation of the cholinergic transmission has an effect on the visual function restoration. To this end, we evaluated for 4 weeks the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on brightness discrimination, visually evoked potentials, and visual cortex reactivity after a bilateral and partial optic nerve crush in adult rats. Donepezil administration enhanced brightness discrimination capacity after optic nerve crush compared to nontreated animals. The visually evoked activation of the primary visual cortex was not restored, as measured by evoked potentials, but the cortical neuronal activity measured by thallium autometallography was not significantly affected four weeks after the optic nerve crush. Altogether, the results suggest a role of the cholinergic system in postlesion cortical plasticity. This finding agrees with the view that restoration of visual function may involve mechanisms beyond the area of primary damage and opens a new perspective for improving visual rehabilitation in humans. PMID:28928986

  12. Influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation conditions on disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition and presynaptic inhibition in healthy adults.

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    Takeda, Kazuya; Tanabe, Shigeo; Koyama, Soichiro; Ushiroyama, Kosuke; Naoi, Yuki; Motoya, Ikuo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the influence of stimulus conditions of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition (RI) and presynaptic inhibition (D1 inhibition) in healthy adults. Eight healthy participants received TENS (stimulus frequencies of 50, 100, and 200 Hz) over the deep peroneal nerve and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in the resting condition for 30 min. At pre- and post-intervention, the RI from the TA to the soleus (SOL) and D1 inhibition of the SOL alpha motor neuron were assessed by evoked electromyography. The results showed that RI was not changed by TENS at any stimulus frequency condition. Conversely, D1 inhibition was significantly changed by TENS regardless of the stimulus frequency. The present results and previous studies pertaining to RI suggest that the resting condition might strongly influence the lack of pre- vs. post-intervention change in the RI. Regarding the D1 inhibition, the present results suggest that the effect of TENS might be caused by post-tetanic potentiation. The knowledge gained from the present study might contribute to a better understanding of fundamental studies of TENS in healthy adults and its clinical application for stroke survivors.

  13. Substitution of natural sensory input by artificial neurostimulation of an amputated trigeminal nerve does not prevent the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic circuits projecting to the somatosensory cortex

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    Herrera-Rincon, Celia; Panetsos, Fivos

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral deafferentation downregulates acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis in sensory cortices. However, the responsible neural circuits and processes are not known. We irreversibly transected the rat infraorbital nerve and implanted neuroprosthetic microdevices for proximal stump stimulation, and assessed cytochrome-oxidase and choline- acetyl-transferase (ChAT) in somatosensory, auditory and visual cortices; estimated the number and density of ACh-neurons in the magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN); and localized down-regulated ACh-neurons in basal forebrain using retrograde labeling from deafferented cortices. Here we show that nerve transection, causes down regulation of MBN cholinergic neurons. Stimulation of the cut nerve reverses the metabolic decline but does not affect the decrease in cholinergic fibers in cortex or cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain. Artifical stimulation of the nerve also has no affect of ACh-innervation of other cortices. Cortical ChAT depletion is due to loss of corticopetal MBN ChAT-expressing neurons. MBN ChAT downregulation is not due to a decrease of afferent activity or to a failure of trophic support. Basalocortical ACh circuits are sensory specific, ACh is provided to each sensory cortex “on demand” by dedicated circuits. Our data support the existence of a modality-specific cortex-MBN-cortex circuit for cognitive information processing. PMID:25452715

  14. Conductive Hearing Loss Has Long-Lasting Structural and Molecular Effects on Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Structures of Auditory Nerve Synapses in the Cochlear Nucleus.

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    Clarkson, Cheryl; Antunes, Flora M; Rubio, Maria E

    2016-09-28

    Sound deprivation by conductive hearing loss increases hearing thresholds, but little is known about the response of the auditory brainstem during and after conductive hearing loss. Here, we show in young adult rats that 10 d of monaural conductive hearing loss (i.e., earplugging) leads to hearing deficits that persist after sound levels are restored. Hearing thresholds in response to clicks and frequencies higher than 8 kHz remain increased after a 10 d recovery period. Neural output from the cochlear nucleus measured at 10 dB above threshold is reduced and followed by an overcompensation at the level of the lateral lemniscus. We assessed whether structural and molecular substrates at auditory nerve (endbulb of Held) synapses in the cochlear nucleus could explain these long-lasting changes in hearing processing. During earplugging, vGluT1 expression in the presynaptic terminal decreased and synaptic vesicles were smaller. Together, there was an increase in postsynaptic density (PSD) thickness and an upregulation of GluA3 AMPA receptor subunits on bushy cells. After earplug removal and a 10 d recovery period, the density of synaptic vesicles increased, vesicles were also larger, and the PSD of endbulb synapses was larger and thicker. The upregulation of the GluA3 AMPAR subunit observed during earplugging was maintained after the recovery period. This suggests that GluA3 plays a role in plasticity in the cochlear nucleus. Our study demonstrates that sound deprivation has long-lasting alterations on structural and molecular presynaptic and postsynaptic components at the level of the first auditory nerve synapse in the auditory brainstem. Despite being the second most prevalent form of hearing loss, conductive hearing loss and its effects on central synapses have received relatively little attention. Here, we show that 10 d of monaural conductive hearing loss leads to an increase in hearing thresholds, to an increased central gain upstream of the cochlear nucleus at

  15. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption, withdrawal and nerve growth factor on neuropeptide Y expression and cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus.

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    Pereira, Pedro A; Rocha, João P; Cardoso, Armando; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Madeira, M Dulce

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation (HF) to chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal. Among the brain systems that appear to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of these conditions are the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic and the cholinergic systems. Because these two systems seem to closely interact in the HF, we sought to study the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (6months) and subsequent withdrawal (2months) on the expression of NPY and on the cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus. As such, we have estimated the areal density and the somatic volume of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, and the density of the cholinergic varicosities. In addition, because alcohol consumption and withdrawal are associated with impaired nerve growth factor (NGF) trophic support and the administration of exogenous NGF alters the effects of those conditions on various cholinergic markers, we have also estimated the same morphological parameters in withdrawn rats infused intracerebroventricularly with NGF. NPY expression increased after withdrawal and returned to control values after NGF treatment. Conversely, the somatic volume of these neurons did not differ among all groups. On other hand, the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was reduced by 24% in ethanol-treated rats and by 46% in withdrawn rats. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats increased the VAChT expression to values above control levels. These results show that the effects of prolonged alcohol intake and protracted withdrawal on the hilar NPY expression differ from those induced by shorter exposures to ethanol and by abrupt withdrawal. They also suggest that the normalizing effect of NGF on NPY expression might rely on the NGF-induced improvement of cholinergic neurotransmission in the dentate hilus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nerve injury-induced calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein dysregulation leads to increased pre-synaptic excitatory input into deep dorsal horn neurons and neuropathic allodynia

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    Zhou, Chunyi; Luo, Z. David

    2015-01-01

    Background Upregulation of voltage-gated-calcium-channel α2δ1 subunit post spinal nerve ligation injury (SNL) or in α2δ1-overexpressing transgenic (Tg) mice correlates with tactile allodynia, a pain state mediated mainly by Aβ sensory fibers forming synaptic connections with deep dorsal horn neurons. It is not clear however whether dysregulated α2δ1 alters deep dorsal horn synaptic neurotransmission that underlies tactile allodynia development post nerve injury. Methods Tactile allodynia was tested in the SNL and α2δ1 Tg models. Miniature excitatory/inhibitory postsynaptic currents were recorded in deep dorsal horn (DDH) neurons from these animal models using whole cell patch clamp slice recording techniques.. Results There was a significant increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) in DDH neurons that correlated with tactile allodynia in SNL and α2δ1 Tg mice. Gabapentin, an α2δ1 ligand that is known to block tactile allodynia in these models, also normalized mEPSC frequency dose-dependently in DDH neurons from SNL and α2δ1 Tg mice. In contrast, neither frequency nor amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was altered in DDH neurons from SNL and α2δ1 Tg mice. Conclusion Our data suggest that α2δ1 dysregulation is highly likely contributing to tactile allodynia through a pre-synaptic mechanism involving facilitation of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in deep dorsal horn of spinal cord. PMID:25691360

  17. Cholinergic innervation of human mesenteric lymphatic vessels.

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    D'Andrea, V; Bianchi, E; Taurone, S; Mignini, F; Cavallotti, C; Artico, M

    2013-11-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmission within the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels has been poorly studied. Therefore, our aim is to analyse the cholinergic nerve fibres of lymphatic vessels using the traditional enzymatic techniques of staining, plus the biochemical modifications of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Specimens obtained from human mesenteric lymphatic vessels were subjected to the following experimental procedures: 1) drawing, cutting and staining of tissues; 2) staining of total nerve fibres; 3) enzymatic staining of cholinergic nerve fibres; 4) homogenisation of tissues; 5) biochemical amount of proteins; 6) biochemical amount of AChE activity; 6) quantitative analysis of images; 7) statistical analysis of data. The mesenteric lymphatic vessels show many AChE positive nerve fibres around their wall with an almost plexiform distribution. The incubation time was performed at 1 h (partial activity) and 6 h (total activity). Moreover, biochemical dosage of the same enzymatic activity confirms the results obtained with morphological methods. The homogenates of the studied tissues contain strong AChE activity. In our study, the lymphatic vessels appeared to contain few cholinergic nerve fibres. Therefore, it is expected that perivascular nerve stimulation stimulates cholinergic nerves innervating the mesenteric arteries to release the neurotransmitter AChE, which activates muscarinic or nicotinic receptors to modulate adrenergic neurotransmission. These results strongly suggest, that perivascular cholinergic nerves have little or no effect on the adrenergic nerve function in mesenteric arteries. The cholinergic nerves innervating mesenteric arteries do not mediate direct vascular responses.

  18. Impairment of the nerve growth factor pathway driving amyloid accumulation in cholinergic neurons: the incipit of the Alzheimer′s disease story?

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    Viviana Triaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current idea behind brain pathology is that disease is initiated by mild disturbances of common physiological processes. Overtime, the disruption of the neuronal homeostasis will determine irreversible degeneration and neuronal apoptosis. This could be also true in the case of nerve growth factor (NGF alterations in sporadic Alzheimer′s disease (AD, an age-related pathology characterized by cholinergic loss, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In fact, the pathway activated by NGF, a key neurotrophin for the metabolism of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN, is one of the first homeostatic systems affected in prodromal AD. NGF signaling dysfunctions have been thought for decades to occur in AD late stages, as a mere consequence of amyloid-driven disruption of the retrograde axonal transport of neurotrophins to BFCN. Nowadays, a wealth of knowledge is potentially opening a new scenario: NGF signaling impairment occurs at the onset of AD and correlates better than amyloid load with cognitive decline. The recent acceleration in the characterization of anatomical, functional and molecular profiles of early AD is aimed at maximizing the efficacy of existing treatments and setting novel therapies. Accordingly, the elucidation of the molecular events underlying APP metabolism regulation by the NGF pathway in the septo-hippocampal system is crucial for the identification of new target molecules to slow and eventually halt mild cognitive impairment (MCI and its progression toward AD.

  19. Relationship between presynaptic membrane potential and acetylcholine release in synaptosomes from Torpedo electric organ.

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    Meunier, F M

    1984-01-01

    The membrane potential of purely cholinergic synaptosomes isolated from Torpedo electric organ was monitored with fluorescent carbocyanine dyes. An increased fluorescence was associated with depolarization and a quenching with hyperpolarization. Fluorescence data provided evidence that Torpedo synaptosomes have a membrane potential mainly driven by a K+ diffusion potential and a membrane potential of about -50 mV could be estimated after calibration of fluorescence signals with ionophore antibiotics. The release of acetylcholine (ACh) from Torpedo synaptosomes was monitored continuously by measuring the light emitted by a chemiluminescent method (Israël & Lesbats, 1981 a). Using fluorescence data, the release of ACh was expressed as a function of membrane potential. The relationship between presynaptic potential and transmitter release as determined by biochemical methods at cholinergic nerve endings showed striking similarities to that observed at the squid giant synapse. Several substances were also tested with regard to their depolarizing and releasing properties and it was found that the toxin isolated from the venom of the annelid Glycera convoluta, which induced a large increase in quantal release of transmitter (Manaranche, Thieffry, & Israël, 1980) promoted a depolarization of Torpedo synaptosomes in addition to ACh release. PMID:6207289

  20. Presynaptic molecular determinants of quantal size

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    Shigeo eTakamori

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in synaptic vesicles that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size – the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle – clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in synaptic vesicles can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size.

  1. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C.

    1989-01-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of [ 3 H]dopamine continuously synthesized from [ 3 H]tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of [ 3 H]dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10 -6 M tetrodotoxin, 5 x 10 -5 M acetylcholine stimulated [ 3 H]dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10 -6 M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on [ 3 H]dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of [ 3 H] dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on [ 3 H]dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of [ 3 H]dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively

  2. severe organophosphate poisoning with delayed cholinergic crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-01-06

    Jan 6, 2011 ... In the. Neuromuscular Junction Acetylcholine is released when a nerve impulse reaches terminal axonal end and it diffuses across the Synaptic Cleft and binds to Cholinergic Nicotinic receptors on the muscle fibers, causing them to contract. The enzyme,. Cholinesterase splits Acetylcholine into Acetic.

  3. The muscarinic stimulation of phospholipid labeling in hippocampus is independent of its cholinergic input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Boast, C.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The authors have examined the role of cholinergic innervation on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced 'phospholipid labeling effect' (PLE) in synaptosomes derived from the hippocampus. The hippocampus supports a robust PLE and its sole cholinergic input from the septal nuclei can be readily disrupted by the placement of lesions in the fornix. The lesion is expected to cause degeneration of cholinergic presynaptic fibers, but should have little effect on the integrity of postsynaptic structures, and thus provide a means of further localizing the synaptosomal PLE. (Auth.)

  4. Linking Cholinergic Interneurons, Synaptic Plasticity, and Behavior during the Extinction of a Cocaine-Context Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junuk; Finkelstein, Joel; Choi, Jung Yoon; Witten, Ilana B

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that cholinergic interneurons are a key cell type within the nucleus accumbens, a relationship between synaptic plasticity and the in vivo activity of cholinergic interneurons remains to be established. Here, we identify a three-way link between the activity of cholinergic interneurons, synaptic plasticity, and learning in mice undergoing the extinction of a cocaine-context association. We found that activity of cholinergic interneurons regulates extinction learning for a cocaine-context association and generates a sustained reduction in glutamatergic presynaptic strength onto medium spiny neurons. Interestingly, activation of cholinergic interneurons does not support reinforcement learning or plasticity by itself, suggesting that these neurons have a modulatory rather than a reinforcing function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum. II. Acetylcholine synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.; De Tejada, S.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Physiological and histochemical evidence indicates that cholinergic nerves may participate in mediating penile erection. Acetylcholine synthesis and release was studied in isolated human corporal tissue. Human corpus cavernosum incubated with [ 3 H]choline accumulated [ 3 H]choline and synthesized [ 3 H]acethylcholine in an concentration-dependent manner. [ 3 H]Acetylcholine accumulation by the tissue was inhibited by hemicholinium-3, a specific antagonist of the high-affinity choline transport in cholinergic nerves. Transmural electrical field stimulation caused release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine which was significantly diminished by inhibiting neurotransmission with calcium-free physiological salt solution or tetrodotoxin. These observations provide biochemical and physiological evidence for the existence of cholinergic innervation in human corpus cavernosum

  6. 5-HT2A-mGlu2/3 receptor complex in rat spinal cord glutamatergic nerve endings: A 5-HT2Ato mGlu2/3 signalling to amplify presynaptic mechanism of auto-control of glutamate exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Guendalina; Grilli, Massimo; Vergassola, Matteo; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Padolecchia, Cristina; Garrone, Beatrice; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Tongiani, Serena; Usai, Cesare; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Presynaptic mGlu2/3 autoreceptors exist in rat spinal cord nerve terminals as suggested by the finding that LY379268 inhibited the 15 mM KCl-evoked release of [ 3 H]D-aspartate ([ 3 H]D-Asp) in a LY341495-sensitive manner. Spinal cord glutamatergic nerve terminals also possess presynaptic release-regulating 5-HT 2A heteroreceptors. Actually, the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp exocytosis from spinal cord synaptosomes was reduced by the 5-HT 2A agonist (±)DOI, an effect reversed by the 5-HT 2A antagonists MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and trazodone (TZD). We investigated whether mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and cross-talk in these terminals and if 5-HT 2A ligands modulate the mGlu2/3-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy highlighted the presence of mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor proteins in spinal cord VGLUT1 positive synaptosomes, where mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor immunoreactivities largely colocalize. Furthermore, mGlu2/3 immunoprecipitates from spinal cord synaptosomes were also 5-HT 2A immunopositive. Interestingly, the 100 pM LY379268-induced reduction of the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp overflow as well as its inhibition by 100 nM (±)DOI became undetectable when the two agonists were concomitantly added. Conversely, 5-HT 2A antagonists (MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and TZD) reinforced the release-regulating activity of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors. Increased expression of mGlu2/3 receptor proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes paralleled the gain of function of the mGlu2/3 autoreceptors elicited by 5-HT 2A antagonists. Based on these results, we propose that in spinal cord glutamatergic terminals i) mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and interact one each other in an antagonist-like manner, ii) 5-HT 2A antagonists are indirect positive allosteric modulator of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors controlling glutamate exocytosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Variable expression of GFP in different populations of peripheral cholinergic neurons of ChATBAC-eGFP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T Christopher; Bond, Cherie E; Hoover, Donald B

    2018-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry is used widely to identify cholinergic neurons, but this approach has some limitations. To address these problems, investigators developed transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) directed by the promoter for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the acetylcholine synthetic enzyme. Although, it was reported that these mice express GFP in all cholinergic neurons and non-neuronal cholinergic cells, we could not detect GFP in cardiac cholinergic nerves in preliminary experiments. Our goals for this study were to confirm our initial observation and perform a qualitative screen of other representative autonomic structures for the presences of GFP in cholinergic innervation of effector tissues. We evaluated GFP fluorescence of intact, unfixed tissues and the cellular localization of GFP and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), a specific cholinergic marker, in tissue sections and intestinal whole mounts. Our experiments identified two major tissues where cholinergic neurons and/or nerve fibers lacked GFP: 1) most cholinergic neurons of the intrinsic cardiac ganglia and all cholinergic nerve fibers in the heart and 2) most cholinergic nerve fibers innervating airway smooth muscle. Most cholinergic neurons in airway ganglia stained for GFP. Cholinergic systems in the bladder and intestines were fully delineated by GFP staining. GFP labeling of input to ganglia with long preganglionic projections (vagal) was sparse or weak, while that to ganglia with short preganglionic projections (spinal) was strong. Total absence of GFP might be due to splicing out of the GFP gene. Lack of GFP in nerve projections from GFP-positive cell bodies might reflect a transport deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuditta, A.; Kaplan, B.B.; van Minnen, J.; Alvarez, J.; Koenig, E.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal - yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins.

  9. Coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis at the presynaptic active zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritzen, Tanja; Haucke, Volker

    2018-02-01

    Brain function depends on the ability of neurons to communicate with each other via the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones (AZs). The presynaptic AZ comprises an assembly of large multidomain proteins that link the machinery for vesicle fusion to sites of voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry. Following SV fusion at AZ release sites SV membranes are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis, and SVs are reformed. Recent data suggest that Ca 2+ -triggered SV exocytosis at AZs and endocytic retrieval of SVs may be functionally and physically linked. Here we discuss the evidence supporting such exo-endocytic coupling as well as possible modes and mechanisms that may underlie coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis at and around AZs in presynaptic nerve terminals. As components of the exo-endocytic machinery at synapses have been linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, understanding the mechanisms that couple exocytosis and endocytosis at AZs may be of importance for developing novel therapies to treat these diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of propofol and pentobarbital on calcium concentration in presynaptic boutons on a rat hippocampal neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shinichi; Sugiyama, Hitomi; Kitahara, Seiko; Ikemoto, Yoshimi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    Numerous reports suggest that intravenously administered (IV) anesthetics affect postsynaptic events in the central nervous system. However, there is little evidence about how general anesthetics influence the presynaptic processes. The level of presynaptic calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration ([Ca(2+)](pre)) regulates neurotransmitter release. In this study, we investigated the effects of anesthetic propofol IV and the barbiturate pentobarbital on neurotransmitter release by measuring [Ca(2+)](pre) in the presynaptic nerve terminals (boutons) on a dissociated single hippocampal rat neuron. Sprague-Dawley rats 10-14 days old were decapitated under pentobarbital anesthesia, and brain slices were prepared. The hippocampal CA1 area was touched with a fire-polished glass pipette, which vibrated horizontally, and neurons were dissociated, along with the attached presynaptic boutons. The presynaptic boutons were visualized under a confocal laser-scanning microscope after staining with FM1-43 dye, and [Ca(2+)](pre) was measured with acetoxymethyl ester of fluo-3 (fluo-3 AM). High potassium (K(+)) (15-90 mM) increased the [Ca(2+)](pre) in the Ca(2+)-containing solution in a concentration-dependent manner. Whereas propofol (10 μM) and pentobarbital (300 μM) suppressed the high K(+) (60 mM)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](pre) in the boutons attached to the dendrite, they did not affect [Ca(2+)](pre) in the boutons attached to the soma or dendrite base. As a large majority of excitatory synapses are located on dendritic spines, these agents may affect Ca(2+) mobilization in the excitatory presynaptic boutons. Propofol and pentobarbital may affect neurotransmitter release from the excitatory presynaptic nerve terminals due to inhibition of increase in [Ca(2+)](pre).

  11. RIM genes differentially contribute to organizing presynaptic release sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Deng, Lunbin; Fan, Mingming; Südhof, Thomas C

    2012-07-17

    Tight coupling of Ca(2+) channels to the presynaptic active zone is critical for fast synchronous neurotransmitter release. RIMs are multidomain proteins that tether Ca(2+) channels to active zones, dock and prime synaptic vesicles for release, and mediate presynaptic plasticity. Here, we use conditional knockout mice targeting all RIM isoforms expressed by the Rims1 and Rims2 genes to examine the contributions and mechanism of action of different RIMs in neurotransmitter release. We show that acute single deletions of each Rims gene decreased release and impaired vesicle priming but did not alter the extracellular Ca(2+)-responsiveness of release (which for Rims gene mutants is a measure of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx). Moreover, single deletions did not affect the synchronization of release (which depends on the close proximity of Ca(2+) channels to release sites). In contrast, deletion of both Rims genes severely impaired the Ca(2+) responsiveness and synchronization of release. RIM proteins may act on Ca(2+) channels in two modes: They tether Ca(2+) channels to active zones, and they directly modulate Ca(2+)-channel inactivation. The first mechanism is essential for localizing presynaptic Ca(2+) influx to nerve terminals, but the role of the second mechanism remains unknown. Strikingly, we find that although the RIM2 C(2)B domain by itself significantly decreased Ca(2+)-channel inactivation in transfected HEK293 cells, it did not rescue any aspect of the RIM knockout phenotype in cultured neurons. Thus, RIMs primarily act in release as physical Ca(2+)-channel tethers and not as Ca(2+)-channel modulators. Different RIM proteins compensate for each other in recruiting Ca(2+) channels to active zones, but contribute independently and incrementally to vesicle priming.

  12. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Kaplan, Barry B; van Minnen, Jan; Alvarez, Jaime; Koenig, Edward

    2002-08-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal -- yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins. To dispel this lingering neglect, we now present the wealth of recent observations bearing on this central idea, and consider their impact on our understanding of the biology of the neuron. We demonstrate that extrasomatic translation sites, which are now well recognized in dendrites, are also present in axonal and presynaptic compartments.

  13. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  14. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  15. Cholinergic Depletion in Alzheimer’s Disease Shown by [18F]FEOBV Autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Parent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative condition characterized in part by deficits in cholinergic basalocortical and septohippocampal pathways. [18F]Fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([18F]FEOBV, a Positron Emission Tomography ligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, is a potential molecular agent to investigate brain diseases associated with presynaptic cholinergic losses. Purpose. To demonstrate this potential, we carried out an [18F]FEOBV autoradiography study to compare postmortem brain tissues from AD patients to those of age-matched controls. Methods. [18F]FEOBV autoradiography binding, defined as the ratio between regional grey and white matter, was estimated in the hippocampus (13 controls, 8 AD and prefrontal cortex (13 controls, 11 AD. Results. [18F]FEOBV binding was decreased by 33% in prefrontal cortex, 25% in CA3, and 20% in CA1. No changes were detected in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, possibly because of sprouting or upregulation toward the resilient glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus. Conclusion. This is the first demonstration of [18F]FEOBV focal binding changes in cholinergic projections to the cortex and hippocampus in AD. Such cholinergic synaptic (and more specifically VAChT alterations, in line with the selective basalocortical and septohippocampal cholinergic losses documented in AD, indicate that [18F]FEOBV is indeed a promising ligand to explore cholinergic abnormalities in vivo.

  16. Asynchronous Cholinergic Drive Correlates with Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance via a Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition imbalance in neural networks is widely linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, how genetic factors alter neuronal activity, leading to excitation-inhibition imbalance, remains unclear. Here, using the C. elegans locomotor circuit, we examine how altering neuronal activity for varying time periods affects synaptic release pattern and animal behavior. We show that while short-duration activation of excitatory cholinergic neurons elicits a reversible enhancement of presynaptic strength, persistent activation results to asynchronous and reduced cholinergic drive, inducing imbalance between endogenous excitation and inhibition. We find that the neuronal calcium sensor protein NCS-2 is required for asynchronous cholinergic release in an activity-dependent manner and dampens excitability of inhibitory neurons non-cell autonomously. The function of NCS-2 requires its Ca2+ binding and membrane association domains. These results reveal a synaptic mechanism implicating asynchronous release in regulation of excitation-inhibition balance.

  17. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Hannan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca2+-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity.

  19. Intersession reliability of Hoffmann reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition in the human soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bradley T; Hicks-Little, Charlie A; Harter, Rod A; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Hoffman, Mark A

    2009-12-01

    Hayes BT, Hicks-Little CA, Harter RA, Widrick JJ, Hoffman MA. Intersession reliability of Hoffmann reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition in the human soleus muscle. To determine the day-to-day reliability of Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) gain and presynaptic inhibition of spinal reflexes in the human soleus muscle. Controlled trial. Research laboratory. Volunteers (N=30; mean +/- SD age, 23.4+/-3.9y; height, 175.64+/-10.87cm; mass, 84.50+/-24.18kg) with no history of lower extremity pathology and/or injury participated. Subjects lay prone with the head, shoulders, arms, and hips supported in a static position by a massage body pillow and the ankle positioned at 90 degrees . Recording electrodes were placed over the soleus and tibialis anterior muscle bellies, and the stimulating electrodes were positioned over the tibial nerve in the popliteal space and the common peroneal nerve near the fibular head. The H-reflex and motor wave recruitment curves were then measured and recorded. Presynaptic inhibition was also assessed in the soleus muscle, and a conditioning stimulation of the common peroneal nerve (1 x motor threshold = motor threshold) was used prior to soleus H-reflex measurement. Two testing sessions took place between 2 and 7 days, and each session occurred at the same time of day. Assessments of H-reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition yielded test-retest reliability of R equal to . 95 and .91, respectively. Measures of presynaptic inhibition and H-reflex gain (H slope/M slope) in the human soleus muscle are consistent and reliable day to day.

  20. Presynaptic Glycine Receptors Increase GABAergic Neurotransmission in Rat Periaqueductal Gray Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi-Hyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG is involved in the central regulation of nociceptive transmission by affecting the descending inhibitory pathway. In the present study, we have addressed the functional role of presynaptic glycine receptors in spontaneous glutamatergic transmission. Spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs were recorded in mechanically dissociated rat PAG neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch recording technique under voltage-clamp conditions. The application of glycine (100 µM significantly increased the frequency of sEPSCs, without affecting the amplitude of sEPSCs. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency was blocked by 1 µM strychnine, a specific glycine receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glycine acts on presynaptic glycine receptors to increase the probability of glutamate release from excitatory nerve terminals. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency completely disappeared either in the presence of tetrodotoxin or Cd2+, voltage-gated Na+, or Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that the activation of presynaptic glycine receptors might depolarize excitatory nerve terminals. The present results suggest that presynaptic glycine receptors can regulate the excitability of PAG neurons by enhancing glutamatergic transmission and therefore play an important role in the regulation of various physiological functions mediated by the PAG.

  1. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could......Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers...

  2. Presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a visuo-motor skill in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Monica A.; Lungholt, Bjarke K.S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Sensory information continuously converges on the spinal cord during a variety of motor behaviours. Here, we examined presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a novel motor skill. We tested whether repetition of two motor tasks with different degrees of difficulty...... of the monosynaptic Ia facilitation of the soleus H-reflex evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. The D1 inhibition was increased and the femoral nerve facilitation was decreased following the visuo-motor skill task, suggesting an increase in presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. No changes were observed...... in the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve (TN) were also unchanged, suggesting that transmission in ascending pathways was unaltered following the visuo-motor skill task. Together these observations suggest that a selective...

  3. Exocytosis: using amperometry to study presynaptic mechanisms of neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2004-01-01

    The development of carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry enabled detailed investigation of the presynaptic response at the single cell level with single vesicle resolution. Consequently, amperometry allowed for detailed studies into the presynaptic mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity. This review

  4. Neuro-immune interactions via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallowitsch-Puerta, Margot; Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2010-01-01

    The overproduction of TNF and other cytokines can cause the pathophysiology of numerous diseases. Controlling cytokine synthesis and release is critical for preventing unrestrained inflammation and maintaining health. Recent studies identified an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism termed “the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” that controls cytokine production and inflammation. Here we review current advances related to the role of this pathway in neuro-immune interactions that prevent excessive inflammation. Experimental evidence indicates that vagus nerve cholinergic anti-inflammatory signaling requires alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on non-neuronal cytokine producing cells. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists inhibit cytokine release and protect animals in a variety of experimental lethal inflammatory models. Knowledge related to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be exploited in therapeutic approaches directed towards counteracting abnormal chronic and hyper-activated inflammatory responses. PMID:17289087

  5. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Crispino, Marianna; Squillace, Angela; van Minnen, Jan; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells and presynaptic RNAs derive from nearby cells, presumably glial cells. Indeed, in perfused squid giant axons, delivery of newly synthesized RNA to the axon perfusate is strongly stimulated by axonal depolarization or agonists of glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors. Likewise, incubation of squid optic lobe slices with [3H]uridine leads to a marked accumulation of [3H]RNA in the large synaptosomes derived from the nerve terminals of retinal photoreceptor neurons. As the cell bodies of these neurons lie outside the optic lobe, the data demonstrate that presynaptic RNA is locally synthesized, presumably by perisynaptic glial cells. Overall, our results support the view that axons and presynaptic regions are endowed with local systems of gene expression which may prove essential for the maintenance and plasticity of these extrasomatic neuronal domains.

  6. Deficiency of alpha7 cholinergic receptors facilitates bacterial clearance in Escherichia coli peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebelen, Ilona A. J.; Le Moine, Alain; van den Pangaart, Petra S.; Sadis, Claude; Goldman, Michel; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efferent vagus nerve can inhibit inflammation via interaction between acetylcholine and alpha7 cholinergic receptors. METHODS: To determine the role played by alpha7 receptors in antibacterial defense, peritonitis was induced in alpha7 receptor-deficient (alpha7(-/-)) and wild-type

  7. Hypo Activity of Cholinergic System in Patients with Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidescu, L.; Codorean, I.; Matei, C.; Barret, O.; Mazere, J.; Guyot, M.; Rimbu, A.; Allard, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Objective A cholinergic dysfunction was documented in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease. In order to specify the cholinergic involvement in early stages, we performed a presynaptic imaging study of the cholinergic system using a vesicular Acetylcholine transporter ligand labelled with iodine 123 ( 123 I-IBVM - Iodobenzovesamicol) Materials And Methods Eight patients (5 women and 3 men, 74-89 years, MMS>23) and 8 controls (6 women and 2 men, 72-80 years, MMS>30) have been evaluated using the neuropsychological tests; cerebral SPECT was performed 6 hours after intravenous injection of 218±19 MBq of 123 I - IBVM (30 min, 3 volume, 128x128) and the 3D MRI (T1 weighted images). Acquisition data were processed by filtered retroprojection (Butterworth 5.35) and analysed with SPM software. Each examination was co-registered with the MRI of the patient, normalised in the MNI template and smoothed (10mm). Results The analyse of the group (two sample T-test, p 123 I-IBVM has been detected in the patients group, compared to the control. Conclusions Our results indicate that cholinergic dysfunctions appear very early in the development of Alzheimer's disease and affect the cortical structures involved in the attention process. Some studies are in progress to analyze imaging data with cognitive impairments of each patient. (author)

  8. Cholinergic transmission in cat parasympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J P; Griffith, W H; Shinnick-Gallagher, P

    1982-11-01

    1. Intracellular electrical recording techniques were used to study the ionic mechanisms of cholinergic synaptic transmission in cat vesical pelvic ganglia (v.p.g.). 2. Orthodromic nerve stimulation as well as ionophoretic application of acetylcholine (ACh) resulted in, first, a fast excitatory post-synaptic potential (f.e.p.s.p.) and secondly, a slow inhibitory post-synaptic potential (s.i.p.s.p). These distinct post-synaptic responses were direct actions of ACh and not mediated through an interneurone. In addition, a slow excitatory post-synaptic potential (s.e.p.s.p.) was observed in 44% of the cells. 3. The f.e.p.s.p., mediated via nicotinic receptors, had a reversal potential of -10 mV and resembled the conventional rapid depolarization in other ganglia. The s.i.p.s.p., mediated by muscarinic receptors, had a reversal potential of about -100 mV and resulted from an increase in potassium conductance. 4. The slow muscarinic hyperpolarization could be observed in the absence of antagonists and it was elicited at stimulus frequencies in the physiological range (2-10 Hz). the s.i.p.s.p. induced orthodromically or ionophoretically inhibited firing in spontaneously active neurones. These observations suggest that the muscarinic hyperpolarization may occur under physiological conditions and has sufficient magnitude to be inhibitory to neuronal activity.

  9. Presynaptic inhibition of the release of multiple major central nervous system neurotransmitter types by the inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, R. I.; Desai, K. M.; Hemmings, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Presynaptic effects of general anaesthetics are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that isoflurane exhibits transmitter-specific effects on neurotransmitter release from neurochemically and functionally distinct isolated mammalian nerve terminals. Methods Nerve terminals from adult male rat brain were prelabelled with [3H]glutamate and [14C]GABA (cerebral cortex), [3H]norepinephrine (hippocampus), [14C]dopamine (striatum), or [3H]choline (precursor of [3H]acetylcholine; striatum). Release evoked by depolarizing pulses of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) or elevated KCl was quantified using a closed superfusion system. Results Isoflurane at clinical concentrations (neurotransmitters tested in a concentration-dependent manner. Isoflurane was a more potent inhibitor [expressed as IC50 (sem)] of glutamate release [0.37 (0.03) mM; Pneurotransmitters with selectivity for glutamate release, consistent with both widespread inhibition and nerve terminal-specific presynaptic effects. Glutamate release was most sensitive to inhibition compared with GABA, acetylcholine, dopamine, and norepinephrine release due to presynaptic specializations in ion channel expression, regulation, and/or coupling to exocytosis. Reductions in neurotransmitter release by volatile anaesthetics could contribute to altered synaptic transmission, leading to therapeutic and toxic effects involving all major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23213036

  10. Presynaptic nicotinic α7 and non-α7 receptors stimulate endogenous GABA release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes through two mechanisms of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Zappettini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although converging evidence has suggested that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR play a role in the modulation of GABA release in rat hippocampus, the specific involvement of different nAChR subtypes at presynaptic level is still a matter of debate. In the present work we investigated, using selective α7 and α4β2 nAChR agonists, the presence of different nAChR subtypes on hippocampal GABA nerve endings to assess to what extent and through which mechanisms they stimulate endogenous GABA release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: All agonists elicited GABA overflow. Choline (Ch-evoked GABA overflow was dependent to external Ca(2+, but unaltered in the presence of Cd(2+, tetrodotoxin (TTX, dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE and 1-(4,4-Diphenyl-3-butenyl-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride SKF 89976A. The effect of Ch was blocked by methyllycaconitine (MLA, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, dantrolene, thapsigargin and xestospongin C, suggesting that GABA release might be triggered by Ca(2+ entry into synaptosomes through the α7 nAChR channel with the involvement of calcium from intracellular stores. Additionally, 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380 elicited GABA overflow, which was Ca(2+ dependent, blocked by Cd(2+, and significantly inhibited by TTX and DHβE, but unaffected by MLA, SKF 89976A, thapsigargin and xestospongin C and dantrolene. These findings confirm the involvement of α4β2 nAChR in 5IA85380-induced GABA release that seems to occur following membrane depolarization and opening calcium channels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rat hippocampal synaptosomes possess both α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes, which can modulate GABA release via two distinct mechanisms of action. The finding that GABA release evoked by the mixture of sub-maximal concentration of 5IA85380 plus sub-threshold concentrations of Ch was significantly larger than that elicited by the sum of the effects of the two agonists is compatible with the possibility that

  11. Monitoring single-synapse glutamate release and presynaptic calcium concentration in organised brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas P; Zheng, Kaiyu; Tyurikova, Olga; Reynolds, James P; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2017-06-01

    Brain function relies in large part on Ca 2+ -dependent release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from neuronal axons. Establishing the causal relationship between presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and probabilistic glutamate release is therefore a fundamental quest across neurosciences. Its progress, however, has hitherto depended primarily on the exploration of either cultured nerve cells or giant central synapses accessible to direct experimental probing in situ. Here we show that combining patch-clamp with time-resolved imaging of Ca 2+ -sensitive fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (Tornado-FLIM) enables readout of single spike-evoked presynaptic Ca 2+ concentration dynamics, with nanomolar sensitivity, in individual neuronal axons in acute brain slices. In parallel, intensity Tornado imaging of a locally expressed extracellular optical glutamate sensor iGluSnFr provides direct monitoring of single-quantum, single-synapse glutamate releases in situ. These two methods pave the way for simultaneous registration of presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and transmitter release in an intact brain at the level of individual synapses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Dishevelled proteins are associated with olfactory sensory neuron presynaptic terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Rodriguez-Gil

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs project their axons from the olfactory epithelium toward the olfactory bulb (OB in a heterogeneous and unsorted arrangement. However, as the axons approach the glomerular layer of the OB, axons from OSNs expressing the same odorant receptor (OR sort and converge to form molecularly homogeneous glomeruli. Axon guidance cues, cell adhesion molecules, and OR induced activity have been implicated in the final targeting of OSN axons to specific glomeruli. Less understood, and often controversial, are the mechanisms used by OSN axons to initially navigate from the OE toward the OB. We previously demonstrated a role for Wnt and Frizzled (Fz molecules in OSN axon extension and organization within the olfactory nerve. Building on that we now turned our attention to the downstream signaling cascades from Wnt-Fz interactions. Dishevelled (Dvl is a key molecule downstream of Fz receptors. Three isoforms of Dvl with specific as well as overlapping functions are found in mammals. Here, we show that Dvl-1 expression is restricted to OSNs in the dorsal recess of the nasal cavity, and labels a unique subpopulation of glomeruli. Dvl-2 and Dvl-3 have a widespread distribution in both the OE and OB. Both Dvl-1 and Dvl-2 are associated with intra-glomerular pre-synaptic OSN terminals, suggesting a role in synapse formation/stabilization. Moreover, because Dvl proteins were observed in all OSN axons, we hypothesize that they are important determinants of OSN cell differentiation and axon extension.

  13. Presynaptic inhibition of synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus by activation of muscarinic receptors: involvement of presynaptic calcium influx

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Jing; Saggau, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Modulation of presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by muscarinic receptors at the CA3–CA1 synapse of rat hippocampal slices was investigated by using the calcium indicator fura-2. Stimulation-evoked presynaptic calcium transients ([Capre]t) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.ps) were simultaneously recorded. The relationship between presynaptic calcium influx and synaptic transmission was studied.Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibited [Capre]t, thereb...

  14. The basal ganglia cholinergic neurochemistry of progressive supranuclear palsy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, N M; Piggott, M A; Lees, A J; Burn, D J

    2007-06-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving motor and cognitive dysfunction. Currently, there is no effective treatment either for symptomatic relief or disease modification. This relates, in part, to a lack of knowledge of the underlying neurochemical abnormalities, including cholinergic receptor status in the basal ganglia. To measure muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors in the basal ganglia in PSP. The muscarinic M2 (presynaptic) and M4 (postsynaptic) receptors in the striatum, pallidum and adjacent insular cortex were autoradiographically measured in pathologically confirmed cases of PSP (n = 18), and compared with cases of Lewy body dementias (LBDs; n = 45), Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 39) and controls (n = 50). In cases of PSP, there was a reduction in M2 and M4 receptors in the posterior caudate and putamen compared to controls, but no significant changes in the pallidum. Cases with AD showed lower M2 receptors in the posterior striatum. Groups with LBD and AD showed higher M2 binding in the insular cortex compared with controls. The results suggest loss of posterior striatal cholinergic interneurones in PSP, and reduction in medium spiny projection neurones bearing M4 receptors. These results should be taken in the context of more widespread pathology in PSP, but may have implications for future trials of cholinergic treatments.

  15. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  16. Control of autophagosome axonal retrograde flux by presynaptic activity unveiled using botulinum neurotoxin type a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B; Mavlyutov, Timur A; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2015-04-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356179-16$15.00/0.

  17. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  18. Active polysomes are present in the large presynaptic endings of the synaptosomal fraction from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Kaplan, B B; Martin, R; Alvarez, J; Chun, J T; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A

    1997-10-15

    Previous data have suggested that the large nerve terminals present in the synaptosomal fraction from squid optic lobe are capable of protein synthesis (Crispino et al., 1993a,b). We have further examined this issue by comparing the translation products of synaptosomal and microsomal polysomes. Both preparations programmed an active process of translation, which was completely abolished by their previous treatment with EDTA. After immunoabsorption of the newly synthesized neurofilament (NF) proteins, the labeling ratio of the 60 and 70 kDa NF proteins was found to differ, in agreement with comparable differences obtained with intact synaptosomes. These observations indicate that the set of mRNAs translated by synaptosomes differs from that translated by nerve cell bodies. Hence, because NF proteins are neuron-specific, they support the view that the active synaptosomal polysomes are mostly localized in the large nerve terminals that represent the most abundant neuronal component of the fraction. This hypothesis was confirmed (1) by electron spectroscopic data demonstrating the presence of ribosomes and polysomes within the large nerve endings of the synaptosomal fraction, as well as in the carrot-like nerve endings of the retinal photoreceptors that constitute the only large terminals in the optic lobe, and (2) by light and high resolution autoradiography of synaptosomal samples incubated with [3H]leucine, showing that most labeled proteins are associated with the large nerve endings. This response was abolished by cycloheximide. Taken together, the data provide the first unequivocal demonstration that presynaptic nerve terminals are capable of protein synthesis.

