WorldWideScience

Sample records for pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power

  1. Remerschen nuclear power station with BBR pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of many decades of successful cooperation in the electricity supply sector with the German RWE utility, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg and RWE jointly founded Societe Luxembourgeoise d'Energie Nucleaire S.A. (SENU) in 1974 in which each of the partners holds a fifty percent interest. SENU is responsible for planning, building and operating this nuclear power station. Following an international invitation for bids on the delivery and turnkey construction of a nuclear power station, the consortium of the German companies of Brown, Boveri and Cie. AG (BBC), Babcock - Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH (BBR) and Hochtief AG (HT) received a letter of intent for the purchase of a 1,300 MW nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The 1,300 MW station of Remerschen will be largely identical with the Muelheim-Kaerlich plant under construction by the same consortium near Coblence on the River Rhine since early 1975. According to present scheduling, the Remerschen nuclear power station could start operation in 1981. (orig.) [de

  2. Pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. Environmental characterization information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The typical plant chosen for characterization is a 10000-MWe nameplate rating with wet-natural-draft cooling towers and modern radwaste control and processing equipment. The process, plant operating parameters, resources needed, and the environmental residuals and products associated with the power plant are presented. Annual resource usage and pollutant discharges are shown in English and metric units, assuming an annual plant capacity factor of 70%. In addition to annual quantities, the summary table gives quantities in terms of 10 12 Btu (about 293 million kWh) of electrical energy produced for comparison among energy processes. Supporting information and calculation procedures for the data are given. Thirteen environmental points of interest are discussed individually. Cost information, typical radioactive releases, and use of cooling ponds as an alternative cooling method are discussed in appendixes. A glossary and list of acronyms and abbreviations are provided

  3. Data list of nuclear power plants of pressurized-water reactor type in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1981-08-01

    This report has collected and compiled the data concerning performances, equipments and installations for nuclear power plants of the pressurized-water reactor type in Japan. The data used in the report are based on informations that were collected before December in 1980. The report is edited by modifing changes of the data appeared after publication of 1979 edition (JAERI-M 8947), and extending the data-package to cover new plants proposed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a computer program FREP, which has been developed as an exclusive use of data processing. (author)

  4. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  5. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design

  6. Suggestion on the safety classification of spent fuel dry storage in China’s pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Qu, Yunhuan; Meng, De; Zhang, Qiaoer; Lu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    China’s spent fuel storage in the pressurized water reactors(PWR) is stored with wet storage way. With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, China’s NPPs(NPPs) will not be able to meet the problem of the production of spent fuel. Currently the world’s major nuclear power countries use dry storage as a way of spent fuel storage, so in recent years, China study on additional spent fuel dry storage system mainly. Part of the PWR NPP is ready to apply for additional spent fuel dry storage system. It also need to safety classificate to spent fuel dry storage facilities in PWR, but there is no standard for safety classification of spent fuel dry storage facilities in China. Because the storage facilities of the spent fuel dry storage are not part of the NPP, the classification standard of China’s NPPs is not applicable. This paper proposes the safety classification suggestion of the spent fuel dry storage for China’s PWR NPP, through to the study on China’s safety classification principles of PWR NPP in “Classification for the items of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (GB/T 17569-2013)”, and safety classification about spent fuel dry storage system in NUREG/CR - 6407 in the United States.

  7. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  8. Materialistic Aspects of Raising Resource of Pressurized Water Reactors for Low-Power Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.; Muratov, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The opportunity of using ships reactors for low-power nuclear plants is considered. Some aspects of working constructional materials on cases of water-water reactors of ships nuclear units are considered. Advantages of raising resource of ships reactors are shown

  9. Rationalizing of construction engineering of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of large power plants requires further reduction of construction efforts and the construction period. A new constructional and technological solution has been developed with the steel-cell composite structure applied in the Greifswald nuclear power plant 'Bruno Leuschner' for the first time. Principles of design, fabrication, transport, and mounting are described. The benefits of the method are indicated. (author)

  10. Role of non destructive techniques for monitoring structural integrity of primary circuit of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.K.; Sreenivas, P.

    2015-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations is ensured by assessing status of primary equipment for performing the intended function reliably and maintaining the integrity of pressure boundaries. The pressure boundary materials undergo material degradation during the plant operation. Pressure boundary materials are subjected to operating stresses and material degradation that results in material properties changes, discontinuities initiation and increase in size of existing discontinuities. Pre-Service Inspection (PSI) is performed to generate reference base line data of initial condition of the pressure boundary. In-Service Inspections (ISI) are performed periodically to confirm integrity of pressure boundaries through comparison with respect to base line data. The non destructive techniques are deployed considering nature of the discontinuities expected to be generated through operating conditions and degradation mechanisms. The paper is prepared considering Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power Plant. The paper describes the degradation mechanisms observed in the PWR nuclear power plants and salient aspect of PSI and ISI and considerations in selecting non destructive testing. The paper also emphasises on application of acoustic emission (AE) based condition monitoring systems that can supplement in-service inspections for detecting and locating discontinuities in pressure boundaries. Criticality of flaws can be quantitatively evaluated by determining their size through in-service inspection. Challenges anticipated in deployment of AE based monitoring system and solutions to cater those challenges are also discussed. (author)

  11. Nuclear power plant control room task analysis. Pilot study for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barks, D.B.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Eckel, S.

    1982-05-01

    The purposes of this nuclear plant task analysis pilot study: to demonstrate the use of task analysis techniques on selected abnormal or emergency operation events in a nuclear power plant; to evaluate the use of simulator data obtained from an automated Performance Measurement System to supplement and validate data obtained by traditional task analysis methods; and to demonstrate sample applications of task analysis data to address questions pertinent to nuclear power plant operational safety: control room layout, staffing and training requirements, operating procedures, interpersonal communications, and job performance aids. Five data sources were investigated to provide information for a task analysis. These sources were (1) written operating procedures (event-based); (2) interviews with subject matter experts (the control room operators); (3) videotapes of the control room operators (senior reactor operators and reactor operators) while responding to each event in a simulator; (4) walk-/talk-throughs conducted by control room operators for each event; and (5) simulator data from the PMS

  12. Internal exposure monitoring of personnel of a nuclear power plant with pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, F.W.; Poulheim, K.F.; Rueger, G.; Schreiter, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the GDR a programme for monitoring the internal radiation exposure of personnel has been established in the Bruno Leuschner Nuclear Power Plant, Greifswald, which allows one to estimate the effective dose equivalent in the way recommended by the ICRP. The measuring equipment used, and the methods of calibration and of evaluation of results are described. At present about 400 persons are monthly monitored with a thorax monitor in the nuclear power plant. If an investigation level - corresponding to an effective dose equivalent of 0.3mSv/month - is exceeded, a more exact measurement is made in the whole-body counter at the National Board for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR. In addition, a selected group of 50 persons is measured twice yearly in the whole-body counter. The measurements show the high effectiveness of the protective measures against radionuclide intake by workers in the nuclear power plant, resulting in a contribution of less than 1% to the collective dose of the personnel. A correlation has been found between external and internal exposure indicating that, in general, there will be a higher intake only under conditions resulting also in higher external exposures. The highest individual values of internal exposure found are below 0.5mSv/month and thus within the range of the lower detection limit of dosimeter films used for monitoring the external exposure. (author)

  13. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This document catalogs roughly 5300 knowledges and abilities of reactor operators and senior reactor operators. It results from a reanalysis of much larger job-task analysis data base compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Knowledges and abilities are cataloged for 45 major power plant systems and 38 emergency evolutions, grouped according to 11 fundamental safety functions (e.g., reactivity control and reactor coolant system inventory control). With appropriate sampling from this catalog, operator licensing examinations having content validity can be developed. A structured sampling procedure for this catalog is under development by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and will be published as a companion document, ''Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations'' (NUREG-1121). The examinations developed by using the catalog and handbook will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55

  14. Behaviour of a pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant during loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Carl, H.; Kubis, K.

    1979-01-01

    Starting from the foundation of the design basis accident in a PWR-type nuclear power plant - Loss of Coolant Accident -the actual status of the processes to be expected in the reactor are described. Operating behaviour of the heat removal system and efficiency of the safety systems are evaluated. Final considerations are concerned with the overall behaviour of the plant under such conditions. Probable failures, shut down times and possibilities of repair are estimated. (author)

  15. Criteria for safety-related nuclear-power-plant operator actions: 1982 pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) simulator exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, D.S.; Beare, A.N.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of the Safety-Related Operator Action (SROA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to provide a data base to support development of criteria for safety-related actions by nuclear power plant operators. When compared to field data collected on similar events, a base of operator performance data developed from the simulator experiments can then be used to establish safety-related operator action design evaluation criteria, evaluate the effects of performance shaping factors, and support safety/risk assessment analyses. This report presents data obtained from refresher training exercises conducted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant control room simulator. The 14 exercises were performed by 24 teams of licensed operators from one utility, and operator performance was recorded by an automatic Performance Measurement System. Data tapes were analyzed to extract operator response times (RTs) and error rate information. Demographic and subjective data were collected by means of brief questionnaires and analyzed in an attempt to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on operator performance

  16. Exxon nuclear power distribution control for pressurized water reactors: Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.S.; Burnside, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The power distribution control procedure, denoted PDC-II, described in this report enables nuclear plants to manage core power distributions such that Technical Specification Limits on F/sub Q//sup T/ are not violated during normal operation and limits on MDNBR are not violated during steady-state, load-follow, and anticipated transients. The PDC-II data base described provides the means for predicting the maximum F/sub Q//sup T/(z) distribution anticipated during operation under the PDC-II procedure taking into account the incore measured equilibrium power distribution data for the reactor in question. A comparison of this distribution with the Technical Specification limit curve determines whether the Technical Specification limit can be protected by PDC-II procedure. If such protection can be confirmed for a given operating cycle interval, APDMS monitoring is not necessary over this interval and the excore monitored constant axial offset limits will protect the Technical Specification F/sub Q//sup T/ limits. This document describes the maximum possible variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) which can occur during operation when following the PDC-II procedures. This bounding variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) is referred to as V(z). This V(z) distribution represents the maximun variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) when the axial offset is maintained within the range defined in this report [+- 5% at full power condition

  17. Contamination of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Bruhn, Gerd; Artmann, Andreas; Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie; Tiessen, Olga

    2017-12-01

    In the precursor project of this study a simulation procedure was developed, consisting of a 3D-CAD model, a mathematical method for coordinate transformation, the software MicroShield and an empiric job model, to calculate the occupational exposure for definable jobs at the primary circuit. It was validated for inspection and maintenance jobs at PWRs of the second and third KWU/Siemens generation. With that the aptitude of this tool for prognosis of radiation exposure was demonstrated. Adhering contaminations within the primary circuit are considered as relevant sources, whereas activated core-near components are neglected. In this study, the model was extended by PWR of the so-called Convoy generation, which differ from older plants in the material composition and consequently in the relevant nuclide vectors. With information from a visit at a nuclear power plant and conversation with the staff, the model could be adjusted appropriately. The radionuclide Cobalt-60 is indeed less important compared to older plant-types, but it is still the dominant nuclide in facilities of the fourth KWU/Siemens generation, so that it is used as reference nuclide. Due to the contemporary planned final shut-down of the three Convoy plants (besides other), dismantling work was set into focus of simulation. Simulation was conducted and results compared for Convoy plants and for plants of the older generations two and three. Furthermore, by comparative simulations the question was answered if full system decontamination in Convoy plants before dismantling lead to benefits that justify this measure. The determined dose saving during unmounting works at the steam generators caused by the decontamination is remarkable. An abdication of decontamination at this location would lead to doses much higher than the occupational job dose during steam generator dismantling in a decontaminated generation 2 facility.

  18. technical guidelines for the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    These technical guidelines present the opinion of the French 'Groupe Permanent charge des Reacteurs nucleaires' (GPR) concerning the safety philosophy and approach as well as the general safety requirements to be applied for the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear power plants of the PWR (pressurized water reactor) type, assuming the construction of the first units of this generation would start at the beginning of the 21. century. These technical guidelines are based on common work of the French Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN) and of the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). Moreover, these technical guidelines were extensively discussed with members of the German Reaktor Sicherheitskommission (RSK) until the end of 1998 and further with German experts. The context of these technical guidelines must be clearly understood. Faced with the current situation of nuclear energy in the world, the various nuclear steam supply system designers are developing new products, all of them claiming their intention of obtaining a higher safety level, by various ways. GPR believes that, for the operation of a new series of nuclear power plants at the beginning of the next century, the adequate way is to derive the design of these plants in an 'evolutionary' way from the design of existing plants, taking into account the operating experience and the in-depth studies conducted for such plants. Nevertheless, introduction of innovative features must also be considered in the frame of the design of the new generation of plants, especially in preventing and mitigating severe accidents. GPR underlines here that a significant improvement of the safety of the next generation of nuclear power plants at the design stage is necessary, compared to existing plants. If the search for improvement is a permanent concern in the field of safety, the necessity of a significant step at the design stage clearly derives from better

  19. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  20. The power control system of the Siemens-KWU nuclear power station of the PWR [pressurized water reactors] type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Starting with the first nuclear power plant constructed by Siemens AG of the pressurized light water reactor line (PWR), the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant (340 MWe net), until the recently constructed plants of 1300 MWe (named 'Konvoi'), the design of the power control system of the plant was continuously improved and optimized using the experience gained in the operation of the earlier generations of plants. The reactor power control system of the Siemens - KWU nuclear power plants is described. The features of this design and of the Siemens designed heavy water power plants (PHWR) Atucha I and Atucha II are mentioned. Curves showing the behaviour of the controlled variables during load changes obtained from plant tests are also shown. (Author) [es

  1. Automatic power control for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Yung Joon

    1994-02-01

    During a normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the reactivity is controlled by control rods, boron, and the average temperature of the primary coolant. Especially in load follow operation, the reactivity change is induced by changes in power level and effects of xenon concentration. The control of the core power distribution is concerned, mainly, with the axial power distribution which depends on insertion and withdrawal of the control rods resulting in additional reactivity compensation. The utilization of part strength control element assemblies (PSCEAs) is quite appropriate for a control of the power distribution in the case of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN Unit 3). However, control of the PSCEAs is not automatic, and changes in the boron concentration by dilution/boration are done manually. Thus, manual control of the PSCEAs and the boron concentration require the operator's experience and knowledge for a successful load follow operation. In this thesis, the new concepts have been proposed to adapt for an automatic power control in a PWR. One of the new concepts is the mode K control, another is a fuzzy power control. The system in mode K control implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial power shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. And the mode K enables precise regulation, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1000-MWe PWR which is a reference plant for the YGN Unit 3. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be

  2. EDF's nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction-had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's 'with book' on nuclear safety. (author)

  3. EDF'S nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction - had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's white book on nuclear safety

  4. Fuzzy power control algorithm for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Y.J.; Lee, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    A fuzzy power control algorithm is presented for automatic reactor power control in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Automatic power shape control is complicated by the use of control rods with a conventional proportional-integral-differential controller because it is highly coupled with reactivity compensation. Thus, manual shape controls are usually employed even for the limited capability needed for load-following operations including frequency control. In an attempt to achieve automatic power shape control without any design modifications to the core, a fuzzy power control algorithm is proposed. For the fuzzy control, the rule base is formulated based on a multiple-input multiple-output system. The minimum operation rule and the center of area method are implemented for the development of the fuzzy algorithm. The fuzzy power control algorithm has been applied to Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3. The simulation results show that the fuzzy control can be adapted as a practical control strategy for automatic reactor power control of PWRs during the load-following operations

  5. Technical feasibility and costs of the retention of radionuclides during accidents in nuclear power plants demonstrated by the example of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Grigull, R.; Lahner, K.; Gutowski, H.; Weber, J.

    1985-01-01

    The maximum allowable radiation doses during accidents in nuclear power plants, i.e., 5 rem whole-body dose and 15 rem thyroid dose, have been laid down in the German Radiation Protection Act. In order to ensure that these limits are not exceeded for all exposure paths including the ingestion path or, if possible, to remain far below them, the Federal Ministry of the Interior has initiated a study on the effectiveness and cost of additional safety features for reducing the release of activity and the dose exposure during accidents in nuclear power plants. Detailed investigations were carried out for the following three radiologically representative types of accidents: break of a reactor coolant line, break of an instrument line in one of the outer ring rooms, and break of a main stream line outside the containment. The technical basis of the study was a BBR-type nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor and once-through steam generator. I-131 was chosen for determining the activity release as this is the critical nuclide for the ingestion path. Altogether 33 feasible technical measures were investigated and their potential improvement was assessed

  6. Franco-German nuclear cooperation: from the 'common product' to the first European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, D.

    1999-01-01

    It has now been 10 years since Framatome and Siemens decided to collaborate on the design and sales of an advanced nuclear power plant (NPP) model based on pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Originally called the 'common product', this model was renamed the European pressurized water reactor when Electricite de France (EDF) and the German electric utilities joined this cooperative development effort in 1992. Since the beginning, this cooperation has been formalized in the framework of an agreement that led to the founding of a joint and equally owned subsidiary, Nucler Power International (NPI), which is reponsible for leading the development of the new model and later handling its export sales

  7. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  8. Parameter Identification with the Random Perturbation Particle Swarm Optimization Method and Sensitivity Analysis of an Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Model for Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to obtain appropriate parameters for an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR unit model is of great significance for power system analysis. The attributes of that ability include the following: nonlinear relationships, long transition time, intercoupled parameters and difficult obtainment from practical test, posed complexity and difficult parameter identification. In this paper, a model and a parameter identification method for the PWR primary loop system were investigated. A parameter identification process was proposed, using a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm that is based on random perturbation (RP-PSO. The identification process included model variable initialization based on the differential equations of each sub-module and program setting method, parameter obtainment through sub-module identification in the Matlab/Simulink Software (Math Works Inc., Natick, MA, USA as well as adaptation analysis for an integrated model. A lot of parameter identification work was carried out, the results of which verified the effectiveness of the method. It was found that the change of some parameters, like the fuel temperature and coolant temperature feedback coefficients, changed the model gain, of which the trajectory sensitivities were not zero. Thus, obtaining their appropriate values had significant effects on the simulation results. The trajectory sensitivities of some parameters in the core neutron dynamic module were interrelated, causing the parameters to be difficult to identify. The model parameter sensitivity could be different, which would be influenced by the model input conditions, reflecting the parameter identifiability difficulty degree for various input conditions.

  9. Modeling and simulation of pressurized water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Two kinds of balance of plant (BOP) models of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system are developed in this work - the detailed BOP model and the simple BOP model. The detailed model is used to simulate the normal operational performance of a whole BOP system. The simple model is used to combine with the NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The trends of the steady state values of the detailed model are correct and the dynamic responses are reasonable. The simple BOP model approach starts the modelling work from the overall point of view. The response of the normalized turbine power and the feedwater inlet temperature to the steam generator of the simple model are compared with those of the detailed model. Both the steady state values and the dynamic responses are close to those of the detailed model. The simple BOP model is found adequate to represent the main performance of the BOP system. The simple balance of plant model was coupled with a NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The NSSS model consists of the reactor core model, the steam generator model, and the coolant temperature control system. A closed loop whole plant simulation for an electric load perturbation was performed. The results are plausible. The coupling effect between the NSSS system and the BOP system was analyzed. The feedback of the BOP system has little effect on the steam generator performance, while the performance of the BOP system is strongly affected by the steam flow rate from the NSSS

  10. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commerical electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate

  11. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  12. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description

  13. Taiwan Power Company's power distribution analysis and fuel thermal margin verification methods for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company's (TPC's) power distribution analysis and fuel thermal margin verification methods for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are examined. The TPC and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research started a joint 5-yr project in 1989 to establish independent capabilities to perform reload design and transient analysis utilizing state-of-the-art computer programs. As part of the effort, these methods were developed to allow TPC to independently perform verifications of the local power density and departure from nucleate boiling design bases, which are required by the reload safety evaluation for the Maanshan PWR plant. The computer codes utilized were extensively validated for the intended applications. Sample calculations were performed for up to six reload cycles of the Maanshan plant, and the results were found to be quite consistent with the vendor's calculational results

  14. Pressurized water reactor iodine spiking behavior under power transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The most accepted theory explaining the cause of pressurized water reactor iodine spiking is steam formation and condensation in damaged fuel rods. The phase transformation of the primary coolant from water to steam and back again is believed to cause the iodine spiking phenomenon. But due to the complex nature of the phenomenon, a comprehensive model of the behavior has not yet been successfully developed. This paper presents a new model based on an empirical approach, which gives a first-order estimation of the peak iodine spiking magnitude. Based on the proposed iodine spiking model, it is apparent that it is feasible to derive a correlation using the plant operating data base to monitor and control the peak iodine spiking magnitude

  15. Robust feedback-linearization control for axial power distribution in pressurized water reactors during load-following operation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zaidabadi nejad; G.R. Ansarifar

    2018-01-01

    Improved load-following capability is one of the most important technical tasks of a pressurized water reactor. Controlling the nuclear reactor core during load-following operation leads to some difficulties. These difficulties mainly arise from nuclear reactor core limitations in local power peaking: the core is subjected to sharp and large variation of local power density during transients. Axial offset (AO) is the parameter usually used to represent the core power peaking. One of the impor...

  16. Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. 12 refs., 7 tabs

  17. The nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is being studied. The principal idea of this strategy is that the discharged plutonium from light water reactors (LWRs) provides the inventories of the FBRs and the high-converter APWRs, whereby the LWRs are installed according to the derivative of a logistical S curve. Special emphasis is given to the dynamics of reaching an asymptotic symbiosis between FBRs and APWRs. The main conclusion is that if a symbiotic APWR-FBR family with an asymptotic total power level in the terawatt range is to exist in about half a century from now, we need a large number of FBRs already in an early phase

  18. Layout of the safety analysis report for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactor or boiling water reactor in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, E.

    1980-01-01

    For a licence according to paragraph 7 of the Atomic Energy Act to construct and operate a nuclear power plant, the applicant has to submit a safety analysis report, which must describe the site, the plant, all hazards in connection with the plant and the proposed safety precautions. For the structure and the content of a safety analysis report, a first guideline was published in 1959. Only a few safety analysis reports were prepared nearly strictly according to this guideline. In 1976 a second guideline was published for a standard safety analysis report. The lecture deals with the guidelines. A survey over the structure and content of the German safety analysis reports will be given. The experience gained by the new safety analysis reports will be discussed. (orig.)

  19. Improvements of nuclear fuel management in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1978-07-01

    The severe variations to which the different elements contributing to the determination of the fuel cycle cost are subjected have led to a reopening of the problem of ''optimization'' of nuclear fuel management. The increase in costs of uranium ore, isotope separation work units (swu), reprocessing, the political implications of proliferation associated with the employment of reprocessing operations have been at the origin of a reassessment of present-day management. It therefore appeared to be appropriate to study variants with respect to a reference mode represented by the management of the PWR 900 MWe systems, without burnable poison in the cycle at equilibrium (Case 3 of Table 1). In order to obtain a complete view of impacts of such modifications, computations were carried out as far as the appraisal of the cycle cost and with reprocessing. There has likewise been added to this the estimate of the gain anticipated from certain improvements in the neutron balance contributed at the level of the lattice

  20. French experience in operating pressurized water reactor power stations. Ten years' operation of the Ardennes power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teste du Bailler, A.; Vedrinne, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    In the paper the experience gained over ten years' operation of the Ardennes (Chooz) nuclear power station is summarized from the point of view of monitoring and control equipment. The reactor was the first pressurized water reactor to be installed in France; it is operated jointly by France and Belgium. The equipment, which in many cases consists of prototypes, was developed for industrial use and with the experience that has now been gained it is possible to evaluate its qualities and defects, the constraints which it imposes and the action that has to be taken in the future. (author)

  1. Contamination of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; Kontamination und berufliche Strahlenexposition in KKW mit Druckwasserreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Bruhn, Gerd; Artmann, Andreas; Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie; Tiessen, Olga

    2017-12-15

    In the precursor project of this study a simulation procedure was developed, consisting of a 3D-CAD model, a mathematical method for coordinate transformation, the software MicroShield and an empiric job model, to calculate the occupational exposure for definable jobs at the primary circuit. It was validated for inspection and maintenance jobs at PWRs of the second and third KWU/Siemens generation. With that the aptitude of this tool for prognosis of radiation exposure was demonstrated. Adhering contaminations within the primary circuit are considered as relevant sources, whereas activated core-near components are neglected. In this study, the model was extended by PWR of the so-called Convoy generation, which differ from older plants in the material composition and consequently in the relevant nuclide vectors. With information from a visit at a nuclear power plant and conversation with the staff, the model could be adjusted appropriately. The radionuclide Cobalt-60 is indeed less important compared to older plant-types, but it is still the dominant nuclide in facilities of the fourth KWU/Siemens generation, so that it is used as reference nuclide. Due to the contemporary planned final shut-down of the three Convoy plants (besides other), dismantling work was set into focus of simulation. Simulation was conducted and results compared for Convoy plants and for plants of the older generations two and three. Furthermore, by comparative simulations the question was answered if full system decontamination in Convoy plants before dismantling lead to benefits that justify this measure. The determined dose saving during unmounting works at the steam generators caused by the decontamination is remarkable. An abdication of decontamination at this location would lead to doses much higher than the occupational job dose during steam generator dismantling in a decontaminated generation 2 facility.

  2. Press kit. EPR (European pressurized water reactor). The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21 century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. In this framework, this document presents the advantages of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). The EPR is the only third generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. (A.L.B.)

  3. Pressurized water reactor and its development for nuclear power plants A survey the beginning, development, transfer, industrial application and; the future of a technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, Reza.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion about PWR type reactors is forwarded to production and technology developments in various countries. Technology transfer to different countries is reviewed in chapter two. The third chapter is about specifications and main components of the reactors. The fourth chapter outlooks to safety in nuclear technology which has a crucial importance in nuclear technology. The first PWR type reactor built in Russia has had some deficiencies; after that, i.e. in the eighties its quality improved and its criteria was met with international criteria. The sixth chapter describe reactor operation and some problems due to its operation. The use of advanced reactors which has had better quality in respect to its safety in the eighties is presented in seventh chapter. The final chapter is devoted to the new generation of reactor design for twenty first century

  4. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: ioliveira@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  5. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  6. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  7. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.D.; Kim, J.S.; Han, S.H.; Ha, Y.K.; Song, K.S.; Jee, K.Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of 129 I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The 129 I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67±3% and 5.43±0.53 g, 70±7% and 10.40±1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 129 I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, 129 I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher 129 I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  8. Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. A phased approach was used in Level 1. In Phase 1 the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to provide a better representation of the plant as it transitions from power to non power operation. This included a coarse screening analysis of all POSs to identify vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) potential frequencies of core damage accidents, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. In Phase 2, selected POSs from both Grand Gulf and Surry were chosen for detailed analysis. For Grand Gulf, POS 5 (approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected. For Surry, three POSs representing the time the plant spends in mid loop operation were chosen for analysis. Level 1 and Level 2/3 results from the Surry analyses are presented

  9. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudier, S.; Badel, D.; Beraha, R.; Champ, M.; Tricot, N.; Tran Dai, P.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: 1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; 2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and 3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs

  10. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudier, S [Direction de la Surete des Installations Nucleaires, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Badel, D; Beraha, R [Direction Regionale de l` Industrie, de la Recherche et de l` Environnement Rhone-Alpes, Lyon (France); Champ, M; Tricot, N; Tran Dai, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1994-12-31

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: (1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; (2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and (3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs.

  11. Parametric studies for the nuclear design of high-conversion pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axmann, J.; Oldekop, W.

    1987-01-01

    Undermoderated high-conversion pressurized water reactors with steel canning tubes offer the possibility of high burnup together with a comparatively low consumption of fissionable material; however, they require a relatively large inventory of fissionable material. The effects of different fuel compositions upon the specific consumption of fissionable material are investigated for a fixed burnup and moderator-to-fuel volume ratios varying between 0.5 and 2.0. Moreover, the required inventory of fissionable material is determined and the influence on the costs of electric power generation is shown. Further investigations deal with the neutron-physical effects of decreasing fuel rod diameters and the influence of differing steel additives. It appears that the parasitic neutron absorption by alloying constituents depends on the moderation level in a non-uniform manner and that the contribution of the fissionable material to the electric power generation costs is rather independent of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio. (orig.) [de

  12. Performance of self-powered neutron detectors in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, H.D.; Bozarch, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    A typical Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor (PWR) contains 364 rhodium self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and 52 background detectors. The detectors are inserted into the reactor core in 52 dry, multidetector assemblies. Each assembly contains seven SPNDs and one background detector. By mid-1977, eight B and W PWRs, each fitted with SPNDs, were in operation. Many of the SPNDs have operated successfully for more than four years. This paper describes the operational performance of the SPNDs and special tests conducted to improve that performance. Topics included are (1) insulation performance versus neutron dose to the SPND, (2) background signals in the leadwire region of the SPND, and (3) depletion of the SPND emitter versus absorbed neutron dose

  13. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  14. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Konzek, G.J.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    Safety and cost information was developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a large [1175 MW(e)] pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station. Two approaches to decommissioning, Immediate Dismantlement and Safe Storage with Deferred Dismantlement, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. Immediate Dismantlement was estimated to require about six years to complete, including two years of planning and preparation prior to final reactor shutdown, at a cost of $42 million, and accumulated occupational radiation dose, excluding transport operations, of about 1200 man-rem. Preparations for Safe Storage were estimated to require about three years to complete, including 1 1 / 2 years for planning and preparation prior to final reactor shutdown, at a cost of $13 million and an accumulated occupational radiation dose of about 420 man-rem. The cost of continuing care during the Safe Storage period was estimated to be about $80 thousand annually. Accumulated occupational radiation dose during the Safe Storage period was estimated to range from about 10 man-rem for the first 10 years to about 14 man-rem after 30 years or more. The cost of decommissioning by Safe Storage with Deferred Dismantlement was estimated to be slightly higher than Immediate Dismantlement. Cost reductions resulting from reduced volumes of radioactive material for disposal, due to the decay of the radioactive containments during the deferment period, are offset by the accumulated costs of surveillance and maintenance during the Safe Storage period

  15. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station. Classification of decommissioning wastes. Addendum 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.S.

    1984-09-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning of the reference pressurized water reactor power station are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. The 17,885 cubic meters of waste from DECON are classified as follows: Class A, 98.0%; Class B, 1.2%; Class C, 0.1%. About 0.7% (133 cubic meters) of the waste would be generally unacceptable for disposal using near-surface disposal methods

  16. Influence of the loop design of the feedwater- and steam quality in a power plant with pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennert, J.; Becher, L.

    1977-01-01

    At nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, condensate occurs on the high pressure part of the water-steam circuit, caused by the operation with low steam parameters. The behaviour of the electrolytes which entered into the circuit (solubility, distribution in water and/or steam) shows that these electrolytes (salts) are to be found mainly in the condensate. The insinuated electrolytes are reconcentrated during the common arrangements with 'Small Circuit' - consisting of steam generator, high pressure turbine, water separator, feedwater vessel, and have a negative influence on the feedwater - boiler water - and the steam quality. Remedy is possible by modified arrangements, during which these electrolyte-containing condensates will be treated and traced back into the main circuit. Nevertheless that the efficiency decrease is insignificant and additional efforts are necessary, a change over to these arrangements is recommendable, due to the fact that the feedwater quality, the boiler water quality, the steam quality in front of the turbine, and finally also the operational safety, as well as the availability will be improved. (orig.) [de

  17. Pressurized water reactor in-core nuclear fuel management by tabu search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Natasha J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a tabu search implementation for PWR reload core design. • We conduct computational experiments to find optimal parameter values. • We test the performance of the algorithm on two representative PWR geometries. • We compare this performance with that given by established optimization methods. • Our tabu search implementation outperforms these methods in all cases. - Abstract: Optimization of the arrangement of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons when reloading pressurized water reactors has, in the past, been performed with many different algorithms in an attempt to make reactors more economic and fuel efficient. The use of the tabu search algorithm in tackling reload core design problems is investigated further here after limited, but promising, previous investigations. The performance of the tabu search implementation developed was compared with established genetic algorithm and simulated annealing optimization routines. Tabu search outperformed these existing programs for a number of different objective functions on two different representative core geometries

  18. Multi-stage-flash desalination plants of relative small performance with integrated pressurized water reactors as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.; Peltzer, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination plants with a performance in the range of 10 000 to 80 000 m 3 distillate per day heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The design study shows that IPWR systems have specific advantages up to 200 MWth compared to other reactor types at least being adapted for single- and dual-purpose desalination plants. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show that due to fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (author)

  19. Design of an integral missile shield in integrated head assembly for pressurized water reactor at commercial nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliga, Ravi; Watts, Tom Neal; Kamath, Harish

    2015-01-01

    containment and damaging other safety components in the containment that are required to be operated for safe shutdown of the reactor. The missile shield in the IHA is designed to absorb missile energy due to an impact from missiles associated with a postulated CRDM housing break. This paper provides details of the CRDM missile shield design in the IHA for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and it can be extended to other PWRs such as VVERs. (author)

  20. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor

  1. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijaksono, Umar, E-mail: umar.wijaksono@student.upi.edu; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman [Electrical Power System Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering Education, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi No. 207 Bandung, Indonesia 40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  2. On the improvement of the response capability of the control room operator in a pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant in a severe earthquake through the use of emergency response guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent probabilistic risk assessment studies indicate that potential accidents initiated by large earthquakes are among the major contributors to public risk from nuclear power plants. During a severe earthquake, the symptoms presented to operators may be unreliable and may endanger the validity of actions in emergency response guidelines (ERGs). The objective of the present study is to improve the operator capability of responding to seismic damage through the use of ERGS. The methods used are to deterministically identify the possible weakness of ERGs, given a severe earthquake, and to probabilistically evaluate those identified weaknesses. Several cases are postulated. Each of them contains system failures with or without indicator failures and leads the core to meltdown conditions if the operator follows the ERGs strictly without any deviation. The likelihood of each case is estimated. A LISP program is developed to estimate the plant seismic risk with which the relative risk contribution of each postulated case is estimated. As a result, ten cases are postulated and possible remedies for each case are discussed. The likelihood of each case is estimated to be not negligible. The identified indicator failures should be considered in future refinement of the ERGS. The development of an expert system to provide remedial procedures should be considered after a more thorough study in which many more cases are postulated

  3. Exxon nuclear neutronics design methods for pressurized water reactors. Supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogen, F.B.; Stout, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications to the Exxon Nuclear PWR neutronic design calculational methods are presented as well as the results obtained when these improved methods are compared to reactor measurements. The basic PWR design tools remain unchanged; i.e., the XPOSE code is used for generating the basic nuclear parameters, the PDQ-7 code is used for calculating reactivity and x-y power distributions, and the XTG code is used for three-dimensional analysis. The recent start-up experiences at D. C. Cook Unit 1 and H. B. Robinson Unit 2 have provided a significant increase in the data base supporting the current ENC PWR neutronic methods. The verification comparisons contained in the supplement include reactor measurements from D. C. Cook Unit 1, Cycle 2; H. B. Robinson Unit 2, Cycles 4 and 5; Palisades Cycle 2, and R. E. Ginna, Cycle 7

  4. Collector feedwater supply and stability of the power distribution in a pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnikov, V.I.; Kosolapov, S.V.; Kramerov, A.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    It is necessary to determine how the collector feedwater supply affects the disposition of the stability limits and the instability period for the power distribution in such a reactor. The main reason for the fluctuations in feedwater flow rate were shown by additional calculations with the general power regulator switched out to be due to instability on the fundamental in the neutron distribution. The power-level fluctuations are due to oscillation of the feed valve in the level regulator, and consequently to oscillations in the feedwater flow rate. If collector feed is to be employed, it is desirable to improve the response of the pressure control system for the separator drum, because under certain emergency conditions there will be a considerable fall in pressure in the separator drum. The deviation from saturation for the water in the separator drum tube is less in the second method than it is in the first, so the cavitation margin in the principal pumps may be reduced somewhat. Calculations show that this reduction will not occur if the time constant of the turbine synchronizer is about 10 sec. Also, the dynamic characteristics of the nuclear power station in these modes of feedwater supply are appreciably influenced by the parameters of the pressure-control system and the water-level control for the separator drum

  5. Enhancement of nuclear heat transfer in a typical pressurized water reactor by new spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazifi, M.; Nematollahi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The fuel element geometry typically used in nuclear reactor is rod bundle whose rod-to-rod clearance is maintained by grid spacer. The heat generated in the rod by nuclear reaction is removed by coolant, usually in turbulent flow. The coolant moves axially through the subchannels. Fuel spacer grid affects the coolant flow distribution in a fuel rod bundle, and so spacer geometry has a strong influence on a bundle's thermal-hydraulic characteristics such as critical heat flux and pressure drop. An understanding of the detailed structure of the turbulent flow and heat transfer in the rod bundle, used especially as nuclear fuel elements, is of major interest to the nuclear power industry for their safe and reliable operation. The flow mixing devices on grid spacer would enhance the mixing rate between sub-channels and promote the turbulence in subchannel. The present study evaluates the effects of mixing vane shape on flow structure and heat transfer downstream of mixing vane in a sub-channel of fuel assembly, by obtaining velocity and pressure fields, turbulent intensity, flow mixing factors, heat transfer coefficient and friction factor using three-dimensional RANS analysis. Six new shapes mixing vane designed by the authors, are simulated numerically to evaluate the performance in enhancing the heat transfer, in comparison with commercialized split vane. Standard K-epsilon model are used as a turbulence closure model and periodic and symmetry condition are set as boundary conditions. The capability of the model to predict the coolant flow distribution inside rod bundles is shown and discussed on the base of comparison with experimental data for a variety of geometrical and Reynolds number conditions. It is conformed that the turbulence in the sub-channel was significantly promoted by spacer and mixing devices but rapidly decreased to a fully developed level approximately 10 time of hydraulic diameter downstream of the top of spacer. Ring type mixer showed a high

  6. Suboptimal control of pressurized water reactor power plant using approximate model-following method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    1987-01-01

    We attempted to develop an effective control system that can successfully manage the nuclear steam supply (NSS) system of a PWR power plant in an operational mode requiring relatively small variations of power. A procedure is proposed for synthesizing control system that is a simple, yet practiced, suboptimal control system. The suboptimal control system is designed in two steps; application of the optimal control theory, based on the linear state-feedback control and the use of an approximate model-following method. This procedure can appreciably reduce the complexity of the structure of the controller by accepting a slight deviation from the optimality and by the use of the output-feedback control. This eliminates the engineering difficulty caused by an incompletely state-feedback that is sometimes encountered in practical applications of the optimal state-feedback control theory to complex large-scale dynamical systems. Digital simulations and graphical studies based on the Bode-diagram demonstrate the effectiveness of the suboptimal control, and the applicability of the proposed design method as well. (author)

  7. Qualification of the Taiwan Power Company's pressurized water reactor physics methods using CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hsien-Chuan, E-mail: linsc@iner.org.tw [Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Yaur, Shung-Jung; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Shiue, Jin-Yih; Huang, Yu-Lung [Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studsvik's core management system (CMS) was applied to Taiwan Power Company's pressurized water reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advanced calculation model of shutdown cooling, B-10 depletion and integrated pin exposure were introduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core characteristic parameters such as boron letdown, low power physics test (LPPT) predictions, and reaction rate were validated to measurement data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uncertainty of each item was quantified. - Abstract: This paper presents the validation of Studsvik core management system (CMS) for application to the Maanshan units 1 and 2 reactor core physics analysis (Huang and Yang, 1994). The methodology was validated by demonstrating the ability to obtain accurate and reliable results for various conditions and applications. Core characteristic parameters such as boron letdown, low power physics test (LPPT) predictions, and reaction rate were validated. Analytical results have been compared to measured data and reliability factors of the method have been quantified.