  19. [Establishing indicators for diagnosis of cholinergic crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyone, Kazuko; Shimatani, Yoshimi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Nagao, Takehiko; Fujita, Yoshika; Uesugi, Masayoshi

    2010-10-01

    Cholinergic crisis is an adverse effect of an anticholinesterase agent, which is one of the cholinergic agents. Cholinergic crisis may induce serious conditions such as breathing difficulties. Cholinergic crisis is often diagnosed by an abnormally low level of serum cholinesterase (ChE). However, ChE value is not an appropriate indicator of cholinergic crisis since it has a high inter-individual variation, even though its intra-individual variation is low. Therefore, an indicator with less inter-individual variation capable of preventing the risk of cholinergic crisis was investigated. The results of correlation test between ChE and serum albumin (Alb) showed a strong positive correlation; r = 0.778 in BCG method(Bromo cresol green method) and r = 0.766 in the BCP-improved method for Alb. In addition, the variations of Alb values are much lower than the drastic depression of ChE values in cholinergic crisis. Thus, it is considered that the ratio of ChE and Alb (ChE/Alb) can be a useful indicator of cholinergic crisis. As a result of ROC (Receiver operating characteristic) analysis, the ratios of ChE and Alb values using the BCG method (ChE/Alb (BCG)) were 20.7, 87.0, 156.8 for the Cutoff value, Likelihood ratio and Odds ratio respectively. When using the BCP-improved method for Alb, the ratios of ChE and Alb (ChE/Alb(BCP improved)) were 25.0, 93.7, 180.1 for the Cutoff value, Likelihood ratio and Odds ratio respectively. The ChE/Alb ratio appears to be an excellent indicator of cholinergic crisis diagnosis since it shows a high likelihood ratio as well as a high odds ratio.

  20. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer H K; Luczak, Vincent; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and

  1. Signal regulatory proteins (SIRPS) are secreted presynaptic organizing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemori, Hisashi; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-12-05

    Formation of chemical synapses requires exchange of organizing signals between the synaptic partners. Using synaptic vesicle aggregation in cultured neurons as a marker of presynaptic differentiation, we purified candidate presynaptic organizers from mouse brain. A major bioactive species was the extracellular domain of signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP-alpha), a transmembrane immunoglobulin superfamily member concentrated at synapses. The extracellular domain of SIRP-alpha is cleaved and shed in a developmentally regulated manner. The presynaptic organizing activity of SIRP-alpha is mediated in part by CD47. SIRP-alpha homologues, SIRP-beta and -gamma also have synaptic vesicle clustering activity. The effects of SIRP-alpha are distinct from those of another presynaptic organizer, FGF22: the two proteins induced vesicle clusters of different sizes, differed in their ability to promote neurite branching, and acted through different receptors and signaling pathways. SIRP family proteins may act together with other organizing molecules to pattern synapses.

  2. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pontine laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) play a critical role in regulation of behavioral state. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that control their activity is vital for understanding of how switching between wakefulness, sleep and anesthetic states is effectuated...

  3. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jähne, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.jaehne1@stud.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Neurosciences, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rizzoli, Silvio O. [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); Helm, Martin S., E-mail: martin.helm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Molecular Biology, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  4. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbilla, S.; Langer, S.Z.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [ 3 H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01-1μM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.1-1 μM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1-10μM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1μM) of the stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective. (Auth.)

  5. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  6. FER-1/Dysferlin promotes cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction in C. elegans and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Krajacic

    2013-10-01

    Dysferlin is a member of the evolutionarily conserved ferlin gene family. Mutations in Dysferlin lead to Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B, an inherited, progressive and incurable muscle disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. We found that both loss-of-function mutations and muscle-specific overexpression of C. elegans fer-1, the founding member of the Dysferlin gene family, caused defects in muscle cholinergic signaling. To determine if Dysferlin-dependent regulation of cholinergic signaling is evolutionarily conserved, we examined the in vivo physiological properties of skeletal muscle synaptic signaling in a mouse model of Dysferlin-deficiency. In addition to a loss in muscle strength, Dysferlin −/− mice also exhibited a cholinergic deficit manifested by a progressive, frequency-dependent decrement in their compound muscle action potentials following repetitive nerve stimulation, which was observed in another Dysferlin mouse model but not in a Dysferlin-independent mouse model of muscular dystrophy. Oral administration of Pyridostigmine bromide, a clinically used acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AchE.I known to increase synaptic efficacy, reversed the action potential defect and restored in vivo muscle strength to Dysferlin −/− mice without altering muscle pathophysiology. Our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for Dysferlin in the regulation of cholinergic signaling and suggest that such regulation may play a significant pathophysiological role in LGMD2B disease.

  7. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(6.000: 491-500

  8. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(6: 491-500

  9. Pedunculopontine nucleus cholinergic deficiency in cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Karin; Edwards, Nancy A; Urbano, Demelio; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Iacono, Diego; Alho, Ana Tereza Di Lorenzo; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Amaro, Edson; Horovitz, Silvina G; Hallett, Mark

    2018-03-06

    The etiology of cervical dystonia is unknown. Cholinergic abnormalities have been identified in dystonia animal models and human imaging studies. Some animal models have cholinergic neuronal loss in the striatum and increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of cholinergic abnormalities in the putamen and pedunculopontine nucleus in cervical dystonia human brain donors. Formalin-fixed brain tissues were obtained from 8 cervical dystonia and 7 age-matched control brains (controls). Pedunculopontine nucleus was available in only 6 cervical dystonia and 5 controls. Neurodegeneration was evaluated pathologically in the putamen, pedunculopontine nucleus, and other regions. Cholinergic neurons were detected using choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry in the putamen and pedunculopontine nucleus. Putaminal cholinergic neurons were quantified. A total of 6 cervical dystonia patients and 6 age-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging to determine if there were white matter microstructural abnormalities around the pedunculopontine nucleus. Decreased or absent choline acetyltransferase staining was identified in all 6 pedunculopontine nucleus samples in cervical dystonia. In contrast, strong choline acetyltransferase staining was present in 4 of 5 pedunculopontine nucleus controls. There were no differences in pedunculopontine nucleus diffusion tensor imaging between cervical dystonia and healthy controls. There was no difference in numbers of putaminal cholinergic neurons between cervical dystonia and controls. Our findings suggest that pedunculopontine nucleus choline acetyltransferase deficiency represents a functional cholinergic deficit in cervical dystonia. Structural lesions and confounding neurodegenerative processes were excluded by absence of neuronal loss, gliosis, diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities, and beta-amyloid, tau, and alpha

  10. Glycolysis selectively shapes the presynaptic action potential waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Brendan; Kushmerick, Christopher; Banerjee, Tania Das; Dagda, Ruben K; Renden, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy in neurons; however, utilization of energy from glycolysis vs. mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in the presynaptic compartment during neurotransmission is largely unknown. Using presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings from the mouse calyx of Held, we examined the effect of acute selective pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis or mitochondrial OxPhos on multiple mechanisms regulating presynaptic function. Inhibition of glycolysis via glucose depletion and iodoacetic acid (1 mM) treatment, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, rapidly altered transmission, resulting in highly variable, oscillating responses. At reduced temperature, this same treatment attenuated synaptic transmission because of a smaller and broader presynaptic action potential (AP) waveform. We show via experimental manipulation and ion channel modeling that the altered AP waveform results in smaller Ca 2+ influx, resulting in attenuated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). In contrast, inhibition of mitochondria-derived ATP production via extracellular pyruvate depletion and bath-applied oligomycin (1 μM) had no significant effect on Ca 2+ influx and did not alter the AP waveform within the same time frame (up to 30 min), and the resultant EPSC remained unaffected. Glycolysis, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, is thus required to maintain basal synaptic transmission at the presynaptic terminal. We propose that glycolytic enzymes are closely apposed to ATP-dependent ion pumps on the presynaptic membrane. Our results indicate a novel mechanism for the effect of hypoglycemia on neurotransmission. Attenuated transmission likely results from a single presynaptic mechanism at reduced temperature: a slower, smaller AP, before and independent of any effect on synaptic vesicle release or receptor activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Sepsis causes presynaptic histamine H3 and alpha2-adrenergic dysfunction in canine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zao-Qin; Bose, Deepak; Jacobs, Han; Light, R Bruce; Mink, Steven N

    2002-11-01

    Histamine H3 receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors are presynaptic receptors that modulate norepinephrine (NE) release from sympathetic nerves innervating the cardiovascular system. We previously showed that cardiac H3 receptors are activated in sepsis, and that this activation leads to a decrease in the adrenergic response (AR) [J. Appl. Physiol. 85 (1998) 1693-1701] H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors appear to be coupled to GTP binding regulatory proteins (G) that modulate transmitter release by reducing calcium current into the nerve terminals through neuronal calcium channels. There may also be interaction between H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors on AR that may occur either at the receptor or a more downstream level. In the present study, we examined the effect of septic plasma on AR in a canine ventricular preparation in which field stimulation was used to produce AR. We determined whether there was interaction between H(3)-receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors and tested whether H3 activation would attenuate the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects of clonidine and yohimbine, respectively. We also determined whether the mechanism by which septic plasma decreases the adrenergic response involves inactivation of an inhibitory G protein and used pertussis toxin (PTX) to assess this effect. We found that septic plasma attenuated AR produced by field stimulation, and that this decrease was mediated by a PTX sensitive inhibitory G protein. H3 activation also attenuated the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects on adrenergic activation as compared with nonseptic plasma. We conclude that presynaptic sympathetic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  12. Determination of LCt50s in Anesthetized Rats Exposed to Aerosolized Nerve Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    junctions. As such, these can result in repetitive nerve misfiring and fasiculations. Nerve agents also affect many sites and receptors such as...smooth muscle muscarinic and skeletal muscle nicotinic recep- tors. Symptoms of toxicity, known as “cholinergic crisis” include bronchoconstriction

  13. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q

    2017-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t...

  14. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Yaakov A; Koopman, Frieda A; Faltys, Michael; Caravaca, April; Bendele, Alison; Zitnik, Ralph; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Tak, Paul Peter

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model. Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed. Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02), a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02) and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01) with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02), accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01). The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  15. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model.Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed.Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01.The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  16. Cholinergic Modulation of Type 2 Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goele Bosmans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the bidirectional relationship between the nervous and immune system has become increasingly clear, and its role in both homeostasis and inflammation has been well documented over the years. Since the introduction of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, there has been an increased interest in parasympathetic regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses, including T helper 2 responses. Increasing evidence has been emerging suggesting a role for the parasympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. In this review, we will highlight the role of cholinergic modulation by both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in several key aspects of the allergic inflammatory response, including barrier function, innate and adaptive immune responses, and effector cells responses. A better understanding of these cholinergic processes mediating key aspects of type 2 immune disorders might lead to novel therapeutic approaches to treat allergic diseases.

  17. Synapse-specific and compartmentalized expression of presynaptic homeostatic potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiling; Goel, Pragya; Chen, Catherine; Angajala, Varun; Chen, Xun; Dickman, Dion K

    2018-04-05

    Postsynaptic compartments can be specifically modulated during various forms of synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear whether this precision is shared at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity (PHP) stabilizes neurotransmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release compensates for diminished postsynaptic receptor functionality. To test the specificity of PHP induction and expression, we have developed a genetic manipulation to reduce postsynaptic receptor expression at one of the two muscles innervated by a single motor neuron. We find that PHP can be induced and expressed at a subset of synapses, over both acute and chronic time scales, without influencing transmission at adjacent release sites. Further, homeostatic modulations to CaMKII, vesicle pools, and functional release sites are compartmentalized and do not spread to neighboring pre- or post-synaptic structures. Thus, both PHP induction and expression mechanisms are locally transmitted and restricted to specific synaptic compartments. © 2018, Li et al.

  18. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  19. Cholinergic Modulation of Restraint Stress Induced Neurobehavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of the cholinergic system in restraint stress induced neurobehavioral alterations was investigated in rodents using the hole board, elevated plus maze, the open field and the light and dark box tests. Restraint stress (3h) reduced significantly (p<0.05) the number of entries and time spent in the open arm, ...

  20. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer Hk; Luczak, Vince; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory because PKA also regulates presynaptic transmitter release. Here, we examine this issue using genetic and pharmacological application of Ht31, a PKA anchoring disrupting peptide. At the hippocampal Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, Ht31 treatment elicits a rapid decay of synaptic responses to repetitive stimuli, indicating a fast depletion of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The interaction between PKA and proteins involved in producing this pool of synaptic vesicles is supported by biochemical assays showing that synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), Rim1, and SNAP25 are components of a complex that interacts with cAMP. Moreover, acute treatment with Ht31 reduces the levels of SV2. Finally, experiments with transgenic mouse lines, which express Ht31 in excitatory neurons at the Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, highlight a requirement for presynaptically anchored PKA in pathway-specific synaptic tagging and long-term contextual fear memory. These results suggest that a presynaptically compartmentalized PKA is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory by regulating the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [ 11 C]MP4A and [ 11 C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [ 123 I]5IA SPECT for the α 4 β 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [ 123 I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  2. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  3. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  4. Muscle Contraction Regulates BDNF/TrkB Signaling to Modulate Synaptic Function through Presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hurtado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF acts via tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB to regulate synapse maintenance and function in the neuromuscular system. The potentiation of acetylcholine (ACh release by BDNF requires TrkB phosphorylation and Protein Kinase C (PKC activation. BDNF is secreted in an activity-dependent manner but it is not known if pre- and/or postsynaptic activities enhance BDNF expression in vivo at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Here, we investigated whether nerve and muscle cell activities regulate presynaptic conventional PKC (cPKCα and βI via BDNF/TrkB signaling to modulate synaptic strength at the NMJ. To differentiate the effects of presynaptic activity from that of muscle contraction, we stimulated the phrenic nerve of rat diaphragms (1 Hz, 30 min with or without contraction (abolished by μ-conotoxin GIIIB. Then, we performed ELISA, Western blotting, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and electrophysiological techniques. We found that nerve-induced muscle contraction: (1 increases the levels of mature BDNF protein without affecting pro-BDNF protein or BDNF mRNA levels; (2 downregulates TrkB.T1 without affecting TrkB.FL or p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 levels; (3 increases presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI protein level through TrkB signaling; and (4 enhances phosphorylation of cPKCα and cPKCβI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cPKCβI, which is exclusively located in the motor nerve terminals, increases activity-induced acetylcholine release. Together, these results show that nerve-induced muscle contraction is a key regulator of BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, retrogradely activating presynaptic cPKC isoforms (in particular cPKCβI to modulate synaptic function. These results indicate that a decrease in neuromuscular activity, as occurs in several neuromuscular disorders, could affect the BDNF/TrkB/PKC pathway that links pre- and postsynaptic activity to maintain neuromuscular function.

  5. Glucocorticoid programming of the mesopontine cholinergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia eBorges

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress perception, response, adaptation and coping strategies are individually distinct, and the sequel of stress and/or glucocorticoids is also distinct between subjects. In the last years, it has become clear that early life stress is a powerful modulator of neuroendocrine stress-responsive circuits, programming intrinsic susceptibility to stress, and potentiating the appearance of stress-related disorders such as depression, anxiety and addiction. Herein we were interested in understanding how early life experiences reset the normal processing of negative stimuli, leading to emotional dysfunction. Animals prenatally exposed to glucocorticoids (iuGC present hyperanxiety, increased fear behaviour and hyper-reactivity to negative stimuli. In parallel, we found a remarkable increase in the number of aversive 22kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in response to an aversive cue. Considering the suggested role of the mesopontine tegmentum cholinergic pathway, arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT, in the initiation of 22kHz vocalizations and hypothetically in the control of emotional arousal and tone, we decided to evaluate the condition of this circuit in iuGC animals. Notably, in a basal situation, iuGC animals present increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression in the LDT and PPT, but not in other cholinergic nuclei, namely in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, and in accordance with the amplified response to an adverse stimulus of iuGC animals, we found marked changes in the cholinergic activation pattern of LDT and PPT regions. Altogether, our results suggest a specific cholinergic pathway programing by prenatal GC, and hint that this may be of relevance in setting individuals stress vulnerability threshold.

  6. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  7. Neurofilament proteins are synthesized in nerve endings from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Capano, C P; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1993-09-01

    It is generally believed that the proteins of the nerve endings are synthesized on perikaryal polysomes and are eventually delivered to the presynaptic domain by axoplasmic flow. At variance with this view, we have reported previously that a synaptosomal fraction from squid brain actively synthesizes proteins whose electrophoretic profile differs substantially from that of the proteins made in nerve cell bodies, axons, or glial cells, i.e., by the possible contaminants of the synaptosomal fraction. Using western analyses and immunoabsorption methods, we report now that (a) the translation products of the squid synaptosomal fraction include neurofilament (NF) proteins and (b) the electrophoretic pattern of the synaptosomal newly synthesized NF proteins is drastically different from that of the NF proteins synthesized by nerve cell bodies. The latter results exclude the possibility that NF proteins synthesized by the synaptosomal fraction originate in fragments of nerve cell bodies possibly contaminating the synaptosomal fraction. They rather indicate that in squid brain, nerve terminals synthesize NF proteins.

  8. The vagus nerve and the inflammatory reflex—linking immunity and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve has an important role in regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and efferent vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic signalling controls immune function and proinflammatory responses via the inflammatory reflex. Dysregulation of metabolism and immune function in obesity are associated with chronic inflammation, a critical step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cholinergic mechanisms within the inflammatory reflex have, in the past 2 years, been implicated in attenuating obesity-related inflammation and metabolic complications. This knowledge has led to the exploration of novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of obesity-related disorders. PMID:23169440

  9. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  10. Presynaptic Active Zone Density during Development and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Chen, Jie; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density) during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS), active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  11. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  12. Human butyrylcholinesterase efficacy against nerve agent exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Beth A; Sabourin, Carol L; Lenz, David E

    2017-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is vital for normal operation of many processes in the body. Following exposure to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents, death can ensue without immediate medical intervention. Current therapies mitigate the cholinergic crisis caused by nerve agents but do not fully prevent long-term health concerns, for example, brain damage following seizures. Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger being investigated as an antidote for OP nerve agent poisoning. HuBChE sequesters OP nerve agent in the bloodstream preventing the nerve agent from reaching critical target organ systems. HuBChE was effective when used as both a pre-treatment and as a post-exposure therapy. HuBChE has potential for use in both military settings and to protect civilian first responders in situations where nerve agent usage is suspected. We reviewed various animal models studies evaluating the efficacy of HuBChE against nerve agent exposure, pursuant to its submission for approval under the FDA Animal Rule. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release induced by adenosine at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Silvana; Veggetti, Mariela; Muchnik, Salomón; Losavio, Adriana

    2004-05-01

    1. At the mouse neuromuscular junction, adenosine (AD) and the A(1) agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA) induce presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release by activation of A(1) AD receptors through a mechanism that is still unknown. To evaluate whether the inhibition is mediated by modulation of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) associated with tonic secretion (L- and N-type VDCCs), we measured the miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency in mouse diaphragm muscles. 2. Blockade of VDCCs by Cd(2+) prevented the effect of the CCPA. Nitrendipine (an L-type VDCC antagonist) but not omega-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VDCC antagonist) blocked the action of CCPA, suggesting that the decrease in spontaneous mepp frequency by CCPA is associated with an action on L-type VDCCs only. 3. As A(1) receptors are coupled to a G(i/o) protein, we investigated whether the inhibition of PKA or the activation of PKC is involved in the presynaptic inhibition mechanism. Neither N-(2[p-bromocinnamylamino]-ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, a PKA inhibitor), nor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7, a PKC antagonist), nor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PHA, a PKC activator) modified CCPA-induced presynaptic inhibition, suggesting that these second messenger pathways are not involved. 4. The effect of CCPA was eliminated by the calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexil)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7) and by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester epsilon6TDelta-BM, which suggests that the action of CCPA to modulate L-type VDCCs may involve Ca(2+)-calmodulin. 5. To investigate the action of CCPA on diverse degrees of nerve terminal depolarization, we studied its effect at different external K(+) concentrations. The effect of CCPA on ACh secretion evoked by 10 mm K(+) was prevented by the P/Q-type VDCC antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA. 6. CCPA failed to

  14. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  15. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis.The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined.McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy.Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  16. Young Human Cholinergic Neurons Respond to Physiological Regulators and Improve Cognitive Symptoms in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Annamaria; Sarchielli, Erica; Guarnieri, Giulia; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pantano, Daniela; Comeglio, Paolo; Nardiello, Pamela; Pugliese, Anna M.; Ballerini, Lara; Matucci, Rosanna; Ambrosini, Stefano; Castronovo, Giuseppe; Valente, Rosa; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Bucciantini, Sandra; Maggi, Mario; Casamenti, Fiorella; Gallina, Pasquale; Vannelli, Gabriella B.

    2017-01-01

    The degeneration of cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) in the basal forebrain (BF) is associated to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. To date no resolutive therapies exist. Cell-based replacement therapy is a strategy currently under consideration, although the mechanisms underlying the generation of stem cell-derived NBM cholinergic neurons able of functional integration remain to be clarified. Since fetal brain is an optimal source of neuronal cells committed towards a specific phenotype, this study is aimed at isolating cholinergic neurons from the human fetal NBM (hfNBMs) in order to study their phenotypic, maturational and functional properties. Extensive characterization confirmed the cholinergic identity of hfNBMs, including positivity for specific markers (such as choline acetyltransferase) and acetylcholine (Ach) release. Electrophysiological measurements provided the functional validation of hfNBM cells, which exhibited the activation of peculiar sodium (INa) and potassium (IK) currents, as well as the presence of functional cholinergic receptors. Accordingly, hfNBMs express both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, which were activated by Ach. The hfNBMs cholinergic phenotype was regulated by the nerve growth factor (NGF), through the activation of the high-affinity NGF receptor TrkA, as well as by 17-β-estradiol through a peculiar recruitment of its own receptors. When intravenously administered in NBM-lesioned rats, hfNBMs determined a significant improvement in memory functions. Histological examination of brain sections showed that hfNBMs (labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye prior to administration) reached the damaged brain areas. The study provides a useful model to study the ontogenetic mechanisms regulating the development and maintenance of the human brain cholinergic system and to assess new lines of research, including disease modeling, drug discovery and cell-based therapy for AD. PMID

  17. Young Human Cholinergic Neurons Respond to Physiological Regulators and Improve Cognitive Symptoms in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Morelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The degeneration of cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM in the basal forebrain (BF is associated to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. To date no resolutive therapies exist. Cell-based replacement therapy is a strategy currently under consideration, although the mechanisms underlying the generation of stem cell-derived NBM cholinergic neurons able of functional integration remain to be clarified. Since fetal brain is an optimal source of neuronal cells committed towards a specific phenotype, this study is aimed at isolating cholinergic neurons from the human fetal NBM (hfNBMs in order to study their phenotypic, maturational and functional properties. Extensive characterization confirmed the cholinergic identity of hfNBMs, including positivity for specific markers (such as choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholine (Ach release. Electrophysiological measurements provided the functional validation of hfNBM cells, which exhibited the activation of peculiar sodium (INa and potassium (IK currents, as well as the presence of functional cholinergic receptors. Accordingly, hfNBMs express both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, which were activated by Ach. The hfNBMs cholinergic phenotype was regulated by the nerve growth factor (NGF, through the activation of the high-affinity NGF receptor TrkA, as well as by 17-β-estradiol through a peculiar recruitment of its own receptors. When intravenously administered in NBM-lesioned rats, hfNBMs determined a significant improvement in memory functions. Histological examination of brain sections showed that hfNBMs (labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye prior to administration reached the damaged brain areas. The study provides a useful model to study the ontogenetic mechanisms regulating the development and maintenance of the human brain cholinergic system and to assess new lines of research, including disease modeling, drug discovery and cell-based therapy for AD.

  18. Dual nitrergic/cholinergic control of short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs to striatal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Peter Blomeley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of nitric oxide and acetylcholine to modulate the short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs was investigated using current-clamp recordings in BAC mouse brain slices. Glutamatergic responses were evoked by stimulation of corpus callosum in D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs and D2-MSN, respectively. Paired-pulse stimulation (50 ms intervals evoked depressing or facilitating responses in subgroups of both D1-MSNs and D2 MSNs. In both neuronal types, glutamatergic responses of cells that displayed paired-pulse depression were not significantly affected by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 100 µM. Conversely, in D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs that displayed paired-pulse facilitation, SNAP did not affect the first evoked response, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the second evoked EPSP, converting paired-pulse facilitation into paired-pulse depression. SNAP also strongly excited cholinergic interneurons and increased their cortical glutamatergic responses acting through a presynaptic mechanism. The effects of SNAP on glutamatergic response of D1-MSNs and D2-MSN were mediated by acetylcholine. The broad-spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (25 µM did not affect paired-pulse ratios and did not prevent the effects of SNAP. Conversely, the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist tubocurarine (10 µM fully mimicked and occluded the effects of SNAP. We concluded that phasic acetylcholine release mediates feedforward facilitation in MSNs through activation of nicotinic receptors on glutamatergic terminals and that nitric oxide, while increasing cholinergic interneurons’ firing, functionally impairs their ability to modulate glutamatergic inputs of MSNs. These results show that nitrergic and cholinergic transmission control the short-term plasticity of glutamatergic inputs in the striatum and reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying paired

  19. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  20. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the presynaptic action of extracellular ATP at the frog neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giniatullin, AR; Grishin, SN; Sharifullina, ER; Petrov, AM; Zefirov, AL; Giniatullin, RA

    2005-01-01

    During normal cell metabolism the production of intracellular ATP is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be important signalling molecules. Both ATP and ROS can be released extracellularly by skeletal muscle during intense activity. Using voltage clamp recording combined with imaging and biochemical assay of ROS, we tested the hypothesis that at the neuromuscular junction extracellular ATP generates ROS to inhibit transmitter release from motor nerve endings. We found that ATP produced the presynaptic inhibitory action on multiquantal end-plate currents. The inhibitory action of ATP (but not that of adenosine) was significantly reduced by several antioxidants or extracellular catalase, which breaks down H2O2. Consistent with these data, the depressant effect of ATP was dramatically potentiated by the pro-oxidant Fe2+. Exogenous H2O2 reproduced the depressant effects of ATP and showed similar sensitivity to anti- and pro-oxidants. While NO also inhibited synaptic transmission, inhibitors of the NO-producing cascade did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. The ferrous oxidation in xylenol orange assay showed the increase of ROS production by ATP and 2-MeSADP but not by adenosine. Suramin, a non-selective antagonist of P2 receptors, and pertussis toxin prevented the action of ATP on ROS production. Likewise, imaging with the ROS-sensitive dye carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein revealed increased production of ROS in the muscle treated with ATP or ADP while UTP or adenosine had no effect. Thus, generation of ROS contributed to the ATP-mediated negative feedback mechanism controlling quantal secretion of ACh from the motor nerve endings. PMID:15774519

  1. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum (LS, central amygdala (CeA, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVH, dorsal raphe (DRN and parabrachial nucleus (PBN. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal-hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function.

  2. Estrogen-Cholinergic Interactions: Implications for Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Paul; Dumas, Julie

    2015-01-01

    While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects. PMID:26187712

  3. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, J.D.; Cohen, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 ..mu..g/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow.

  4. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  5. SNAP-25, a known presynaptic protein with emerging postsynaptic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia eAntonucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different synaptopathies. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions.

  6. Nerve growth factor actions on the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of the trophic protein, nerve growth factor (NGF), on cultures of fetal rat neostriatum and basal forebrain-medial septal area (BF-MS) to define its role in brain development. Treatment of cultures with NGF resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT) in both brain areas. CAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons. In the BF-MS, NGF treatment elicited a marked increase in staining intensity and an apparent increase in the number of CAT-positive neurons. Moreover, treatment of BF-MS cultures with NGF increased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting that the cholinergic neuron as a whole was affected. To begin defining mechanisms of action of NGF in the BF-MS, we detected NGF receptors by two independent methods. Receptors were localized to two different cellular populations: neuron-like cells, and non-neuron-like cells. Dissociation studies with [ 125 I]NGF suggested that high affinity receptors were localized to the neuron-like population. Only low-affinity receptors were localized to the non-neuron-like cells. Moreover, employing combined immunocytochemistry and [ 125 I]NGF autoradiography, we detected a subpopulation of CAT-containing neutrons that exhibited high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell group also expressed high affinity binding. However, only subsets of cholinergic or GABA neurons expressed high-affinity biding, suggesting that these transmitter populations are composed of differentially response subpopulations

  7. A randomised trial of a pre-synaptic stimulator of DA2-dopaminergic and alpha2-adrenergic receptors on morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Carlsen, Jan E

    2008-01-01

    Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed as a mul.......i.d. of nolomirole was not beneficial (or harmful) in patients with heart failure. (c) 2007 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1......Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed...... as a multicentre, double blind, parallel group trial of 5 mg b.i.d. of nolomirole (n=501) versus placebo (n=499) in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, recently in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV. The primary endpoint was time to all cause death or hospitalisation for HF...

  8. Intra-axonal Synthesis of SNAP25 Is Required for the Formation of Presynaptic Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia F.R. Batista

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Localized protein synthesis is a mechanism for developing axons to react acutely and in a spatially restricted manner to extracellular signals. As such, it is important for many aspects of axonal development, but its role in the formation of presynapses remains poorly understood. We found that the induced assembly of presynaptic terminals required local protein synthesis. Newly synthesized proteins were detectable at nascent presynapses within 15 min of inducing synapse formation in isolated axons. The transcript for the t-SNARE protein SNAP25, which is required for the fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, was recruited to presynaptic sites and locally translated. Inhibition of intra-axonal SNAP25 synthesis affected the clustering of SNAP25 and other presynaptic proteins and interfered with the release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic sites. This study reveals a critical role for the axonal synthesis of SNAP25 in the assembly of presynaptic terminals.

  9. Basic and modern concepts on cholinergic receptor: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tiwari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic system is an important system and a branch of the autonomic nervous system which plays an important role in memory, digestion, control of heart beat, blood pressure, movement and many other functions. This article serves as both structural and functional sources of information regarding cholinergic receptors and provides a detailed understanding of the determinants governing specificity of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor to researchers. The study helps to give overall information about the fundamentals of the cholinergic system, its receptors and ongoing research in this field.

  10. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal cord and muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilonius, S.M.; Askmark, H.; Gilberg, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Current knowledge regarding the distribution of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cholineacetyltranferase (ChAT) and cholinergic receptors in the spinal cord is presented as well as changes in these markers coupled to the degenerations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The principal changes in ChAT and nicotonic receptors in rat hindleg muscles during denervation and reinnervation is discussed as a background for quantitative studies in human muscle biopsies. It is noted that thefirst published autoradiograph on spinal cord muscarinic receptors was from the rat, depicting an intense binding of radiolabeled quinuclikiny benzilate (tritium-QNB) in the ventral horn, and expecially in an apical part of the dorsal horn claimed to correspond to correspond to sustantia gelatinosa

  11. Elements of molecular machinery of GABAergic signaling in the vertebrate cholinergic neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurullin, Leniz F; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Malomouzh, Artem I

    2018-04-01

    It is generally accepted that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a signaling molecule abundant in central synapses. In a number of studies though, it has been shown that GABA signaling functions in the peripheral nervous system as well, in particular, in the synapses of sympathetic ganglia. However, there exists no firm evidence on the presence of GABAergic signaling cascade in the intercellular junctions of the somatic nerve system. By the use of immunohistochemistry methods, in the synaptic area of cholinergic neuromuscular contact in rat diaphragm, we have detected glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme involved in synthesis of GABA, molecules of GABA, and also GAT-2, a protein responsible for transmembrane transport of GABA. Earlier we have also shown that metabotropic GABA B receptors have overlapping localization in the same compartment. Moreover, activation of GABA B receptors affects the intensity of acetylcholine release. These data taken together, allows us to suggest that in the mammalian cholinergic neuromuscular junction, GABA is synthesized and performs certain synaptic signaling function. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  12. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Deficits Reduce Glucose Metabolism and Function of Cholinergic and GABAergic Systems in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Un; Oh, Jin Hwan; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyeon; Cho, Zang Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Chang, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by ¹⁸F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism.

  13. Modulation of Cholinergic Pathways and Inflammatory Mediators in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    the expression of cholinergic ( muscarinic and nicotinic) and gammaaminobutyric acid and glutamate receptors in the midbrain region along with...value)** Mid brain NM_203491 Chrm2 Cholinergic receptor muscarinic 2 2.01 0.032 NM_007390 Chrna7 Cholinergic receptor nicotinic alpha 7 1.53 0.015...multiple genes involved in cholinergic transmission (Table 1). The expres- sion profiles of cholinergic receptors muscarinic 2 and nicotinic al- pha

  14. Centrality of striatal cholinergic transmission in basal ganglia function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eBonsi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Work over the past two decades revealed a previously unexpected role for striatal cholinergic interneurons in the context of basal ganglia function. The recognition that these interneurons are essential in synaptic plasticity and motor learning represents a significant step ahead in deciphering how the striatum processes cortical inputs, and why pathological circumstances cause motor dysfunction.Loss of the reciprocal modulation between dopaminergic inputs and the intrinsic cholinergic innervation within the striatum appears to be the trigger for pathophysiological changes occurring in basal ganglia disorders. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence showing profound changes in cholinergic markers in these disorders, in particular Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.Based on converging experimental and clinical evidence, we provide an overview of the role of striatal cholinergic transmission in physiological and pathological conditions, in the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  15. Presynaptic G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Gatekeepers of Addiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A Johnson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse and addiction cause widespread social and public health problems, and the neurobiology underlying drug actions and drug use and abuse is an area of intensive research. Drugs of abuse alter synaptic transmission, and these actions contribute to acute intoxication as well as the chronic effects of abused substances. Transmission at most mammalian synapses involves neurotransmitter activation of two receptor subtypes, ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic responses, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that have slower neuromodulatory actions. The GPCRs represent a large proportion of neurotransmitter receptors involved in almost all facets of nervous system function. In addition, these receptors are targets for many pharmacotherapeutic agents. Drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neuromodulation mediated by GPCRs, with important consequences for intoxication, drug taking and responses to prolonged drug exposure, withdrawal and addiction. Among the GPCRs are several subtypes involved in presynaptic inhibition, most of which are coupled to the Gi/o class of G protein. There is increasing evidence that these presynaptic Gi/o-coupled GPCRs have important roles in the actions of drugs of abuse, as well as behaviors related to these drugs. This topic will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on receptors for three neurotransmitters, dopamine (D1- and D2-like receptors, endocannabinoids (CB1 receptors and glutamate (group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu receptors. The focus is on recent evidence from laboratory animal models (and some evidence in humans implicating these receptors in the acute and chronic effects of numerous abused drugs, as well as in the control of drug seeking and taking. The ability of drugs targeting these receptors to modify drug seeking behavior has raised the possibility of using compounds targeting these receptors for addiction pharmacotherapy. This topic is also discussed, with emphasis on

  16. Effect of Cholinergic Signaling on Neuronal Cell Bioenergetics

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jianghua; Lezi, E; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Selfridge, Eva; Funk, Eric; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have reduced brain acetylcholine and reversing this deficit yields clinical benefits. In this study we explored how increased cholinergic tone impacts cell bioenergetics, which are also perturbed in AD. We treated SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells with carbachol, a cholinergic agonist, and tested for bioenergetic flux and bioenergetic infrastructure changes. Carbachol rapidly increased both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis fluxes. ATP levels rose slightly, a...

  17. Cholinergic depletion and basal forebrain volume in primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolien Schaeverbeke

    2017-01-01

    In the PPA group, only LV cases showed decreases in AChE activity levels compared to controls. Surprisingly, a substantial number of SV cases showed significant AChE activity increases compared to controls. BF volume did not correlate with AChE activity levels in PPA. To conclude, in our sample of PPA patients, LV but not SV was associated with cholinergic depletion. BF atrophy in PPA does not imply cholinergic depletion.

  18. The nicotinic cholinergic system function in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Frauke

    2015-09-01

    Research on the nicotinic cholinergic system function in the brain was previously mainly derived from animal studies, yet, research in humans is growing. Up to date, findings allow significant advances on the understanding of nicotinic cholinergic effects on human cognition, emotion and behavior using a range of functional brain imaging approaches such as pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Studies provided insights across various mechanistic psychological domains using different tasks as well as at rest in both healthy individuals and patient populations, with so far partly mixed results reporting both enhancements and decrements of neural activity related to the nicotinic cholinergic system. Moreover, studies on the relation between brain structure and the nicotinic cholinergic system add important information in this context. The present review summarizes the current status of human brain imaging studies and presents the findings within a theoretical and clinical perspective as they may be useful not only for an advancement of the understanding of basic nicotinic cholinergic-related mechanisms, but also for the development and integration of psychological and pharmacological treatment approaches. Patterns of functional neuroanatomy and neural circuitry across various cognitive and emotional domains may be used as neuropsychological markers of mental disorders such as addiction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease or schizophrenia, where nicotinic cholinergic system changes are characteristic. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Presynaptic pH and vesicle fusion in Drosophila larvae neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Lesley; Harries, Peter; Sydlik, Sebastian; Schwiening, Christof J

    2013-11-01

    Both intracellular pH (pHi) and synaptic cleft pH change during neuronal activity yet little is known about how these pH shifts might affect synaptic transmission by influencing vesicle fusion. To address this we imaged pH- and Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent indicators (HPTS, Oregon green) in boutons at neuromuscular junctions. Electrical stimulation of motor nerves evoked presynaptic Ca(2+) i rises and pHi falls (∼0.1 pH units) followed by recovery of both Ca(2+) i and pHi. The plasma-membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) inhibitor, 5(6)-carboxyeosin diacetate, slowed both the calcium recovery and the acidification. To investigate a possible calcium-independent role for the pHi shifts in modulating vesicle fusion we recorded post-synaptic miniature end-plate potential (mEPP) and current (mEPC) frequency in Ca(2+) -free solution. Acidification by propionate superfusion, NH(4)(+) withdrawal, or the inhibition of acid extrusion on the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) induced a rise in miniature frequency. Furthermore, the inhibition of acid extrusion enhanced the rise induced by propionate addition and NH(4)(+) removal. In the presence of NH(4)(+), 10 out of 23 cells showed, after a delay, one or more rises in miniature frequency. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent pHi shifts, caused by the PMCA and regulated by NHE, may stimulate vesicle release. Furthermore, in the presence of membrane permeant buffers, exocytosed acid or its equivalents may enhance release through positive feedback. This hitherto neglected pH signalling, and the potential feedback role of vesicular acid, could explain some important neuronal excitability changes associated with altered pH and its buffering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS): a rare autoimmune presynaptic disorder often associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoser, Benedikt; Eymard, Bruno; Datt, Joe; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-09-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder that is related to the loss of functional P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) on presynaptic nerve terminals. Up to 60% of cases occur as a paraneoplastic disorder (SCLC-LEMS), most commonly in association with small cell lung cancer. The remaining cases have an idiopathic non-tumor etiology but are associated with underlying autoimmune disease (NT-LEMS). Patients with LEMS invariably experience progressive proximal muscle weakness, often accompanied by general fatigue and autonomic symptoms. Some LEMS clinical symptoms overlap with those of other myasthenic syndromes, most commonly myasthenia gravis, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. Prognosis is related to the presence of cancer or autoimmune disease and the severity/distribution of muscle weakness. Cause of death in patients with SCLC-LEMS is typically tumor progression, whereas NT-LEMS does not reduce life expectancy. LEMS diagnosis is supported by a threefold approach: clinical features, electromyography, and anti-VGCC antibody serology. LEMS is a clinically important early indicator of possible cancer; therefore, a LEMS diagnosis should immediately prompt rigorous oncological screening and surveillance. Symptomatic treatment of LEMS typically involves medications that improve neurotransmission (e.g., the potassium channel blocker amifampridine [3,4-diaminopyridine]), with addition of immunosuppressants/modulators (e.g., prednisone plus azathioprine) in individuals with persistent symptoms. Where a tumor is identified, oncological treatment should take priority. It should be remembered, however, that LEMS has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities, and therefore warrants timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment in and of itself.

  1. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.

  2. Bortezomib induces neuropathic pain through protein kinase C-mediated activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs, including bortezomib, often cause painful peripheral neuropathy, which is a severe dose-limiting adverse effect experienced by many cancer patients. The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) at the spinal cord level are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined whether treatment with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, affects the NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. Systemic treatment with bortezomib in rats did not significantly affect postsynaptic NMDAR currents elicited by puff application of NMDA directly to dorsal horn neurons. Bortezomib treatment markedly increased the baseline frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), which was completely normalized by the NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5). AP5 also reduced the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by dorsal root stimulation in bortezomib-treated, but not vehicle-treated, rats. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with chelerythrine fully reversed the increased frequency of miniature EPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in bortezomib-treated rats. Intrathecal injection of AP5 and chelerythrine both profoundly attenuated mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by systemic treatment with bortezomib. In addition, treatment with bortezomib induced striking membrane translocation of PKC-βII, PKC-δ, and PKC-ε in the dorsal root ganglion. Our findings indicate that bortezomib treatment potentiates nociceptive input from primary afferent nerves via PKC-mediated tonic activation of presynaptic NMDARs. Targeting presynaptic NMDARs and PKC at the spinal cord level may be an effective strategy for treating chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414210-09$15.00/0.

  4. Molecular imaging of cholinergic processes in prostate cancer using {sup 11}C-donepezil and {sup 18}F-FEOBV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokholm, Morten Gersel; Bender, Dirk; Jakobsen, Steen; Froekiaer, Joergen; Borghammer, Per [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Aarhus C (Denmark); Hoeyer, Soeren [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Histopathology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Borre, Michael [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Urology, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    High-grade prostate cancer (PC) displays parasympathetic neoneurogenesis. We investigated the binding of two PET tracers that visualize cholinergic nerves in PC tissue using autoradiography. Prostatectomy tissue was subjected to autoradiography with {sup 11}C-donepezil and {sup 18}F-FEOBV and correlated with Gleason scores (GS). Regions of interest on the autoradiograms were defined and quantified. Tracer binding in cancer tissue regions was compared with that in normal tissue. We included 13 patients with biopsy-verified PC. In particular, {sup 11}C-donepezil uptake was higher in ''high-grade'' PC (GS ≥4 + 3) than in ''low-grade'' PC and benign hyperplasia. {sup 11}C-donepezil uptake ranged from a mean of 56 % higher (GS 3 + 3) to 409 % higher (GS 4 + 4), and {sup 18}F-FEOBV uptake ranged from 67 % higher (GS 3 + 3) to 194 % higher (GS 4 + 5). The uptake of both tracers was higher in PC with a high GS than in PC with a low GS, but the difference was significant only for {sup 11}C-donepezil (p = 0.003). Uptake of PET tracers binding to cholinergic nerves was markedly higher in PC with a high GS than in PC with a low GS. This finding implies that {sup 11}C-donepezil PET/CT may be able to differentiate between low-grade and high-grade PC. (orig.)

  5. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  6. Neurofunctional imaging of the pancreas utilizing the cholinergic PET radioligand [{sup 18}F]4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.B.; Gage, H.D.; Brown-Proctor, C.; Buchheimer, N.; Morton, K.A. [Nuclear Medicine Section, Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd., NC 27157, Winston-Salem (United States); Calles-Escandon, J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Mach, R.H. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The pancreas is one of the most heavily innervated peripheral organs in the body. Parasympathetic and sympathetic neurons terminate in the pancreas and provide tight control of endocrine and exocrine functions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the pancreas can be imaged with a radioligand that binds to specific neuroreceptors. Using fluorine-18 4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol (FBT), which binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter, positron emission tomography scans were performed in four adult mice, two adult rhesus monkeys, and one adult human. In these mammals, the pancreas is intensely FBT avid, with uptake greater than in any other organ at 30, 60, and 90 min. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios of pancreas to liver, for example, ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 in rhesus monkeys (mean 1.6; median 1.7) and from 1.9 to 4.7 (mean 3.24; median 3.02) in mice. The maximum SUV ratio of pancreas to liver in the human was 1.8. These data suggest that neuroreceptor imaging of the pancreas in vivo is feasible in animal models and humans. This imaging could allow researchers to interrogate functions under control of the autonomic nervous system in the pancreas, with applications possible in transplanted and native pancreata. Also, as beta cell function is intimately related to parasympathetic cholinergic input, FBT activity in the pancreas may correlate with insulin-producing beta cell mass. This could ultimately provide a method of in vivo imaging in animal models and humans for diabetes research. (orig.)

  7. Neurofunctional imaging of the pancreas utilizing the cholinergic PET radioligand [18F]4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.B.; Gage, H.D.; Brown-Proctor, C.; Buchheimer, N.; Morton, K.A.; Calles-Escandon, J.; Mach, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the most heavily innervated peripheral organs in the body. Parasympathetic and sympathetic neurons terminate in the pancreas and provide tight control of endocrine and exocrine functions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the pancreas can be imaged with a radioligand that binds to specific neuroreceptors. Using fluorine-18 4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol (FBT), which binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter, positron emission tomography scans were performed in four adult mice, two adult rhesus monkeys, and one adult human. In these mammals, the pancreas is intensely FBT avid, with uptake greater than in any other organ at 30, 60, and 90 min. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios of pancreas to liver, for example, ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 in rhesus monkeys (mean 1.6; median 1.7) and from 1.9 to 4.7 (mean 3.24; median 3.02) in mice. The maximum SUV ratio of pancreas to liver in the human was 1.8. These data suggest that neuroreceptor imaging of the pancreas in vivo is feasible in animal models and humans. This imaging could allow researchers to interrogate functions under control of the autonomic nervous system in the pancreas, with applications possible in transplanted and native pancreata. Also, as beta cell function is intimately related to parasympathetic cholinergic input, FBT activity in the pancreas may correlate with insulin-producing beta cell mass. This could ultimately provide a method of in vivo imaging in animal models and humans for diabetes research. (orig.)

  8. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Tornøe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device...

  9. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  10. Beyond the usual suspects: a cholinergic route for panic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Marco

    2002-01-01

    For unknown reasons and through poorly understood mechanisms, people at risk of panic attacks are hypersensitive to suffocative stimuli and experience hyperventilation and anxiety after exposure to heightened concentrations of carbon dioxide. Similarly to the physiological reflex response to hypercapnia in animals and man, the anxious response to carbon dioxide in people with panic disorder is at least partially controlled by the central muscarinic receptors. It is suggested here that some modifications of the cholinergic functions could underlie human individual differences in carbon dioxide sensitivity and proneness to experience panic attacks. The hypothesis is based upon experimental evidence that stressful and potentially harmful stimuli prime relatively long-lasting changes in cholinergic genes expression and cholinergic receptors' regulation. The adaptive sequels of these modifications include protection of the brain from overstimulation, and, at the level of the corticolimbic circuitries, promotion of passive avoidance and learning after stress. The extension of the same modifications to the cholinergic receptors involved in chemoception, however, could lower the threshold for reaction to suffocative stimuli, including carbon dioxide. The exaggerated sensitivity to carbon dioxide observed in humans suffering from panic attacks could then be thought of as an evolutionary cost of the involvement of the cholinergic system in shaping otherwise adaptive responses to stress and threatening stimuli.

  11. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H. (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1991-06-28

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a (3H) (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major (3H)(R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ((3H)ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a (3H) yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors.

  12. The presynaptic machinery at the synapse of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorro, Fernando; Izquierdo, Patricia G

    2018-03-12

    Synapses are specialized contact sites that mediate information flow between neurons and their targets. Important physical interactions across the synapse are mediated by synaptic adhesion molecules. These adhesions regulate formation of synapses during development and play a role during mature synaptic function. Importantly, genes regulating synaptogenesis and axon regeneration are conserved across the animal phyla. Genetic screens in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have identified a number of molecules required for synapse patterning and assembly. C. elegans is able to survive even with its neuronal function severely compromised. This is in comparison with Drosophila and mice where increased complexity makes them less tolerant to impaired function. Although this fact may reflect differences in the function of the homologous proteins in the synapses between these organisms, the most likely interpretation is that many of these components are equally important, but not absolutely essential, for synaptic transmission to support the relatively undemanding life style of laboratory maintained C. elegans. Here, we review research on the major group of synaptic proteins, involved in the presynaptic machinery in C. elegans, showing a strong conservation between higher organisms and highlight how C. elegans can be used as an informative tool for dissecting synaptic components, based on a simple nervous system organization.

  13. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H.

    1991-01-01

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a [3H] (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major [3H](R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ([3H]ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a [3H] yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors

  14. Histamine H3 receptors mediate inhibition of noradrenaline release from intestinal sympathetic nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Blandizzi, Corrado; Tognetti, Martina; Colucci, Rocchina; Tacca, Mario Del

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigates whether presynaptic histamine receptors regulate noradrenaline release from intestinal sympathetic nerves. The experiments were performed on longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations of guinea-pig ileum, preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline.In the presence of rauwolscine, electrically-induced [3H]-noradrenaline release was inhibited by histamine or R-α-methylhistamine, whereas it was unaffected by pyridylethylamine, impromidine, pyrilamine, cimetidine, t...

  15. Loss of Sympathetic Nerves in Spleens from Patients with End Stage Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald B. Hoover

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The spleen is an important site for central regulation of immune function by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, but little is known about this major region of neuroimmune communication in humans. Experimental studies using animal models have established that sympathetic innervation of the spleen is essential for cholinergic anti-inflammatory responses evoked by vagal nerve stimulation, and clinical studies are evaluating this approach for treating inflammatory diseases. Most data on sympathetic nerves in spleen derive from rodent studies, and this work has established that remodeling of sympathetic innervation can occur during inflammation. However, little is known about the effects of sepsis on spleen innervation. Our primary goals were to (i localize noradrenergic nerves in human spleen by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, a specific noradrenergic marker, (ii determine if nerves occur in close apposition to leukocytes, and (iii determine if splenic sympathetic innervation is altered in patients who died from end stage sepsis. Staining for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT was done to screen for cholinergic nerves. Archived paraffin tissue blocks were used. Control samples were obtained from trauma patients or patients who died after hemorrhagic stroke. TH + nerves were associated with arteries and arterioles in all control spleens, occurring in bundles or as nerve fibers. Individual TH + nerve fibers entered the perivascular region where some appeared in close apposition to leukocytes. In marked contrast, spleens from half of the septic patients lacked TH + nerves fibers and the average abundance of TH + nerves for the septic group was only 16% of that for the control group (control: 0.272 ± 0.060% area, n = 6; sepsis: 0.043 ± 0.026% area, n = 8; P < 0.005. All spleens lacked cholinergic innervation. Our results provide definitive evidence for the distribution of noradrenergic

  16. Re-emergence of striatal cholinergic interneurons in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Antonio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Ding, Jun; Surmeier, D James

    2007-10-01

    Twenty years ago, striatal cholinergic neurons were central figures in models of basal ganglia function. But since then, they have receded in importance. Recent studies are likely to lead to their re-emergence in our thinking. Cholinergic interneurons have been implicated as key players in the induction of synaptic plasticity and motor learning, as well as in motor dysfunction. In Parkinson's disease and dystonia, diminished striatal dopaminergic signalling leads to increased release of acetylcholine by interneurons, distorting network function and inducing structural changes that undoubtedly contribute to the symptoms. By contrast, in Huntington's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy, there is a fall in striatal cholinergic markers. This review gives an overview of these recent experimental and clinical studies, placing them within the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  17. Cortical cholinergic innervation: Distribution and source in monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, R.G.; Cork, L.C.; Coyle, J.T.; Lehmann, J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Price, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its late-life variant, senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT), the predominant neurochemical abnormalities are marked decrements in the activities of ChAT and AChE, the high affinity uptake of tritium-choline, and synthesis of acetylcholine. Two studies are undertaken to delineate more clearly the variability of cortical cholinergic innervation and the contribution of the Ch system, particularly the Ch4, to this cholinergic innervation. In the first study, ChAT activity was assessed in multiple samples of neocortex from seven normal cynomolgus monkeys. In the second study, the nbM was lesioned in order to determine the contribution of the Ch system to cortical cholinergic innervation

  18. Local gene expression in axons and nerve endings: the glia-neuron unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2008-04-01

    Neurons have complex and often extensively elongated processes. This unique cell morphology raises the problem of how remote neuronal territories are replenished with proteins. For a long time, axonal and presynaptic proteins were thought to be exclusively synthesized in the cell body, which delivered them to peripheral sites by axoplasmic transport. Despite this early belief, protein has been shown to be synthesized in axons and nerve terminals, substantially alleviating the trophic burden of the perikaryon. This observation raised the question of the cellular origin of the peripheral RNAs involved in protein synthesis. The synthesis of these RNAs was initially attributed to the neuron soma almost by default. However, experimental data and theoretical considerations support the alternative view that axonal and presynaptic RNAs are also transcribed in the flanking glial cells and transferred to the axon domain of mature neurons. Altogether, these data suggest that axons and nerve terminals are served by a distinct gene expression system largely independent of the neuron cell body. Such a local system would allow the neuron periphery to respond promptly to environmental stimuli. This view has the theoretical merit of extending to axons and nerve terminals the marginalized concept of a glial supply of RNA (and protein) to the neuron cell body. Most long-term plastic changes requiring de novo gene expression occur in these domains, notably in presynaptic endings, despite their intrinsic lack of transcriptional capacity. This review enlightens novel perspectives on the biology and pathobiology of the neuron by critically reviewing these issues.

  19. Whereas Short-Term Facilitation Is Presynaptic, Intermediate-Term Facilitation Involves Both Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Protein Kinases and Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Iksung; Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas short-term plasticity involves covalent modifications that are generally restricted to either presynaptic or postsynaptic structures, long-term plasticity involves the growth of new synapses, which by its nature involves both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. In addition, an intermediate-term stage of plasticity has been identified that…

  20. The determination of presynaptic pA2 values of yohimbine and phentolamine on the perfused rat heart under conditions of negligible autoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuder, H.; Muscholl, E.; Spemann, R.

    1983-01-01

    1 Rat isolated perfused hearts with the right sympathetic nerves attached were loaded with [3H]-(-)-noradrenaline. The nerves were stimulated with up to 40 trains of 10 pulses every min at 1 Hz, and the evoked increases of [3H-]noradrenaline overflow into the perfusate, of right atrial tension development and ventricular beating frequency were measured. 2 Oxymetazoline inhibited the evoked transmitter overflow (IC50: 10 nM) and decreased the postsynaptic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. It behaved as a full against in abolishing the evoked transmitter overflow. 3 Yohimbine up to 1 microM neither enhanced the evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow nor the postsynaptic parameters. Phentolamine (1 microM) caused a transient, minor (less than 30%) increase in [3H]-noradrenaline overflow. 4 Yohimbine (0.03-1.0 microM) and phentolamine (0.1-5.0 microM) shifted to the right the concentration-response curve of oxymetazoline for the inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline overflow in response to nerve stimulation without depressing the maxima. The pA2 values were 7.82 and 7.52, respectively. 5 Yohimbine (0.1 microM) also antagonized the decrease induced by oxymetazoline in the postsynaptic responses to nerve stimulation. 6 The results confirm the existence of presynaptic inhibitory alpha 2-adrenoceptors at the adrenergic nerve fibres of the rat heart in vitro. Under the stimulation and perfusion conditions selected, the released endogenous transmitter apparently does not activate a negative feedback mechanism, thus permitting the determination of pA2 values. PMID:6307450

  1. Degeneracy in the regulation of short-term plasticity and synaptic filtering by presynaptic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukunda, Chinmayee L; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-04-15

    We develop a new biophysically rooted, physiologically constrained conductance-based synaptic model to mechanistically account for short-term facilitation and depression, respectively through residual calcium and transmitter depletion kinetics. We address the specific question of how presynaptic components (including voltage-gated ion channels, pumps, buffers and release-handling mechanisms) and interactions among them define synaptic filtering and short-term plasticity profiles. Employing global sensitivity analyses (GSAs), we show that near-identical synaptic filters and short-term plasticity profiles could emerge from disparate presynaptic parametric combinations with weak pairwise correlations. Using virtual knockout models, a technique to address the question of channel-specific contributions within the GSA framework, we unveil the differential and variable impact of each ion channel on synaptic physiology. Our conclusions strengthen the argument that parametric and interactional complexity in biological systems should not be viewed from the limited curse-of-dimensionality standpoint, but from the evolutionarily advantageous perspective of providing functional robustness through degeneracy. Information processing in neurons is known to emerge as a gestalt of pre- and post-synaptic filtering. However, the impact of presynaptic mechanisms on synaptic filters has not been quantitatively assessed. Here, we developed a biophysically rooted, conductance-based model synapse that was endowed with six different voltage-gated ion channels, calcium pumps, calcium buffer and neurotransmitter-replenishment mechanisms in the presynaptic terminal. We tuned our model to match the short-term plasticity profile and band-pass structure of Schaffer collateral synapses, and performed sensitivity analyses to demonstrate that presynaptic voltage-gated ion channels regulated synaptic filters through changes in excitability and associated calcium influx. These sensitivity analyses

  2. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research. PMID:25107282

  3. Cypermethrin Poisoning and Anti-cholinergic Medication- A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 30 years old male was brought to emergency department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal with alleged history of consumption of pyrethroid compound 'cypermethrin'. It was found to be newer insecticide poisoning reported in Nepal. We reported this case to show effectiveness of anti-cholinergic like ...

  4. The cholinergic system, sigma-1 receptors and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K.; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of present knowledge regarding the relationship between the cholinergic system and sigma-1 receptors, and discusses potential applications of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of memory deficits and cognitive disorders. Sigma-1 receptors, initially

  5. RIM determines Ca2+ channel density and vesicle docking at the presynaptic active zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yunyun; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    At presynaptic active zones, neurotransmitter release is initiated by the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels close to docked vesicles. The mechanisms that enrich Ca2+ channels at active zones are, however, largely unknown, possibly because of the limited presynaptic accessibility of most synapses. Here, we have established a Cre-lox based conditional knock-out approach at a presynaptically accessible CNS synapse, the calyx of Held, to directly study the functions of RIM proteins. Removal of all RIM1/2 isoforms strongly reduced the presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, revealing a new role of RIM proteins in Ca2+ channel targeting. Removal of RIMs also reduced the readily-releasable pool, paralleled by a similar reduction of the number of docked vesicles, and the Ca2+ channel - vesicle coupling was decreased. Thus, RIM proteins co-ordinately regulate key functions for fast transmitter release: enabling a high presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, and vesicle docking at the active zone. PMID:21262468

  6. Role of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in presynaptic differentiation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Alejandra R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wnt signaling pathway regulates several fundamental developmental processes and recently has been shown to be involved in different aspects of synaptic differentiation and plasticity. Some Wnt signaling components are localized at central synapses, and it is thus possible that this pathway could be activated at the synapse. Results We examined the distribution of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in cultured hippocampal neurons and determined that this receptor is located at synaptic contacts co-localizing with presynaptic proteins. Frizzled-1 was found in functional synapses detected with FM1-43 staining and in synaptic terminals from adult rat brain. Interestingly, overexpression of Frizzled-1 increased the number of clusters of Bassoon, a component of the active zone, while treatment with the extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD of Frizzled-1 decreased Bassoon clustering, suggesting a role for this receptor in presynaptic differentiation. Consistent with this, treatment with the Frizzled-1 ligand Wnt-3a induced presynaptic protein clustering and increased functional presynaptic recycling sites, and these effects were prevented by co-treatment with the CRD of Frizzled-1. Moreover, in synaptically mature neurons Wnt-3a was able to modulate the kinetics of neurotransmitter release. Conclusion Our results indicate that the activation of the Wnt pathway through Frizzled-1 occurs at the presynaptic level, and suggest that the synaptic effects of the Wnt signaling pathway could be modulated by local activation through synaptic Frizzled receptors.

  7. Cellular mechanisms for presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; delgado-lezama, rodolfo; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt

    (DRP) by stimulating one dorsal root and recording another one. In the presence of a low concentration of tetrodotoxin (100nM) nerve impulses are abolished centrally but remain in nociceptive afferents. Under these conditions, a DRP generated by a non-spiking microcircuit remained. In the presence...... with a 2-photon microscope. Stimulation of primary afferents evoked a transient increase in calcium concentration in a subset of cells. The response disappeared after addition of CNQX. This showed that primary afferents activate astrocytes. In a thin slice preparation, we recorded astrocytes with the whole...

  8. Reduced cholinergic olfactory centrifugal inputs in patients with neurodegenerative disorders and MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiñano, Iñaki-Carril; Hernandez, Maria; Dicaudo, Carla; Ordoñez, Cristina; Marcilla, Irene; Tuñon, Maria-Teresa; Luquin, Maria-Rosario

    2013-09-01

    Olfactory impairment is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Olfactory bulb (OB) pathology in these diseases shows an increased number of olfactory dopaminergic cells, protein aggregates and dysfunction of neurotransmitter systems. Since cholinergic denervation might be a common underlying pathophysiological feature, the objective of this study was to determine cholinergic innervation of the OB in 27 patients with histological diagnosis of PD (n = 5), AD (n = 14), DLB (n = 8) and 8 healthy control subjects. Cholinergic centrifugal inputs to the OB were clearly reduced in all patients, the most significant decrease being in the DLB group. We also studied cholinergic innervation of the OB in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys (n = 7) and 7 intact animals. In MPTP-monkeys, we found that cholinergic innervation of the OB was reduced compared to control animals (n = 7). Interestingly, in MPTP-monkeys, we also detected a loss of cholinergic neurons and decreased dopaminergic innervation in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, which is the origin of the centrifugal cholinergic input to the OB. All these data suggest that cholinergic damage in the OB might contribute, at least in part, to the olfactory dysfunction usually exhibited by these patients. Moreover, decreased cholinergic input to the OB found in MPTP-monkeys suggests that dopamine depletion in itself might reduce the cholinergic tone of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  9. Closing the gap: long-term presynaptic plasticity in brain function and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monday, Hannah R; Castillo, Pablo E

    2017-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity is critical for experience-dependent adjustments of brain function. While most research has focused on the mechanisms that underlie postsynaptic forms of plasticity, comparatively little is known about how neurotransmitter release is altered in a long-term manner. Emerging research suggests that many of the features of canonical 'postsynaptic' plasticity, such as associativity, structural changes and bidirectionality, also characterize long-term presynaptic plasticity. Recent studies demonstrate that presynaptic plasticity is a potent regulator of circuit output and function. Moreover, aberrant presynaptic plasticity is a convergent factor of synaptopathies like schizophrenia, addiction, and Autism Spectrum Disorders, and may be a potential target for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of presynaptic markers in a neurodevelopmental animal model with relevance to schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anna S; Kaalund, Sanne Simone; Møller, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) to rat pups at postnatal day (PND) 7, 9, and 11 [neonatal PCP (neoPCP) model] induces cognitive deficits similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Expression of presynaptic SNARE protein, synaptosomal......-associated protein of 25 kDa (Snap25), has been shown to be downregulated in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia. The present study was designed to investigate the long-term effects of neoPCP administration on expression of presynaptic markers altered in schizophrenia. Using radioactive in...

  11. Increased cholinergic contractions of jejunal smooth muscle caused by a high cholesterol diet are prevented by the 5-HT4 agonist – tegaserod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Eldon

    2006-02-01

    -treatment removed the effects of a high cholesterol diet on neuronal muscarinic receptors, as the potentiating effect of TTX on carbachol-elicited contractions was maintained in these animals. Conclusion A high cholesterol diet causes significant changes to cholinergic neurotransmission in the enteric nerves of the jejunum. The mechanisms by which these effects of cholesterol are reversed by tegaserod are unknown, but relate to removal of an inhibitory effect of cholesterol on enteric nerves.

  12. Cholinergic signaling in the gut: a novel mechanism of barrier protection through activation of enteric glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Gerald A; Costantini, Todd W; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-08-01

    Enteric glia cells (EGCs) play an important role in maintaining proper intestinal barrier function. We have shown that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) increases EGC activation, which is associated with better gut barrier integrity. Enteric neurons communicate with EGCs through nicotinic cholinergic signaling, which may represent a pathway by which VNS activates EGCs. This study sought to define further the mechanism by which VNS prevents intestinal barrier failure using an in vitro model. We hypothesized that a nicotinic cholinergic agonist would increase EGC activation, prevent intestinal nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, and result in better intestinal barrier function. Cultured EGCs were exposed to the nicotinic cholinergic agonist nicotine. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was measured by immunoblot to determine changes in EGC activation. Caco-2 cells were grown to confluence and incubated alone or in co-culture with EGCs. Cells were then stimulated with Cytomix for 24 h in the presence or absence of nicotine, and barrier integrity was assessed by permeability to 4-kDa FITC-dextran. Changes in phosphorylated inhibitor of NF-κb (P-IκBα) and phosphorylated NF-κB (P-NF-κB) were assessed by immunoblot. Stimulation with nicotine resulted in EGC activation, as demonstrated by an increase in GFAP expression. Cytomix stimulation increased permeability in Caco-2 cells cultured alone or with EGCs. Treatment of stimulated Caco-2/EGC co-cultures with nicotine reduced permeability similar to control. Nicotine failed to prevent barrier permeability in Caco-2 cells alone. Co-culture of stimulated Caco-2 cells with nicotine-activated EGCs prevented Cytomix-induced increases in P-IκBα and P-NF-κB expression. A pharmacologic nicotinic cholinergic agonist increased EGC activation and improved intestinal epithelial barrier function in an in vitro model of intestinal injury. Nicotine-activated EGCs appear to modulate barrier function by

  13. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal locomotion-potential target for rehabilitation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Larry M; McVagh, J R; Noga, B R; Cabaj, A M; Majczyński, H; Sławińska, Urszula; Provencher, J; Leblond, H; Rossignol, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a "hyper-cholinergic" state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in suppressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed by our experiments.

  14. Regulation of drugs affecting striatal cholinergic activity by corticostriatal projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladinsky, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research demonstrates that the chronic degeneration of the corticostriatal excitatory pathway makes the cholinergic neurons of the striatum insensitive to the neuropharmacological action of a number of different drugs. Female rats were used; they were killed and after the i.v. infusion of tritium-choline precursor, choline acetyltransferase activity was measured. Striatal noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin content was measured by electrochemical detection coupled with high pressure liquid chromatography. Uptake of tritium-glutamic acid was estimated. The data were analyzed statistically. It is shown that there is evidence that the effects of a number of drugs capable of depressing cholinergic activity through receptor-mediated responses are operative only if the corticostriatal pathway is integral. Neuropharmacological responses in the brain appear to be the result of an interaction between several major neurotransmitter systems

  15. Cholinergic receptor binding in the frontal cortex of suicide victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.

    1986-01-01

    Because there is a high incidence of individuals diagnosed as having an affective disorder who subsequently commit suicide, the author thought it would be of interest to determine QNB binding in the brains of a large sample of suicide victims, and to compare the findings with a well-matched control group. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from 22 suicide victims and 22 controls. Frontal cortex samples were diseected, frozen, and stored until assayed. Samples of tissue homogenate were incubated in duplicate with 10 concentrations of tritium-QNB. Specific binding was determined with and without atropine. The results confirmed previous studies in which no changes were noted in suicide versus control brains. While the findings neither disprove nor support the cholinergic hypothesis of depression, they do suggest that the neurochemical basis for the in vivo observations of increased responsivity of depressed individuals to muscarinic cholinergic agents might not involve changes in receptors estimated by QNB binding

  16. Cholinergic modulation of the hippocampal region and memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Juhee; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2017-08-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in memory function and has been implicated in aging-related dementia, in which the impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning strongly manifests. Cholinergic neurons densely innervate the hippocampus, mediating the formation of episodic as well as semantic memory. Here, we will review recent findings on acetylcholine's modulation of memory function, with a particular focus on hippocampus-dependent learning, and the circuits involved. In addition, we will discuss the complexity of ACh actions in memory function to better understand the physiological role of ACh in memory. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Midazolam-Ketamine Dual Therapy Stops Cholinergic Status Epilepticus And Reduces Morris Water Maze Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niquet, Jerome; Baldwin, Roger; Norman, Keith; Suchomelova, Lucie; Lumley, Lucille; Wasterlain, Claude G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Pharmacoresistance remains an unsolved therapeutic challenge in status epilepticus (SE) and in cholinergic SE induced by nerve agent intoxication. SE triggers a rapid internalization of synaptic GABAA receptors and externalization of NMDA receptors that may explain the loss of potency of standard anti-epileptic drugs (AED). We hypothesized that a drug combination aimed at correcting the consequences of receptor trafficking would reduce SE severity and its long-term consequences. Methods A severe model of SE was induced in adult Sprague-Dawley rats with a high dose of lithium and pilocarpine. The GABAA receptor agonist midazolam, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine and/or the AED valproate were injected 40 min after SE onset in combination or as monotherapy. Measures of SE severity were the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were acute neuronal injury, spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), and Morris water maze (MWM) deficits. Results Midazolam-ketamine dual therapy was more efficient than double-dose midazolam or ketamine monotherapy or than valproate-midazolam or valproate-ketamine dual therapy in reducing several parameters of SE severity, suggesting a synergistic mechanism. In addition, midazolam-ketamine dual therapy reduced SE-induced acute neuronal injury, epileptogenesis and MWM deficits. Significance This study showed that a treatment aimed at correcting maladaptive GABAA receptor and NMDA receptor trafficking can stop SE and reduce its long-term consequences. Early Midazolam-ketamine dual therapy may be superior to monotherapy in the treatment of benzodiazepine-refractory SE. PMID:27500978

  18. Preparation of modulators of cholinesterases and cholinergic receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Röder, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Title: Preparation of modulators of cholinesterases and cholinergic receptors Author: Jan Röder Organophosphorus compounds are widely used as pesticides and were also misused as chemical warfare agents. Up to date, the pre-exposure treatment of organophosphorus compounds intoxication consists in use of carbamate cholinesterase inhibitors. Carbamates act as reversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and thus protect it against irreversible inhibition with organophosphorus compounds. ...

  19. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells of the hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring via dysfunction of cholinergic inputs by myelin vacuolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itahashi, Megu; Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Kimura, Masayuki; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of maternal exposure to HCP on rat hippocampal neurogenesis was examined. • HCP induces myelin vacuolation of nerve tracts in the septal–hippocampal pathway. • Myelin changes suppress Chrnb2-mediated cholinergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. • SGZ apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway and targets type-2b cells. • Dysfunction of cholinergic inputs is related to type-2b SGZ cell apoptosis. - Abstract: Hexachlorophene (HCP) is known to induce myelin vacuolation corresponding to intramyelinic edema of nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system in animals. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 100, or 300 ppm HCP in the diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, the numbers of T box brain 2 + progenitor cells and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling + apoptotic cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) decreased in female offspring at 300 ppm, which was accompanied by myelin vacuolation and punctate tubulin beta-3 chain staining of nerve fibers in the hippocampal fimbria. In addition, transcript levels of the cholinergic receptor, nicotinic beta 2 (Chrnb2) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP-exposure did not alter the numbers of SGZ proliferating cells and reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneuron subpopulations in the dentate hilus on PND 21 and PND 77. Although some myelin vacuolation remained, all other changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77. These results suggest that maternal HCP exposure reversibly decreases type-2b intermediate-stage progenitor cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in offspring hippocampal neurogenesis at 300 ppm HCP. Neurogenesis may be affected by dysfunction

  20. Calcium Assists Dopamine Release by Preventing Aggregation on the Inner Leaflet of Presynaptic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokkila, Sini; Postila, Pekka A.; Rissanen, Sami

    2017-01-01

    . The inner leaflets of presynaptic vesicles, which are responsible for releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft, are mainly composed of neutral lipids such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The neutrality of the lipid head group region, enhanced by a low pH level, should limit...

  1. Presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: the findings, the debate, the therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Angela eCenci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine precursor L-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson´s disease (PD for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes during the progression of PD, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements and motor fluctuations within a few years of L-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal dopamine transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large dopamine swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma L-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in dopamine transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the dopamine transporter, aberrant release of dopamine from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from dopamine play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  2. Neto Auxiliary Subunits Regulate Interneuron Somatodendritic and Presynaptic Kainate Receptors to Control Network Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S. Wyeth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Netos are considered auxiliary subunits critical for kainate receptor (KAR function, direct evidence for their regulation of native KARs is limited. Because Neto KAR regulation is GluK subunit/Neto isoform specific, such regulation must be determined in cell-type-specific contexts. We demonstrate Neto1/2 expression in somatostatin (SOM-, cholecystokinin/cannabinoid receptor 1 (CCK/CB1-, and parvalbumin (PV-containing interneurons. KAR-mediated excitation of these interneurons is contingent upon Neto1 because kainate yields comparable effects in Neto2 knockouts and wild-types but fails to excite interneurons or recruit inhibition in Neto1 knockouts. In contrast, presynaptic KARs in CCK/CB1 interneurons are dually regulated by both Neto1 and Neto2. Neto association promotes tonic presynaptic KAR activation, dampening CCK/CB1 interneuron output, and loss of this brake in Neto mutants profoundly increases CCK/CB1 interneuron-mediated inhibition. Our results confirm that Neto1 regulates endogenous somatodendritic KARs in diverse interneurons and demonstrate Neto regulation of presynaptic KARs in mature inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

  3. Local gene expression in nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Marianna; Chun, Jong Tai; Cefaliello, Carolina; Perrone Capano, Carla; Giuditta, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    At the Nobel lecture for physiology in 1906, Ramón y Cajal famously stated that "the nerve elements possess reciprocal relationships in contiguity but not in continuity," summing up the neuron doctrine. Sixty years later, by the time the central dogma of molecular biology formulated the axis of genetic information flow from DNA to mRNA, and then to protein, it became obvious that neurons with extensive ramifications and long axons inevitably incur an innate problem: how can the effect of gene expression be extended from the nucleus to the remote and specific sites of the cell periphery? The most straightforward solution would be to deliver soma-produced proteins to the target sites. The influential discovery of axoplasmic flow has supported this scheme of protein supply. Alternatively, mRNAs can be dispatched instead of protein, and translated locally at the strategic target sites. Over the past decades, such a local system of protein synthesis has been demonstrated in dendrites, axons, and presynaptic terminals. Moreover, the local protein synthesis in neurons might even involve intercellular trafficking of molecules. The innovative concept of glia-neuron unit suggests that the local protein synthesis in the axonal and presynaptic domain of mature neurons is sustained by a local supply of RNAs synthesized in the surrounding glial cells and transferred to these domains. Here, we have reviewed some of the evidence indicating the presence of a local system of protein synthesis in axon terminals, and have examined its regulation in various model systems. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. PET study of cholinergic system in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a method to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, a functional marker for cholinergic system, by positron emission tomography (PET) and carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate. Kinetic analysis of the radioactivity in the brain and the plasma yielded a rate constant ''k 3'' as an index of AChE activity. The ratios for the k 3 values for the cerebral cortex/thalamus/cerebellum/striatum found in healthy participants were 1/ 3/ 8/ 10, respectively, corresponding well with AChE activity ratios in the brain at necropsy (1/ 3/ 8/ 38), except for the striatum. In 23 healthy volunteers (age range: 24-89 years), there was no age-related decline of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex, suggesting AChE activity is preserved in aged cerebral cortex. In 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, there was a significant reduction (-24%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, suggesting a loss of ascending cholinergic system from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In 16 patients with Parkinson's disease, there was a significant reduction (-18%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with progressive supra nuclear palsy, there was a significant reduction (-38%) of k 3 values in the thalamus. This technique is useful for investigating central cholinergic system in neuro degenerative disorders with dementia. (author)

  5. PET study of cholinergic system in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a method to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, a functional marker for cholinergic system, by positron emission tomography (PET) and carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate. Kinetic analysis of the radioactivity in the brain and the plasma yielded a rate constant ``k 3`` as an index of AChE activity. The ratios for the k 3 values for the cerebral cortex/thalamus/cerebellum/striatum found in healthy participants were 1/ 3/ 8/ 10, respectively, corresponding well with AChE activity ratios in the brain at necropsy (1/ 3/ 8/ 38), except for the striatum. In 23 healthy volunteers (age range: 24-89 years), there was no age-related decline of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex, suggesting AChE activity is preserved in aged cerebral cortex. In 11 patients with Alzheimer`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-24%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, suggesting a loss of ascending cholinergic system from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In 16 patients with Parkinson`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-18%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with progressive supra nuclear palsy, there was a significant reduction (-38%) of k 3 values in the thalamus. This technique is useful for investigating central cholinergic system in neuro degenerative disorders with dementia. (author)

  6. Role of cholinergic receptors in melanophore responses of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A S; Peter, J; Ali, S A

    1995-01-01

    Responses of isolated skin melanophores of Rana tigerina and Bufo melanostictus to cholinergic drugs were studied using the Mean Melanophore Size Index assay to explore the nature and role of cellular receptors in melanophore regulation activity. Acetylcholine (Ach) in a concentration of 10(-7) to 6.4 x 10(-6) g/ml caused dispersion of the skin melanophores of R. tigerina and B. melanostictus. These effects were blocked by both atropine and hyoscine in a concentration of 8 x 10(-6) g/ml each. Eserine augmented the melanophore dispersal effects of Ach. This potentiation of the dispersal effect of Ach by eserine was also antagonised by hyoscine. Carbachol another specific cholinergic agonist significantly caused dispersion of the melanophores of both the amphibian species. The effects were also blocked by atropine and hyoscine. These data indicate that cholinergic receptors of muscarinic type are present on the melanophores of R. tigerina and B. melanostictus which mediate dispersion of integumental melanophores leading to darkening of the skin.

  7. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  8. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal locomotion—potential target for rehabilitation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Larry M.; McVagh, J. R.; Noga, B. R.; Cabaj, A. M.; Majczyński, H.; Sławińska, Urszula; Provencher, J.; Leblond, H.; Rossignol, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a “hyper-cholinergic” state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in suppressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed by our

  9. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  10. Effects of Pyridostigmine in Flinders Line Rats Differing in Cholinergic Sensitivity (AIBS GWI 0055)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overstreet, David

    1999-01-01

    .... The second aim was to determine whether pyridostigmine had prophylactic effects against the organophosphates chlorpyrifos and diisopropylfluorophosphate regardless of innate cholinergic sensitivity...

  11. Development of myenteric cholinergic neurons in ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Marlene M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2013-10-01

    Cholinergic neurons are the major excitatory neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and include intrinsic sensory neurons, interneurons, and excitatory motor neurons. Cholinergic neurons have been detected in the embryonic ENS; however, the development of these neurons has been difficult to study as they are difficult to detect prior to birth using conventional immunohistochemistry. In this study we used ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice to examine the development of cholinergic neurons in the gut of embryonic and postnatal mice. Cholinergic (YFP+) neurons were first detected at embryonic day (E)11.5, and the proportion of cholinergic neurons gradually increased during pre- and postnatal development. At birth, myenteric cholinergic neurons comprised less than half of their adult proportions in the small intestine (25% of myenteric neurons were YFP+ at P0 compared to 62% in adults). The earliest cholinergic neurons appear to mainly project anally. Projections into the presumptive circular muscle were first observed at E14.5. A subpopulation of cholinergic neurons coexpress calbindin through embryonic and postnatal development, but only a small proportion coexpressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Our study shows that cholinergic neurons in the ENS develop over a protracted period of time. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Inter-channel scaffolding of presynaptic CaV2.2 via the C terminal PDZ ligand domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiha R. Gardezi

    2013-04-01

    Calcium entry through CaV2.2 calcium channels clustered at the active zone (AZ of the presynaptic nerve terminal gates synaptic vesicle (SV fusion and the discharge of neurotransmitters, but the mechanism of channel scaffolding remains poorly understood. Recent studies have implicated the binding of a PDZ ligand domain (PDZ-LD at the tip of the channel C terminal to a partner PDZ domain on RIM1/2, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein. To explore CaV2.2 scaffolding, we created intracellular region fusion proteins and used these to test for binding by ‘fishing’ for native CaV2.2 channels from cell lysates. Fusion proteins mimicking the distal half of the channel C terminal (C3strep reliably captured CaV2.2 from whole brain crude membrane or purified synaptosome membrane lysates, whereas channel I–II loop or the distal half of the II–III loop proteins were negative. This capture could be replicated in a non-synaptic environment using CaV2.2 expressed in a cell line. The distal tip PDZ-LD, DDWC-COOH, was confirmed as the critical binding site by block of pull-down with mimetic peptides. Pull-down experiments using brain crude membrane lysates confirmed that RIM1/2 can bind to the DDWC PDZ-LD. However, robust CaV2.2 capture was observed from synaptosome membrane or in the cell line expression system with little or no RIM1/2 co-capture. Thus, we conclude that CaV2.2 channels can scaffold to each other via an interaction that involves the PDZ-LD by an inter-channel linkage bridged by an unknown protein.

  13. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  14. The presynaptic microtubule cytoskeleton in physiological and pathological conditions: lessons from Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bodaleo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models.

  15. Neurotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Envenoming is Primarily due to U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a, a Pre-Synaptic Neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anjana; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Othman, Iekhsan; Goode, Robert J A; Hodgson, Wayne C; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2017-01-01

    Russell's vipers are snakes of major medical importance in Asia. Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming in Sri Lanka and South India leads to a unique, mild neuromuscular paralysis, not seen in other parts of the world where the snake is found. This study aimed to identify and pharmacologically characterise the major neurotoxic components of Sri Lankan Russell's viper venom. Venom was fractionated using size exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). In vitro neurotoxicities of the venoms, fractions and isolated toxins were measured using chick biventer and rat hemidiaphragm preparations. A phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ) toxin, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a (13.6 kDa), which constitutes 19.2 % of the crude venom, was isolated and purified using HPLC. U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a produced concentration-dependent in vitro neurotoxicity abolishing indirect twitches in the chick biventer nerve-muscle preparation, with a t 90 of 55 ± 7 min only at 1 μM. The toxin did not abolish responses to acetylcholine and carbachol indicating pre-synaptic neurotoxicity. Venom, in the absence of U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a, did not induce in vitro neurotoxicity. Indian polyvalent antivenom, at the recommended concentration, only partially prevented the neurotoxic effects of U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a was the basic S-type PLA 2 toxin previously identified from this venom (NCBI-GI: 298351762; SwissProt: P86368). The present study demonstrates that neurotoxicity following Sri Lankan Russell's viper envenoming is primarily due to the pre-synaptic neurotoxin U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a. Mild neurotoxicity observed in severely envenomed Sri Lankan Russell's viper bites is most likely due to the low potency of U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a, despite its high relative abundance in the venom.

  16. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  17. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli Prevents Severe Scalds-Induced Gut Ischemia and Paralysis by Activating the Cholinergic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn injuries may result in gastrointestinal paralysis, and barrier dysfunction due to gut ischemia and lowered vagus excitability. In this study we investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA at Zusanli (ST36 could prevent severe scalds-induced gut ischemia, paralysis, and barrier dysfunction and whether the protective role of EA at ST36 is related to the vagus nerve. 35% burn area rats were divided into six groups: (a EAN: EA nonchannel acupoints followed by scald injury; (b EA: EA at ST36 after scald injury; (c VGX/EA: vagotomy (VGX before EA at ST36 and scald injury; (d VGX/EAN: VGX before EAN and scald injury; (e atropine/EA: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at ST36; (f atropine/EAN: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at nonchannel acupoints. EA at the Zusanli point significantly promoted the intestinal impelling ratio and increased the amount of mucosal blood flow after scald injury. The plasma diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal permeability decreased significantly after scald injury in the EA group compared with others. However, EA after atropine injection or cervical vagotomy failed to improve intestinal motility and mucosa blood flow suggesting that the mechanism of EA may be related to the activation of the cholinergic nerve pathway.

  18. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  19. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of cholinergic amacrine cells in the bat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Bee; Gu, Ya-Nan; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to localize the cholinergic amacrine cells, one of the key elements of a functional retina, in the retina of a microbat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. The presence and localization of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive (ChAT-IR) cells in the microbat retina were investigated using immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, and quantitative analysis. These ChAT-IR cells were present in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner part of the inner nuclear layer (INL), as previously reported in various animals. However, the bat retina also contained some ChAT-IR cells in the outer part of the INL. The dendrites of these cells extended into the outer plexiform layer, and those of the cells in the inner INL extended within the outer part of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). The dendrites of the ChAT-IR cells in the GCL extended into the middle of the IPL and some fibers ramified up to the outer IPL. The average densities of ChAT-IR cells in the GCL, inner INL, and outer INL were 259±31cells/mm 2 , 469±48cells/mm 2 , and 59±8cells/mm 2 , respectively. The average total density of the ChAT-IR cells was 788±58cells/mm 2 (mean±S.D.; n=3; 2799±182 cells/retina). We also found that the cholinergic amacrine cells in the bat retina contained calbindin, one of the calcium-binding proteins, but not calretinin or parvalbumin. As the cholinergic amacrine cells play key roles in the direction selectivity and optokinetic eye reflex in the other mammalian retinas, the present study might provide better information of the cytoarchitecture of bat retina and the basic sources for further physiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholinergic interneurons are differentially distributed in the human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2007-11-14

    The striatum (caudate nucleus, CN, and putamen, Put) is a group of subcortical nuclei involved in planning and executing voluntary movements as well as in cognitive processes. Its neuronal composition includes projection neurons, which connect the striatum with other structures, and interneurons, whose main roles are maintaining the striatal organization and the regulation of the projection neurons. The unique electrophysiological and functional properties of the cholinergic interneurons give them a crucial modulating function on the overall striatal response. This study was carried out using stereological methods to examine the volume and density (cells/mm(3)) of these interneurons, as visualized by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity, in the following territories of the CN and Put of nine normal human brains: 1) precommissural head; 2) postcommissural head; 3) body; 4) gyrus and 5) tail of the CN; 6) precommissural and 7) postcommissural Put. The distribution of ChAT interneurons was analyzed with respect to the topographical, functional and chemical territories of the dorsal striatum. The CN was more densely populated by cholinergic neurons than the Put, and their density increased along the anteroposterior axis of the striatum with the CN body having the highest neuronal density. The associative territory of the dorsal striatum was by far the most densely populated. The striosomes of the CN precommissural head and the postcommissural Put contained the greatest number of ChAT-ir interneurons. The intrastriosomal ChAT-ir neurons were abundant on the periphery of the striosomes throughout the striatum. All these data reveal that cholinergic interneurons are differentially distributed in the distinct topographical and functional territories of the human dorsal striatum, as well as in its chemical compartments. This heterogeneity may indicate that the posterior aspects of the CN require a special integration of information by interneurons

  2. Water vapour loss threshold and induction of cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupker, R A; Doeglas, H M

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with cholinergic urticaria (CU) in whom the symptoms could be provoked by gustatory stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a threshold of sweating (monitored by skin water vapour loss (SVL) measurements) at which CU can be provoked. Provocations with lemon and sal-ammoniac liquorice induced transient sweating differing both in degree and duration. Only 'doubly salted' liquorice, which caused the most intense sweat response, resulted in urticarial lesions. This findings suggest a threshold dependency for the induction of CU. SVL measurement may be a useful method for the evaluation of sweating tests in CU patients.