  8. A heuristic application of critical power ratio to pressurized water reactor core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Jeun, Gyoo Dong

    2002-01-01

    The approach for evaluating the critical heat flux (CHF) margin using the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) concept has been widely applied to PWR core design, while DNBR in this approach does not indicate appropriately the CHF margin in terms of the attainable power margin-to-CHF against a reactor core condition. The CHF power margin must be calculated by increasing power until the minimum DNBR reaches a DNBR limit. The Critical Power Ratio (CPR), defined as the ratio of the predicted CHF power to the operating power, is considered more reasonable for indicating the CHF margin and can be calculated by a CPR correlation based on the heat balance of a test bundle. This approach yields directly the CHF power margin, but the calculated CPR must be corrected to compensate for many local effects of the actual core, which are not considered in the CHF test and analysis. In this paper, correction of the calculated CPR is made so that it may become equal to the DNB overpower margin. Exemplary calculations showed that the correction tends to be increased as power distribution is more distorted, but are not unduly large

  9. Response of pressurized water reactor (PWR) to network power generation demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The flexibility of the PWR type reactor in terms of response to the variations of the network power demands, is demonstrated. The factors that affect the transitory flexibility and some design prospects that allow the reactor fits the requirements of the network power demands, are also discussed. (M.J.A.)

  10. Decommissioning of the BR3 pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    1996-01-01

    The dismantling and the decommissioning of nuclear installations at the end of their life-cycle is a new challenge to the nuclear industry. Different techniques and procedures for the dismantling of a nuclear power plant on an existing installation, the BR-3 pressurized-water reactor, are described. The scientific programme, objectives, achievements in this research area at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN for 1995 are summarized

  11. Improved algorithm based on equivalent enthalpy drop method of pressurized water reactor nuclear steam turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hu; Qi Guangcai; Li Shaohua; Li Changjian

    2011-01-01

    Because it is difficulty to accurately determine the extraction steam turbine enthalpy and the exhaust enthalpy, the calculated result from the conventional equivalent enthalpy drop method of PWR nuclear steam turbine is not accurate. This paper presents the improved algorithm on the equivalent enthalpy drop method of PWR nuclear steam turbine to solve this problem and takes the secondary circuit thermal system calculation of 1000 MW PWR as an example. The results show that, comparing with the design value, the error of actual thermal efficiency of the steam turbine cycle obtained by the improved algorithm is within the allowable range. Since the improved method is based on the isentropic expansion process, the extraction steam turbine enthalpy and the exhaust enthalpy can be determined accurately, which is more reasonable and accurate compared to the traditional equivalent enthalpy drop method. (authors)

  12. Nuclear fuel, with emphasis on its utilization in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, R.; Roshanzamir, M.

    1997-01-01

    Production processes of nuclear fuel on one hand and using nuclear fuels in reactors, particularly PWR Type reactors on the other hand is investigated. The first chapter reviews the relationship between fuel and reactors; The principals of reactor physics in relation with fuel are described shortly. The second chapter reviews uranium exploration and extraction as well as production of uranium concentrate and uranium dioxides. The third chapter is specified to the different procedures of uranium enrichment. In the fourth chapter, processing of uranium dioxide powder and fuel pellet is described. In the fifth chapter fabrication of fuel rod and fuel assemblies is explained thoroughly. The sixth chapter devoted to the different phenomena which occur ed in fuel structure and can during operational time of reactor; damage to fuel rods and developing theoretical models to describe these phenomena and analysis of fuel structure. The seventh chapter discusses how fuel rods are to be experimented during fabrication, operation and development of technology. The eighth chapter explains different fuels such as uranium compounds and mixed oxide fuel of uranium Gadolinium and uranium plutonium and the process of fabrication of zircaloy. In the tenth chapter, fuel reprocessing is investigated and the difficulties of developing this technology is referred

  13. Status of advanced small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Zhou Yun

    2012-01-01

    In order to expand the nuclear power in energy and desalination, increase competitiveness in global nuclear power market, many developed countries with strong nuclear energy technology have realized the importance of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) and initiated heavy R and D programs in SMR. The Advanced Small Pressurized Water Reactor (ASPWR) is characterized by great advantages in safety and economy and can be used in remote power grid and replace mid/small size fossil plant economically. This paper reviews the history and current status of SMR and ASPWR, and also discusses the design concept, safety features and other advantages of ASPWR. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall review of ASPWR technology in western countries, and to promote the R and D in ASPWR in China. (authors)

  14. Modeling of boron control during power transients in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, P.; Distexhe, E.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate control instructions in a reactor control aid computer are included in order to realize the boron makeup throughput, which is required to obtain the boron concentration in the primary coolant loop, predicted by a neutronic code. A modeling of the transfer function between the makeup and the primary loop is proposed. The chemical and volumetric control system, the pressurizer, and the primary loop are modeled as instantaneous diffusion cells. The pipes are modeled as time lag lines. The model provides the unstationary boron distributions in the different elements of the setup. A numerical code is developed to calculate the time evolutions of the makeup throughput during power transients

  15. An improved model to simulate pressurized water reactor iodine spiking behavior under power transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Among those theories to interpret the PWR iodine spiking behaviors, the most accepted concept is based on steam formation and condensation in damaged fuel rods. Due to the complex nature of the phenomenon, a comprehensive model of the iodine behavior has not yet been successfully developed. In 1992 a new empirical model was introduced to establish a correlation with the operating parameters. The comparison results of the predicted iodine-131 equivalent activity value with the operating radiochemistry database was off by 23%. This paper presents an improved model. Although it is still an empirical model which also gives a first order estimation of the peak iodine spiking magnitude, the deviation between prediction and measurement was reduced to ∼7%. It is believed that this improved model can be used for better prediction and control of the iodine spiking magnitude resulted from failed fuel rods during power transients or plant shutdown. (author)

  16. Power-level regulation and simulation of nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillation using H-infinity loop shaping control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to solve the power-level control issue of a nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillations. A nonlinear pressurized water reactor core is modeled using the lumped parameter method, and a linear model of the core is then obtained through the small perturbation linearization way. The H∞loop shapingcontrolis utilized to design a robust controller of the linearized core model.The calculated H∞loop shaping controller is applied to the nonlinear core model. The nonlinear core model and the H∞ loop shaping controller build the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system.Finally, the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system is simulatedconsidering two typical load processes that are a step load maneuver and a ramp load maneuver, and simulation results show that the nonlinear control system is effective.

  17. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  18. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  19. A multi-stage-flash desalination plant of relative small performance with an integrated pressurized water reactor as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, M.; Petersen, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination-plants with a performance in the range of 10,000 to 80,000 m 3 /d heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the integrated pressurized water reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show, that due to the fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (orig.) [de

  20. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  1. Development of alternative fuel for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, P.E.; Ferreira, R.A.N.; Ferraz, W.B.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.; Assis, G. de; Doerr, W.O.; Wehner, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of alternative fuel cycles in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) such as Th/U and Th/Pu cycles can permit a better utilization of uranium reserves without the necessity of developing new power reactor concepts. The development of the technology of alternative fuels for PWR is one of the objectives of the 'Program on Thorium Utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors' carried out jointly by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. (NUCLEBRAS), through its Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) and by German institutions, the Julich Nuclear Research Center (KFA), the Kraftwerk Union A.G. (KWU) and NUKEM GmbH. This paper summarizes the results so far obtained in the fuel technology. The development of a fabrication process for PWR fuel pellets from gel-microspheres is reported as well as the design, the specification, and the fabrication of prototype fuel rods for irradiation tests. (Author) [pt

  2. Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Shen Shifei

    1996-01-01

    Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor (OSSPWR) has been developed under the sponsorship of IAEA from August 1994. The project is being carried out by the Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The Design concepts of the operator support functions have been established. The prototype systems of OSSPWR has been developed as well. The primary goal of the project is to create an advanced operator support system by applying new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, advanced communication technologies, etc. Recently, the advanced man-machine interface for nuclear power plant operators has been developed. It is connected to the modern computer systems and utilizes new high performance graphic displays. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  3. Decision-making support system based on MAS for emergency response to nuclear accidents of marine pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dengke; Zhang Dafa; Jiang Wei; Chen Yonghong

    2007-01-01

    Emergency decision-making to Marine Pressurized-Water Reactor (MPWR) was severely restricted by the complex environment. To enhance the emergency decision-making ability of MPWR, reducing the effect of emergencies, an emergency Decision-making Support System (DSS) which based on Multi-agent System (MAS) was presented. In the system, the HLA/RTI was used as the support environment, and the structure and the Control Agent (SCA), Analyse Agent (AA), Countermeasure Agent (CA), Evaluation Agent (EVA) and Environment Agent (ENA) were designed. The MAS were with the characteristics of autonomy, reactivity and initiative, which were fully used in the system to make effective decision for emergencies. (authors)

  4. Automatic determination of pressurized water reactor core loading patterns which maximize end-of-cycle reactivity within power peaking and burnup constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    An automated procedure for determining the optimal core loading pattern for a pressurized water reactor which maximizes end-of-cycle k/sub eff/ while satisfying constraints on power peaking and discharge burnup has been developed. The optimization algorithm combines a two energy group, two-dimensional coarse-mesh finite difference diffusion theory neutronics model to simulate core conditions, a perturbation theory approach to determine reactivity, flux, power and burnup changes as a function of assembly shuffling, and Monte Carlo integer programming to select the optimal loading pattern solution. The core examined was a typical Cycle 2 reload with no burnable poisons. Results indicate that the core loading pattern that maximizes end-of-cycle k/sub eff/ results in a 5.4% decrease in fuel cycle costs compared with the core loading pattern that minimizes the maximum relative radial power peak

  5. Pressurized water reactor flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; Knapp, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A flow path is provided for cooling the control rods of a pressurized water reactor. According to this scheme, a small amount of cooling water enters the control rod guide tubes from the top and passes downwards through the tubes before rejoining the main coolant flow and passing through the reactor core. (LL)

  6. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  7. The Westinghouse Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor, AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Featuring proven technology and innovative passive safety systems, the Westinghouse AP1000 pressurized water reactor can achieve competitive generation costs in the current electricity market without emitting harmful greenhouse gases and further harming the environment. Westinghouse Electric Company, the pioneer in nuclear energy once again sets a new industry standard with the AP1000. The AP1000 is a two-loop pressurized water reactor that uses simplified, innovative and effective approach to safety. With a gross power rating of 3415 megawatt thermal and a nominal net electrical output of 1117 megawatt electric, the AP1000 is ideal for new base load generation. The AP1000 is the safest and most economical nuclear power plant available in the worldwide commercial marketplace, and is the only Generation III+ reactor to receive a design certification from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Based on nearly 20 years of research and development, the AP1000 builds and improves upon the established technology of major components used in current Westinghouse designed plants. These components, including steam generators, digital instrumentation and controls, fuel, pressurizers, and reactor vessels, are currently in use around the world and have years of proven, reliable operating experience. Historically, Westinghouse plant designs and technology have forged the cutting edge technology of nuclear plant around the world. Today, nearly 50 percent of the world's 440 nuclear plants are based on Westinghouse technology. Westinghouse continues to be the nuclear industry's global leader. (author)

  8. Safety systems and features of boiling and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khair, H. O. M.

    2012-06-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) requires a deep understanding of the functioning of physical processes and systems involved. This study was carried out to present an overview of the features of safety systems of boiling and pressurized water reactors that are available commercially. Brief description of purposes and functions of the various safety systems that are employed in these reactors was discussed and a brief comparison between the safety systems of BWRs and PWRs was made in an effort to emphasize of safety in NPPs.(Author)

  9. Manufacturing of welded polyblock turbine rotors for pressurized water reactor nuclear plants; Optimization of the steel grade; Effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisseloup, J.; Poitrault, I.S.; De Badereau, A.; Bocquet, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Le Creusot Heavy Forge has been manufacturing low-pressure (LP) disks and shaft ends for 1300-MW nuclear power plants. These forgings, in weldable 1.8Cr-1Ni-0.8Mo steel, are welded by Alsthom Atlantique. With the aim of improved quality, homogeneity of mechanical properties, hardenability, and weldability, this metallurgical research has been carried out: 1. Optimization of the steel grade (the effect of silicon, manganese, and molybdenum). 2. The influence of tempering and stress relief treatment parameters. 3. The effect of impurities. These studies have led the Steel Melting Shop of Creusot-Loire Factory to invest in a high-performance process of steelmaking: the heating ladle refining process. This new process has had spectacular results that have been confirmed by investigations on cut-up industrial forgings

  10. Automatic determination of pressurized water reactor core loading patterns that maximize beginning-of-cycle reactivity within power-peaking and burnup constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to automatically determine a good estimate of the core loading pattern, which minimizes fuel cycle costs for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Equating fuel cycle cost minimization with core reactivity maximization, the objective is to determine the loading pattern that maximizes core reactivity while satisfying power peaking, discharge burnup, and other constraints. The method utilizes a two-dimensional, coarse-mesh, finite difference scheme to evaluate core reactivity and fluxes for an initial reference loading pattern. First-order perturbation theory is applied to determine the effects of assembly shuffling on reactivity, power distribution, end-of-cycle burnup. Monte Carlo integer programming is then used to determine a near-optimal loading pattern within a range of loading patterns near the reference pattern. The process then repeats with the new loading pattern as the reference loading pattern and terminates when no better loading pattern can be determined. The process was applied with both reactivity maximization and radial power-peaking minimization as objectives. Results on a typical large PWR indicate that the cost of obtaining an 8% improvement in radial power-peaking margin is ≅2% in fuel cycle costs, for the reload core loaded without burnable poisons that was studied

  11. Relative power density distribution calculations of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor with full-scope explicit modeling of monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. O.; Kim, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Relative power density distributions of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor calculated by Monte Carlo modeling with the MCNP code. The Kori unit 1 core is modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-eighth of the reactor in-vessel component with reflective boundaries at 0 and 45 degrees. The axial core model is based on half core symmetry and is divided into four axial segments. Fission reaction density in each rod is calculated by following 100 cycles with 5,000 test neutrons in each cycle after starting with a localized neutron source and ten noncontributing settle cycles. Relative assembly power distributions are calculated from fission reaction densities of rods in assembly. After 100 cycle calculations, the system coverages to a κ value of 1.00039 ≥ 0.00084. Relative assembly power distribution is nearly the same with that of the Kori unit 1 FSAR. Applicability of the full-scope Monte Carlo simulation in the power distribution calculation is examined by the relative root mean square error of 2.159%. (author)

  12. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-07-01

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  13. The Proliferation Resistance of a Nuclear Fuel Cycle Using Fuel Recovered from the Electrolytic Reduction of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Min; Cochran, Thomas; Mckinzie, Matthew [NRDC, Washington, (United States)

    2016-05-15

    At some points in the fuel cycle, a level of intrinsic or technical proliferation-resistance can be provided by radiation barriers that surround weapons-usable materials. In this report we examine some aspects of intrinsic proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle for a fast neutron reactor that uses fuel recovered from the electrolytic reduction process of pressurized water reactor spent fuel, followed by a melt-refining process. This fuel cycle, proposed by a nuclear engineer at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), is being examined with respect to its potential merits of higher fuel utilization, lower production of radioactive byproducts, and better economics relative to a pyroprocesing-based fuel cycle. With respect to intrinsic proliferation resistance, however, we show that since europium is separated out during the electrolytic reduction process, this fuel cycle has little merit beyond that of a pyroprocessing-based fuel cycle because of the lower radiation barrier of its recovered materials containing weapons-usable actinides. Unless europium is not separated following voloxidation, the proposed KAIST fuel cycle is not intrinsically proliferation resistant and in this regard does not represent a significant improvement over pyroprocessing. We suggest further modification of the proposed KAIST fuel cycle, namely, omitting electrolytic reduction and melt reduction, and producing the fast reactor fuel directly following voloxidation.

  14. The European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The present state of development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is outlined. During the so-called harmonization phase, the French and German utilities drew up their common requirements and evaluated the reactor concept developed until then with respect to these requirements. A main result of the harmonization phase was the issue, in September 1993, of the 'EPR Conceptual Safety Feature Review File' to be jointly assessed by the safety authorities in France and Germany. The safety objectives to be met by the EPR are specified in the second part of the paper, and some details of the primary and secondary side safety systems are given. (orig.) [de

  15. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  16. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  17. Development of BWR [boiling water reactor] and PWR [pressurized water reactor] event descriptions for nuclear facility simulator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    A number of tools that can aid nuclear facility training developers in designing realistic simulator scenarios have been developed. This paper describes each of the tools, i.e., event lists, events-by-competencies matrices, and event descriptions, and illustrates how the tools can be used to construct scenarios

  18. Neutron transport. Physics and calculation of nuclear reactors with applications to pressurized water reactors and fast neutron reactors. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Reuss, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the main physical bases of neutron theory and nuclear reactor calculation. 1) Interactions of neutrons with matter and basic principles of neutron transport; 2) Neutron transport in homogeneous medium and the neutron field: kinetic behaviour, slowing-down, resonance absorption, diffusion equation, processing methods; 3) Theory of a reactor constituted with homogeneous zones: critical condition, kinetics, separation of variables, calculation and neutron balance of the fundamental mode, one-group and multigroup theories; 4) Study of heterogeneous cell lattices: fast fission factor, resonance absorption, thermal output factor, diffusion coefficient, computer codes; 5) Operation and control of reactors: perturbation theory, reactivity, fuel properties evolution, poisoning by fission products, calculation of a reactor and fuel management; 6) Study of some types of reactors: PWR and fast breeder reactors, the main reactor types of the present French program [fr

  19. Pressurized-water-reactor station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbe, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program was to investigate accident scenarios beyond the design basis. The primary objective of SASA was to analyze nuclear plant transients that could lead to partial or total core melt and evaluate potential mitigating actions. The following summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) SASA effort at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is presently evaluating Unresolved Safety Issue A-44 - Station Blackout from initiation of the transient to core uncovery. The balance of the analysis from core uncovery until fission product release is being performed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The current analyses involve the Bellefonte Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS), a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) 205 Fuel Assembly (205-FA) raised loop design to be operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority

  20. The safety of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panossian, J.; Tanguy, P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of the status of the safety level of modern pressurized water reactors, that is to say those that meet the safety criteria accepted today by the international nuclear community. We will mainly rely on the operating experience and the Probabilistic Safety Assessments concerning French reactors. We will not back over the basic safety concepts of these reactors, which are well known. We begin with a brief review of some of the lessons learned from the two main accidents discussed in the present meeting. Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, without entering into details presented in previous papers. The presentation ends with a rather lengthy conclusion, aimed more at those not directly involved in the technical details of nuclear safety matters

  1. Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1980-09-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  2. Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vito, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors (CE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors. The CE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  3. Pressurized water reactors: the EPR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, J.P.; Yvon, M.

    2007-01-01

    EPR (originally 'European pressurized water reactor', and now 'evolutionary power reactor') is a model of reactor initially jointly developed by French and German engineers which fulfills the particular safety specifications of both countries but also the European utility requirements jointly elaborated by the main European power companies under the initiative of Electricite de France (EdF). Today, two EPR-based reactors are under development: one is under construction in Finland and the other, Flamanville 3 (France), received its creation permit decree on April 10, 2007. This article presents, first, the main objectives of the EPR, and then, describes the Flamanville 3 reactor: reactor type and general conditions, core and conditions of operation, primary and secondary circuits with their components, main auxiliary and recovery systems, man-machine interface and instrumentation and control system, confinement and serious accidents, arrangement of buildings. (J.S.)

  4. Remote-controlled television for locating leaking tubes in pressurized-water reactor steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormault, P.; Denis, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Scarabee system is designed for observation of the tubes in water boxes of pressurized-water reactor nuclear-power-station steam generators. It consists essentially of a camera and a projector used as a marker, both of which swivel freely. The whole unit is housed in a water-tight container which can easily be decontaminated. Remote control of camera and marker movement is carried out from a console. (author)

  5. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  6. Natural Circulation Characteristics of an Integral Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junli Gou; Suizheng Qiu; Guanghui Su; Dounan Jia

    2006-01-01

    Natural circulation potential is of great importance to the inherent safety of a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a theoretical investigation on the natural circulation characteristics of an integrated pressurized water reactor. Through numerically solved the one-dimensional model, the steady-state single phase conservative equations for the primary circuit and the steady-state two-phase drift-flux conservative equations for the secondary side of the once-through steam generator, the natural circulation characteristics are studied. Based on the preliminary calculation analysis, it is found that natural circulation mass flow rate is proportional to the exponential function of the power, and the value of the exponent is related to working conditions of the steam generator secondary side. The higher height difference between the core center and the steam generator center is favorable to the heat removal capacity of the natural circulation. (authors)

  7. Pressurized water-reactor feedwater piping response to water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1978-03-01

    The nuclear power industry is interested in steam-generator water hammer because it has damaged the piping and components at pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water hammer arises when rapid steam condensation in the steam-generator feedwater inlet of a PWR causes depressurization, water-slug acceleration, and slug impact at the nearest pipe elbow. The resulting pressure pulse causes the pipe system to shake, sometimes violently. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential structural effects of steam-generator water hammer on feedwater piping. This was accomplished by finite-element computation of the response of two sections of a typical feedwater pipe system to four representative water-hammer pulses. All four pulses produced high shear and bending stresses in both sections of pipe. Maximum calculated pipe stresses varied because the sections had different characteristics and were sensitive to boundary-condition modeling

  8. Pumps for German pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dernedde, R.

    1984-01-01

    The article describes the development of a selection of pumps which are used in the primary coolant system and the high-pressure safety injection system and feed water system during the past 2 decades. The modifications were caused by the step-wise increasing power output of the plants from 300 MW up to 1300 MW. Additional important influences were given be the increased requirements for quality assurance and final-documentation. The good operating results of the delivered pumps proved that the reliability is independent of the volume of the software-package. The outlook expects that consolidation will be followed by additional steps for the order processing of components for the convoy pumps. KW: main coolant pump; primary system; boiler feed pump; reactor pump; secondary system; barrel insert pump; pressure water reactor; convoy pump; state of the art.

  9. Common safety approach for future pressurized water reactors in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.; Gros, G.

    1994-01-01

    In France and Germany all major activities related to future pressurized water reactors are now proceeding in a coordinated way among the two countries. This holds for utilities and industry in the development of a joint PWR project, the ''European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR)'' by Electricite de France (EDF), German utilities, Nuclear Power International (NPI), Framatome and Siemens as well as for the technical safety objectives for future evolutionary reactors on the basis of a common safety approach adopted by the safety authorities of both countries for plants to operate form the beginning of the next century. The proposed paper covers this common development of a safety approach and particular technical safety objectives. (authors). 5 refs. 1 fig

  10. The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR). State of the art after the preliminary design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouteille, F.; Schneider, D.

    2002-01-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is an evolutionary development of the pressurized water reactor product lines built by Framatome and Siemens in France and Germany. Under the technical leadership of both nuclear power plant suppliers (now merged in Framatome ANP, a joint venture of AREVA and Siemens) the future-oriented plant concepts was developed in close cooperation with German and French utilities and in compliance with the European Utility Requirements. The EPR has safety features with which even extremely improbable, beyond design-basis events can be controlled and their effects can be limited to such an extent that no emergency response actions need be taken outside of the immediate plant site. This also means that safety systems prevent containment failure even in the improbable case of a core melt. This was confirmed by the French and German reactor safety authorities. The selected high thermal output also insures the economic viability of the innovative reactor concept, so that the power generation costs which can be achieved with the EPR will be absolutely competitive with those of fossil energy carriers. Framatome ANP has thus developed a pressurized water reactor ready for offer at the right time, which can completely fulfill the most rigorous requirements in terms of nuclear safety and economy. (Author)

  11. Design and safety of the Sizewell pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1983-01-01

    The Central Electricity Generating Board propose to build a pressurized water reactor at Sizewell in Suffolk. The PWR Task Force was set up in June 1981 to provide a communications centre for developing firm design proposals for this reactor. These were to follow the Standardized Nuclear Unit Power Plant System designed by Bechtel for the Westinghouse nuclear steam supply system for reactors built in the United States. Changes were required to the design to accommodate, for example, the use of two turbine generators and to satisfy British safety requirements. Differences exist between the British and American licensing procedures. In the UK the statutory responsibility for the safety of a nuclear power station rests unambiguously with the Generating Boards. In the U.S.A. the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues detailed written instructions, which must be followed precisely. Much of the debate on the safety of nuclear power focuses on the risks of big nuclear accidents. It is necessary to explain to the public what, in a balanced perspective, the risks of accidents actually are. The long-term consequences can be presented in terms of reduction in life expectancy, increased chance of cancer or the equivalent pattern of compulsory cigarette smoking. (author)

  12. Design description of the European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, R.

    1999-01-01

    The EPR (the European Pressurized Water Reactor) is an evolutionary PWR developed by Nuclear Power International and its parent companies, Framatome and Siemens, in co-operation with Electricite de France and German Utilities. NPI can rely on the huge experience gained by its parent companies; they have constructed more than 100 nuclear power plants throughout the world. The total installed capacity exceeds 100,000 MW - about 25% of the total world-wide figure. Following the conceptual design phase of the so-called Common Product conducted by NPI, Framatome and Siemens, from 1989 through 1991, Electricite de France (EDF) and several major German utilities decided to merge their own development programmes, - the N4 Plus and REP 2000 projects on the French side and the further development of the KONVOI technology on the German side, - with the NPI project. From that time on, the NPI project became one single common development line for both countries. In parallel, EDF and the German utilities decided to establish, together with other European utilities, specifications that would represent common utility views on the design and performance of future nuclear power plants. These are documented in the European Utility Requirements (EURs). The basic design has been completed in 1997, and in 1998 a design optimization is being carried out with the goal to even increase the economic competitiveness of nuclear power. This paper provides a brief design description of the EPR. (author)

  13. Apparatus for localizing disturbances in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention according to CS-PS 177386, entitled ''Apparatus for increasing the efficiency and passivity of the functioning of a bubbling-vacuum system for localizing disturbances in nuclear power plants with a pressurized water reactor'', concerns an important area of nuclear power engineering that is being developed in the RGW member countries. The invention solves the problems of increasing the reliability and intensification during the operation of the above very important system for guaranteeing the safety of the standard nuclear power plants of Soviet design. The essence of the invention consists in the installation of a simple passively operating supplementary apparatus. Consequently, the following can be observed in the system: first an improvement and simultaneous increase in the reliability of its function during the critical transition period, which follows the filling of the second space with air from the first space; secondly, elimination of the hitherto unavoidable initiating role of the active sprinkler-condensation device present; thirdly, a more effective performance and subjection of the elements to disintegration of the water flowing from the bubbling condenser into the first space; and fourthly, an enhanced utilization of the heat-conducting ability of the water reservoir of the bubbling condenser. Representatives of the supplementary apparatus are autonomous and local secondary systems of the sprinkler-sprayer without an insert, which spray the water under the effect of gravity. 1 fig

  14. Operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook gives a systematic introduction into the operational and maintenance activities in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Subjects: (1) Setup and operational behaviour of power reactors, (2) setup of nuclear power plants, (3) radiation protection and nuclear safety, (4) nuclear fuel, (5) constructional layout of nuclear power plants, (6) management, and (7) maintenance. 158 figs., 56 tabs

  15. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  16. Computerized cost model for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneely, T.K.; Tabata, Hiroaki; Labourey, P.

    1999-01-01

    A computerized cost model has been developed in order to allow utility users to improve their familiarity with pressurized water reactor overnight capital costs and the various factors which influence them. This model organizes its cost data in the standard format of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB), and encapsulates simplified relationships between physical plant design information and capital cost information in a computer code. Model calculations are initiated from a base case, which was established using traditional cost calculation techniques. The user enters a set of plant design parameters, selected to allow consideration of plant models throughout the typical three- and four-loop PWR power range, and for plant sites in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Calculation of the new capital cost is then performed in a very brief time. The presentation of the program's output allows comparison of various cases with each other or with separately calculated baseline data. The user can start at a high level summary, and by selecting values of interest on a display grid show progressively more and more detailed information, including links to background information such as individual cost driver accounts and physical plant variables for each case. Graphical presentation of the comparison summaries is provided, and the numerical results may be exported to a spreadsheet for further processing. (author)

  17. Assessment of a small pressurized water reactor for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of several recent ERDA/ORNL sponsored studies on the application of a small, 365 MW(t) pressurized water reactor for industrial energy is presented. Preliminary studies have investigated technical and reliability requirements; costs for nuclear and fossil based steam were compared, including consideration of economic inflation and financing methods. For base-load industrial steam production, small reactors appear economically attractive relative to coal fired boilers that use coal priced at $30/ton

  18. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  19. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory

  20. Analysis of French (Paluel) pressurized water reactor design differences compared to current US PWR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    To understand better the regulatory approaches to reactor safety in foreign countries, the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commisssion has reviewed design information on the Paluel nuclear power plant, one of the current standard 1300-MWe plant operating in France. This report provides the staff's evaluation of major design differences between this standardized French plant and current US pressurized water reactor plants, as well as insights concerning French regulatory practices. The staff identified approximately 25 design differences, and an analysis of the safety significance of each of these design features is presented, along with an assessment comparing the relative safety benefit of each

  1. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  2. Pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  3. Contributions to the energetical role of advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1984-06-01

    Three articles written by the author in the past two years and all concerned with energy production of the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) are collated to form this report. The standpoint is made that the APWR using mixed oxide-fuel (about 8% Pusub(fiss) and Usub(depl)) would entail similar capital costs as a PWR, but with conversion rates of 0.85< C<0.95. Given this assumption the analysis shows that the high specific plutonium inventories (being proportional to the conversion ratio in the interested range) result in a strong damping effect on the growth rate, the effective uranium utilization, and on the total nuclear power level. Over one century an APWR strategy is 'far from equilibrium' and to describe this dynamic situation using static APWR data is not appropriate. If nuclear fission energy is to play a substantial and not just a marginal role in providing energy for the future (in the region of 5 - 8 TWsub(el) in 50 years time, corresponding to a share of 20 - 25% of the total world demand), clearly the fast breeder strategy offers the better chance of achieving the goal. (Auth.)

  4. Physics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to demonstrate typical problems and solutions encountered in the design and operation of PWR power plants. The examples selected for illustration refer to PWR's of KWU design and to results of KWU design methods. In order to understand the physics of a power reactor it is necessary to have some knowledge of the structure and design of the power plant system of which the reactor is a part. It is therefore assumed that the reader is familiar with the design of the more important components and systems of a PWR, such as fuel assemblies, control assemblies, core lay-out, reactor coolant system, instrumentation. (author)

  5. Sensor response monitoring in pressurized water reactors using time series modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kerlin, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Random data analysis in nuclear power reactors for purposes of process surveillance, pattern recognition and monitoring of temperature, pressure, flow and neutron sensors has gained increasing attention in view of their potential for helping to ensure safe plant operation. In this study, application of autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) time series modeling for monitoring temperature sensor response characteristrics is presented. The ARMA model is used to estimate the step and ramp response of the sensors and the related time constant and ramp delay time. The ARMA parameters are estimated by a two-stage algorithm in the spectral domain. Results of sensor testing for an operating pressurized water reactor are presented. 16 refs

  6. Modeling of hydrogen stratification in a pressurized water reactor containment with the contain computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Skerlavaj, A.; Parzer, I.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution during a severe accident in a nuclear power plant with a two-loop Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor was simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. The accidents is initiated by a large-break loss-of-coolant accident which is nit successfully mitigated by the action of the emergency core cooling system. Cases with and without successful actuation of spray systems and fan coolers were considered. The simulations predicted hydrogen stratification within the containment main compartment with intensive hydrogen mixing in the containment dome region. Pressure and temperature responses were analyzed as well.(author)

  7. In the matter of the application of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the export of pressurized water reactor to Asociacion Nuclear ASCO II, Barcelona, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, M.A.; Mason, E.A.; Gilinsky, V.; Kennedy, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The paper contains the text of a decision of the US NRC that the export of the ASCO nuclear power unit II to Spain would not be inimical to the common defense and security of the United States, so that there are no objections to issue the license to Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Furthermore the paper contains the dissenting opinion of Commissioner Gilinsky. (HP) [de

  8. Taipower's reload safety evaluation methodology for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ping-Hue; Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    For Westinghouse pressurized water reactors (PWRs) such as Taiwan Power Company's (TPC's) Maanshan Units 1 and 2, each of the safety analysis is performed with conservative reload related parameters such that reanalysis is not expected for all subsequent cycles. For each reload cycle design, it is required to perform a reload safety evaluation (RSE) to confirm the validity of the existing safety analysis for fuel cycle changes. The TPC's reload safety evaluation methodology for PWRs is based on 'Core Design and Safety Analysis Package' developed by the TPC and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), and is an important portion of the 'Taipower's Reload Design and Transient Analysis Methodologies for Light Water Reactors'. The Core Management System (CMS) developed by Studsvik of America, the one-dimensional code AXINER developed by TPC, National Tsinghua University and INER, and a modified version of the well-known subchannel core thermal-hydraulic code COBRAIIIC are the major computer codes utilized. Each of the computer models is extensively validated by comparing with measured data and/or vendor's calculational results. Moreover, parallel calculations have been performed for two Maanshan reload cycles to validate the RSE methods. The TPC's in-house RSE tools have been applied to resolve many important plant operational issues and plant improvements, as well as to verify the vendor's fuel and core design data. (author)

  9. Standard technical specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors (revision issued Fall 1981). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1981-11-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  10. Integral Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides detailed explanations of the theoretical concepts that the simulator users have to know to gain a comprehensive understanding of the physics and technology of integral pressurized water reactors. It provides explanations of each of the simulator screens and various controls that a user can monitor and modify. A complete description of all the simulator features is also provided. A detailed set of exercises is provided in the Exercise Handbook accompanying this publication.

  11. Validation of the dynamic model for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, Gilles.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic model validation is a necessary procedure to assure that the developed empirical or physical models are satisfactorily representing the dynamic behavior of the actual plant during normal or abnormal transients. For small transients, physical models which represent isolated core, isolated steam generator and the overall pressurized water reactor are described. Using data collected during the step power changes that occured during the startup procedures, comparisons of experimental and actual transients are given at 30% and 100% of full power. The agreement between the transients derived from the model and those recorded on the plant indicates that the developed models are well suited for use for functional or control studies

  12. Reactor vessel pressure transient protection for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, G.

    1978-09-01

    During the past few years the NRC has been studying the issue of protection of the reactor pressure vessels at Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) from transients when the vessels are at a relatively low temperature. This effort was prompted by concerns related to the safety margins available to vessel damage as a result of such events. Nuclear Reactor Regulation Category A Technical Activity No. A-26 was established to set forth the NRC plan for resolution of the generic aspects of this safety issue. The purpose of the report is to document the completion of this generic technical activity

  13. Neutron physics of a high converting advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron physics of an APWR are analysed by single pin-cell calculations as well as two-dimensional whole-reactor computations. The calculational methods of the two codes employed for this study, viz. the cell code SPEKTRA and the diffusion-burnup code DIBU, are presented in detail. The APWR-investigations carried out concentrate on the void coefficient characteristics of tight UO 2 /PuO 2 -lattices, control rod worths, burnup behaviour and spatial power distributions in APWR cores. The principal physics design differences between advanced pressurized water reactors and present-day PWRs are identified and discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Twin header bore welded steam generator for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.J.; Hirst, B.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator concept, several examples of which have been in service for up to fourteen years. Details are given of the highly successful service record of this equipment and the features which have been incorporated to minimize corrosion and deposition pockets. The design employs a vertical U tube bundle carried off two horizontal headers to which the tubes are welded by the Foster Wheeler Power Products (FWPP) bore welding process. The factors to be considered in uprating the design to meet the current operating conditions for a 1000 MW unit are discussed. (author)

  15. Startup and commissioning of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, L.J.; Gilbert, C.F.

    1983-05-01

    A critical phase of plant development is the test, startup, and commissioning period. The effort expended prior to commissioning has a definite effect on the reliability and continuing availability of the plant during its life. This paper describes a test, startup, and commissioning program for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. This program commences with the completion of construction and continues through the turnover of equipment/systems to the owner's startup/ commissioning group. The paper addresses the organization of the test/startup group, planning and scheduling, test procedures and initial testing, staffing and certification of the test group, training of operators, and turnover to the owner

  16. Thermohydraulic analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program PANTERA is applied in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Cores (PWR). It is a version of COBRA-IIIC in which a new thermal conduction model for fuel rods was introduced. The results calculated by this program are compared with experimental data obtained from bundles of fuel rods, simulating reactor conditions. The validity of the new thermal model is checked too. The PANTERA code, through a simplified procedure of calculation, is used in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Indian Point, Unit 2, reactor core, in stationary conditions. The results are discussed and compared with design data. (Autor) [pt

  17. A dual pressurized water reactor producing 2000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. M.; Suh, K. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Dual Unit Optimizer 2000 MWe (DUO2000) is proposed as a new design concept for large nuclear power plant. DUO is being designed to meet economic and safety challenges facing the 21. century green and sustainable energy industry. DUO2000 has two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) of the Unit Nuclear Optimizer (UNO) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. UNO is anchored to the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000). The concept of DUO can be extended to any number of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), or even boiling water reactor (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. In particular, since it is required that the Small and Medium sized Reactors (SMRs) be built as units, the concept of DUO2000 will apply to SMRs as well. With its in-vessel retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as severe accident management strategy, DUO can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to end, but also pave ways to most promising large power capacity dispensing with huge redesigning cost for Generation III+ nuclear systems. Also, the strengths of DUO2000 include reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS. Two prototypes are presented for the DUO2000, and their respective advantages and drawbacks are considered. The strengths include, but are not necessarily limited to, reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS, just to name the few. The Coolant Unit Branching Apparatus (CUBA) is proposed

  18. Pump selection and application in a pressurized water reactor electric generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitch, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Various pump applications utilized in a nuclear pressurized water reactor electric generating plant are described. Emphasis is on pumps installed in the auxiliary systems of the primary nuclear steam supply system. Hydraulic and mechanical details, the ASME Code (Nuclear Design), materials, mechanical seals, shaft design, seismic qualification, and testing are addressed

  19. Zr-alloys, the nuclear material for water reactor fuel. A survey and update with focus on fuel for pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a solid overview on the development of the requirements and the respective answers found as far as water cooled fuel rods and assemblies are concerned. It shall be a help as well for designers and manufacturers as also for users of this fuel, because only a broad and consistent knowledge on all aspects of the application of this material in nuclear fuel can guarantee a successful operation under the still increasing requirements in water cooled reactor cores

  20. Aging assessment of PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Auxiliary Feedwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a review of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater Systems. Two of the objectives of the NPAR Program are to identify failure modes and causes and identify methods to detect and track degradation. In Phase I of the Auxiliary Feedwater System study, a detailed review of system design and operating and surveillance practices at a reference plant is being conducted to determine failure modes and to provide an indication of the ability of current monitoring methods to detect system degradation. The extent to which current practices are contributing to aging and service wear related degradation is also being assessed. This paper provides a description of the study approach, examples of results, and some interim observations and conclusions. 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Numerical simulation of large systems: application to a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, Michele.