  3. DYSFUNCTIONAL PRESYNAPTIC ALPHA-2-ADRENOCEPTORS EXPOSE FACILITATORY BETA-2-ADRENOCEPTORS IN THE VASCULATURE OF SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REMIE, R; VANROSSUM, JXM; COPPES, RP; ZAAGSMA, J

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have yielded inconsistent information about functional aberrations of the presynaptic alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of sympathetic neurotransmitter release. In the present investigation we studied the capacity of

  4. Presynaptic Ionotropic Receptors Controlling and Modulating the Rules for Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs B. Verhoog

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, activity-dependent changes in neuronal connection strength enable the brain to refine neural circuits and learn based on experience. In line with predictions made by Hebb, synapse strength can be modified depending on the millisecond timing of action potential firing (STDP. The sign of synaptic plasticity depends on the spike order of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors, such as NMDA receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, are intimately involved in setting the rules for synaptic strengthening and weakening. In addition, timing rules for STDP within synapses are not fixed. They can be altered by activation of ionotropic receptors located at, or close to, synapses. Here, we will highlight studies that uncovered how network actions control and modulate timing rules for STDP by activating presynaptic ionotropic receptors. Furthermore, we will discuss how interaction between different types of ionotropic receptors may create “timing” windows during which particular timing rules lead to synaptic changes.

  5. Immobilization induces changes in presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    Neural plasticity occurs throughout adult life in response to maturation, use and disuse. Recent studies have documented that H-reflex amplitudes increase following a period of immobilization. To elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the increase in H-reflex size following immobilization we...... immobilized the left foot and ankle joint for 2 weeks in 12 able-bodied subjects. Disynaptic reciprocal inhibition of soleus (SOL) motoneurones and presynaptic control of SOL group Ia afferents was measured before and after the immobilization as well as following 2 weeks of recovery. Following immobilization...... inhibition of SOL Ia afferents and taken together suggest that GABAergic presynaptic inhibition of the SOL Ia afferents is decreased following 2 weeks of immobilization. The depression of the SOL H-reflex when evoked at intervals shorter than 10 s (homosynaptic post-activation depression) also decreased...

  6. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: DMH cholinergic neurons directly send efferent signals to sympathetic premotor neurons in the Rpa. Elevated cholinergic input to this area reduces BAT activity through activation of M2 mAChRs on serotonergic neurons. Therefore, the direct DMHACh–Rpa5-HT pathway may mediate physiological heat-defense responses to elevated environmental temperature.

  7. 123-I ioflupane (Datscan) presynaptic nigrostriatal imaging in patients with movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano Castrejon, Angel; Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Cortes Romera, Montserrat; Rodado Marina, Sonia; Poblete Garcia, Victor Manuel; Ruiz Solis, Sebastian Ruiz; Talavera Rubio, Maria del Prado; Vaamonde Cano, Julia

    2005-01-01

    123-I Ioflupane (Datscan) presynaptic imaging has been shown to have a significant utility in the assessment of patients with movement disorders 123 I Ioflupane SPECT is able to distinguish between Parkinson's disease (PD) and other forms of parkinsonism without degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, including a common movement disorder such as essential tremor, and to assess disease progression in PD and other neuro degenerative disorders involving the substantia nigra. (author)

  8. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    and 280nm using a BioMate 5 UV- visible spectrophotometer (Thermo Spectronic, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA). The integrity of the extracted RNA was...presynaptic P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channel to reduce glutamate release. In a different study, local perfusion with LEV (10, 30 and 100M) alone...the brain was used for protein expression analysis (western blotting) as described above while the other hemisphere was used for mRNA extraction . As

  9. Presynaptic active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: Nanoarchitecture and selective impairments in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Yomna; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    Neurotransmitter release occurs at active zones, which are specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane. A dense collection of proteins at the active zone provides a platform for molecular interactions that promote recruitment, docking, and priming of synaptic vesicles. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), muscle-derived laminin β2 interacts with presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels to organize active zones. The molecular architecture of presynaptic active zones has been revealed using super-resolution microscopy techniques that combine nanoscale resolution and multiple molecular identification. Interestingly, the active zones of adult NMJs are not stable structures and thus become impaired during aging due to the selective degeneration of specific active zone proteins. This review will discuss recent progress in the understanding of active zone nanoarchitecture and the mechanisms underlying active zone organization in mammalian NMJs. Furthermore, we will summarize the age-related degeneration of active zones at NMJs, and the role of exercise in maintaining active zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Alternative Splicing of P/Q-Type Ca2+ Channels Shapes Presynaptic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Thalhammer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is prominent in the mammalian brain, where it is thought to expand proteome diversity. For example, alternative splicing of voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC α1 subunits can generate thousands of isoforms with differential properties and expression patterns. However, the impact of this molecular diversity on brain function, particularly on synaptic transmission, which crucially depends on VGCCs, is unclear. Here, we investigate how two major splice isoforms of P/Q-type VGCCs (Cav2.1[EFa/b] regulate presynaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. We find that the efficacy of P/Q-type VGCC isoforms in supporting synaptic transmission is markedly different, with Cav2.1[EFa] promoting synaptic depression and Cav2.1[EFb] synaptic facilitation. Following a reduction in network activity, hippocampal neurons upregulate selectively Cav2.1[EFa], the isoform exhibiting the higher synaptic efficacy, thus effectively supporting presynaptic homeostatic plasticity. Therefore, the balance between VGCC splice variants at the synapse is a key factor in controlling neurotransmitter release and presynaptic plasticity.

  11. Protein synthesizing units in presynaptic and postsynaptic domains of squid neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R; Vaida, B; Bleher, R; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A

    1998-11-01

    Putative protein synthesizing domains, called plaques, are characterized in the squid giant synapse and axon and in terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons. Plaques are oval-shaped formations of about 1 microm in size, which (1) generate signals that have spectroscopic electron energy loss characteristics of ribosomes, (2) exhibit ribonuclease-sensitive binding of YOYO-1, a fluorescent RNA/DNA dye, and (3) in part hybridize with a poly(dT) oligonucleotide. In the giant synapse plaques are abundant in the postsynaptic area, but are absent in the presynaptic terminal. In the cortical layer of the optic lobes, plaques are localized in the large carrot-shaped presynaptic terminals of photoreceptor neurons, where they are surrounded by synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. Biochemical and autoradiographic data have documented that the protein synthetic activity of squid optic lobe synaptosomes is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neurons. The identification of ribosomes and poly(A+)-mRNA in the plaques indicates that these structures are sites of local protein synthesis in synaptic domains.

  12. Regarding the unitary theory of agonist and antagonist action at presynaptic adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, S; Abdali, S A

    2001-06-01

    1. The linkage between potentiation of field stimulation-induced noradrenaline release and blockade of the presynaptic inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline by a presynaptic antagonist was examined in superfused rabbit aorta preparations. 2. Rauwolscine clearly potentiated the release of noradrenaline in response to 100 pulses at 2 Hz but reduced the capacity of noradrenaline to inhibit transmitter release to a questionable extent, and then only when comparisons were made with untreated, rather then to rauwolscine-treated, controls. 3. Aortic preparations exposed for 60 min to rauwolscine followed by superfusion with antagonist-free Krebs for 60 min retained the potentiation of stimulation-induced transmitter release but no antagonism of the noradrenaline-induced inhibition could be detected at either of two noradrenaline concentrations when comparisons were made with rauwolscine treated controls. 4. Comparisons of the inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline (1.8 x 10-6 M) on transmitter efflux in the presence and absence of rauwolscine pretreatment revealed that the antagonist enhanced rather than antagonized the presynaptic inhibition by noradrenaline. 5 It is concluded that the unitary hypothesis that asserts that antagonist enhancement of transmitter release and its blockade of noradrenaline induced inhibition are manifestations of a unitary event are not supportable.

  13. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L. Dobson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia.

  14. Evidence against the unitary hypothesis of agonist and antagonist action at presynaptic adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, S.

    1982-01-01

    1 The concept that presynaptic receptors regulate noradrenergic transmitter release via a system of inhibitory receptors mediating negative feedback relies on a supposed association between increases in stimulation-induced efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline by antagonists and blockade by them of the inhibitory effects of exogenous noradrenaline. 2 It was shown in guinea-pig ureter, that yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M), a presumed selective presynaptic antagonist, increased transmitter efflux substantially at 1 Hz and 5 Hz with 100 pulses, purportedly representing antagonism of the inhibitory effect of locally released noradrenaline but did not reduce the inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline (1.8 X 10(-6)M or 1.8 X 10(-7)M) except in one case. 3 Additionally, the inhibitory effect of oxymetazoline (1.0 X 10(-7)M or 1.0 X 10(-8)M) on stimulation-induced efflux was in no way antagonized by yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M). 4 It is concluded that the increased efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline produced by antagonists and the decreased efflux produced by exogenous agonists may represent actions at different loci and that the hypothesis of presynaptic feedback regulatory sites is still not substantiated. PMID:6128040

  15. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  16. Long-term Relationships between Cholinergic Tone, Synchronous Bursting and Synaptic Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Maya; Corner, Michael A.; Ziv, Noam E.

    2012-01-01

    Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity), followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited. PMID:22911726

  17. Deoxycholic acid conjugates are muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Chen, Ying; Zimniak, Piotr; Cheng, Kunrong

    2002-08-01

    In the course of examining the actions of major human bile acids on cholinergic receptors, we discovered that conjugates of lithocholic acid are partial muscarinic agonists. In the present communication, we report that conjugates of deoxycholic acid (DC) act as cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonists. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing rat M3-muscarinic receptors were used to test bile acids for inhibition of radioligand [N- (3)H-methylscopolamine ((3)H-NMS)] binding; alteration of inositol phosphate (IP) formation; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation and cell toxicity. We observed approximately 18.8, 30.3 and 37.1% inhibition of (3)H-NMS binding with DC and its glycine (DCG) and taurine (DCT) conjugates, respectively (all 100 micromol/l, p exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase release from CHO-M3 cells. We observed the following rank order of potency (IC(50) micromol/l) for inhibition of (3)H-NMS by muscarinic antagonists and bile acids: NMS (0.0004) > 4-DAMP (0.009) > atropine (0.012) > DCT (170) > DCG (250). None of the bile acids tested were hydrolyzed by recombinant cholinesterase. At concentrations achieved in human bile, DC derivatives are natural muscarinic antagonists. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Somatostatin modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in canine antral muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelbel, C.B.; van Deventer, G.; Khawaja, S.; Mogard, M.; Walsh, J.H.; Mayer, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin has been shown to inhibit antral motility in vivo. To examine the effect of somatostatin on cholinergic neurotransmission in the canine antrum, we studied the mechanical response of and the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine from canine longitudinal antral muscle in response to substance P, gastrin 17, and electrical stimulation. In unstimulated tissues, somatostatin had a positive inotropic effect on spontaneous phasic contractions. In tissues stimulated with substance P and gastrin 17, but not with electrical stimulation, somatostatin inhibited the phasic inotropic response dose dependently. This inhibitory effect was abolished by indomethacin. Somatostatin stimulated the release of prostaglandin E 2 radioimmunoreactivity, and prostaglandin E 2 inhibited the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. Somatostatin increased the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine from unstimulated tissues by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive mechanism but inhibited the release induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. These results suggest that somatostatin has a dual modulatory effect on cholinergic neutrotransmission in canine longitudinal antral muscle. This effect is excitatory in unstimulated tissues and inhibitory in stimulated tissues. The inhibitory effect is partially mediated by prostaglandins

  19. Cholinergic transmission underlies modulation of frustration by open field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Mustaca, Alba; Justel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Frustration can be defined as an emotional state generated by the omission or devaluation in the quantity or quality of an expected appetitive reward. Thus, reactivity to a reward is affected by prior experience with the different reinforcer values of that reward. This phenomenon is known as incentive relativity, and can be studied by different paradigms. Although methodologically simple, the exploration of a novel open field (OF) is a complex situation that involves several behavioral processes, including stress induction and novelty detection. OF exposure can enhance or block the acquisition of associative and non-associative memories. These experiments evaluated the effect of OF exploration on frustration and the role played by the cholinergic system in this phenomenon. OF exploration before first or second trial of incentive downshift modulated the expression of frustration. This effect of OF was blocked by the administration of scopolamine either before or after OF exploration. These results indicate that the cholinergic system is involved in the acquisition and consolidation of OF information.

  20. Starburst cholinergic amacrine cells in the tree shrew retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, D; Engelmann, R; Peichl, L

    1997-12-08

    In all mammalian retinae studied to date, starburst cholinergic amacrine cells are a consistently occurring cell type. Here, we show that the cone-dominated retina of the tree shrew also has starburst cells with the characteristic radially symmetric branching pattern known from other species. Dendritic field sizes increase from 150 microm in the central retina to 300 microm in the retinal periphery. The characteristic morphology is established early during postnatal development. Labelling the starburst cholinergic cells with an antibody against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) reveals two dendritic strata in the inner plexiform layer and two corresponding soma populations in the inner nuclear layer (orthotopic) and ganglion cell layer (displaced). These features are present in the adult and in early postnatal stages. In the adult, the density of the orthotopic population as well as the displaced population peaks in the central retina at about 2,200 cells/mm2 and has a peripheral minimum of 400 cells/mm2. These properties are qualitatively similar to those of starburst cells in rod-dominated retinae. In contrast to findings in other mammals, we did not see gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65) immunoreactivity in tree shrew starburst cells. These cells also appear to lack synaptophysin, a ubiquitous synaptic vesicle protein detected in the starburst cells of some other mammals. However, synaptoporin, a homologous synaptic vesicle protein, appears to be present in tree shrew starburst cells.

  1. A reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves.

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    Benjamin Lansdell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs, whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability.

  2. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

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    Olga Gajewska-Woźniak

    Full Text Available The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG. LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models

  3. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    project was to develop an alternative to autologous nerve grafts used in repair of peripheral nerve injuries in war and civilian life. Based on our...gradient compositions tested in Aim 1 in preparation to studies in the large animal model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . As it was not...this specific aim was to test the efficacy of optimized nanofiber nerve guide in a canine model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . Peripheral nerve

  4. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus.

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    Jae Hoon Jeong

    Full Text Available The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat.

  6. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  7. Cholinergic markers in elderly patients with early signs of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K L; Mohs, R C; Marin, D; Purohit, D P; Perl, D P; Lantz, M; Austin, G; Haroutunian, V

    1999-04-21

    A central tenet of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the loss of cortical cholinergic function and cholinergic markers in postmortem brain specimens. Whether these profound deficits in cholinergic markers found in end-stage patients are also found in patients with much earlier disease is not known. To determine whether cholinergic deficits in AD precede, follow, or occur in synchrony with the earliest signs of cognitive deterioration. Postmortem study of nursing home residents with Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale scores of 0.0 to 2.0 and 4.0 to 5.0 who underwent autopsy between 1986 and 1997, comparing the activity of the cholinergic marker enzymes in the cortices of 66 elderly subjects with no (CDR score = 0.0; n = 18), questionable (CDR score = 0.5; n = 11), mild (CDR score = 1.0; n = 22), or moderate (CDR score = 2.0; n = 15) dementia vs subjects with severe dementia (CDR score = 4.0-5.0; n = 15). Activity of the cholinergic marker enzymes choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase in 9 neocortical brain regions. The activity of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase in 9 neocortical brain regions did not differ significantly in subjects with CDR scores of 0.0 to 2.0, but was significantly lower in subjects with severe dementia (CDR score = 4.0-5.0). Choline acetyltransferase levels were significantly correlated with severity of neuropathological lesions of AD, as measured by density of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Although neocortical cholinergic deficits are characteristic of severely demented AD patients, in this study, cholinergic deficits were not apparent in individuals with mild AD and were not present until relatively late in the course of the disease. These results suggest that patients with more severe disease should be a target for cholinergic treatment.

  8. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Numbness in your ...

  10. The involvement of cholinergic neurons in the spreading of tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eSimon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Long time ago, it was described the selective loss of cholinergic neurons during the development of Alzheimer disease. Recently, it has been suggested that tau protein may play a role in that loss of cholinergic neurons through a mechanism involving the interaction of extracellular tau with M1/M3 muscarinic receptors present in the cholinergic neurons. This interaction between tau and muscarinic receptors may be a way, although not the only one, to explain the spreading of tau pathology occurring in Alzheimer disease.

  11. Cholinergic symptoms and QTc prolongation following donepezil overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, A; Shay, C; Redha, W; Aalam, A; Mazer-Amirshahi, M

    2017-09-01

    Donepezil is the most commonly prescribed acetylcholinesterase inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, an ailment that affects millions of older adult patients. By inhibiting the breakdown of acetylcholine in the central nervous system, donepezil has been shown to slow cognitive decline and improve patients' functional status. While donepezil is well-tolerated and generally considered safe at therapeutic doses, taking more than the prescribed dose could result in adverse cholinergic effects that range from mild gastrointestinal distress to serious cardiac dysrhythmias. We present a case of an 84-year-old man who developed gastrointestinal and cardiac disturbances after ingesting seven-times his daily dose of donepezil. As no specific antidote is available for donepezil overdose, this case highlights the importance of supportive care with particular attention to the management of cardiac dysrhythmias in patients displaying signs of toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the medial geniculate body in guinea pigs

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    Susan D Motts

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The midbrain tegmentum is the source of cholinergic innervation of the thalamus and has been associated with arousal and control of the sleep/wake cycle. In general, the innervation arises bilaterally from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT. While this pattern has been observed for many thalamic nuclei, a projection from the LDT to the medial geniculate body (MG has been questioned in some species. We combined retrograde tracing with immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT to identify cholinergic projections from the brainstem to the MG in guinea pigs. Double-labeled cells (retrograde and immunoreactive for ChAT were found in both the PPT (74% and the LDT (26%. In both nuclei, double-labeled cells were more numerous on the ipsilateral side. About half of the retrogradely labeled cells were immunonegative, suggesting they are non-cholinergic. The distribution of these immunonegative cells was similar to that of the immunopositive ones: more were in the PPT than the LDT and more were on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side. The results indicate that both the PPT and the LDT project to the MG, and suggest that both cholinergic and non-cholinergic cells contribute substantially to these projections.

  14. The amyloid precursor protein – a novel player within the molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines

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    Melanie eLassek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years ago the amyloid precursor protein (APP was identified as the precursor protein of the Aβ peptide, the main component of senile plaques in brains affected by Alzheimer´s disease. The pathophysiology of AD, characterized by a massive loss of synapses, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes was in principle attributed to the accumulation of Aβ. Within the last decades, much effort has gone into understanding the molecular basis of the progression of Alzheimer´s disease. However, little is known about the actual physiological function of amyloid precursor proteins. Allocating APP to the proteome of the structurally and functionally dynamic presynaptic active zone highlights APP as a hitherto unknown player within the setting of the presynapse. The molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines comprising the life cycle of synaptic vesicles, exo- and endocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and mitochondrial activity provides a balance between structural and functional maintenance and diversity. The generation of genetically designed mouse models further deciphered APP as an essential player in synapse formation and plasticity. Deletion of APP causes an age-dependent phenotype: while younger mice revealed almost no physiological impairments, this condition was changed in the elderly mice. Interestingly, the proteomic composition of neurotransmitter release sites already revealed substantial changes at young age. These changes point to a network that incorporates APP into a cluster of nanomachines. Currently, the underlying mechanism of how APP acts within these machines is still elusive. Within the scope of this review, we shall construct a network of APP interaction partners within the presynaptic active zone. Furthermore, we intend to outline how deletion of APP affects this network during space and time leading to impairments in learning and memory. These alterations may provide a molecular link to the pathogenesis of

  15. RIM proteins tether Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S.; Deng, Lunbin; Wang, Yun; Dulubova, Irina; Liu, Xinran; Rizo, Josep; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY At a synapse, fast synchronous neurotransmitter release requires localization of Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones. How Ca2+-channels are recruited to active zones, however, remains unknown. Using unbiased yeast two-hybrid screens, we here identify a direct interaction of the central PDZ-domain of the active-zone protein RIM with the C-termini of presynaptic N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels, but not L-type Ca2+-channels. To test the physiological significance of this interaction, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking all presynaptic RIM isoforms. Deletion of all RIMs ablated most neurotransmitter release by simultaneously impairing the priming of synaptic vesicles and by decreasing the presynaptic localization of Ca2+-channels. Strikingly, rescue of the decreased Ca2+-channel localization required the RIM PDZ-domain, whereas rescue of vesicle priming required the RIM N-terminus. We propose that RIMs tether N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain mediated interaction, thereby enabling fast, synchronous triggering of neurotransmitter release at a synapse. PMID:21241895

  16. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Kryukova, Elena V; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Shelukhina, Irina V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Faure, Grazyna; Zouridakis, Marios; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which should be proved by

  17. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Vulfius

    Full Text Available Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which

  18. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  19. Optimizing cholinergic tone through lynx modulators of nicotinic receptors: implications for plasticity and nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Julie M; Lester, Henry A; Walz, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The cholinergic system underlies both adaptive (learning and memory) and nonadaptive (addiction and dependency) behavioral changes through its ability to shape and regulate plasticity. Protein modulators such as lynx family members can fine tune the activity of the cholinergic system and contribute to the graded response of the cholinergic system, stabilizing neural circuitry through direct interaction with nicotinic receptors. Release of this molecular brake can unmask cholinergic-dependent mechanisms in the brain. Lynx proteins have the potential to provide top-down control over plasticity mechanisms, including addictive propensity. If this is indeed the case, then, what regulates the regulator? Transcriptional changes of lynx genes in response to pharmacological, physiological, and pathological alterations are explored in this review.

  20. The association of cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria: diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Bahar; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Physical urticaria is often challenging to diagnose and manage. We present a case of both cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria and discuss the diagnosis and management strategies of these two important conditions. PMID:25694628

  1. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells in the hippocampal neurogenesis involving myelin vacuolation of cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mizuho; Abe, Hajime; Itahashi, Megu; Kikuchihara, Yoh; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    Hexachlorophene (HCP) has been shown to induce myelin vacuolation due to intramyelinic edema of the nerve fibers in animal neural tissue. We investigated the maternal exposure effect of HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the offspring of pregnant mice supplemented with 0 (control), 33 or 100 ppm HCP in diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, offspring as examined in males exhibited decreased granule cell lineage populations expressing paired box 6, sex-determining region Y-box 2 and eomesodermin in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) accompanied by myelin vacuolation involving white matter tracts of the hippocampal fimbria at ≥ 33 ppm. However, SGZ cellular populations expressing brain lipid binding protein and doublecortin were unchanged at any dose. Transcript expression of cholinergic receptor genes, Chrna4 and Chrnb2, and glutamate receptor genes, Grm1 and Grin2d, examined at 100 ppm, decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP exposure did not alter the number of proliferating or apoptotic cells in the SGZ, or reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons in the dentate hilus, on PND 21 and PND 77. All neurogenesis-related changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77, suggesting that maternal HCP exposure at ≥ 33 ppm reversibly decreased type 2 intermediate-stage progenitor cells in the hippocampal neurogenesis. Myelin vacuolation might be responsible for changes in neurogenesis possibly by reducing nerve conduction velocity of cholinergic inputs from the septal-hippocampal pathway to granule cell lineages and/or GABAergic interneurons, and of glutamatergic inputs to granule cell lineages. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells of the hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring via dysfunction of cholinergic inputs by myelin vacuolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, Megu; Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Kimura, Masayuki; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-02-03

    Hexachlorophene (HCP) is known to induce myelin vacuolation corresponding to intramyelinic edema of nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system in animals. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 100, or 300 ppm HCP in the diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, the numbers of T box brain 2(+) progenitor cells and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling(+) apoptotic cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) decreased in female offspring at 300 ppm, which was accompanied by myelin vacuolation and punctate tubulin beta-3 chain staining of nerve fibers in the hippocampal fimbria. In addition, transcript levels of the cholinergic receptor, nicotinic beta 2 (Chrnb2) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP-exposure did not alter the numbers of SGZ proliferating cells and reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneuron subpopulations in the dentate hilus on PND 21 and PND 77. Although some myelin vacuolation remained, all other changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77. These results suggest that maternal HCP exposure reversibly decreases type-2b intermediate-stage progenitor cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in offspring hippocampal neurogenesis at 300 ppm HCP. Neurogenesis may be affected by dysfunction of cholinergic inputs into granule cell lineages and/or GABAergic interneurons as indicated by decreased transcript levels of Chrnb2 and numbers of Chrnb2(+) interneurons caused by myelin vacuolation in the septal-hippocampal pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SMN requirement for synaptic vesicle, active zone and microtubule postnatal organization in motor nerve terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Torres-Benito

    Full Text Available Low levels of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN protein produce Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA, a severe monogenetic disease in infants characterized by muscle weakness and impaired synaptic transmission. We report here severe structural and functional alterations in the organization of the organelles and the cytoskeleton of motor nerve terminals in a mouse model of SMA. The decrease in SMN levels resulted in the clustering of synaptic vesicles (SVs and Active Zones (AZs, reduction in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP, and the recycling pool (RP of synaptic vesicles, a decrease in active mitochondria and limiting of neurofilament and microtubule maturation. We propose that SMN is essential for the normal postnatal maturation of motor nerve terminals and that SMN deficiency disrupts the presynaptic organization leading to neurodegeneration.

  4. Presynaptic adenosine receptor-mediated regulation of diverse thalamocortical short-term plasticity in the mouse whisker pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eFerrati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In driver thalamocortical (TC synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors, modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  5. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Quiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Higher sensitivity to cadmium induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Garbriela; Anadon, María José; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Díaz, María Jesús; García, Jimena; Frejo, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant, which is a cause of concern because it can be greatly concentrated in the organism causing severe damage to a variety of organs including the nervous system which is one of the most affected. Cadmium has been reported to produce learning and memory dysfunctions and Alzheimer like symptoms, though the mechanism is unknown. On the other hand, cholinergic system in central nervous system (CNS) is implicated on learning and memory regulation, and it has been reported that cadmium can affect cholinergic transmission and it can also induce selective toxicity on cholinergic system at peripheral level, producing cholinergic neurons loss, which may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes if produced on central level. The present study is aimed at researching the selective neurotoxicity induced by cadmium on cholinergic system in CNS. For this purpose we evaluated, in basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it on NS56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line. This study proves that cadmium induces a more pronounced, but not selective, cell death on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on cholinergic neurons. Moreover, MTT and LDH assays showed a dose dependent decrease of cell viability in NS56 cells. The ACh treatment of SN56 cells did not revert cell viability reduction induced by cadmium, but siRNA transfection against AChE partially reduced it. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on the function and viability of neurons, and the possible relevance of cadmium in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  8. EEG sleep and the cholinergic REM induction test in anorexic and bulimic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, C.; Zulley, Jürgen; Krieg, J. C.; Riemann, D.; Berger, M.

    1988-01-01

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep of 20 anorexic patients, 10 bulimic patients, and 10 age-matched healthy controls was studied. In addition, six anorexic patients and six bulimic patients had a cholinergic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep induction test (RIT) performed with the cholinergic agent RS 86. The three samples showed no major differences in sleep patterns. The same held true when attention was focused on patients who additionally met DSM-III criteria for major depression. The R...

  9. Cholinergic axon length reduced by 300 meters in the brain of an Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Gitte; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; West, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Modern stereological techniques have been used to show that the total length of the cholinergic fibers in the cerebral cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse is reduced by almost 300 meters at 18 months of age and has a nonlinear relationship to the amount of transgenetically-induced amyloidosis. ....... These data provide rigorous quantitative morphological evidence that Alzheimer's-like amyloidosis affects the axons of the cholinergic enervation of the cerebral cortex....

  10. Comparison of Extracellular Striatal Acetylcholine and Brain Seizure Activity Following Acute Exposure to the Nerve Agents Cyclosarin and Tabun in Freely Moving Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Buckley N. 2004a. Early management after self-poisoning with an orga- nophosphorus or carbamate pesticide —a treatment protocol for junior doctors...the early stages of nerve agent toxicity as a supplement to the various avenues of cholinergic interven- tion (i.e. carbamate pre-treatments, anti...investigation into the relationship between stress and seizure susceptibility to identify new therapeutic targets to elicit more specific anti

  11. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, ... eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These muscles move the eye up and down, right and ... nerve 4th cranial nerve 6th ...

  12. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    rodents as a function of time after surgery. As predicted, those animals in the negative control group (no repair following nerve deficit injury ...80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve damage, typically involve large segmental nerve deficits. Standard repair uses...technology for repair of peripheral nerve injuries involving significant neural deficit with improved functional outcomes for the wounded warrior. The

  13. Protein synthesis in presynaptic endings from squid brain: modulation by calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, J C; Crispino, M; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-15

    Previous biochemical, autoradiographic, and ultrastructural data have shown that, in the synaptosomal fraction of the squid optic lobe, protein synthesis is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the retinal photoreceptor neurons (Crispino et al. [1993a] Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 4:366-374; Crispino et al. [1993b] J. Neurochem. 61:1144-1146; Crispino et al. [1997] J. Neurosci. 17:7694-7702). We now report that this process is close to its maximum at the basal concentration of cytosolic Ca++, and is markedly inhibited when the concentration of this ion is either decreased or increased. This conclusion is supported by the results of experiments with: 1) compounds known to increase the level of cytosolic Ca++, such as A23187, ionomycin, thapsigargin, and caffeine; 2) compounds sequestering cytosolic calcium ions such as BAPTA-AM; and 3) agents that block the role of Ca++ as second messenger, such as TFP and W7, which inhibit calmodulin, and calphostin, which inhibits protein kinase C. We conclude that variations in the level of cytosolic Ca++ induced in presynaptic terminals by neuronal activity may contribute to the modulation of the local synthesis of protein.

  14. Presynaptic serotonin 2A receptors modulate thalamocortical plasticity and associative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Alexander; Berthoux, Coralie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Bécamel, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level cognitive processes strongly depend on a complex interplay between mediodorsal thalamus nuclei and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Alteration of thalamofrontal connectivity has been involved in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors play an essential role in cortical network activity, but the mechanism underlying their modulation of glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at thalamocortical synapses remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that 5-HT2A receptor activation enhances NMDA transmission and gates the induction of temporal-dependent plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors at thalamocortical synapses in acute PFC slices. Expressing 5-HT2A receptors in the mediodorsal thalamus (presynaptic site) of 5-HT2A receptor-deficient mice, but not in the PFC (postsynaptic site), using a viral gene-delivery approach, rescued the otherwise absent potentiation of NMDA transmission, induction of temporal plasticity, and deficit in associative memory. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first physiological evidence of a role of presynaptic 5-HT2A receptors located at thalamocortical synapses in the control of thalamofrontal connectivity and the associated cognitive functions. PMID:26903620

  15. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Teresa Jurado-Parras

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics.

  16. Pre-synaptic control of remote fear extinction in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisella eVetere

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Consolidation of remote memory enhances immediate early genes induction (IEGs, augments the expression of the presynaptic growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43, and increases the density and size of dendritic spines in anterior cingulate (aCC and infra-limbic (ILC cortices. Remote memory extinction, however, does not uniformly alter consolidation-induced structural changes. In the aCC, the density, but not the size, of spines is reset to pseudo-conditioning levels while novel thin spines are formed in the ILC. Whether IEGs and GAP-43 also undergo region-specific changes upon remote memory extinction is undetermined. Here we confirm in the same batch of mice that c-Fos induction and GAP-43 expression are increased in both the aCC and the ILC 36 days after contextual fear conditioning. We then show that, in both regions, remote memory extinction is associated with decrease of c-Fos induction but no change in GAP-43 expression thus revealing similar, although protein-specific, pre-synaptic adaptations in aCC and ILC neurons. These observations, in addition to our previous report of region-specific post-synaptic structural changes, disclose a complex pattern of extinction-driven neocortical alterations suitable to support erasure or reinstatement of fear according to the environment demand.

  17. Optogenetic probing and manipulation of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal in the embryonic chick ciliary ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Ryo; Hososhima, Shoko; Hou, Xubin; Katow, Hidetaka; Ishizuka, Toru; Nakamura, Harukazu; Yawo, Hiromu

    2013-01-01

    The calyx-type synapse of chick ciliary ganglion (CG) has been intensively studied for decades as a model system for the synaptic development, morphology and physiology. Despite recent advances in optogenetics probing and/or manipulation of the elementary steps of the transmitter release such as membrane depolarization and Ca(2+) elevation, the current gene-manipulating methods are not suitable for targeting specifically the calyx-type presynaptic terminals. Here, we evaluated a method for manipulating the molecular and functional organization of the presynaptic terminals of this model synapse. We transfected progenitors of the Edinger-Westphal (EW) nucleus neurons with an EGFP expression vector by in ovo electroporation at embryonic day 2 (E2) and examined the CG at E8-14. We found that dozens of the calyx-type presynaptic terminals and axons were selectively labeled with EGFP fluorescence. When a Brainbow construct containing the membrane-tethered fluorescent proteins m-CFP, m-YFP and m-RFP, was introduced together with a Cre expression construct, the color coding of each presynaptic axon facilitated discrimination among inter-tangled projections, particularly during the developmental re-organization period of synaptic connections. With the simultaneous expression of one of the chimeric variants of channelrhodopsins, channelrhodopsin-fast receiver (ChRFR), and R-GECO1, a red-shifted fluorescent Ca(2+)-sensor, the Ca(2+) elevation was optically measured under direct photostimulation of the presynaptic terminal. Although this optically evoked Ca(2+) elevation was mostly dependent on the action potential, a significant component remained even in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). It is suggested that the photo-activation of ChRFR facilitated the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores directly or indirectly. The above system, by facilitating the molecular study of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal, would provide an experimental platform for unveiling

  18. Optogenetic probing and manipulation of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal in the embryonic chick ciliary ganglion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Egawa

    Full Text Available The calyx-type synapse of chick ciliary ganglion (CG has been intensively studied for decades as a model system for the synaptic development, morphology and physiology. Despite recent advances in optogenetics probing and/or manipulation of the elementary steps of the transmitter release such as membrane depolarization and Ca(2+ elevation, the current gene-manipulating methods are not suitable for targeting specifically the calyx-type presynaptic terminals. Here, we evaluated a method for manipulating the molecular and functional organization of the presynaptic terminals of this model synapse. We transfected progenitors of the Edinger-Westphal (EW nucleus neurons with an EGFP expression vector by in ovo electroporation at embryonic day 2 (E2 and examined the CG at E8-14. We found that dozens of the calyx-type presynaptic terminals and axons were selectively labeled with EGFP fluorescence. When a Brainbow construct containing the membrane-tethered fluorescent proteins m-CFP, m-YFP and m-RFP, was introduced together with a Cre expression construct, the color coding of each presynaptic axon facilitated discrimination among inter-tangled projections, particularly during the developmental re-organization period of synaptic connections. With the simultaneous expression of one of the chimeric variants of channelrhodopsins, channelrhodopsin-fast receiver (ChRFR, and R-GECO1, a red-shifted fluorescent Ca(2+-sensor, the Ca(2+ elevation was optically measured under direct photostimulation of the presynaptic terminal. Although this optically evoked Ca(2+ elevation was mostly dependent on the action potential, a significant component remained even in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+. It is suggested that the photo-activation of ChRFR facilitated the release of Ca(2+ from intracellular Ca(2+ stores directly or indirectly. The above system, by facilitating the molecular study of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal, would provide an experimental platform for

  19. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  20. Cholinergic receptor alterations in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chinthu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many areas of the cerebral cortex process sensory information or coordinate motor output necessary for control of movement. Disturbances in cortical cholinergic system can affect locomotor coordination. Spinal cord injury causes severe motor impairment and disturbances in cholinergic signalling can aggravate the situation. Considering the impact of cortical cholinergic firing in locomotion, we focussed the study in understanding the cholinergic alterations in cerebral cortex during spinal cord injury. The gene expression of key enzymes in cholinergic pathway - acetylcholine esterase and choline acetyl transferase showed significant upregulation in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured group compared to control with the fold increase in expression of acetylcholine esterase prominently higher than cholineacetyl transferase. The decreased muscarinic receptor density and reduced immunostaining of muscarinic receptor subtypes along with down regulated gene expression of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptor subtypes accounts for dysfunction of metabotropic acetylcholine receptors in spinal cord injury group. Ionotropic acetylcholine receptor alterations were evident from the decreased gene expression of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors and reduced immunostaining of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in confocal imaging. Our data pin points the disturbances in cortical cholinergic function due to spinal cord injury; which can augment the locomotor deficits. This can be taken into account while devising a proper therapeutic approach to manage spinal cord injury.

  1. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists.

  2. Radial to axillary nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Martínez-Gómez, Deborah; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2018-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE .

  3. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  4. Optic Nerve Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve. Ocular ultrasound, CT scan and/or fundus photography can also aid in the diagnosis. Drusen can ... Medical Disclaimer Search Site ▶ AAPOS Headquarters 655 Beach Street San Francisco, CA 94109-1336 Phone: (415) 561- ...

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  6. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms include: Difficulty speaking Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness Injury to the left and right laryngeal nerves at the same time can cause a breathing problem. This can be an urgent medical problem.

  7. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  8. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  9. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  10. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  11. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Michael T.; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K+ current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30–50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30–50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity

  12. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Michael T; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A; Horner, Richard L

    2015-10-07

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K(+) (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K(+) current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASK(f/f) mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30-50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30-50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASK(f/f) mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity. Basal forebrain

  13. Co-expression of Cholinergic and Noradrenergic Phenotypes in Human and Non-Human Autonomic Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Weihe, Eberhard; Schütz, Burkhard; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Anlauf, Martin; Schäfer, Martin K.; Eiden, Lee E.

    2005-01-01

    It has long been known that the sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands is cholinergic in most mammalian species, and that during development, rodent sympathetic cholinergic sweat gland innervation transiently expresses noradrenergic traits. We show here that some noradrenergic traits persist in cholinergic sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands in rodents, but that lack of expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter renders these cells functionally non-noradrenergic. Adult hum...

  14. Central cholinergic pathways in the rat: an overview based on an alternative nomenclature (Ch1-Ch6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesulam, M M; Mufson, E J; Wainer, B H; Levey, A I

    1983-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and a histochemical method for the concurrent demonstration of acetylcholinesterase and horseradish peroxidase were used to investigate the organization of ascending cholinergic pathways in the central nervous system of the rat. The cortical mantle, the amygdaloid complex, the hippocampal formation, the olfactory bulb and the thalamic nuclei receive their cholinergic innervation principally, from cholinergic projection neurons of the basal forebrain and upper brainstem. On the basis of connectivity patterns, we subdivided these cholinergic neurons into six major sectors. The Ch1 and Ch2 sectors are contained within the medial septal nucleus and the vertical limb nucleus of the diagonal band, respectively. They provide the major cholinergic projections of the hippocampus. The Ch3 sector is contained mostly within the lateral portion of the horizontal limb nucleus of the diagonal band and provides the major cholinergic innervation to the olfactory bulb. The Ch4 sector includes cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis, and also within parts of the diagonal band nuclei. Neurons of the Ch4 sector provide the major cholinergic innervation of the cortical mantle and the amygdala. The Ch5-Ch6 sectors are contained mostly within the pedunculopontine nucleus of the pontomesencephalic reticular formation (Ch5) and within the laterodorsal tegmental gray of the periventricular area (Ch6). These sectors provide the major cholinergic innervation of the thalamus. The Ch5-Ch6 neurons also provide a minor component of the corticopetal cholinergic innervation. These central cholinergic pathways have been implicated in a variety of behaviors and especially in memory function. It appears that the age-related changes of memory function as well as some of the behavioral disturbances seen in the dementia of Alzheimer's Disease may be related to pathological alterations along central cholinergic pathways.

  15. Biflorin Ameliorates Memory Impairments Induced by Cholinergic Blockade in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Jin; Kim, Boseong; Ryu, Byeol; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Sunhee; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of biflorin, a component of Syzygium aromaticum, on memory deficit, we introduced a scopolamine-induced cognitive deficit mouse model. A single administration of biflorin increased latency time in the passive avoidance task, ameliorated alternation behavior in the Y-maze, and increased exploration time in the Morris water maze task, indicating the improvement of cognitive behaviors against cholinergic dysfunction. The biflorin-induced reverse of latency in the scopolamine-treated group was attenuated by MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. Biflorin also enhanced cognitive function in a naïve mouse model. To understand the mechanism of biflorin for memory amelioration, we performed Western blot. Biflorin increased the activation of protein kinase C-ζ and its downstream signaling molecules in the hippocampus. These results suggest that biflorin ameliorates drug-induced memory impairment by modulation of protein kinase C-ζ signaling in mice, implying that biflorin could function as a possible therapeutic agent for the treatment of cognitive problems. PMID:27829270

  16. Angiotensin II inhibits cortical cholinergic function: Implications for cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.M.; Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In the present studies we have shown that angiotensin II (AT II), in a concentration-dependent manner in rat tissue (10(-9)-10(-5) M) or at a single concentration in human tissue (10(-6) M), can inhibit potassium-stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine ( [3H]Ach) from slices of rat entorhinal cortex and human temporal cortex preloaded with [3H]choline for the biochemical analyses. The inhibitory effects of AT II (10(-6) M) were antagonised by the specific AT II receptor antagonist [1-sarcosine, 8-threonine]AT II in a concentration-dependent manner in rat tissue (10(-11)-10(-8) M) and at the single concentration employed in the human studies (10(-7) M). Also demonstrated were other components of the angiotensin system in the human temporal cortex; ACE activity was present (1.03 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein), as were AT II recognition sites (Bmax = 8.6 fmol mg-1 protein). It is hypothesised that the potential cognitive enhancing properties of ACE inhibitors may reflect their action to prevent the formation of AT II and so remove an inhibitory modulator of cholinergic function

  17. Cholinergic regulation of protein phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycock, J.W.; Browning, M.D.; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Chromaffin cells were isolated from bovine adrenal medullae and maintained in primary culture. After prelabeling with 32 PO 4 , exposure of the chromaffin cells to acetylcholine increased the phosphorylation of a M/sub r/ ≅ 100,000 protein and a M/sub r/ ≅ 60,000 protein (tyrosine hydroxylase), visualized after separation of total cellular proteins in NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gels. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies to three known phosphoproteins (100-kDa, 87-kDa, and protein III) revealed an acetylcholine-dependent phosphorylation of these proteins. These three proteins were also shown to be present in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by immunolabeling techniques. 100-kDa is a M/sub r/ ≅ 100,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III, 87-kDa is a M/sub r/ ≅ 87,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, and protein III is a phosphoprotein doublet of M/sub r/ ≅ 74,000 (IIIa) and M/sub r/ ≅ 55,000 (IIIb) phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I. The data demonstrate that cholinergic activation of chromaffin cells increases the phosphorylation of several proteins and that several protein kinase systems may be involved in these effects

  18. Cholinergic modulation of cognitive processing: insights drawn from computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehren L Newman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine plays an important role in cognitive function, as shown by pharmacological manipulations that impact working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory function. Acetylcholine also shows striking modulatory influences on the cellular physiology of hippocampal and cortical neurons. Modeling of neural circuits provides a framework for understanding how the cognitive functions may arise from the influence of acetylcholine on neural and network dynamics. We review the influences of cholinergic manipulations on behavioral performance in working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory tasks, the physiological effects of acetylcholine on neural and circuit dynamics, and the computational models that provide insight into the functional relationships between the physiology and behavior. Specifically, we discuss the important role of acetylcholine in governing mechanisms of active maintenance in working memory tasks and in regulating network dynamics important for effective processing of stimuli in attention and episodic memory tasks. We also propose that theta rhythm play a crucial role as an intermediary between the physiological influences of acetylcholine and behavior in episodic and spatial memory tasks. We conclude with a synthesis of the existing modeling work and highlight future directions that are likely to be rewarding given the existing state of the literature for both empiricists and modelers.

  19. Cholinergic function and dysfunction in the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelke, M; Sannita, W G

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) function is thought not only to play a significant role in memory, learning and other cognitive processes, but studies at a cellular level and in vivo indicate an important role for ACh in vision as well, especially for visual information processing. A suitable experimental model of geriatric memory impairment and Alzheimer dementia that pharmacologically blocks the brain muscarinic transmission has been proposed. This model has been extensively used also as an attempt to test cholinergic drugs in the absence of detailed knowledge of sites and mechanisms of ACh action and as test condition in the investigation of the role of ACh in visual information processing. Alzheimer's dementia results from complex neuron alterations, rather than simply reflecting ACh impoverishment, also involving the visual system, with substantial loss of retinal ganglion cells and alterations in visual information processing. Viewing all these data as a whole, nonspecific ACh actions on cognition, such as arousal or attention, contribute in modulating the function-specific action of ACh in information processing, both at cognitive and visual level.

  20. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  1. Noradrenergic and cholinergic innervation of the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Bosco, Sandro; Cavallotti, Carlo; Agostinelli, Enzo; Giuliani-Piccari, Gabriella; Sciorio, Salvatore; Cocco, Lucio; Vitale, Marco

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow is supplied by sensory and autonomic innervation. Although it is well established that hematopoiesis is regulated by cytokines and cell-to-cell contacts, the role played by neuromediators on the proliferation, differentiation and release of hematopoietic cells is still controversial. We studied the innervation of rat femur bone marrow by means of fluorescence histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Glyoxylic acid-induced fluorescence was used to demonstrate catecholaminergic nerve fibers. The immunoperoxidase method with nickel amplification was applied to detect the distribution of nerve fibers using antibodies against the general neuronal marker PGP 9.5 (neuron-specific cytoplasmic protein), while the cholinacetyltransferase immunoreactivity was studied by immunohistochemistry. Our results show the presence of an extensive network of innervation in the rat bone marrow, providing a morphological basis for the neural modulation of hemopoiesis.

  2. Illuminating the role of cholinergic signaling in circuits of attention and emotionally salient behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eLuchicchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh signaling underlies specific aspects of cognitive functions and behaviors, including attention, learning, memory and motivation. Alterations in ACh signaling are involved in the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. In the central nervous system, ACh transmission is mainly guaranteed by dense innervation of select cortical and subcortical regions from disperse groups of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain (e.g. diagonal band, medial septal, nucleus basalis and the pontine-mesencephalic nuclei, respectively. Despite the fundamental role of cholinergic signaling in the CNS and the long standing knowledge of the organization of cholinergic circuitry, remarkably little is known about precisely how ACh release modulates cortical and subcortical neural activity and the behaviors these circuits subserve. Growing interest in cholinergic signaling in the CNS focuses on the mechanism(s of action by which endogenously released ACh regulates cognitive functions, acting as a neuromodulator and /or as a direct transmitter via nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. The development of optogenetic techniques has provided a valuable toolbox with which we can address these questions, as it allows the selective manipulation of the excitability of cholinergic inputs to the diverse array of cholinergic target fields within cortical and subcortical domains. Here, we review recent papers that use the light-sensitive opsins in the cholinergic system to elucidate the role of ACh in circuits related to attention and emotionally salient behaviors. In particular, we highlight recent optogenetic studies which have tried to disentangle the precise role of ACh in the modulation of cortical-, hippocampal- and striatal-dependent functions.

  3. Cholinergic Hypofunction in Presbycusis-Related Tinnitus With Cognitive Function Impairment: Emerging Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwei Ruan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss is a potential risk factor for tinnitus and cognitive deterioration, which result in poor life quality. Presbycusis-related tinnitus with cognitive impairment is a common phenotype in the elderly population. In these individuals, the central auditory system shows similar pathophysiological alterations as those observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, including cholinergic hypofunction, epileptiform-like network synchronization, chronic inflammation, and reduced GABAergic inhibition and neural plasticity. Observations from experimental rodent models indicate that recovery of cholinergic function can improve memory and other cognitive functions via acetylcholine-mediated GABAergic inhibition enhancement, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR-mediated anti-inflammation, glial activation inhibition and neurovascular protection. The loss of cholinergic innervation of various brain structures may provide a common link between tinnitus seen in presbycusis-related tinnitus and age-related cognitive impairment. We hypothesize a key component of the condition is the withdrawal of cholinergic input to a subtype of GABAergic inhibitory interneuron, neuropeptide Y (NPY neurogliaform cells. Cholinergic denervation might not only cause the degeneration of NPY neurogliaform cells, but may also result in decreased AChR activation in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. This, in turn, would lead to reduced GABA release and inhibitory regulation of neural networks. Reduced nAChR-mediated anti-inflammation due to the loss of nicotinic innervation might lead to the transformation of glial cells and release of inflammatory mediators, lowering the buffering of extracellular potassium and glutamate metabolism. Further research will provide evidence for the recovery of cholinergic function with the use of cholinergic input enhancement alone or in combination with other rehabilitative interventions to reestablish inhibitory regulation

  4. Cholinergic Hypofunction in Presbycusis-Related Tinnitus With Cognitive Function Impairment: Emerging Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qingwei; Yu, Zhuowei; Zhang, Weibin; Ruan, Jian; Liu, Chunhui; Zhang, Ruxin

    2018-01-01

    Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a potential risk factor for tinnitus and cognitive deterioration, which result in poor life quality. Presbycusis-related tinnitus with cognitive impairment is a common phenotype in the elderly population. In these individuals, the central auditory system shows similar pathophysiological alterations as those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including cholinergic hypofunction, epileptiform-like network synchronization, chronic inflammation, and reduced GABAergic inhibition and neural plasticity. Observations from experimental rodent models indicate that recovery of cholinergic function can improve memory and other cognitive functions via acetylcholine-mediated GABAergic inhibition enhancement, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated anti-inflammation, glial activation inhibition and neurovascular protection. The loss of cholinergic innervation of various brain structures may provide a common link between tinnitus seen in presbycusis-related tinnitus and age-related cognitive impairment. We hypothesize a key component of the condition is the withdrawal of cholinergic input to a subtype of GABAergic inhibitory interneuron, neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurogliaform cells. Cholinergic denervation might not only cause the degeneration of NPY neurogliaform cells, but may also result in decreased AChR activation in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. This, in turn, would lead to reduced GABA release and inhibitory regulation of neural networks. Reduced nAChR-mediated anti-inflammation due to the loss of nicotinic innervation might lead to the transformation of glial cells and release of inflammatory mediators, lowering the buffering of extracellular potassium and glutamate metabolism. Further research will provide evidence for the recovery of cholinergic function with the use of cholinergic input enhancement alone or in combination with other rehabilitative interventions to reestablish inhibitory regulation mechanisms of

  5. Acute desensitization of presynaptic GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and induction of epileptiform discharges in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosetti, P; Bakels, R; Colin-Le Brun, [No Value; Ferrand, N; Gaiarsa, JL; Caillard, O

    The consequences of sustained activation of GABA(B) receptors on GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and network activity were investigated in the neonatal rat hippocampus using whole-cell and extracellular field recordings. GABA(B)-mediated presynaptic control of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release

  6. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q; Møller, H J; Pfeiffer Jensen, M; Drewes, A M; Farmer, A D

    2017-05-01

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t-VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which warrants further evaluation in larger controlled studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Learning and retrieval behavior in recurrent neural networks with pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusaki, Beatriz E. P.; Agnes, Everton J.; Erichsen, Rubem; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-08-01

    The plastic character of brain synapses is considered to be one of the foundations for the formation of memories. There are numerous kinds of such phenomenon currently described in the literature, but their role in the development of information pathways in neural networks with recurrent architectures is still not completely clear. In this paper we study the role of an activity-based process, called pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic scaling, in the organization of networks that yield precise-timed spiking patterns. It encodes spatio-temporal information in the synaptic weights as it associates a learned input with a specific response. We introduce a correlation measure to evaluate the precision of the spiking patterns and explore the effects of different inhibitory interactions and learning parameters. We find that large learning periods are important in order to improve the network learning capacity and discuss this ability in the presence of distinct inhibitory currents.

  8. Changes in presynaptic release, but not reuptake, of bioamines induced by long-term antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolzhenko, A.T.; Komissarov, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the effect of long-term administration of antidepressants on neuronal uptake of NA and 5-HT and on their release, induced by electrical stimulation, in rat brain slices. The effects of the test substances on neuronal uptake of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT by the slices was investigated. Values of IC 50 and EC 2 were found and compared in the experiments and control. The inhibitory effect of clonidine (10 -4 M) and of 5-HT (10 -5 M) on presynaptic release of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT also was studied in brain slices from intact rats and rats treated for two weeks with antidepressants

  9. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding...... syntaxin-1B(6), that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees(7,8) identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations....... Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes....

  10. The presynaptic Munc13-1 binds alcohol and modulates alcohol self-administration in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joydip; Xu, Shiyu; Pany, Satyabrata; Guillory, Ashley; Shah, Vrutant; Roman, Gregg W.

    2013-01-01

    Munc13-1 is a presynaptic active-zone protein essential for neurotransmitter release and involved in presynaptic plasticity in brain. Ethanol, butanol and octanol quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of the C1 domain of Munc13-1 with EC50s of 52 mM, 26 mM and 0.7 mM, respectively. Photoactive azialcohols photolabeled Munc13-1 C1 exclusively at Glu-582, which was identified by mass spectrometry. Mutation of Glu-582 to alanine, leucine and histidine reduced the alcohol binding two- to five-fold. Circular dichroism studies suggested that binding of alcohol increased the stability of the wild type Munc13-1 compared with the mutants. If Munc13-1 plays some role in the neural effects of alcohol in vivo, changes in the activity of this protein should produce differences in the behavioral responses to ethanol. We tested this prediction with a loss-of-function mutation in the conserved Dunc-13 in Drosophila melanogaster. The Dunc-13P84200/+ heterozygotes have 50% wild type levels of Dunc-13 mRNA and display a very robust increase in ethanol self-administration. This phenotype is reversed by the expression of the rat Munc13-1 protein within the Drosophila nervous system. The present studies indicate that Munc13-1 C1 has binding site(s) for alcohols and Munc13-1 activity is sufficient to restore normal self-administration to Drosophila mutants deficient in Dunc-13 activity. PMID:23692447

  11. Electrical receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells: Influence of presynaptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Matias I; Apollo, Nicholas V; Garrett, David J; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Ibbotson, Michael R; Meffin, Hamish

    2018-02-01

    Implantable retinal stimulators activate surviving neurons to restore a sense of vision in people who have lost their photoreceptors through degenerative diseases. Complex spatial and temporal interactions occur in the retina during multi-electrode stimulation. Due to these complexities, most existing implants activate only a few electrodes at a time, limiting the repertoire of available stimulation patterns. Measuring the spatiotemporal interactions between electrodes and retinal cells, and incorporating them into a model may lead to improved stimulation algorithms that exploit the interactions. Here, we present a computational model that accurately predicts both the spatial and temporal nonlinear interactions of multi-electrode stimulation of rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The model was verified using in vitro recordings of ON, OFF, and ON-OFF RGCs in response to subretinal multi-electrode stimulation with biphasic pulses at three stimulation frequencies (10, 20, 30 Hz). The model gives an estimate of each cell's spatiotemporal electrical receptive fields (ERFs); i.e., the pattern of stimulation leading to excitation or suppression in the neuron. All cells had excitatory ERFs and many also had suppressive sub-regions of their ERFs. We show that the nonlinearities in observed responses arise largely from activation of presynaptic interneurons. When synaptic transmission was blocked, the number of sub-regions of the ERF was reduced, usually to a single excitatory ERF. This suggests that direct cell activation can be modeled accurately by a one-dimensional model with linear interactions between electrodes, whereas indirect stimulation due to summated presynaptic responses is nonlinear.

  12. Presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic transmission by adenosine in mouse hypothalamic hypocretin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J X; Xiong, J X; Wang, H K; Duan, S M; Ye, J N; Hu, Z A

    2012-01-10

    Hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, a new wakefulness-promoting center, have been recently regarded as an important target involved in endogenous adenosine-regulating sleep homeostasis. The GABAergic synaptic transmissions are the main inhibitory afferents to hypocretin neurons, which play an important role in the regulation of excitability of these neurons. The inhibitory effect of adenosine, a homeostatic sleep-promoting factor, on the excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmissions in hypocretin neurons has been well documented, whether adenosine also modulates these inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmissions in these neurons has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of adenosine on inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hypocretin neurons was examined by using perforated patch-clamp recordings in the acute hypothalamic slices. The findings demonstrated that adenosine suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a dose-dependent manner, which was completely abolished by 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT), a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptor but not adenosine A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-(2-propynyl) xanthine. A presynaptic origin was suggested as following: adenosine increased paired-pulse ratio as well as reduced GABAergic miniature IPSC frequency without affecting the miniature IPSC amplitude. Further findings demonstrated that when the frequency of electrical stimulation was raised to 10 Hz, but not 1 Hz, a time-dependent depression of evoked IPSC amplitude was detected in hypocretin neurons, which could be partially blocked by CPT. However, under a higher frequency at 100 Hz stimulation, CPT had no action on the depressed GABAergic synaptic transmission induced by such tetanic stimulation in these hypocretin neurons. These results suggest that endogenous adenosine generated under certain stronger activities of synaptic transmissions exerts an inhibitory effect on GABAergic synaptic transmission in hypocretin

  13. Prophylactic versus Therapeutic Fingolimod: Restoration of Presynaptic Defects in Mice Suffering from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Bonfiglio

    Full Text Available Fingolimod, the first oral, disease-modifying therapy for MS, has been recently proposed to modulate glutamate transmission in the central nervous system (CNS of mice suffering from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE and in MS patients. Our study aims at investigating whether oral fingolimod recovers presynaptic defects that occur at different stages of disease in the CNS of EAE mice. In vivo prophylactic (0.3 mg/kg for 14 days, from the 7th day post immunization, d.p.i, the drug dissolved in the drinking water fingolimod significantly reduced the clinical symptoms and the anxiety-related behaviour in EAE mice. Spinal cord inflammation, demyelination and glial cell activation are markers of EAE progression. These signs were ameliorated following oral fingolimod administration. Glutamate exocytosis was shown to be impaired in cortical and spinal cord terminals isolated from EAE mice at 21 ± 1 d.p.i., while GABA alteration emerged only at the spinal cord level. Prophylactic fingolimod recovered these presynaptic defects, restoring altered glutamate and GABA release efficiency. The beneficial effect occurred in a dose-dependent, region-specific manner, since lower (0.1-0.03 mg/kg doses restored, although to a different extent, synaptic defects in cortical but not spinal cord terminals. A delayed reduction of glutamate, but not of GABA, exocytosis was observed in hippocampal terminals of EAE mice at 35 d.p.i. Therapeutic (0.3 mg/kg, from 21 d.p.i. for 14 days fingolimod restored glutamate exocytosis in the cortex and in the hippocampus of EAE mice at 35 ± 1 d.p.i. but not in the spinal cord, where also GABAergic defects remained unmodified. These results improve our knowledge of the molecular events accounting for the beneficial effects elicited by fingolimod in demyelinating disorders.

  14. Effects of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, on neuromuscular transmission. I. Presynaptic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiekers, J F

    1983-06-01

    The effects of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, were studied in voltage-clamped transected twitch fibers of the costocutaneous muscles of garter snakes (species Thamnophis). The concentration-dependent effects of each antibiotic were quantitated by measuring miniature end-plate currents (mepcs) and evoked end-plate currents (epcs) in a single fiber before and in the presence of a wide range of concentrations of each antibiotic. The amplitude and the kinetics of these currents were studied and estimates of the quantal content of evoked transmitter release determined by the direct method of mean ratios, epc/mepc. A distinct separation was obtained between the concentrations of each antibiotic which demonstrated either pre- or postsynaptic actions. Both streptomycin and neomycin produced a concentration-dependent reduction in epc amplitude at concentrations which did not reduce mepc amplitude. Thus, the primary site of action for these antibiotics was considered of presynaptic origin. Streptomycin was approximately one-tenth as active as neomycin in reducing quantal release of acetylcholine. The marked depression in epc amplitude and quantal content produced by high concentrations of each antibiotic were reversed by elevating the external calcium concentration. Double logarithmic plots of the relationship between external calcium concentration and epc amplitude yielded a slope of approximately 3.8 in control physiological solution. In the presence of blocking concentrations of each antibiotic, increasing the external calcium concentration caused a parallel shift to the right of this relationship. These results suggest that the major mechanism for the neuromuscular depression produced by these aminoglycoside antibiotics is a competitive antagonism with calcium for a common presynaptic site required for evoked transmitter release.

  15. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

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    Takeaki Saijo

    Full Text Available A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenylpiperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylbenzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride, has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In addition, [(35S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  17. Super-resolution microscopy reveals presynaptic localization of the ALS / FTD related protein FUS in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchoen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fused in Sarcoma (FUS is a multifunctional RNA- / DNA-binding protein, which is involved in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. A common hallmark of these disorders is the abnormal accumulation of mutated FUS protein in the cytoplasm. Under normal conditions FUS is confined to the nuclear compartment, in neurons however, additional somatodendritic localization can be observed. In this study, we carefully analyzed the subcellular localization of endogenous FUS at synaptic sites of hippocampal neurons which are among the most affected cell types in frontotemporal dementia with FUS pathology. We could confirm a strong nuclear localization of FUS as well as its prominent and widespread neuronal expression throughout the adult and developing rat brain, particularly in the hippocampus, the cerebellum and the outer layers of the cortex. Intriguingly, FUS was also consistently observed at synaptic sites as detected by neuronal subcellular fractionation as well as by immunolabeling. To define a pre- and / or postsynaptic localization of FUS, we employed super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. FUS was found to be localized within the axon terminal in close proximity to the presynaptic vesicle protein Synaptophysin1 and adjacent to the active zone protein Bassoon, but well separated from the postsynaptic protein PSD-95. Having shown the presynaptic localization of FUS in the nervous system, a novel extranuclear role of FUS at neuronal contact sites has to be considered. Since there is growing evidence that local presynaptic translation might also be an important mechanism for plasticity, FUS - like the fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP - might act as one of the presynaptic RNA-binding proteins regulating this machinery. Our observation of presynaptic FUS should foster further investigations to determine its role in neurodegenerative diseases such as

  18. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  19. Neuroinflammation not associated with cholinergic degeneration in aged-impaired brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuail, Joseph A; Riddle, David R; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2011-12-01

    Degeneration of the cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and elevation of inflammatory markers are well-established hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease; however, the interplay of these processes in normal aging is not extensively studied. Consequently, we conducted a neuroanatomical investigation to quantify cholinergic neurons and activated microglia in the medial septum/vertical diagonal band (MS/VDB) of young (6 months) and aged (28 months) Fisher 344 × Brown Norway F(1) rats. Aged rats in this study were impaired relative to the young animals in spatial learning ability as assessed in the Morris water maze. Stereological analysis revealed no difference between aged and young rats in the total numbers of cholinergic neurons, demonstrating that loss of cholinergic neurons is not a necessary condition to observe impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In this same region, the total number of activated microglia was substantially greater in aged rats relative to young rats. Jointly, these data demonstrate that aging is characterized by an increase in the basal inflammatory state within the MS/VDB, but this inflammation is not associated with cholinergic neuron death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Internal cholinergic regulation of learning and recall in a model of olfactory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licurgo Benemann Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the olfactory system, cholinergic modulation has been associated with contrast modulation and changes in receptive fields in the olfactory bulb, as well the learning of odor associations in olfactory cortex. Computational modeling and behavioral studies suggest that cholinergic modulation could improve sensory processing and learning while preventing pro-active interference when task demands are high. However, how sensory inputs and/or learning regulate incoming modulation has not yet been elucidated. We here use a computational model of the olfactory bulb, piriform cortex (PC and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB to explore how olfactory learning could regulate cholinergic inputs to the system in a closed feedback loop. In our model, the novelty of an odor is reflected in firing rates and sparseness of cortical neurons in response to that odor and these firing rates can directly regulate learning in the system by modifying cholinergic inputs to the system. In the model, cholinergic neurons reduce their firing in response to familiar odors – reducing plasticity in the PC, but increase their firing in response to novel odor – increasing PC plasticity. Recordings from HDB neurons in awake behaving rats reflect predictions from the model by showing that a subset of neurons decrease their firing as an odor becomes familiar.

  1. Upregulating Nonneuronal Cholinergic Activity Decreases TNF Release from Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonneuronal cholinergic system plays a primary role in maintaining homeostasis. It has been proved that endogenous neuronal acetylcholine (ACh could play an anti-inflammatory role, and exogenous cholinergic agonists could weaken macrophages inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation through activation of α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR. We assumed that nonneuronal cholinergic system existing in macrophages could modulate inflammation through autocrine ACh and expressed α7nAChR on the cells. Therefore, we explored whether LPS continuous stimulation could upregulate the nonneuronal cholinergic activity in macrophages and whether increasing autocrine ACh could decrease TNF release from the macrophages. The results showed that, in RAW264.7 cells incubated with LPS for 20 hours, the secretion of ACh was significantly decreased at 4 h and then gradually increased, accompanied with the enhancement of α7nAChR expression level. The release of TNF was greatly increased from RAW264.7 cells at 4 h and 8 h exposure to LPS; however, it was suppressed at 20 h. Upregulating choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression through ChAT gene transfection could enhance ACh secretion and reduce TNF release from the infected RAW264. 7cells. The results indicated that LPS stimulation could modulate the activity of nonneuronal cholinergic system of RAW264.7 cells. Enhancing autocrine ACh production could attenuate TNF release from RAW264.7 cells.

  2. Cognitive performance as a zeitgeber: cognitive oscillators and cholinergic modulation of the SCN entrain circadian rhythms.

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    Howard J Gritton

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals that can synchronize or entrain to environmental cues. Although light exerts powerful influences on SCN output, other non-photic stimuli can modulate the SCN as well. We recently demonstrated that daily performance of a cognitive task requiring sustained periods of attentional effort that relies upon basal forebrain (BF cholinergic activity dramatically alters circadian rhythms in rats. In particular, normally nocturnal rats adopt a robust diurnal activity pattern that persists for several days in the absence of cognitive training. Although anatomical and pharmacological data from non-performing animals support a relationship between cholinergic signaling and circadian rhythms, little is known about how endogenous cholinergic signaling influences SCN function in behaving animals. Here we report that BF cholinergic projections to the SCN provide the principal signal allowing for the expression of cognitive entrainment in light-phase trained animals. We also reveal that oscillator(s outside of the SCN drive cognitive entrainment as daily timed cognitive training robustly entrains SCN-lesioned arrhythmic animals. Ablation of the SCN, however, resulted in significant impairments in task acquisition, indicating that SCN-mediated timekeeping benefits new learning and cognitive performance. Taken together, we conclude that cognition entrains non-photic oscillators, and cholinergic signaling to the SCN serves as a temporal timestamp attenuating SCN photic-driven rhythms, thereby permitting cognitive demands to modulate behavior.

  3. Chronic Cerebral Ischaemia Forms New Cholinergic Mechanisms of Learning and Memory

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    E. I. Zakharova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was a comparative analysis of cholinergic synaptic organization following learning and memory in normal and chronic cerebral ischaemic rats in the Morris water maze model. Choline acetyltransferase and protein content were determined in subpopulations of presynapses of “light” and “heavy” synaptosomal fractions of the cortex and the hippocampus, and the cholinergic projective and intrinsic systems of the brain structures were taken into consideration. We found a strong involvement of cholinergic systems, both projective and intrinsic, in all forms of cognition. Each form of cognition had an individual cholinergic molecular profile and the cholinergic synaptic compositions in the ischaemic rat brains differed significantly from normal ones. Our data demonstrated that under ischaemic conditions, instead of damaged connections new key synaptic relationships, which were stable against pathological influences and able to restore damaged cognitive functions, arose. The plasticity of neurochemical links in the individual organization of certain types of cognition gave a new input into brain pathology and can be used in the future for alternative corrections of vascular and other degenerative dementias.

  4. Cholinergic synaptic vesicle heterogeneity: evidence for regulation of acetylcholine transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracz, L.M.; Wang, W.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Crude cholinergic synaptic vesicles from a homogenate of the electric organ of Torpedo californica were centrifuged to equilibrium in an isosmotic sucrose density gradient. The classical VP 1 synaptic vesicles banding at 1.055 g/mL actively transported [ 3 H]acetylcholine (AcCh). An organelle banding at about 1.071 g/mL transported even more [ 3 H]AcCh. Transport by both organelles was inhibited by the known AcCh storage blockers trans-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183) and nigericin. Relative to VP 1 vesicles the denser organelle was slightly smaller as shown by size-exclusion chromatography. It is concluded that the denser organelle corresponds to the recycling VP 2 synaptic vesicle originally described in intact Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The properties of the receptor for vesamicol were studied by measuring binding of [ 3 H]vesamicol, and the amount of SV2 antigen characteristic of secretory vesicles was assayed with a monoclonal antibody directed against it. Relative to VP 1 vesicles the VP 2 vesicles had a ratio of [ 3 H]AcCh transport activity to vesamicol receptor concentration that typically was 4-7-fold higher, whereas the ratio of SV2 antigen concentration to vesamicol receptor concentration was about 2-fold higher. The Hill coefficients α/sub H/ and equilibrium dissociation constants K for vesamicol binding to VP 1 and VP 2 vesicles were essentially the same. The positive Hill coefficient suggests that the vesamicol receptor exists as a homotropic oligomeric complex. The results demonstrate that VP 1 and VP 2 synaptic vesicles exhibit functional differences in the AcCh transport system, presumably as a result of regulatory phenomena

  5. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, 12 pairs of upper back (thoracic) nerves, five pairs of lower back (lumbar) nerves, five pairs of pelvis (sacral) nerves and ...

  7. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  8. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects of ...

  9. Nerve Transfer versus Interpositional Nerve Graft Reconstruction for Posttraumatic, Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Agrawal, Nikhil A; Seruya, Mitchel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes between nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures in the setting of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries. A systematic review was performed using the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify all cases of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries in patients aged 18 years or older. Patients who underwent axillary nerve reconstruction were included and categorized by technique: graft or transfer. Demographics were recorded, including age, time to operation, and presence of concomitant injuries. Functional outcomes were evaluated, including British Medical Research Council strength and range of motion for shoulder abduction. Ten retrospective studies met criteria, for a total of 66 patients (20 nerve grafts and 46 nerve transfers). Median time from injury to operation was equivalent across the nerve graft and nerve transfer groups (8.0 months versus 7.0 months; p = 0.41). Postoperative follow-up was 24.0 months for nerve grafting versus 18.5 months for nerve transfer (p = 0.13). Clinically useful shoulder abduction, defined as British Medical Research Council grade M3 or greater, was obtained in 100 percent of nerve graft patients versus 87 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.09). Grade M4 or better strength was obtained in 85 percent of nerve graft patients and 73.9 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.32). Significant differences in functional outcomes between nerve graft and transfer procedures for posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries are not apparent at this time. Prospective outcomes studies are needed to better elucidate whether functional differences do exist. Therapeutic, IV.

  10. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

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    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  11. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

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    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  12. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response......-induced fall in SVR and, thereby, augmented the pressor response (+13 ± 3 mmHg at 10 s; P exercise. These findings suggest that a cholinergic mechanism is important for the BP...... resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions...

  13. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced 155 Eu: 3+ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor

  14. Selective retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons with [3H]choline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnoli, P.; Beaudet, A.; Stella, M.; Cuenod, M.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented which is consistent with a specific retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons following [ 3 H]choline application in their zone of termination. [ 3 H]Choline injection in the rat hippocampus leads to perikaryal retrograde labeling in the ipsilateral medial septal nuclease and nucleus of the diagonal band, thus delineating an established cholinergic pathway, while only diffuse presumably anterograde labeling was observed in the lateral septum, the entorhinal cortex, and the opposite hippocampus. After [ 3 H]choline injection in the pigeon visual Wulst, only the ipsilateral thalamic relay, of all inputs, showed similar perikaryal retrograde labeling, an observation supporting the suggestion that at least some thalamo-Wulst neurons are cholinergic

  15. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  16. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  17. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  18. Pedunculopontine cholinergic cell loss in hallucinating Parkinson disease patients but not in dementia with Lewy bodies patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepp, D.H.; Ruiter, A.M.; Galis, Y.; van der Voorn, J.P.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Berendse, H.W.; Foncke, E.M.J.; van de Berg, W.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a cholinergic deficit in Parkinson disease (PD) and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) that plays a role in a variety of clinical symptoms, including visual hallucinations (VH). The aim of this study was to assess cholinergic neuronal loss and PD and Alzheimer disease pathology in the

  19. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have...

  20. Using cholinergic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulators to improve memory via enhancement of brain cholinergic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Caroline; Jatzke, Claudia; Wegener, Nico; Gravius, Andreas; Danysz, Wojciech

    2012-12-15

    Benzylquinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is a recently described cholinergic muscarinic M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator having potential as cognitive enhancer in dementia. The present study focused on the characterisation of BQCA's mode of action in relation to positive effects on memory and side-effects in an animal model. To get insight into this mode of action, in vitro receptor potency/left shift experiments in cells stably expressing the rat's M(1) receptor were performed. They revealed an inflection point value of BQCA corresponding to 306nM, and potentiation of the agonist response up to 47-fold in presence of 10μM of BQCA. In vivo, brain microdialysis showed a maximal brain level of 270nM, 40min after i.p. administration at 10mg/kg. Based on in vitro data obtained with this dose, it can be concluded that BQCA reaches brain levels which should potentiate the agonist response about 4-fold. Behavioural data confirmed that BQCA used at 10mg/kg attenuated scopolamine-induced memory deficit in a spontaneous alternation task. Moreover, BQCA showed no side effect at 10mg/kg and above in spontaneous locomotion and salivation tests. The profile of BQCA observed in the present study displays a clear advantage over the M(1)-M(3) agonist cevimeline. The present data show the therapeutic potential of the M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator BQCA for the treatment of memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  2. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  3. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A.; White, Valerie A.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-01-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the

  4. Participation of the cholinergic system in the ethanol-induced suppression of paradoxical sleep in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Papale

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is among the many consequences of ethanol abuse in both humans and rodents. Ethanol consumption can reduce REM or paradoxical sleep (PS in humans and rats, respectively. The first aim of this study was to develop an animal model of ethanol-induced PS suppression. This model administered intragastrically (by gavage to male Wistar rats (3 months old, 200-250 g 0.5 to 3.5 g/kg ethanol. The 3.5 g/kg dose of ethanol suppressed the PS stage compared with the vehicle group (distilled water during the first 2-h interval (0-2 h; 1.3 vs 10.2; P < 0.001. The second aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which ethanol suppresses PS. We examined the effects of cholinergic drug pretreatment. The cholinergic system was chosen because of the involvement of cholinergic neurotransmitters in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. A second set of animals was pretreated with 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/kg pilocarpine (cholinergic agonist or atropine (cholinergic antagonist. These drugs were administered 1 h prior to ethanol (3.5 g/kg or vehicle. Treatment with atropine prior to vehicle or ethanol produced a statistically significant decrease in PS, whereas pilocarpine had no effect on minutes of PS. Although the mechanism by which ethanol induces PS suppression is not fully understood, these data suggest that the cholinergic system is not the only system involved in this interaction.

  5. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  6. Disuse Induced Changes in the Cholinergic System of Sciatic Nerve and Slow and Fast Twitch Muscle of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Hindlimb suspension was used as a model of disuse in experiments studing the effects of reduced muscle activity on AChE and its molecular forms, choline acetyltransferase and nicotinic receptor binding in innervated slow and fast muscle. The weight of SOL was reduced to 64% within one week and continued to decrease progressively up to the third week when the weight was reduced to 40% as compared to controls. EDL showed a significant decrease in its weight only at the end of three weeks hypokinesia when it was reduced to 71% of control. Biochemical and histochemical findings are summarized. From these data and from morphological findings it is evident that some properties of skeletal muscles are strongly dependent on patterns and level of loadbearing and on motor unit activiy. With suspension-induced disuse, the usually slow SOL appeared to change its characteristics such as fiber type distribution and AChE activity to one that more resembled a faster muscle. It is important to note that hypokinesia induced changes either physiological, biochemical or morphological, are totally reversible as the induced changes returned to control levels within a week after cessation of disuse.

  7. Thalamic cholinergic innervation and postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martijn L T M; Albin, Roger L; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J H; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of postural instability in Parkinson's disease remains poorly understood. Normal postural function depends in part on the ability of the postural control system to integrate visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory information. Degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus complex and their thalamic efferent terminals has been implicated in postural control deficits in Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of cholinergic terminal loss in thalamus and cortex, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, on postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease. We studied 124 subjects with Parkinson's disease (32 female/92 male; 65.5 ± 7.4 years old; 6.0 ± 4.2 years motor disease duration; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 2.4 ± 0.5) and 25 control subjects (10 female/15 male, 66.8 ± 10.1 years old). All subjects underwent (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 and (11)C-methylpiperidin-4-yl propionate acetylcholinesterase positron emission tomography and the sensory organization test balance platform protocol. Measures of dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal integrity were obtained, i.e. striatal vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 binding (distribution volume ratio) and thalamic and cortical acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rate per minute (k3), respectively. Total centre of pressure excursion (speed), a measure of total sway, and sway variability were determined for individual sensory organization test conditions. Based on normative data, principal component analysis was performed to reduce postural sensory organization functions to robust factors for regression analysis with the dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal data. Factor analysis demonstrated two factors with eigenvalues >2 that explained 52.2% of the variance, mainly reflecting postural sway during sensory organization test Conditions 1-3 and 5, respectively. Regression

  8. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  9. Effect of galantamine on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and spontaneous cholinergic synaptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texidó, Laura; Ros, Esteve; Martín-Satué, Mireia; López, Susana; Aleu, Jordi; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2005-01-01

    Various types of anticholinesterasic agents have been used to improve the daily activities of Alzheimer's disease patients. It was recently demonstrated that Galantamine, described as a molecule with anticholinesterasic properties, is also an allosteric enhancer of human α4β2 neuronal nicotinic receptor activity. We explored its effect on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Galantamine, at a concentration of 0.1 μM, increased the amplitude of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion currents in the human α7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, but caused inhibition at higher concentrations. The maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 22% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, was observed at a concentration of 250 μM Ach. The same enhancing effect was obtained in oocytes transplanted with Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) isolated from the electric organ, but in this case the optimal concentration of galantamine was 1 μM. In this case, the maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 35% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, occurred at a concentration of 50 μM ACh. Galantamine affects not only the activity of post-synaptic receptors but also the activity of nerve terminals. At a concentration of 1 μM, quantal spontaneous events, recorded in a cholinergic synapse, increased their amplitude, an effect which was independent of the anticholinesterasic activity associated with this compound. The anticholinesterasic effect was recorded in preparations treated with a galantamine concentration of 10 μM. In conclusion, our results show that galantamine enhances human α7 neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor activity. It also enhances muscular AChRs and the size of spontaneous cholinergic synaptic events. However, only a very narrow range of galantamine concentrations can be used for enhancing effects. PMID:15834443

  10. Cholinergic stimulation prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes: Evidence for the modulation of Th17 effector cells via an IFNgamma-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junu George

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I diabetes (T1D results from T cell-mediated damage of pancreatic β-cells and loss of insulin production. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway represents a physiological link connecting the central nervous and immune systems via vagus nerve, and functions to control the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Using the multiple-low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ model to induce experimental autoimmune diabetes, we investigated the potential of regulating the development of hyperglycemia through administration of paraoxon, a highly specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI. We demonstrate that pretreatment with paraoxon prevented hyperglycemia in STZ-treated C57BL/6 mice. This correlated with a reduction in T cell infiltration into pancreatic islets and preservation of the structure and functionality of β-cells. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic tissue revealed that increased peripheral cholinergic activity prevented STZ-mediated loss of insulin production, this being associated with a reduction in IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 proinflammatory cytokines. Intracellular cytokine analysis in splenic T cells demonstrated that inhibition of AChE led to a shift in STZ-induced immune response from a predominantly disease-causing IL-17-expressing Th17 cells to IFNγ-positive Th1 cells. Consistent with this conclusion, inhibition of AChE failed to prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia in IFNγ-deficient mice. Our results provide mechanistic evidence for the prevention of murine T1D by inhibition of AChE and suggest a promising strategy for modulating disease severity.

  11. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Holm; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael Linnemann

    2014-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved...... in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7–P15), nicotine induced larger...... intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15–P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells...

  12. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  13. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2012-02-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  14. Responses of neurons of lizard's, Lacerta viridis, vestibular nuclei to electrical stimulation of the ipsi- and contralateral VIIIth nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Precht, W; Ozawa, S

    1975-03-22

    Field and intracellular potentials were recorded in the vestibular nuclei of the lizard following stimulation of the ipsi- and contralateral vestibular nerves. The field potentials induced by ipsilateral VIIIth nerve stimulation consisted of an early negative or positive-negative wave (presynaptic component) followed by a slow negativity (transsynaptic component). The spatial distribution of the field potential complex closely paralleled the extension of the vestibular nuclei. Mono- and polysynaptic EPSPs were recorded from vestibular neurons after ipsilateral VIIIth nerve stimulation. In some neurons early depolarizations preceded the EPSPs. These potentials may be elicited by electrical transmission. Often spikelike partial responses were superimposed on the EPSPs. It is assumed that these potentials represent dendritic spikes. Contralateral VIIIth nerve stimulation generated disynaptic and polysynaptic IPSPs in some neurons and EPSPs in others. The possible role of commissural inhibition in phylogeny is discussed. In a group of vestibular neurons stimulation of the ipsilateral VIIIth nerve evoked full action potentials with latencies ranging from 0.25-1.1msec. These potentials are caused by antidromic activation of neurons which send their axons to the labyrinth.

  15. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  16. Post-inflammatory Ileitis Induces Non-neuronal Purinergic Signaling Adjustments of Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Myenteric Plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Vieira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling between ATP overflow and extracellular adenosine formation changes purinergic signaling in post-inflammatory ileitis. Adenosine neuromodulation deficits were ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular adenine nucleotides in the inflamed ileum. Here, we hypothesized that inflammation-induced changes in cellular density may also account to unbalance the release of purines and their influence on [3H]acetylcholine release from longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations of the ileum of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS-treated rats. The population of S100β-positive glial cells increase, whereas Ano-1-positive interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs diminished, in the ileum 7-days after the inflammatory insult. In the absence of changes in the density of VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves detected by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, the inflamed myenteric plexus released smaller amounts of [3H]acetylcholine which also became less sensitive to neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin (1 μM. Instead, [3H]acetylcholine release was attenuated by sodium fluoroacetate (5 mM, carbenoxolone (10 μM and A438079 (3 μM, which prevent activation of glial cells, pannexin-1 hemichannels and P2X7 receptors, respectively. Sodium fluoroacetate also decreased ATP overflow without significantly affecting the extracellular adenosine levels, thus indicating that surplus ATP release parallels reactive gliosis in post-inflammatory ileitis. Conversely, loss of ICCs may explain the lower amounts of adenosine detected in TNBS-treated preparations, since blockade of Cav3 (T-type channels existing in ICCs with mibefradil (3 μM or inhibition of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 with dipyridamole (0.5 μM, both decreased extracellular adenosine. Data indicate that post-inflammatory ileitis operates a shift on purinergic neuromodulation reflecting the upregulation of ATP-releasing enteric glial cells and

  17. Fetal cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and necrotizing enterocolitis: the brain-gut connection begins in utero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eGarzoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is an acute neonatal inflammatory disease that affects the intestine and may result in necrosis, systemic sepsis and multisystem organ failure. NEC affects 5-10% of all infants with birth weight ≤ 1500 g or gestational age less than 30 weeks. Chorioamnionitis (CA is the main manifestation of pathological inflammation in the fetus and is strongly associated with NEC. CA affects 20% of full-term pregnancies and up to 60% of preterm pregnancies and, notably, is often an occult finding. Intrauterine exposure to inflammatory stimuli may switch innate immunity cells such as macrophages to a reactive phenotype (‘priming’. Confronted with renewed inflammatory stimuli during labour or postnatally, such sensitized cells can sustain a chronic or exaggerated production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with NEC (two-hit hypothesis. Via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a neurally mediated innate anti-inflammatory mechanism, higher levels of vagal activity are associated with lower systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This effect is mediated by the α7 subunit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR on macrophages. The gut is the most extensive organ innervated by the vagus nerve; it is also the primary site of innate immunity in the newborn. Here we review the mechanisms of possible neuroimmunological brain-gut interactions involved in the induction and control of antenatal intestinal inflammatory response and priming. We propose a neuroimmunological framework to 1 study the long-term effects of perinatal intestinal response to infection and 2 to uncover new targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention.

  18. DC-Evoked Modulation of Excitability of Myelinated Nerve Fibers and Their Terminal Branches; Differences in Sustained Effects of DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Dominik; Jankowska, Elzbieta

    2018-03-15

    Direct current (DC) evokes long-lasting changes in neuronal networks both presynaptically and postsynaptically and different mechanisms were proposed to be involved in them. Different mechanisms were also suggested to account for the different dynamics of presynaptic DC actions on myelinated nerve fibers stimulated before they entered the spinal gray matter and on their terminal branches. The aim of the present study was to examine whether these different dynamics might be related to differences in the involvement of K + channels. To this end, we compared effects of the K + channel blocker 4-amino-pyridine (4-AP) on DC-evoked changes in the excitability of afferent fibers stimulated within the dorsal columns (epidurally) and within their projection areas in the dorsal horn and motor nuclei (intraspinally). 4-AP was applied systemically in deeply anesthetized rats. DC-evoked increases in the excitability of epidurally stimulated afferent nerve fibers, and increases in field potentials evoked by these fibers, were not affected by 4-AP. In contrast, sustained decreases rather than increases in the excitability of intraspinally stimulated terminal nerve branches were evoked by local application of DC in conjunction with 4-AP. The study leads to the conclusion that 4-AP-sensitive K + channels contribute to the sustained DC-evoked post-polarization increases in the excitability at the level of terminal branches of nerve fibers but not of the nodes of Ranvier nor within the juxta-paranodal regions where other mechanisms would be involved in inducing the sustained DC-evoked changes. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyman, M.; Cefaliello, C.; Ferrara, E.; De Stefano, R.; Lavina, Z.S.; Crispino, M.; Squillace, A.; van Minnen, J.; Kaplan, B.B.; Giuditta, A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells

  20. Intra-Amniotic LPS Induced Region-Specific Changes in Presynaptic Bouton Densities in the Ovine Fetal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Strackx

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Chorioamnionitis has been associated with increased risk for fetal brain damage. Although, it is now accepted that synaptic dysfunction might be responsible for functional deficits, synaptic densities/numbers after a fetal inflammatory challenge have not been studied in different regions yet. Therefore, we tested in this study the hypothesis that LPS-induced chorioamnionitis caused profound changes in synaptic densities in different regions of the fetal sheep brain. Material and Methods. Chorioamnionitis was induced by a 10 mg intra-amniotic LPS injection at two different exposure intervals. The fetal brain was studied at 125 days of gestation (term = 150 days either 2 (LPS2D group or 14 days (LPS14D group after LPS or saline injection (control group. Synaptophysin immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the presynaptic density in layers 2-3 and 5-6 of the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, entorhinal cortex, and piriforme cortex, in the nucleus caudatus and putamen and in CA1/2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Results. There was a significant reduction in presynaptic bouton densities in layers 2-3 and 5-6 of the motor cortex and in layers 2-3 of the entorhinal and the somatosensory cortex, in the nucleus caudate and putamen and the CA1/2 and CA3 of the hippocampus in the LPS2D compared to control animals. Only in the motor cortex and putamen, the presynaptic density was significantly decreased in the LPS14 D compared to the control group. No changes were found in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the piriforme cortex. Conclusion. We demonstrated that LPS-induced chorioamnionitis caused a decreased density in presynaptic boutons in different areas in the fetal brain. These synaptic changes seemed to be region-specific, with some regions being more affected than others, and seemed to be transient in some regions.