    1981-10-01

    This note describes the design of a pressurized water reactor power plant simulator using a minicomputer. It contains the description of the models used to simulate the dynamic behavior of the various components of the nuclear power station (i.e. the reactor core, two steam generators, the pressurizer and the control systems associated with them); the algorithms used to integrate the resulting system of algebraic differential equations; the solution of problems associated with the use of a mini-computer; the control deck outlay designed and the variables shown on it to the user; and finally the description of tests made to validate the models used and the results obtained for various transients using plant signal is presented. These results are compared to corresponding plant signals and outputs of other, already existing models [fr

  2. Neurocontrol of Pressurized Water Reactors in Load-Follow Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chaung; Shen Chihming

    2000-01-01

    The neurocontrol technique was applied to control a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in load-follow operations. Generalized learning or direct inverse control architecture was adopted in which the neural network was trained off-line to learn the inverse model of the PWR. Two neural network controllers were designed: One provided control rod position, which controlled the axial power distribution, and the other provided the change in boron concentration, which adjusted core total power. An additional feedback controller was designed so that power tracking capability was improved. The time duration between control actions was 15 min; thus, the xenon effect is limited and can be neglected. Therefore, the xenon concentration was not considered as a controller input variable, which simplified controller design. Center target strategy and minimum boron strategy were used to operate the reactor, and the simulation results demonstrated the effectiveness and performance of the proposed controller

  3. Design and analysis of pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.; Kim, Y.H.

    1979-01-01

    To help develop nuclear engineering technologies in local industry sectors, technical and economical data on pressurized water reactor systems and components have been collected, systematically analyzed and computerized to a certain degree. Codes and standards necessary for engineering design of PWR systems have been surveyed and clarified in terms of NSSS, turbine-generator system and BOP, then again rearranged with respect to quality classes and seismic classes. Some design manuals, criteria and guidelines regarding design, construction, test and operation of PWR plants have also been surveyed and collected. Benchmark cost calculation for the construction of a 900 MWe PWR plant, according to the standard format, was carried out, and computer model on construction costs was improved and updated by considering the local supply of labor and materials. And for the indigeneous development of PWR equipment and materials, such data as delivery schedule and manufacturers of 52 systems and 36,000 components have also been reviewed herein. (author)

  4. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Raitses, G.; Galperin, A.

    2009-01-01

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  5. Study on severe accident induced by large break loss of coolant accident for pressureized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longfei; Zhang Dafa; Wang Shaoming

    2007-01-01

    Using the best estimate computer code SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 and taking US Westinghouse corporation Surry nuclear power plant as the reference object, a typical three-loop pressurized water reactor severe accident calculation model was established and 25 cm large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) in cold and hot leg of primary loop induced core melt accident was analyzed. The calculated results show that core melt progression is fast and most of the core material melt and relocated to the lower plenum. The lower head of reactor pressure vessel failed at an early time and the cold leg break is more severe than the hot leg break in primary loop during LBLOCA. (authors)

  6. Best-estimate methodology for analysis of anticipated transients without scram in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, L.

    1993-01-01

    Union Fenosa, a utility company in Spain, has performed research on pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety with respect to the development of a best-estimate methodology for the analysis of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), i.e., those anticipated transients for which failure of the reactor protection system is postulated. A scientific and technical approach is adopted with respect to the ATWS phenomenon as it affects a PWR, specifically the Zorita nuclear power plant, a single-loop Westinghouse-designed PWR in Spain. In this respect, an ATWS sequence analysis methodology based on published codes that is generically applicable to any PWR is proposed, which covers all the anticipated phenomena and defines the applicable acceptance criteria. The areas contemplated are cell neutron analysis, core thermal hydraulics, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and validated by comparison with reference calculations and measurements obtained from integral or separate-effects tests

  7. Pressurized water reactor system model for control system design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, K.F.; Cain, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    Satisfactory operation of present generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power systems requires that several independent and interactive control systems be designed. Since it is not practical to use an actual PWR system as a design tool, a mathematical model of the system must be developed as a design and analysis tool. The model presented has been developed to be used as an aid in applying optimal control theory to design and implement new control systems for PWR plants. To be applicable, the model developed must represent the PWR system in its normal operating range. For safety analysis the operating conditions of the system are usually abnormal and, therefore, the system modeling requirements are different from those for control system design and analysis

  8. Assessing information needs and instrument availability for a pressurized water reactor during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Duane J. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)); Arcieri, William C. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)); Ward, Leonard W. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States))

    1994-07-01

    A five-step methodology was developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information that personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and severe accident conditions, to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information. This methodology was applied to a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment and the results are presented. A companion article describes application of the methodology to a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment. ((orig.))

  9. Assessing information needs and instrument availability for a pressurized water reactor during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Duane J.; Arcieri, William C.; Ward, Leonard W.

    1994-01-01

    A five-step methodology was developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information that personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and severe accident conditions, to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information. This methodology was applied to a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment and the results are presented. A companion article describes application of the methodology to a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment. ((orig.))

  10. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  11. 78 FR 64027 - Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... comments were received. A companion guide, DG-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0129] Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling... (RG), 1.79, ``Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors...

  12. Some local dilution transient in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity accidents are important in the safety analysis of a pressurized water reactor. In this anlysis ejected control rod, steam line break, start of in-active loop and boron dilution accidents are usually dealt with. However, in the analysis is not included what reactivity excursions might happen when a zone,depleted of boron passes the reactor core. This thesis investigates during what operation and emergency conditions diluted zones might exist in a pressurized water reactor and what should be the maximum volumes for then. The limiting transport means are also established in terms of reactivty addition, for the depleted zones. In order to describe the complicated mixing process in the reactor vessel during such a transportation, a typical 3-loop reactor vessel has been modulated by means of TRAC-PF1's VESSEL component. Three cases have been analysed. In the first case the reactor is in a cold condition and the ractor coolant has boron concentration of 2000 ppm. To the reactor vessel is injected an clean water colume of 14 m 3 . In the two other cases the reactor is close to hot shutdown and borated to 850 ppm. To the reactor vessel is added 41 and 13 m 3 clean water, respectively. In the thesis is shown what spatial distribution the depleted zone gets when passing through the reactor vessel in the three cases. The boron concentration in the first case did not decrease the values which would bring the reactor to critical condition. For case two was shown by means of TRAC's point kinetics model that the reactor reaches prompt criticality after 16.03 seconds after starting of the reactor coolant pump. Another prompt criticality occured two seconds later. The total energy developed during the two power escalations were about 55 GJ. A comparision with the criteria used to evaluate the ejected control rod reactivity transient showed that none of these criteria were exceeded. (64 figs.)

  13. Pressurized Water Reactor containment in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taymouri, Majid.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important systems of nuclear power plants from an economical point of view and view point of safety is containment; Therefore, the containments designed in Russia were studied in the first chapter. Russian general rules and requirements of structure of accident localization system were illustrated. Methods of accident localization system rooms tested for tightness and strength are presented in chapter three. Russian specialists have been working hard to ensure the safety culture in building structures and operational procedures and the have successfully implemented these objectives in new nuclear power plant designs and rules

  14. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  15. China’s Nuclear Power Plants in Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Qinshan Plant Phase I Located in Haiyan,Zhejiang Province,Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Phase I is t he first 300-megawatt pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant independently designed,constructed,operated and managed by China.The plant came into commercial operation in April 1994.

  16. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-01

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and economic assessment. The investigation was conducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperature. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasibility issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density

  17. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  18. Estabilishing requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors--reducing the uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernock, W.P.; Corcoran, W.R.; Rasin, W.H.; Stahlkopf, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is managing a major effort to establish requirements for the next generation of U.S. light water reactors. This effort is the vital first step in preserving the viability of the nuclear option to contribute to meet U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century. Combustion Engineering, Inc. and Duke Power Company formed a team to participate in the EPRI program which is guided by a Utility Steering committee consisting of experienced utility technical executives. A major thrust of the program is to reduce the uncertainties which would be faced by the utility executives in choosing the nuclear option. The uncertainties to be reduced include those related to safety, economic, operational, and regulatory aspects of advanced light water reactors. This paper overviews the Requirements Document program as it relates to the U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) effort in reducing these uncertainties and reports the status of efforts to establish requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors. It concentrates on progress made in reducing the uncertainties which would deter selection of the nuclear option for contributing to U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century and updates previous reports in the same area. (author)

  19. Current state of research on pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel; Roubaud, Sebastien; Lavarenne, Caroline; Mattei, Jean-Marie; Rigollet, Laurence; Scotti, Oona; Clement, Christophe; Lancieri, Maria; Gelis, Celine; Jacquemain, Didier; Bentaib, Ahmed; Nahas, Georges; Tarallo, Francois; Guilhem, Gilbert; Cattiaux, Gerard; Durville, Benoit; Mun, Christian; Delaval, Christine; Sollier, Thierry; Stelmaszyk, Jean-Marc; Jeffroy, Francois; Dechy, Nicolas; Chanton, Olivier; Tasset, Daniel; Pichancourt, Isabelle; Barre, Francois; Bruna, Gianni; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Gonzalez, Richard; Loiseau, Olivier; Queniart, Daniel; Vola, Didier; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile

    2018-03-01

    For more than 40 years, IPSN then IRSN has conducted research and development on nuclear safety, specifically concerning pressurized water reactors, which are the reactor type used in France. This publication reports on the progress of this research and development in each area of study - loss-of-coolant accidents, core melt accidents, fires and external hazards, component aging, etc. -, the remaining uncertainties and, in some cases, new measures that should be developed to consolidate the safety of today's reactors and also those of tomorrow. A chapter of this report is also devoted to research into human and organizational factors, and the human and social sciences more generally. All of the work is reviewed in the light of the safety issues raised by feedback from major accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, as well as the issues raised by assessments conducted, for example, as part of the ten-year reviews of safety at French nuclear reactors. Finally, through the subjects it discusses, this report illustrates the many partnerships and exchanges forged by IRSN with public, industrial and academic bodies both within Europe and internationally

  20. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharari, Rahman; Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

  1. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharari, Rahman [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi [Nuclear Engineering Dept, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  2. Report from the parliament office: nuclear power is fundamentally indispensable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, N.

    1999-01-01

    According to a recent report from the French parliament office concerning the evaluation of scientific and technical choices, nuclear power remains a basic source of electric power production, even if today other energy sources used for power generation lead to equivalent production costs. Thus, the parliament recommends to start up immediately the building of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). (J.S.)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of equipment materials in domestic pressurized water reactors and the relevant safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Haitao

    2015-01-01

    International and domestic research and project state about stress corrosion cracking of nuclear equipments and materials (including austenitic stainless steel and nickel based alloys) in pressurized water reactor are discussed, and suggestions on how to prevent, mitigate ana deal with the stress corrosion cracking issues in domestic reactors are given in this paper based on real case analysis and study ondomestic nuclear equipment and material stress corrosion cracking failure. (author)

  4. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition.'' The new subsection is the Standard Review Plan... Nuclear Power Plants: Integral Pressurized Water Reactor (iPWR) Edition.'' DATES: Comments must be filed... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0268] Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power...

  5. Remarks on some problems of radiation protection concerning low active materials in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschner, G.

    1991-01-01

    Problems are discussed using as example a nuclide mixture accumulated on low active ion exchange resin and solution obtained during its regeneration. To decide whether such solutions can safely be given into a receiving body of water and whether or not low active ion exchangers should be shielded under specific conditions, calculations are made to describe the decay of the nuclide mixture. The decline of the dose rate is calculated radially from a rotational-symmetric ion exchanger loaded with the resin. To assess the radiotoxic danger of the nuclide mixture, annual limited intake values are calculated and shown in diagramm. Futhermore, a potential of danger is defined and also shown in diagramm. The influence of daughter products is studied. The radiotoxicity of the nuclide mixture mainly depends on the iodine nuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal methods for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed for incorporating moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal codes used for pressurized water reactor (PWR) neutronic analysis. Equations for the assembly average quality and density are developed in terms of the assembly power calculated in two dimensions. The method is validated with a Westinghouse PWR using the Electric Power Research Institute code SIMULATE-E. Results show a several percent improvement is achieved in the two-dimensional power distribution prediction compared to methods without moderator feedback

  7. Natural circulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Loureiro, L.V.; Rocha, R.T.V. da; Umbehaun, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    Several analytical modelling have been done for steady-state and slow transients conditions, besides more sophisticated studies considering two and three dimensional effects in a very simple geometry. Under severe accident conditions for PWR a code to analyse natural circulation has been developed by Westinghouse. This paper discusses the problem of natural circulation in a complex geometry similar to that of nuclear power plants. A first experiment has been done at the integral test facility of 'Co-ordination of Special Projects-Ministry of Naval Affairs' (Coordenadoria para Projetos Especiais -Ministerio da Marinha, COPESP) for several flux conditions. The results obtained were compared with numerical simulations for the steady-state regime. 09 refs, 05 figs, 01 tab. (B.C.A.)

  8. Containment for small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, W.C.; Marda, R.S.; Smith, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox Company has prepared studies under ERDA contract of small and intermediate size (313, 365 and 1200 MWt) PWR reactor plants, for industrial cogeneration or electric power generation. Studies and experience with nuclear plants in this size range indicate unfavorable economics. To offset this disadvantage, modular characteristics of an integral reactor and close-coupled vapor suppression containment have been exploited to shorten construction schedules and reduce construction costs. The resulting compact reactor/containment complex is illustrated. Economic studies to date indicate that the containment design and the innovative construction techniques developed to shorten erection schedules have been important factors in reducing estimated project costs, thus potentially making such smaller plants competetive with competing energy sources

  9. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  10. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  11. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development. And the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21, 2nd edition, 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2005). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  12. An automated optimization of core fuel loading pattern for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renji

    1988-11-01

    An optimum method was adopted to search for an optimum fuel loading pattern in pressurized water reactors. A radial power peak factor was chosen as the objective function of the optimum loading. The direct search method with shuffling rules is used to find optimum solution. The search for an optimum loading pattern with the smallest radial power peak by exchanging fuel assemblies was made. The search process is divided into two steps. In the first step fresh fuels or high reactivity fuels are arranged which are placed in core interior to have a reasonable fuel loading pattern. To further reduce the radial power peak factor, the second step will be necessary to rearrange the exposed lower reactivity fuel around the assemblies which has the radial power peak. In optimum process 1.5 group coarse mesh diffusion theory or two group nodal Green function diffusion theory is utilized to calculate the two dimensional power distribution after each shuffle. Also, above two methods are combinatively utilized to calculate the state quantity. It is not only true to save CPU time, but also can obtian exact results. Besides above function, the code MSOFEL is used to search critical boron concentration and to predict burn-up. The code has been written with FORTRAN-4. The optimum loading pattern was chosen for OCONEE and QINSHAN nuclear power plants as reference examples. The validity and feasibility of MSOFEL was demonstrated

  13. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The standard applies to components of the primary circuit including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components, and to elevators within the containment. Part 2 specifies testing, test periods, test methods, and documentation

  14. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  15. Design of an additional heat sink based on natural circulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischengruber, Kurt; Solanilla, Roberto; Fernandez, Ricardo; Blumenkrantz, Arnaldo; Castano, Jorge

    1989-01-01

    Residual heat removal through the steam generators in Nuclear Power Plant with pressurized water reactors (PWR) or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR in pressured vessel or pressured tube types) requires the maintenance of the steam generator inventory and the availability of and appropriate heat sink, which are based on the operability of the steam generators feedwater system. This paper describes the conceptual design of an assured heat removal system which includes only passive elements and is based on natural circulation. The system can supplement the original systems of the plant. The new system includes a condenser/boiler heat exchanger to condense the steam produced in the steam generator, transferring the heat to the water of an open pool at atmospheric pressure. The condensed steam flows back to the steam generators by natural circulation effects. The performance of an Atucha type PHWR nuclear power station with and without the proposed system is calculated in an emergency power case for the first 5000 seconds after the incident. The analysis shows that the proposed system offers the possibility to cool-down the plant to a low energy state during several hours and avoids the repeated actuation of the primary and secondary system safety valves. (Author) [es

  16. 77 FR 47121 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel,'' endorses the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) report NEI 06-11...(c)(25). Pursuant to 10 CFR 51.22(b), no environmental impact statement or environmental assessment... hereafter in effect. The facility consists of two pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) located in Calvert...

  17. Software to study the control strategy of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jose Ricardo de

    2002-01-01

    The computational program, result of this work, is a tool developed for the study of the control of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) constituted by only one coolant loop. The implementation of a user friendly interface for input/output data, makes the program also suitable for training and teaching applications. As design premise, it was considered enough just the modeling of the primary circuit, using as interface with the secondary circuit, a simplified differential equation of the temperature associated with the secondary power. All the incorporated dynamic equations to the model were developed using basic laws of conservation, boundary conditions and hypotheses appropriated to the control study. To arrive to the final model, core thermal and hydraulic characteristics and design data were obtained from of the available bibliography and adapted for a conceptual peculiar design of a small PWR. The whole program and all input/output interfaces were developed using the software Matlab, version 5.L Sub-routines of numeric integration based on the Runge-Kutta 4 method were applied, to solve the set of ordinary differential equations. (author)

  18. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I.; Bhatt, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed

  19. Hydrogen behavior in a large-dry pressurized water reactor containment building during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu Wensheng; Chen Hungpei; Hung Zhenyu; Lin Huichen

    2014-01-01

    Following severe accidents in nuclear power plants, large quantities of hydrogen may be generated after core degradation. If the hydrogen is transported from the reactor vessel into the containment building, an explosion might occur, which might threaten the integrity of the building; this can ultimately cause the release of radioactive materials. During the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011, the primary containment structures remained intact but contaminated fragments broke off the secondary containment structures, which disrupted mitigation activities and triggered subsequent explosions. Therefore, the ability to predict the behavior of hydrogen after severe accidents may facilitate the development of effective nuclear reactor accident management procedures. The present study investigated the behavior of hydrogen in a large-dry pressurized water reactor (PWR). The amount of hydrogen produced was calculated using the Modular Accident Analysis Program. The hydrogen transport behavior and the effect of the explosion on the PWR containment building were simulated using the Flame Acceleration Simulator. The simulation results showed that the average hydrogen volume fraction is approximately 7% in the containment building and that the average temperature is 330 K. The maximum predicted pressure load after ignition is 2.55 bar, which does not endanger the structural integrity of the containment building. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydrogen mitigation system should be arranged on both the upper and lower parts of the containment building to reduce the impact of an explosion. (author)

  20. A Neural-Network-Based Nonlinear Adaptive State-Observer for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been some severe nuclear accidents such as Three Mile Island (USA, Chernobyl (Ukraine and Fukushima (Japan, nuclear fission energy is still a source of clean energy that can substitute for fossil fuels in a centralized way and in a great amount with commercial availability and economic competitiveness. Since the pressurized water reactor (PWR is the most widely used nuclear fission reactor, its safe, stable and efficient operation is meaningful to the current rebirth of the nuclear fission energy industry. Power-level regulation is an important technique which can deeply affect the operation stability and efficiency of PWRs. Compared with the classical power-level controllers, the advanced power-level regulators could strengthen both the closed-loop stability and control performance by feeding back the internal state-variables. However, not all of the internal state variables of a PWR can be obtained directly by measurements. To implement advanced PWR power-level control law, it is necessary to develop a state-observer to reconstruct the unmeasurable state-variables. Since a PWR is naturally a complex nonlinear system with parameters varying with power-level, fuel burnup, xenon isotope production, control rod worth and etc., it is meaningful to design a nonlinear observer for the PWR with adaptability to system uncertainties. Due to this and the strong learning capability of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural network, an MLP-based nonlinear adaptive observer is given for PWRs. Based upon Lyapunov stability theory, it is proved theoretically that this newly-built observer can provide bounded and convergent state-observation. This observer is then applied to the state-observation of a special PWR, i.e., the nuclear heating reactor (NHR, and numerical simulation results not only verify its feasibility but also give the relationship between the observation performance and observer parameters.

  1. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Burn, Kenneth W.; Console Camprini, Patrizio; Duhamel, Isabelle; Peron, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  2. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovchenko Mariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR. The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  3. Development and design of control rod drive mechanisms for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leme, Francisco Louzano

    2003-01-01

    The Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (CRDM) for a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) are equipment, integrated to the reactor pressure vessel, incorporating mechanical and electrical components designed to move and position the control rods to guarantee the control of power and shutdown of the nuclear reactor, during normal operation, either in emergency or accidental situations. The type of CRDM used in PWR reactors, whose detailed individual description will be presented in this monograph are the Roller-Nut and Magnetic-Jack. The environment, where the CRDM performs its above presented operational functions, includes direct contact with the fluid used as coolant peculiar to the interior of the reactor, and its associated chemical characteristics, the radiation field next to the reactor core, and also the temperature and pressure in the reactor pressure vessel. So the importance of the CRDM design requirements related to its safety functions are emphasized. Finally, some aspects related to the mechanical and structural design of CRDM of a case study, considering the CRDM for a PWR from the experimental nuclear plant to be applied by CTMSP (Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo), are pointed out. The design and development of these equipment (author)

  4. Living PSA issues in France on pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewailly, J.; Deriot, S.; Dubreuil Chambardel, A.; Francois, P.; Magne, L.

    1993-09-01

    Two Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) carried out in France on 900 and 1300 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor units ended in 1990. These PSAs determined the core damage frequency for all plant operating conditions ranging from cold shutdown for refuelling to full power operation. Since 1990, these PSAs have been used increasingly as tools for applications such as accident precursor analysis, risk-based Technical Specifications, and maintenance optimization. In turn, these applications are used to enhance the initial PSAs. The notion of a ''living'' PSA which can be used and updated is slowly taking form. The accident precursor analysis consists in applying PSA event trees to obtain quick information on the potential consequences of a precursor event and on the corresponding probabilities of occurrence. A feedback on PSAs is provided by comparing them with actual operating incidents. The computation of the allowed outage time during power operation, based on the computerized models of Probabilistic Safety Assessments, requires adjustments: calculation of hourly risk of core damage under different reactor conditions without equipment unavailabilities. The proposed method also turns out to be an aid in determining the safe shutdown condition and procedure. Furthermore, when introducing a sufficient level of detail, PSA reliability models make it possible to compute contributions and to perform sensitivity studies in order to highlight those components for which a maintenance effort should be made. From the experience acquired up to now, there was felt to be a strong need to create guidelines for using PSAs that would simplify their implementation by the experts in charge of determining Technical Specifications, of maintenance programs, etc. who are not generally specialists in PSAs. For this purpose, it is necessary to improve the intelligibility of the models made in order for them to be used and to offer user's guides adapted to each application. Documents

  5. Ethanolamine properties and use for feedwater pH control: A pressurized water reactor case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, D.L.; Polidoroff, C.T.; Cortese, S.; Cushner, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Ethanolamine (ETA) as a feedwater pH control additive has been recently used to minimize corrosion of secondary water components in the nuclear power industry pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The use of ETA is compared with ammonia. Relative volatility effects on various parts of the system are analyzed and chemistry changes are presented. Materials of construction and the use of existing plant equipment for ETA service are discussed. Properties of ETA as well as safety, storage and handling issues are compared with ammonia. Health d aquatic toxicity are reviewed. warnings, safety, handling guidelines, biodegradability an Diablo Canyon Power Plant used ammonia for pH control from 1985 until a change over to ETA in 1993/1994. Full flow condensate polishers that are required to protect the plant from saltwater cooling incursions limit the amount of pH additive. Iron levels in the secondary water systems are compared before and after changing to ETA and replacement of corrosion-susceptible piping. Iron reduction benefits are assessed along with other effects on the feedwater nozzles, low pressure turbine, polisher resin capacity and polisher regeneration system

  6. 76 FR 73720 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0272] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power...) is issuing for public comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2103, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000 Pressurized-Water Reactors. DATES: Submit...

  7. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  8. Effect of Spray System on Fission Product Distribution in Containment During a Severe Accident in a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehjourian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The containment response during the first 24 hours of a low-pressure severe accident scenario in a nuclear power plant with a two-loop Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor was simulated with the CONTAIN 2.0 computer code. The accident considered in this study is a large-break loss-of-coolant accident, which is not successfully mitigated by the action of safety systems. The analysis includes pressure and temperature responses, as well as investigation into the influence of spray on the retention of fission products and the prevention of hydrogen combustion in the containment.

  9. Temperature noise characteristics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The core exit temperature noise RMS is linearly related to the core ΔT at a commercial PWR and LOFT. Test loop observations indicate that this linear behavior becomes nonlinear with blockages, boiling, or power skews. The linear neutron flux to temperature noise phase behavior is indicative of a pure time delay process, which has been shown to be related to coolant flow velocity in the core. Therefore, temperature noise could provide a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection of coolant blockages, boiling, and sensor malfunction under both normal and accident conditions in a PWR

  10. Gray mode control or a device with added manoeuvrability: a new fine control system for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmin, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present fine control system for pressurized water reactors (the so-called ''A'' mode) cannot meet the requirements of a variable output in all respects. For this reason specialists are now developing a new fine control system, called gray mode control which is better suited to rapid load variations. The basic principles for control of pressurized water reactors are summarized and, then gray mode control or the device with added manoeuvrability is described. The series of tests carried out in 1981 and 1982 on stage 3 of the Tricastin power station are analyzed and the satisfactory results obtained are presented [fr

  11. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO) accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO

  12. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO) accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  13. Industrial experience with the construction of pressurized-water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.-C.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1969, the switch to light-water reactors as the basis of the French nuclear programme has led to the development of an industrial infrastructure for the manufacture of pressurized-water reactor equipment. Since the massive power plant construction programme was approved in 1974, an integrated PWR industry has been built up around and in conjunction with Framatome. The experience gathered relates to the series production of thirty-four 900 MW(e) units and eighteen 1300 MW(e) units, and it is unique. From the industrial point of view, the high rate of construction of identical equipment items has made it possible to streamline production and establish a fully integrated and complete team of constructors and sub-contractors supervised by a likewise highly integrated and comprehensive organization responsible for regulating quality. At the research and development level, the effort to improve knowledge of the product has gradually led to mastery of a French technology and to further developments proceeding therefrom. Standardized, repeated production has given rise to consistent quality, better component reliability and safer plant operation as well as reduced construction time and lower manufacturing costs. However, difficulties have inevitably had to be overcome with respect to the setting up of teams maintaining schedules and mastering the techniques used, and this has required time and money. The remarkable quality, reliability and safety of the products has led to export orders and to good co-operation with local industry in the importing countries. (author)

  14. Not a mystery. Inner containment of the pressurized water reactor (EPR trademark type)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermann, Dirk; Wienand, Burkhard; Krumb, Christian [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The containment of the advanced pressurized water reactor EPR trademark type is developed on the basis of the French nuclear power plant operational experience and consists of - The reinforced outer containment structure, designed to withstand external hazards (e.g. APC), - The pre-stressed inner containment structure, designed to bear the loads resulting from internal hazards (LOCA), - The steel liner, designed to provide leak tightness resulting from internal hazards. The main advantage of the pre-stressed inner containment design is that the structure remains in linear-elastic behavior during the whole life-time. Even in case of postulated design accidents (LOCA) concrete tensile strains are strongly limited. Due to pre-stressing the concrete structure remains practically free of cracks. Due to pre-stressing the leak tightness ensuring steel liner, embedded into the inner concrete shell, is exposed to more favorable compression loads. In addition to detailed calculations several test programs have been performed to verify and confirm the predicted behavior in normal operation and in accident condition. (orig.)

  15. Development of a double containment concept for the European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costaz, J.L.; Bonhomme, N.; L'Huby, Y.; Sidaner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of a double containment concept for the European Pressurized Water Reactor. Specification of containment leak tightness during severe hazards resulting from core melt scenarios is part of the safety goals defined for the EPR project. These safety goals include retention of molten core, mitigation of hydrogen deflagration or explosion risks and decay heat removal. The main new containment structural design loads which have been defined, including containment pressure and temperature conditions following possible postulated-core melt events, are recalled in the paper. The feasibility of a double containment with a prestressed concrete inner containment taking into account these new design loads but based upon experience gained within the well tested concept of concrete double wall containment used in 1400 MW nuclear power plants which have already been built in France, is presented. The main characteristics of such a prestressed inner containment are described. Limits and further possible optimization for even more severe design loads (including liner option) are indicated. Experimental works including a large scale mock up are already under way. (author). 2 refs., 4 figs

  16. Development and construction of nuclear power and nuclear heating stations in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.; Kirmse, B.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of nuclear power technology in the USSR is reviewed by presenting characteristic data on design and construction. The review takes into consideration the following types of facilities: Nuclear power stations with 1000 MWe pressurized water reactors, with 1000 MWe pressure tube boiling water reactors, and with 600 MWe fast breeder reactors; nuclear heating power stations with 1000 MWe reactors and nuclear heating stations with 500 MWth boiling water reactors

  17. High conversion pressurized water reactor with boiling channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, M., E-mail: maratm@post.bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E., E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of partially boiling PWR core was proposed and studied. • Self-sustainable Th–{sup 233}U fuel cycle was utilized in this study. • Seed-blanket fuel assembly lattice optimization was performed. • A coupled Monte Carlo, fuel depletion and thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis assured that the design matches imposed safety constraints. - Abstract: Parametric studies have been performed on a seed-blanket Th–{sup 233}U fuel configuration in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with boiling channels to achieve high conversion ratio. Previous studies on seed-blanket concepts suggested substantial reduction in the core power density is needed in order to operate under nominal PWR system conditions. Boiling flow regime in the seed region allows more heat to be removed for a given coolant mass flow rate, which in turn, may potentially allow increasing the power density of the core. In addition, reduced moderation improves the breeding performance. A two-dimensional design optimization study was carried out with BOXER and SERPENT codes in order to determine the most attractive fuel assembly configuration that would ensure breeding. Effects of various parameters, such as void fraction, blanket fuel form, number of seed pins and their dimensions, on the conversion ratio were examined. The obtained results, for which the power density was set to be 104 W/cm{sup 3}, created a map of potentially feasible designs. It was found that several options have the potential to achieve end of life fissile inventory ratio above unity, which implies potential feasibility of a self-sustainable Thorium fuel cycle in PWRs without significant reduction in the core power density. Finally, a preliminary three-dimensional coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analysis for a single seed-blanket fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate that axial void distribution changes drastically with burnup. Therefore

  18. Sources of radioiodine at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, C.A.; Cline, J.E.; Barefoot, E.D.; Hemphill, R.T.; Voilleque, P.G.; Emel, W.A.

    1978-11-01

    The report determines specific components and operations at operating pressurized water reactors that have a potential for being significant emission sources of radioactive iodine. The relative magnitudes of these specific sources in terms of the chemical forms of the radioiodine and the resultant annual averages from major components are established. The data are generalized for broad industry use for predictive purposes. The conclusions of this study indicate that the majority of radioiodine emanating from the primary side of pressurized water reactors comes from a few major areas; in some cases these sources are locally treatable; the interaction of radioiodine with plant interior surfaces is an important phenomenon mediating the source and affecting its release to the atmosphere; the chemical form varies depending on the circumstances of the release

  19. CFD simulation analysis and validation for CPR1000 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingqian; Ran Xiaobing; Liu Yanwu; Yu Xiaolei; Zhu Mingli

    2013-01-01

    Background: With the rapid growth in the non-nuclear area for industrial use of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) which has been accompanied by dramatically enhanced computing power, the application of CFD methods to problems relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) is rapidly accelerating. Existing research data have shown that CFD methods could predict accurately the pressure field and the flow repartition in reactor lower plenum. But simulations for the full domain of the reactor have not been reported so far. Purpose: The aim is to determine the capabilities of the codes to model accurately the physical phenomena which occur in the full reactor vessel. Methods: The flow field of the CPR1000 reactor which is associated with a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) is simulated by using ANSYS CFX. The pressure loss in reactor pressure vessel, the hydraulic loads of guide tubes and support columns, and the bypass flow of head dome were obtained by calculations for the full domain of the reactor. The results were validated by comparing with the determined reference value of the operating nuclear plant (LingAo nuclear plant), and the transient simulation was conducted in order to better understand the flow in reactor pressure vessel. Results: It was shown that the predicted pressure loss with CFD code was slightly different with the determined value (10% relative deviation for the total pressure loss), the hydraulic loads were less than the determined value with maximum relative deviation 50%, and bypass flow of head dome was approximately the same with determined value. Conclusion: This analysis practice predicts accurately the physical phenomena which occur in the full reactor vessel, and can be taken as a guidance for the nuclear plant design development and improve our understanding of reactor flow phenomena. (authors)

  20. An expert system for pressurized water reactor load maneuvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaung Lin; Jungping Chen; Yihjiunn Lin; Lianshin Lin

    1993-01-01

    Restartup after reactor shutdown and load-follow operations are the important tasks in operating pressurized water reactors. Generally, the most efficient method is to apply constant axial offset control (CAOC) strategy during load maneuvers. An expert system using CAOC strategy, fuzzy reasoning, a two-node core model, and operational constraints has been developed. The computation time is so short that this system, which leads to an approximate closed-loop control, could be useful for on-site calculation

  1. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1984-11-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It identifies physical parameters, establishes instrumentation performance goals, and specifies sensor types and locations. It presents a simple algorithm that yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. Leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation

  2. Electrochemical noise measurements under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical potential noise measurements on sensitized stainless steel pressure tubes under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions were performed for the first time. Very short potential spikes, believed to be associated to crack initiation events, were detected when stressing the sample above the yield strength and increased in magnitude until the sample broke. Sudden increases of plastic deformation, as induced by an increased tube pressure, resulted in slower, high-amplitude potential transients, often accompanied by a reduction in noise level

  3. Lippe-Ems GmbH nuclear power stations. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear power company Lippe-Ems GmbH (KLE) runs the Emsland Nuclear Power Station (KKE) in Lingen (Ems) with a 1300 MW pressurized Water reactor. Partners of KLE are VEW and Elektromark. This 1992 annual report reveals numerous financial data of the operator (balance sheet, profit and loss account.) (orig./UA) [de

  4. Steam explosions-induced containment failure studies for Swiss nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuchuat, O.; Schmocker, U. [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, Villigen (Switzerland); Esmaili, H.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1998-01-01

    The assessment of the consequences of both in-vessel and ex-vessel energetic fuel-coolant interaction for Beznau (a Westinghouse pressurized water reactor with a large, dry containment), Goesgen (a Siemens/KWU pressurized water reactor with a large, dry containment) and Leibstadt (a General Electric boiling water reactor-6 with a free standing steel, MARK-III containment) nuclear power plants is presented in this paper. The Conditional Containment Failure Probability of the steel containment of these Swiss nuclear power plants is determined based on different probabilistic approaches. (author)

  5. Fracture risk assessment for the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • The PTS loading conditions consistent with the USNRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition for a Taiwan domestic PWR. • The state-of-the-art PFM technique is employed to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Novel flaw model and embrittlement correlation are considered in the study. • The RT-based regression formula of NUREG-1874 was also utilized to evaluate the failure risks of RPV. • For slightly embrittled RPV, the SO-1 type PTSs play more important role than other types of PTS. - Abstract: The fracture risk of the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel of a Taiwan domestic nuclear power plant has been evaluated according to the technical basis of the U.S.NRC's new pressurized thermal shock (PTS) screening criteria. The ORNL's FAVOR code and the PNNL's flaw models were employed to perform the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis associated with plant specific parameters of the domestic reactor pressure vessel. Meanwhile, the PTS thermal hydraulic and probabilistic risk assessment data analyzed from a similar nuclear power plant in the United States for establishing the new PTS rule were applied as the loading conditions. Besides, an RT-based regression formula derived by the U.S.NRC was also utilized to verify the through-wall cracking frequencies. It is found that the through-wall cracking of the analyzed reactor pressure vessel only occurs during the PTS events resulted from the stuck-open primary safety relief valves that later reclose, but with only an insignificant failure risk. The results indicate that the Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel has sufficient structural margin for the PTS attack until either the current license expiration dates or during the proposed extended operation periods.

  6. 76 FR 72007 - ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-295 and 50-304; NRC-2011-0244] ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS or Zion), Unit 1, is a Westinghouse 3250 MWt Pressurized Water Reactor...

  7. Instrumentation availability for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcieri, W.C.; Hanson, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, the availability of instruments to supply accident management information during a broad range of severe accidents is evaluated for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment. Results from this evaluation include the following: (a) identification of plant conditions that would impact instrument performance and information needs during severe accidents, (b) definition of envelopes of parameters that would be important in assessing the performance of plant instrumentation for a broad range of severe accident sequences, and (c) assessment of the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  8. RELAP5 analyses of overcooling transients in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolander, M.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Ogden, D.M.; Stitt, B.D.; Waterman, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    In support of the Pressurized Thermal Shock Integration Study sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has performed analyses of overcooling transients using the RELAP5/MOD1.5 computer code. These analyses were performed for Oconee Plants 1 and 3, which are pressurized water reactors of Babcock and Wilcox lowered-loop design. Results of the RELAP5 analyses are presented, including a comparison with plant data. The capabilities and limitations of the RELAP5/MOD1.5 computer code in analyzing integral plant transients are examined. These analyses require detailed thermal-hydraulic and control system computer models

  9. RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic analyses of overcooling sequences in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolander, M.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B.; Kullberg, C.M.; Stitt, B.D.; Waterman, M.E.; Burtt, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In support of the Pressurized Thermal Shock Integration Study, sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has performed analyses of overcooling transients using the RELAP5/MOD1.6 and MOD2.0 computer codes. These analyses were performed for the H.B. Robinson Unit 2 pressurized water reactor, which is a Westinghouse 3-loop design plant. Results of the RELAP5 analyses are presented. The capabilities of the RELAP5 computer code as a tool for analyzing integral plant transients requiring a detailed plant model, including complex trip logic and major control systems, are examined

  10. Heat exchanging tube behaviour in steam generators of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, D.; Oertel, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive failure statistics, materials corrosion chemistry and thermohydraulics problems of the tubings of steam generators are considered. A historical review of failures in the tubings of steam generators in pressurized water reactors reflects the often successless measures by designers, manufacturers and operating organizations for preventing failures, especially with regard to materials selection and water regime. It is stated that laboratory tests could not give sufficient information about safe and stable operation of nuclear steam generators unless real constructive, hydrodynamic, thermodynamical and chemical conditions of operation had been taken into account. (author)

  11. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  12. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  13. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ''green field'' condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities

  14. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the '978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ''green field'' condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities

  15. 1984 availability of the world's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeless, A.; Oszuszky, F.