  1. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  3. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  4. Quantal analysis reveals a functional correlation between presynaptic and postsynaptic efficacy in excitatory connections from rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardingham, Neil R; Read, Jenny C A; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Nelson, J Charmaine; Jack, J Julian B; Bannister, Neil J

    2010-01-27

    At many central synapses, the presynaptic bouton and postsynaptic density are structurally correlated. However, it is unknown whether this correlation extends to the functional properties of the synapses. To investigate this, we made recordings from synaptically coupled pairs of pyramidal neurons in rat visual cortex. The mean peak amplitude of EPSPs recorded from pairs of L2/3 neurons ranged between 40 microV and 2.9 mV. EPSP rise times were consistent with the majority of the synapses being located on basal dendrites; this was confirmed by full anatomical reconstructions of a subset of connected pairs. Over a third of the connections could be described using a quantal model that assumed simple binomial statistics. Release probability (P(r)) and quantal size (Q), as measured at the somatic recording site, showed considerable heterogeneity between connections. However, across the population of connections, values of P(r) and Q for individual connections were positively correlated with one another. This correlation also held for inputs to layer 5 pyramidal neurons from both layer 2/3 and neighboring layer 5 pyramidal neurons, suggesting that during development of cortical connections presynaptic and postsynaptic strengths are dependently scaled. For 2/3 to 2/3 connections, mean EPSP amplitude was correlated with both Q and P(r) values but uncorrelated with N, the number of functional release sites mediating the connection. The efficacy of a cortical connection is thus set by coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic strength.

  5. Calcium microdomains at presynaptic active zones of vertebrate hair cells unmasked by stochastic deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolozzi, Mario; Lelli, Andrea; Mammano, Fabio

    2008-08-01

    Signal transduction by auditory and vestibular hair cells involves an impressive ensemble of finely tuned control mechanisms, strictly dependent on the local intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The study of Ca(2+) dynamics in hair cells typically combines Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent indicators (dyes), patch clamp and optical microscopy to produce images of the patterns of fluorescence of a Ca(2+) indicator following various stimulation protocols. Here we describe a novel method that combines electrophysiological recordings, fluorescence imaging and numerical simulations to effectively deconvolve Ca(2+) signals within cytoplasmic microdomains that would otherwise remain inaccessible to direct observation. The method relies on the comparison of experimental data with virtual signals derived from a Monte Carlo reaction-diffusion model based on a realistic reconstruction of the relevant cell boundaries in three dimensions. The model comprises Ca(2+) entry at individual presynaptic active zones followed by diffusion, buffering, extrusion and release of Ca(2+). Our results indicate that changes of the hair cell [Ca(2+)](i) during synaptic transmission are primarily controlled by the Ca(2+) endogenous buffers both at short (hair cell endogenous Ca(2+) buffers and Ca(2+)-ATPases. We finally show that experimental fluorescence data collected during Ca(2+) influx are not interpreted correctly if the [Ca(2+)](i) is estimated by assuming that Ca(2+) equilibrates instantly with its reactants. In our opinion, this approach is of potentially general interest as it can be easily adapted to the study of Ca(2+) dynamics in diverse biological systems.

  6. 123-I ioflupane (Datscan® presynaptic nigrostriatal imaging in patients with movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Soriano Castrejón

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available 123-I Ioflupane (Datscan® presynaptic imaging has been shown to have a significant utility in the assessment of patients with movement disorders 123-I Ioflupane SPECT is able to distinguish between Parkinson’s disease (PD and other forms of parkinsonism without degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, including a common movement disorder such as essential tremor, and to assess disease progression in PD and other neurodegenerative disorders involving the substantia nigra.A imagem pré-sináptica através de 123-I Ioflupane (Datscan® tem mostrado um papel significante na avaliação de pacientes com distúrbios do movimento. 123-I Ioflupane SPECT é capaz de distinguir entre Mal de Parkinson (MP e outras formas de parkinsonismo sem degenerações da via nigroestriatal incluindo um distúrbio comum de movimento parecido com o tremor essencial e para medir a evolução da doença no Mal de Parkinson e outros distúrbios neurodegenerativos envolvendo a substantia nigra.

  7. A postsynaptic PI3K-cII dependent signaling controller for presynaptic homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, Anna G; Ford, Kevin J; Wang, Tingting; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Presynaptic homeostatic plasticity stabilizes information transfer at synaptic connections in organisms ranging from insect to human. By analogy with principles of engineering and control theory, the molecular implementation of PHP is thought to require postsynaptic signaling modules that encode homeostatic sensors, a set point, and a controller that regulates transsynaptic negative feedback. The molecular basis for these postsynaptic, homeostatic signaling elements remains unknown. Here, an electrophysiology-based screen of the Drosophila kinome and phosphatome defines a postsynaptic signaling platform that includes a required function for PI3K-cII, PI3K-cIII and the small GTPase Rab11 during the rapid and sustained expression of PHP. We present evidence that PI3K-cII localizes to Golgi-derived, clathrin-positive vesicles and is necessary to generate an endosomal pool of PI(3)P that recruits Rab11 to recycling endosomal membranes. A morphologically distinct subdivision of this platform concentrates postsynaptically where we propose it functions as a homeostatic controller for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling. PMID:29303480

  8. Unique presynaptic alpha 2-receptor selectivity and specificity of the antihypertensive agent moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, B I

    1988-10-01

    The characteristics of the alpha-receptor activating property of the new antihypertensive agent moxonidine (4-chloro-N-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinamine, BDF 5895) was studied using peripheral vasculature and brain membranes of various animals. Moxonidine exerted a full agonist effect in elevating diastolic blood pressure in the pithed rat. Activation of postsynaptic alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors contribute to the vasoconstrictory effect in rats. In the vasculature of the rabbit, moxonidine was a full agonist at presynaptic alpha 2-receptors in inhibiting transmitter release induced by electrical stimulation of pulmonary artery strips. At postsynaptic sites, exogenously applied moxonidine was a full agonist at alpha 1-receptors in the isolated aorta, pulmonary artery and vena cava of the rabbit. Selectivity for alpha 2-receptors in the pulmonary artery was 106-fold. In rat brain membranes, moxonidine showed 288-fold greater selectivity for alpha 2-receptors, when the displacement of [3H]-rauwolscine was compared with the displacement of [3H]-prazosin. On the whole, clonidine exhibited greater potency than moxonidine on both alpha-receptor subtypes, but moxonidine consistently showed greater alpha 2-receptor selectivity than clonidine. In the guinea pig myocardium, moxonidine caused neither bradycardia nor tachycardia in the isolated right atrium and produced a negligible positive inotropic effect at 100 mumol/l in the isolated papillary muscle.

  9. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Andrew B; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV) markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  10. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Hellman

    Full Text Available During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  11. Phagocytic clearance of presynaptic dystrophies by reactive astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Arboledas, Angela; Davila, Jose C; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Navarro, Victoria; Nuñez-Diaz, Cristina; Sanchez-Varo, Raquel; Sanchez-Mico, Maria Virtudes; Trujillo-Estrada, Laura; Fernandez-Valenzuela, Juan Jose; Vizuete, Marisa; Comella, Joan X; Galea, Elena; Vitorica, Javier; Gutierrez, Antonia

    2018-03-01

    Reactive astrogliosis, a complex process characterized by cell hypertrophy and upregulation of components of intermediate filaments, is a common feature in brains of Alzheimer's patients. Reactive astrocytes are found in close association with neuritic plaques; however, the precise role of these glial cells in disease pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, using immunohistochemical techniques and light and electron microscopy, we report that plaque-associated reactive astrocytes enwrap, engulf and may digest presynaptic dystrophies in the hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mice. Microglia, the brain phagocytic population, was apparently not engaged in this clearance. Phagocytic reactive astrocytes were present in 35% and 67% of amyloid plaques at 6 and 12 months of age, respectively. The proportion of engulfed dystrophic neurites was low, around 7% of total dystrophies around plaques at both ages. This fact, along with the accumulation of dystrophic neurites during disease course, suggests that the efficiency of the astrocyte phagocytic process might be limited or impaired. Reactive astrocytes surrounding and engulfing dystrophic neurites were also detected in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's patients by confocal and ultrastructural analysis. We posit that the phagocytic activity of reactive astrocytes might contribute to clear dysfunctional synapses or synaptic debris, thereby restoring impaired neural circuits and reducing the inflammatory impact of damaged neuronal parts and/or limiting the amyloid pathology. Therefore, potentiation of the phagocytic properties of reactive astrocytes may represent a potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hippocampal cholinergic interneurons visualized with the choline acetyltransferase promoter: anatomical distribution, intrinsic membrane properties, neurochemical characteristics, and capacity for cholinergic modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eYi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Release of acetylcholine (ACh in the hippocampus (HC occurs during exploration, arousal, and learning. Although the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB is the major extrinsic source of cholinergic input to the HC, cholinergic neurons intrinsic to the HC also exist but remain poorly understood. Here, ChAT-tauGFP and ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP (ChAT-Rosa mice were examined in HC. The HC of ChAT-tauGFP mice was densely innervated with GFP-positive axons, often accompanied by large GFP-positive structures, some of which were Neurotrace/DAPI-negative and likely represent large axon terminals. In the HC of ChAT-Rosa mice, ChAT-YFP cells were Neurotrace-positive and more abundant in CA3 and dentate gyrus than CA1 with partial overlapping with calretinin/VIP. Moreover, an anti-ChAT antibody consistently showed ChAT immunoreactivity in ChAT-YFP cells from MS-DBB but rarely from HC. Furthermore, ChAT-YFP cells from CA1 stratum radiatum/stratum lacunosum moleculare (SR/SLM exhibited a stuttering firing phenotype but a delayed firing phenotype in stratum pyramidale (SP of CA3. Input resistance and capacitance were also different between CA1 SR/LM and CA3 SP ChAT-YFP cells. Bath application of ACh increased firing frequency in all ChAT-YFP cells; however, cholinergic modulation was larger in CA1 SR/SLM than CA3 SP ChAT-YFP cells. Finally, CA3 SP ChAT-YFP cells exhibited a wider AP half-width and weaker cholinergic modulation than YFP-negative CA3 pyramidal cells. Consistent with CRE expression in a subpopulation of principal cells, optogenetic stimulation evoked glutamatergic postsynaptic currents in CA1 SR/SLM interneurons. In conclusion, the presence of fluorescently labeled hippocampal cells common to both ChAT-Rosa and ChAT-tauGFP mice are in good agreement with previous reports on the existence of cholinergic interneurons, but both transgenic mouse lines exhibited unexpected anatomical features that departed considerably from earlier observations.

  13. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  14. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-[3H]nicotine or alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin; [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by [3H]nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment

  15. Cholinergic Modulation during Acquisition of Olfactory Fear Conditioning Alters Learning and Stimulus Generalization in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Gooch, Allison; Lee, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in olfactory fear learning. Mice receiving pairings of odor and foot shock displayed fear to the trained odor the following day. Pretraining injections of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine had no effect on subsequent freezing, while the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine significantly…

  16. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kaltsatou

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.

  17. Expression of the cholinergic signal-transduction pathway components during embryonic rat heart development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, D.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is present in the downstream (arterial) part of the embryonic chick and rat heart, but its functional significance was unclear. To establish whether other components of a cholinergic signal-transduction pathway are present

  18. Activation of the reticulothalamic cholinergic pathway by the major metabolites of aniracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Shirane, M

    1999-09-10

    The aim of the study was to further investigate the effects of aniracetam, a cognition enhancer, and its metabolites on the brain cholinergic system. We measured choline acetyltransferase activity and acetylcholine release using in vivo brain microdialysis in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). The enzyme activity in the pons-midbrain and hippocampus, and basal acetylcholine release in the nucleus reticularis thalami were lower in SHRSP than in age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats, indicating central cholinergic deficits in SHRSP. Repeated treatment of aniracetam (50 mg/kg p.o. x 11 for 6 days) preferentially increased the enzyme activity in the thalamus, whereas decreased it in the striatum. Among the metabolites of aniracetam, local perfusion of N-anisoyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0.1 and/or 1 microM) and p-anisic acid (1 microM) into the nucleus reticularis thalami, dorsal hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of SHRSP produced a significant but delayed increase of acetylcholine release. We failed, however, to find any effect of aniracetam itself. A direct injection of N-anisoyl-GABA (1 nmol) into the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus of SHRSP enhanced the release in the nucleus reticularis thalami. Thus, these data prove that aniracetam can facilitate central cholinergic neurotransmission via both metabolites. Based on its pharmacokinetic profile, N-anisoyl-GABA may contribute to the clinical effects of aniracetam, mainly by acting on the reticulothalamic cholinergic pathway.

  19. The effect of the augmentation of cholinergic neurotransmission by nicotine on EEG indices of visuospatial attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H.N.A.; Bocker, K.B.E.; Deschamps, P.K.H.; Kemner, C.; Kenemans, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic system has been implicated in visuospatial attention but the exact role remains unclear. In visuospatial attention, bias refers to neuronal signals that modulate the sensitivity of sensory cortex, while disengagement refers to the decoupling of attention making reorienting possible.

  20. Enhanced flexibility of place discrimination learning by targeting striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kana; Nishizawa, Kayo; Fukabori, Ryoji; Kai, Nobuyuki; Shiota, Akira; Ueda, Masatsugu; Tsutsui, Yuji; Sakata, Shogo; Matsushita, Natsuki; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2014-05-06

    Behavioural flexibility is mediated through the neural circuitry linking the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia. Here we conduct selective elimination of striatal cholinergic interneurons in transgenic rats by immunotoxin-mediated cell targeting. Elimination of cholinergic interneurons from the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), but not from the dorsolateral striatum, results in enhanced reversal and extinction learning, sparing the acquisition of place discrimination. This enhancement is prevented by infusion of a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist into the DMS either in the acquisition, reversal or extinction phase. In addition, gene-specific silencing of M4 muscarinic receptor by lentiviral expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) mimics the place reversal learning promoted by cholinergic elimination, whereas shRNA-mediated gene silencing of M1 muscarinic receptor shows the normal performance of reversal learning. Our data indicate that DMS cholinergic interneurons inhibit behavioural flexibility, mainly through the M4 muscarinic receptor, suggesting that this role is engaged to the stabilization of acquired reward contingency and the suppression of response switch to changed contingency.

  1. Cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons relay striatal information to the optic tectum in amphibians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, O.; Smeets, W.J.A.J.; Munoz, M.; Sanchez-Camacho, C.; Pena, A.S.; Lopez, J.M.; Gonzalez, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the amphibians Rana perezi and Xenopus laevis, the involvement of cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons in the relay of basal ganglia inputs to the tectum was investigated. Tract-tracing experiments, in which anterograde tracers were applied to the basal ganglia and retrograde tracers to the

  2. Prolonged Expression of Puma in Cholinergic Amacrine Cells During the Development of Rat Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Jun; Mori, Tetsuji; Yamada, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    During development of the nervous system, large numbers of neurons are overproduced and then eliminated by programmed cell death. Puma is a BH3-only protein that is reported to be involved in the initiation of developmental programmed cell death in rodent retinal neurons. The expression and cellular localization of Puma in retinal tissues during development are not, however, well known. Here the authors report the expression pattern of Puma during retinal development in the rat. During the period of programmed cell death in the retina, Puma was expressed in some members of each retinal neuron, including retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, horizontal cells, and photoreceptor cells. Although the developmental programmed cell death of cholinergic amacrine cells is known to be independent of Puma, this protein was expressed in almost all their dendrites and somata of cholinergic amacrine cells at postnatal age 2 to 3 weeks, and it continued to be detected in cholinergic dendrites in the inner plexiform layer for up to 8 weeks after birth. These results suggest that Puma has some significant roles in retinal neurons after eye opening, especially that of cholinergic amacrine cells, in addition to programmed cell death of retinal neurons before eye opening. PMID:22736709

  3. GABAERGIC MODULATION OF STRIATAL CHOLINERGIC INTERNEURONS - AN IN-VIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; WESTERINK, BHC

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons have been shown to receive input from striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell elements. GABA is known to act on two different types of receptors, the GABA(A) and the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vivo microdialysis, we have studied the effect of

  4. BEHAVIORAL AND BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF EARLY POSTNATAL CHOLINERGIC LESION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GASPAR, E; HEERINGA, M; MARKEL, E; LUITEN, PGM; NYAKAS, C

    The effects of early postnatal (PD 8) intracerebroventricular injection of ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF64A) on development of open-field and cognitive behaviors and cholinergic markers in several brain areas were examined in the rat. The cholinotoxin was bilaterally administered in a

  5. Cholinergic Septo-Hippocampal Innervation Is Required for Trace Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan-Lozano, Angela; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro; Carrion, Angel Manuel; Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of a selective lesion in rats, with 192-IgG-saporin, of the cholinergic neurons located in the medial septum/diagonal band (MSDB) complex on the acquisition of classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms. The MSDB lesion induced a marked deficit in the acquisition, but not in the retrieval, of eyeblink classical…

  6. Dysautonomia due to reduced cholinergic neurotransmission causes cardiac remodeling and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A S; Sirvente, Raquel A; Salemi, Vera M; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G; Ferreira, Anderson J; Brum, Patricia C; Resende, Rodrigo R; Cruz, Jader S; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F; de Almeida, Alvair P; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction.

  7. Urotensin II modulates rapid eye movement sleep through activation of brainstem cholinergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Sánchez-Alavez, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a cyclic neuropeptide with strong vasoconstrictive activity in the peripheral vasculature. UII receptor mRNA is also expressed in the CNS, in particular in cholinergic neurons located in the mesopontine tegmental area, including the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) and later...... brainstem neurons....

  8. Modulation of cholinergic airway reactivity and nitric oxide production by endogenous arginase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Hamer, M.A M; Pethe, S; Vadon-Le Goff, S; Boucher, J.-L; Zaagsma, Hans

    1 Cholinergic airway constriction is functionally antagonized by agonist-induced constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO). Since cNOS and arginase, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, use L-arginine as a common substrate, competition between both enzymes

  9. Nerve growth factor affects 11C-nicotine binding, blood flow, EEG, and verbal episodic memory in an Alzheimer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, L.; Nordberg, A.; Holst, H. von

    1992-01-01

    Based on animal research suggesting that nerve growth factor (NGF) can stimulate central cholinergic neurons, the known losses of cholinergic innervation of the cortices in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and our experience of infusing NGF to support adrenal grafts in parkinsonian patients, we have initiated clinical trials of NGF infusions into the brain of patients with AD. Here we report a follow-up of our first case, a 69-year-old woman, with symptoms of dementia since 8 years. Intraventricular infusion of 6.6 mg NGF during three months resulted in a marked transient increase in uptake and binding of 11 C-nicotine in frontal and temporal cortex and a persistent increase in cortical blood flow as measured by PET as well as progressive decreases of slow wave EEG activity. After one month of NGF, tests of verbal episodic memory were improved whereas other cognitive tests were not. No adverse effects could be ascribed to the NGF infusion. Taken together, the results of this case study indicate that NGF may counteract cholinergic deficits in AD, and suggest that further clinical trials of NGF infusion in AD are warranted. (authors)

  10. Homocysteine aggravates ROS-induced depression of transmitter release from motor nerve terminals: potential mechanism of peripheral impairment in motor neuron diseases associated with hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellya eBukharaeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (HCY is a pro-inflammatory sulphur-containing redox active endogenous amino acid, which concentration increases in neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. A widely held view suggests that HCY could contribute to neurodegeneration via promotion of oxidative stress. However, the action of HCY on motor nerve terminals has not been investigated so far. We previously reported that oxidative stress inhibited synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction, targeting primarily the motor nerve terminals. In the current study, we investigated the effect of HCY on oxidative stress-induced impairment of transmitter release at the mouse diaphragm muscle. The mild oxidant H2O2 decreased the intensity of spontaneous quantum release from nerve terminals (measured as the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, MEPPs without changes in the amplitude of MEPPs, indicating a presynaptic effect. Pre-treatment with HCY for 2 h only slightly affected both amplitude and frequency of MEPPs but increased the inhibitory potency of H2O2 almost two fold. As HCY can activate certain subtypes of glutamate NMDA receptors we tested the role of NMDA receptors in the sensitizing action of HCY. Remarkably, the selective blocker of NMDA receptors, AP-5 completely removed the sensitizing effect of HCY on the H2O2-induced presynaptic depressant effect. Thus, at the mammalian neuromuscular junction HCY largely increases the inhibitory effect of oxidative stress on transmitter release, via NMDA receptors activation. This combined effect of HCY and local oxidative stress can specifically contribute to the damage of presynaptic terminals in neurodegenerative motoneuron diseases, including ALS.

  11. Cholinergic markers in the cortex and hippocampus of some animal species and their correlation to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta-Salazar, E; Cuellar-Lemus, C A; Díaz-Cintra, S; Feria-Velasco, A I

    2014-10-01

    The cholinergic system includes neurons located in the basal forebrain and their long axons that reach the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. This system modulates cognitive function. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ageing, cognitive impairment is associated with progressive damage to cholinergic fibres, which leads us to the cholinergic hypothesis for AD. The AD produces alterations in the expression and activity of acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), enzymes specifically related to cholinergic system function. Both proteins play a role in cholinergic transmission, which is altered in both the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus due to ageing and AD. Dementia disorders are associated with the severe destruction and disorganisation of the cholinergic projections extending to both structures. Specific markers, such as anti-ChAT and anti-AChE antibodies, have been used in light immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy assays to study this system in adult members of certain animal species. This paper reviews the main immunomorphological studies of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in some animal species with particular emphasis on the cholinergic system and its relationship with the AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  13. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  14. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  15. Cholinergic circuitry functioning in patients with vascular cognitive impairment--no dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Rita; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Lanza, Giuseppe; Ferri, Raffaele; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Puglisi, Valentina; Pennisi, Manuela; Ricceri, Riccardo; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pennisi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    An impairment of central cholinergic activity, as evaluated non-invasively by the short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) of motor responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), was observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Conversely, the involvement of central cholinergic neurotransmission in vascular dementia (VaD) is still under debate and data on Vascular Cognitive Impairment--No Dementia (VCI-ND) at risk for future VaD are lacking. To test for the first time SAI in patients with VCI-ND. Single-pulse TMS measures of cortical excitability and SAI were evaluated in 25 VCI-ND patients with subcortical ischemic lesions and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Functional status, neuropsychological tests evaluating frontal lobe abilities, and white matter lesions (WMLs) load were assessed. A significant difference was found between patients and controls for the mean SAI, although this result did not resist after the Bonferroni correction. In the whole group of patients and controls, SAI showed a correlation with worse scores at the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (r = 0.376, p r = 0.345, p < 0.05) but not with the WML severity. Central cholinergic pathway does not seem to be involved in VCI-ND, and the current results differ from those reported in primary cholinergic forms of dementia, such as AD. SAI might represent a valuable additional tool in the differential diagnosis of the dementing processes and in identifying potential responders to cholinergic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurturin enhances the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Robert D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms responsible for the survival and preservation of function for adult parasympathetic ganglion neurons following injury remain incompletely understood. However, advances in the neurobiology of growth factors, neural development, and prevention of cell death have led to a surge of clinical interest for protective and regenerative neuromodulatory strategies, as surgical therapies for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers often result in neuronal axotomy and debilitating loss of sexual function or continence. In vitro studies have identified neurturin, a glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, as a neuromodulator for pelvic cholinergic neurons. We present the first in vivo report of the effects of neurturin upon the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat. Methods In these experiments, groups (n = 8 each consisted of uninjured controls and animals treated with injection of albumin (blinded crush control group, extended release neurotrophin-4 or neurturin to the site of cavernous nerve crush injury (100 μg per animal. After 5 weeks, recovery of erectile function (treatment effect was assessed by cavernous nerve electrostimulation and peak aortic pressures were measured. Investigators were unblinded to specific treatments after statistical analyses were completed. Results Erectile dysfunction was not observed in the sham group (mean maximal intracavernous pressure [ICP] increase of 117.5 ± 7.3 cmH2O, whereas nerve injury and albumin treatment (control produced a significant reduction in ICP elevation of 40.0 ± 6.3 cmH2O. Neurturin facilitated the preservation of erectile function, with an ICP increase of 55% at 62.0 ± 9.2 cmH2O (p Conclusion Treatment with neurturin at the site of cavernous nerve crush injury facilitates recovery of erectile function. Results support further investigation of neurturin as a neuroprotective and/or neuroregenerative

  17. Longterm effects of cardiac mediastinal nerve cryoablation on neural inducibility of atrial fibrillation in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Glavinovic, Tamara; Armour, J Andrew; Cardinal, René; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Kus, Teresa

    2011-04-26

    In canines, excessive activation of select mediastinal nerve inputs to the intrinsic cardiac nervous system induces atrial fibrillation (AF). Since ablation of neural elements is proposed as an adjunct to circumferential pulmonary vein ablation for AF, we investigated the short and long-term effects of mediastinal nerve ablation on AF inducibility. Under general anesthesia, in 11 dogs several mediastinal nerve sites were identified on the superior vena cava that, when stimulated electrically during the atrial refractory period, reproducibly initiated AF. Cryoablation of one nerve site was then performed and inducibility retested early (1-2 months post Cryo; n=7) or late (4 months post Cryo; n=4). Four additional dogs that underwent a sham procedure were retested 1 to 2 months post-surgery. Stimulation induced AF at 91% of nerve sites tested in control versus 21% nerve sites early and 54% late post-ablation (both P<0.05). Fewer stimuli were required to induce AF in controls versus the Early Cryo group; this capacity returned to normal values in the Late Cryo group. AF episodes were longer in control versus the Early or Late Cryo groups. Heart rate responses to vagal or stellate ganglion stimulation, as well as to local nicotine infusion into the right coronary artery, were similar in all groups. In conclusion, focal damage to intrinsic cardiac neuronal inputs causes short-term stunning of neuronal inducibility of AF without major loss of overall adrenergic or cholinergic efferent neuronal control. That recovery of AF inducibility occurs rapidly post-surgery indicates the plasticity of intrathoracic neuronal elements to focal injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional characterization of neuronal pre and postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes in guinea-pig submucosal plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, K. Z.; Barajas-Lopez, C.; Surprenant, A.

    1990-01-01

    1. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors on cell bodies of submucosal neurones, on presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals innervating submucosal neurones, and on presynaptic sympathetic fibres innervating submucosal arterioles were characterized in functional studies by use of subtype selective ligands. 2. Both membrane hyperpolarization and presynaptic inhibition of nicotinic excitatory synaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps) produced by UK 14304 were similarly antagonized by idazoxan, yohimbine. SKF 104078, WB 4101 and ARC-239. Antagonism was competitive and dissociation equilibrium constants were the same for both effects. 3. Vasoconstriction of submucosal arterioles in response to stimulation of the sympathetic nerves (20 Hz for 2 s) was inhibited by UK 14304 and clonidine: concentrations producing half-maximum responses were 6 nm and 10 nM respectively. Idazoxan, yohimbine, WB 4101 and SKF 104078 antagonized this action, with dissociation constants similar to those for antagonism of the postsynaptic membrane hyperpolarization and presynaptic inhibition of nicotinic e.p.s.ps. 4. Oxymetazoline was a partial agonist when membrane hyperpolarization or presynaptic inhibition of nicotinic e.p.s.ps were measured but a full agonist when presynaptic inhibition of sympathetically-mediated arteriolar vasoconstriction was measured. As an agonist, oxymetazoline produced half maximum responses at 80-120 nM; the dissociation constant for oxymetazoline as an antagonist was 130 nM. 5. Neither prazosin nor chlorpromazine (up to 30 microM) altered any of the three responses to alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 6. It is concluded that alpha 2-adrenoceptors present on submucosal neuronal cell bodies, on presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals and on presynaptic sympathetic nerve terminals are the alpha 2A subtype. However, functional characterization of this subtype differs from that provided by ligand binding studies. PMID:1982232

  19. The origin of the anticholinesterase-induced repetitive activity of the phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation of the rat in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferry, C. B.

    1988-01-01

    1. Action potentials have been recorded in contracting muscle cells of the phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation from rats. After the organophosphorous anticholinesterase, ecothiopate, some cells fired repetitive action potentials. In 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o the repetitive activity was generated presynaptically or postsynaptically, and in 1 mM [Mg2+]o, probably only postsynaptically. 2. The repetitive action potentials in muscle were generated ectopically about 0.2 mm away from the usual site. 3. In 1 m...

  20. Nerve cross-bridging to enhance nerve regeneration in a rat model of delayed nerve repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    Full Text Available There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1 CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2 CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays.

  1. Use of fluorescent probes to follow membrane traffic in nerve terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guatimosim C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical tracers in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy have become widely used to follow the movement of synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals. The present review discusses the use of these optical methods to understand the regulation of exocytosis and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. The maintenance of neurotransmission depends on the constant recycling of synaptic vesicles and important insights have been gained by visualization of vesicles with the vital dye FM1-43. A number of questions related to the control of recycling of synaptic vesicles by prolonged stimulation and the role of calcium to control membrane internalization are now being addressed. It is expected that optical monitoring of presynaptic activity coupled to appropriate genetic models will contribute to the understanding of membrane traffic in synaptic terminals.

  2. The action of thallium acetate on neuromuscular transmission in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, H; Csicsaky, M; Krämer, U

    1984-03-01

    In the isolated phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation from the rat, thallium acetate induced a dose-dependent irreversible paralysis. There was a major time lag between the onset of the exposure and the decline in the indirectly elicited muscle twitches. The slope of the decline was in proportion to the applied concentration, which ranged from 1 X 10(-3) to 5 X 10(-6) mol/l. The paralysis was definitively manifest after approximately 40 min of incubation. In the phase of paralysis, both electrical stimulation of the muscle and chemical stimulation by addition of K+ were fully effective. However, addition of 4-aminopyridine and/or guanidine restored the indirect muscle twitches, indicating a previous reduction of synaptic activity by thallium. Lowering the Ca2+-concentration resulted in a reduced paralysis time. From these results it is suggested that thallium interferes with synaptic transmission by presynaptically antagonizing Ca2+-dependent processes.

  3. Common peroneal nerve entrapment with the communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve divides into tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve at the level of superior angle of popliteal fossa and variations in its branching pattern are common. The most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the lower limbs is common peroneal nerve entrapment at fibular head. Invariably it can also be trapped in ...

  4. Presynaptic neurones may contribute a unique glycoprotein to the extracellular matrix at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico; Carlson, Steven S.; Schweitzer, Erik; Kelly, Regis B.

    1985-04-01

    As the extracellular matrix at the original site of a neuromuscular junction seems to play a major part in the specificity of synaptic regeneration1-5, considerable attention has been paid to unique molecules localized to this region6-11. Here we describe an extracellular matrix glycoprotein of the elasmobranch electric organ that is localized near the nerve endings. By immunological criteria, it is synthesized in the cell bodies, transported down the axons and is related to a glycoprotein in the synaptic vesicles of the neurones that innervate the electric organ. It is apparently specific for these neurones, as it cannot be detected elsewhere in the nervous system of the fish. Therefore, neurones seem to contribute unique extracellular matrix glycoproteins to the synaptic region. Synaptic vesicles could be involved in transporting these glycoproteins to or from the nerve terminal surface.

  5. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  6. Genetically encoded pH-indicators reveal activity-dependent cytosolic acidification of Drosophila motor nerve termini in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Adam J; Chouhan, Amit K; Macleod, Gregory T

    2013-01-01

    All biochemical processes, including those underlying synaptic function and plasticity, are pH sensitive. Cytosolic pH (pHcyto) shifts are known to accompany nerve activity in situ, but technological limitations have prevented characterization of such shifts in vivo. Genetically encoded pH-indicators (GEpHIs) allow for tissue-specific in vivo measurement of pH. We expressed three different GEpHIs in the cytosol of Drosophila larval motor neurons and observed substantial presynaptic acidification in nerve termini during nerve stimulation in situ. SuperEcliptic pHluorin was the most useful GEpHI for studying pHcyto shifts in this model system. We determined the resting pH of the nerve terminal cytosol to be 7.30 ± 0.02, and observed a decrease of 0.16 ± 0.01 pH units when the axon was stimulated at 40 Hz for 4 s. Realkalinization occurred upon cessation of stimulation with a time course of 20.54 ± 1.05 s (τ). The chemical pH-indicator 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein corroborated these changes in pHcyto. Bicarbonate-derived buffering did not contribute to buffering of acid loads from short (≤4 s) trains of action potentials but did buffer slow (∼60 s) acid loads. The magnitude of cytosolic acid transients correlated with cytosolic Ca2+ increase upon stimulation, and partial inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase, a Ca2+/H+ exchanger, attenuated pHcyto shifts. Repeated stimulus trains mimicking motor patterns generated greater cytosolic acidification (∼0.30 pH units). Imaging through the cuticle of intact larvae revealed spontaneous pHcyto shifts in presynaptic termini in vivo, similar to those seen in situ during fictive locomotion, indicating that presynaptic pHcyto shifts cannot be dismissed as artifacts of ex vivo preparations. PMID:23401611

  7. Impaired neurotransmission in ether lipid-deficient nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodde, Alexander; Teigler, Andre; Brugger, Britta; Lehmann, Wolf D; Wieland, Felix; Berger, Johannes; Just, Wilhelm W

    2012-06-15

    Isolated defects of ether lipid (EL) biosynthesis in humans cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2 and type 3, serious peroxisomal disorders. Using a previously described mouse model [Rodemer, C., Thai, T.P., Brugger, B., Kaercher, T., Werner, H., Nave, K.A., Wieland, F., Gorgas, K., and Just, W.W. (2003) Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 12, 1881-1895], we investigated the effect of EL deficiency in isolated murine nerve terminals (synaptosomes) on the pre-synaptic release of the neurotransmitters (NTs) glutamate and acetylcholine. Both Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and Ca(2+)-independent efflux of the transmitters were affected. EL-deficient synaptosomes respire at a reduced rate and exhibit a lowered adenosin-5'-triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio. Consequently, ATP-driven processes, such as synaptic vesicle cycling and maintenance of Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis, might be disturbed. Analyzing reactive oxygen species in EL-deficient neural and non-neural tissues revealed that plasmalogens (PLs), the most abundant EL species in mammalian central nervous system, considerably contribute to the generation of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde. Although EL-deficient tissue contains less lipid peroxidation products, fibroblasts lacking ELs are more susceptible to induced oxidative stress. In summary, these results suggest that due to the reduced energy state of EL-deficient tissue, the Ca(2+)-independent efflux of NTs increases while the Ca(2+)-dependent release declines. Furthermore, lack of PLs is mainly compensated for by an increase in the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine and results in a significantly lowered level of lipid peroxidation products in the brain cortex and cerebellum.

  8. Presynaptic plasticity as a hallmark of rat stress susceptibility and antidepressant response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Nieto-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Two main questions are important for understanding and treating affective disorders: why are certain individuals susceptible or resilient to stress, and what are the features of treatment response and resistance? To address these questions, we used a chronic mild stress (CMS rat model of depression. When exposed to stress, a fraction of rats develops anhedonic-like behavior, a core symptom of major depression, while another subgroup of rats is resilient to CMS. Furthermore, the anhedonic-like state is reversed in about half the animals in response to chronic escitalopram treatment (responders, while the remaining animals are resistant (non-responder animals. Electrophysiology in hippocampal brain slices was used to identify a synaptic hallmark characterizing these groups of animals. Presynaptic properties were investigated at GABAergic synapses onto single dentate gyrus granule cells. Stress-susceptible rats displayed a reduced probability of GABA release judged by an altered paired-pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs (1.48 ± 0.25 compared with control (0.81 ± 0.05 and stress-resilient rats (0.78 ± 0.03. Spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs occurred less frequently in stress-susceptible rats compared with control and resilient rats. Finally, a subset of stress-susceptible rats responding to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment showed a normalization of the paired-pulse ratio (0.73 ± 0.06 whereas non-responder rats showed no normalization (1.2 ± 0.2. No changes in the number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons were observed. Thus, we provide evidence for a distinct GABAergic synaptopathy which associates closely with stress-susceptibility and treatment-resistance in an animal model of depression.

  9. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Fan; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-01-01

    Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN) of the central nervous system (CNS), there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat.

  10. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M Bráz

    Full Text Available Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN of the central nervous system (CNS, there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat.

  11. Presynaptic membrane receptors in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs, Josep; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Marta; Besalduch, Núria; Obis, Teresa; Priego, Mercedes; Hurtado, Erica

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have studied, in the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the local involvement in transmitter release of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors (mAChRs), purinergic adenosine autoreceptors (P1Rs), and trophic factor receptors (TFRs; for neurotrophins and trophic cytokines) during development and in the adult. At any given moment, the way in which a synapse works is largely the logical outcome of the confluence of these (and other) metabotropic signalling pathways on intracellular kinases, which phosphorylate protein targets and materialize adaptive changes. We propose an integrated interpretation of the complementary function of these receptors in the adult NMJ. The activity of a given receptor group can modulate a given combination of spontaneous, evoked, and activity-dependent release characteristics. For instance, P1Rs can conserve resources by limiting spontaneous quantal leak of ACh (an A1 R action) and protect synapse function, because stimulation with adenosine reduces the magnitude of depression during repetitive activity. The overall outcome of the mAChRs seems to contribute to upkeep of spontaneous quantal output of ACh, save synapse function by decreasing the extent of evoked release (mainly an M2 action), and reduce depression. We have also identified several links among P1Rs, mAChRs, and TFRs. We found a close dependence between mAChR and some TFRs and observed that the muscarinic group has to operate correctly if the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (trkB) is also to operate correctly, and vice versa. Likewise, the functional integrity of mAChRs depends on P1Rs operating normally. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Presynaptic [Ca2+] and GCAPs: aspects on the structure and function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchmitz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular calcium ions [Ca2+] play important roles in photoreceptor signalling. Consequently, intracellular [Ca2+] levels need to be tightly controlled. In the light-sensitive outer segments (OS of photoreceptors, Ca2+ regulates the activity of retinal guanylate cyclases (ret-GCs thus playing a central role in phototransduction and light-adaptation by restoring light-induced decreases in cGMP. In the synaptic terminals, changes of intracellular Ca2+ trigger various aspects of neurotransmission. Photoreceptors employ tonically active ribbon synapses that encode light-induced, graded changes of membrane potential into different rates of synaptic vesicle exocytosis. The active zones of ribbon synapses contain large electron-dense structures, synaptic ribbons, that are associated with large numbers of synaptic vesicles. Synaptic coding at ribbon synapses differs from synaptic coding at conventional (phasic synapses. Recent studies revealed new insights how synaptic ribbons are involved in this process. This review focuses on the regulation of [Ca2+] in presynaptic photoreceptor terminals and on the function of a particular Ca2+-regulated protein, the neuronal calcium sensor protein GCAP2 (guanylate cyclase-activating protein-2 in the photoreceptor ribbon synapse. GCAP2, an EF hand-containing protein plays multiple roles in the OS and in the photoreceptor synapse. In the OS, GCAP2 works as a Ca2+-sensor within a Ca2+-regulated feedback loop that adjusts cGMP levels. In the photoreceptor synapse, GCAP2 binds to RIBEYE, a component of synaptic ribbons, and mediates Ca2+-dependent plasticity at that site. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  13. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Laßek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network.

  14. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  15. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  16. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark H.; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L.; Leonard, Christopher S.; Kohlmeier, Kristi A.

    2015-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on several parameters affecting LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine was found to induce larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. PMID:24863041

  17. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark H; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2014-10-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine induced larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  19. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurological defect in traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation is isolated axillary nerve palsy. Most recover spontaneously; however, some have persistent axillary neuropathy. An intact rotator cuff may compensate for an isolated axillary nerve injury; however, given the high rate of rotator cuff pathology with advancing age, patients with an axillary nerve injury are at risk for complete shoulder disability. To review reconstruction of the axillary nerve to alleviate shoulder pain, augment shoulder stability, abduction and external rotation to alleviate sole reliance on the rotator cuff to move and stabilize the shoulder. A retrospective review of 10 patients with an isolated axillary nerve injury and an intact rotator cuff who underwent a triceps nerve branch to axillary nerve transfer was performed. Patient demographics, surgical technique, deltoid strength, donor-site morbidity, complications and time to surgery were evaluated. Ten male patients, mean age 38.3 years (range 18 to 66 years), underwent a triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary nerve injury 7.4 months (range five to 12 months) post-traumatic shoulder dislocation. Deltoid function was British Medical Research Council grade 0/5 in all patients preoperatively and ≥3/5 deltoid strength in eight patients at final follow-up (14.8 months [range 12 to 25 months]). There were no complications and no donor-site morbidity. A triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary neuropathy following traumatic shoulder dislocation improved shoulder pain, stability and deltoid strength, and potentially preserves shoulder function with advancing age by alleviating sole reliance on the rotator cuff for shoulder abduction and external rotation.

  20. The Surgical Management of Facial Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rovak, Jason M.; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The surgical management of facial nerve injuries is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve anatomy, nerve physiology, and microsurgical techniques. When possible, primary neurorrhaphy is the “gold standard” repair technique. Injuries resulting in long nerve gaps or a significant delay between the time of injury and repair requires alterative techniques, such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, regional muscle transfers, free tissue transfers, and static procedures. Scrupulous t...

  1. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  2. Visualization of ATP release in pancreatic acini in response to cholinergic stimulus. Use of fluorescent probes and confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Christiane Elisabeth; Novak, Ivana

    2001-01-01

    overlapping with those marked by acridine orange and LysoTracker Red. In functional studies we show that native pancreatic acini release ATP in response to various stimuli but most importantly to cholinergic stimulation, a very likely physiological stimulus in this epithelium. In a close vicinity of acini we...... detect about 9 microm ATP after cholinergic stimulation. Thus, ATP is poised as the paracrine mediator between pancreatic acini and ducts....

  3. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  4. Contribution of muscarinic M1 receptors to the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer II of the entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Shawnna G; Chapman, C Andrew

    2013-10-25

    The entorhinal cortex is thought to play roles in sensory and mnemonic function, and the cholinergic suppression of the strength of synaptic inputs is likely to have important impacts on these processes. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the medial entorhinal cortex evoked by stimulation of the piriform cortex are suppressed during theta EEG activity in behaving animals, and cholinergic receptor activation suppresses synaptic responses both in vivo, and in layer II entorhinal neurons in vitro. Here, we have used in vitro field potential recordings to investigate the transmitter receptors that mediate the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer I inputs to layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex. Bath-application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol suppressed the amplitude of fEPSPs with an EC50 of 5.3μM, and enhanced paired-pulse ratio. The M2/M4 preferring receptor blocker methoctramine, or the M4 receptor blocker PD102807, did not prevent the cholinergic suppression. However, the M1/M4 receptor blocker pirenzepine and the M1 receptor blocker VU0255035 reduced the suppression, suggesting that the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in the entorhinal cortex is dependent in large part on activation of M1 receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Severe scene learning impairment, but intact recognition memory, after cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex followed by fornix transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Philip G F; Gaffan, David; Croxson, Paula L; Baxter, Mark G

    2010-02-01

    To examine the generality of cholinergic involvement in visual memory in primates, we trained macaque monkeys either on an object-in-place scene learning task or in delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS). Each monkey received either selective cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex (including the entorhinal cortex and perirhinal cortex) with injections of the immunotoxin ME20.4-saporin or saline injections as a control and was postoperatively retested. Cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex was without effect on either task. Each monkey then received fornix transection because previous studies have shown that multiple disconnections of temporal cortex can produce synergistic impairments in memory. Fornix transection mildly impaired scene learning in monkeys that had received saline injections but severely impaired scene learning in monkeys that had received cholinergic lesions of inferotemporal cortex. This synergistic effect was not seen in monkeys performing DNMS. These findings confirm a synergistic interaction in a macaque monkey model of episodic memory between connections carried by the fornix and cholinergic input to the inferotemporal cortex. They support the notion that the mnemonic functions tapped by scene learning and DNMS have dissociable neural substrates. Finally, cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex, in this study, appears insufficient to impair memory functions dependent on an intact inferotemporal cortex.

  6. Functional role of acetylcholine and the expression of cholinergic receptors and components in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takahiro; Chida, Dai; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Hori, Naoko; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Iwata, Takanori; Usui, Michihiko; Aiko, Katsuya; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2010-02-19

    Recent studies have indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) plays a vital role in various tissues, while the role of ACh in bone metabolism remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that ACh induced cell proliferation and reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity via nicotinic (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in osteoblasts. We detected mRNA expression of several nAChRs and mAChRs. Furthermore, we showed that cholinergic components were up-regulated and subunits/subtypes of acetylcholine receptors altered during osteoblast differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that osteoblasts express specific acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic components and that ACh plays a possible role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain cholinergic involvement during the rapid development of tolerance to morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Z. Z.; Oriaku, E. T.; Soliman, S. F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated administration of morphine on the activities of the cholinergic enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), in specific brain regions were studied in rats treated with 10 mg/kg morphine for one or two days. Repeated administration of morphine was associated with a decline in the degree of analgesia produced and with a significant increase of AChE activity of the medulla oblongata. A single injection of morphine resulted in a significant decline in ChAT activity in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata regions. After two consecutive injections, no decline in ChAT was observed in these regions, while in the cerebral cortex the second administration elicited a significant decline. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine may be mediated through changes in ChAT activity and lend support to the involvement of the central cholinergic system in narcotic tolerance.

  8. Uranium chronic contamination effects on the cholinergic system: in vivo and in vitro approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensoussan, H.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) is a heavy metal which occurs naturally in the environment. It is both a chemical and a radiological toxicant. The aim of this work was: (i) to assess the effects of U chronic exposure on the cholinergic system (biosynthesis and breakdown enzymes, receptors and on behaviour of adult, young or predisposed to neuro-degenerative illness (ApoE KO) rodents; (ii) to grasp the neurotoxic effects of U on human neuronal cells. In vivo, this work shows a structure- (cortex more sensitive than hippocampus), rodent model- (young more sensitive than adults), time- (sub-chronic exposure more harmful than chronic exposure), exposure level- and isotope-dependent effect of U. In vitro, the study underlined the neuro-cytotoxic U potential and the presence of uranium precipitates in cells. These results show the deleterious impact of U on neuronal cells, and demonstrate that U induces impairments on the cholinergic system and the behaviour of rodents. (author)

  9. The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on rat's cerebral neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yan; Xue Yilong; Luo Yun; Tian Lei; Pan Jingkun; Cui Xin

    2004-01-01

    The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on isolated and cultivated rat's cerebral neural stem cells (NSC) was examined. NSC isolated from two months old rat's brain region like hippocampus and striatum was cultivated in a DMEM/F12 medium containing EGF and bFGF, and was identified with morphological character and nestin immunocytochemistry test. After 24 hours, cultivating the NSC with the BMP4-added medium for 7-8 days, then the microscopical change were observed, ChAT and nestin double-labelling immunocytochemistry test was done. Results showed that about 34% NSC of neuron-like character was observed by microscope in the paper. That ChAT-positive cells coexist with nestin-positive cells was found by immunocytochemistry test. There were 28% ChAT-positive cells and 38% nestin-positive cells in the study. Cholinergic neurons differentiated from NSC could be induced by adding BMP4 to the medium

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  11. The Role of Cysteine String Protein α Phosphorylation at Serine 10 and 34 by Protein Kinase Cγ for Presynaptic Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Ueyama, Takehiko; Adachi, Naoko; Yoshino, Ken-Ichi; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Uwada, Junsuke; Kaneoka, Azumi; Ueda, Taro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2018-01-10

    Protein kinase Cγ (PKCγ) knock-out (KO) animals exhibit symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra. However, the PKCγ substrates responsible for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in vivo have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we found 10 potent substrates in the striatum of PKCγ-KO mice. Here, we focused on cysteine string protein α (CSPα), a protein from the heat shock protein (HSP) 40 cochaperone families localized on synaptic vesicles. We found that in cultured cells, PKCγ phosphorylates CSPα at serine (Ser) 10 and Ser34. Additionally, apoptosis was found to have been enhanced by the overexpression of a phosphorylation-null mutant of CSPα, CSPα(S10A/S34A). Compared with wild-type (WT) CSPα, the CSPα(S10A/S34A) mutant had a weaker interaction with HSP70. However, in sharp contrast, a phosphomimetic CSPα(S10D/S34D) mutant, compared with WT CSPα, had a stronger interaction with HSP70. In addition, total levels of synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP) 25, a main downstream target of the HSC70/HSP70 chaperone complex, were found to have decreased by the CSPα(S10A/S34A) mutant through increased ubiquitination of SNAP25 in PC12 cells. In the striatum of 2-year-old male PKCγ-KO mice, decreased phosphorylation levels of CSPα and decreased SNAP25 protein levels were observed. These findings indicate the phosphorylation of CSPα by PKCγ may protect the presynaptic terminal from neurodegeneration. The PKCγ-CSPα-HSC70/HSP70-SNAP25 axis, because of its role in protecting the presynaptic terminal, may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cysteine string protein α (CSPα) is a protein belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) 40 cochaperone families localized on synaptic vesicles, which maintain the presynaptic terminal. However, the function of CSPα phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) for neuronal cell survival remains unclear. The experiments

  12. Xanomeline quasi-irreversibly bound to an ectopic site can stimulate presynaptic M2 receptors via the orthosteric binding site

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. S2 (2005), s. 90-90 ISSN 0022-3042. [Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry and the European Society for Neurochemistry /20./. 21.08.2005-26.08.2005, Innsbruck] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : xanomeline * presynaptic M2 receptor * acetylcholine release * brain cortex * wash-resistant binding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  13. Role of cholinergic markers on memory function of rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraju, Sangu; Maiti, Panchanan; Pati, Soumya; Solanki, Preeti; Sharma, Alpesh Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala; Prasad, Dipti; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2011-12-15

    Hypobaric hypoxia is encountered at high altitude. It has a deleterious effect on cognitive functions. An important cause of memory impairment at high altitude is the impairment of neurotransmission. The present study investigates the role of cholinergic markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia at 6,100 m for 7 days in a simulated-decompression chamber. Memory performance was assessed using the Morris water maze task. Cholinergic markers such as acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor were also evaluated along with neuronal morphology and DNA fragmentation. We found impairment in memory function along with a decrease in acetylcholine levels, increase in acetylcholinesterase activity, down regulation of choline acetyltransferase, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We also found that cellular damage is associated with a significant increase in DNA fragmentation. However, administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as physostigmine and galantamine, resulted in amelioration of the hypobaric hypoxia induced deleterious effects. It improved acetylcholine level, decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased the synthesis of acetylcholine by increasing choline acetyltransferase activity. Also, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors improved neuronal morphology, perhaps by increasing the expression of α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and by reducing the acetylcholinesterase level in the cortex and the hippocampus. Therefore, our results suggest cholinergic dysfunction is one of the mechanisms involved in hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment and that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were able to restore cholinergic function and thus improve memory function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Cholinergic Synapse International Symposium Held in Berlin, Germany on 23-27 September 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-27

    THE NICOTINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR SYSTEM OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER E.D. Gundelfinger, A. Baumann, N. Hess, P. Jonas , B. Merz, P. Schloss, C. Schrbdar...of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94141-0444, USA. HEINEMANN. Stephen F., The Salk Institute, Molecular Neurobiology, P.O. Box 85800...Biophysik, Freie Universit~t Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D - 1000 Berlin 33. LINDSTROM, Jon, The Salk Institute - Molecular Neurobiology, P.O. Box 85800

  15. Neither Cholinergic Nor Dopaminergic Enhancement Improve Spatial Working Memory Precision in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harewood Smith, Adeola N; Challa, Jnana Aditya; Silver, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Acetylcholine and dopamine are neurotransmitters that play multiple important roles in perception and cognition. Pharmacological cholinergic enhancement reduces excitatory receptive field size of neurons in marmoset primary visual cortex and sharpens the spatial tuning of visual perception and visual cortical fMRI responses in humans. Moreover, previous studies show that manipulation of cholinergic or dopaminergic signaling alters the spatial tuning of macaque prefrontal cortical neurons during the delay period of a spatial working memory (SWM) task and can improve SWM performance in macaque monkeys and human subjects. Here, we investigated the effects of systemic cholinergic and dopaminergic enhancement on the precision of SWM, as measured behaviorally in human subjects. Cholinergic transmission was increased by oral administration of 5 mg of the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, and dopaminergic signaling was enhanced with 100 mg levodopa/10 mg carbidopa. Each neurotransmitter system was separately investigated in double-blind placebo-controlled studies. On each trial of the SWM task, a square was presented for 150 ms at a random location along an invisible circle with a radius of 12 degrees of visual angle, followed by a 900 ms delay period with no stimulus shown on the screen. Then, the square was presented at new location, displaced in either a clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) direction along the circle. Subjects used their memory of the location of the original square to report the direction of displacement. SWM precision was defined as the amount of displacement corresponding to 75% correct performance. We observed no significant effect on SWM precision for either donepezil or levodopa/carbidopa. There was also no significant effect on performance on the SWM task (percent correct across all trials) for either donepezil or levodopa/carbidopa. Thus, despite evidence that acetylcholine and dopamine regulate spatial tuning of individual neurons and can

  16. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Pranay [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Yadav, Rajesh S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Department of Crimnology and Forensic Science, Harisingh Gour University, Sagar 470 003 (India); Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Dwivedi, Hari N. [Babu Banarasi Das University, BBD City, Faizabad Road, Lucknow 227 015 (India); Pant, Aditiya B. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Khanna, Vinay K., E-mail: vkkhanna1@gmail.com [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  17. Cholinergic interactions between donepezil and prucalopride in human colon: potential to treat severe intestinal dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, J; Kung, V W S; Boundouki, G; Aziz, Q; De Maeyer, J H; Knowles, C H; Sanger, G J

    2013-11-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors such as neostigmine are used for acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, but cardio-bronchial side-effects limit use. To minimize side-effects, lower doses could be combined with a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, which also facilitates intestinal cholinergic activity. However, safety concerns, especially in the elderly, require drugs with good selectivity of action. These include the AChE inhibitor donepezil (used for Alzheimer's disease, with reduced cardio-bronchial liability) and prucalopride, the first selective, clinically available 5-HT4 receptor agonist. This study examined their individual and potential synergistic activities in human colon. Neuronally mediated muscle contractions and relaxations of human colon were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and defined phenotypically as cholinergic, nitrergic or tachykinergic using pharmacological tools; the effects of drugs were determined as changes in 'area under the curve'. Prucalopride increased cholinergically mediated contractions (EC50 855 nM; 33% maximum increase), consistent with its ability to stimulate intestinal motility; donepezil (477%) and neostigmine (2326%) had greater efficacy. Concentrations of donepezil (30-100 nM) found in venous plasma after therapeutic doses had minimal ability to enhance cholinergic activity. However, donepezil (30 nM) together with prucalopride (3, 10 μM) markedly increased EFS-evoked contractions compared with prucalopride alone (P = 0.04). For example, the increases observed with donepezil and prucalopride 10 μM together or alone were, respectively, 105 ± 35%, 4 ± 6% and 35 ± 21% (n = 3-7, each concentration). Potential synergy between prucalopride and donepezil activity calls for exploration of this combination as a safer, more effective treatment of colonic pseudo-obstruction. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Pranay; Yadav, Rajesh S.; Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S.; Dwivedi, Hari N.; Pant, Aditiya B.; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  19. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  20. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype expression in avian vestibular hair cells, nerve terminals and ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G Q; Kevetter, G A; Leonard, R B; Prusak, D J; Wood, T G; Correia, M J

    2007-04-25

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are widely expressed in the CNS and peripheral nervous system and play an important role in modulating the cell activity and function. We have shown that the cholinergic agonist carbachol reduces the pigeon's inwardly rectifying potassium channel (pKir2.1) ionic currents in native vestibular hair cells. We have cloned and sequenced pigeon mAChR subtypes M2-M5 and we have studied the expression of all five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) in the pigeon vestibular end organs (semicircular canal ampullary cristae and utricular maculae), vestibular nerve fibers and the vestibular (Scarpa's) ganglion using tissue immunohistochemistry (IH), dissociated single cell immunocytochemistry (IC) and Western blotting (WB). We found that vestibular hair cells, nerve fibers and ganglion cells each expressed all five (M1-M5) mAChR subtypes. Two of the three odd-numbered mAChRs (M1, M5) were present on the hair cell cilia, supporting cells and nerve terminals. And all three odd numbered mAChRs (M1, M3 and M5) were expressed on cuticular plates, myelin sheaths and Schwann cells. Even-numbered mAChRs were seen on the nerve terminals. M2 was also shown on the cuticular plates and supporting cells. Vestibular efferent fibers and terminals were not identified in our studies. Results from WB of the dissociated vestibular epithelia, nerve fibers and vestibular ganglia were consistent with the results from IH and IC. Our findings suggest that there is considerable co-expression of the subtypes on the neural elements of the labyrinth. Further electrophysiological and pharmacological studies should delineate the mechanisms of action of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on structures in the labyrinth.

  1. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C; Druschky, K F; Sturm, U; Neundörfer, B; Fahlbusch, R

    1988-09-02

    Nineteen patients with isolated suprascapular entrapment neuropathy were seen between 1980 and 1986. A neurogenic cause and absence of other deficits were confirmed by electromyography. Electroneurographic tests were performed in 13 and demonstrated delayed conduction time and (or) reduction in stimulus response amplitude. In 16 patients there was an acute or chronic mechanical cause (direct pressure on the suprascapular nerve, forced dislocation of the shoulder blade). Two types of paralysis could be distinguished, an upper one affecting both the infra- and the supraspinatus muscles (12 patients), and a lower one involving only the infraspinatus muscle (4 patients). In two patients an inflammatory cause was considered likely, while in one the cause remained unclear. Restricting movement brought about an improvement in most patients, while in one the neurophysiological parameters improved after neurosurgical intervention, without complete clinical restoration.

  2. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  3. Effects of Pro-Cholinergic Treatment in Patients Suffering from Spatial Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, N.; Saj, A.; Schwartz, S.; Ptak, R.; Thomas, C.; Conne, P.; Leroy, R.; Pavin, S.; Diserens, K.; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a neurological condition characterized by a breakdown of spatial cognition contralateral to hemispheric damage. Deficits in spatial attention toward the contralesional side are considered to be central to this syndrome. Brain lesions typically involve right fronto-parietal cortices mediating attentional functions and subcortical connections in underlying white matter. Convergent findings from neuroimaging and behavioral studies in both animals and humans suggest that the cholinergic system might also be critically implicated in selective attention by modulating cortical function via widespread projections from the basal forebrain. Here we asked whether deficits in spatial attention associated with neglect could partly result from a cholinergic deafferentation of cortical areas subserving attentional functions, and whether such disturbances could be alleviated by pro-cholinergic therapy. We examined the effect of a single-dose transdermal nicotine treatment on spatial neglect in 10 stroke patients in a double-blind placebo-controlled protocol, using a standardized battery of neglect tests. Nicotine-induced systematic improvement on cancellation tasks and facilitated orienting to single visual targets, but had no significant effect on other tests. These results support a global effect of nicotine on attention and arousal, but no effect on other spatial mechanisms impaired in neglect. PMID:24062674

  4. Spontaneous Vesicle Fusion Is Differentially Regulated at Cholinergic and GABAergic Synapses

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    Haowen Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The locomotion of C. elegans is balanced by excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular junctions. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain the balance of synaptic transmission remain enigmatic. Here, we investigated the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in triggering spontaneous release at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Recordings of the miniature excitatory/inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs, respectively showed that UNC-2/CaV2 and EGL-19/CaV1 channels are the two major triggers for spontaneous release. Notably, however, Ca2+-independent spontaneous release was observed at GABAergic but not cholinergic synapses. Functional screening led to the identification of hypomorphic unc-64/Syntaxin-1A and snb-1/VAMP2 mutants in which mEPSCs are severely impaired, whereas mIPSCs remain unaltered, indicating differential regulation of these currents at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Moreover, Ca2+-independent spontaneous GABA release was nearly abolished in the hypomorphic unc-64 and snb-1 mutants, suggesting distinct mechanisms for Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent spontaneous release.

  5. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

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    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  6. Is There a Canonical Cortical Circuit for the Cholinergic System? Anatomical Differences Across Common Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Disney, Anita A

    2018-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is believed to act as a neuromodulator in cortical circuits that support cognition, specifically in processes including learning, memory consolidation, vigilance, arousal and attention. The cholinergic modulation of cortical processes is studied in many model systems including rodents, cats and primates. Further, these studies are performed in cortical areas ranging from the primary visual cortex to the prefrontal cortex and using diverse methodologies. The results of these studies have been combined into singular models of function-a practice based on an implicit assumption that the various model systems are equivalent and interchangeable. However, comparative anatomy both within and across species reveals important differences in the structure of the cholinergic system. Here, we will review anatomical data including innervation patterns, receptor expression, synthesis and release compared across species and cortical area with a focus on rodents and primates. We argue that these data suggest no canonical cortical model system exists for the cholinergic system. Further, we will argue that as a result, care must be taken both in combining data from studies across cortical areas and species, and in choosing the best model systems to improve our understanding and support of human health.

  7. Is There a Canonical Cortical Circuit for the Cholinergic System? Anatomical Differences Across Common Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Coppola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is believed to act as a neuromodulator in cortical circuits that support cognition, specifically in processes including learning, memory consolidation, vigilance, arousal and attention. The cholinergic modulation of cortical processes is studied in many model systems including rodents, cats and primates. Further, these studies are performed in cortical areas ranging from the primary visual cortex to the prefrontal cortex and using diverse methodologies. The results of these studies have been combined into singular models of function—a practice based on an implicit assumption that the various model systems are equivalent and interchangeable. However, comparative anatomy both within and across species reveals important differences in the structure of the cholinergic system. Here, we will review anatomical data including innervation patterns, receptor expression, synthesis and release compared across species and cortical area with a focus on rodents and primates. We argue that these data suggest no canonical cortical model system exists for the cholinergic system. Further, we will argue that as a result, care must be taken both in combining data from studies across cortical areas and species, and in choosing the best model systems to improve our understanding and support of human health.

  8. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  9. Topographic Organization of Cholinergic Innervation From the Basal Forebrain to the Visual Cortex in the Rat

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    Frédéric Huppé-Gourgues

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter for the regulation of visual attention, plasticity, and perceptual learning. It is released in the visual cortex predominantly by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, where stimulation may produce potentiation of visual processes. However, little is known about the fine organization of these corticopetal projections, such as whether basal forebrain neurons projecting to the primary and secondary visual cortical areas (V1 and V2, respectively are organized retinotopically. The aim of this study was to map these basal forebrain-V1/V2 projections. Microinjections of the fluorescent retrograde tracer cholera toxin b fragment in different sites within V1 and V2 in Long–Evans rats were performed. Retrogradely labeled cell bodies in the horizontal and vertical limbs of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB and VDB, respectively, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and substantia innominata (SI, were mapped ex vivo with a computer-assisted microscope stage controlled by stereological software. Choline acetyltranferase immunohistochemistry was used to identify cholinergic cells. Our results showed a predominance of cholinergic projections coming from the HDB. These projections were not retinotopically organized but projections to V1 arised from neurons located in the anterior HDB/SI whereas projections to V2 arised from neurons located throughout the whole extent of HDB/SI. The absence of a clear topography of these projections suggests that BF activation can stimulate visual cortices broadly.

  10. Novel information on the non-neuronal cholinergic system in orthopedics provides new possible treatment strategies for inflammatory and degenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sture Forsgren

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cholinergic agents are used in the treatment of several pathological conditions. Therapy regimens aimed at up-regulating cholinergic functions, such as treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, are also currently prescribed. It is now known that not only is there a neuronal cholinergic system but also a non-neuronal cholinergic system in various parts of the body. Therefore, interference with the effects of acetylcholine (ACh brought about by the local production and release of ACh should also be considered. Locally produced ACh may have proliferative, angiogenic, wound-healing, and immunomodulatory functions. Interestingly, cholinergic stimulation may lead to anti-inflammatory effects. Within this review, new findings for the locomotor system of a more widespread non-neuronal cholinergic system than previously expected will be discussed in relation to possible new treatment strategies. The conditions discussed are painful and degenerative tendon disease (tendinopathy/tendinosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  11. Lesions of cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons fail to affect cocaine or heroin self-administration or conditioned place preference in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Steidl

    Full Text Available Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA is known to contribute to reward. Although it is known that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg provides an important source of excitatory input to the dopamine system, the specific role of PPTg cholinergic input to the VTA in cocaine reward has not been previously determined. We used a diphtheria toxin conjugated to urotensin-II (Dtx::UII, the endogenous ligand for urotensin-II receptors expressed by PPTg cholinergic but not glutamatergic or GABAergic cells, to lesion cholinergic PPTg neurons. Dtx::UII toxin infusion resulted in the loss of 95.78 (±0.65% of PPTg cholinergic cells but did not significantly alter either cocaine or heroin self-administration or the development of cocaine or heroin conditioned place preferences. Thus, cholinergic cells originating in PPTg do not appear to be critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine or of heroin.

  12. A Comparative Toxidrome Analysis of Human Organophosphate and Nerve Agent Poisonings Using Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D S; Colman, E

    2017-05-01

    Here we utilized social media to compare the toxidrome of three lethal chemical exposures worldwide. YouTube videos were the main source from which the data were collected, but published reports and news were also utilized to fill in some gaps. All videos were organized in a database detailing symptoms and severity of each victim, along with demographics such as approximate age and gender. Each symptom was rated as mild, moderate, or severe and corresponding pie graphs for each incident were compared. The videos displayed symptoms ranging from mild to severe cholinergic toxicity and life-threatening convulsions. Social media may represent an important resource in developing a viable approach to the early detection and identification of chemical exposure, reinforce our preparedness for better antidotes, long-term follow up, and training about deadly chemical nerve agent attacks. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. The role of oxidative stress in organophosphate and nerve agent toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jennifer N; Patel, Manisha

    2016-08-01

    Organophosphate (OP) nerve agents exert their toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. The excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors rapidly causes neuronal damage, seizures, death, and long-term neurological impairment in those that survive. Owing to the lethality of organophosphorus agents and the growing risk they pose, medical interventions that prevent OP toxicity and the delayed injury response are much needed. Studies have shown that oxidative stress occurs in models of subacute, acute, and chronic exposure to OP agents. Key findings of these studies include alterations in mitochondrial function and increased free radical-mediated injury, such as lipid peroxidation. This review focuses on the role of reactive oxygen species in OP neurotoxicity and its dependence on seizure activity. Understanding the sources, mechanisms, and pathological consequences of OP-induced oxidative stress can lead to the development of rational therapies for treating toxic exposures. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Gastrointestinal peristalsis: joint action of enteric nerves, smooth muscle, and interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, J D

    1999-11-15

    Peristalsis is a propulsive motor pattern orchestrated by neuronal excitation and inhibition in cooperation with intrinsic muscular control mechanisms, including those residing in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Interstitial cells of Cajal form a network of cells in which electrical slow waves originate and then propagate into the musculature initiating rhythmic contractile activity upon excitaton by enteric nerves. Interstitial cells of Cajal have now been isolated and their intrinsic properties reveal the presence of rhythmic inward currents not found in smooth muscle cells. In tissues where classical slow waves are not present, enteric cholinergic excitation will evoke slow wave-like activity that forces action potentials to occur in a rhythmic manner. Intrinsic and induced slow wave activity directs many of the peristaltic motor patterns in the gut. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Functional assessment of sciatic nerve reconstruction : Biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Dijkstra, [No Value; Den Dunnen, WFA; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Schakenraad, JM; Gramsbergen, A; Robinson, PH

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT), or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve recovery using walking track analysis (measurement of the

  16. [Development of peripheral nerve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, M

    1998-03-01

    In the submitted review the author deals with the development of peripheral nerve surgery (PN) from ancient times to the present time incl. hithero unpublished details. He analyses in great detail the period of the last 40 years which is divided into three stages--the mechanical, biological period and the period of neurotrophism. From the Second World War to the sixties the period bears the term mechanical. The results of reinnervation during this period were not satisfactory as the nerves were connected without the use of a microscope, in major defects they were connected under considerable traction and the only criterion was the resistance against dehiscence. Significant improvement of results of regeneration of PN was recorded during the biological period. Mechanical ideas were overcome and biological and physiological reactions of the peripheral nerves were taken into account. Suture of nerves under traction was refuted and into clinical practice the surgical microscope, microsurgical technique and microsurgical autotransplantation with a nervous graft were introduced. The anatomical structure of the nerve with a plexiform pattern of the fascicles became however the limitation of surgical methods. After discovery of NGF (nerve growth factor) we can speak of the onset of a new period, neurotrophism. In laboratory experiments many substances are studied and theoretically new non-surgical possibilities how to promote regeneration lie ahead. However they cannot be applied yet in clinical practice. In injuries of peripheral nerves the only correct reconstruction method is still microsuture of the nerve and in case of losses microsurgical autotransplantation using a nerve graft.

  17. Outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, M; Al-Shawi, A; Gschwind, C R; Warwick, D J; Tonkin, M A

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafting. Thirty-six patients were retrospectively reviewed after a mean of 53 months (minimum 12 months). The mean interval from injury to surgery was 6.5 months. Recovery of deltoid function was assessed by the power of both abduction and retropulsion, the deltoid bulk and extension lag. The deltoid bulk was almost symmetrical in nine of 34 cases, good in 22 and wasted in three. Grade M4 or M5* was achieved in 30 of 35 for abduction and in 32 of 35 for retropulsion. There was an extension lag in four patients. Deltoid bulk continued to improve with a longer follow-up following surgery. Nerve grafting to the axillary nerve is a reliable method of regaining deltoid function when the lesion is distal to its origin from the posterior cord.

  18. Central Mandibular Nerve Sheath Myxoma

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    Narges Ghazi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve sheath myxoma has been described as a rare neural tumor arising from Schwann cells. It is observed most frequently in the central area of the face, neck and upper extremities. In the past the term neurothekeoma was used as synonym for nerve sheath myxoma but according to new reports, they are separate entities which can be confirmed by immunohistochemistry as in our case. Oral involvement of this tumor is extremely rare. Here, we present an unusual case of nerve sheath myxoma in the mandible of a 22-year old female patient. This case appears to be the first myxomatous variant which is centrally located in the mandible.

  19. The role of muscarinic cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobbs, Wambura

    Animals regularly face decisions that affect both their immediate success and long term survival. Such decisions typically involve some form of cost-benefit analysis and engage a number of high level cognitive processes, including learning, memory and motivational influences. While decision making has been a focus of study for over a century, it's only in the last 20 years that researchers have begun to identify functional neural circuits that subserve different forms of cost-benefit decision making. Even though the cholinergic system is both functionally and anatomically positioned to modulate cost-benefit decision circuits, the contribution of the cholinergic system to decision making has been little studied. In this thesis, I investigated the cognitive and neural contribution of muscarinic cholinergic signaling to cost-benefit decision making. I, first, re-examined the effects of systemic administration of 0.3 mg/kg atropine on delay and probability discounting tasks and found that blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by atropine induced suboptimal choices (impulsive and risky) in both tasks. Since the effect on delay discounting was restricted to the No Cue version of the delay discounting task, I concluded that muscarinic cholinergic signaling mediates both forms of cost-benefit decision making and is selectively engaged when decisions require valuation of reward options whose costs are not externally signified. Second, I assessed the impact of inactivating the nucleus basalis (NBM) on both forms decision making and the effect of injecting atropine locally into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), or nucleus accumbens (NAc) core during the No Cue version of the delay discounting task. I discovered that although NBM inactivation failed to affect delay discounting, it induced risk aversion in the probability discounting task; and blockade of intra- NAc core, but not intra-OFC or intra-BLA, muscarinic cholinergic signaling lead to

  20. Nerve damage associated with inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Bryan, J; Regezi, J

    1995-08-01

    The authors reviewed 12 cases in which altered sensation occurred in the distribution of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves following injection of a local anesthetic for restorative treatment only. Most patients suffered only partial damage, but recovery was poor. The exact mechanism of the nerve damage is unknown, but a number of theories are proposed. The extent of this problem is also unknown, but many more cases probably exist than have been reported to date.

  1. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-half of all dislocations involve the shoulder and may also involve the axillary nerves, which may influence functional recovery and result in persistent shoulder neuropathy. Although individuals with intact rotator cuffs may be able to compensate for axillary nerve dysfunction, the injury may become problematic in later years, especially given the increasing incidence of rotator cuff tears in aging populations, thus placing increased importance on the immediate success of acute man...

  2. Protective Effects of Testosterone on Presynaptic Terminals against Oligomeric β-Amyloid Peptide in Primary Culture of Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Fai Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing lines of evidence support that testosterone may have neuroprotective effects. While observational studies reported an association between higher bioavailable testosterone or brain testosterone levels and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there is limited understanding of the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. Previous studies demonstrated that testosterone could alleviate neurotoxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ, but these findings mainly focused on neuronal apoptosis. Since synaptic dysfunction and degeneration are early events during the pathogenesis of AD, we aim to investigate the effects of testosterone on oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic changes. Our data suggested that exposure of primary cultured hippocampal neurons to oligomeric Aβ could reduce the length of neurites and decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synaptotagmin, and synapsin-1. Aβ also disrupted synaptic vesicle recycling and protein folding machinery. Testosterone preserved the integrity of neurites and the expression of presynaptic proteins. It also attenuated Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic exocytosis. By using letrozole as an aromatase antagonist, we further demonstrated that the effects of testosterone on exocytosis were unlikely to be mediated through the estrogen receptor pathway. Furthermore, we showed that testosterone could attenuate Aβ-induced reduction of HSP70, which suggests a novel mechanism that links testosterone and its protective function on Aβ-induced synaptic damage. Taken together, our data provide further evidence on the beneficial effects of testosterone, which may be useful for future drug development for AD.

  3. Homeostatic Presynaptic Plasticity Is Specifically Regulated by P/Q-type Ca2+ Channels at Mammalian Hippocampal Synapses

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    Alexander F. Jeans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VGCC represent the principal source of Ca2+ ions driving evoked neurotransmitter release at presynaptic boutons. In mammals, presynaptic Ca2+ influx is mediated mainly via P/Q-type and N-type VGCC, which differ in their properties. Changes in their relative contributions tune neurotransmission both during development and in Hebbian plasticity. However, whether this represents a functional motif also present in other forms of activity-dependent regulation is unknown. Here, we study the role of VGCC in homeostatic plasticity (HSP in mammalian hippocampal neurons using optical techniques. We find that changes in evoked Ca2+ currents specifically through P/Q-type, but not N-type, VGCC mediate bidirectional homeostatic regulation of both neurotransmitter release efficacy and the size of the major synaptic vesicle pools. Selective dependence of HSP on P/Q-type VGCC in mammalian terminals has important implications for phenotypes associated with P/Q-type channelopathies, including migraine and epilepsy.

  4. Release properties of individual presynaptic boutons expressed during homosynaptic depression and heterosynaptic facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eMalkinson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Much of what we know about the mechanisms underlying Homosynaptic Depression (HSD and heterosynaptic facilitation is based on intracellular recordings of integrated postsynaptic potentials. This methodological approach views the presynaptic apparatus as a single compartment rather than taking a more realistic representation reflecting the fact that it is made up of tens to hundreds of individual and independent Presynaptic Release Boutons (PRBs. Using cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapses, we reexamined HSD and its dishabituation by imaging the release properties of individual PRBs. We find that the PRB population is heterogeneous and can be clustered into three groups: approximately 25% of the PRBs consistently release neurotransmitter throughout the entire habituation paradigm (35 stimuli, 0.05Hz and have a relatively high quantal content, 36% of the PRBs display intermittent failures only after the tenth stimulation, and 39% are low quantal-content PRBs that exhibit intermittent release failures from the onset of the habituation paradigm. 5HT-induced synaptic dishabituation by a single 5HT application was generated by the enhanced recovery of the quantal content of the habituated PRBs and did not involve the recruitment of new release boutons. The characterization of the PRB population as heterogeneous in terms of its temporal pattern of release-probability and quantal content provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying HSD and its dishabituation.

  5. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  6. Prehospital management of sarin nerve gas terrorism in urban settings: 10 years of progress after the Tokyo subway sarin attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Kikuchi, Makiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Stein, Gerald H

    2006-02-01

    Chemical agents have been used previously in wartime on numerous occasions, from World War I to the Gulf War. In 1994 and 1995, sarin nerve gas was used first in peacetime as a weapon of terrorism in Japan. The Tokyo subway sarin attack was the first large-scale disaster caused by nerve gas. A religious cult released sarin gas into subway commuter trains during morning rush hour. Twelve passengers died and about 5500 people were harmed. Sarin is a highly toxic nerve agent that can be fatal within minutes to hours. It causes the clinical syndrome of cholinergic hyperstimulation by inhibition of the crucial enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Therapy of nerve agent toxicity is divided into three categories, decontamination, respiratory support, and antidotes. All of these therapies may be given simultaneously. This article reviews toxicology and management of this acute chemical emergency. To help minimize the possible catastrophic impact on the public, we make several recommendations based on analysis of the Tokyo subway sarin attack and systematically review the current scientific literature.

  7. The clinical benefit of imaging striatal dopamine transporters with [123I]FP-CIT SPET in differentiating patients with presynaptic parkinsonism from those with other forms of parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, J.; Speelman, J.DE.; Horstink, M. W.I.M.; Wolters, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    [ 123 I]FP-CIT (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane) has been developed successfully as a radioligand for single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of dopamine transporters, which are situated in the membrane of dopaminergic neurons. Imaging of these transporters has shown promise as a clinical tool to detect degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Several ''presynaptic parkinsonian'' syndromes, such as Parkinson's disease or multiple system atrophy, are characterised by degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET imaging studies have shown the ability to detect loss of striatal dopamine transporters in such syndromes. However, in clinical practice it is sometimes difficult, but important, to discriminate patients with ''presynaptic parkinsonism'' from those with other forms of parkinsonism not characterised by loss of presynaptic dopaminergic cells (e.g. psychogenic parkinsonism or drug-induced postsynaptic parkinsonism). In these inconclusive cases, it may be of value to confirm or exclude the existence of degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic cells by using imaging techniques such as [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET. Using [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET, we have imaged the striatal dopamine transporters in a group of patients with inconclusive forms of parkinsonism, and, moreover, have been able to perform clinical follow-up of these patients 2-4 years after imaging. In 33 inconclusive cases, ratios of specific to non-specific binding were calculated for the caudate nucleus and putamen following [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET imaging and compared with ratios obtained in healthy controls. In nine of the patients, degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway was found scintigraphically and in all these cases, presynaptic parkinsonism was confirmed by clinical follow-up. In the other 24 subjects no degeneration was found scintigraphically. Forms of parkinsonism other than the presynaptic were confirmed at follow-up in 19 cases

  8. Use of tubulization (nerve conduits in repairing nerve defects in children

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    Filippo Maria Sénès

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In peripheral nerve repairing in children by using nerve conduits, the outcome has been widely effective even when dealing with mixed and motor nerve, thus nerve tubulization might be considered as an alternative to nerve grafting. Conversely, considering the uncertain result obtained in brachial plexus repairing, the conduits cannot be considered as afirst choice of treatment in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  9. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  10. Decreased Nerve Conduction Velocity in Football Players

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    Daryoush Didehdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower limbs nerves are exposed to mechanical injuries in the football players and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of football on the lower leg nerves. Materials and Methods: Nerve conduction studies were done on 35 male college students (20 football players, 15 non active during 2006 to 2007 in the Shiraz rehabilitation faculty. Standard nerve conduction techniques using to evaluate dominant and non dominant lower limb nerves. Results: The motor latency of deep peroneal and tibial nerves of dominant leg of football players and sensory latency of superficial peroneal, tibial and compound nerve action potential of tibial nerve of both leg in football players were significantly prolonged (p<0.05. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of tibial and common peroneal in football players were significant delayed (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that football is sport with high contact and it causes sub-clinical neuropathies due to nerve entrapment.

  11. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    decellularized nerve allograft for inferior alveolar nerve reconstruction: a case report. Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of...the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2011 Feb;69(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21145638. Epub 2010/12/15. eng. 16. Gunn S, Cosetti M...Massachusetts General Hospital (protocol #2012N000117) and was also granted ACURO approval on 11/19/2012. Task 2b. Rodent surgeries for segmental deficit

  12. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  13. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  14. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation and vagotomy on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model in rats.

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    Matthijs Kox

    Full Text Available Pulmonary inflammation contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury. Sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammation (first hit may be potentiated by mechanical ventilation (MV, second hit. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various animal models through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. We determined the effects of vagotomy (VGX and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were i.v. administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently underwent VGX, VNS or a sham operation. 1 hour following LPS, MV with low (8 mL/kg or moderate (15 mL/kg tidal volumes was initiated, or animals were left breathing spontaneously (SP. After 4 hours of MV or SP, rats were sacrificed. Cytokine and blood gas analysis was performed. MV with 15, but not 8 mL/kg, potentiated the LPS-induced pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokine response (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to LPS-SP, but did not affect systemic inflammation or impair oxygenation. VGX enhanced the LPS-induced pulmonary, but not systemic pro-inflammatory cytokine response in spontaneously breathing, but not in MV animals (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to SHAM, and resulted in decreased pO(2 (p<0.05 compared to sham-operated animals. VNS did not affect any of the studied parameters in both SP and MV animals. In conclusion, MV with moderate tidal volumes potentiates the pulmonary inflammatory response elicited by systemic LPS administration. No beneficial effects of vagus nerve stimulation performed following LPS administration were found. These results questions the clinical applicability of stimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in systemically inflamed patients admitted to the ICU where MV is initiated.

  15. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

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    Monica S Guzman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease.

  16. 5-Desmethylnobiletin augments synaptic ACh levels and nicotinic ACh receptor activity: A potential candidate for alleviation of cholinergic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Shalini; Maurya, Priyanka; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-09-14

    Cholinergic function is compromised in plethora of neurodegenerative disorders especially Alzheimer's disease. Increasing acetylcholine (ACh) levels has been the mainstay in majority of the therapeutic regimens, accepted for management of disease. The present study investigates the efficacy of 5-Desmethylnobiletin (DN), a polymethoxyflavone in augmenting cholinergic function using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism. The studies revealed significant elevation in cholinergic transmission mediated through increased levels of ACh and activity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Further investigation into the mechanistic aspects indicated that DN enhanced cholinergic function through down modulation of acetylcholinesterase activity at enzyme and transcript level along with upregulation of non alpha subunit, unc-29 which could be linked with enhanced nAChR activity as evident from levamisole assay. Additionally, studies on antioxidant properties, implicated significant potential of DN in curtailing ROS, both in vivo and in vitro. Our studies present DN as a phytomolecule with novel biological activities which could be exploited and researched upon for therapeutic avenues in terms of cholinergic function and antioxidant potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists in the VTA and RMTg have opposite effects on morphine-induced locomotion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Stephan; Dhillon, Ekamjeet S; Sharma, Natasha; Ludwig, Jessica

    2017-04-14

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) each contribute to opiate reward and each receive inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, the two principle brainstem cholinergic cell groups. We compared the contributions of VTA or RMTg muscarinic cholinergic receptors to locomotion induced by morphine infusions into the same sites. VTA co-infusion of atropine completely blocked VTA morphine-induced locomotion providing additional support for the important role of VTA muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the stimulant effects of opiates. By contrast, RMTg co-infusion of atropine increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. Furthermore, RMTg co-infusion of the M3-selective antagonist 4-DAMP, but not the M4-selective antagonist Tropicamide, strongly increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. RMTg infusions of 4-DAMP, but not of Tropicamide, by themselves strongly increased drug-free locomotion. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the RMTg thus also contribute to the stimulant effects of morphine, but in a way opposite to those in VTA. We suggest that the net effect of endogenous cholinergic input to the RMTg on drug-free and on RMTg morphine-induced locomotion is inhibitory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Histaminergic modulation of cholinergic release from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis into insular cortex during taste aversive memory formation.

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    Liliana Purón-Sierra

    Full Text Available The ability of acetylcholine (ACh to alter specific functional properties of the cortex endows the cholinergic system with an important modulatory role in memory formation. For example, an increase in ACh release occurs during novel stimulus processing, indicating that ACh activity is critical during early stages of memory processing. During novel taste presentation, there is an increase in ACh release in the insular cortex (IC, a major structure for taste memory recognition. There is extensive evidence implicating the cholinergic efferents of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM in cortical activity changes during learning processes, and new evidence suggests that the histaminergic system may interact with the cholinergic system in important ways. However, there is little information as to whether changes in cholinergic activity in the IC are modulated during taste memory formation. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the influence of two histamine receptor subtypes, H1 in the NBM and H3 in the IC, on ACh release in the IC during conditioned taste aversion (CTA. Injection of the H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine (RAMH into the IC or of the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine into the NBM during CTA training impaired subsequent CTA memory, and simultaneously resulted in a reduction of ACh release in the IC. This study demonstrated that basal and cortical cholinergic pathways are finely tuned by histaminergic activity during CTA, since dual actions of histamine receptor subtypes on ACh modulation release each have a significant impact during taste memory formation.

  19. Nerve fascicle transfer using a part of the C-7 nerve for spinal accessory nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuan; Shen, Yun-Dong; Feng, Jun-Tao; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury results in a series of shoulder dysfunctions and continuous pain. However, current treatments are limited by the lack of donor nerves as well as by undesirable nerve regeneration. Here, the authors report a modified nerve transfer technique in which they employ a nerve fascicle from the posterior division (PD) of the ipsilateral C-7 nerve to repair SAN injury. The technique, first performed in cadavers, was then undertaken in 2 patients. METHODS Six fresh cadavers (12 sides of the SAN and ipsilateral C-7) were studied to observe the anatomical relationship between the SAN and C-7 nerve. The length from artificial bifurcation of the middle trunk to the point of the posterior cord formation in the PD (namely, donor nerve fascicle) and the linear distance from the cut end of the donor fascicle to both sites of the jugular foramen and medial border of the trapezius muscle (d-SCM and d-Traps, respectively) were measured. Meanwhile, an optimal route for nerve fascicle transfer (NFT) was designed. The authors then performed successful NFT operations in 2 patients, one with an injury at the proximal SAN and another with an injury at the distal SAN. RESULTS The mean lengths of the cadaver donor nerve fascicle, d-SCM, and d-Traps were 4.2, 5.2, and 2.5 cm, respectively. In one patient who underwent proximal SAN excision necessitated by a partial thyroidectomy, early signs of reinnervation were seen on electrophysiological testing at 6 months after surgery, and an impaired left trapezius muscle, which was completely atrophic preoperatively, had visible signs of improvement (from grade M0 to grade M3 strength). In the other patient in whom a distal SAN injury was the result of a neck cyst resection, reinnervation and complex repetitive discharges were seen 1 year after surgery. Additionally, the patient's denervated trapezius muscle was completely resolved (from grade M2 to grade M4 strength), and her shoulder pain had disappeared

  20. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

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    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  1. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Anuar RIM; Gooi SG; Zulkiflee O

    2015-01-01

    The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF) in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ?watch and see? the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important ...