    1985-01-01

    This survey of the availability of the world's nuclear power plants in 1984 coveres 250 units (the CMEA countries excluded) with an aggregate 184,500 MWe, which are arranged by types of reactor and geographic distribution. The utilization of nuclear power plant capacity attained an average of 66% in 1984, which is an increase by 3 percentage points in the utilization of capacity over the previous year's level (63%). Capacity utilization in pressurized water reactors 1984 (69%) was 4 percentage points higher than it was in boiling water reactors (65%). The ranking list of the world's nuclear power plants is headed by one heavy water reactor and one gas cooled reactor each (98%), followed by five generating units, i.e., two pressurized water reactors, two boiling water reactors, and one heavy water reactor (all 95%). The best German nuclear power plants were Grafenrheinfeld (89%, position No. 20) and Unterweser and Stade (88%, position No. 25). (orig.) [de

  16. Contribution to a neutronic calculation scheme for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Del Campo, C.

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis aims at developing and validating the set of data and codes which build up the neutron computation scheme of pressurized water reactors. More precisely, it focuses on the improvement of the precision of calculation of command clusters (absorbing components which can be inserted into the core to control the reactivity), and on the modelling of reflector representation (material placed around the core and reflecting back the escaping neutrons). For the first case, a precise calculation is performed, based on the transport theory. For the second case, diffusion constants obtained in the previous case and simplified equations are used to reduce the calculation cost

  17. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph.; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J.P.; Guillet, J.L.; Poinot, Ch.; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1 . More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  18. The inner containment of an EPR trademark pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermann, Dirk; Krumb, Christian; Wienand, Burkhard [AREVA GmbH, Offenbach (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    On February 12, 2014 the containment pressure and subsequent leak tightness tests on the containment of the Finnish Olkiluoto 3 EPR trademark reactor building were completed successfully. The containment of an EPR trademark pressurized water reactor consists of an outer containment to protect the reactor building against external hazards (such as airplane crash) and of an inner containment that is subjected to internal overpressure and high temperature in case of internal accidents. The current paper gives an overview of the containment structure, the design criteria, the validation by analyses and experiments and the containment pressure test.

  19. State of the art of the advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.; Chawla, R.

    1987-01-01

    A review is given of the present status of the works concerned with an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR). It includes the following items: reactor physics, thermal and hydraulic investigations and other engineering aspects as well as an analysis of electricity generation cost and long-term problems of embedding the APWR in a plutonium economy. As a summary it can be stated that there are discernible no principal obstacles of technically accomplishing an APWR, but there will be necessary considerable expenses in research and development works if it should be intended to start commercial service of an APWR up to the end of this century. (author)

  20. SCALE-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-03-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original fresh composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 reactor for the Cycle 2 core; Volume 4 documents the calculations performed based on GPU Nuclear Corporation's Three Mile Island Unit 1 Cycle 5 core; and, lastly, Volume 5 describes the analysis of Virginia Power's North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5 core. Each of the reactor-specific volumes provides the details of calculations performed to determine the effective multiplication factor for each reactor core for one or more critical configurations using the SCALE-4 system; these results are summarized in this volume. Differences between the core designs and their possible impact on the criticality calculations are also discussed. Finally, results are presented for additional analyses performed to verify that solutions were sufficiently converged

  1. Contributions to economical and safe operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Meyer, K.

    1989-01-01

    Selected results of scientific and technical research works in the Department 'Nuclear Power' of the Zittau Technical University are summarized which have been obtained on behalf of the Kombinat Kernkraftwerke 'Bruno Leuschner' and in conjunction with the education of scientific successors and have been partly adopted in textbooks. Works on improved utilization of nuclear fuel in pressurized water reactors are mentioned which, among other things, are related with the use of stretch-out mode of operation and optimization of nuclear fuel loading sequence. Results of experimental and theoretical investigations on coolant mixing in the reactor core are presented. A complex modelling of the dynamical long-term behaviour of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors due to xenon poisoning are briefly described. Finally, some results on noise diagnostics theory of power reactors are summarized. (author)

  2. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  3. Implementation of utilities operation and maintenance experience into the European pressurized water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiss, W.; Lallier, M.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1992 Electricite de France EDF and German Utilities GU work together with Nuclear Power International NPI, a subsidiary of Framatome and Siemens, in the development of the future European Pressurized Water Reactor EPR. The EPR is an evolutionary concept, based on the French N4 plants and the German KONVOI plants. From the beginning, experienced operation and maintenance people from the precursor plants participate at the design process. Their experience will lead to a plant, which is not only characterised by low investment costs, but also by good operability, high availability and low operation and maintenance costs. No expensive back-fittings should be necessary after commissioning, to reach these availability and maintenance targets. The utility specialists give design requirements for outage performance, system design, and layout. These design requirements are really determining the system performances, and not what was design basis before. It does not necessarily lead to system increases. Mainly it is a shifting of the emphasis to other items. There are even cases, where the system performances can be reduced. Mostly very small modifications, which are nearly cost neutral when implemented early in the design, have big impact on the further operation. If there are big cost influences, a sound balance between investment and gained availability is made together with the designers. There is very fruitful discussion between designers and operators, which is highly estimated by both sides. In this frame also new, revolutionary ideas are coming up, which are going mostly in the direction of investment cost reduction, without loosing operation freedom. It is the first time in Europe, that designers and operators are working so close together. It is also the first time, that the management and the decision making is dominated by the utilities. (author)

  4. Knowledge base expert system control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alten, S.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear reactor operators are required to pay special attention to spatial xenon oscillations during the load-follow operation of pressurized water reactors. They are expected to observe the axial offset of the core, and to estimate the correct time and amount of necessary control action based on heuristic rules given in axial xenon oscillations are knowledge intensive, and heuristic in nature. An expert system, ACES (Axial offset Control using Expert Systems) is developed to implement a heuristic constant axial offset control procedure to aid reactor operators in increasing the plant reliability by reducing the human error component of the failure probability. ACES is written in a production system language, OPS5, based on the forward chaining algorithm. It samples reactor data with a certain time interval in terms of measurable parameters, such as the power, period, and the axial offset of the core. It then processes the core status utilizing a set of equations which are used in a back of the envelope calculations by domain experts. Heuristic rules of ACES identify the control variable to be used among the full and part length control rods and boron concentration, while a knowledge base is used to determine the amount of control. ACES is designed as a set of generic rules to avoid reducing the system into a set of patterns. Instead ACES evaluates the system, determines the necessary corrective actions in terms of reactivity insertion, and provides this reactivity insertion using the control variables. The amount of control action is determined using a knowledge base which consists of the differential rod worth curves, and the boron reactivity worth of a given reactor. Having the reactor dependent parameters in its knowledge base, ACES is applicable to an arbitrary reactor for axial offset control purposes

  5. The European pressurized water reactor. Result of the French-German cooperation of experienced NPP suppliers and operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.

    1999-01-01

    In 1989 Framatome and Siemens, the two most experienced European nuclear power plant suppliers, decided to join the efforts for the development of a new reactor type for the next generation in their equally owned subsidiary nuclear power international (NPI). In 1992 Electricite de France and the major German utilities operating nuclear power plants merged their own development programs with that of nuclear power international and initiated the European pressurized water reactor (EPR) project. In order to reach the two major targets of the project, the licensability in both countries, France and Germany, and the competitiveness of nuclear energy with other alternative energy sources, the design basis which had differently developed in the two countries needed to be harmonized. In parallel, the licensing authorities of both countries extended their existing cooperation in the field of a safety survey of existing nuclear power plants to the definition of safety criteria for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Through this cooperation the licensability of EPR in France and Germany will be assured. Continuously performed cost analysis show in addition that also the second target of the project, the competitiveness with alternative primary energy sources, can be achieved. Thanks to the fruitful cooperation between all parties involved, satisfactory results have been achieved not by a simple superposition of existing design features but through a careful evaluation and combination of the best available alternatives. At the end of 1997 the basic design results were compiled in a final report. Subsequently an optimization phase was launched that further improves the competitiveness of the power generation costs. (orig.)

  6. Track 3: growth of nuclear technology and research numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-I. 5. Analyses of the OECD MSLB Benchmark with the Codes DYN3D and DYN3D/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.

    2001-01-01

    The code DYN3D coupled with ATHLET was used for the analysis of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark, which is based on real plant design and operational data of the TMI-1 pressurized water reactor (PWR). Like the codes RELAP or TRAC,ATHLET is a thermal-hydraulic system code with point or one-dimensional neutron kinetic models. ATHLET, developed by the Gesellschaft for Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, is widely used in Germany for safety analyses of nuclear power plants. DYN3D consists of three-dimensional nodal kinetic models and a thermal-hydraulic part with parallel coolant channels of the reactor core. DYN3D was coupled with ATHLET for analyzing more complex transients with interactions between coolant flow conditions and core behavior. It can be applied to the whole spectrum of operational transients and accidents, from small and intermediate leaks to large breaks of coolant loops or steam lines at PWRs and boiling water reactors. The so-called external coupling is used for the benchmark, where the thermal hydraulics is split into two parts: DYN3D describes the thermal hydraulics of the core, while ATHLET models the coolant system. Three exercises of the benchmark were simulated: Exercise 1: point kinetics plant simulation (ATHLET) Exercise 2: coupled three-dimensional neutronics/core thermal-hydraulics evaluation of the core response for given core thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions (DYN3D) Exercise 3: best-estimate coupled core-plant transient analysis (DYN3D/ATHLET). Considering the best-estimate cases (scenarios 1 of exercises 2 and 3), the reactor does not reach criticality after the reactor trip. Defining more serious tests for the codes, the efficiency of the control rods was decreased (scenarios 2 of exercises 2 and 3) to obtain recriticality during the transient. Besides the standard simulation given by the specification, modifications are introduced for sensitivity studies. The results presented here show (a) the influence of a reduced

  7. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldaschl, H.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors -Quantification of the influence of leak size, control assembly worth, boron concentration and initial power by a dynamic operations criterion. Neutronic and thermohydraulic behaviour of a pressurized water reactor during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is mainly influenced by -change of fuel temperature, -void in the primary coolant. They cause a local stabilization of power density, that means that also in the case of small leaks local void is the main stabilization effect. As a consequence the increase of fuel temperature remains very small even under extremely hypothetical assumptions: small leak, positive reactivity feedback (positive coolant temperature coefficient, negative density coefficient) at the beginning of the accident and all control assemblies getting stuck. Restrictions which have been valid up to now for permitted start-up conditions to fulfill inherent safety requirements can be lossened substantially by a dynamic operations criterion. Burnable poisons for compensation of reactivity theorefore can be omitted. (orig.)

  8. Estimation of costs for fabrication of pressurized-water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judkins, R.R.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    To provide a reference case on which to base cost estimates of the several fuel cycles to be considered, the facility, equipment, and operating requirements for the fabrication of fuel for current-design pressurized-water reactors were examined. From an analysis of these requirements, the capital and operating costs of a plant with a capacity of two metric tons of heavy metal per day (MTHM/day) were estimated. In a cash flow analysis, the lifetime of the plant was assumed to be 20 y, and the income from the sale of nuclear fuel assemblies over this period was equated to the total capital and operating expenses of the plant, including a specified 15% return on investment. In this way a levelized unit price for the fuel was obtained. The effects of inflation were not considered since the purpose of these estimates and the determination of unit price was to permit comparison of different types of fuels. The capital costs of the fuel fabrication plant were estimated at $32 million for the facility--land, site preparation, building--and $34 million for equipment. Annual operating costs including labor, management, materials, and utilities were estimated to be $36.5 million. From these estimates, the unit price for fabricating the fuel for the reference pressurized-water reactor was determined to be $138/kg of heavy metal or $63,600 per fuel assembly

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout Caused by External Flooding Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Prescott, Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the application of a RISMC detailed demonstration case study for an emergent issue using the RAVEN and RELAP-7 tools. This case study looks at the impact of a couple of challenges to a hypothetical pressurized water reactor, including: (1) a power uprate, (2) a potential loss of off-site power followed by the possible loss of all diesel generators (i.e., a station black-out event), (3) and earthquake induces station-blackout, and (4) a potential earthquake induced tsunami flood. The analysis is performed by using a set of codes: a thermal-hydraulic code (RELAP-7), a flooding simulation tool (NEUTRINO) and a stochastic analysis tool (RAVEN) – these are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  10. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The standard applies to components of the primary circuit including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components; to elevators within the containment, electrical installations, and piping and valves of radiation protection monitoring equipment. Part 1 defines the terms and specifies engineered safety requirements

  11. Computer code for simulating pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, A.M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numerically. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistance added to the film coefficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (author)

  12. Code for the core simulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, M.A.B.

    1978-08-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numericaly. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistence added to the film coeficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (Author) [pt

  13. Dominant accident sequences in Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.; Henninger, R.J.; Nassersharif, B.

    1985-04-01

    A set of dominant accident sequences in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor was selected using probabilistic risk analysis methods. Because some accident scenarios were similar, a subset of four accident sequences was selected to be analyzed with the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to further our insights into similar types of accidents. The sequences selected were loss-of-feedwater, small-small break loss-of-coolant, loss-of-feedwater-initiated transient without scram, and interfacing systems loss-of-coolant accidents. The normal plant response and the impact of equipment availability and potential operator actions were also examined. Strategies were developed for operator actions not covered in existing emergency operator guidelines and were tested using TRAC simulations to evaluate their effectiveness in preventing core uncovery and maintaining core cooling

  14. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  15. Liquid radioactive waste processing system for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard sets forth design, construction, and performance requirements, with due consideration for operation, of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System for pressurized water reactor plants for design basis inputs. For the purpose of this Standard, the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary and the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems, or at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material; and it terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system, and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse

  16. Performance of materials in the component cooling water systems of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The component cooling water (CCW) system provides cooling water to several important loads throughout the plant under all operating conditions. An aging assessment CCW systems in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was conducted as part of Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program (NPAR) instituted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents some of the results on the performances of materials in respect of their application in CCW Systems. All the CCW system failures reported to the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) from January 1988 to June 1990 were reviewed; it is concluded that three of the main contributors to CCW system failures are valves, pumps, and heat exchangers. This study identified the modes and causes of failure for these components; most of the causes for the aging-related failures could be related to the performance of materials. Also, in this paper the materials used for these components are reviewed, and there aging mechanisms under CCW system conditions are discussed

  17. Introduction to nuclear power reactors and their health physics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtis, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to: (1) the major systems of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), (2) the production and distribution of radiation sources in BWR's and PWR's, (3) the regulatory and functional requirements for nuclear power reactor design from a health physics standpoint, (4) the health physics systems provided to meet such requirements, and (5) a bibliography of documents germane to power reactor health physics design

  18. Commissioning of the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, P.M.; Rolf, F.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Angra 2, located at Itaorna Beach-Angra dos Reis is the first plant of the Brazilian-German Agreement to be commissioned. The Nuclear Power Plant is a pressurized water reactor rated at 3765 Mw thermal/1325 Mw electrical. For commissioning purpose the plant is divided into 110 systems. Plant commissioning objective is to demonstrate the safe and correct operation of each plan component, system and of the whole plant in agreement with design conditions, licensing requirements and contractual obligations. This work gives a description of plant commissioning objectives, activities their time sequence, and documentation. (Author) [pt

  19. Station black out concurrent with PORV failure using a Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ababneh, Ahmad; Ishag, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •SBO accident simulation by using a GPWR simulator. •Normal SBO, and SBO with additional failure of Pilot Operated Relief Valve. •The research results will provide help in future for better understanding of accidents in APR 1400 reactors. -- Abstract: Station Black Out (SBO) is an accident situation that refers to the total loss of offsite power, along with the unavailability of onsite power, which results from the failure of all Diesel Generators (DG). Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) spans a number of methods that include modeling of event-trees and simulation of accidents scenarios, aimed to quantify risk and ensure safety in nuclear power plants. PSA also deals with prediction of future accidents and calculation of failure probabilities that has been done in this study. A SBO accident was simulated using a Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (GPWR) simulator from KEYMASTER™. The accident scenario consists of two stages; the first stage belongs to normal SBO, in second stage SBO accident with additional failure of Pilot Operated Relief Valve (PORV) opens and it stuck open has been considered for the pressurizer. A comparison of the two stages was made by plotting variables on the same graph. The research has been carried out to analyze the hot and cold leg temperatures, Steam Generator (SG) pressure, SG Narrow Range (NR) level, SG water-level-percentage (PCT), Pressurizer pressure, Fuel Temperature, and containment pressure. Simulation results suggest that failure in closing PORV has negligible impact on hot and cold leg temperatures, results in an overall less pressure in SGs, but higher pressure in the pressurizer. Additionally, containment pressure did not exceed the maximum approved pressure of 8.7 kg/cm 2 , but was approaching the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor’s (APR-1400) design pressure of 4.218 kg/cm 2 . Finally, nuclear fuel temperature exceeded Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) limit of 726.7 °C for both scenarios. The

  20. Reviewing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Colin

    1990-01-01

    The UK government has proposed a review of the prospects for nuclear power as the Sizewell B pressurized water reactor project nears completion in 1994. However, a delay in the completion of Sizewell B or a change of government could put off the review for some years beyond the mid 1990s. Anticipating, though, that such a review will eventually take place, issues which it should consider are addressed. Three broad categories of possible benefit claimed for nuclear power are examined. These are that nuclear power contributes to the security of energy supply, that it provides protection against long run fossil fuel price increases and that it is a means of mitigating the greenhouse effect. Arguments are presented which cost doubt over the reality of these benefits. Even if these benefits could be demonstrated, they would have to be set against the financial, health and accident costs attendant on nuclear power. It is concluded that the case may be made that nuclear power imposes net costs on society that are not justified by the net benefits conferred. Some comments are made on how a government review, if and when it takes place, should be conducted. (UK)

  1. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs

  2. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  3. Microstructural characteristics of PWR [pressurized water reactor] spent fuel relative to its leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural, compositional and thermochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel are discussed relative to its potential performance as a high-level waste form under proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project tuff repository conditions. Pressurized water reactor spent fuel specimens with various artificially induced cladding defects were leach tested in deionized water and in a reference tuff groundwater under ambient hot cell air and temperature conditions. Greater fractional actinide release was observed with bare fuel than with clad fuel leached through a cladding defect. Congruent actinide release and preferential release of cesium and technetium were observed in both water types. Selected summary radionuclide release data are presented and correlated to pre- and post-test microstructural characterization data

  4. Optimization of core reload design for low-leakage fuel management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Downar, T.J.; Sesonske, A.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed to optimize pressurized water reactor low-leakage core reload designs that features the decoupling and sequential optimization of the fuel arrangement and control problems. The two-stage optimization process provides the maximum cycle length for a given fresh fuel loading subject to power peaking constraints. In the first stage, a best fuel arrangement is determined at the end of cycle (EOC) in the absence of all control poisons by employing a direct search method. The constant power, Haling depletion is used to provide the cycle length and EOC power peaking for each candidate core fuel arrangement. In the second stage, the core control poison requirements to meet the core peaking constraints throughout the cycle are determined using an approximate nonlinear programming technique

  5. Safety aspects of using gadolinium as burnable poison in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, C.; Bonet, H.; Charlier, A.; Motte, F.

    1979-01-01

    Within the framework of an experimental program on the behavior of gadolinium in light water reactors (LWRs), the BR3 power plant, a small 11-MW(electric) pressurized water reactor, was operated successfully with a core containing 5% Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 rods. The core reached an average burnup increase of 22,000 MWd/tM, corresponding to 500 effective full-power days in a single cycle. These results were used to extrapolate the consequences on safety of extending such a control policy to large LWRs. In this context, the following factors were investigated: impact on the design, reactivity control and core behavior operated with lower and more constant boric acid concentration, environmental impact, fuel handling, etc

  6. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  7. Iterative solution to the optimal poison management problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.; Levine, S.H.; Lewis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for solving the optimal poison management problem for a multiregion pressurized water reactor has been developed. The optimization objective is to maximize the end-of-cycle core excess reactivity for any given beginning-of-cycle fuel loading. The problem is treated as an optimal control problem with the region burnup and control absorber concentrations acting as the state and control variables, respectively. Constraints are placed on the power peaking, soluble boron concentration, and control absorber concentrations. The solution method consists of successive relinearizations of the system equations resulting in a sequence of nonlinear programming problems whose solutions converge to the desired optimal control solution. Application of the method to several test problems based on a simplified three-region reactor suggests a bang-bang optimal control strategy with the peak power location switching between the inner and outer regions of the core and the critical soluble boron concentration as low as possible throughout the cycle

  8. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins

  9. Development of a transient identification and classification system to an integral pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronne, Ivan Dionysio

    2009-01-01

    The demand for energy in the modern world is growing, particularly in the developing countries. The nuclear options has been deserving prominence for their qualities of not impacting the environment through emissions of greenhouse gases and nor to demand great areas.. However society requests improvement in the safety of new reactors and the utilities request larger availability of the power plants. The IRIS project of an integral nuclear pressurized water reactor proposes to fulfill those requirements. A system for identification and classification of transients would help to improve the safety and to increase the availability of the IRIS increasing its competitiveness. In order to contribute to the development o such a system it was developed in this work a System for Identification and Classification of Transients - SDICT - capable of monitoring the operation of the reactor and of providing information on its operational state. SICT was developed using the technique of neural networks, more specifically the Self-Organizing Maps. Results of IRIS simulation with RELAP5 code were used to train the neural network of SICT. To demonstrate the correctness of the methodology of using simulations results, whose values have characteristics different from the measured ones, it was made a version of SICT for an experimental installation, the The Circuit no. 1 - CT1. Experiments were run in this test facility and simulations of its operation were done with RELAP5. This CT1 version of SICT was then checked against the simulation and experimental data validating the methodology. As a result of the activities to develop SICT, it is now available for futures studies: the developed application, SICT, a database of experiments in CT1, a validate nodalization of CT1, a database of results of CT1 simulations , a nodalization of the IRIS tested for several normal and abnormal transients and a database with the results of IRIS simulations. Attached to this thesis is a CD with the

  10. Incineration of actinide targets in a pressurized water reactor spin project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puill, A.; Bergeron, J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with uranium fuel to limit the inventory growth of minor actinides (237 neptunium, and americium) produced by the French nuclear powerplants is studied. Targets containing an actinide oxide mixed to an inert matrix are loaded in some reactors. After being irradiated along with the fuel, the target is specially reprocessed. The remaining actinide and the plutonium which is produced, added to fresh actinide, are recycled in new targets. The radiotoxicity balance, with and without incineration, is examined considering that only the losses coming from the target reprocessing treated as waste. A scenario arbitrarily based on 18 years of operation results in a reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste by a factor between 10 and 20, depending on the actinide considered. 6 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Survey of natural-circulation cooling in U.S. pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    Literature describing natural circulation analyses, experiments, and plant operation have been obtained from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reactor vendors, utility-sponsored research groups, utilities, national laboratories, and foreign sources. These have been reviewed and significant results and conclusions identified. Three modes of natural-circulation cooling are covered: single phase, two-phase, and reflux condensation. Single-phase natural circulation is amply verified by plant operational data, test data from scaled experimental facilities, and analysis with assessed computer codes. Ample evidence also exists that two-phase natural circulation can successfully cool pressurized water reactors. This mode occurs during certain events such as small-break loss-of-coolant accidents. The data base for reflux condensation is primarily from tests in scaled experimental facilities. There are no plant operational data and only limited assessment of thermal-hydraulic systems codes has been performed. Further work is needed before this mode of natural circulation can be confidently used

  12. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 3. Analysis of the OECD TMI-1 Main-Steam- Line-Break Benchmark Accident Using the Coupled RELAP5/PANTHER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneidesch, C.R.; Guisset, J.P.; Zhang, J.; Bryce, P.; Parkes, M.

    2001-01-01

    The RELAP5 best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code has been coupled with the PANTHER three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics code via the TALINK dynamic data exchange control and processing tool. The coupled RELAP5/PANTHER code package is being qualified and will be used at British Energy (BE) and Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE), independently, to analyze pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients where strong core-system interactions occur. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency PWR Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem was performed to demonstrate the capability of the coupled code package to simulate such transients, and this paper reports the BE and TEE contributions. In the first exercise, a point-kinetics (PK) calculation is performed using the RELAP5 code. Two solutions have been derived for the PK case. The first corresponds to scenario, 1 where calculations are carried out using the original (BE) rod worth and where no significant return to power (RTP) occurs. The second corresponds to scenario 2 with arbitrarily reduced rod worth in order to obtain RTP (and was not part of the 'official' results). The results, as illustrated in Fig. 1, show that the thermalhydraulic system response and rod worth are essential in determining the core response. The second exercise consists of a 3-D neutron kinetics transient calculation driven by best-estimate time-dependent core inlet conditions on a 18 T and H zones basis derived from TRAC-PF1/MOD2 (PSU), again analyzing two scenarios of different rod worths. Two sets of PANTHER solutions were submitted for exercise 2. The first solution uses a spatial discretization of one node per assembly and 24 core axial layers for both flux and T and H mesh. The second is characterized by spatial refinement (2 x 2 nodes per assembly, 48 core layers for flux, and T and H calculation), time refinement (half-size time steps), and an increased radial discretization for solution

  13. A novel coordinated control for Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuxin; Du, Xue; Xia, Genglei; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed IPWR coordinated control strategy to avoid flow instability of OTSG. • Tuned PID controller parameters by Fuzzy kernel wavelet neural network with kernel trick and adaptive variable step-size. • Transition process exhibit the effectiveness of the novel IPWR control system. - Abstract: Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) has the characteristic of strong coupling, nonlinearity and complicated dynamic performance, which requires high standards of the control strategy and controller design. Most of IPWR systems utilize control strategy of ideal steady-state and PID controller, even though this strategy causes flow instability in the once through steam generator (OTSG) in low load conditions. Besides, the simple form of PID limits the performance developing which could not appropriately satisfy the requirements for quality. Motivated by these drawbacks, this paper proposes an IPWR coordinated control strategy and adopts PID controller to control each subsystem. The control strategy considers the system as a two-level hierarchical control system, and considers coordinating controller and bottom controllers. In the period of controller design, this strategy utilizes PID controller to control each subsystem, and modifies the controller parameters in real time by Fuzzy-KWNN algorithm, which adaptively achieves the system adjustment. Finally, simulation results are presented to exhibit the effectiveness of the proposed IPWR control system

  14. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, J.P.; Nigon, M.; Vitton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  15. Numerical study of optimal equilibrium cycles for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlers, Y.P.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm based on simulated annealing and successive linear programming is applied to solve equilibrium cycle optimization problems for pressurized water reactors. In these problems, the core reload scheme is represented by discrete variables, while the cycle length as well as uranium enrichment and loading of burnable poison in each feed fuel assembly are treated as continuous variables. The enrichments are considered to be distinct in all feed fuel assemblies. The number of batches and their sizes are not fixed and also determined by the algorithm. An important feature of the algorithm is that all the parameters are determined by the solution of one optimization problem including both discrete and continuous variables. To search for the best reload scheme, simulated annealing is used. The optimum cycle length as well as uranium enrichment and loading of burnable poison in each feed fuel assembly are determined for each reload pattern examined using successive linear programming. Numerical results of equilibrium cycle optimization for various values of the effective price of electricity and fuel reprocessing cost are studied

  16. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  17. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It discusses the third, and final, year's work on an NRC-funded project examining diagnostic instrumentation in water reactors. The first two years were broad in coverage, concentrating on anticipatory measurements for detection of potential problems in both pressurized- and boiling-water reactors, with recommendations for areas of further study. One of these areas, the early detection of small steam tube leaks in PWRs, formed the basis of study for the last year of the project. Four tasks are addressed in this study of the detection of steam tube leaks. (1) Determination of which physical parameters indicate the onset of steam generator tube leaks. (2) Establishing performance goals for diagnostic instruments which could be used for early detection of steam generator tube leaks. (3) Defining the diagnostic instrumentation and their location which satisfy Items 1 and 2 above. (4) Assessing the need for diagnostic data processing and display. Parameters are identified, performance goals established, and sensor types and locations are specified in the report, with emphasis on the use of existing instrumentation with a minimum of retrofitting. A simple algorithm is developed which yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. The conclusion is that leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation. (orig./HP)

  18. Evolution of general design requirements for french pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gros, G.; Jalouneix, J.; Rollinger, F.

    1988-10-01

    The design of French pressurized water reactors is based first on deterministic principles, using the well-known defense in depth concept. This safety approach, basically reflected current American practice at that time, which consisted notably in designing engineered safeguard systems capable of limiting the consequences of accidents assumed to be credible despite the preventive measures taken. Further reflections have led to complete this approach, resulting in modifications to regulatory practice, mainly related to better practical assimilation of the problems arising during plant unit operation and reactor control after an accident and to the determination to enhance the overall consistency of the safety approach. As regards system redundancy, it should be noted that common cause failures can result in the total loss of a redundant system. System redundancy aspects will be dealt with in Chapter 2. As regards study of design basis accidents, attention was focused on the human intervention stage following automatic activation of protection and safeguard systems. This resulted, for all plant units, in the revision of operating procedures, accompanied by examination of the means required for their implementation. These subjects will be discussed in Chapter 3. Finally, as regards equipment classification, the range of equipment subjected to particular requirements, formerly limited to design basis safety classified equipment, was enlarged to include important for safety equipment. This subject will be dealt with in Chapter 5

  19. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Qiaolin; Qiu, Suizheng; Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Xiao, Zejun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions

  20. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Qiaolin [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Qiu, Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Xiao, Zejun [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions.

  1. Contemporary pressurized water reactor technology in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, A.

    1991-01-01

    The recent political events enabled Czechoslovak industrial companies to come into direct contact with leading western companies involved in pressurized water ractor technology. A survey is presented of the present situation at the world market of PWR type nuclear power plant suppliers and suppliers of fuel cycle services. Information is given on the potential bids for the next Czechoslovak nuclear power plants with PWR reactors. Economic aspects of the potential bids are presented including some considerations about the participation of the Czechoslovak nuclear industry as a supplier of the reactor for the future power plants. Main technical parameters are listed of PWR units with an output about 1000 MW supplied by Westinghouse EC, ABB -Combustion Engineering and Siemens AG. At present, the bids for new Czechoslovak nuclear power plants are being evaluated. No information on terms of the bids actually coming from foreign companies is used in the article. (Z.S.). 9 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Theoretical and experimental investigations into the filtration of the atmosphere within the containments of pressurized water reactors after serious reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillmann, H.G.; Pasler, H.

    1981-01-01

    For serious accidents in nuclear power stations equipped with pressurized water reactors and with boundary conditions assumed, a conservative evaluation was made of the condition of the atmosphere within the reactor containment, particularly referring to pressure, temperature, air humidity and activity release. Based on these data the loads were calculated of accident filter systems of different designs as a function of parameters such as the course of releases and the volume flow through the filter systems. A number of experimental results are indicated on the behaviour of iodine sorption materials under extreme conditions including the least favorable temperature, humidity and pressure derived from the calculations above. Reference is made to the targets of future R and D work on aerosol removal

  3. Analysis of high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel using uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium isotope correlations with burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Suk; Jeon, Young Shin; Park, Soon Dal; Ha, Yeong Keong; Song, Kyu Seok

    2015-01-01

    The correlation of the isotopic composition of uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium with the burnup for high burnup pressurized water reactor fuels irradiated in nuclear power reactors has been experimentally investigated. The total burnup was determined by Nd-148 and the fractional 235 U burnup was determined by U and Pu mass spectrometric methods. The isotopic compositions of U, Pu, Nd, and Cs after their separation from the irradiated fuel samples were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The contents of these elements in the irradiated fuel were determined through an isotope dilution mass spectrometric method using 233 U, 242 Pu, 150 Nd, and 133 Cs as spikes. The activity ratios of Cs isotopes in the fuel samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. The content of each element and its isotopic compositions in the irradiated fuel were expressed by their correlation with the total and fractional burnup, burnup parameters, and the isotopic compositions of different elements. The results obtained from the experimental methods were compared with those calculated using the ORIGEN-S code

  4. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yong Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  5. China's Nuclear Power Program: Options for the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttmeier, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The issue of American nuclear cooperation with the People's Republic of China is examined with regards to political relations, commercial benefits to the United States, and nonproliferation. China's interest in nuclear power is examined, and its nuclear program is briefly reviewed from the 1950's to present. China's international nuclear relations with other countries are discussed, and implications for the United States examined, particularly with regards to China's intentions toward nuclear proliferation, danger of diversion of material for nuclear weapons, use of pressurized water reactor technology for Chinese naval reactors, and the terms of the nuclear cooperation agreement

  6. Sensor fault analysis using decision theory and data-driven modeling of pressurized water reactor subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Skorska, M.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument fault detection and estimation is important for process surveillance, control, and safety functions of a power plant. The method incorporates the dual-hypotheses decision procedure and system characterization using data-driven time-domain models of signals representing the system. The multivariate models can be developed on-line and can be adapted to changing system conditions. For the method to be effective, specific subsystems of pressurized water reactors were considered, and signal selection was made such that a strong causal relationship exists among the measured variables. The technique is applied to the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test reactor using in-core neutron detector and core-exit thermocouple signals. Thermocouple anomalies such as bias error, noise error, and slow drift in the sensor are detected and estimated using appropriate measurement models

  7. The potential for expert system support in solving the pressurized water reactor fuel shuffling problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.; Poetschat, G.R.; Faught, W.S.; Eich, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    The fuel shuffling problem is posed by the need to reposition partially burned assemblies to achieve minimum X-Y pin power peaks reload cycles of pressurized water reactors. This problem is a classic artificial intelligence (AI) problem and is highly suitable for AI expert system solution assistance, in contrast to the conventional solution, which ultimately depends solely on trial and error. Such a fuel shuffling assistant would significantly reduce engineering and computer execution time for conventional loading patterns and, much more importantly, even more significantly for low-leakage loading patterns. A successful hardware/software demonstrator has been introduced, paving the way for development of a broadly expert system program. Such a program, upon incorporating the recently developed technique perverse depletion, would provide a directed path for solving the low-leakage problem

  8. Implementation of a pressurized water reactor simulator for teaching on a mini-computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, Michele.

    1982-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a pressurized water reactor power plant simulator using a mini-computer. This simulator is oriented towards teaching. It operates real-time simulations and many parameters can be changed by the student during execution of the digital code. First, a state variable model of the dynamic behavior of the plant is derived from the physical laws. The second part presents the problems associated with the use of a mini-computer for the resolution of a large differential system, notably the problems of memory-space availability, execution time and numerical integration. Finally, it contains the description of the control deck outlay used to interfer with the digital code, and of the the conditions that can be changed during an excution [fr

  9. Nuclear power in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Z.H.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan started its nuclear power program by installing a 137 M We Canadian Deuterium Reactor (Candu) at Karachi in 1971 which became operational in 1972. The post-contract technical support for the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) was withdrawn by Canada in 196 as a consequence of Indian nuclear device test in 1974. In spite of various difficulties PAEC resolved to continue to operate KANUPP and started a process for the indigenous fabrication of spare parts and nuclear fuel. The first fuel bundle fabricated in Pakistan was loaded in the core in 1980. Since then KANUPP has been operating on the indigenously fabricated fuel. The plant computer systems and the most critical instrumentation and Control system were also replaced with up-to date technology. In 2002 KANUPP completed its original design life of 30 year. A program for the life extension of the plant had already been started. The second nuclear power plant of 300 M We pressurized water reactor purchased from China was installed in Chashma in 1997, which started commercial operations in 2001. Another unit of 300 M We will be installed at Chashma in near future. These nuclear power plants have been operating under IAEA safeguards agreements. PAEC through the long-term performance of the two power plants has demonstrated its competence to safely and successfully operate and maintain nuclear power plants. Pakistan foresees an increasingly important and significant share of nuclear power in the energy sector. The Government has recently allocated a share of 8000 MWe for nuclear energy in the total energy scenario of Pakistan by the year 2025. (author)

  10. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  11. Study and modeling of fluctuating fluid forces exerted on fuel rods in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in the fuel rods. Due to friction, wear occurs at the contact locations between the spacer grid and the fuel rod. This could compromise the first safety barrier of the nuclear reactor by damaging the fuel rod cladding. In order to ensure the integrity of the cladding, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods. However, the spectra for these fluid forces are not well known. The goal of this PhD thesis was to use simple geometrical elements to check the reproducibility of realistic pressurized water reactor spacer grids. As a first step, large eddy simulations were performed on a concentric annular pipe for different mesh refinements using the CFD code Trio CFD (previously Trio U) developed by CEA. A mesh sensitivity study was performed to obtain an acceptable mesh for reproducing standard literature results. This information on mesh resolution was used when carrying out simulations using various geometric obstacles inside the pipe, namely, mixing vanes, circular spacer grid and a combination of square spacer grid with mixing vanes. The last of the three configurations is the closest to a realistic PWR fuel assembly. Structured mesh was generated for the annular pipe case and circular grid case. An innovative hybrid mesh was used for the two remaining cases of the mixing vanes and the square grid: keeping unstructured mesh around the obstacles and structured mesh in the rest of the domain. The inner wall of the domain was representative of the fuel rod cladding. Both hydraulic and wall pressure characteristics were analyzed for each case. The results for the square grid case were found to be an approximate combination of the mixing vane case and circular grid case. Simulation results were compared with experiments performed at CEA Cadarache. Some preliminary comparisons were also made with classical semi-empirical models. (author) [fr

  12. Application of leak-before-break criteria to pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roege, P.; Day, B.; Beckjord, E.; Golay, M.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of consequential damage to safety-related systems or components after postulated pipe breaks in Light Water Reactors has led to the installation of pipe restraints capable of withstanding the loads in such an accident. These restraints are a significant part of initial capital cost, and because of their size and location, impede plant maintenance. The Piping Review Committee of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has concluded that, subject to fulfillment of certain criteria, the pipe restraints for pressurized water reactor main coolant piping are not necessary, because the failure mode of this piping is such that it will leak before it will break, and the leakage of reactor coolant is large enough to detect. In this study, we examine the piping systems of a 4-loop 1,150 MWe pressurized water reactor, determining the crack size that would be stable from a fracture mechanics point of view, and the range of leak rates that would ensue. We then consider the sensitivity of conventional leak detection systems, and find that pipe sizes down to 45 cm in diameter would meet the leak-before-break criteria. Improvements in the sensitivity of conventional leak detectors would extend this range down to pipe sizes down to the range of 20 - 45 cm in diameter. The development of local leak detection systems which would respond to leaks in compartments or confined areas would make it possible to apply the criteria to sizes as low as 10 - 20 cm in diameter, which appear to be the limit of the net cost savings of eliminating pipe restraints and adding additional leak detection instrumentation. Extending the leak-before-break concept into this smallest pipe range may require improved precision in crack definition, flow modeling, and leak detection. Better detection of leaks may also require use of new detection methods coupled to novel approaches to piping system design. (J.P.N.)

  13. The max–min ant system and tabu search for pressurized water reactor loading pattern design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chaung; Chen, Ying-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An automatic loading pattern design tool for a pressurized water reactor is developed. • The design method consists of max–min ant system and tabu search. • The heuristic rules are developed to generate the candidates for tabu search. • The initial solution of tabu search is provided by max–min ant system. • The new algorithm shows very satisfactory results compared to the old one. - Abstract: An automatic loading pattern (LP) design tool for a pressurized water reactor is developed. The design procedure consists of two steps: first, a LP is generated using max–min ant system (MMAS) and then tabu search (TS) is adopted to search the satisfactory LP. The MMAS is previously developed and the TS process is newly-developed. The heuristic rules are implemented to generate the candidate LP in TS process. The heuristic rules are comprised of two kinds of action, i.e., a single swap in the location of two fuel assemblies and rotation of fuel assembly. Since developed TS process is a local search algorithm, it is efficient for the minor change of LP. It means that a proper initial LP should be provided by the first step, i.e., by MMAS. The design requirements such as hot channel factor, the hot zero power moderator temperature coefficient, and cycle length are formulated in the objective function. The results show that the developed tool can obtain the satisfactory LP and dramatically reduce the computation time compared with previous tool using ant system alone

  14. Application of the accident consequences model of the German risk study to assessments of accident risks in different types of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Bayer, A.

    1982-01-01

    Within the scope of the 'German Risk Study for Nuclear Power Plants' (Phase A) the accident consequence model UFOMOD was developed in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. This model originally developed for pressurized water reactors has now been extended in order to obtain results about accidental releases of activity from fast breeder and high-temperature reactors, too. (RW) [de

  15. Development of a decommissioning plan for nuclear power plant 'Krsko'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, Djurica; Fink, Kresimir

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant 'Krsko' (NEK), is the only nuclear power plant in Yugoslavia, is a two-loop, Westinghouse-design, pressurized water reactor rated at 632 MWe. When NEK applied for an operating license in 1981, it did not have to explain how the plant would be decommissioned and decommissioning provisions were not part of the licensing process. Faced with mounting opposition to nuclear power and a real threat that the plant would be shut down, the plant management developed a Mission Plan for resolving the decommissioning problem. The Mission Plan calls for a preliminary decommissioning plan to be prepared and submitted to the local regulatory body before the end of 1992

  16. Nuclear power costs in the build, operate, transfer approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybers, M.N.; Sahin, B.

    1990-01-01

    The costs of nuclear power are discussed with special reference to the economic problems faced by developing countries, and the relative merit of a new accounting approach, viz., the build, operate, transfer contract model, which was proposed in Turkey for the Akkuyu nuclear power project, is illustrated. In this context, the general methodology of calculating nuclear power costs is summarized and a capital cost analysis for a 986 MW pressurized water reactor plant is given in terms of constant monetary units for the above contract model and the turnkey contract model. Adjustment of the costs taking into account regional conditions such as inflation and higher interest rates is also indicated. (orig.) [de

  17. Earthquake-relief APWR (Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Hidekazu; Oshibe, Toshihiro; Yamaura, Yoshihisa; Kokubo, Eiji

    1999-01-01

    The anti-seismic design conditions for nuclear power stations are extremely severe in Japan. Therefore, various measures, including the increase in building wall thickness and in the number of equipment supports, need to be implemented to satisfy the necessary anti-seismic design. This is one of the causes of the increase in the construction cost of power stations. Meanwhile, a seismic isolation system, which mitigates an input earthquake motion, has been attracting attention in the general construction industry since the Great Hansin Earthquake in 1995. An increasing number of buildings employing such a system have been constructed. The system is being more popular and socially accepted. At the same time, the anti-seismic nuclear power stations have already been operated in France and South Africa. Various reviews and researches are promoted in Japan to adopt the seismic isolation system in nuclear power stations. The building and equipment designs when the seismic isolation system is applied to APWR are reviewed based on the experience in Japan and overseas. Specifically, reviews were conducted on the following items and their technical and economical feasibility has been well confirmed: Earthquake-relief equipment properties. Building design. Equipment design. The reliability and economy on the building and equipment designs shall further be enhanced in order to maximize the advantages of seismic isolation system in the future. (author)

  18. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  19. Application of linearized model to the stability analysis of the pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haipeng; Huang Xiaojin; Zhang Liangju

    2008-01-01

    A Linear Time-Invariant model of the Pressurized Water Reactor is formulated through the linearization of the nonlinear model. The model simulation results show that the linearized model agrees well with the nonlinear model under small perturbation. Based upon the Lyapunov's First Method, the linearized model is applied to the stability analysis of the Pressurized Water Reactor. The calculation results show that the methodology of linearization to stability analysis is conveniently feasible. (authors)

  20. Chooz A, First Pressurized Water Reactor to be Dismantled in France - 13445

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucau, Joseph [Westinghouse Electric Company, 43 rue de l' Industrie, Nivelles (Belgium); Mirabella, C. [Westinghouse Electric France, Orsay (France); Nilsson, Lennart [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vaesteraas (Sweden); Kreitman, Paul J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Lake Bluff, IL 60048 (United States); Obert, Estelle [EDF - DPI - CIDEN, Lyon (France)

    2013-07-01

    Nine commercial nuclear power plants have been permanently shut down in France to date, of which the Chooz A plant underwent an extensive decommissioning and dismantling program. Chooz Nuclear Power Station is located in the municipality of Chooz, Ardennes region, in the northeast part of France. Chooz B1 and B2 are 1,500 megawatt electric (MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) currently in operation. Chooz A, a 305 MWe PWR implanted in two caves within a hill, began operations in 1967 and closed in 1991, and will now become the first PWR in France to be fully dismantled. EDF CIDEN (Engineering Center for Dismantling and Environment) has awarded Westinghouse a contract for the dismantling of its Chooz A reactor vessel (RV). The project began in January 2010. Westinghouse is leading the project in a consortium with Nuvia France. The project scope includes overall project management, conditioning of the reactor vessel (RV) head, RV and RV internals segmentation, reactor nozzle cutting for lifting the RV out of the pit and seal it afterwards, dismantling of the RV thermal insulation, ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) forecast to ensure acceptable doses for the personnel, complementary vacuum cleaner to catch the chips during the segmentation work, needs and facilities, waste characterization and packaging, civil work modifications, licensing documentation. The RV and RV internals will be segmented based on the mechanical cutting technology that Westinghouse applied successfully for more than 13 years. The segmentation activities cover the cutting and packaging plan, tooling design and qualification, personnel training and site implementation. Since Chooz A is located inside two caves, the project will involve waste transportation from the reactor cave through long galleries to the waste buffer area. The project will end after the entire dismantling work is completed, and the waste storage is outside the caves and ready to be shipped either to the ANDRA (French

  1. Extended fuel cycle operation for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear steam turbine power plant system having an arrangement therein for extended fuel cycle operation is described. The power plant includes a turbine connected at its inlet to a source of motive fluid having a predetermined pressure associated therewith. The turbine has also connected thereto an extraction conduit which extracts steam from a predetermined location therein for use in an associated apparatus. A bypass conduit is provided between a point upstream of the inlet and the extraction conduit. A flow control device is provided within the bypass conduit and opens when the pressure of the motive steam supply drops beneath the predetermined pressure as a result of reactivity loss within the nuclear reactor. Opening of the bypass conduit provides flow to the associated apparatus and at the same time provides an increased flow orifice to maintain fluid flow rate at a predetermined level

  2. Contribution to the qualification of calculation methods of reactivity and of flux and power distributions in nuclear pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abit, K.

    1984-01-01

    The last stage of the creation computer methods and calculations consists of verifying the running and qualifying the results obtained. The work of the present thesis consisted of improving a coupling method between radial and axial phenomena in a PWR core, refering to three-dimensional calculations, while ensuring a perfect coherence between the programmed physical models. The calculation results have been compared to measurements of reactivity and of flux distributions realized during start-up tests. Thus, the methods have been applied to the calculation of the evolution of a burnable poison (gadolinium) in view of operation in long campaign. 13 refs [fr

  3. Innovative Control concepts for German pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzozowski, Raphael; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Controlling reactor power without any manual support is becoming more and more important. The READIG project (READIG = Reactor Instrumentation and Digital Control) power control system installed in unit 2 of the Philippsburg nuclear power station (KKP 2) requires no manual intervention except for specific strategy criteria settings. It was even possible to eliminate the power distribution set points. With minor adaptations, this concept can be applied in other PWR plants as well. KKP 2 is a PWR plant with particularly sophisticated core charges; as a consequence, the I and C systems were adapted accordingly. The increase in integral reactor power and the low-leakage core charges are the main reasons for lower limiting margins, especially in peak limiting. The standard control concept was supplemented in such a way that a more precise fine control concept for power distribution in the full-load regime is achieved. The READIG project fully utilizes the possibilities offered by digital TXS Technology, which is why use is also made of physical parameterization. The new power distribution control concept has these advantages: - Operation at small peak-/DNB-reactor output limitation margins. - Stable control without manual intervention also in load cycles and in the frequency control mode. - Simplified operation due to omission of the power distribution set point. - Reduction to zero of the frequency of L-bank steps at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode. - Reduction to zero of the frequency of D-bank steps at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode. - Lower quantities of demineralized water to be fed at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode (±1%). (orig.)

  4. Nuclear Power Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981-85 research program planned by the Nuclear Power Division of EPRI places major emphasis on the assurance of safety and realiability of light water reactors (LWRs). Of high priority is a better knowledge of LWR-system behavior undeer abnormal conditions and the behavior of structural materials used for pressure vessels, piping, and large nuclear-plant components. Strong emphasis is also placed on achieving the most-effective performance and utilization of nuclear fuels and improving the corrosion resistance of pressurized-water-reactor steam generators. Efforts are underway to reduce radiation exposure and outage duration and to investigate the human factors involved in plant operation and maintenance. Substantial emphasis is placed on short-range goals designed to achieve useful results in the next two to seven years. The Division's mid- and long-range goal is to improve the use of fissionable and fertile materials and aid in the realization of other reactor systems. A series of general goals, categorized into three time frames and planned expenditures shows the trend of work to be undertaken. 53 figures

  5. A new Finnish nuclear power unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In Finland, nuclear power is considered a natural part of a sustainable energy system. The Finnish Parliament has decided that development of nuclear power is consistent with the overall interests of society when climate issues, environmental targets, supply security and stable and competitive prices of electric power are considered as a whole. In 2002, the Finnish Parliament approved the Government's decision in principle to build a fifth nuclear power plant. The new project is the most advanced energy project in the Nordic countries with respect to the availability of energy free of carbon dioxide. The decision is also welcomed by the EU. The new reactor will be of the EPR (European Pressurized Water Reactor) type. In addition to supplying power to the Finnish industries, the plant is considered necessary if Finland is to comply with international conventions on CO 2 emissions

  6. Implementation of an expert system for xenon spatial control in pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Control of the axial xenon oscillations is a knowledge- and experience-intensive activity for reactor operators. To aid reactor operators in the control of axial xenon oscillations, an advisory expert system was developed. A rule-based expert system shell, INSIGHT2+, was used to build the expert system which was interfaced with a microcomputer-based core control model of a pressurized-water reactor, graphic engine, and data base. A core control model described by one-group diffusion theory with moderator temperature and xenon feedbacks was used to develop heuristic control rules and to test the system. Full- and part-length control rods, boron concentration, and coolant inlet temperature were considered as control variables of the core control model. This expert system consists of a search space: the set of possible power level and power shape patterns. The search space was made by combining the following core state variables: the sign of relative power and axial offset (AO) error, sign of the rate of change of power level and AO, and magnitude of relative power and AO error

  7. Economical opportunities on advanced conventional island design for the European pressurized water reactor (EPR) based on Konvoi design. Annex 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremayr, A.; Wagner, K.; Schuberth, U.

    2002-01-01

    Design of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) has been finalized by the end of 1998. In parallel with these efforts, the German utilities group contracted the Siemens AG Power generation Group (KWU) to develop an advanced and optimized conventional island for the EPR. The main objectives for improving the conventional island design were determined on the basis of experience of the Konvoi series plants and advanced fossil plants. This paper describes the innovations introduced to the conventional island and presents the reasons for the resultant cost reductions. (author)

  8. Cable condition monitoring in a pressurized water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hussaini, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Oconee Nuclear Station is the first nuclear plant designed, engineered and constructed by Duke Power Company. Even though the accelerated aging method was available to determine the life expectancy of the cable used in the reactor building, no natural aging data was available at that time. In order to be able to verify the condition of the reactor building cable over the life of the plant, an on-going cable monitoring plan was instituted. Various types of cable were selected to be monitored, and they were installed in cable life evaluation circuits in the reactor building. At five year intervals over the life of the plant, cable samples would be removed from these cable life evaluation circuits and tested to determine the effects of the reactor building environment on the integrity of the cable. A review of the cable life evaluation circuits and the results of the evaluation program to date is presented

  9. Development of design technology for advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Sung Ki; Cho, Sung Won; Park, Chang Kyu

    1991-07-01

    The evaluation method of containment integrity and source terms in nuclear power plant were systematized. First, PRA level 2 procedure which provides the procedures of the containment analysis was developed. The containment event tree method which can assess the severe accident phenomena, the mode of containment failure, and source terms was proposed. The new proposed CET employed simple event tree which is supported by supporting tree on quantification. It can resolve the inter-dependency between top events and/or supporting events. Some Term Code Package was selected as means of evaluation of source terms. New guidance material was prepared to help easy use of STCP. (Author)

  10. Methodology for safety classification of PWR type nuclear power plants items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Patricia Pagetti de

    1995-01-01

    This paper contains the criteria and methodology which define a classification system of structures, systems and components in safety classes according to their importance to nuclear safety. The use of this classification system will provide a set of basic safety requirements associated with each safety class specified. These requirements, when available and applicable, shall be utilized in the design, fabrication and installation of structures, systems and components of Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plants. (author). 13 refs, 1 tab

  11. Status of researches in the field of safety of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This collective publication proposes a synthesis of the status of researches performed in the field of safety of pressurized water reactors. They may discuss past, current and projected research works, involved actors, or lessons learned from these works. The authors propose a presentation of some research tools privileged by the IRSN for these researches: the CABRI and PHEBUS reactors, the GALAXIE experimental platform, and some other installations. Then they address researches related to loss-of-coolant accidents (two-phase thermohydraulics, fuel rod behaviour), to reactivity accidents, to accidents related to dewatering of irradiated fuel storage pools, to fires, to extreme aggressions of natural origin (earthquake, extreme flooding), to core fusion accidents (core heating and fusion within the vessel, vessel failure and apron erosion by corium, containment enclosure dynamic loading, release of radioactive products), to the behaviour of nuclear plant important metallic or civil works components and notably to their ageing, to organisational and human factors or more generally to social and human sciences (design of control rooms, safety organisation and management in EDF nuclear plants), and to other issues and research perspectives

  12. The NCSU [North Carolina State Univ.] freon PWR [pressurized water reactor] loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caves, J.R.; Doster, J.M.; Miller, G.D.; Wehring, B.W.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear engineering department at North Carolina State University has designed and constructed an operating scale model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS). This facility will be used for education, training, and research. The loop uses electric heaters to simulate the reactor core and Freon as the primary and secondary coolant. Viewing ports at various locations in the loop allow the students to visualize flow regimes in normal and off-normal operating conditions. The objective of the design effort was to scale the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a two-loop Westinghouse NSSS. Provisions have been made for the simulation of various abnormal occurrences. The model is instrumented in much the same manner as the actual NSSS. Current research projects using the loop include the development of adaptive expert systems to monitor the performance of the facility, diagnose mechanical faults, and to make recommendations to operators for mitigation of accidents. This involves having thermal-hydraulics and core-physics simulators running faster than real time on a mini-supercomputer, with operating parameters updated by communication with the data acquisition and control computer. Further opportunities for research will be investigated as they arise

  13. Simultaneous loading patterns optimization for two successive cycles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Sugimura, Erina; Kitamura, Yasunori; Yamane, Yoshihiro

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, simultaneous optimization is carried out for successive two cycles of pressurized water reactors. At first, a simplified problem of the simultaneous optimization was studied by assuming the batch-wise power sharing as independent variable, i.e., batch-wise power sharing was optimized without considering corresponding loading patterns. The optimization of the batch-wise power sharing was carried out for the conventional single cycle, the equilibrium cycle and the two successive (tandem) cycles. The analysis indicated that the tandem cycle optimization well reproduce that of the equilibrium cycle optimization, which is considered as a typical case of the true multicycle optimization. Next, simultaneous optimization of loading patterns for tandem cycles is carried out using the simulated annealing method. Since the design space of the tandem cycles optimization is much larger than that of the conventional single cycle optimization, the optimization condition (i.e., number of calculated patterns) are established through sensitivity study. The optimization results are compared with those obtained by the successive single cycle optimizations and it is clarified that the successive single cycle optimization well reproduces the optimization results obtained by the simultaneous optimization if objective functions are appropriately chosen. The above result will be encouraging for the current in-core optimization method since single cycle optimization is utilized due to limitation of computation time. (author)

  14. Optimization of core reload design for low leakage fuel management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1986-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize pressurized water reactor core reload design for low leakage fuel management, a strategy recently adopted by most utilities to extend cycle length and mitigate pressurized thermal shock concerns. The method consists of a two-stage optimization process which provides the maximum cycle length for a given fresh fuel loading subject to power peaking constraints. In the first stage, a best fuel arrangement is determined at the end of cycle in the absence of burnable poisons. A direct search method is employed in conjunction with a constant power, Haling depletion. In the second stage, the core control poison requirements are determined using a linear programming technique. The solution provides the fresh fuel burnable poison loading required to meet core power peaking constraints. An accurate method of explicitly modeling burnable absorbers was developed for this purpose. The design method developed here was implemented in a currently recognized fuel licensing code, SIMULATE, that was adapted to the CYBER-205 computer. This methodology was applied to core reload design of cycles 9 and 10 for the Commonwealth Edison Zion, Unit-1 Reactor. The results showed that the optimum loading pattern for cycle 9 yielded almost a 9% increase in the cycle length while reducing core vessel fluence by 30% compared with the reference design used by Commonwealth Edison

  15. AUTOLOAD, an automatic optimal pressurized water reactor reload design system with an expert module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Levine, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    An automatic optimal pressurized water reactor (PWR) reload design expert system AUTOLOAD has been developed. It employs two important new techniques. The first is a new loading priority scheme that defines the optimal placement of the fuel in the core that has the maximum end-of-cycle state k eff . The second is a new power-shape-driven progressive iteration method for automatically determining the burnable poison (BP) loading in the fresh fuel assemblies. The Haling power distribution is used in converting the theoretically optimal solution into the practical design, which meets the design constraints for the given fuel assemblies. AUTOLOAD is a combination of C and FORTRAN languages. It requires only the required cycle length, the maximum peak normalized power, the BP type, the number of fresh fuel assemblies, the assembly burnup, and BP histories of the available fuel assemblies as its input. Knowledge-based modules have been built into the expert system computer code to perform all of the tasks involved in reloading a PWR. AUTOLOAD takes only ∼ 30 CPU min on an IBM 3090 600s mainframe to accomplish a practical reload design. A maximum of 12.5% fresh fuel enrichment saving is observed compared with the core used by the utility

  16. Development of Abnormal Operating Strategies for Station Blackout in Shutdown Operating Mode in Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Lee, Seung-Chan; Sung, Je-Joong; Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Su-Hyun [FNC Tech. Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Loss of all AC power is classified as one of multiple failure accident by regulatory guide of Korean accident management program. Therefore we need develop strategies for the abnormal operating procedure both of power operating and shutdown mode. This paper developed abnormal operating guideline for loss of all AC power by analysis of accident scenario in pressurized water reactor. This paper analyzed the loss of ultimate heat sink (LOUHS) in shutdown operating mode and developed the operating strategy of the abnormal procedure. Also we performed the analysis of limiting scenarios that operator actions are not taken in shutdown LOUHS. Therefore, we verified the plant behavior and decided operator action to taken in time in order to protect the fuel of core with safety. From the analysis results of LOUHS, the fuel of core maintained without core uncovery for 73 minutes respectively for opened RCS states after the SBO occurred. Therefore, operator action for the emergency are required to take in 73 minutes for opened RCS state. Strategy is to cooldown by using spent fuel pool cooling system. This method required to change the plant design in some plant. In RCS boundary closed state, first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is to remove the residual heat of core by steam dump flow and auxiliary feedwater of SG.

  17. Modeling of a Flooding Induced Station Blackout for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis L; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J; Kinoshita, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    In the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach we want to understand not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or are not) to key safety-related events and how might we increase our safety margins. The RISMC Pathway uses the probabilistic margin approach to quantify impacts to reliability and safety by coupling both probabilistic (via stochastic simulation) and mechanistic (via physics models) approaches. This coupling takes place through the interchange of physical parameters and operational or accident scenarios. In this paper we apply the RISMC approach to evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., system activation) and to perform statistical analyses (e.g., run multiple RELAP-7 simulations where sequencing/timing of events have been changed according to a set of stochastic distributions). By using the RISMC toolkit, we can evaluate how power uprate affects the system recovery measures needed to avoid core damage after the PWR lost all available AC power by a tsunami induced flooding. The simulation of the actual flooding is performed by using a smooth particle hydrodynamics code: NEUTRINO.

  18. Nuclear safety review for qualification of class 1E motor inside containment for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shixin; Wu Qi; Zhang Yunbo; Wu Caixia

    2013-01-01

    In nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, the review for class 1E motor inside containment qualification process and documents is an important aspect of nuclear safety equipment review, and the reviewers should make evaluations for the qualification test results in terms of the compliance with standard and regulation, and the consistency with inside containment environment. Firstly, this paper introduces the qualification test of class 1E motor inside containment for nuclear power generating stations, such as aging test and design-basis-event test. Second, there is a discussion about typical problems of review. At last, comparison of IEEE334 with RCC-E is conducted and explored. (authors)

  19. Specific safety aspects of the water-steam cycle important to nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    The water-steam cycle in a nuclear power plant is similar to that used in conventional power plants. Some systems and components are required for the safe nuclear power plant operation and therefore are designed according to the safety criteria, rules and regulations applied in nuclear installations. The aim of this report is to present the safety characteristics of the water-steam cycle of a nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor, as applied for the design of the nuclear power plants Angra 2 and Angra 3. (Author) [pt

  20. Taipower's transient analysis methodology for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Pinghue

    1998-01-01

    The methodology presented in this paper is a part of the 'Taipower's Reload Design and Transient Analysis Methodologies for Light Water Reactors' developed by the Taiwan Power Company (TPC) and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. This methodology utilizes four computer codes developed or sponsored by Electric Power Research institute: system transient analysis code RETRAN-02, core thermal-hydraulic analysis code COBRAIIIC, three-dimensional spatial kinetics code ARROTTA, and fuel rod evaluation code FREY. Each of the computer codes was extensively validated. Analysis methods and modeling techniques were conservatively established for each application using a systematic evaluation with the assistance of sensitivity studies. The qualification results and analysis methods were documented in detail in TPC topical reports. The topical reports for COBRAIIIC, ARROTTA. and FREY have been reviewed and approved by the Atomic Energy Council (ABC). TPC 's in-house transient methodology have been successfully applied to provide valuable support for many operational issues and plant improvements for TPC's Maanshan Units I and 2. Major applications include the removal of the resistance temperature detector bypass system, the relaxation of the hot-full-power moderator temperature coefficient design criteria imposed by the ROCAEC due to a concern on Anticipated Transient Without Scram, the reduction of boron injection tank concentration and the elimination of the heat tracing, and the reduction of' reactor coolant system flow. (author)

  1. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  2. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-01-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better

  3. Nuclear power: the future reassessed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, L [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (UK). Environmental Risk Assessment Unit (ERAU)

    1991-02-01

    In recommending that consent be given for the construction of a further Pressurized Water Reactor at Hinkley Point in Somerset, UK, the Inspector at the Public Inquiry underlined two major benefits: (i) the contribution an additional large nuclear plant would make to the strategic objective of diversity of supply, and (ii) the environmental benefits of nuclear power compared to many alternative forms of electricity generation. The major environmental advantages of nuclear power over fossil fuel combustion arise both because of the small amounts of fuel required - 1/18,000 compared to coal - thus minimizing transport needs and land use, and because of the virtual absence of atmospheric emissions from nuclear stations. Nuclear reactors emit no acid gases and the nuclear fuel cycle gives rise to only small amounts of carbon dioxide. An expansion of the nuclear option is often opposed on three grounds; the need to dispose of radioactive waste; the danger of the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the risk of a large scale accident. However all these doubts can be answered and the arguments supporting nuclear safety are summarized. It is argued that the contribution to primary energy demand in Europe could be doubled or trebled by 2020 with considerable benefits in overall safety environmental impacts at no extra cost. (author).

  4. Nuclear power: the future reassessed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    In recommending that consent be given for the construction of a further Pressurized Water Reactor at Hinkley Point in Somerset, UK, the Inspector at the Public Inquiry underlined two major benefits: (i) the contribution an additional large nuclear plant would make to the strategic objective of diversity of supply, and (ii) the environmental benefits of nuclear power compared to many alternative forms of electricity generation. The major environmental advantages of nuclear power over fossil fuel combustion arise both because of the small amounts of fuel required - 1/18,000 compared to coal - thus minimizing transport needs and land use, and because of the virtual absence of atmospheric emissions from nuclear stations. Nuclear reactors emit no acid gases and the nuclear fuel cycle gives rise to only small amounts of carbon dioxide. An expansion of the nuclear option is often opposed on three grounds; the need to dispose of radioactive waste; the danger of the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the risk of a large scale accident. However all these doubts can be answered and the arguments supporting nuclear safety are summarized. It is argued that the contribution to primary energy demand in Europe could be doubled or trebled by 2020 with considerable benefits in overall safety environmental impacts at no extra cost. (author)

  5. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wati, Nurokhim

    2008-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  6. Improving operator quality at Genkai Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Takeshi.

    1989-01-01

    Improvement in operator quality, or improvement in an operator's skill and professional knowledge, is of prime importance because of its great influence on safe and steady plant operation. This paper describes the education and training of reactor operators at the Genkai pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant with respect to the following topics: organization of Genkai power plant; education and training program management; training at the Nuclear Training Center; training and education on-site including emergency procedures training, normal operating procedures training, informational study of emergency conditions in existing plants, and all-around training of operators; qualifying tests for supervisors; and operator motivation

  7. Analysis of fire risk in French pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savornin; Brauns; Deletre; Laborde; Malet; Haller; Vachon; Rebuffat

    1988-10-01

    In a nuclear power station, as in other industrial Installations, fire can be the cause of considerable damage involving loss of capital for the operator along with loss of availability for electrical energy production which must be made up for at a later date. But to make matters worse, fire could also compromise safety of the installation, in order words it could be the cause of an accident involving discharge of radioactivity into the environment, if special precautions were not taken. Clearly then, in view of installation availability and of the very high level of safety which must be guaranteed, fire protection becomes an issue of the utmost importance. Although, practically speaking, fire protection is a composite issue affecting availability as much as installation safety, it is the latter subject which we intend to discuss in our paper

  8. Liquid metal reactor/Pressurized water reactor plant comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    The selection between alternative electric power generating technologies is mainly based on their overall economics. Capital costs account for over 60% of the total busbar cost of nuclear plants. Estimates reported in the literature have shown capital cost ratios of LMRs to PWRs ranging from less than 1 to as high as 1.8. To reduce this range of uncertainty, the study selected a method for cataloging plant hardware and then performed comparisons using engineering judgment as to the anticipated and reasonable cost differences. The paper summarizes the resulting one-on-one comparisons of components, systems, and buildings and identifies the LMR-PWR similarities and differences which influence costs. The study leads to the conclusion that the capital cost of the most up-to-date large LMR design would be very close to that of the latest PWRs

  9. PWR [pressurized water reactor] optimal reload configuration with an intelligent workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greek, K.J.; Robinson, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    In a previous paper, the implementation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) refueling expert system that combined object-oriented programming in Smalltalk and a FORTRAN power calculation to evaluate loading patterns was discussed. The expert system applies heuristics and constraints that lead the search toward an optimal configuration. Its rate of improvement depends on the expertise coded for a search and the loading pattern from where the search begins. Due to its complexity, however, the solution normally cannot be served by a rule-based expert system alone. A knowledge base may take years of development before final acceptance. Also, the human pattern-matching capability to view a two-dimensional power profile, recognize an imbalance, and select an appropriate response has not yet been surpassed by a rule-based system. The user should be given the ability to take control of the search if he believes the solution needs a new direction and should be able to configure a loading pattern and resume the search. This paper introduces the workstation features of Shuffle important to aid the user to manipulate the configuration and retain a record of the solution

  10. A reverse depletion method for pressurized water reactor core reload design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.; Kin, Y.J.

    1986-01-01

    Low-leakage fuel management is currently practiced in over half of all pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores. The large numbers of burnable poison pins used to control the power peaking at the in-board fresh fuel positions have introduced an additional complexity to the core reload design problem. In addition to determining the best location of each assembly in the core, the designer must concurrently determine the distribution of burnable poison pins in the fresh fuel. A new method for performing core design more suitable for low-leakage fuel management is reported. A procedure was developed that uses the wellknown ''Haling depletion'' to achieve an end-of-cycle (EOC) core state where the assembly pattern is configured in the absence of all control poison. This effectively separates the assembly assignment and burnable poison distribution problems. Once an acceptable pattern at EOC is configured, the burnable and soluble poison required to control the power and core excess reactivity are solved for as unknown variables while depleting the cycle in reverse from the EOC exposure distribution to the beginning of cycle. The methods developed were implemented in an approved light water reactor licensing code to ensure the validity of the results obtained and provided for the maximum utility to PWR core reload design

  11. Iterative solution to the optimal control of depletion problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for determining the optimal time and spatial dependence of control absorbers in the core of a pressurized water reactor over a single refueling cycle. The reactor is modeled in two dimensions with many regions using two-group diffusion theory. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem with the cycle length fixed and the initial reactor state known. Constraints are placed on the regionwise normalized powers, control absorber concentrations, and the critical soluble boron concentration of the core. The cost functional contains two terms which may be used individually or together. One term maximizes the end-of-cycle (EOC) critical soluble boron concentration, and the other minimizes the norm of the distance between the actual and a target EOC burnup distribution. Results are given for several test problems which are based on a three-region model of the Three Mile Island Unit 1 reactor. The resulting optimal control strategies are bang-bang and lead to EOC states with the power peaking at its maximum and no control absorbers remaining in the core. Throughout the cycle the core soluble boron concentration is zero

  12. Aging mechanisms in the Westinghouse PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Control Rod Drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aging assessment of the Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Control Rod System (CRD) has been completed as part of the US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research, (NPAR) Program. This study examined the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the system to determine its potential for degradation as the plant ages. Selected results from this study are presented in this paper. The operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. From our evaluation of the data, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and the operating environment, we conclude that the Westinghouse CRD system is subject to degradation which, if unchecked, could affect its safety function as a plant ages. Ways to detect and mitigate the effects of aging are included in this paper. The current maintenance for the control rod drive system at fifteen Westinghouse PWRs was obtained through a survey conducted in cooperation with EPRI and NUMARC. The results of the survey indicate that some plants have modified the system, replaced components, or expanded preventive maintenance. Several of these activities have effectively addressed the aging issue. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. On the sensitivity of HCPWR [high conversion pressurized water reactors] microcell calculations to geometrical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Maria; Abbate, Maximo; Patino, Nestor

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactor microcell calculations are, normally, carried out using simplified geometrical models which do not include the total number of homogeneous zones actually present. Regarding the particular case of High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors (HCPWR), the revision of this approximation has been done to determine the sensitivity of its neutronic parameters to the use of these models. The study was performed comparing multiplication factors, reaction rates and neutron spectra, obtained using different geometrical treatments for a HCPWR typical microcell. From the results, it can be asserted that, if only two zones should be used in the calculation, the model which dilutes the clad into the moderator gives best results for the neutron fluxes, but the model that mix it with the fuel is better for k-infinite and reaction rate values. Considering the significance of these parameters on the physical behaviour of the reactor, the last one is recommended for cell calculations. Even if there is a slight difference between the cells considered, some results of this work were also compared with those of the NEACRP HCLWR benchmark with good agreement, so it can be concluded that the methodology here used for data processing and calculations is applicable to HCR's cell studies. (Author)

  14. A Mixed-Oxide Assembly Design for Rapid Disposition of Weapons Plutonium in Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Gustavo; Adams, Marvin L.

    2002-01-01

    We have created a new mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assembly design for standard pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Design goals were to maximize the plutonium throughput while introducing the lowest perturbation possible to the control and safety systems of the reactor. Our assembly design, which we call MIX-33, offers some advantages for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium; it increases the disposition rate by 8% while increasing the worth of control material, compared to a previous Westinghouse design. The MIX-33 design is based upon two ideas: the use of both uranium and plutonium fuel pins in the same assembly, and the addition of water holes in the assembly. The main result of this paper is that both of these ideas are effective at increasing Pu throughput and increasing the worth of control material. With this new design, according to our analyses, we can transition smoothly from a full low-enriched-uranium (LEU) core to a full MIX-33 core while meeting the operational and safety requirements of a standard PWR. Given an interruption of the MOX supply, we can transition smoothly back to full LEU while meeting safety margins and using standard LEU assemblies with uniform pinwise enrichment distribution. If the MOX supply is interrupted for only one cycle, the transition back to a full MIX-33 core is not as smooth; high peaking could cause power to be derated by a few percent for a few weeks at the beginning of one transition cycle

  15. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic analysis of pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    A computational code, named CANAL2, was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of a Pressurized Water Reactor core. The conservation equations for the control volumes are obtained by area-averaging of the two-fluid model conservation equations and reducing them to the drift-flux model formulation. The resulting equations are aproximated by finite differences and solved by a marching-type numerical scheme. The model takes into account the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between adjacent subchannels of a fuel bundle. Turbulent mixing and diversion crossflow are considered. Correlations are provided for several heat trans and flow regimes and selected according to the local conditons. During transients core power can be evaluated by a point-Kinetics model. Fuel and coolant temperatures are feedback to the neutronics. The heat conduction equation is solved in the fuel using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. Temperature-dependent correlations are provided for the fuel and cladding thermal conductivities. Several runs were made with the code CANAL2 using the available experimental and calculated data in the open literature. Results indicate that CANAL2 is a good calculational tool for the thermal-hydraulics of PWR cores. A few refinements will make the code useful for design. (Author) [pt

  16. Investigation of coolant mixture in pressurized water reactors at the Rossendorf mixing test facility ROCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Richter, K.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    During the so-called boron dilution or cold water transients at pressurized water reactors too weakly borated water or too cold water, respectively, might enter the reactor core. This results in the insertion of positive reactivity and possibly leads to a power excursion. If the source of unborated or subcooled water is not located in all coolant loops but in selected ones only, the amount of reactivity insertion depends on the coolant mixing in the downcomer and lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such asymmetric disturbances of the coolant temperature or boron concentration might e.g. be the result of a failure of the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) or of a main steam line break (MSLB) that does only affect selected steam generators (SG). For the analysis of boron dilution or MSLB accidents coupled neutron kinetics/thermo-hydraulic system codes have been used. To take into account coolant mixing phenomena in these codes in a realistic manner, analytical mixing models might be included. These models must be simple and fast running on the one hand, but must well describe the real mixing conditions on the other hand. (orig.)

  17. Possibility of a pressurized water reactor concept with highly inherent heat removal following capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Fumimasa; Murao, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    If the core power inherently follows change in heat removal rate from the primary coolant system within small thermal expansion of the coolant which can be absorbed in a practical size of pressurizer, reactor systems may have more safety and load following capability. In order to know possibility and necessary conditions of a concept on reactor core and primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with such 'highly inherent heat removal following capability', transient analyses on an ordinary two-loop PWR have been performed for a transient due to 50% change in heat removal with the RETRAN-02 code. The possibility of a PWR concept with the highly inherent heat removal following capability has been demonstrated under the conditions of the absolute value of ratio of the coolant density reactivity coefficient to the Doppler reactivity coefficient more than 10x10 3 kg·cm 3 which is two to three times larger than that at beginning of cycle (BOC) in an ordinary PWR and realized by elimination of the chemical shim, the 12% lower average linear heat generation rate of 17.9 kW/m, and the 1.5 times larger pressurizer volume than those of the ordinary PWR. (author)

  18. An evaluation of the deployment of AIROX-recycled fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; McGeehan, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical evaluation is made of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core performance of recycled light water reactor fuel that has been Atomics International reduction oxidation (AIROX) reprocessed and reenriched with fissile materials. The neutronics performance is shown to lie within the neutronics performance of existing high-performance and high-burnup fuels. Three AIROX-recycled fuels are compared with a high-burnup virgin fuel and an equivalent mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. The AIROX-recycled fuel neutronics performance lies consistently between the virgin and the MOX fuel for both the pin power peaking and the reactivity response characteristics in PWRs. Among the attractive features of AIROX-recycled fuel is that it can optimize fissile and fertile fuel use, minimize final fuel disposal impact on the environment, and provide energy in the process of denaturing weapons-grade fissile materials. The fuel material performance may be anticipated from high-burnup virgin fuel and from MOX fuel performance. Recommendations for lead rod testing and for optimization of the AIROX-processing and resintering techniques are made

  19. Simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under flow rate transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Anwar M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mir, Imran

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor has been done under flow rate transients. Employing time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 99Mo show that the specific activity in primary loop approaches equilibrium value under normal operating conditions fairly rapidly. Predominant corrosion product activity is due to Mn-56. Parametric studies at full power for various ramp decreases in flow rate show initial decline in the activity and then a gradual rise to relatively higher saturation values. The minimum value and the time taken to reach the minima are strong functions of the slope of linear decrease in flow rate. In the second part flow rate coastdown was allowed to occur at different flow half-times. The reactor scram was initiated at 90% of the normal flow rate. The results show that the specific activity decreases and the rate of decrease depends on pump half time and the reactor scram conditions

  20. The UK nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, nuclear power plants are operated by three companies: Nuclear Electric (NE), Scottish Nuclear (SN), and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The state-operated power industry was privatized in 1989 with the exception of nuclear power generation activities, which were made part of the newly founded (state-owned) NE and SN. At the same time, a moratorium on the construction of new nuclear power plants was agreed. Only Sizewell B, the first plant in the UK to be equipped with a pressurized water reactor, was to be completed. That unit was first synchronized with the power grid on February 14, 1995. Another decision in 1989 provided for a review to be conducted in 1994 of the future of the peaceful uses of nuclear power in the country. The results of the review were presented by the government in a white paper on May 9, 1995. Accordingly, NE and SN will be merged and privatized in 1996; the headquarters of the new holding company will be in Scotland. The review does not foresee the construction of more nuclear power plants. However, NE hopes to gain a competitive edge over other sources of primary energy as a result of this privatization, and advocates construction of a dual-unit plant identical with Sizewell B so as to avoid recurrent design and development costs. Outside the UK, the company plans to act jointly with the reactor vendor, Westinghouse, especially in the Pacific region; a bid submitted by the consortium has been shortisted by the future operator of the Lungmen nuclear power plant project in Taiwan. In upgrading the safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe, the new company will be able to work through existing contacts of SN. (orig.) [de

  1. Reflooding phase after loss of coolant of an advanced pressurized water reactor with high conversion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.

    1984-01-01

    The emergency core cooling behaviour of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR) during the reflooding phase of the LOCA with double-ended break is analysed and compared to a common pressurized water reactor (PWR). The code FLUT-BS, its models and correlations are explained in detail and have been verified by numerous PWR-reflood experiments with large parameter range. The influence of core-design on ECC-behaviour as well as the influences of initial and boundary values are examined. The results show the essential differences of ECC-behaviour between PWR and APWR. (orig.) [de

  2. CIRFT Data Update and Data Analyses for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this research is to collect experimental data on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including the H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), Catawba Nuclear Station, North Anna Nuclear Power Station (NA), and the Limerick Nuclear Power Station (LMK) boiling water reactor (BWR).

  3. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The standard applies to primary circuit components including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components; to elevators within the containment, and to electrical installations. Part 3 specifies the behaviour of workers in conformity with safety provisions during operation, inspection, lifetime surveillance, functional testing, and maintenance. Special demands are made on the water regime and on elevators, lifting gear, and load take-ups

  4. Simulation study of a system for diagnosis of nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, J.; Fukumoto, A.

    1981-01-01

    A diagnostic system of the nuclear power plant operation is proposed and the applicability of this system to the actual plant has been verified by computer simulation. A typical pressurized water reactor plant simulator was made by an analog computer and the diagnostic system was made by a digital computer. The observed signals obtained from the actual plant are simulated by superposing the equivalent observation noises generated by the digital computer on the sampled signals obtained from the plant simulator. 8 refs

  5. The safety analysis report for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the standard format for drawing up safety analysis reports for stationary fission reactors - this format was published in 1959 by the competent Federal Ministry for Atomic Energy - a report is made on the format and scope of German safety analysis reports. The reasons for drawing up a standard safety analysis report for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactor or boiling water reactor and a KWU draft are discussed. (orig./RW) [de

  6. Development and Applications of a General Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutronic Model for the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalek, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    Coupled calculations are important for the simulation of nuclear power plants when there is a strong feedback between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics. A general coupled model of the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor has been developed for this purpose. The development is outlined in the thesis with details given in the appended papers. A PARCS model was developed for the core calculations and a RELAP5 model for the thermal-hydraulic calculations. The RELAP5 model has 157 channels for modelling the flow in the fuel assemblies. This means that there is a one-one correspondence radially between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nodalization. This detailed mapping between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics makes it possible to use the model for all kinds of transient. To provide realistic material data to the PARCS model, a cross-section interface was developed. With this interface one can import material data from a binary CASMO-4 library file into PARCS. Due to the one-to-one mapping, any any core loading can easily be considered. The PARCS model was benchmarked against measurements of the steady-state power distribution of Ringhals-3. The power shape was well reproduced by the model. Validational work for steady-state conditions of the thermal-hydraulic was also successfully performed. The most challenging part of the validation of a coupled model is for transients. This is much more difficult since the dynamics of the system becomes very important. Two transients that occurred at Ringhals-3 were chosen for the validational work. The first transient was a Load Rejection Transient. In general the model gave good results but some problems were experienced, e.g. the pressurizer pressure turned out to be more difficult to be correctly simulated. The second transient was a Loss of Feed Water transient. A malfunctioning feed water control valve closed, and therefore shut down the feed water supply to the steam generator in one of the

  7. Development and Applications of a General Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutronic Model for the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staalek, Mathias

    2008-03-15

    Coupled calculations are important for the simulation of nuclear power plants when there is a strong feedback between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics. A general coupled model of the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor has been developed for this purpose. The development is outlined in the thesis with details given in the appended papers. A PARCS model was developed for the core calculations and a RELAP5 model for the thermal-hydraulic calculations. The RELAP5 model has 157 channels for modelling the flow in the fuel assemblies. This means that there is a one-one correspondence radially between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nodalization. This detailed mapping between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics makes it possible to use the model for all kinds of transient. To provide realistic material data to the PARCS model, a cross-section interface was developed. With this interface one can import material data from a binary CASMO-4 library file into PARCS. Due to the one-to-one mapping, any any core loading can easily be considered. The PARCS model was benchmarked against measurements of the steady-state power distribution of Ringhals-3. The power shape was well reproduced by the model. Validational work for steady-state conditions of the thermal-hydraulic was also successfully performed. The most challenging part of the validation of a coupled model is for transients. This is much more difficult since the dynamics of the system becomes very important. Two transients that occurred at Ringhals-3 were chosen for the validational work. The first transient was a Load Rejection Transient. In general the model gave good results but some problems were experienced, e.g. the pressurizer pressure turned out to be more difficult to be correctly simulated. The second transient was a Loss of Feed Water transient. A malfunctioning feed water control valve closed, and therefore shut down the feed water supply to the steam generator in one of the

  8. Nuclear power plant operating experience. Annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, M.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports issued annually that summarizes the operating experience of US nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1978 data from 65 plants - 25 boiling water reactor plants and 40 pressurized water reactor plants. Discussion of radioactive effluents which has been a part of this report in previous years, has not been included in this issue because of late acquisition of data

  9. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Use of intermittent renewable-energy source in power grid is becoming a trend. • Gird load-following can leads to variable power demand from Nuclear power plant. • Reactor components can be stressed differently under gird load-following mode. • Estimation of stress–strain state under grid load-following condition is essential. - Abstract: In this paper, we present thermal–mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal–mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress–strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. The stress–strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress–strain state estimated assuming simplified transients.

  10. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of intermittent renewable-energy source in power grid is becoming a trend. • Gird load-following can leads to variable power demand from Nuclear power plant. • Reactor components can be stressed differently under gird load-following mode. • Estimation of stress–strain state under grid load-following condition is essential. - Abstract: In this paper, we present thermal–mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal–mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress–strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. The stress–strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress–strain state estimated assuming simplified transients.

  11. An evaluation of light water breeder reactor system (LWBR) as an alternative for nuclear power generation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, I.L.

    1981-01-01

    The LWBR system as an alternative for nuclear power generation in Brazil, was technically and economically evaluated. The LWBR system has been characterized comparatively with the Pressurized Water Reactors through technological and investment cost analysis and through the analysis of the processes and unit costs of the fuel cycle stages. The characteristics of the LWBR system in comparison to the PWR system, with respect to utilization and cumulative consumption of uranium and thorium resources, fuel cycle processes and associated costs have been determined for possible alternatives of nuclear power participation in the Brazilian hidro-thermal electricity generating system. The analysis concluded that the LWBR system does not represent an attractive alternative for nuclear power generation in Brazil and even has no potential to compete with conventional Pressurized Water Reactors. (Author) [pt

  12. Evaluation of denatured thorium fuel cycles in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Rec, J.R.; Terney, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A developing national energy policy that is based in part on a substantial expansion of the LWR-based electrical generating capacity with deferment of the LMFBR has prompted a re-evaluation of our nuclear fuel resources and their utilization. The ancillary policy of minimizing nuclear weapons proliferation through diversion of bred fissile material has left in doubt the viability of fuel recycling as a means of extending these fuel resources. A substantial, government-sponsored effort is in progress to examine alternate fuel cycles and advanced reactor concepts which can lead to improved resource utilization while minimizing proliferation potential. This paper evaluates several improved fuel cycles for use in current design PWRs and develops selected scenarios for their use within the framework of the safeguarded Nuclear Energy Center (NEC) concept

  13. Economic analysis of grid and wire wrap supported hydride and oxide fueled pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuffler, C.; Diller, P.; Malen, J.; Todreas, N.; Greenspan, E.; Petrovic, B.

    2009-01-01

    An economic analysis is performed to calculate the levelized unit cost of electricity (COE) for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) retrofitted with a range of potential U (45 wt.%)-ZrH 1.6 hydride and UO 2 oxide fueled geometries (i.e., combinations of rod diameter and pitch) supported by traditional grid spacers (square array) and wire wrap spacers (hexagonal array). The time frame considered in computing the COE is the remaining plant life, beginning at the time of retrofit. The goals of the analysis are twofold: (1) comparing the economic performance of UO 2 and U-ZrH 1.6 fuels for a range of retrofitted geometries supported by grid and wire wrap spacers; and (2) investigating the potential economic benefits for nuclear utilities considering retrofitting new fuels and/or geometries into existing PWR pressure vessels. Fuel cycle, operations and maintenance (O and M), and capital costs are considered. The economic performance of U-ZrH 1.6 and UO 2 fuels is found to be similar, with UO 2 fueled designs providing a slight advantage when supported by grid spacers, and U-ZrH 1.6 providing a slight advantage when supported by wire wrap spacers. These small differences in cost, however, are within the bounds of uncertainty of this study and are not believed to provide a strong economic argument for the use of one fuel type over the other. To demonstrate the potential economic benefits of retrofitted designs to nuclear utilities, two different comparisons are made. The first compares the COE for retrofitted designs with the COE for a reference PWR, assumed to have operated long enough to recuperate its initial capital investment. The costs for this reference PWR reflect the 'do-nothing' case for current plant owners whose primary expenditures are fuel cycle and O and M costs. The second comparison introduces a different reference PWR that includes the costs to operate an existing unit and the cost to purchase power from a newly constructed PWR, for comparison with

  14. Analysis of strategies for improving uranium utilization in pressurized water reactors. Annual technical progress report for FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefcik, J.A.; Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic procedures have been devised and applied to evaluate core design and fuel management strategies for improving uranium utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors operated on a once-through fuel cycle. A principal objective has been the evaluation of suggested improvements on a self-consistent basis, allowing for concurrent changes in dependent variables such as core leakage and batch power histories, which might otherwise obscure the sometimes subtle effects of interest. Two levels of evaluation have been devised: a simple but accurate analytic model based on the observed linear variations in assembly reactivity as a function of burnup; and a numerical approach, embodied in a computer program, which relaxes this assumption and combines it with empirical prescriptions for assembly (or batch) power as a function of reactivity, and core leakage as a function of peripheral assembly power. State-of-the-art physics methods, such as PDQ-7, were used to verify and supplement these techniques

  15. The art and trend of nuclear power plants aging management and licenses renewal activity In USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhimin; Li Jinsong; Zhang Mengyi

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly introduced the history and the art of nuclear power plants licenses renewal in United State. The aims, working scope, methodology, the art and trend of aging management and its role in license renewal process in United State nuclear power plants license renewal process were discussed in details. Furthermore, the aging management current research focus in United State was described. Then, take into account the AP serials Pressurized Water Reactor and nuclear safety requirements in the regulatory and safety guide in China, some suggestions and recommendation on nuclear power plants aging management were introduced, which will be helpful when we developed related aging management works in China. (authors)

  16. Method of core thermodynamic reliability determination in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, G.; Horche, W. (Ingenieurhochschule Zittau (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Kraftwerksanlagenbau und Energieumwandlung)

    1983-01-01

    A statistical model appropriate to determine the thermodynamic reliability and the power-limiting parameter of PWR cores is described for cases of accidental transients. The model is compared with the hot channel model hitherto applied.

  17. Method of core thermodynamic reliability determination in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Horche, W.

    1983-01-01

    A statistical model appropriate to determine the thermodynamic reliability and the power-limiting parameter of PWR cores is described for cases of accidental transients. The model is compared with the hot channel model hitherto applied. (author)

  18. Calculation and analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmir, Hessam; Vosoughi, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations are originally derived in the frequency domain. • The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters are calculated, without any simplifying assumptions. • The radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. • The closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise theory. • Both the space- and frequency-dependence of the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations are analyzed. - Abstract: Analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors (e.g., local and global temperature or density fluctuations, as well as primary and charging pumps fluctuations) has various applications in calculation or measurement of the core dynamical parameters (temperature or density reactivity coefficients) in addition to thermal–hydraulics surveillance and diagnostics. In this paper, the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in PWRs are investigated. At first, the single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations (in the frequency domain) are originally derived, without any simplifying assumptions. The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters, as well as the radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. Then, the derived governing equations are discretized using the finite volume method (FVM). Based on the discretized equations and the proposed algorithm of solving, a single heated channel noise calculation code (SHC-Noise) is developed, by which the steady-state and fluctuating parameters of PWR fuel assemblies can be calculated. The noise sources include the inlet coolant temperature and velocity fluctuations, in addition to the power density noises. The developed SHC-Noise code is benchmarked in different cases and scenarios. Furthermore, to show the effects of the power feedbacks, the closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise

  19. Position-dependency of Fuel Pin Homogenization in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Woong; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technolgy, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    By considering the multi-physics effects more comprehensively, it is possible to acquire precise local parameters which can result in a more accurate core design and safety assessment. A conventional approach of the multi-physics neutronics calculation for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is to apply nodal methods. Since the nodal methods are basically based on the use of assembly-wise homogenized parameters, additional pin power reconstruction processes are necessary to obtain local power information. In the past, pin-by-pin core calculation was impractical due to the limited computational hardware capability. With the rapid advancement of computer technology, it is now perhaps quite practical to perform the direct pin-by-pin core calculation. As such, fully heterogeneous transport solvers based on both stochastic and deterministic methods have been developed for the acquisition of exact local parameters. However, the 3-D transport reactor analysis is still challenging because of the very high computational requirement. Position-dependency of the fuel pin homogenized cross sections in a small PWR core has been quantified via comparison of infinite FA and 2-D whole core calculations with the use of high-fidelity MC simulations. It is found that the pin environmental affect is especially obvious in FAs bordering the baffle reflector regions. It is also noted that the downscattering cross section is rather sensitive to the spectrum changes of the pins. It is expected that the pinwise homogenized cross sections need to be corrected somehow for accurate pin-by-pin core calculations in the peripheral region of the reactor core.

  20. Applications of a surveillance and diagnostics methodology using neutron noise from a pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Miller, L.F.; Perez, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Two applications of a noise diagnostic methodology were performed with ex-core neutron detector data from a pressurized-water reactor (PWR). A feedback dynamics model of the neutron power spectral denisty was derived from a low-order whole-plant physical model made stochastic with the Langevin technique. From a functional fit to plant data, the response of the dynamic system to changes in important physical parameters was evaluated by a direct sensitivity analysis. In addition, changes in monitored spectra were related to changes in physical parameters, and detection thresholds using common surveillance discriminants were determined. A resonance model was developed from perturbation theory to give the ex-core neutron detector response for small in-core mechanical motions in terms of a pole-strength factor, a resonance asymmetry (or skewness) factor, a vibration damping factor, and a frequency of vibration. The mechanical motion paramters for several resonances were determined by a functional fit of the model to plant data taken at various times during a fuel cycle and were tracked to determined trends that indicated vibrational changes of reactor internals. In addition, the resonance model gave the ability to separate the resonant components of the power spectral density after the parameters had been identified. As a result, the behavior of several vibration peaks was monitored over a fuel cycle. The noise diagnostic methodology illustrated by these applications can be used in monitoring the condition of the reactor system. Early detection of degraded mechanical components or undesirable operating conditions by using such surveillance and diagnostic techniques would enhance plant safety. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Contribution to the study on the contamination of the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors by fission products. Application for evaluation of failed fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, Pierre.

    1979-01-01

    After describing the radioactive substances present in the primary system, the consequences of this contamination are studied. The many publications relating to the emergence of fission products from the fuel pins are then analyzed. This study reaches the conclusion that none of the proposed methods makes it possible to interpret the activity determinations made in power reactors. This is why the opposite approach is adopted consisting in suggesting a model as from in-reactor measurements. This model will apply in the conditions for which it has been adjusted, i.e. at a steady nominal power in a 900 MWe pressurized water reactor. The originality of this model lies in the determination of a probable emergence of the can-fuel set which reflects the state of the can and the demonstration of a trapping of the iodine in the set, the consequence of which is a lower release than that of the rare gases in the primary system. After comparing the experimental results available in the literature with the results of the model, it is shown how to proceed in order to evaluate the number of failed fuel elements. Finally, on the basis of the experiments performed at the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre, the mean and maximal predictable activites are calculated for load following working. The study of the transients is completed by a more accurate calculation of the iodine releases when the reactor is shut down which confirms the main hypotheses of the steady state model [fr

  2. Neutron evaluation of burnable poison insertion in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Rochkhudson Batista de

    2013-01-01

    The development of this work was to match the 'Burn-up Credit Criticality Benchmark - Phase II-D - PWR-UO 2 Assembly Study of Control Rod Effects on Spent Fuel Composition' (case 15), which was modeled using the code MCNP5 and SCALE 6.0. The results of the infinite multiplication factor (k inf ) were compared with those obtained by international institutions. Later we performed in this same benchmark, a sensitivity analysis using SCALE 6.0. Thus, we tested several changes in case 15 of Benchmark, such as insertion of different percentages of burnable poison, changing the number and positions of the rods. In all cases were analyzed, comparisons and discussions about the results. The same methodology was applied to the reactor core of the Nuclear Plant in Brazil, Angra II, initially to evaluate its behavior when subjected to a variation in the percentage of burnable poison and then, introduce changes also in the enrichment of nuclear fuel, doing the appropriate comparisons of results. Considering results and experience gained, the Department of Nuclear Engineering, is prepared to control analysis of reactivity with the use of different types of burnable poisons under the code SCALE 6.0 through its various modules. (author)

  3. Development and qualification of reference calculation schemes for absorbers in pressured water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc-Tranchant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code APOLLO2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B4C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI4. They were then checked against experimental data measured during French experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  4. Analysis of pressurized water reactor accidents in reactivity disturbances. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinka, I.

    1978-01-01

    The logic structure of program FATRAP is described. The time course of reactivity temporal and spatial distributions of neutron flux density and power, characteristic temperatures of the individual reactor zones and the heat flux density from cladding to the coolant can be obtained as the main results. The basic program funcitons were tested for a point and a one-dimensional model. In the basic test the absorption rod was removed uncontrollably at a preset speed for 0.5 s with the reactivity feedback operative. A second test simulated the action of the accident protection system with a delay of 0.1 s started when the 7500 MW power had been obtained. The last test consisted in simulating a start-up accident with an initial power of 2.25 MW. For the said chosen accident models reactivity feedback is responsible for the formation of the appropriate power peak while the accident protection attendance alone can considerably reduce temperatures during the process. (J.F.)

  5. Impact of load follow operation on the chemistry of the primary and secondary circuit of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, F.; Riehm, S.; Bolz, M.; Speck, A.

    2012-09-01

    Germany decided to abandon nuclear energy and to switch to renewable energy forms. According the renewable energy act renewable energy forms have priority to be fed to the grid. The support of wind and solar energy demands more and more load follow operation of the remaining nuclear power plants to stabilize the grid. This report summarizes first experience with load follow operation in two pressurized water reactors (Philippsburg KKP2 and Neckarwestheim GKNI) with regard to chemistry and radiology. The most important mechanisms of dose rate built up on the primary side are described with Co-60 and Co-58 being the main contributors to dose rate. Goal of the primary side chemistry is to avoid or at least to delay the dose rate built-up as far as achievable. Both reactors are operated according to the modified coordinated B-Li-Chemistry with a pH300 of 7.4 as target value for optimised dose build up delay. By using B-10-enriched boric acid with a boron-10 abundance of 30 at-% (compared to ca. 19.9 at-% in natural boron) the pH 300 target value can be reached earlier in the cycle due to the lower concentration of boric acid required for neutron balancing. In GKNI Zn-injection was started 2005 as a mean of dose reduction. Since 2007 GKNI was operated with load follow operation. In KKP2 load reductions due to wind energy excess are more and more common since 2008. The results of dose rate measurements on the primary side are correlated to primary coolant chemistry and load follow operation. The use of enriched boric acid had a positive (i.e. reducing dose rate) impact on the activity build-up of Co-60 on the loop lines, thus proving the effectiveness of the VGB specifications. After 5 years (one half life time of Co-60) of Zn-injection a positive effect on surface occupancy with nuclides can be determined. The impact of short term deviations from optimal chemical conditions during load follow operation on the activity build up is assessed on the basis of the corrosion

  6. Fibre optic sensors in pressurized water reactor alternators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.M.; Piguet, M.

    1994-01-01

    Measurement in the electrical engine environment (alternator, transformer...) is identified as one of the two main applications of fibre optic sensors within EDF; the other application niche is the monitoring of civil works (dams, containment building of nuclear reactors...). At the EDF Research and Development Division, temperature and vibration fibre optic sensors were evaluated by the Metrology Service, since their use is under consideration for alternator monitoring. For alternator stator thermal monitoring, the BERTIN company developed a fibre optic sensor network. The optic coding technique is based on broadband source spectral modulation; the sensors are interrogated sequentially by electronic commutation. For alternator stator vibration monitoring, a fibre optic accelerometer was developed in the frame of a manufacturers and universities consortium supported by the French Research and Technology Ministry. The accelerometer is of cantilever beam type and its networking is possible by chromatic multiplexing. The Metrology Service evaluated these temperature and vibration sensors in order to verify their metrological characteristics (bias error, hysteresis, repeatability, resolution, noise, amplitude linearity, response time, frequency response, etc.) and to test their behaviour in harsh alternator environmental conditions (pressure, vibrations and temperature). Ageing and accidental condition resistance tests were also carried out. Temperature sensor test results were very satisfactory. An eight-sensor BERTIN prototype was installed on the Tricastin 1 alternator during the september 1993 nuclear station periodic stop. On the contrary, the accelerometers presented deficient metrological characteristics (shorter span than foreseen, low repeatability...). They need some improvements and could not be installed on alternators. (authors). 5 refs., 8 figs

  7. Complex analysis of hazards to the man and natural environment due to electricity production in nuclear and coal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.

    1990-01-01

    The report presents a complex analysis of hazards connected with electrical energy production in nuclear power plants and coal power plants, starting with fuel mining, through power plant construction, operation, possible accidents and decommissioning to long term global effects. The comparison is based on contemporary, proven technologies of coal fired power plants and nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. The hazards to environment and man due to nuclear power are shown to be much smaller than those due to coal power cycle. The health benefits due to electrical power availability are shown to be much larger than the health losses due to its production. (author). 71 refs, 17 figs, 12 tabs

  8. Performance of Fragema fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, A.; Ravier, G.; Ballot, B.

    1986-06-01

    FRAGEMA fuel operating experience in power reactors is very extensive. Performance over a range of power and burnup levels for various operating conditions is quite satisfactory. However significant development programs are presently in progress to further extend our knowledge under increasingly severe operating conditions. In particular, upcoming data acquisition programs (1985-1988) will cover site and hot cell measurements on Gd poison rods, 4.5 % overenriched fuel rods over four operating cycles, 17 x 17 AFA fuel assemblies. For these products the same surveillance strategy as the one used for the standard assembly has been adopted, in order to continuously provide more data which can be used to upgrade design models and pave the way for the development of future products

  9. Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodak, P. III

    1996-05-01

    This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO 2 assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the 239 Pu and ≥90% total Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products

  10. Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chodak, III, Paul [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO2 assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the 239Pu and ≥90% {sub total}Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products.

  11. Development of design technology for advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hwan; Chang, Moon Hee; Lee, Jong Chul

    1991-08-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of the domestic passive reactor development, the analysis and evaluation on the development status, technical characteristics, and the safety and economy for the overseas passive reactors were carried out based on the vendor's information. Also the domestic nuclear technology basis was surveyed. The analysis and evaluation of the development status and technical characteristics were performed mainly for the AP-600 developed by Westing house and the SIR of UKAEA. The new design concepts and system characteristics have been evaluated by utilizing EPRI Utility Requirement Documents and Lahmeyer evaluation criteria. Based on this evaluation the recommendable design concepts in each major system were selected. The feasibility for the domestic passive reactor development has focused on the safety, technology and economy aspects, and on the applicability of the existing domestic technology to the design of the passive reactor. And the development plan for the domestic passive reactor was recommended in a step by step way. (Author)

  12. Mechanics of structures and maintenance of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutin, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Electricite de France nowadays has in operation 34 units of 900 MW and 17 units of 1300 MW of PWR. Since the first unit was run, this means that more than 350 reactor-years have been performed, to which should be added the experience already gained on fossil fuel or natural uranium plants. This enabled EDF to build its own philosophy and a strategy for maintenance that are best suited for the specific requirements of the hardware with which the actual nuclear boilers are made-up. This philosophy and strategy rest upon an analysis which calls widely for the mechanics of structures, to such an extent that major decisions concerning maintenance depend on the ability that one has for resolving problems within the scope of that discipline

  13. Natural circulation cooling in US pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.; Wilson, G.E.; Boyack, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The research into the modes of, and heat removed by, natural circulation in PWR systems is reviewed for the purpose of determining the status of this method for off-nominal recovery procedures. The referenced information comes from all facets of the nuclear industry, both domestic and international. The information focuses on recent research (1986--1988); however, pre-1986 research is summarized and referenced. Particular attention is paid to the role of scaling in the experimental facilities and analytical tools. Three modes of natural-circulation cooling are covered: condensation. The conclusion of the review is that the new research reconfirms the pre-1986 conclusion that natural circulation is a viable means of decay heat removal. In addition, the new research sufficiently completes the acquisition of an appropriate experimental data base and the development of system codes to permit the design of valid plant recovery procedures incorporating all three modes of natural circulation. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  14. Vibration and noise analysis in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-12-01

    Results of the investigations on noise and vibration analysis are presented as a follow-up study of the work published in ''On-load Surveillance of Nuclear Power Plant Components by Noise and Vibration Analysis'' EUR 5036 e. The state of the art in on-load surveillance techniques of light water reactors is given by extending the preceding studies to investigations of boiling water reactors and by summarizing the latest results of pressurized water reactors, the basis being experimental and theoretical work performed by the different organizations involved in preparing this report. Finally, some developments with respect to measurement and identification methods are discussed

  15. Improved water density feedback model for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    An improved water density feedback model has been developed for neutron diffusion calculations of PWR cores. This work addresses spectral effects on few-group cross sections due to water density changes, and water density predictions considering open channel and subcooled boiling effects. An homogenized spectral model was also derived using the unit assembly diffusion method for employment in a coarse mesh 3D diffusion computer program. The spectral and water density evaluation models described were incorporated in a 3D diffusion code, and neutronic calculations for a typical PWR were completed for both nominal and accident conditions. Comparison of neutronic calculations employing the open versus the closed channel model for accident conditions indicates that significant safety margin increases can be obtained if subcooled boiling and open channel effects are considered in accident calculations. This is attributed to effects on both core reactivity and power distribution, which result in increased margin to fuel degradation limits. For nominal operating conditions, negligible differences in core reactivity and power distribution exist since flow redistribution and subcooled voids are not significant at such conditions. The results serve to confirm the conservatism of currently employed closed channel feedback methods in accident analysis, and indicate that the model developed in this work can contribute to show increased safety margins for certain accidents

  16. Modelling Pressurized Water Reactor cores in terms of porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, G.; Collard, B.; Ricciardi, G.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a tractable model of a nuclear reactor core taking the complexity of the structure (including its nonlinear behaviour) and fluid flow coupling into account. The mechanical behaviour modelling includes the dynamics of both the fuel assemblies and the fluid. Each rod bundle is modelled in the form of a deformable porous medium; then, the velocity field of the fluid and the displacement field of the structure are defined over the whole domain. The fluid and the structure are first modelled separately, before being linked together. The equations of motion for the structure are obtained using a Lagrangian approach and, to be able to link up the fluid and the structure, the equations of motion for the fluid are obtained using an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian approach. The finite element method is applied to spatially discretize the equations. Simulations are performed to analyse the effects of the characteristics of the fluid and of the structure. Finally, the model is validated with a test involving two fuel assemblies, showing good agreement with the experimental data. (authors)

  17. Structural mechanics in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangbi

    1998-01-01

    The main research works in structural mechanics in reactor technology are emphatically introduced. It is completed by structural mechanics engineers at Shanghai Nuclear Research and Design Institute associated with the design and construction problems for Qinshan NPP Unit 1 and Pakistani CHASNUPP. About structural mechanics problem for the containment, the rock and soft soil two different bases are considered. For the later the interaction between soil and structure is carefully studied. About the structural mechanics problem for the equipment and pipings, the three dimensional stress and fracture analyses are studied. For the structural dynamics problem, including flow induced vibration, the response analyses under earthquake and loss coolant accident loadings are studied. For pipings, the leak before break technique has been emphatically introduced. A lot of mathematical models, the used computer codes, analytical calculations and experimental results are also introduced. This is a comprehensive description about structural mechanics problem in pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

  18. LWR nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.H.

    1980-10-01

    An analysis of the most significant light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant component failures, from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank, shows that for both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants the component category most responsible for reactor shutdowns is valves. Next in importance for PWR shutdowns is steam generators followed by seals of all kinds. For BWR plants, seals, and pipes and pipe fittings are the second and third most important component failure categories which lead to reactor shutdown. The data are for records extending from early 1972 through September 1978. A list of the most significant component categories and a breakdown of the number of component citations for both PWR and BWR reactor types are presented

  19. The fourth nuclear power plant in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2017-01-15

    Since 2006 the nuclear sector in Argentina has aimed at recovering and strengthening its capabilities and facilities. Part of the challenge posed by this revival has been to also accompany the development of activities with a higher level of responsibility for safety and the environment. Among the strategic decisions taken in recent years, one main highlight is the construction of the nuclear power plant CAREM25 entirely with Argentine technology and design under the responsibility of the National Atomic Energy Commission. On February 4, 2015, the Ministry of Federal Planning and the National Energy Administration (NEA) signed the agreement for cooperation and construction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) with ACP-1000 technology, developed in the Peoples Republic of China.

  20. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 2. TRAB-3D/SMABRE Calculation of the OECD/ NRC PWR MSLB Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, A.; Haemaelaeinen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.

    2001-01-01

    All three exercises of the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark were calculated at VTT Energy. The SMABRE thermal-hydraulics code was used for the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetics neutronics. The second exercise was calculated with the TRAB-3D three-dimensional reactor dynamics code. The third exercise was calculated with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. Both codes have been developed at VTT Energy. The results of all the exercises agree reasonably well with those of the other participants; thus, instead of reporting the results, this paper concentrates on describing the computational aspects of the calculation with the foregoing codes and on some observations of the sensitivity of the results. In the TRAB-3D neutron kinetics, the two-group diffusion equations are solved in homogenized fuel assembly geometry with an efficient two-level nodal method. The point of the two-level iteration scheme is that only one unknown variable per node, the average neutron flux, is calculated during the inner iteration. The nodal flux shapes and cross sections are recalculated only once in the outer iteration loop. The TRAB-3D core model includes also parallel one-dimensional channel hydraulics with detailed fuel models. Advanced implicit time discretization methods are used in all submodels. SMABRE is a fast-running five-equation model completed by a drift-flux model, with a time discretization based on a non-iterative semi-implicit algorithm. For the third exercise of the benchmark, the TMI-1 models of TRAB-3D and SMABRE were coupled. This was the first time these codes were coupled together. However, similar coupling of the HEXTRAN and SMABRE codes has been shown to be stable and efficient, when used in safety analyses of Finnish and foreign VVER-type reactors. The coupling used between the two codes is called a parallel coupling. SMABRE solves the thermal hydraulics both in the cooling circuit and in the core

  1. Rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Ski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Quinones, D.F.; Server, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    For much of the high-energy piping in light reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but also improves the overall safety and integrity of the plant since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied a Beaver Valley Power Station- Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferrutic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in. (152-mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel line as small as 3-in. (76-mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elemination

  2. Pipe rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Szyslowski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.; Quinones, D.; Server, W.

    1987-01-01

    For much of the high energy piping in light water reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but the overall safety and integrity of the plant are improved since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied at Beaver Valley Power Station - Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferritic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in (152 mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel lines as small as 3-in (76 mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elimination

  3. Theoretical investigation on the steady-state natural circulation characteristics of a new type of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Junli; Qiu Suizheng; Su Guanghui; Jia Dounan

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical investigation on the steady-state natural circulation characteristics of a new type of pressurized water reactor. Through numerically solving the one-dimensional steady-state single-phase conservative equations for the primary circuit and the steady-state two-phase drift-flux conservative equations for the secondary side of the steam generator, the natural circulation characteristics were studied. On the basis of the preliminary calculation analysis, it was found that natural circulation mass flow rate was proportional to the exponential function of the power and that the value of the exponent is related to the operating conditions of the secondary side of the steam generator. The higher the outlet pressure of the secondary side of the steam generator, the higher the primary natural circulation mass flow rate. The larger height difference between the core center and the steam generator center is favorable for the heat removal capacity of the natural circulation. (authors)

  4. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  5. The function of people in a nuclear power plant in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, E.

    1986-01-01

    Based mainly on the operating experience of Obrigheim nuclear power plant - a two-loop pressurized water reactor with about 120,000 operating hours - the function of people in the very complex technical field of operation including supervision, maintenance and repair of a nuclear power plant is presented with special attention to safety related activities. The boundaries are indicated where automatic actions for safety and economic reasons are necessary and where manually operated systems are possible or even desirable. Typical examples and figures will show, how the operating people influenced the operation and availability of Obrigheim nuclear power plant. (orig./GL)

  6. Experience with ALARA and ALARA procedures in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamse, J.C. [N.V. Elektriciteits-Produktiemaatschappij Zuid-Nederland (Netherlands)

    1995-03-01

    The nuclear power plant Borssele is a Siemens two-loop Pressurized Water Reactor having a capacity of 480 MWe and in operation since 1973. The nuclear power plant Borssle is located in the southwest of the Netherlands, near the Westerschelde River. In the first nine years of operation the radiation level in the primary system increased, reaching a maximum in 1983. The most important reason for this high radiation level was the cobalt content of the grid assemblies of the fuel elements. After resolving this problem, the radiation level decreased to a level comparable with that of other nuclear power plants.

  7. Nonlinear Fuzzy Model Predictive Control for a PWR Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjie Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable power and temperature control in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power plant is necessary to guarantee high efficiency and plant safety. Since the nuclear plants are quite nonlinear, the paper presents nonlinear fuzzy model predictive control (MPC, by incorporating the realistic constraints, to realize the plant optimization. T-S fuzzy modeling on nuclear power plant is utilized to approximate the nonlinear plant, based on which the nonlinear MPC controller is devised via parallel distributed compensation (PDC scheme in order to solve the nonlinear constraint optimization problem. Improved performance compared to the traditional PID controller for a TMI-type PWR is obtained in the simulation.

  8. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  9. Superheated steam annealing of pressurized water reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal annealing of an embrittled Reactor Pressure Shell is the only recognized means for recovering material properties lost due to long-term exposure of the reactor walls to radiation. Reduced toughness of the material during operation is a major concern in evaluations of structural integrity of older reactors. Extensive studies performed within programs related to life extension of nuclear plants have confirmed that the thermal treatment of 850 deg. F for 168 hours on irradiated material essentially recovers material properties lost due to neutron exposure. Dry and wet annealing methods have been considered. Wet annealing involves operating the reactor at near design temperatures and pressures. Since the temperature of wet annealing must be limited to vessel design temperature of 650 deg. F, only partial recovery of the lost properties is achieved. Thus dry annealing was selected as an alternative for future development and industrial implementation to extend the safe life of reactors. Dry thermal annealing consists of heating portions of the reactor vessel at a specific temperature for a given period of time using a high temperature heat source. The use of spent fuel assemblies, induction heating and resistance heating elements as well as the circulation of heated fluid were investigated as potential candidate methods. To date the use of resistance heating elements which are lowered into a dry empty reactor was considered to be the preferred method. In-depth research in the United States and practical applications of such a method in Russia have confirmed feasibility of the method. The method of using circulating superheated steam to anneal the vessel at 850 deg. F without complete removal of the reactor internals is described herein. After removing the reactor head and fuel, the core barrel along with the upper and lower core in PWRs is lifted to open an annular space between the reactor shell flange and the core barrel flange. The thermal shield can remain

  10. Aging considerations for PWR [pressurized water reactor] control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes age-related degradation mechanisms affecting life extension of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals. The major sources of age-related degradation for control rod drive mechanisms are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, latchings and unlatchings, long-term aging effects on electrical insulation, and the high temperature corrosive environment. Flow induced loads, the high-temperature corrosive environment, radiation exposure, and high tensile stresses in bolts all contribute to aging related degradation of reactor internals. Another problem has been wear and fretting of instrument guide tubes. The paper also discusses age-related failures that have occurred to date in pressurized water reactors

  11. Corrosion fatigue cracking behavior of Inconel 690 (TT) in secondary water of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jun; Chen Luyao; Qiu Shaoyu; Chen Yong; Lin Zhenxia; Fu Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Inconel 690 (TT) is one of the key materials for tubes of steam generators for pressurized water reactors, where it is susceptible to corrosion fatigue cracking. In this paper, the corrosion fatigue cracking behavior of Inconel 690 (TT) was investigated under small scale yielding conditions, in the simulated secondary water of pressurized water reactor. It was observed that the fatigue crack growth rate was accelerated by a maximum factor up to 3 in the simulated secondary water, comparing to that in room temperature air. In addition, it was found that the accelerating effect was influenced by out-of-plane cracking of corrosion fatigue cracks and also correlated with stress intensity factor range, maximum stress intensity factor and stress ratio. (authors)

  12. The European Pressurized Water Reactor. A safe and competitive solution for future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, R.; Gerhard, L.; Goebel, A.

    2004-01-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor - the EPR - is a PWR in the 1600 MW class. Its design is based on experience feedback from several thousand reactors x years of light water reactor operation worldwide, primarily those incorporating the most recent technologies: the French N4 and the German KONVOI reactors. It is an evolutionary design that ensures continuity in the mastery of PWR technology, minimizing the risk for the customer. (author)

  13. Common safety approach for future pressurized water reactors in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Jahns, A.; Queniart, D.; Gros, G.

    1995-01-01

    In France and Germany all major activities related to future pressurized water reactors are now proceeding in a coordinated way among the two countries. The proposed paper covers this common development of a safety approach and particular technical safety objectives. The main topics of this document are presented in this paper, together with a rationale for the approach and the recommended technical principles. (K.A.). 5 refs., 1 fig

  14. Ion irradiation studies of the origins of pressurized water reactor fuel assembly deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengstler-Eger, Rosmarie Martina

    2012-01-01

    The presented thesis studies ion irradiation damage in Zr-based alloys for pressurized water reactors to explain the origins of unexpectedly high fuel assembly growth in some plants. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the effects of temperature, dose, hydrogen content of the alloy and tensile stress. A clear correlation between the stress orientation towards the crystal lattice and the density of the dislocation loops which are responsible for increased growth was found.

  15. RELAP5 - a new tool for pressurized water reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perneczky, L.

    1988-11-01

    The RELAP type pressurized water reactor safety system codes are used world wide for the loss of coolant accident analyses. In this paper the RELAP5, the advanced generation of the code family is presented. The relationship to RELAP4/mod6 version is discussed. The capability of the RELAP5/mod1-EUR version for small, medium and large break LOCA is investigated based on international user experience. (author) 30 refs

  16. On-off controller for installation to test the pressurized water reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes the design of an ON-OFF controller based on the 6800 microprocessor in its assembly language and its interfacing with its environment (sensors, periphery, etc). The controller is meant to control the temperature and the pressure inside an experimental chamber in which the material under test is placed. The ''Design basis accident'' conditions (e.g., LOCA) for a pressurized water reactor are simulated in the experimental chamber [fr

  17. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  18. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a closure head penetration in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, D.R.; Schwirian, R.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    ALLOY 600 has been used typically for penetrations through the closure head in pressurized water reactors because of its thermal compatibility with carbon steel, superior resistance to chloride attack and higher strength than the austenitic stainless steels. Recent plant operating experience with this alloy has indicated that this material may be susceptible to degradation. One of the major parameters relating to degradation of the head penetrations are the operational temperatures and stress levels in the penetration.

  19. Multi-dimensional fluid-structure interactions in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.; Hirt, C.W.; Stein, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Sudden loss of coolant in a pressurized water reactor due to failure of a coolant pipe would result in flashing of the coolant accompanied by the propagation of a rarefaction wave into the downcomer. A computer program that simultaneously calculates the behavior of the coolant and the accompanying motion of the core support barrel which is considered as a three-dimensional shell with both membrane and bending stresses is discussed

  20. Effect of pressurized water reactor environment on fatigue crack propagation, including hole times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental program being conducted to investigate the effects of pressurized water reactor environment on the fatigue crack growth rate of pressure vessel steels. Tests were conducted on precracked WOL type specimens under load controlled conditions. The effects of R ratio, loading rates, and loading wave form are evaluated, and the results are compared for both forging and plate material, as well as weldments

  1. Cook's Carteaux: Trends in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The following Nuclear News interview, conducted by associate editor Gregg M. Taylor, is with Paul F. Carteaux, training superintendent at Indiana/Michigan Power Company's Cook nuclear power plant. The site has two Westinghouse pressurized water reactors. Cook-1, rated 1020-MWe (net), started commercial operation in August 1975, and the 1060-MWe Cook-2 began operation in July 1978

  2. Evaluation of a Kalman filter based power pressurizer instrument failure detection system implemented on a nuclear power plant training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegmiller, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of a nuclear power plant training simulator for developing and testing modern estimation and control applications for nuclear power plants is demonstrated. A Kalman filter based instrument failure detection technique for a pressurized water reactor pressurizer is implemented on the Department of Energy N Reactor Training Simulator. This real-time failure detection method computes the first two moments (mean and variance) of each element of a normalized filter innovations vector. Failed pressurizer instrumentation can be detected by comparing these moments to the known statistical properties of the steady state, linear Kalman fitler innovations sequence. The capabilities of the detection system are evaluated using simulated plant transients and instrument failures

  3. Effect of special features of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharf, H.

    1986-01-01

    Special features of nuclear power plants are reported with the Muelheim-Kaerlich pressurized water reactor as the reference plant. This nuclear reactor uses 'Once Through Steam Generators (OTSG)' with 'Integrated Economizer' to provide the turbine with superheated steam. The implementation of OTSG allows to operate the plant with constant steam pressure over the entire power range, and with constant main coolant temperature over a power range from 15% power to 100% power. Control of the plant during power operation is provided by the 'Integrated Control System', which simultaneously sends signals to the plant's subsystems reactor, OTSG, and turbine to get optimum response of the plant during power transients. The characteristics of this 'Integrated Control System' and its different modes of operation are presented. (orig./GL)

  4. Double containment shell for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1977-01-01

    A double containment shell is proposed for nuclear power plants, especially those equipped with pressurized water reactors. The shell offers increased environmental protection from primary circuit accidents. The inner shell is built of steel or concrete while the outer shell is always built of concrete. The space between the two shells is filled with water and is provided with several manholes and with stiffeners designed for compensation for load due to the water hydrostatic pressure. Water serves the airtight separation of the containment shell inside from the environment and the absorption of heat released in a primary circuit accident. In case the inner shell is made of concrete, it is provided with heat-removal tubes in-built in its walls ensuring rapid heat transfer from the inside of the containment to the water in the interwall space. (Z.M.)

  5. Hydrogen risk reduction in Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movahed, M.A.; Travis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    In case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant with core melt and hydrogen production, the hydrogen risk is one of the main concerns. It may jeopardize the containment integrity due to violent deflagration that can lead to DDT (Deflagration Detonation Transient) or even detonation of proper hydrogen mitigation means are not available. The design of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) Hydrogen mitigation and control system is based on the lumped parameter code WAVCO and the 3D code GASFLOW. The concept consists of recombiners and igniters to cope with all scenarios including those without steam. The system has been checked to avoid DDT by the 7λ criteria that's implemented in GASFLOW. Future analysis could deal with determining dynamic pressure loads, if appropriate, and some sensitivity studies to check the hydrogen control measures with respect to different source locations and mass flow rates. Also a conditional criterion for determining the likelihood of fast deflagration should be developed. (author)

  6. Applying risk insights in US NRC reviews of integral pressurized water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, M.A.; Hilsmeier, T.; Kevern, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    In its Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) on COMGBJ-10-0004/COMGEA-10-0001, 'Use of Risk Insights to Enhance Safety Focus of Small Modular Reactor Reviews,' dated August 31, 2010 (ML102510405), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) directed the NRC staff to more fully integrate the use of risk insights into pre-application activities and the review of small modular reactor (SMR) applications with near-term focus on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) designs. The Commission's objective is to align the review focus and resources with the risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSCs) and other aspects of the design, that contribute most to safety in order to enhance the efficiency of the review process while still enabling a decision of reasonable assurance of the design's safety. The staff was directed to develop a design-specific, risk-informed review plan for each SMR to address pre-application and application review activities. The NRC staff submitted a response to the Commission which describes its approach for (1) using risk insights, consistent with current regulatory requirements, to assign SSCs to one of a limited set of graded categories, and (2) adjusting the scope and depth of current review plans--where possible--consistent with regulatory requirements and consistent with the applicable graded category. Because the staff's review constitutes an independent audit of the application, the staff may emphasize or de-emphasize particular aspects of its review guidance (i.e., Standard Review Plan), as appropriate and consistent with regulatory requirements, for the application being reviewed. The staff may propose justifications for not performing certain sections of the reviews called for by the applicable review plan. Examples of acceptable variations in the scope of a review can include reduced emphasis on SSC attributes such as reliability, availability, or functional performance when the SSC will be in the scope of a program

  7. Automatic control of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jover, P.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental concepts in automatic control are surveyed, and the purpose of the automatic control of pressurized water reactors is given. The response characteristics for the main components are then studied and block diagrams are given for the main control loops (turbine, steam generator, and nuclear reactors) [fr

  8. Training and qualification of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Based on training experiences of the nuclear power plant operators of pressurized water reactors (PWR) at the Nuclear Power Training Center Ltd. (NTC) in Japan, training programs were reviewed referring to US training programs. A systematic approach is deployed to them, which mainly consist of on-the-job training and the NTC training courses to meet the needs of all operators from beginners to experienced veterans according to their experiences and objectives. The NTC training is conducted using the simulators that simulate the nuclear power plant dynamics through the use of computers. The operators trained at the NTC work in the central control room of every PWR power plant. The NTC also carries out the qualification examinations for the shift managers. (T. Tanaka)

  9. The main features of control and operation of steam turbines at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czinkoczky, B.

    1981-01-01

    The output and speed control of steam turbines at nuclear power plants as well as the combination of both controls are reviewed and evaluated. At the same time the tasks of unit control at nuclear power plants, the control of steady main steam pressure and medium pressure of primary circuit, further the connection of reactor and turbine controls and the self-controlling properties of pressurized water reactor are dealt with. Hydraulic and electro-hydraulic speed control, the connection of cach-up dampers and speed control and the application of electro-hydraulic signal converters are discussed. The accomplishment of protection is also described. (author)

  10. Chemical process measurements in PWR-type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to achieve high levels of availability of nuclear power plants equipped with pressurized water reactors, strict standards have to be applied to the purity of coolant and of other media. Chemical process measurements can meet these requirements only if programmes are established giving maximum information with minimum expenditure and if these programmes are realized with effective analytical methods. Analysis programmes known from literature are proved for their usefulness, and hints are given for establishing rational programmes. Analytical techniques are compared with each other taking into consideration both methods which have already been introduced into nuclear power plant practice and methods not yet generally used in practice, such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, etc. Finally, based on the state of the art of chemical process measurements in nuclear power plants, the trends of future development are pointed out. (author)

  11. Optimal control of load-following operations in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Fuyu; Zhou Dawei

    2000-01-01

    According to the optimal control theory, the problem of load-following operation in a pressurized water reactor is formulated as a nonlinear-quadratic optimal control problem. One-dimensional core model is adopted. A successful optimization algorithm DDPSR is proposed to solving the obtained problem. The research results show that the DDPSR can converge with a long time interval and needs very small iteration number and computing time, and the practical reactor can be fairly operated in an optimal load-following manner and axial offset satisfies the required value from beginning to end. Control characters of boron concentration are discussed specially

  12. Analysis of an ultrasonic level device for in-core Pressurized Water Reactor coolant detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous semi-empirical approach was undertaken to model the response of an ultrasonic level device (ULD) for application to in-core coolant detection in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). An equation is derived for the torsional wave velocity v/sub t phi/ in the ULD. Existing data reduction techniques were analyzed and compared to results from use of the derived equation. Both methods yield liquid level measurements with errors of approx. 5%. A sensitivity study on probe performance at reactor conditions predicts reduced level responsivity from data at lower temperatures

  13. Possibilities of tritium removal from waste waters of pressurized water reactors and fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribnikar, S.V.; Pupezin, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Starting from parameters known for heavy water production processes, a parallel was made with separation of tritium from water. The quantity in common is the total cascade flow. The most efficient processes appear to be hydrogen sulfide, water exchange, hydrogen- and water distillation. Prospects of application of new processes are discussed briefly. Problems concerning detritiation of pressurized water reactors and large fuel reprocessing plants are analyzed. Detritiation of the former should not present problems. With the latter, economical detritiation can be achieved only after some plant flow patterns are changed. (U.S.)

  14. Apparatus for inspecting and repairing a pressurized-water reactor's steam generator heat exchanger tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, O.; Roettger, H.; Kasti, H.; Hagen, H.G.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus provided for use with a pressurized-water reactor' steam generator having a manifold chamber enclosing the bottom side of a horizontal tube sheet having holes therethrough in which are mounted the tubes of a heat exchanger tube bundle. The manifold chamber has a manhole giving access to the tube's bottom side to permit internal inspection or repair of the tubes by registration of an end of a flexible guide conduit with the tube sheet holes and through which a flexible carrier can be guided for insertion via these holes in the tube sheet and through the tubes extending from the tube sheet's other side

  15. Plutonium and minor actinides recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, A.; Sekimoto, H. [Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study on plutonium and minor actinides (MA) recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been performed. The calculation results showed that the enrichment and the required amount of natural uranium decrease significantly with increasing number of confined plutonium and MA when uranium is discharged from the reactor. However, when uranium is totally confined, the enrichment becomes extremely high. The recycle of plutonium and MA together with discharging uranium can reduce the radio-toxicity of discharged heavy metal (HM) waste to become less than that of loaded uranium. (author)

  16. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors. Revision 4. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Babcock and Wilcox Pressurized Water Reactors (BandW-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process. The BandW-STS provide applicants with model specifications to be used in formulation plant-specific technical specifications required by 10 CFR Part 50, Section 50.36, which set forth the specific characteristics of the facility and the conditions for its operation that are required to provide adequate protection to the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  17. Application of a neural network to control a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Ku, C.C.; Lee, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    A neural network has been trained to control a pressurized water reactor. The inputs of the training pattern are the plant signals, and the outputs are the control rod actions. The training patterns are some kind of lookup table of control action. The table is designed by the heuristic method, which is based on the designer's knowledge of the controlled system and the operation experience. This method has two advantages: The controller's performance does not depend on the mathematical model of the plant, and the controller could be a nonlinear one. The advantages of using neural networks to implement the controller are to save computing time and overcome partial hardware failure

  18. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Falahi, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Haennine, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Porkholm, K. [IVO International, Ltd., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  19. Neutron multiplication and shielding problems in pressurized water reactor spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Blum, P.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of accuracy of computational methods used in the shield design of spent fuel shipping casks, comparisons have been made between biological dose-rate calculations and measurements at the surface of a cask carrying three pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Neutron dose-rate measurements made with the fuel-carrying region successively wet and dry are also used to derive an experimental value of the k/sub eff/ of the wet fuel assemblies. Results obtained by this method are shown to be consistent with criticality calculations, taking into account fuel depletion

  20. Investigations on the retention of 131I by an iodine filter of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.; Gerlach, K.

    1983-09-01

    The retention of 131 I by an equipment room exhaust filter of a German pressurized water reactor was determined by various methods to particularly obtain reliable results. Moreover, investigations were performed to clarify the reason for aging of the carbon contained in the iodine filter mentioned. The actual retention of the organic 131 I, corresponding to a value of 99.9%, was limited by 131 I in the form of penetrating iodine compounds. It was lower than the retention of CH 3 131 I under layout conditions by more than one order of magnitude. The aging was essentially caused by the adsorption of low-volatile organic compounds. (orig.) [de

  1. Investigations on the retention of I-131 by an iodine filter of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.; Gerlach, K.

    1984-01-01

    The retention of I-131 by an equipment room exhaust filter of a German pressurized water reactor was determined by various methods to particularly obtain reliable results. Moreover, investigations were performed to clarify the reason for aging of the carbon contained in the iodine filter mentioned. The actual retention of the organic I-131, corresponding to a value of 99.9%, was limited by I-131 in the form of penetrating iodine compounds. It was lower than the retention of CH 3 I-131 under layout conditions by more than one order of magnitude. The aging was essentially caused by the adsorption of low-volatile organic compounds. (orig.) [de

  2. Expandable antivibration bar for heat transfer tubes of a pressurized water reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    An expandable antivibration bar for use in stabilizing the U-bend portion of heat transfer tubes in a pressurized water reactor steam generator comprises two adjustable rods connected together by an arcuate connector. The two adjustable rods preferably comprise two mating rod sections having complementary angular sliding surfaces thereon, with means provided to move the rod sections relative to each other along the sliding surfaces so as to expand the rods from a first mated cross-sectional width to a second larger cross-sectional width. The ends of the rod sections have means for aligning the two rod sections and maintaining them in alignment during expansion. (author)

  3. Pressurized water reactor monitoring. Study of detection, diagnostic and estimation (least squares and filtering) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, M.

    1986-07-01

    This thesis presents a study for the surveillance of the Primary circuit water inventory of a pressurized water reactor. A reference model is developed for the development of an automatic system ensuring detection and real-time diagnostic. The methods to our application are statistical tests and adapted a pattern recognition method. The estimation of the detected anomalies is treated by the least square fit method, and by filtering. A new projected optimization method with superlinear convergence is developed in this framework, and a segmented linearization of the model is introduced, in view of a multiple filtering. 46 refs [fr

  4. Effects of Secondary Circuit Modeling on Results of Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Calculations with New Coupled Code TRAB-3D/SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, Antti; Haemaelaeinen, Anitta; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta

    2003-01-01

    All of the three exercises of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Regulatory Commission pressurized water reactor main steam line break (PWR MSLB) benchmark were calculated at VTT, the Technical Research Centre of Finland. For the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetic neutronics, the thermal-hydraulics code SMABRE was used. The second exercise was calculated with the three-dimensional reactor dynamics code TRAB-3D, and the third exercise with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. VTT has over ten years' experience of coupling neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes, but this benchmark was the first time these two codes, both developed at VTT, were coupled together. The coupled code system is fast and efficient; the total computation time of the 100-s transient in the third exercise was 16 min on a modern UNIX workstation. The results of all the exercises are similar to those of the other participants. In order to demonstrate the effect of secondary circuit modeling on the results, three different cases were calculated. In case 1 there is no phase separation in the steam lines and no flow reversal in the aspirator. In case 2 the flow reversal in the aspirator is allowed, but there is no phase separation in the steam lines. Finally, in case 3 the drift-flux model is used for the phase separation in the steam lines, but the aspirator flow reversal is not allowed. With these two modeling variations, it is possible to cover a remarkably broad range of results. The maximum power level reached after the reactor trip varies from 534 to 904 MW, the range of the time of the power maximum being close to 30 s. Compared to the total calculated transient time of 100 s, the effect of the secondary side modeling is extremely important

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-01-01

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores

  6. New nuclear heat sources for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    1975-01-01

    The means by which urban oil heating may be taken over by new energy sources, especially nuclear, are discussed. Several possibilities exist: pressurized water reactors for high powers, and low-temperature swimming-pool-type process-heat reactors for lower powers. Both these cases are discussed [fr

  7. Corrosion-related failures in power plant condensers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavers, J.A.; Agrawal, A.K.; Berry, W.E.

    1980-08-01

    A survey of the literature has been conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute on corrosion failures in surface condensers. The survey was directed toward condenser failures in pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants but includes pertinent literature related to fossil and to other nuclear power plants. It includes literature on reported service failures and on experimental studies that impact on these failures

  8. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  9. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, N. M. N.

    2012-02-01

    A major safety concern in pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) design is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA),in which a break in the primary coolant circuit leads to depressurization, boiling of the coolant, consequent reduced cooling of the reactor core, and , unless remedial measures are taken, overheating of the fuel rods. This concern has led to the development of several simulators for safety analysis. This study demonstrates how the passive and active safety systems in conventional and advanced PWR behave during the small break loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The consequences of SBOLOCA have been simulated using IAEA Generic pressurized Water Reactor Simulator (GPWRS) and personal Computer Transient analyzer (PCTRAN) . The results were presented and discussed. The study has confirmed the major safety advantage of passive plants versus conventional PWRs is that the passive safety systems provide long-term core cooling and decay heat removal without the need for operator actions and without reliance on active safety-related system. (Author)

  10. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  11. Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, J.; Home Robertson, J.; Beith, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this debate the Government's policy on nuclear power is discussed. Government policy is that nuclear power is the safest and cleanest way of generating electricity and is cheap. Other political parties who do not endorse a nuclear energy policy are considered not to be acting in the people's best interests. The debate ranged over the risks from nuclear power, the UK safety record, safety regulations, and the environmental effects of nuclear power. The Torness nuclear power plant was mentioned specifically. The energy policy of the opposition parties is strongly criticised. The debate lasted just over an hour and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  12. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  13. Advanced light water reactor program at ABB-Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, H.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of Electric Utilities ordering nuclear power plants in the 1990s, ABB-Combustion Engineering is developing two designs which will meet EPRI consensus requirements and new licensing issues. The System 80 Plus design is an evolutionary pressurized water reactor plant modelled after the successful System 80 design in operation in Palo Verde and under construction in Korea. System Plus is currently under review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with final design approval expected in 1991 and design certification in 1992. The Safe Integral Reactor (SIR) plant is a smaller facility with passive safety features and modular construction intended for design certification in the late 1990s. (author)

  14. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components: Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Certain internal components of Pressurized Water Reactors are damaged by wear when subjected to vibration induced by flow. In order to enable predictive calculation of such wear, one must have a model which takes account reliably of real damages. The modelling of wear represents a final link in a succession of numerical calculations which begins by the determination of hydraulic excitations induced by the flow. One proceeds, then, in the dynamic response calculation of the structure to finish up with an estimation of volumetric wear and of the depth of wear scars. A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which correspond to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work

  15. Identification of seismically risk-sensitive systems and components in nuclear power plants: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarm, M.; Boccio, J.; Farahzad, P.

    1983-06-01

    An approach for the identification of risk-sensitive components in a nuclear power plant during and after a seismic event is described. Application of the methodology to two hypothetical power plants - a Boiling Water Reactor and a Pressurized Water Reactor - are presented and the results are given in tabular and graphical form. Conclusions drawn and lessons learned through the course of this study, based on the relative importance of various accident scenarios and sensitivity analyses, are discussed. In addition, the areas that may need further investigation are identified

  16. Net energy from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotty, R.M.; Perry, A.M.; Reister, D.B.

    1975-11-01

    An analysis of net energy from nuclear power plants is dependent on a large number of variables and assumptions. The energy requirements as they relate to reactor type, concentration of uranium in the ore, enrichment tails assays, and possible recycle of uranium and plutonium were examined. Specifically, four reactor types were considered: pressurized water reactor, boiling water reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, and heavy water reactor (CANDU). The energy requirements of systems employing both conventional (current) ores with uranium concentration of 0.176 percent and Chattanooga Shales with uranium concentration of 0.006 percent were determined. Data were given for no recycle, uranium recycle only, and uranium plus plutonium recycle. Starting with the energy requirements in the mining process and continuing through fuel reprocessing and waste storage, an evaluation of both electrical energy requirements and thermal energy requirements of each process was made. All of the energy, direct and indirect, required by the processing of uranium in order to produce electrical power was obtained by adding the quantities for the individual processes. The energy inputs required for the operation of a nuclear power system for an assumed life of approximately 30 years are tabulated for nine example cases. The input requirements were based on the production of 197,100,000 MWH(e), i.e., the operation of a 1000 MW(e) plant for 30 years with an average plant factor of 0.75. Both electrical requirements and thermal energy requirements are tabulated, and it should be emphasized that both quantities are needed. It was found that the electricity generated far exceeded the energy input requirements for all the cases considered

  17. Method for controlling a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit and interfacing the same with a load dispatching system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.P.; Meyer, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear fueled, electric power generating unit is controlled through the use of on-line calculations of the rapid, step and ramp, power change capabilities of the unit made from measured values of power level, axial offset, coolant temperature and rod position taking into account operator generated, safety and control, and balance of plant limits. The power change capabilities so generated may be fed to an automatic dispatch system which provides closed loop control of a power grid system. (author)

  18. Effects of operating conditions on molten-salt electrorefining for zirconium recovery from irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaeyeong, E-mail: d486916@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sungyeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Sungjune [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Rag [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Il Soon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Computational simulation on electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding. • Composition of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. • Redox behavior of elements in irradiated Zircaloy cladding during electrorefining. • Effect of electrorefining operating conditions on decontamination factor. - Abstract: To reduce the final waste volume from used nuclear fuel assembly, it is significant to decontaminate irradiated cladding. Electrorefining in high temperature molten salt could be one of volume decontamination processes for the cladding. This study examines the effect of operating conditions on decontamination factor in electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. One-dimensional time-dependent electrochemical reaction code, REFIN, was utilized for simulating irradiated cladding electrorefining. Composition of irradiated Zircaloy was estimated based on ORIGEN-2 and other literatures. Co and U were considered in electrorefining simulation with major elements of Zircaloy-4 to represent activation products and actinides penetrating into the cladding respectively. Total 240 cases of electrorefining are simulated including 8 diffusion boundary layer thicknesses, 10 concentrations of contaminated molten salt and 3 termination conditions. Decontamination factors for each case were evaluated and it is revealed that the radioactivity of Co-60 in recovered zirconium on cathode could decrease below the clearance level when initial concentration of chlorides except ZrCl{sub 4} is lower than 1 × 10{sup −11} weight fraction if electrorefining is finished before anode potential reaches −1.8 V (vs. Cl{sub 2}/Cl{sup −})

  19. Modeling and analysis of neutron noise from an ex-core detector at a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Perez, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Two applications of a noise diagnostic methodology were performed using ex-core neutron detector data from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A feedback dynamics model of the neutron power spectral density (PSD) was derived from a low-order whole-plant physical model made stochastic using the Langevin technique. From a functional fit to plant data, the response of the dynamic system to changes in important physical parameters was evaluated by a direct sensitivity analysis. In addition, changes in monitored spectra were related to changes in physical parameters and detection thresholds using common surveillance discriminants were determined. A resonance model was developed from perturbation theory to give the ex-core neutron detector response for small in-core mechanical motions in terms of a pole-strength factor, a resonance asymmetry (or skewness) factor, a vibration damping factor, and a frequency of vibration. The mechanical motion parameters for several resonances were determined by a functional fit of the model to plant data taken at various times during a fuel cycle and were tracked to determine trends that indicated vibrational changes of reactor internals. In addition, the resonance model gave the ability to separate the resonant components of the PSD after the parameters had been identified. As a result, the behavior of several vibration peaks were monitored over a fuel cycle. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  20. Examination of turbine discs from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Weeks, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations were performed on a cracked turbine disc from the Cooper Nuclear Power Station, and on two failed turbine discs (governor and generator ends) from the Yankee-Rowe Nuclear Power Station. Cooper is a boiling water reactor (BWR) which went into commercial operation in July 1974, and Yankee-Rowe is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) which went into commercial operation in June 1961. Cracks were identified in the bore of the Cooper disc after 41,913 hours of operation, and the disc removed for repair. At Yankee-Rowe two discs failed after 100,000 hours of operation. Samples of the Cooper disc and both Yankee-Rowe disc (one from the governor and one from the generator end of the LP turbine) were sent to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for failure analysis

  1. Waste generation comparison: Coal-fired versus nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste generation and disposal attract a great deal of attention whenever the nuclear industry is scrutinized by concerned parties, be it the media, the public, or political interests. It is therefore important to the nuclear industry that this issue be put into perspective relative to other current forms of energy production. Most of the country's fossil-fueled power comes from coal-fired plants, with oil and gas as other fuel sources. Most of the generated waste also comes from coal plants. This paper, therefore, compares waste quantities generated by a typical (1150-MW(electric)) pressurized water reactor (PWR) to that of a comparably sized coal-fired power plant

  2. Total energy analysis of nuclear and fossil fueled power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, W.D.; Mutsakis, M.; Ort, R.G.

    1971-01-01

    The overall thermal efficiencies of electrical power generation were determined for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder, High Temperature Gas Cooled, Boiling Water, and Pressurized Water Reactors and for coal-, oil-, and gas-fired systems. All important energy consuming steps from mining through processing, transporting, and reprocessing the fuels were included in the energy balance along with electrical transmission and thermal losses and energy expenditures for pollution abatement. The results of these studies show that the overall fuel cycle efficiency of the light water nuclear fueled reactors is less than the efficiency of modern fossil fuel cycles. However, the nuclear fuel cycle based on the fast breeder reactors should produce power more efficiently than the most modern supercritical fossil fuel cycles. The high temperature gas cooled reactor has a cycle efficiency comparable to the supercritical coal fuel cycle

  3. Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) implementation, Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, W.; Akers, D.W.

    1985-06-01

    A review of the Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) for the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant was performed. The principal review guidelines used were NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants,'' and Draft 7'' of NUREG-0472, Revision 3, ''Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Pressurized Water Reactors.'' Draft submittals were discussed with the Licensee by the NRC staff until all items requiring changes to the Technical Specifications were resolved. The Licensee then submitted final proposed RETS to the NRC which were evaluated and found to be in compliance with the NRC review guidelines. The proposed Offsite Dose Calculation Manual and the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Manual were reviewed and generally found to be in compliance with the NRC review guidelines

  4. The effects of electric power industry restructuring on the safety of nuclear power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas S.

    Throughout the United States the electric utility industry is restructuring in response to federal legislation mandating deregulation. The electric utility industry has embarked upon an extraordinary experiment by restructuring in response to deregulation that has been advocated on the premise of improving economic efficiency by encouraging competition in as many sectors of the industry as possible. However, unlike the telephone, trucking, and airline industries, the potential effects of electric deregulation reach far beyond simple energy economics. This dissertation presents the potential safety risks involved with the deregulation of the electric power industry in the United States and abroad. The pressures of a competitive environment on utilities with nuclear power plants in their portfolio to lower operation and maintenance costs could squeeze them to resort to some risky cost-cutting measures. These include deferring maintenance, reducing training, downsizing staff, excessive reductions in refueling down time, and increasing the use of on-line maintenance. The results of this study indicate statistically significant differences at the .01 level between the safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants and boiling water reactor nuclear power plants. Boiling water reactors exhibited significantly more problems than did pressurized water reactors.

  5. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  6. Reliability analysis of protection system of advanced pressurized water reactor - APR 1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varde, P. V.; Choi, J. G.; Lee, D. Y.; Han, J. B.

    2003-04-01

    Reliability analysis was carried out for the protection system of the Korean Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor - APR 1400. The main focus of this study was the reliability analysis of digital protection system, however, towards giving an integrated statement of complete protection reliability an attempt has been made to include the shutdown devices and other related aspects based on the information available to date. The sensitivity analysis has been carried out for the critical components / functions in the system. Other aspects like importance analysis and human error reliability for the critical human actions form part of this work. The framework provided by this study and the results obtained shows that this analysis has potential to be utilized as part of risk informed approach for future design / regulatory applications

  7. Fuzzy logic control of steam generator water level in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, C.C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a fuzzy logic controller is applied to control the steam generator water level in a pressurized water reactor. The method does not require a detailed mathematical mode of the object to be controlled. The design is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operator's experience. After off-line fuzzy computation, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real-time control is achieved. Shrink-and-swell phenomena are considered in the linguistic rules, and the simulation results show that their effect is dramatically reduced. The performance of the control system can also be improved by changing the input and output scaling factors, which is convenient for on-line tuning

  8. SACI - O: A code for the analysis of transients in a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende Lobo, A.A. de; Soares, P.A.

    1979-03-01

    The SACI-O digital computer code consists basically of a pressurized water reactor core model. It is useful in the analysis of fast reactivity transients shorter than the loop transit time. The program can also be used for evaluating the core behaviour, during other transients, when the inlet coolant conditions are known. SACI-O uses point model neutron kinetics taking into account moderator and fuel reactivity effects, and fission products decay. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic equations are solved for an average fuel pin described by a single axial node. To perform a more detailed calculation, the modeling of another cooling channel, which can be divided into axial segments, is included in the program. The reactor trip system is also partially simulated. (Author) [pt

  9. Secondary-side feed-and-bleed effectiveness in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annunziato, A.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis is presented of physical phenomena occurring during secondary-side feed-and-bleed, which is being considered as an accident management procedure for pressurized water reactors. Problem areas related to the reliability of this procedure are identified and discussed. Secondary-side feed-and-bleed, as examined in the LOBI (which is the Light Water Reactor Off-Normal Behavior Investigation) integral system test facility, was not successful because of a delay in the secondary-side heat removal caused by the release of stored heat from the steam generator downcomer wall. Countercurrent flow limiting in the hot leg was another major phenomenon that can influence the effectiveness of this procedure. The discussion of the experimental results is complemented by relevant calculations by RELAP5/MOD3. In general, it was found that the effectiveness of the feed-and-bleed procedure is maximized if the number of steam generators used to implement it is reduced

  10. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  11. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided

  12. Scram characteristics of the control rods of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shinohara, Yoshikazu; Nakatogawa, Tetsuto; Nanbu, Kiyoshi; Nomura, Tomonori.

    1987-01-01

    Control rod drop verification experiments of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions are performed to confirm the insertion function of control rods into a core. To evaluate these tests, computer simulations are performed. A fuel assembly, control rods, guide tube and other associated structures are immersed in a water tank, and shaken by four hydraulic shakers. The scram time of control rods under seismic conditions was measured, and confirmed to meet the scram function. Moreover, vibrational response characteristics of core structures and dropping behavior of control rods in consideration of collisions are calculated by using a finite difference method. The behavior of the dropping control rods and the scram time obtained by the computer simulation show a very good agreement with the verification experimental results. (author)

  13. Pressurized water reactor monitoring. Study of detection, diagnostic and estimation methods (least error squares and filtering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, M.

    1986-07-01

    This thesis presents a study for the surveillance of the ''primary coolant circuit inventory monitoring'' of a pressurized water reactor. A reference model is developed in view of an automatic system ensuring detection and diagnostic in real time. The methods used for the present application are statistical tests and a method related to pattern recognition. The estimation of failures detected, difficult owing to the non-linearity of the problem, is treated by the least error squares method of the predictor or corrector type, and by filtering. It is in this frame that a new optimized method with superlinear convergence is developed, and that a segmented linearization of the model is introduced, in view of a multiple filtering [fr

  14. High converter pressurized water reactor with heavy water as a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Reyev, D.

    1983-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in water breeder and high converter reactors. The increase in the conversion ratio of these reactors is obtained by hardening the neutron spectrum achieved by tightening the reactor's lattice. Another way of hardening the neutron spectrum is to replace the light water with heavy water. Two pressurized water reactor fuel cycles that use heavy water as a coolant are considered. The first fuel cycle is based on plutonium and depleted uranium, and the second cycle is based on plutonium and enriched uranium. The uranium ore and separative work unit (SWU) requirements are calculated as well as the fuel cycle cost. The savings in uranium ore are about40 and 60% and about40% in SWU for both fuel cycles considered

  15. Investigation and evaluation of cracking incidents in piping in pressurized water reactors. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of known cracking incidents in pressurized water reactor plants. Several instances of cracking in feedwater piping in 1979, together with reported cases of stress corrosion cracking at Three Mile Island Unit 1, led to the establishment of the third Pipe Crack Study Group. Major differences between the scope of the third PCSG and the previous two are: (1) the emphasis given to systems safety implications of cracking, and (2) the consideration given all cracking mechanisms known to affect PWR piping, including the failure of small lines in secondary safety systems. The present PCSG reviewed existing information on cracking of PWR pipe systems, either contained in written records of collected from meetings in the United States, and made recommendations in response to the PCSG charter questions and to othe major items that may be considered to either reduce the potential for cracking or to improve licensing bases

  16. Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads

  17. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  18. Steam-generator-tube-rupture transients for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobranich, D.; Henninger, R.J.; DeMuth, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    Steam generator tube ruptures with and without concurrent main-steam-line break are investigated for pressurized water reactors supplied by the major US vendors. The goal of these analyses is to provide thermodynamic and flow conditions for the determination of iodine transport to the environment and to provide an evaluation of the adequacy of the plant safety systems and operating procedures for controlling these transients. The automatic safety systems of the plant were found to be adequate for the mitigation of these transients. Emergency injection system flows equilibrated with the leakage flows and prevented core uncovery. Sufficient time was afforded by the plant safety systems for the operators to identify the problem and to take appropriate measures

  19. Impact of external grid disturbances on nuclear power plants; Rueckwirkungen von Netzstoerungen auf Kernkraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arains, Robert; Arnold, Simone; Brueck, Benjamin; Mueller, Christian; Quester, Claudia; Sommer, Dagmar

    2017-06-15

    The electrical design of nuclear power plants and the reliability of their electrical power supply including the offsite power supply are of high importance for the safe operation of the plants. The operating experience of recent years has shown that disturbances in the external grid can have impact on the electrical equipment of nuclear power plants. In the course of this project, possible causes and types of grid disturbances were identified. Based on these, scenarios of grid disturbances were developed. In order to investigate the impact of the developed scenarios of grid disturbances on the electrical equipment of nuclear power plants, the auxiliary power supply of a German pressurized water reactor of type Konvoi was simulated using the simulation tool NEPLAN. On the basis of the results of the analyses, it was identified whether there are possible measures to prevent the spread of grid disturbances in the plants which have not been implemented in the nuclear power plants today.

  20. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 5. TMI-1 Benchmark Performed by Different Coupled Three-Dimensional Neutronics Thermal- Hydraulic Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.; Spadoni, A.; Gago, J.L.; Grgic, D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of a double-ended main-steam-line-break (MSLB) accident assumed to have occurred in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 1 nuclear power plant (NPP) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy. The research has been carried out in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia, and with partial financial support from the European Union through a grant to one of the authors. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee PWR MSLB Benchmark. Different code versions have been adopted in the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are described in this paper: 1. RELAP5/mod 3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics PARCS code; 2. RELAP5/mod 3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics QUABBOX code; 3. RELAP5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics NESTLE code. Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by The Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main challenge for the calculation was the prediction of the return to power (RTP) following the inlet of cold water into the core and one 'stuck-withdrawn' control rod. Non-realistic assumptions were proposed to augment the core power peak following scram. Zero-dimensional neutronics codes were capable of detecting the RTP after scram. However, the application of 3-D neutronics codes to the same scenario allowed the calculation of a similar value for overall core power peak but showed power increase occurrence in about one-tenth of the core volume. The results achieved in phase 1 of

  1. Control system for a nuclear power producing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, O.W.

    1978-01-01

    The invention provides in a control system for a nuclear power producing unit comprising a pressurized water reactor, a once-through steam generator provided with feedwater supply means, a turbine-generator supplied with steam from the steam generator and means maintaining a flow of pressurized water through the reactor and steam generator. The combination comprising; means generating a feed forward control signal proportional to the desired power output of the power producing unit, a second means for adjusting the reactor heat release, a third means for adjusting the rate of flow of feedwater to the steam generator, the second and third means solely responsive to and operated in parallel from the feed forward control signal whereby the reactor heat release and the rate of flow of feedwater to the steam generator are each maintained in a discrete functional relationship to the feed forward control signal

  2. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Power'' describes how a reactor works and examines the different designs including Magnox, AGR, RBMK and PWR. It charts the growth of nuclear generation in the world and its contributions to world energy resources. (author)

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  4. Development of resilience evaluation method for nuclear power plants. Part 3. Study of evaluation method and applicability of resilience index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Miyano, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a new index, called the resilience index, that evaluates the dynamic stability of the system safety of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident by considering the ability to recover system safety functions that have become lost in the situation. In this paper, a detailed evaluation procedure for the resilience index is described. The system safety of a pressurized water reactor plant during a severe accident is then assessed according to the resilience index in order to discuss the applicability of the index. We find that the resilience index successfully represents management capability and, therefore, the resilience capability of a nuclear power plant. (author)

  5. Advanced digital I and C technology in nuclear power plants. A success story from Finland and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebschner, T.; Heidowitzsch, B.

    2005-01-01

    FRAMATOME ANP together with Siemens PGL have just commissioned the I and C systems for the Chinese Nuclear Power Plant Tianwan Unit 1, design the I and C systems for the first European Pressurized Water Reactor Olkiluoto 3 in Finland and started one of the most extensive and ambitious modernization project in a nuclear power plant for Loviisa NPP in Finland. The presentation delivers an insight into the problematic of digital I and C systems integration and focuses on aspects regarding design criteria, Structure and test approaches. (author)

  6. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous effluents from nuclear-powered merchant ships (NMS-GEFF code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardile, F.P.; Bangart, R.L.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    The Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization IMCO) is currently preparing guidelines concerning the safety of nuclear-powered merchant ships. An important aspect of these guidelines is the determination of the releases of radioactive material in effluents from these ships and the control exercised by the ships over these releases. To provide a method for the determination of these releases, the NRC staff has developed a computerized model, the NMS-GEFF Code, which is described in the following chapters. The NMS-GEFF Code calculates releases of radioactive material in gaseous effluents for nuclear-powered merchant ships using pressurized water reactors

  7. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  8. Modeling and simulation of pressurizer dynamic process in PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jin; Liu Changliang; Li Shu'na

    2010-01-01

    By analysis of the actual operating characteristics of pressurizer in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant and based on some reasonable simplification and basic assumptions, the quality and energy conservation equations about pressurizer' s steam zone and the liquid zone are set up. The purpose of this paper is to build a pressurizer model of two imbalance districts. Water level and pressure control system of pressurizer is formed though model encapsulation. Dynamic simulation curves of main parameters are also shown. At last, comparisons between the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the pressurizer model of two imbalance districts is reasonable. (authors)

  9. Cost-effectiveness considerations in reducing occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Maccia, C.; Pages, P.

    1983-01-01

    This article outlines a method of applying the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principle to occupational radiation exposures in nuclear power stations. A set of protective actions already taken at French pressurized-water reactors now in operation were selected, and their cost and effectiveness were assessed, allowing for the possible interdependence of protection and energy-production objectives. The usefulness of such quantitative evaluation is discussed with regard to the problem of using monetary values of the man-sievert in optimization procedures

  10. Safety analysis of an expert reactor protection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kafas, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the dissertation is to develop real time expert reactor protection system (ERPS) for operational safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. The system is developed to diagnose plant failures and for identification plant transients (with and without scram). For this erps, probabilistic safety analysis techniques are used to check the availability and priority of the recommended safety system in case of plant accidents. The real - time information during transients and accidents can be obtained to assess the operator in his decision - making. Also, the ERPS is able to give advice for the reactor operator to take the appropriate corrective action during abnormal situations. 5-15 figs., 42 refs

  11. Fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks for nuclear power plant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkan, R.C.; Eryurek, E.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of applying fuzzy logic and neural networks to plant-wide monitoring, diagnostics, and control problems. Different data sets are gathered from several sources including two commercial Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), and the conceptual design of Modular Liquid-Metal Reactor (PRISM). These data sets are used to illustrate applications to operating processes, and to PRISM design. The results show that the artificial intelligence approach to a number of operational tasks can considerably improve the safety and availability of nuclear power generation

  12. Expert systems for analysis and management assistance of nuclear reactor electrical power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evrard, J.M.; Souchet, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Electrical power supplies of nuclear plants are very complex systems. They are studied in many ways: failure consequences, probabilistic risk assessement, failure diagnosis, corrective actions in case of incident ... Knowledge base technology (expert systems) is very suited to solve these problems. A common structural representation can generate specific functional representations; thus we get coherency and easy evolution. This paper shows a two facet methodology: the plant description (both static and dynamic) and reasoning about it. Current applications are developed for pressurized water reactors and gas cooled reactors, using the SPIRAL expert system shell buil at CEA [fr

  13. RETRAN safety analyses of the nuclear-powered ship Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinori, N.; Ishida, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshiaki, F.

    1983-01-01

    A number of operational transient analyses of the nuclear-powered ship Mutsu have been performed in response to Japanese nuclear safety regulatory concerns. The RETRAN and COBRA-IV computer codes were used to provide a quantitative basis for the safety evaluation of the plant. This evaluation includes a complete loss of load without reactor scram, an excessive load increase incident, and an accidental depressurization of the primary system. The minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio remained in excess of 1.53 for these three transients. Hence, the integrity of the core was shown to be maintained during these transients. Comparing the transient behaviors with those of land-based pressurized water reactors, the characteristic features of the Mutsu reactor were presented and the safety of the plant under the operational transient conditions was confirmed

  14. TRANP - a computer code for digital simulation of steady - state and transient behavior of a pressurizer water reactor primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, E.S.

    1980-09-01

    A digital computer code TRANP was developed to simulate the steady-state and transient behavior of a pressurizer water reactor primary circuit. The development of this code was based on the combining of three codes already developed for the simulation of a PWR core, a pressurizer, a steam generator and a main coolant pump, representing the primary circuit components. (Author) [pt

  15. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    Is a nuclear power renaissance likely to occur in the United States? This paper investigates the many driving forces that will determine the answer to that question. This analysis reveals some frequently overlooked truths about the current state of nuclear technology: An examination of the issues also produces some noteworthy insights concerning government regulations and related technologies. Public opinion will play a major role in the unfolding story of the nuclear power renaissance. Some observers are betting that psychological, sociological, and political considerations will hod sway over public attitudes. Others wager that economic and technical concerns will prevail. The implications for the nuclear power renaissance are striking

  17. Assessment of EPRI water chemistry guidelines for new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid Richard; Kim Karen; McCree, Anisa; Eaker, Richard; Sawochka, Steve; Giannelli, Joe

    2012-09-01

    Water chemistry control technologies for nuclear power plants have been significantly enhanced over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance, and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. Chemistry Guidelines have been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for currently operating plants and have been intermittently revised over the past twenty-five years for the protection of systems and components and for radiation management. As new plants are being designed for improved safety and increased power production, it is important to ensure that the designs consider implementation of state-of-the-art, industry developed water chemistry controls. In parallel, the industry will need to consider and update water chemistry guidelines as well as plant startup and operational strategies based on the advanced plant designs. EPRI has performed assessments of water chemistry control guidance or assumptions provided in design and licensing documents for several advanced plant designs. These designs include: Westinghouse AP1000 Pressurized Water Reactor AREVA US-EPR Pressurized Water Reactor Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems/Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power APR1400 Pressurized Water Reactor Toshiba Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) General Electric-Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) The intent of these assessments was to identify key design differences in each of the new plant designs relative to the current operating fleet and to identify differences in water chemistry specifications or design assumptions provided in design and licensing documents for the plants in comparison to current EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines. This paper provides a summary of the key results of these assessments. The fundamental design and operation of the advanced plants is similar to the currently operating fleet. As such, the new plants are

  18. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

  19. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - IV: DUPIC Fuel Cycle Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the economics of the DUPIC fuel cycle using unit costs of fuel cycle components estimated based on conceptual designs. The fuel cycle cost (FCC) was calculated by a deterministic method in which reference values of fuel cycle components are used. The FCC was then analyzed by a Monte Carlo simulation to get the uncertainty of the FCC associated with the unit costs of the fuel cycle components. From the deterministic analysis on the equilibrium fuel cycle model, the DUPIC FCC was estimated to be 6.21 to 6.34 mills/kW.h for DUPIC fuel options, which is a little smaller than that of the once-through FCC by 0.07 to 0.27 mills/kW.h. Considering the uncertainty (0.40 to 0.44 mills/kW.h) of the FCC estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method, the cost difference between the DUPIC and once-through fuel cycle is negligible. On the other hand, the material balance calculation has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle can save natural uranium resources by ∼20% and reduce the spent fuel arising by ∼65% compared with the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion, the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable with the once-through fuel cycle from the viewpoint of FCC. In the future, it should be important to consider factors such as the environmental benefit owing to natural uranium savings, the capability of reusing spent pressurized water reactor fuel, and the safeguardability of the fuel cycle when deciding on an advanced nuclear fuel cycle option

  20. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage

  1. Revision of the basic plans of the first nuclear-powered ship development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Along with the law for Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency, the basic plans of development of the first nuclear-powered ship have been revised. After explaining the basic policy concerning the matter, the development program is described as follows: ship type/kind, nuclear power plant, construction, training of ship crew, experimental voyage, compilation of the development results, and works after the experimental voyage. The first nuclear-powered ship of about 8,000 tons gross tonnage, 10,000 horsepower main engine output, and about 16 knots, sea speed will be the ship for special cargo transport and crew training. A pressurized water reactor is used for the power plant. Following the repair of shielding and the overall inspection of safety, the ship is to be completed as early as possible. After completion of the ship, its experimental voyage will be carried out, aiming at the aspects of operational familiarization, ship performance, reliability, port call experience, etc. (Mori, K

  2. Overview of in-vessel retention concept involving level of passivity: with application to evolutionary pressurized water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghyym, Seong H.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, one strategy of severe accident management, the applicability of the in-vessel retention (IVR) concept, which has been incorporated in passive type reactor designs, to evolutionary type reactor designs, is examined with emphasis on the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) to realize the IVR concept in view of two aspects: for the regulatory aspect, it is addressed in the context of the resolution of the issue of corium coolability; for the technical one, the reliance on and the effectiveness of the IVR concept are mentioned. Additionally, for the ERVC method to be better applied to designs of the evolutionary type reactor, the conditions to be met are pointed out in view of the technical aspect. Concerning the issue of corium coolability/quenchability, based on results of the review, plausible alternative strategies are proposed. According to the decision maker's risk behavior, these would help materialize the conceptual design for evolutionary type reactors, especially Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGRs), which have been developing at the Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI): (A1) Strategy 1A: strategy based on the global approach using the reliance on the wet cavity method; (A2) Strategy 1B: strategy based on the combined approach using both the reliance on the wet cavity method and the counter-measures for preserving containment integrity; (A3) Strategy 2A: strategy based on the global approach to the reliance on the ERVC method; (A4) Strategy 2B: strategy based on the balanced approach using both the reliance on the ERVC method and the countermeasures for preserving containment integrity. Finally, in application to an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) design, several recommendations are made in focusing on both monitoring the status of approaches and preparing countermeasures in regard to the regulatory and the technical aspects

  3. Methodologies to assess PWSCC susceptibility of primary component Alloy 600 locations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.V.

    1993-01-01

    Methodologies to assess susceptibility to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 component locations in the Primary System of Pressurized Water Reactors are presented. The assessment methodologies are presented. The assessment methodologies are based on Relative Susceptibility Index (RSI) and Cumulative Susceptibility Index (CSI) models utilizing key contributing parameters such as service and residual stresses, yield strength, service temperature, material condition and microstructure, and the accumulated service time. To aid in the development of future inspection plans, a method of ranking of the assessed susceptibilities by 'bench marking' with respect to the susceptibility of a reference location of known PWSCC history of a reference location of known PWSCC history is presented. Means of utilizing the susceptibility ranking results in developing a prioritized inspection plan are discussed. A follow-up investigative plan to the initial inspection is proposed, which includes identification of critical sampling locations, sample extraction, sample investigations and testing to ensure that the potentially highest susceptibility locations are free from near term PWSCC and, further, to provide a basis for established schedules for future inspections. Finally, parametric considerations of the contributing factor are presented to help the utility choose suitable option to mitigate the PWSCC issue while minimizing the impact on continued service

  4. Fatigue life response of ASME SA 106-B steel in pressurized water reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrell, J B [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (USA)

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue strain-life tests were conducted on ASMESA 106-B piping steel base metal and weld metal specimens in 288{sup 0}C (550{sup 0}F) pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments as a function of strain amplitude, strain ratio, notch acuity, and cyclic frequency. Notched base metal specimens tested at 0.017 Hz in 0.001 part per million (ppm) dissolved oxygen environments nearly completely used up the margins of safety of 2 on stress and 20 on cycles incorporated into the ASMA Section III design curve for carbon steels. Tests conducted with smooth base metal and weld metal specimens at 1.0 Hz showed virtually no degradation in cycles to failure when compared to 288{sup 0}C air test results. In all cases, however, the effect of temperature alone reduced the margin of safety offered by the design curve in the low cycle regime for the test specimens. Comparison between the fatigue life results of smooth and notched specimens suggests that fatigue crack initiation is not significantly affected by 0.001 ppm dissolved oxygen, and that most of the observed degradation may be attributed to crack growth acceleration. These results suggest that the ASMA Section III methodology should be reviewed, taking into account the PWR environment variables which degrade the fatigue life of pressure-retaining components. (author).

  5. An estimation of core damage frequency of a pressurized water reactor during mid-loop operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.; Chen, C.T.; Lee, M.

    2004-01-01

    The core damage frequency during mid-loop operation of a Westinghouse designed 3-loop Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) due to loss of Residual Heat Removal (RHR) events was assessed. The assessment considers two types of outages (refueling and drained maintenance), and uses failure data collected specifically for shutdown condition. Event trees were developed for five categories of loss of RHR events. Human actions to mitigate the loss of RHR events was identified and human error probabilities were quantified using HCR and THERP model. The result showed that the core damage frequency due to loss of RHR events during mid-loop operation is 3.1x10 -5 per year. The results also showed that the core damage frequency can be reduced significantly by removing a pressurizer safety valve before entering mid-loop operation. The establishment of reflux cooling, i.e. decay heat removal through steam generator secondary side also plays important role in mitigating the loss of RHR events. (author)

  6. Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor containment spray by largescale facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoki, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Kitani, S.; Naritomi, M.; Nishio, G.; Tanaka, M.

    1983-01-01

    Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment spray were carried out to investigate effectiveness of the depressurization by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute model containment (7-m diameter, 20 m high, and 708-m 3 volume) with PWR spray nozzles. The depressurization rate is influenced by the spray heat transfer efficiency and the containment wall surface heat transfer coefficient. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was investigated with respect to spray flow rate, weight ratio of steam/air, and spray height. The spray droplet heat transfer efficiency was investigated whether the overlapping of spray patterns gives effect or not. The effect was not detectable in the range of large value of steam/air, however, it was better in the range of small value of it. The experimental results were compared with the calculated results by computer code CONTEMPT-LT/022. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was almost 100% in the containment pressure, ranging from 2.5 to 0.9 kg/cm 2 X G, so that the code was useful on the prediction of the thermal hydraulic behavior of containment atmosphere in a PWR accident condition

  7. Earthquake resistance of residual heat removed (RHR) pump for pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uga, Takeo; Shiraki, K.; Honma, T.; Matsubayashi, H.; Inazuka, H.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with the earthquake resistance of the residual heat removed (RHR) pump of single stage double volute type, which is one of the structurally simplest pumps used for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The results of the study can be summarized as follows: (1) Any trouble which can give effect on the functions of the pump at earthquake does not become a problem so long as each part of the pump is of aseismatically rigid structure. (2) Aseismatic tolerance test in the pump's operating condition has shown that the earthquake resistance of the pump at its location has a tolerance about five times the dynamic design acceleration. (3) The pump is provided with an impeller-casing wear ring at the pressure boundary between the suction side pressure and discharge side pressure. This wear ring acts as an underwater bearing when the pump is in operation, and improves the vibration characteristics, particularly damping ratio, of the pump shaft to a great extent to make the pump more aseismatic. (4) In the evaluation of the underwater bearing characteristics of the wear ring, the evaluation accuracy of the vibration characteristics of the pump shaft can be improved by taking into consideration the pressure loss in the wear ring part from the head of the single stage of the pump due to the rotation of the impeller. (author)

  8. Post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of a reference pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual study to evaluate the technical requirements, costs, and safety impacts of the cleanup and decommissioning of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR) involved in an accident. The costs and occupational doses for post-accident cleanup and decommissioning are estimated to be substantially higher than those for decommissioning following the orderly shutdown of a reactor. A major factor in these cost and occupational dose increases is the high radiation environment that exists in the containment building following an accident which restricts worker access and increases the difficulty of performing certain tasks. Other factors which influence accident cleanup and decommissioning costs are requirements for the design and construction of special tools and equipment, increased requirements for regulatory approvals, and special waste management needs. Radiation doses to the public from routine accident cleanup and decommissioning operations are estimated to be below permissible radiation dose levels in unrestricted areas and within the range of annual doses from normal background. 6 references, 1 figure, 7 tables

  9. Modified fuel assembly design for pressurized water reactors with improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Ronen, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A method for reactivity control through variation of the moderator content in the reactor core was proposed. The main idea is to adjust the amount of water in the core from a low value at beginning of cycle to a high value at end of cycle, so as to compensate for fissile material burnup and buildup of fission products. The possible implementation of this idea may be carried out by introducing a number of hollow tubes into the fuel assembly between the fuel rods. Then variation of the moderator content in the core may be managed through a change of the water level in these tubes. cated a potential savings in the fuel cycle requirements and costs. Preliminary steady-state thermal-hydraulic calculations indicate the possibility of implementing the proposed method in the existing pressurized water reactor plants. Feasibility of the proposed design may be finally established after rigorous thermal hydraulics as well as safety analysis calculations. Furthermore, there is need to elaborate the mechanical design of the pressure vessel internals together with cost benefit analysis

  10. Assessment of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanism nozzle cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report surveys the field experience related to cracking of pressurized water reactor (PWR) control rod drive mechanism nozzles (Alloy 600 material); evaluates design, fabrication, and operating conditions for the nozzles in US PWR; and evaluates the safety significance of nozzle cracking. Inspection at 78 overseas and one US PWR has revealed mainly axial cracks in 101 nozzles. The cracking is caused by primary water stress corrosion cracking, which requires the simultaneous presence of high tensile stresses, high operating temperatures, and susceptible microstructure. CRDM nozzle cracking is not a short-term safety issue. An axial crack is not likely to grow above the vessel head to a critical length because the stresses are not high enough to support the growth away from the attachment weld. Primary coolant leaking through an axial crack could cause a short circumferential crack on the outside surface. However, this crack is not likely to propagate through the nozzle wall to cause rupture. Leakage of the primary coolant from a through-wall crack could cause boric acid corrosion of the vessel head and challenge the structural integrity of the head, but it is very unlikely that the accumulated deposits of boric acid crystals resulting from such leakage could remain undetected

  11. Fatigue life response of ASME SA 106-B steel in pressurized water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue strain-life tests were conducted on ASMESA 106-B piping steel base metal and weld metal specimens in 288 0 C (550 0 F) pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments as a function of strain amplitude, strain ratio, notch acuity, and cyclic frequency. Notched base metal specimens tested at 0.017 Hz in 0.001 part per million (ppm) dissolved oxygen environments nearly completely used up the margins of safety of 2 on stress and 20 on cycles incorporated into the ASMA Section III design curve for carbon steels. Tests conducted with smooth base metal and weld metal specimens at 1.0 Hz showed virtually no degradation in cycles to failure when compared to 288 0 C air test results. In all cases, however, the effect of temperature alone reduced the margin of safety offered by the design curve in the low cycle regime for the test specimens. Comparison between the fatigue life results of smooth and notched specimens suggests that fatigue crack initiation is not significantly affected by 0.001 ppm dissolved oxygen, and that most of the observed degradation may be attributed to crack growth acceleration. These results suggest that the ASMA Section III methodology should be reviewed, taking into account the PWR environment variables which degrade the fatigue life of pressure-retaining components. (author)

  12. Generic risk insights for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J.; Fresco, A.; Chung, J.

    1990-11-01

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering (CE) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and apply the insights gained to Westinghouse and Ce plants have not been subjected to a PRA. The available PRAs (five Westinghouse plants and one CE plant) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plant. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eleven sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human errors that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training maintenance, design review, and inspections

  13. Stress analysis of pressurized water reactor steam generator tube denting phenomena. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cipolla, R.C.; Ranjan, G.V.; Derbalian, G.

    1978-07-01

    In some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) steam generators, a corrosion product has formed on the carbon steel support plate in the crevice between the tube and support plate. The corrosion product occupies more volume than the original metal; the tube-to-support plate crevice volume is thus consumed with corrosion product, and further corrosive action results in a radially inward force on the tube and a radially outward force on the corroding support plate. This has resulted in indentation (''denting'') of the tube, accompanied by occasional cracking. Large in-plane deformation and cracking of support plates has also been observed in the most severely affected plants along with some serious side effects, such as deformation and cracking of inner row tube U-bends caused by support plate movement. Mechanical aspects of the tube denting phenomena have been studied using analytical models. The models used ranged from closed form analytical solutions to state-of-the-art numerical elastic-plastic computer program for moderate strains. It was found that tube dents, such as those observed in operating steam generators, are associated with yielding of both the tubes and support plates. Also studied were the stresses in tube U-bends caused by support plate flow slot deformation

  14. Advanced development and operating experience with a canned motor pump under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, H.; Reymann, A.; Seibig, B.; Reinecker, H.

    1988-01-01

    At the research reactor FRG-2, Geesthacht, an irradiation device is in operation for testing defective light-water-reactor (LWR) test fuel rods under pressurized water reactor conditions (320 0 C, 160 bar). The requirements to the canned motor pump for cooling water circulation: medium: Demineralized water, operating temperature 320 0 C, operating pressure 155 bar, radiation field of the reactor, integration in the irradiation capsule, helium leak rate -6 mbar.dm 3 .s -1 , minimum working life 3000 hours, were high and caused difficulties in the acquisition of this component. First test runs with supplied pumps showed that the desired working life could not be achieved. The results of the development steps, the test runs, and the performance in service show that for our range of applications, the best combination of materials for the radial bearings is silicon-infiltrated SiC (8% free Si) against the same material. These bearings allowed a good working life for the pump to be achieved. (orig./GL) [de

  15. Post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of a reference pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1982-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual study to evaluate the technical requirements, costs, and safety impacts of the cleanup and decommissioning of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR) involved in an accident. The costs and occupational doses for post-accident cleanup and dcommissioning are estimated to be substantially higher than those for decommissioning following the orderly shutdown of a reactor. A major factor in these cost and occupational dose increases is the high radiation environment that exists in the containment building following an accident which restricts worker access and increases the difficulty of performing certain tasks. Other factors which influence accident cleanup and decommissioning costs are requirements for the design and construction of special tools and equipment, increased requirements for regulatory approvals, and special waste management needs. Radiation doses to the public from routine accident cleanup and decommissioning operations are estimated to be below permissible radiation dose levels in unrestricted areas and within the range of annual doses from normal background

  16. Computer simulation of the hydroelastic response of a pressurized water reactor to a sudden depressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.; Hirt, C.W.; Stein, L.R.

    1977-03-01

    A computer program is being developed to analyze the response of the core support barrel to a sudden loss of coolant in a pressurized water reactor. This program, SOLA-FLX, combines SOLA-DF, a two-dimensional, two-phase, hydrodynamic code with FLX, a finite-difference code that integrates the Timoshenko equations of elastic shell motion. The programs are coupled so that the shell motion determined by FLX is used as a boundary condition by SOLA. In turn, the pressure determined by SOLA is the forcing term that controls the shell motion. An axisymmetric version was first developed to provide a basis for comparing with a simple set of experiments and to serve as a test case for the more general, unsymmetric version. The unsymmetric version is currently under development. The report describes the hydrodynamic code, the symmetric shell code, the unsymmetric shell code, and the method of coupling. Test problems used to verify the shell codes and coupled codes are also reported. Work is continuing to verify both the symmetric and unsymmetric codes by making comparisons with experimental data and with theoretical test problems

  17. Self-adjointness of the fast flux in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Most computer codes for the analysis of systems transients rely on a simplified representation of the active core, typically employing either a one-dimensional or a point kinetics model. The collapsing of neutronics data from multidimensional steady-state calculations normally employs flux/flux-adjoint weighting. The multidimensional calculations, however, usually are performed only for the forward problem, not the adjoint. The collapsing methodologies employed in generating the neutronics input for transient codes typically construct adjoint fluxes from the assumption that the fast flux is self-adjoint. Until now, no further verification of this assumption has been undertaken for thermal reactors. As part of the verification effort for EPRI's reactor analysis support package, the validity of this assumption now has been investigated for a modern pressurized water reactor (PWR). The PDQ-7 code was employed to perform two-group fine-mesh forward and adjoint calculations for a two-dimensional representation of Zion Unit 2 at beginning of life, based on the standard PWR ARMP model. It has been verified that the fast flux is very nearly self-adjoint in a PWR. However, a significant error can arise during the subsequent construction of the thermal adjoint flux unless allowance is made for the difference between the forward and adjoint thermal buckling terms. When such a difference is included, the thermal adjoint flux can be estimated very accurately

  18. Coupling finite elements and reliability methods - application to safety evaluation of pressurized water reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, P.; Venturini, V.

    1995-02-01

    When reliability studies are extended form deterministic calculations in mechanics, it is necessary to take into account input parameters variabilities which are linked to the different sources of uncertainty. Integrals must then be calculated to evaluate the failure risk. This can be performed either by simulation methods, or by approximations ones (FORM/SORM). Model in mechanics often require to perform calculation codes. These ones must then be coupled with the reliability calculations. Theses codes can involve large calculation times when they are invoked numerous times during simulations sequences or in complex iterative procedures. Response surface method gives an approximation of the real response from a reduced number of points for which the finite element code is run. Thus, when it is combined with FORM/SORM methods, a coupling can be carried out which gives results in a reasonable calculation time. An application of response surface method to mechanics reliability coupling for a mechanical model which calls for a finite element code is presented. It corresponds to a probabilistic fracture mechanics study of a pressurized water reactor vessel. (authors). 5 refs., 3 figs

  19. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  20. Analytical investigation of a one-dimensional homogenized model for a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.; Schumann, U.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional homogenized model for dynamic fluid-structure interaction in a pressurized water reactor core is used to study the influence of the virtual density and spacer's stiffness. The model consists of a linear system of partial differential equations for fluid velocity, rod velocity and pressure. For these equations analytical solutions are deduced for boundary conditions prescribing either periodic wall oscillations or linearly growing wall accelerations from rest. The theoretical model for the virtual density is verified by comparison to an experiment. For zero spacer stiffness, purely acoustic oscillations appear. For positive spacer stiffness, additional oscillations arise with relative rod motions. The wavelengths of the latter oscillations are small for weak spacers. Large numerical effort would be required in a more complete three-dimensional core-model to resolve such short wave lengths. In fact in a typical core the spacer's stiffness csub(S) is small in comparison to the fluid bulk modulus K. For csub(s)/K <= 0.1 it might be appropriate to neglect the influence of the spacers. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Hsu, C.; Atwood, C.L.; Sattison, M.B.; Hartley, R.S.; Shah, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number and rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs

  2. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Ware, Arthur Gates; Atwood, Corwin Lee; Sattison, Martin Blaine; Hartley, Robert Scott; Hsu, C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number of rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs

  3. A computer program for accident calculations of a standard pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutner, H.

    1979-01-01

    In this computer program the dynamic of a standard pressurized water reactor should be realized by both circulation loops with all important components. All important phenomena are taken into consideration, which appear for calculation of disturbances in order to state a realistic process for some minutes after a disturbance or a desired change of condition. In order to optimize the computer time simplifications are introduced in the statement of a differential-algebraic equalization system such that all important effects are taken into consideration. The model analysis starts from the heat production of the fuel rod via cladding material to the cooling medium water and considers the delay time from the core to the steam generator. Alternations of the cooling medium pressure as well as the different temperatures in the primary loop influence the pressuring system - the pressurizer - which is realized by a water and a steam zone with saturated and superheated steam respectively saturated and undercooled water with injection, heating and blow-down devices. The bilance of the steam generator to the secondary loop realizes the process engineering devices. Thereby the control regulation of the steam pressure and the reactor performance is realized. (orig.) [de

  4. Multiobjective pressurized water reactor reload core design by nondominated genetic algorithm search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.

    1996-01-01

    The design of pressurized water reactor reload cores is not only a formidable optimization problem but also, in many instances, a multiobjective problem. A genetic algorithm (GA) designed to perform true multiobjective optimization on such problems is described. Genetic algorithms simulate natural evolution. They differ from most optimization techniques by searching from one group of solutions to another, rather than from one solution to another. New solutions are generated by breeding from existing solutions. By selecting better (in a multiobjective sense) solutions as parents more often, the population can be evolved to reveal the trade-off surface between the competing objectives. An example illustrating the effectiveness of this novel method is presented and analyzed. It is found that in solving a reload design problem the algorithm evaluates a similar number of loading patterns to other state-of-the-art methods, but in the process reveals much more information about the nature of the problem being solved. The actual computational cost incurred depends on the core simulator used; the GA itself is code independent

  5. Comparison and analysis on transient characteristics of integral pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guoxu; Xie, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Two IPWR Relap5 models with different PSS design were developed. • Postulated SBO and SBLOCA were analyzed. • PRHRS in primary PSS design showed stable performance under different scenarios. • Secondary PRHRS design faced flow instability. - Abstract: In the present work, the similarities and differences of representative IPWRs (integral pressurized water reactor) are studied, and two typical reactor design schemes are summarized. To get a comprehensive understanding of their transient characteristics, SBO (station blackout) and SBLOCA (small break LOCA) are simulated and analyzed respectively by using Relap5/Mod3.2. The calculation results show that, both designs are effective in keeping reactor safe. However, the transient features of the two designs show significant differences. In the primary side passive safety system (PSS) connection design, PRHRS (passive residual heat removal system) shows a roughly congruent performance in removing residual heat under various accidents. While in secondary side PSS connection design, the capability of PRHRS is closely related to primary coolant circulation condition. In SBLOCA analysis, different design approach shows different primary coolant water inventory change trend. And primary PSS connection design could potentially keep reactor core well covered for a longer time.

  6. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  7. Automatic optimized reload and depletion method for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D.H.; Levene, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    A new method has been developed to automatically reload and deplete a pressurized water reactor (PWR) so that both the enriched inventory requirements during the reactor cycle and the cost of reloading the core are minimized. This is achieved through four stepwise optimization calculations: (a) determination of the minimum fuel requirement for an equivalent three-region core model, (b) optimal selection and allocation of fuel assemblies for each of the three regions to minimize the reload cost, (c) optimal placement of fuel assemblies to conserve regionwise optimal conditions, and (d) optimal control through poison management to deplete individual fuel assemblies to maximize end-of-cycle k /SUB eff/ . The new method differs from previous methods in that the optimization process automatically performs all tasks required to reload and deplete a PWR. In addition, the previous work that developed optimization methods principally for the initial reactor cycle was modified to handle subsequent cycles with fuel assemblies having burnup at beginning of cycle. Application of the method to the fourth reactor cycle at Three Mile Island Unit 1 has shown that both the enrichment and the number of fresh reload fuel assemblies can be decreased and fully amortized fuel assemblies can be reused to minimize the fuel cost of the reactor

  8. Stochastic estimation approach for the evaluation of thermal-hydraulic parameters in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    A method based on the extended Kalman filter is developed for the estimation of the core coolant mass flow rate in pressurized water reactors. The need for flow calibration can be avoided by a direct estimation of this parameter. A reduced-order neutronic and thermal-hydraulic model is developed for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor. The neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals from the LOFT reactor are used as measurements in the parameter estimation algorithm. The estimation sensitivity to model uncertainties was evaluated using the ambiguity function analysis. This also provides a lower bound on the measurement sample size necessary to achieve a certain estimation accuracy. A sequential technique was developed to minimize the computational effort needed to discretize the continuous time equations, and thus achieve faster convergence to the true parameter value. The performance of the stochastic approximation method was first evaluated using simulated random data, and then applied to the estimation of coolant flow rate using the operational data from the LOFT reactor at 100 and 65% flow rate conditions

  9. Control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors via the Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Lin, Y.J.

    1994-01-01

    A direct control method is developed to control the spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors. The xenon and iodine concentration difference between the top and bottom halves of the core is estimated by using the extended Kalman filter (EKF), which is a closed-loop estimation method. The measurement equation used in the observer is the axial offset measurement equation, which reflects the xenon unbalanced effect on the axial offset. Meanwhile, some of the coefficients of the observer are estimated on-line to reduce estimation error resulting from model error, i.e., simplified xenon and iodine dynamics. Therefore, the estimation can be guaranteed to be accurate, and the success of the estimation does not greatly depend on the accuracy of the observer model. The predicted one-step ahead xenon concentration, by using the EKF, was used to calculate the possible axial offset variation, and then the control rod motion was calculated to compensate for it. The simulation results show that the proposed method successfully controls the xenon oscillations

  10. Expandable antivibration bar for heat transfer tubes of a pressurized water reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleman, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor steam generator having spaced rows of heat transfer tubes through which primary coolant from the reactor flows, the tubes being of a U-shaped design, with the U-bend portions of the U-shaped tubes stabilized by antivibration bars. The improvement described here comprises expandable antivibration bars for stabilizing the U-bend portions of the U-shaped tubes, the expandable bars having a pair of adjustable rods, formed from a pair of rod sections affixed to a connector, one rod section of each of the pair of rod sections having a plurality of protrusions. Each of the protrusions has slidable surfaces thereon. The other rod section of each of the pair of rod sections has indentations, each of the indentations having slidable surfaces thereon complementary to the sliding surfaces of the protrusions, such that the rods are expandable from a first cross-sectional width less than the spacing between two adjacent rows of the tubes, to a second cross-sectional width greater than the first cross-sectional width. The expanded rods are adapted to contact tubes of the two adjacent rows of the tubes

  11. Remote techniques for the underwater dismantling of reactor internals at the nuclear power plant Gundremmingen unit A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eickelpasch, N.; Steiner, H.; Priesmeyer, U.

    1997-01-01

    Unit A of the nuclear power plant in Gundremmingen (KRB A) is a boiling water reactor with an electrical power of 250 MWe. It was shut down in 1977 after eleven years of operation. The actual decommissioning started in 1983. Since then more than 5200 tons of contaminated components have been dismantled. Special cutting and handling tools were tested, developed and optimized for the purpose of working in radiation fields and under water. Due to the special design of KRB A, which uses a dual-cycle system for additional steam generation, the experience gained is transferable to pressurized water reactors. (Author)

  12. Systematic generation of rules for nuclear power plant diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Lee, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The knowledge base of an expert system is generally represented by a set of heuristic rules derived from the expert's own experience and judgmental knowledge. These heuristic or production rules are cast as if (condition), then (consequence) statements, and represent, for nuclear power plant diagnostic systems, information connecting symptoms to failures. In this paper, the authors apply an entropy minimax pattern recognition algorithm to automate the process of extracting and encoding knowledge into a set of rules. Knowledge is extracted by recognizing patterns in plant parameters or symptoms associated with failures or transient events, and is encoded by casting the discovered patterns as production rules. The paper discusses how the proposed method can systematically generate rules that characterize failure of pressurizer components based on transient events analyzed with a pressurizer components based on transient events analyzed with a pressurizer water reactor simulator program

  13. Signal validation in nuclear power plants using redundant measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glockler, O.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Morgenstern, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the basic principles of a multivariable signal validation software system utilizing redundant sensor readings of process variables in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The technique has been tested in numerical experiments, and was applied to actual data from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The simultaneous checking within one redundant measurement set, and the cross-checking among redundant measurement sets of dissimilar process variables, results in an algorithm capable of detecting and isolating bias-type errors. A case in point occurs when a majority of the direct redundant measurements of more than one process variable has failed simultaneously by a common-mode or correlated failures can be detected by the developed approach. 5 refs

  14. A new approach to the use of genetic algorithms to solve the pressurized water reactor's fuel management optimization problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapot, Jorge Luiz C. [ELETRONUCLEAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho Da Silva, Fernando; Schirru, Roberto [COPPE/UFRJ-Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-05-01

    A Genetic Algorithm (GA) based system, coupling the computer codes GENESIS 5.0 and ANC through the interface ALGER has been developed aiming at pressurized water reactor's (PWR) fuel management optimization. An innovative codification, the List Model (LM), has been incorporated into the system. LM avoids the use of heuristic crossover operators and only generates valid nonrepetitive loading patterns in the reactor core. The LM has been used to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). The results got for a benchmark problem were very satisfactory, in terms of precision and computational costs. The GENESIS/ALGER/ANC system has been successfully tested in optimization studies for Angra 1 power plant reloads.

  15. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in nuclear power plans as reported in 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1975-05-01

    All abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants reported in 1974 are reviewed and summarized. This bibliography covers the individual reports on each of the 1421 abnormal occurrences reported to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as well as some 455 other documents pertaining to these and other events of note. The review is intended to provide insight as to where additional effort can be expended to improve operations in nuclear power plants. The individual reports, abstracted by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, concern incidents and failures, design or construction deficiencies, and noncompliance citations for license violations. A bibliography is included which contains 100-word abstracts of each incident. For convenience, the bibliography is organized according to type of facility as follows: boiling-water reactors; pressurized-water reactors; non-water-cooled power reactors; and reactors, general. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided for each section. (U.S.)

  16. MDEP Common Position CP-STC-02. Common Position Addressing Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    considered are: EPR (1650 MWe pressurized water reactor); AP1000 (1110 MWe pressurized water reactor); APR1400 (1400 MWe pressurized water reactor); VVER (1200 MWe pressurized water reactor); ABWR (boiling water reactor with a power output in the 1350 to 1460 MWe range). The designs were assessed in the following five areas: external hazards reliability of safety functions (addressing station black-out and ultimate heat sinks), accidents with core melt, spent fuel pools, and emergency preparedness in design. Mitigation of extreme external hazards often implies improving the robustness of an NPP. While the MDEP focus in addressing issues related to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident has been on safety, it should be noted that improved NPP robustness will also improve the capability of the plant to withstand security related challenges

  17. Preliminary thermal design of a pressurized water reactor containment for handling severe accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, A.M.; Karameldin, A.

    1998-01-01

    A one-dimensional mathematical model has been developed for a 4250 MW(th) Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor containment analysis following a severe accident. The cooling process of the composite containment-steel shell and concrete shield- is achievable by natural circulation of atmospheric air. However, for purpose of gettering higher degrees of safety margin, the present study undertakes two objectives: (1) Installment of a diesel engine-driven air blower to force air through the annular space between the steel shell and concrete shield. The engine can be remotely operated to be effective in case of station blackout. (ii) Fixing longitudinally plate fins on the circumference of the inside and outside containment steel shell. These fins increase the heat transfer areas and hence the rate of heat removal from the containment atmosphere. In view of its importance - from the safety viewpoint - the long term behaviour of the containment which is a quasi-steady state problem, is formulated through a system of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations which describe the thermal-hydraulic and thermodynamic behaviour of the double shell containment. The calculated results revealed the following: (i) the passively air cooled containment can remove maximum heat load of 11.5 MW without failure, (ii) the effect of finned surface in the air passage tends to decrease the containment pressure by 20 to 30%, depending on the heat load, (iii) the effect of condensing fins is negligible for the proposed fin dimensions and material. However, by reducing the fin width, increasing their thickness, doubling their number, and using a higher conductive metal than the steel, it is expected that the containment pressure can be further reduced by 10% or more, (iv) the fins' dimensions and their number must be optimized via maximizing the difference or the ratio between the heat removed and pressure drop to get maximum heat flow rate

  18. A hybrid method for in-core optimization of pressurized water reactor reload core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this research is the development of an accurate, practical, and robust method for optimization of the design of loading patterns for pressurized water reactors, a nonlinear, non-convex, integer optimization problem. The many logical constraints which may be applied during the design process are modeled herein by a network construction upon which performance objectives and safety constraints from reactor physics calculations are optimized. This thesis presents the synthesis of the strengths of previous algorithms developed for reload design optimization and extension of robustness through development of a hybrid liberated search algorithm. Development of three independent methods for reload design optimization is presented: random direct search for local improvement, liberated search by simulated annealing, and deterministic search for local improvement via successive linear assignment by branch and bound. Comparative application of the methods to a variety of problems is discussed, including an exhaustive enumeration benchmark created to allow comparison of search results to a known global optimum for a large scale problem. While direct search and determinism are shown to be capable of finding improvement, only the liberation of simulated annealing is found to perform robustly in the non-convex design spaces. The hybrid method SHAMAN is presented. The algorithm applies: determinism to shuffle an initial solution for satisfaction of heuristics and symmetry; liberated search through simulated annealing with a bounds cooling constraint treatment; and search bias through relational heuristics for the application of engineering judgment. The accuracy, practicality, and robustness of the SHAMAN algorithm is demonstrated through application to a variety of reload loading pattern optimization problems

  19. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) round robin benchmark for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Shin K., E-mail: paengki1@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The capabilities of steady RANS models were directly assessed for full axial scale experiment. • The importance of mesh and conjugate heat transfer was reaffirmed. • The rod inner-surface temperature was directly compared. • The steady RANS calculations showed a limitation in the prediction of circumferential distribution of the rod surface temperature. - Abstract: This study examined the capabilities and limitations of steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) approach for pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle problems, based on the round robin benchmark of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes against the NESTOR experiment for a 5 × 5 rod bundle with typical split-type mixing vane grids (MVGs). The round robin exercise against the high-fidelity, broad-range (covering multi-spans and entire lateral domain) NESTOR experimental data for both the flow field and the rod temperatures enabled us to obtain important insights into CFD prediction and validation for the split-type MVG PWR rod bundle problem. It was found that the steady RANS turbulence models with wall function could reasonably predict two key variables for a rod bundle problem – grid span pressure loss and the rod surface temperature – once mesh (type, resolution, and configuration) was suitable and conjugate heat transfer was properly considered. However, they over-predicted the magnitude of the circumferential variation of the rod surface temperature and could not capture its peak azimuthal locations for a central rod in the wake of the MVG. These discrepancies in the rod surface temperature were probably because the steady RANS approach could not capture unsteady, large-scale cross-flow fluctuations and qualitative cross-flow pattern change due to the laterally confined test section. Based on this benchmarking study, lessons and recommendations about experimental methods as well as CFD methods were also provided for the future research.

  20. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryk, Holger, E-mail: h.kryk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan [Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products.