  2. Origin and pharmacological response of atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by activation of mediastinal nerves in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J Andrew; Richer, Louis-Philippe; Pagé, Pierre; Vinet, Alain; Kus, Teresa; Vermeulen, Michel; Nadeau, Réginald; Cardinal, René

    2005-03-31

    We sought to determine the sites of origin of atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by activating mediastinal nerves, as well as the response of such arrhythmias to autonomic modulation. Under general anaesthesia, atrioventricular block was induced after thoracotomy in 19 canines. Brief trains of 5 electrical stimuli were delivered to right-sided mediastinal nerves during the atrial refractory period. Unipolar electrograms were recorded from 191 right and left atrial epicardial sites under several conditions, i.e. (i) with intact nervous systems and following (ii) acute decentralization of the intrathoracic nervous system or administration of (iii) atropine, (iv) timolol, (v) hexamethonium. Concomitant right atrial endocardial mapping was performed in 7 of these dogs. Mediastinal nerve stimulation consistently initiated bradycardia followed by atrial tachyarrhythmias. In the initial tachyarrhythmia beats, early epicardial breakthroughs were identified in the right atrial free wall (28/50 episodes) or Bachmann bundle region (22/50), which corresponded to endocardial sites of origin associated with the right atrial subsidiary pacemaker complex, i.e. the crista terminalis and dorsal locations including the right atrial aspect of the interatrial septum. Neuronally induced responses were eliminated by atropine, modified by timolol and unaffected by acute neuronal decentralization. After hexamethonium, responses to extra-pericardial but not intra-pericardial nerve stimulation were eliminated. It is concluded that concomitant activation of cholinergic and adrenergic efferent intrinsic cardiac neurons induced by right-sided efferent neuronal stimulation initiates atrial tachyarrhythmias that originate from foci anatomically related to the right atrial pacemaker complex and tissues underlying major atrial ganglionated plexuses.

  3. DL0410 Ameliorates Memory and Cognitive Impairments Induced by Scopolamine via Increasing Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Mice

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    Wenwen Lian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the cholinergic system is thought to play a vital role in cognitive impairment of dementia. DL0410 was discovered as a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinestease (BuChE, with potent efficiency in in-vitro experiments, but its in vivo effect on the cholinergic model has not been evaluated, and its action mechanism has also not been illustrated. In the present study, the capability of DL0410 in ameliorating the amnesia induced by scopolamine was investigated, and its effect on the cholinergic system in the hippocampus and its binding mode in the active site of AChE was also explored. Mice were administrated DL0410 (3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 30 mg/kg, and mice treated with donepezil were used as a positive control. The Morris water maze, escape learning task, and passive avoidance task were used as behavioral tests. The test results indicated that DL0410 could significantly improve the learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine, with 10 mg/kg performing best. Further, DL0410 inhibited the AChE activity and increased acetylcholine (ACh levels in a dose-dependent manner, and interacted with the active site of AChE in a similar manner as donepezil. However, no difference in the activity of BuChE was found in this study. All of the evidence indicated that its AChE inhibition is an important mechanism in the anti-amnesia effect. In conclusion, DL0410 could be an effective therapeutic drug for the treatment of dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease.

  4. Dopamine-galanin receptor heteromers modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in the rat ventral hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Vaz, Sandra H.; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Ferrada, Carla; Quiroz, César; Barodia, Sandeep; Kabbani, Nadine; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine and galanin modulate cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus, but little is known about the mechanisms involved and their possible interactions. By using resonance energy transfer techniques in transfected mammalian cells we demonstrated the existence of heteromers between the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) and galanin Gal1, but not Gal2 receptors. Within the D1-Gal1 and D5-Gal1 receptor heteromers, dopamine receptor activation potentiated and dopamine receptor blockade counteracted MAPK activation induced by stimulation of Gal1 receptors, while Gal1 receptor activation or blockade did not modify D1-like receptor-mediated MAPK activation. Ability of a D1-like receptor antagonist to block galanin-induced MAPK activation (cross-antagonism) was used as a “biochemical fingerprint” of D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers, allowing their identification in the rat ventral hippocampus. The functional role of D1-like-Gal receptor heteromers was demonstrated in synaptosomes from rat ventral hippocampus, where galanin facilitated acetylcholine release, but only with co-stimulation of D1-like receptors. Electrophysiological experiments in rat ventral hippocampal slices showed that these receptor interactions modulate hippocampal synaptic transmission. Thus, a D1-like receptor agonist, that was ineffective when administered alone, turned an inhibitory effect of galanin into an excitatory effect, an interaction that required cholinergic neurotransmission. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers act as processors that integrate signals of two different neurotransmitters, dopamine and acetylcholine, to modulate hippocampal cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:21593325

  5. Cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the central amygdala induces antinociception in the guinea pig

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    Leite-Panissi C.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA in the modulation of defensive behavior and in antinociceptive regulation. In a previous study, we demonstrated the existence of a cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the CEA, modulating the defensive response of tonic immobility in guinea pigs. In the present study, we investigated a similar interaction in the CEA, but now involved in the regulation of the nociceptive response. Microinjection of carbachol (2.7 nmol and morphine (2.2 nmol into the CEA promoted antinociception up to 45 min after microinjection in guinea pigs as determined by a decrease in the vocalization index in the vocalization test. This test consists of the application of a peripheral noxious stimulus (electric shock into the subcutaneous region of the thigh that provokes the emission of a vocalization response by the animal. Furthermore, the present results demonstrated that the antinociceptive effect of carbachol (2.7 nmol; N = 10 was blocked by previous administration of atropine (0.7 nmol; N = 7 or naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 7 into the same site. In addition, the decrease in the vocalization index induced by the microinjection of morphine (2.2 nmol; N = 9 into the CEA was prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 11. All sites of injection were confirmed by histology. These results indicate the involvement of the cholinergic and opioidergic systems of the CEA in the modulation of antinociception in guinea pigs. In addition, the present study suggests that cholinergic transmission may activate the release of endorphins/enkephalins from interneurons of the CEA, resulting in antinociception.

  6. Cholinergic modulation of visual and attentional brain responses in Alzheimer's disease and in health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, P.; Driver, J.; Dolan, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Visuo-attentional deficits occur early in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are considered more responsive to pro-cholinergic therapy than characteristic memory disturbances. We hypothesised that neural responses in AD during visual attentional processing would be impaired relative to controls, yet partially susceptible to improvement with cholinesterase inhibition. We studied 16 mild AD patients and 17 age-matched healthy controls, using fMRI-scanning to enable within-subject placebo-controlled comparisons of the effects of physostigmine on stimulus- and attention-related brain activations, and to allow between-group comparisons for these. Subjects viewed stimuli comprising faces or buildings while performing a shallow judgement (colour of image) or a deep judgement (young/old age of depicted face or building). Behaviourally, AD subjects performed poorer than controls in both tasks, while physostigmine benefited AD patients for the more demanding age-judgement task. Stimulus-selective (face minus building, and vice versa) BOLD signals in precuneus and posterior parahippocampal cortex were attenuated in AD relative to controls but increased following physostigmine. By contrast, face-selective responses in fusiform cortex were not impaired in AD and showed decreases following physostigmine for both groups. Task-dependent responses in right parietal and prefrontal cortices were diminished in AD but improved following physostigmine. A similar pattern of group and treatment effects was observed in two extrastriate cortical regions that showed enhanced stimulus-selectivity for the deep versus shallow task. Finally, for the healthy group, physostigmine decreased task-dependent effects, partly due to an exaggeration of selectivity during the shallow relative to deep task. Our results demonstrate cholinergic-mediated improvements for both stimulus- and attention-dependent responses in functionally affected extrastriate and frontoparietal regions for AD. We also show that normal

  7. The motilin receptor agonist erythromycin stimulates hunger and food intake through a cholinergic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloose, Eveline; Vos, Rita; Janssen, Pieter; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Motilin-induced phase III contractions have been identified as a hunger signal. These phase III contractions occur as part of the migrating motor complex (MMC), a contractility pattern of the gastrointestinal tract during fasting. The mechanism involved in this association between subjective hunger feelings and gastrointestinal motility during the MMC is largely unknown, however, as is its ability to stimulate food intake. We sought to 1) investigate the occurrence of hunger peaks and their relation to phase III contractions, 2) evaluate whether this relation was cholinergically driven, and 3) assess the ability of the motilin receptor agonist erythromycin to induce food intake. An algorithm was developed to detect hunger peaks. The association with phase III contractions was studied in 14 healthy volunteers [50% men; mean ± SEM age: 25 ± 2 y; mean ± SEM body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 23 ± 1]. The impact of pharmacologically induced phase III contractions on the occurrence of hunger peaks and the involvement of a cholinergic pathway were assessed in 14 healthy volunteers (43% men; age: 29 ± 3 y; BMI: 23 ± 1). Last, the effect of erythromycin administration on food intake was examined in 15 healthy volunteers (40% men; age: 28 ± 3 y; BMI: 22 ± 1). The occurrence of hunger peaks and their significant association with phase III contractions was confirmed (P hunger peaks (P hunger feelings through a cholinergic pathway. Moreover, erythromycin stimulated food intake, suggesting a physiologic role of motilin as an orexigenic signal from the gastrointestinal tract. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02633579. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Effects of septal cholinergic lesion on rat exploratory behavior in an open-field

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    M.R. Lamprea

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The medial septum participates in the modulation of exploratory behavior triggered by novelty. Also, selective lesions of the cholinergic component of the septohippocampal system alter the habituation of rats to an elevated plus-maze without modifying anxiety indices. We investigated the effects of the intraseptal injection of the cholinergic immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin (SAP on the behavior of rats in an open-field. Thirty-nine male Wistar rats (weight: 194-230 g were divided into three groups, non-injected controls and rats injected with either saline (0.5 µl or SAP (237.5 ng/0.5 µl. Twelve days after surgery, the animals were placed in a square open-field (120 cm and allowed to freely explore for 5 min. After the test, the rats were killed by decapitation and the septum, hippocampus and frontal cortex were removed and assayed for acetylcholinesterase activity. SAP increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the septum, hippocampus and frontal cortex and decreased the total distance run (9.15 ± 1.51 m in comparison to controls (13.49 ± 0.91 m. The time spent in the center and at the periphery was not altered by SAP but the distance run was reduced during the first and second minutes (2.43 ± 0.36 and 1.75 ± 0.34 m compared to controls (4.18 ± 0.26 and 3.14 ± 0.25 m. SAP-treated rats showed decreased but persistent exploration throughout the session. These results suggest that septohippocampal cholinergic mechanisms contribute to at least two critical processes, one related to the motivation to explore new environments and the other to the acquisition and storage of spatial information (i.e., spatial memory.

  9. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

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    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  10. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX-XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry.

  11. Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Binding Sites in the Brain: Regulation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rochelle D.; Kellar, Kenneth J.

    1983-04-01

    Tritiated acetylcholine was used to measure binding sites with characteristics of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Regulation of the binding sites in vivo was examined by administering two drugs that stimulate nicotinic receptors directly or indirectly. After 10 days of exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor diisopropyl fluorophosphate, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cerebral cortex was decreased. However, after repeated administration of nicotine for 10 days, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cortex was increased. Saturation analysis of tritiated acetylcholine binding in the cortices of rats treated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate or nicotine indicated that the number of binding sites decreased and increased, respectively, while the affinity of the sites was unaltered.

  12. Sleep and dreaming: induction and mediation of REM sleep by cholinergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, J A

    1992-12-01

    The most important recent work on the neurobiology of sleep has focused on the precise cellular and biochemical mechanisms of rapid eye movement sleep mediation. Direct and indirect evidence implicates acetylcholine-containing neurons in the peribrachial pons as critical in the triggering and maintenance of rapid eye movement sleep. Other new studies provide support for the hypothesis that the cholinergic generator system is gated during waking by serotonergic and noradrenergic influences. A growing consensus regarding the basic neurobiology has stimulated new thinking about the brain basis of consciousness during waking and dreaming.

  13. beta-amyloid((1-42))-induced cholinergic lesions in rat nucleus basalis bidirectionally modulate serotonergic innervation of the basal forebrain and cerebral cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; O'Mahony, S; Kelly, JP; Konya, C; Borostyankoi, ZA; Gorcs, TJ; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Leonard, BE; Luiten, PGM; Keijser, Jan N.

    Ample experimental evidence suggests that beta -amyloid (A beta), when injected into the rat magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN), impels excitotoxic injury of cholinergic projection neurons. Whereas learning and memory dysfunction is a hallmark of A beta -induced cholinergic deficits, anxiety, or

  14. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  15. CXCR4 and NMDA Receptors Are Functionally Coupled in Rat Hippocampal Noradrenergic and Glutamatergic Nerve Endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Olivero, Guendalina; Merega, Elisa; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies had shown that the HIV-1 capsidic glycoprotein gp120 (strain IIIB) modulates presynaptic release-regulating NMDA receptors on noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals. This study aims to assess whether the chemokine CXC4 receptors (CXCR4s) has a role in the gp120-mediated effects. The effect of CXCL12, the endogenous ligand at CXCR4, on the NMDA-mediated releasing activity was therefore investigated. Rat hippocampal synaptosomes were preloaded with [ 3 H]noradrenaline ([ 3 H]NA) or [ 3 H]D-aspartate ([ 3 H]D-Asp) and acutely exposed to CXCL12, to NMDA or to both agonists. CXCL12, inactive on its own, facilitated the NMDA-evoked tritium release. The NMDA antagonist MK-801 abolished the NMDA/CXCL12-evoked tritium release of both radiolabelled tracers, while the CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 halved it, suggesting that rat hippocampal nerve endings possess presynaptic release-regulating CXCR4 receptors colocalized with NMDA receptors. Accordingly, Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of CXCR4 proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes. In both synaptosomal preparations, CXCL12-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release was dependent upon PLC-mediated src-induced events leading to mobilization of Ca 2+ from intraterminal IP 3 -sensitive stores Finally, the gp120-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release of [ 3 H]NA and [ 3 H]D-Asp was prevented by AMD 3100. We propose that CXCR4s are functionally coupled to NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals and account for the gp120-induced modulation of the NMDA-mediated central effects. The NMDA/CXCR4 cross-talk could have a role in the neuropsychiatric symptoms often observed in HIV-1 positive patients.

  16. Presynaptic localization of Smn and hnRNP R in axon terminals of embryonic and postnatal mouse motoneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Dombert

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by deficiency of the ubiquitously expressed survival motoneuron (SMN protein. SMN is crucial component of a complex for the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP particles. Other cellular functions of SMN are less characterized so far. SMA predominantly affects lower motoneurons, but the cellular basis for this relative specificity is still unknown. In contrast to nonneuronal cells where the protein is mainly localized in perinuclear regions and the nucleus, Smn is also present in dendrites, axons and axonal growth cones of isolated motoneurons in vitro. However, this distribution has not been shown in vivo and it is not clear whether Smn and hnRNP R are also present in presynaptic axon terminals of motoneurons in postnatal mice. Smn also associates with components not included in the classical SMN complex like RNA-binding proteins FUS, TDP43, HuD and hnRNP R which are involved in RNA processing, subcellular localization and translation. We show here that Smn and hnRNP R are present in presynaptic compartments at neuromuscular endplates of embryonic and postnatal mice. Smn and hnRNP R are localized in close proximity to each other in axons and axon terminals both in vitro and in vivo. We also provide new evidence for a direct interaction of Smn and hnRNP R in vitro and in vivo, particularly in the cytosol of motoneurons. These data point to functions of SMN beyond snRNP assembly which could be crucial for recruitment and transport of RNA particles into axons and axon terminals, a mechanism which may contribute to SMA pathogenesis.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a presynaptic neurotoxin, P-elapitoxin-Bf1a from Malaysian Bungarus fasciatus venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmili, Muhamad Rusdi Ahmad; Yee, Tee Ting; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Hodgson, Wayne C; Othman, Iekhsan

    2014-10-01

    Presynaptic neurotoxins are one of the major components in Bungarus venom. Unlike other Bungarus species that have been studied, β-bungarotoxin has never been isolated from Bungarus fasciatus venom. It was hypothesized that the absence of β-bungarotoxin in this species was due to divergence during evolution prior to evolution of β-bungarotoxin. In this study, we have isolated a β-bungarotoxin isoform we named P-elapitoxin-Bf1a by using gel filtration, cation-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from Malaysian B. fasciatus venom. The toxin consists of two heterogeneous subunits, subunit A and subunit B. LCMS/MS data showed that subunit A was homologous to acidic phospholipase A2 subunit A3 from Bungarus candidus and B. multicinctus venoms, whereas subunit B was homologous with subunit B1 from B. fasciatus venom that was previously detected by cDNA cloning. The toxin showed concentration- and time-dependent reduction of indirect-twitches without affecting contractile responses to ACh, CCh or KCl at the end of experiment in the chick biventer preparation. Toxin modification with 4-BPB inhibited the neurotoxic effect suggesting the importance of His-48. Tissue pre-incubation with monovalent B. fasciatus (BFAV) or neuro-polyvalent antivenom (NPV), at the recommended titer, was unable to inhibit the twitch reduction induced by the toxin. This study indicates that Malaysian B. fasciatus venom has a unique β-bungarotoxin isoform which was not neutralized by antivenoms. This suggests that there might be other presynaptic neurotoxins present in the venom and there is a variation in the enzymatic neurotoxin composition in venoms from different localities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  19. Nerve excitability in the rat forelimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Ria; Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer

    2017-01-01

    a novel setup to explore the ulnar nerve excitability in rodents. We provide normative ulnar data in 11 adult female Long Evans rats under anaesthesia by comparison with tibial and caudal nerves. Additionally, these measures were repeated weekly on 3 occasions to determine the repeatability of these tests....... Results Nerve excitability assessment of ulnar nerve proved to be a longitudinally repeatable measure of axonal function mature in rats, as were measures in tibial and caudal nerves. Comparison with existing method: Ulnar nerve motor excitability measures were different from the caudal and tibial...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  1. The role of the intrinsic cholinergic system of the striatum: What have we learned from TAN recordings in behaving animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, Paul

    2017-09-30

    Cholinergic interneurons provide rich local innervation of the striatum and play an important role in controlling behavior, as evidenced by the variety of movement and psychiatric disorders linked to disrupted striatal cholinergic transmission. Much progress has been made in recent years regarding our understanding of how these interneurons contribute to the processing of information in the striatum. In particular, investigation of the activity of presumed striatal cholinergic interneurons, identified as tonically active neurons or TANs in behaving animals, has pointed to their role in the signaling and learning of the motivational relevance of environmental stimuli. Although the bulk of this work has been conducted in monkeys, several studies have also been carried out in behaving rats, but information remains rather disparate across studies and it is still questionable whether rodent TANs correspond to TANs described in monkeys. Consequently, our current understanding of the function of cholinergic transmission in the striatum is challenged by the rapidly growing, but often confusing literature on the relationship between TAN activity and specific behaviors. As regards the precise nature of the information conveyed by the cholinergic TANs, a recent influential view emphasized that these local circuit neurons may play a special role in the processing of contextual information that is important for reinforcement learning and selection of appropriate actions. This review provides a summary of recent progress in TAN physiology from which it is proposed that striatal cholinergic interneurons are crucial elements for flexible switching of behaviors under changing environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A ten fold reduction of nicotine yield in tobacco smoke does not spare the central cholinergic system in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Correa-Santos, Monique; Dutra-Tavares, Ana C; Paes-Branco, Danielle; Nunes-Freitas, Andre; Manhães, Alex C; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Ribeiro-Carvalho, Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The tobacco industry has gradually decreased nicotine content in cigarette smoke but the impact of this reduction on health is still controversial. Since the central cholinergic system is the primary site of action of nicotine, here, we investigated the effects of exposure of adolescent mice to tobacco smoke containing either high or low levels of nicotine on the central cholinergic system and the effects associated with cessation of exposure. From postnatal day (PN) 30 to 45, male and female Swiss mice were exposed to tobacco smoke (whole body exposure, 8h/day, 7 days/week) generated from 2R1F (HighNic group: 1.74mg nicotine/cigarette) or 4A1 (LowNic group: 0.14mg nicotine/cigarette) research cigarettes, whereas control mice were exposed to ambient air. Cholinergic biomarkers were assessed in the cerebral cortex and midbrain by the end of exposure (PN45), at short- (PN50) and long-term (PN75) deprivation. In the cortex, nicotinic cholinergic receptor upregulation was observed with either type of cigarette. In the midbrain, upregulation was detected only in HighNic mice and remained significant in females at short-term deprivation. The high-affinity choline transporter was reduced in the cortex: of HighNic mice by the end of exposure; of both HighNic and LowNic females at short-term deprivation; of LowNic mice at long-term deprivation. These decrements were separable from effects on choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, suggesting cholinergic synaptic impairment. Here, we demonstrated central cholinergic alterations in an animal model of tobacco smoke exposure during adolescence. This system was sensitive even to tobacco smoke with very low nicotine content. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Single cocaine exposure does not alter striatal pre-synaptic dopamine function in mice: an [18 F]-FDOPA PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsall, David R; Kokkinou, Michelle; Veronese, Mattia; Coello, Christopher; Wells, Lisa A; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    Cocaine is a recreational drug of abuse that binds to the dopamine transporter, preventing reuptake of dopamine into pre-synaptic terminals. The increased presence of synaptic dopamine results in stimulation of both pre- and post-synaptic dopamine receptors, considered an important mechanism by which cocaine elicits its reinforcing properties. However, the effects of acute cocaine administration on pre-synaptic dopamine function remain unclear. Non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography have revealed impaired pre-synaptic dopamine function in chronic cocaine users. Similar impairments have been seen in animal studies, with microdialysis experiments indicating decreased basal dopamine release. Here we use micro positron emission tomography imaging techniques in mice to measure dopamine synthesis capacity and determine the effect of acute cocaine administration of pre-synaptic dopamine function. We show that a dose of 20 mg/kg cocaine is sufficient to elicit hyperlocomotor activity, peaking 15-20 min post treatment (p cocaine treatment (KiCer: 0.0097 per min vs. 0.0112 per min in vehicle controls, p > 0.05). Furthermore, expression levels of two key enzymes related to dopamine synthesis, tyrosine hydroxylase and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase, within the striatum of scanned mice were not significantly affected by acute cocaine pre-treatment (p > 0.05). Our findings suggest that while the regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in the striatum have been shown to change with chronic cocaine use, leading to a reduced basal tone, these adaptations to pre-synaptic dopaminergic neurons are not initiated following a single exposure to the drug. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  5. Cholinergic degeneration is associated with increased plaque deposition and cognitive impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction and deposition of plaques containing amyloid ß-peptides (Aß) are two of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we combine APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice with the cholinergic immunotoxin mu p75-saporin (SAP) to integrate partial basal forebrain cholinergic degenera...... decline and accelerated plaque burden. SAP treated APP/PS1 mice might thus constitute an improved model of Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology and cognitive deficits compared to the conventional APP/PS1 model without selective removal of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons........ Additionally, APP/PS1 mice treated with SAP showed a tendency towards an increased level of soluble and insoluble Aß1-40 and Aß1-42 measured in brain tissue homogenate. Our results suggest that the combination of cholinergic degeneration and Aß overexpression in the APP/PS1 mouse model results in cognitive...

  6. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2017-01-01

    with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. Results In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h...... exhibit more intense accumulation than 18F-FDG at sites of chronic inflammation. Cholinergic PET imaging may therefore have potential applications for basic research into cholinergic mechanisms of immune modulation, but also clinical applications for diagnosing infections, inflammatory disorders...

  7. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  8. Progress of nerve bridges in the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Q

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Ao Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Fundamental Science, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, Peoples’ Republic of China Abstract: Clinical repair of a nerve defect is one of the most challenging surgical problems. Autologous nerve grafting remains the gold standard treatment in addressing peripheral nerve injuries that cannot be bridged by direct epineural suturing. However, the autologous nerve graft is not readily available, and the process of harvesting autologous nerve graft results in several complications. Thus, it is necessary to explore an alternative to autologous nerve graft. In the last few decades, with significant advances in the life sciences and biotechnology, a lot of artificial nerve grafts have been developed to aim at the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions. Artificial nerve grafts range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes and from nondegradable tubes to degradable tubes. Among them, acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are two kinds of the most promising substitutes for nerve autografts. The history, research status, and prospect of acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are described briefly in this review. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, repair, acellular nerve graft, nerve conduit

  9. The impact of motor and sensory nerve architecture on nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Arash; Borschel, Gregory H; Luciano, Janina P; Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2008-08-01

    Sensory nerve autografting is the standard of care for injuries resulting in a nerve gap. Recent work demonstrates superior regeneration with motor nerve grafts. Improved regeneration with motor grafting may be a result of the nerve's Schwann cell basal lamina tube size. Motor nerves have larger SC basal lamina tubes, which may allow more nerve fibers to cross a nerve graft repair. Architecture may partially explain the suboptimal clinical results seen with sensory nerve grafting techniques. To define the role of nerve architecture, we evaluated regeneration through acellular motor and sensory nerve grafts. Thirty-six Lewis rats underwent tibial nerve repairs with 5 mm double-cable motor or triple-cable sensory nerve isografts. Grafts were harvested and acellularized in University of Wisconsin solution. Control animals received fresh motor or sensory cable isografts. Nerves were harvested after 4 weeks and histomorphometry was performed. In 6 animals per group from the fresh motor and sensory cable graft groups, weekly walking tracks and wet muscle mass ratios were performed at 7 weeks. Histomorphometry revealed more robust nerve regeneration in both acellular and cellular motor grafts. Sensory groups showed poor regeneration with significantly decreased percent nerve, fiber count, and density (parchitecture (size of SC basal lamina tubes) plays an important role in nerve regeneration in a mixed nerve gap model.

  10. Nerve entrapment after hamstring injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Konerding, Moritz A

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring muscle injuries are a frequent cause of athletic sequelae, and the frequency of reinjuries is high. Frequently, disability in sport is the consequence and performance is limited. A case report of a soccer player who was unable to play his sport after a minor hamstring muscle injury is presented. We introduce a previously undescribed lesion featured by a scar compromising a motor branch of the sciatic nerve to the long head of the biceps femoris muscle. Resection of the involved branch of the nerve resulted in complete pain relief and full sport capacity. This case report demonstrates that in very rare cases, a scar tissue-induced intramuscular entrapment of a branch of the sciatic nerve must be considered as a reason for athletic incapacity after minor hamstring injury. Both the degree of a muscular injury and its specific location within the injured muscle may therefore influence the functional outcome.

  11. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  12. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  13. [3H]cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic 3 H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of [ 3 H]cytisine in rat brain homogenates. [ 3 H]Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that [ 3 H]cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of [ 3 H]cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors

  14. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  15. Opposing Cholinergic and Serotonergic Modulation of Layer 6 in Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Daniel W; Tian, Michael K; Sargin, Derya; Venkatesan, Sridevi; Intson, Katheron; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2017-01-01

    Prefrontal cortex is a hub for attention processing and receives abundant innervation from cholinergic and serotonergic afferents. A growing body of evidence suggests that acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) have opposing influences on tasks requiring attention, but the underlying neurophysiology of their opposition is unclear. One candidate target population is medial prefrontal layer 6 pyramidal neurons, which provide feedback modulation of the thalamus, as well as feed-forward excitation of cortical interneurons. Here, we assess the response of these neurons to ACh and 5-HT using whole cell recordings in acute brain slices from mouse cortex. With application of exogenous agonists, we show that individual layer 6 pyramidal neurons are bidirectionally-modulated, with ACh and 5-HT exerting opposite effects on excitability across a number of concentrations. Next, we tested the responses of layer 6 pyramidal neurons to optogenetic release of endogenous ACh or 5-HT. These experiments were performed in brain slices from transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin in either ChAT-expressing cholinergic neurons or Pet1-expressing serotonergic neurons. Light-evoked endogenous neuromodulation recapitulated the effects of exogenous neurotransmitters, showing opposing modulation of layer 6 pyramidal neurons by ACh and 5-HT. Lastly, the addition of 5-HT to either endogenous or exogenous ACh significantly suppressed the excitation of pyramidal neurons in prefrontal layer 6. Taken together, this work suggests that the major corticothalamic layer of prefrontal cortex is a substrate for opposing modulatory influences on neuronal activity that could have implications for regulation of attention.

  16. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati ePaul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine, glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention.

  17. Evaluation of Cholinergic Deficiency in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease Using Pupillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Frost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical cholinergic deficiency is prominent in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and published findings of diminished pupil flash response in AD suggest that this deficiency may extend to the visual cortical areas and anterior eye. Pupillometry is a low-cost, noninvasive technique that may be useful for monitoring cholinergic deficits which generally lead to memory and cognitive disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate pupillometry for early detection of AD by comparing the pupil flash response (PFR in AD (N=14 and cognitively normal healthy control (HC, N=115 participants, with the HC group stratified according to high (N=38 and low (N=77 neocortical amyloid burden (NAB. Constriction phase PFR parameters were significantly reduced in AD compared to HC (maximum acceleration p<0.05, maximum velocity p<0.0005, average velocity p<0.005, and constriction amplitude p<0.00005. The high-NAB HC subgroup had reduced PFR response cross-sectionally, and also a greater decline longitudinally, compared to the low-NAB subgroup, suggesting changes to pupil response in preclinical AD. The results suggest that PFR changes may occur in the preclinical phase of AD. Hence, pupillometry has a potential as an adjunct for noninvasive, cost-effective screening for preclinical AD.

  18. Cholinergic receptors: functional role of nicotinic ACh receptors in brain circuits and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakel, Jerrel L

    2013-04-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system by acting on both the cys-loop ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor channels (nAChRs) and the G protein-coupled muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs). The hippocampus is an important area in the brain for learning and memory, where both nAChRs and mAChRs are expressed. The primary cholinergic input to the hippocampus arises from the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca, the activation of which can activate both nAChRs and mAChRs in the hippocampus and regulate synaptic communication and induce oscillations that are thought to be important for cognitive function. Dysfunction in the hippocampal cholinergic system has been linked with cognitive deficits and a variety of neurological disorders and diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. My lab has focused on the role of the nAChRs in regulating hippocampal function, from understanding the expression and functional properties of the various subtypes of nAChRs, and what role these receptors may be playing in regulating synaptic plasticity. Here, I will briefly review this work, and where we are going in our attempts to further understand the role of these receptors in learning and memory, as well as in disease and neuroprotection.

  19. The effect of the augmentation of cholinergic neurotransmission by nicotine on EEG indices of visuospatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, H N A; Böcker, K B E; Deschamps, P K H; Kemner, C; Kenemans, J L

    2014-03-01

    The cholinergic system has been implicated in visuospatial attention but the exact role remains unclear. In visuospatial attention, bias refers to neuronal signals that modulate the sensitivity of sensory cortex, while disengagement refers to the decoupling of attention making reorienting possible. In the current study we investigated the effect of facilitating cholinergic neurotransmission by nicotine (Nicorette Freshmint 2mg, polacrilex chewing gum) on behavioral and electrophysiological indices of bias and disengagement. Sixteen non-smoking participants performed in a Visual Spatial Cueing (VSC) task while EEG was recorded. A randomized, single-blind, crossover design was implemented. Based on the scarce literature, it was expected that nicotine would specifically augment disengagement related processing, especially manifest as an increase of the modulation of the Late Positive Deflection (LPD) by validity of cueing. No effect was expected on bias related components (cue-locked: EDAN, LDAP; target-locked: P1 and N1 modulations). Results show weak indications for a reduction of the reaction time validity effect by nicotine, but only for half of the sample in which the validity effect on the pretest was largest. Nicotine reduced the result of bias as indexed by a reduced P1 modulation by validity, especially in subjects with strong peripheral responses to nicotine. Nicotine did not affect ERP manifestations of the directing of bias (EDAN, LDAP) or disengagement (LPD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Altitude acclimatization improves submaximal cognitive performance in mice and involves an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Narbona, R; Delgado-García, J M; López-Ramos, J C

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this work was to reveal a hypothetical improvement of cognitive abilities in animals acclimatized to altitude and performing under ground level conditions, when looking at submaximal performance, once seen that it was not possible when looking at maximal scores. We modified contrasted cognitive tasks (object recognition, operant conditioning, eight-arm radial maze, and classical conditioning of the eyeblink reflex), increasing their complexity in an attempt to find performance differences in acclimatized animals vs. untrained controls. In addition, we studied, through immunohistochemical quantification, the expression of choline acetyltransferase and acetyl cholinesterase, enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of acetylcholine, in the septal area, piriform and visual cortexes, and the hippocampal CA1 area of animals submitted to acute hypobaric hypoxia, or acclimatized to this simulated altitude, to find a relationship between the cholinergic system and a cognitive improvement due to altitude acclimatization. Results showed subtle improvements of the cognitive capabilities of acclimatized animals in all of the tasks when performed under ground-level conditions (although not before 24 h), in the three tasks used to test explicit memory (object recognition, operant conditioning in the Skinner box, and eight-arm radial maze) and (from the first conditioning session) in the classical conditioning task used to evaluate implicit memory. An imbalance of choline acetyltransferase/acetyl cholinesterase expression was found in acclimatized animals, mainly 24 h after the acclimatization period. In conclusion, altitude acclimatization improves cognitive capabilities, in a process parallel to an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane on cholinergic neurons in mice with Alzheimer's disease-like lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jingzhu; Fang, Lingduo; Li, Xi; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Wanying; An, Li

    2014-08-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are unavailable. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane (an activator of NF-E2-related factor 2) on mice with AD-like lesions induced by combined administration of aluminum and D-galactose. Step-down-type passive avoidance tests showed sulforaphane ameliorated cognitive impairment in AD-like mice. Immunohistochemistry results indicated sulforaphane attenuated cholinergic neuron loss in the medial septal and hippocampal CA1 regions in AD-like mice. However, spectrophotometry revealed no significant difference in acetylcholine level or the activity of choline acetyltransferase or acetylcholinesterase in the cerebral cortex among groups of control and AD-like mice with and without sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane significantly increased the numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive neurons in the subventricular and subgranular zones in AD-like mice which were significantly augmented compared with controls. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed significantly lower aluminum levels in the brains of sulforaphane-treated AD-like mice than in those that did not receive sulforaphane treatment. In conclusion, sulforaphane ameliorates neurobehavioral deficits by reducing cholinergic neuron loss in the brains of AD-like mice, and the mechanism may be associated with neurogenesis and aluminum load reduction. These findings suggest that phytochemical sulforaphane has potential application in AD therapeutics.

  2. Neural stem cells was induced to differentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yan; Xu Yilong; Pan Jingkun; Tian Lei; Gao Yuhong; Guo Shuilong

    2004-01-01

    The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on isolated and cultivated rat's cerebral neural stem cells (NSCs) was examined. NSCs which were isolated from two month's old rat's brain region like hippocampus and striatum were cultivated in a medium containing EGF and bFGF, and were identified with morphological character by microscope and nestin immunocytochemistry test. After 24 hours, half NSCs were cultivated with a BMP4-added medium as a experimental group instead of the primary medium, while the an other half NSCs being cultivated with the primary medium as a control group. After 8 days the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) of the cultivated cells was observated by indirect immunofluorescence test. Results showed that more positive cells were found in the experimental group, and the fluorescence intensity were stronger; while less positive cells were found in the control group, and the fluorescence intensity was weaker. The differentiational efficiency of the NSCs was examined by FITC-labelled Flow Cytometry. The results showed that about 16% cells of the experimental group appeared ChAT-positive, while that of control group only 7%. So BMP4 may have the function of inducing NSCs to differentiate into neurons with cholinergic characteristic. (authors)

  3. Stress, chemical defense agents, and cholinergic receptors. Midterm report, 1 November 1987-31 July 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, J.D.

    1989-11-30

    This project is assessing the affects of exposure to a chemical defense agent on anxiety and stress, by using rat models of anxiety (conditioned emotional response (CER); conditioned suppression) and unconditioned non-specific stres (exposure to footshock). The specific experiments determined the plasticity of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites in the central nervous system. The neuroanatomical locus and neuropharmacological profile of changes in binding sites were assessed in brain areas enriched in cholinergic markers. Acetylcholine turnover was measured to determine if the receptor response is compensatory or independent. The effects of acute exposure to doses of a chemical defense agent (soman--XGD) on lethality and behaviors were examined. The experiments involved training and conditioning adult rats to CER using standard operant/respondent techniques. The binding of radiolabelled ligand was studied in vitro using brain membranes and tissue sections (autoradiography). The major findings are that CER produces increases in acetylcholine turnover in brain areas involved in anxiety, and that primarily post-synaptic M1 receptors compensatorly decrease in response. These neurochemical phenomena are directly correlated with several behaviors, including onset and extinction of CER and non-specific stress. Followup experiments have been designed to test the interaction of CER, XGD and neurochemistry.

  4. Cholinergic control of the nocturnal prolactin surge in the pseudopregnant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, B K; Nikitovitch-Winer, M B

    1975-10-01

    The possible involvement of cholinergic mechanisms in the control of rhythmic secretion of prolactin has been examined in the pseudopregnant rat. Baseline data were obtained in decapitated animals in which the diuranl surge was observed in the 1430--2030 h range and the nocturnal surge during the 2330-0530 h interval. Atrial cannulation permitted a faithful reproduction of the prolactin pattern seen in decapitated rats if at least 3 days elapsed between the cannulation operation and bleeding, while cardiac puncture, under light ether anesthesia, appeared to suppress the diurnal surge. This latter observation appeared to depend on the time of sampling in relation to the onset of the dark phase of the daily lighting cycle. Atropine (35 or 70 mg/100 g BW) was found to inhibit the nocturnal surge in animals bled by either the cardiac puncture or cannulation techniques --an effect which was reversed by pretreatment with eserine (50 or 100 mug/100 g BW). Nicotine (0.75 mg/100 g BW) was found to delay, but not completely to inhibit, the nocturnal surge. When evaluated in the light of other available information, these observations suggest that a complex cholinergic mechanism is involved in control of the nocturnal rhythm of prolactin in pseudopregnancy and that the two surges, diurnal and nocturnal, are differentially controlled.

  5. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intramuscular sodium diclofenac 75 mg was administered intraoperatively into the contralateral gluteal muscle. A 5–6‑cm oblique incision was made from the .... Mechanism of femoral nerve palsy complicating percutaneous ilioinguinal field block. Br J Anaesth 1997;78:314‑6. 19. Chan PY, Lee MP, Cheung HY, Chung CC, ...

  6. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  7. An Acetylcholinesterase-Based Chronoamperometric Biosensor for Fast and Reliable Assay of Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE is an important part of cholinergic nervous system, where it stops neurotransmission by hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is sensitive to inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, some Alzheimer disease drugs, secondary metabolites such as aflatoxins and nerve agents used in chemical warfare. When immobilized on a sensor (physico-chemical transducer, it can be used for assay of these inhibitors. In the experiments described herein, an AChE- based electrochemical biosensor using screen printed electrode systems was prepared. The biosensor was used for assay of nerve agents such as sarin, soman, tabun and VX. The limits of detection achieved in a measuring protocol lasting ten minutes were 7.41 × 10−12 mol/L for sarin, 6.31 × 10−12 mol /L for soman, 6.17 × 10−11 mol/L for tabun, and 2.19 × 10−11 mol/L for VX, respectively. The assay was reliable, with minor interferences caused by the organic solvents ethanol, methanol, isopropanol and acetonitrile. Isopropanol was chosen as suitable medium for processing lipophilic samples.

  8. The Vagus Nerve at the Interface of the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaz, Bruno; Bazin, Thomas; Pellissier, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    The microbiota, the gut, and the brain communicate through the microbiota-gut-brain axis in a bidirectional way that involves the autonomic nervous system. The vagus nerve (VN), the principal component of the parasympathetic nervous system, is a mixed nerve composed of 80% afferent and 20% efferent fibers. The VN, because of its role in interoceptive awareness, is able to sense the microbiota metabolites through its afferents, to transfer this gut information to the central nervous system where it is integrated in the central autonomic network, and then to generate an adapted or inappropriate response. A cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been described through VN's fibers, which is able to dampen peripheral inflammation and to decrease intestinal permeability, thus very probably modulating microbiota composition. Stress inhibits the VN and has deleterious effects on the gastrointestinal tract and on the microbiota, and is involved in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which are both characterized by a dysbiosis. A low vagal tone has been described in IBD and IBS patients thus favoring peripheral inflammation. Targeting the VN, for example through VN stimulation which has anti-inflammatory properties, would be of interest to restore homeostasis in the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  10. Effects of short-term continuous positive airway pressure on myocardial sympathetic nerve function and energetics in patients with heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison B; Ziadi, Maria C; Leech, Judith A; Chen, Shin-Yee; Burwash, Ian G; Renaud, Jennifer; deKemp, Robert A; Haddad, Haissam; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Guo, Ann; Chen, Li; Walter, Olga; Garrard, Linda; DaSilva, Jean N; Floras, John S; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2014-09-09

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 2 states of increased metabolic demand and sympathetic nervous system activation, often coexist. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which alleviates OSA, can improve ventricular function. It is unknown whether this is due to altered oxidative metabolism or presynaptic sympathetic nerve function. We hypothesized that short-term (6-8 weeks) CPAP in patients with OSA and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction would improve myocardial sympathetic nerve function and energetics. Forty-five patients with OSA and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (left ventricular ejection fraction 35.8±9.7% [mean±SD]) were evaluated with the use of echocardiography and 11C-acetate and 11C-hydroxyephedrine positron emission tomography before and ≈6 to 8 weeks after randomization to receive short-term CPAP (n=22) or no CPAP (n=23). Work metabolic index, an estimate of myocardial efficiency, was calculated as follows: (stroke volume index×heart rate×systolic blood pressure÷Kmono), where Kmono is the monoexponential function fit to the myocardial 11C-acetate time-activity data, reflecting oxidative metabolism. Presynaptic sympathetic nerve function was measured with the use of the 11C-hydroxyephedrine retention index. CPAP significantly increased hydroxyephedrine retention versus no CPAP (Δretention: +0.012 [0.002, 0.021] versus -0.006 [-0.013, 0.005] min(-1); P=0.003). There was no significant change in work metabolic index between groups. However, in those with more severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index>20 events per hour), CPAP significantly increased both work metabolic index and systolic blood pressure (Penergetics. In those with more severe OSA, CPAP may improve cardiac efficiency. Further outcome-based investigation of the consequences of CPAP is warranted. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00756366. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Comparison of nerve regenerative efficacy between decellularized nerve graft and nonwoven chitosan conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaba, Hiroki; Terada-Nakaishi, Michiko; Wang, Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Nozaki, Kosuke; Nagai, Akiko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-05-12

    Recently decellularized nerves with various methods are reported as highly functional nerve grafts for the treatment of nerve defects. To evaluate the efficacy of decellularized allogeneic nerve, compared with oriented chitosan mesh tube, and an autologous nerve. Sciatic nerves harvested from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were decellularized in combination with Sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100. A graft into the sciatic nerve in Wistar rats was performed with the decellularized SD rat sciatic nerves or oriented chitosan nonwoven nanofiber mesh tubes (15 mm in length, N=5 in each group). A portion of sciatic nerve of Wistar rat was cut, reversed and re-sutured in-situ as a control. Nerve functional and histological evaluations were performed 25 weeks postoperatively. It was revealed that functional, electrophysiological and histological recoveries in the decellularized nerve group match those in the autograft group. Recovery of sensory function and nerve maturation in the decellularized nerve group were superior to those in the chitosan mesh tube group. Nerve regeneration in the decellularized nerves could match that in the autografts and is somehow superior to artificial chitosan mesh tube. Detergents wash of SDS and Triton X-100 could obtain highly functional nerve grafts from allografts.

  12. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle num