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Sample records for presentation t-cell priming

  1. Rational design of nanoparticles towards targeting antigen-presenting cells and improved T cell priming.

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    Zupančič, Eva; Curato, Caterina; Paisana, Maria; Rodrigues, Catarina; Porat, Ziv; Viana, Ana S; Afonso, Carlos A M; Pinto, João; Gaspar, Rogério; Moreira, João N; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Jung, Steffen; Florindo, Helena F

    2017-07-28

    Vaccination is a promising strategy to trigger and boost immune responses against cancer or infectious disease. We have designed, synthesized and characterized aliphatic-polyester (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to investigate how the nature of protein association (adsorbed versus entrapped) and polymer/surfactant concentrations impact on the generation and modulation of antigen-specific immune responses. The ability of the NP formulations to target dendritic cells (DC), be internalized and activate the T cells was characterized and optimized in vitro and in vivo using markers of DC activation and co-stimulatory molecules. Ovalbumin (OVA) was used as a model antigen in combination with the engraftment of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, carrying a transgenic OVA-responding T cell receptor (TCR), to trace and characterize the activation of antigen-specific CD4 + and CD8 + lymph node T cells upon NP vaccination. Accordingly, the phenotype and frequency of immune cell stimulation induced by the NP loaded with OVA, isolated or in combination with synthetic unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) motifs, were characterized. DC-NP interactions increased with incubation time, presenting internalization values between 50 and 60% and 30-40%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Interestingly, animal immunization with antigen-adsorbed NP up-regulated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (MHCII), while NP entrapping the antigen up-regulated MHCI, suggesting a more efficient cross-presentation. On the other hand, rather surprisingly, the surfactant used in the NP formulation had a major impact on the activation of antigen presenting cells (APC). In fact, DC collected from lymph nodes of animals immunized with NP prepared using poly(vinil alcohol) (PVA), as a surfactant, expressed significantly higher levels of CD86, MHCI and MHCII. In addition, those NP prepared with PVA and co-entrapping OVA and the toll

  2. The role of cDC1s in vivo: CD8 T cell priming through cross-presentation [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    Derek Theisen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The cDC1 subset of classical dendritic cells is specialized for priming CD8 T cell responses through the process of cross-presentation. The molecular mechanisms of cross-presentation remain incompletely understood because of limited biochemical analysis of rare cDC1 cells, difficulty in their genetic manipulation, and reliance on in vitro systems based on monocyte- and bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells. This review will discuss cross-presentation from the perspective of studies with monocyte- or bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells while highlighting the need for future work examining cDC1 cells. We then discuss the role of cDC1s as a cellular platform to combine antigen processing for class I and class II MHC presentation to allow the integration of “help” from CD4 T cells during priming of CD8 T cell responses.

  3. Increased antigen presentation but impaired T cells priming after upregulation of interferon-beta induced by lipopolysaccharides is mediated by upregulation of B7H1 and GITRL.

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    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are able to present Ag-derived peptides on MHC class I and II molecules and induce T cells priming. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, an activator of Toll-like 4 receptor (TLR4 signaling, has been demonstrated to facilitate Ag-presentation, up-regulate surface molecules expression but impair T cells priming. In this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on nicotine-enhanced DCs-dependent T cells priming and the mechanisms of LPS orchestrating the immunosuppressive program. We could demonstrate that the treatment with LPS resulted in increased surface molecules expression, enhanced Ag-presentation, up-regulated release of TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-beta. Concomititantly, the upregulation of IFN-beta in DCs induces the up-regulation of coinhibitory molecules B7H1 and GITRL, which cause an impaired activation of naïve Ag-specific T cells and the induction of T cell tolerance by enhancing B7H1-PD-1 interactions and promoting GITRL-GITL facilitated Treg generation, respectively. These data provide a mechanistic basis for the immunomodulatory action of IFN-beta which might open new possibilities in the development of therapeutic approaches aimed at the control of excessive immune response and persistent infection.

  4. Differential presentation of endogenous and exogenous hepatitis B surface antigens influences priming of CD8(+) T cells in an epitope-specific manner.

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    Riedl, Petra; Reiser, Michael; Stifter, Katja; Krieger, Jana; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about whether presentation of endogenous and exogenous hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigens on APCs targeted by vaccination and/or virus-harboring hepatocytes influences de novo priming of CD8(+) T cells. We showed that surface antigen-expressing transfectants exclusively display a K(b) /S190 epitope, whereas cells pulsed with recombinant surface particles (rSPs) exclusively present a K(b) /S208 epitope to CD8(+) T cells. The differential presentation of these epitopes largely reflects the selective, but not exclusive, priming of K(b) /S190- and K(b) /S208-specific T cells in C57BL/6 mice by endogenous/DNA- or exogenous/protein-based vaccines, respectively. Silencing the K(b) /S190 epitope (K(b) /S190V194F ) in antigen-expressing vectors rescued the presentation of the K(b) /S208 epitope in stable transfectants and significantly enhanced priming of K(b) /S208-specific T cells in C57BL/6 mice. A K(b) /S190-mediated immunodominance operating in surface antigen-expressing cells, but not in rSP-pulsed cells, led to an efficient suppression in the presentation of the K(b) /S208 epitope and a consequent decrease in the priming of K(b) /S208-specific T cells. This K(b) /S190-mediated immunodominance also operated in 1.4HBV-S(mut) transgenic (tg) hepatocytes selectively expressing endogenous surface antigens and allowed priming of K(b) /S208- but not K(b) /S190-specific T cells in 1.4HBV-S(mut) tg mice. However, IFN-γ(+) K(b) /S208-specific T cells could not inhibit HBV replication in the liver of 1.4HBV-S(mut) tg mice. These results have practical implications for the design of T-cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccines. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Termination of T cell priming relies on a phase of unresponsiveness promoting disengagement from APCs and T cell division.

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    Bohineust, Armelle; Garcia, Zacarias; Beuneu, Hélène; Lemaître, Fabrice; Bousso, Philippe

    2018-05-07

    T cells are primed in secondary lymphoid organs by establishing stable interactions with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the termination of T cell priming and the initiation of clonal expansion remain largely unknown. Using intravital imaging, we observed that T cells typically divide without being associated to APCs. Supporting these findings, we demonstrate that recently activated T cells have an intrinsic defect in establishing stable contacts with APCs, a feature that was reflected by a blunted capacity to stop upon T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. T cell unresponsiveness was caused, in part, by a general block in extracellular calcium entry. Forcing TCR signals in activated T cells antagonized cell division, suggesting that T cell hyporesponsiveness acts as a safeguard mechanism against signals detrimental to mitosis. We propose that transient unresponsiveness represents an essential phase of T cell priming that promotes T cell disengagement from APCs and favors effective clonal expansion. © 2018 Bohineust et al.

  6. Liver-primed memory T cells generated under noninflammatory conditions provide anti-infectious immunity.

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    Böttcher, Jan P; Schanz, Oliver; Wohlleber, Dirk; Abdullah, Zeinab; Debey-Pascher, Svenja; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Höchst, Bastian; Hegenbarth, Silke; Grell, Jessica; Limmer, Andreas; Atreya, Imke; Neurath, Markus F; Busch, Dirk H; Schmitt, Edgar; van Endert, Peter; Kolanus, Waldemar; Kurts, Christian; Schultze, Joachim L; Diehl, Linda; Knolle, Percy A

    2013-03-28

    Development of CD8(+) T cell (CTL) immunity or tolerance is linked to the conditions during T cell priming. Dendritic cells (DCs) matured during inflammation generate effector/memory T cells, whereas immature DCs cause T cell deletion/anergy. We identify a third outcome of T cell priming in absence of inflammation enabled by cross-presenting liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Such priming generated memory T cells that were spared from deletion by immature DCs. Similar to central memory T cells, liver-primed T cells differentiated into effector CTLs upon antigen re-encounter on matured DCs even after prolonged absence of antigen. Their reactivation required combinatorial signaling through the TCR, CD28, and IL-12R and controlled bacterial and viral infections. Gene expression profiling identified liver-primed T cells as a distinct Neuropilin-1(+) memory population. Generation of liver-primed memory T cells may prevent pathogens that avoid DC maturation by innate immune escape from also escaping adaptive immunity through attrition of the T cell repertoire. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

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    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  8. Glutathione Primes T Cell Metabolism for Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tak W.; Grusdat, Melanie; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR) and expression of NFAT and Myc transcription factors, abrogating the energy utilization and Myc-dependent metabolic reprogramming that allows activated T cells to switch to glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In vivo, T-cell-specific ablation of murine Gclc...

  9. Conventional CD4+ T cells present bacterial antigens to induce cytotoxic and memory CD8+ T cell responses.

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    Cruz-Adalia, Aránzazu; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Osuna-Pérez, Jesús; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Zorita, Virgina; Martínez-Riaño, Ana; Boccasavia, Viola; Borroto, Aldo; Martínez Del Hoyo, Gloria; González-Granado, José María; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Veiga, Esteban

    2017-11-17

    Bacterial phagocytosis and antigen cross-presentation to activate CD8 + T cells are principal functions of professional antigen presenting cells. However, conventional CD4 + T cells also capture and kill bacteria from infected dendritic cells in a process termed transphagocytosis (also known as transinfection). Here, we show that transphagocytic T cells present bacterial antigens to naive CD8 + T cells, which proliferate and become cytotoxic in response. CD4 + T-cell-mediated antigen presentation also occurs in vivo in the course of infection, and induces the generation of central memory CD8 + T cells with low PD-1 expression. Moreover, transphagocytic CD4 + T cells induce protective anti-tumour immune responses by priming CD8 + T cells, highlighting the potential of CD4 + T cells as a tool for cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Peptide-loaded dendritic cells prime and activate MHC-class I-restricted T cells more efficiently than protein-loaded cross-presenting DC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Met, Ozcan; Buus, Søren; Claesson, Mogens H

    2003-01-01

    -pulsed DC. Moreover, SIINFEKL-loaded DC were up to 50 times more efficient than DC-pulsed with OVA-protein for generation of an H-2K(b)-restricted response. Immunization of mice with SIINFEKL-loaded DC resulted in a much stronger H-2K(b)-restricted response than immunization with OVA-pulsed DC. These data......Undifferentiated and differentiated dendritic cells (uDC and dDC, respectively), derived from the bone marrow, were studied in vitro and in vivo. Ovalbumin (OVA) and two OVA-derived peptides binding to H-2K(b) and I-A(b), respectively, were used. Two IL-2 secreting T cell hybridomas specific...... for the OVA-derived epitopes were used in the in vitro read-out. The ability to cross-present the H-2K(b) binding OVA(257-264)-peptide (SIINFEKL) was restricted to dDC, which express CD11c(+), CD86(+), and MHC-II(+). In vitro, the antigenicity of SIINFEKL-loaded DC declined at a slower rate than that of OVA...

  11. Can resting B cells present antigen to T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; DeFranco, A.L.; Paul, W.E.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Antigen stimulation of T lymphocytes can occur only in the presence of an antigen-presenting cell (APC). An ever-increasing number of cell types have been found to act as APCs; these include macrophages, splenic and lymph node dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells of the skin. Although activated B lymphocytes and B cell lymphomas are known to serve as APCs, it has been generally believed that resting B cells cannot perform this function. However, in recent studies the authors have found that resting B cells can indeed present soluble antigen to T cell clones as well as to antigen-primed T cells. The previous difficulty in demonstrating this activity can be explained by the finding that, in contrast to macrophages and dendritic cells, the antigen-presenting ability of resting B cells is very radiosensitive. Macrophages are usually irradiated with 2000-3300 rads to prevent them from incorporating [ 3 H]thymidine in the T cell proliferation assay. Resting B cells, however, begin to lose presenting function at 1500 rads and have completely lost this activity at 3300 rads. It was also possible to distinguish two distinct T cell clonal phenotypes when resting B cells were used as APCs on the basis of two different assays (T cell proliferation, and B cell proliferation resulting from T cell activation). The majority of T cell clones tested were capable of both proliferating themselves and inducing the proliferation of B cells. Some T cells clones, however, could not proliferate in the presence of antigen and B cell APCs, although they were very good at inducing the proliferation of B cells

  12. The timing of T cell priming and cycling

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    Reinhard eObst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The results suggest a degree of programming by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4+ T cell expansion and new avenues towards a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed.

  13. Presentation of lipid antigens to T cells.

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    Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-04-15

    T cells specific for lipid antigens participate in regulation of the immune response during infections, tumor immunosurveillance, allergy and autoimmune diseases. T cells recognize lipid antigens as complexes formed with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules, thus resembling recognition of MHC-peptide complexes. The biophysical properties of lipids impose unique mechanisms for their delivery, internalization into antigen-presenting cells, membrane trafficking, processing, and loading of CD1 molecules. Each of these steps is controlled at molecular and celular levels and determines lipid immunogenicity. Lipid antigens may derive from microbes and from the cellular metabolism, thus allowing the immune system to survey a large repertoire of immunogenic molecules. Recognition of lipid antigens facilitates the detection of infectious agents and the initiation of responses involved in immunoregulation and autoimmunity. This review focuses on the presentation mechanisms and specific recognition of self and bacterial lipid antigens and discusses the important open issues.

  14. Regulation and Gene Expression Profiling of NKG2D Positive Human Cytomegalovirus-Primed CD4+ T-Cells

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    Jensen, Helle; Folkersen, Lasse; Skov, Søren

    2012-01-01

    NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D– CD4+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression. PMID:22870231

  15. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells.

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    Helle Jensen

    Full Text Available NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK cells, CD8(+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4(+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4(+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D(- CD4(+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4(+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4(+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4(+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4(+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression.

  16. Estradiol-induced vaginal mucus inhibits antigen penetration and CD8(+) T cell priming in response to intravaginal immunization.

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    Seavey, Matthew M; Mosmann, Tim R

    2009-04-14

    Although vaginal immunization has been explored as a strategy to induce mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract, this site displays unique immunological features that probably evolved to inhibit anti-paternal T cell responses after insemination to allow successful pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that estradiol, which induces an estrus-like state, prevented CD8(+) T cell priming during intravaginal immunization of mice. We now show that estradiol prevented antigen loading of vaginal antigen presenting cells (APCs) after intravaginal immunization. Histological examination confirmed that estradiol prevented penetration of peptide antigen into the vaginal wall. Removal of the estradiol-induced mucus barrier by mucinase partially restored antigen loading of vaginal APC and CD8(+) T cell proliferation in vivo. The estradiol-induced mucus barrier may thus prevent exposure to antigens delivered intravaginally, supplementing additional estradiol-dependent mechanism(s) that inhibit CD8(+) T cell priming after insemination or vaginal vaccination.

  17. Estradiol-induced vaginal mucus inhibits antigen penetration and CD8+ T cell priming in response to intravaginal immunization

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    Seavey, Matthew M.; Mosmann, Tim R.

    2010-01-01

    Although vaginal immunization has been explored as a strategy to induce mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract, this site displays unique immunological features that probably evolved to inhibit anti-paternal T cell responses after insemination to allow successful pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that estradiol, which induces an estrus-like state, prevented CD8+ T cell priming during intravaginal immunization of mice. We now show that estradiol prevented antigen loading of vaginal antigen presenting cells (APC) after intravaginal immunization. Histological examination confirmed that estradiol prevented penetration of peptide antigen into the vaginal wall. Removal of the estradiol-induced mucus barrier by mucinase partially restored antigen loading of vaginal APC and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. The estradiol-induced mucus barrier may thus prevent exposure to antigens delivered intravaginally, supplementing additional estradiol-dependent mechanism(s) that inhibit CD8+ T cell priming after insemination or vaginal vaccination. PMID:19428849

  18. CD8 T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue induce immune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

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    Seidel, Daniel; Eickmeier, Ira; Kühl, Anja A; Hamann, Alf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schott, Eckart

    2014-02-01

    The pathogenesis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains poorly understood. Since PSC predominantly occurs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity triggered by activated T cells migrating from the gut to the liver is a possible mechanism. We hypothesized that T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) by a specific antigen migrate to the liver and cause cholangitis when they recognize the same antigen on cholangiocytes. We induced ovalbumin-dependent colitis in mice that express ovalbumin in biliary epithelia (ASBT-OVA mice) and crossed ASBT-OVA mice with mice that express ovalbumin in enterocytes (iFABP-OVA mice). We analyzed T-cell activation in the GALT and crossreactivity to the same antigen in the liver as well as the effects of colitis per se on antigen-presentation and T-cell activation in the liver. Intrarectal application of ovalbumin followed by transfer of CD8 OT-I T cells led to antigen-dependent colitis. CD8 T cells primed in the GALT acquired effector function and the capability to migrate to the liver, where they caused cholangitis in a strictly antigen-dependent manner. Likewise, cholangitis developed in mice expressing ovalbumin simultaneously in biliary epithelia and enterocytes after transfer of OT-I T cells. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis led to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in the portal venous blood, induced activation of resident liver dendritic cells, and promoted the induction of T-cell-dependent cholangitis. Our data strengthen the notion that immune-mediated cholangitis is caused by T cells primed in the GALT and provide the first link between colitis and cholangitis in an antigen-dependent mouse model. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. Virus-specific regulatory T cells ameliorate encephalitis by repressing effector T cell functions from priming to effector stages.

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    Jingxian Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the presence of pathogen-specific Foxp3+ CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg in infected animals, but little is known about where and how these cells affect the effector T cell responses and whether they are more suppressive than bulk Treg populations. We recently showed the presence of both epitope M133-specific Tregs (M133 Treg and conventional CD4 T cells (M133 Tconv in the brains of mice with coronavirus-induced encephalitis. Here, we provide new insights into the interactions between pathogenic Tconv and Tregs responding to the same epitope. M133 Tregs inhibited the proliferation but not initial activation of M133 Tconv in draining lymph nodes (DLN. Further, M133 Tregs inhibited migration of M133 Tconv from the DLN. In addition, M133 Tregs diminished microglia activation and decreased the number and function of Tconv in the infected brain. Thus, virus-specific Tregs inhibited pathogenic CD4 T cell responses during priming and effector stages, particularly those recognizing cognate antigen, and decreased mortality and morbidity without affecting virus clearance. These cells are more suppressive than bulk Tregs and provide a targeted approach to ameliorating immunopathological disease in infectious settings.

  20. Concanavalin A-mediated in vitro activation of a secondary cytotoxic T-cell response in virus-primed splenocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Jensen, B L

    1980-01-01

    In a recent report it was shown that what appeared to be secondary cytotoxic T cells could be obtained from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-primed splenocytes after stimulation in vitro with the non-specific T cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A). The present experiments attempt to chara......In a recent report it was shown that what appeared to be secondary cytotoxic T cells could be obtained from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-primed splenocytes after stimulation in vitro with the non-specific T cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A). The present experiments attempt...... to characterize further these effector cells and, in particular, to establish whether the Con A-activated cytotoxic effectors are qualitatively different from the secondary cytotoxic T cells induced by restimulation with the homologous antigen. It was found that: (1) in vitro activation with Con A could......, since no evidence was found to indicate a role for other cell types or soluble (cytotoxic or arming) factors; (4) cytotoxicity was specific with regard to both virus and 'self'. By comparison with previous data on LCMV-induced cytotoxic T cells, it is concluded that Con A induces the generation...

  1. Antigen-primed helper T cell function in CBA/N mice is radiosensitive

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    Phillips, N.E.; Campbell, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    CBA/N mice have an X-linked immunodeficiency that includes a deficient humoral response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). In order to study the cellular mechanisms of this deficiency we have examined helper T cell function to SRBC in an adoptive transfer system by using 2 different sources of helper T cells. When thymocytes were used as the source of helper T cell precursors in an adoptive transfer system, CBA/N thymocytes were as effective as CBA/Ca thymocytes in inducing CBA/Ca bone marrow cells to develop into both direct and indirect anti-SRBC plaque-forming cells (PFC). However, when SRBC-primed, irradiated recipient mice were used as the source of helper T cells, primed and irradiated CBA/N recipiets developed significantly fewer direct and indirect anti-SRBC PFC than similarly treated CBA/CA recipients when reconstituted with CBA/Ca bone marrow cells and challenged with SRBC. We conclude that antigen-primed helper T cell function in CBA/N mice is radiosensitive. Possible reasons for this are evaluated and discussed

  2. Antigen Requirements for Efficient Priming of CD8+ T Cells by Leishmania major-Infected Dendritic Cells

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    Bertholet, Sylvie; Debrabant, Alain; Afrin, Farhat; Caler, Elisabeth; Mendez, Susana; Tabbara, Khaled S.; Belkaid, Yasmine; Sacks, David L.

    2005-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses have been shown to be critical for the development and maintenance of acquired resistance to infections with the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. Monitoring the development of immunodominant or clonally restricted T-cell subsets in response to infection has been difficult, however, due to the paucity of known epitopes. We have analyzed the potential of L. major transgenic parasites, expressing the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), to be presented by antigen-presenting cells to OVA-specific OT-II CD4+ or OT-I CD8+ T cells. Truncated OVA was expressed in L. major as part of a secreted or nonsecreted chimeric protein with L. donovani 3′ nucleotidase (NT-OVA). Dendritic cells (DC) but not macrophages infected with L. major that secreted NT-OVA could prime OT-I T cells to proliferate and release gamma interferon. A diminished T-cell response was observed when DC were infected with parasites expressing nonsecreted NT-OVA or with heat-killed parasites. Inoculation of mice with transgenic parasites elicited the proliferation of adoptively transferred OT-I T cells and their recruitment to the site of infection in the skin. Together, these results demonstrate the possibility of targeting heterologous antigens to specific cellular compartments in L. major and suggest that proteins secreted or released by L. major in infected DC are a major source of peptides for the generation of parasite-specific CD8+ T cells. The ability of L. major transgenic parasites to activate OT-I CD8+ T cells in vivo will permit the analysis of parasite-driven T-cell expansion, differentiation, and recruitment at the clonal level. PMID:16177338

  3. Autoimmune vitiligo does not require the ongoing priming of naïve CD8 T cells for disease progression or associated protection against melanoma1

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    Byrne, Katelyn T.; Zhang, Peisheng; Steinberg, Shannon M.; Turk, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is a CD8 T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that has been shown to promote the longevity of memory T cell responses to melanoma. However mechanisms whereby melanocyte/melanoma antigen-specific T cell responses are perpetuated in the context of vitiligo are not well understood. The present studies investigate the possible phenomenon of naïve T cell priming in hosts with melanoma-initiated, self-perpetuating, autoimmune vitiligo. Using naïve pmel (gp10025-33-specific) transgenic CD8 T cells, we demonstrate that autoimmune melanocyte destruction induces naive T cell proliferation in skin-draining lymph nodes, in an antigen-dependent fashion. These pmel T cells upregulate expression of CD44, P-selectin ligand, and granzyme B. However, they do not downregulate CD62L, nor do they acquire the ability to produce IFN-γ, indicating a lack of functional priming. Accordingly, adult thymectomized mice exhibit no reduction in the severity or kinetics of depigmentation or long-lived protection against melanoma, indicating that the continual priming of naïve T cells is not required for vitiligo or its associated anti-tumor immunity. Despite this, depletion of CD4 T cells during the course of vitiligo rescues the priming of naïve pmel T cells that are capable of producing IFN-γ and persisting as memory, suggesting an ongoing and dominant mechanism of suppression by regulatory T cells. This work reveals the complex regulation of self-reactive CD8 T cells in vitiligo, and demonstrates the overall poorly immunogenic nature of this autoimmune disease setting. PMID:24403535

  4. Understanding delayed T-cell priming, lung recruitment, and airway luminal T-cell responses in host defense against pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaler, Christopher R; Horvath, Carly; Lai, Rocky; Xing, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the causative bacterium of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), is a serious global health concern. Central to M.tb effective immune avoidance is its ability to modulate the early innate inflammatory response and prevent the establishment of adaptive T-cell immunity for nearly three weeks. When compared with other intracellular bacterial lung pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila, or even closely related mycobacterial species such as M. smegmatis, this delay is astonishing. Customarily, the alveolar macrophage (AM) acts as a sentinel, detecting and alerting surrounding cells to the presence of an invader. However, in the case of M.tb, this may be impaired, thus delaying the recruitment of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to the lung. Upon uptake by APC populations, M.tb is able to subvert and delay the processing of antigen, MHC class II loading, and the priming of effector T cell populations. This delay ultimately results in the deferred recruitment of effector T cells to not only the lung interstitium but also the airway lumen. Therefore, it is of upmost importance to dissect the mechanisms that contribute to the delayed onset of immune responses following M.tb infection. Such knowledge will help design the most effective vaccination strategies against pulmonary TB.

  5. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions.Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings.Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  6. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Degang; Shui, Tiejun; Miranda, Jake W; Gilson, Danny J; Song, Zhengyu; Chen, Jia; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Jianyu; Yang, Jun; Jing, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions. Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg) cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings. Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  7. In Vitro Priming of Naı̈ve T-cells with p-Phenylenediamine and Bandrowski's Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andrew; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Faulkner, Lee; Evely, Jane; Pirmohamed, Munir; Park, Kevin B; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2015-10-19

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is a component of hair dye formulations that is associated with T-cell mediated allergic contact dermatitis. Antigen-specific T-cells from allergic contact dermatitis patients are activated with either PPD or the oxidation product, Bandrowski's base. In nonallergic individuals, T-cells that are activated by Bandrowski's base, but not by PPD, are readily detectable. The aim of the current study was to use an in vitro T-cell priming assay to assess the activation of memory and naı̈ve T-cells from healthy donors with PPD and Bandrowski's base, and to compare these responses to those observed from allergic patients. Both PPD and Bandrowski's base-responsive clones were generated from allergic patients. The majority of Bandrowski's base-responsive clones were CD4+ and displayed a lack of PPD reactivity. In contrast, CD4+ and CD8+ clones displaying PPD reactivity were detected. Approximately 25% of these displayed low levels of reactivity to Bandrowski's base. Clones from the allergic patients secreted a range of cytokines including IFN-γ, Il-13, and Il-22. In healthy donors, Bandrowski's base-specific T-cell proliferative responses and cytokine secretion were detected with both naı̈ve and memory T-cells. T-cell clones generated from the Bandrowski's base-responsive cultures responded to Bandrowski's base but not PPD. PPD-specific naı̈ve and memory T-cell responses were not detected from healthy donors. These data show that Bandrowski's base stimulates pre-existing memory T-cells isolated from healthy donors and primes naı̈ve T-cells when the chemical is bound to autologous dendritic cells. Priming naı̈ve T-cells against PPD failed, suggesting an important individual susceptibility factor is missing from the in vitro T-cell priming assay.

  8. Diverse Epitope Specificity, Immunodominance Hierarchy, and Functional Avidity of Effector CD4 T Cells Established During Priming Is Maintained in Lung After Influenza A Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Katherine A; DiPiazza, Anthony T; Rattan, Ajitanuj; Knowlden, Zackery A G; Yang, Hongmei; Sant, Andrea J

    2018-01-01

    One of the major contributions to protective immunity to influenza viruses that is provided by virus-specific CD4 T cells is delivery of effector function to the infected lung. However, there is little known about the selection and breadth of viral epitope-specific CD4 T cells that home to the lung after their initial priming. In this study, using a mouse model of influenza A infection and an unbiased method of epitope identification, the viral epitope-specific CD4 T cells elicited after infection were identified and quantified. We found that a very diverse specificity of CD4 T cells is primed by infection, including epitopes from hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, matrix protein, nucleoprotein, and non-structural protein-1. Using peptide-specific cytokine EliSpots, the diversity and immunodominance hierarchies established in the lung-draining lymph node were compared with specificities of CD4 T cells that home to the lung. Our studies revealed that CD4 T cells of all epitope specificities identified in peripheral lymphoid tissue home back to the lung and that most of these lung-homing cells are localized within the tissue rather than the pulmonary vasculature. There is a striking shift of CD4 T cell functionality that enriches for IFN-γ production as cells are primed in the lymph node, enter the lung vasculature, and finally establish residency in the tissue, but with no apparent shifts in their functional avidity. We conclude that CD4 T cells of broad viral epitope specificity are recruited into the lung after influenza infection, where they then have the opportunity to encounter infected or antigen-bearing antigen-presenting cells.

  9. Nodular inflammatory foci are sites of T cell priming and control of murine cytomegalovirus infection in the neonatal lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix R Stahl

    Full Text Available Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8(+ T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming "nodular inflammatory foci" (NIF in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control.

  10. Immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. Transfer of immunity with primed CD45RC+ and CD45RC- CD4 T-cell subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1996-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen CD4 T cells were separated by antibody......-induced increase in CD45RC+ cells is most likely due to generation of antigen-specific memory T cells....

  11. Liver-Primed Memory T Cells Generated under Noninflammatory Conditions Provide Anti-infectious Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Böttcher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of CD8+ T cell (CTL immunity or tolerance is linked to the conditions during T cell priming. Dendritic cells (DCs matured during inflammation generate effector/memory T cells, whereas immature DCs cause T cell deletion/anergy. We identify a third outcome of T cell priming in absence of inflammation enabled by cross-presenting liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Such priming generated memory T cells that were spared from deletion by immature DCs. Similar to central memory T cells, liver-primed T cells differentiated into effector CTLs upon antigen re-encounter on matured DCs even after prolonged absence of antigen. Their reactivation required combinatorial signaling through the TCR, CD28, and IL-12R and controlled bacterial and viral infections. Gene expression profiling identified liver-primed T cells as a distinct Neuropilin-1+ memory population. Generation of liver-primed memory T cells may prevent pathogens that avoid DC maturation by innate immune escape from also escaping adaptive immunity through attrition of the T cell repertoire.

  12. The role of natural killer T cells in dendritic cell licensing, cross-priming and memory CD8+ T cell generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eGottschalk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available New vaccination strategies focus on achieving CD8+ T cell (CTL immunity rather than on induction of protective antibody responses. While the requirement of CD4+ T (Th cell help in dendritic cell (DC activation and licensing, and in CTL memory induction has been described in several disease models, CTL responses may occur in a Th cell help independent manner. Natural Killer T cells (NKT cells can substitute for Th cell help and license DC as well. NKT cells produce a broad spectrum of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, thereby inducing a similar set of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in DC. This form of licensing differs from Th cell help by inducing other chemokines: while Th cell licensed DC produce CCR5 ligands, NKT cell-licensed DC produce CCL17 which attracts CCR4+ CD8+ T cells for subsequent activation. It has recently been shown that iNKT cells do not only enhance immune responses against bacterial pathogens or parasites, but also play a role in viral infections. The inclusion of NKT cell ligands in Influenza virus vaccines enhanced memory CTL generation and protective immunity in a mouse model. This review will focus on the role of iNKT cells in the cross-talk with cross-priming DC and memory CD8+ T cell formation.

  13. Antigen presentation by resting B cells. Radiosensitivity of the antigen-presentation function and two distinct pathways of T cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; DeFranco, A.L.; Paul, W.E.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this report we have examined the ability of small resting B cells to act as antigen-presenting cells (APC) to antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cells as assessed by either T cell proliferation or T cell-dependent B cell stimulation. We found that 10 of 14 in vitro antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cell clones and lines and three of four T cell hybridomas could be induced to either proliferate or secrete IL-2 in the presence of lightly irradiated (1,000 rads) purified B cells and the appropriate foreign antigen. All T cell lines and hybridomas were stimulated to proliferate or make IL-2 by macrophage- and dendritic cell-enriched populations and all T cells tested except one hybridoma caused B cell activation when stimulated with B cells as APC. Furthermore, lightly irradiated, highly purified syngeneic B cells were as potent a source of APC for inducing B cell activation as were low density dendritic and macrophage-enriched cells. Lymph node T cells freshly taken from antigen-primed animals were also found to proliferate when cultured with purified B cells and the appropriate antigen. This APC function was easily measured when the cells were irradiated with 1,000 rads, but was greatly diminished or absent when they were irradiated with 3,300 rads. In addition, this radiosensitivity allowed us to easily distinguish B cell antigen presentation from presentation by the dendritic cell and macrophage, as the latter was resistant to 3,300 rads. Finally, one T cell clone that failed to proliferate when B cells were used as APC was able to recruit allogeneic B cells to proliferate in the presence of syngeneic B cells and the appropriate antigen. This result suggests that there are at least two distinct pathways of activation in T cells, one that leads to T cell proliferation and one that leads to the secretion of B cell recruitment factor(s)

  14. Characterizing T Cells in SCID Patients Presenting with Reactive or Residual T Lymphocytes

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    Atar Lev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID may present with residual circulating T cells. While all cells are functionally deficient, resulting in high susceptibility to infections, only some of these cells are causing autoimmune symptoms. Methods. Here we compared T-cell functions including the number of circulating CD3+ T cells, in vitro responses to mitogens, T-cell receptor (TCR repertoire, TCR excision circles (TREC levels, and regulatory T cells (Tregs enumeration in several immunodeficinecy subtypes, clinically presenting with nonreactive residual cells (MHC-II deficiency or reactive cells. The latter includes patients with autoreactive clonal expanded T cell and patients with alloreactive transplacentally maternal T cells. Results. MHC-II deficient patients had slightly reduced T-cell function, normal TRECs, TCR repertoires, and normal Tregs enumeration. In contrast, patients with reactive T cells exhibited poor T-cell differentiation and activity. While the autoreactive cells displayed significantly reduced Tregs numbers, the alloreactive transplacentally acquired maternal lymphocytes had high functional Tregs. Conclusion. SCID patients presenting with circulating T cells show different patterns of T-cell activity and regulatory T cells enumeration that dictates the immunodeficient and autoimmune manifestations. We suggest that a high-tolerance capacity of the alloreactive transplacentally acquired maternal lymphocytes represents a toleration advantage, yet still associated with severe immunodeficiency.

  15. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+ T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8+ T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a−/− CD8+ T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a−/− CD8+ T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8+ T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8+ T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8+ T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8+ T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas. PMID:28344876

  16. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+ T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Sara Y; Kang, Sohyeong; Ford, Mandy L; Harder, Kenneth W; Priatel, John J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8 + T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8 + T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8 + T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8 + T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8 + T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas.

  17. Prolonged antigen presentation is required for optimal CD8+ T cell responses against malaria liver stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A Cockburn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunization with irradiated sporozoites is currently the most effective vaccination strategy against liver stages of malaria parasites, yet the mechanisms underpinning the success of this approach are unknown. Here we show that the complete development of protective CD8+ T cell responses requires prolonged antigen presentation. Using TCR transgenic cells specific for the malaria circumsporozoite protein, a leading vaccine candidate, we found that sporozoite antigen persists for over 8 weeks after immunization--a remarkable finding since irradiated sporozoites are incapable of replication and do not differentiate beyond early liver stages. Persisting antigen was detected in lymphoid organs and depends on the presence of CD11c+ cells. Prolonged antigen presentation enhanced the magnitude of the CD8+ T cell response in a number of ways. Firstly, reducing the time primed CD8+ T cells were exposed to antigen in vivo severely reduced the final size of the developing memory population. Secondly, fully developed memory cells expanded in previously immunized mice but not when transferred to naïve animals. Finally, persisting antigen was able to prime naïve cells, including recent thymic emigrants, to become functional effector cells capable of eliminating parasites in the liver. Together these data show that the optimal development of protective CD8+ T cell immunity against malaria liver stages is dependent upon the prolonged presentation of sporozoite-derived antigen.

  18. Direct stimulation of T cells by membrane vesicles from antigen-presenting cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovář, Marek; Boyman, O.; Shen, X.; Hwang, I.; Kohler, R.; Sprent, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 31 (2006), s. 11671-11676 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : immunotherapy * t cell priming * tumors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.643, year: 2006

  19. Nasal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs) support the recall but not priming of influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolla, Angela; Wang, Zhongfang; Groom, Joanna R; Kedzierska, Katherine; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C; Wakim, Linda M

    2017-05-16

    The lymphoid tissue that drains the upper respiratory tract represents an important induction site for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity to airborne pathogens and intranasal vaccines. Here, we investigated the role of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs), which are mucosal-associated lymphoid organs embedded in the submucosa of the nasal passage, in the initial priming and recall expansion of CD8 + T cells following an upper respiratory tract infection with a pathogenic influenza virus and immunization with a live attenuated influenza virus vaccine. Whereas NALTs served as the induction site for the recall expansion of memory CD8 + T cells following influenza virus infection or vaccination, they failed to support activation of naïve CD8 + T cells. Strikingly, NALTs, unlike other lymphoid tissues, were not routinely surveyed during the steady state by circulating T cells. The selective recruitment of memory T cells into these lymphoid structures occurred in response to infection-induced elevation of the chemokine CXCL10, which attracted CXCR3 + memory CD8 + T cells. These results have significant implications for intranasal vaccines, which deliver antigen to mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue and aim to elicit protective CTL-mediated immunity.

  20. Activation of Antigen-Specific CD8(+) T Cells by Poly-DL-Lactide/Glycolide (PLGA) Nanoparticle-Primed Gr-1(high) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen-Hui; Yang, Ya-Wun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the induction of antigen-specific T cell activation and cell cycle modulation by a poly-DL-lactide/glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticle (NP)-primed CD11b(+)Gr-1(high) subset isolated from mouse bone marrow. PLGA NPs containing the ovalbumin (OVA) antigen were prepared using the double emulsion and solvent evaporation method, and protein release rate and cell viability were determined. The Lin2(¯)CD11b(+)Gr-1(high)Ly6c(low) (Gr-1(high)) subset was sorted from the bone marrow of C57BL/6 J mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and co-cultured with OT-I CD8(+) splenic T cells. Proliferation of OT-I CD8(+) T cells was monitored, and cell cycles were determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling. Treatment of Gr-1(high) cells with PLGA/OVA NPs upregulated expression of the SIINFEKL-H2K(b) complex in the context of MHC I. Co-cultures of OT-I CD8(+) T cells with the PLGA/OVA NP-primed Gr-1(high) cells induced the proliferation of T cells in vitro and modulated cell division and morphology. Treatment of Gr-1(high) cells with PLGA/OVA NPs also induced cell apoptosis and necrosis. This study demonstrated the function of PLGA/OVA NPs in the activation of OT-I CD8(+) T cells and the capability of cross-presentation via the Gr-1(high) polymorphonuclear subset from mouse bone marrow.

  1. Enteroantigen-presenting B cells efficiently stimulate CD4(+) T cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2011-01-01

    Presentation of enterobacterial antigens by antigen-presenting cells and activation of enteroantigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are considered crucial steps in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathology. The detrimental effects of such CD4(+) T cells have been thoroughly demonstrated in models...... of colitis. Also, we have previously established an in vitro assay where murine enteroantigen-specific colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells are activated by splenocytes pulsed with an enterobacterial extract....

  2. Aging Impairs the Ability of Conventional Dendritic Cells to Cross-Prime CD8+ T Cells upon Stimulation with a TLR7 Ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía R Zacca

    Full Text Available The aging process is accompanied by altered immune system functioning and an increased risk of infection. Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen-presenting cells that play a key role in both adaptive and innate immunity, but how aging affects DCs and their influence on immunity has not been thoroughly established. Here we examined the function of conventional DCs (cDCs in old mice after TLR7 stimulation, focusing on their ability to cross-prime CD8+ T cells. Using polyU, a synthetic ssRNA analog, as TLR7 ligand and OVA as an antigen (Ag model, we found that cDCs from old mice have a poor ability to stimulate a CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxic response. cDCs from old mice exhibit alterations in Ag-processing machinery and TLR7 activation. Remarkably, CD8α+ cDCs from old mice have an impaired ability to activate naïve CD8+ T cells and, moreover, a lower capacity to mature and to process exogenous Ag. Taken together, our results suggest that immunosenescence impacts cDC function, affecting the activation of naïve CD8+ T cells and the generation of effector cytotoxic T cells.

  3. Exploiting the role of endogenous lymphoid-resident dendritic cells in the priming of NKT cells and CD8+ T cells to dendritic cell-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels R Petersen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of antigen between antigen-presenting cells (APCs is potentially a physiologically relevant mechanism to spread antigen to cells with specialized stimulatory functions. Here we show that specific CD8+ T cell responses induced in response to intravenous administration of antigen-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs, were ablated in mice selectively depleted of endogenous lymphoid-resident langerin+ CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs, suggesting that the antigen is transferred from the injected cells to resident APCs. In contrast, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were primed predominantly by the injected BM-DCs, with only very weak contribution of resident APCs. Crucially, resident langerin+ CD8α+ DCs only contributed to the priming of CD8+ T cells in the presence of maturation stimuli such as intravenous injection of TLR ligands, or by loading the BM-DCs with the glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer to recruit the adjuvant activity of activated invariant natural killer-like T (iNKT cells. In fact, injection of α-GalCer-loaded CD1d-/- BM-DCs resulted in potent iNKT cell activation, suggesting that this glycolipid antigen can also be transferred to resident CD1d+ APCs. While iNKT cell activation per se was independent of langerin+ CD8α+ DCs, some iNKT cell-mediated activities were reduced, notably release of IL-12p70 and transactivation of NK cells. We conclude that both protein and glycolipid antigens can be exchanged between distinct DC species. These data suggest that the efficacy of DC-based vaccination strategies may be improved by the incorporation of a systemic maturation signal aimed to engage resident APCs in CD8+ T cell priming, and α-GalCer may be particularly well suited to this purpose.

  4. Presentation of an immunodominant immediate-early CD8+ T cell epitope resists human cytomegalovirus immunoevasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ameres

    Full Text Available Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1, that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy.

  5. TLR1/2 activation during heterologous prime-boost vaccination (DNA-MVA enhances CD8+ T Cell responses providing protection against Leishmania (Viannia.

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    Asha Jayakumar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Viannia parasites present particular challenges, as human and murine immune responses to infection are distinct from other Leishmania species, indicating a unique interaction with the host. Further, vaccination studies utilizing small animal models indicate that modalities and antigens that prevent infection by other Leishmania species are generally not protective.Using a newly developed mouse model of chronic L. (Viannia panamensis infection and the heterologous DNA prime - modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA boost vaccination modality, we examined whether the conserved vaccine candidate antigen tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP could provide protection against infection/disease.Heterologous prime - boost (DNA/MVA vaccination utilizing TRYP antigen can provide protection against disease caused by L. (V. panamensis. However, protection is dependent on modulating the innate immune response using the TLR1/2 agonist Pam3CSK4 during DNA priming. Prime-boost vaccination using DNA alone fails to protect. Prior to infection protectively vaccinated mice exhibit augmented CD4 and CD8 IFNγ and memory responses as well as decreased IL-10 and IL-13 responses. IL-13 and IL-10 have been shown to be independently critical for disease in this model. CD8 T cells have an essential role in mediating host defense, as CD8 depletion reversed protection in the vaccinated mice; vaccinated mice depleted of CD4 T cells remained protected. Hence, vaccine-induced protection is dependent upon TLR1/2 activation instructing the generation of antigen specific CD8 cells and restricting IL-13 and IL-10 responses.Given the general effectiveness of prime-boost vaccination, the recalcitrance of Leishmania (Viannia to vaccine approaches effective against other species of Leishmania is again evident. However, prime-boost vaccination modality can with modulation induce protective responses, indicating that the delivery system is critical. Moreover, these results suggest that

  6. Primed T cell responses to chemokines are regulated by the immunoglobulin-like molecule CD31.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Kishore

    Full Text Available CD31, an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by leukocytes and endothelial cells, is thought to contribute to the physiological regulation T cell homeostasis due to the presence of two immunotyrosine-based inhibitory motifs in its cytoplasmic tail. Indeed, loss of CD31 expression leads to uncontrolled T cell-mediated inflammation in a variety of experimental models of disease and certain CD31 polymorphisms correlate with increased disease severity in human graft-versus-host disease and atherosclerosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying CD31-mediated regulation of T cell responses have not yet been clarified. We here show that CD31-mediated signals attenuate T cell chemokinesis both in vitro and in vivo. This effect selectively affects activated/memory T lymphocytes, in which CD31 is clustered on the cell membrane where it segregates to the leading edge. We provide evidence that this molecular segregation, which does not occur in naïve T lymphocytes, might lead to cis-CD31 engagement on the same membrane and subsequent interference with the chemokine-induced PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. We propose that CD31-mediated modulation of memory T cell chemokinesis is a key mechanism by which this molecule contributes to the homeostatic regulation of effector T cell immunity.

  7. Mast-Cell-Derived TNF Amplifies CD8+ Dendritic Cell Functionality and CD8+ T Cell Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are critical promoters of adaptive immunity in the contact hypersensitivity model, but the mechanism of allergen sensitization is poorly understood. Using Mcpt5-CreTNFFL/FL mice, we show here that the absence of TNF exclusively in mast cells impaired the expansion of CD8+ T cells upon sensitization and the T-cell-driven adaptive immune response to elicitation. T cells primed in the absence of mast cell TNF exhibited a diminished efficiency to transfer sensitization to naive recipients. Specifically, mast cell TNF promotes CD8+ dendritic cell (DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes. The peripherally released mast cell TNF further critically boosts the CD8+ T-cell-priming efficiency of CD8+ DCs, thereby linking mast cell effects on T cells to DC modulation. Collectively, our findings identify the distinct potential of mast cell TNF to amplify CD8+ DC functionality and CD8+ T-cell-dominated adaptive immunity, which may be of great importance for immunotherapy and vaccination approaches.

  8. A population dynamics analysis of the interaction between adaptive regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fouchet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks that can be accomplished by a network. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model to describe a interaction network of adaptive regulatory T cells, in which mature precursor T cells may differentiate into either adaptive regulatory T cells or effector T cells, depending on the activation state of the cell by which the antigen was presented. Using an equilibrium analysis of the mathematical model we show that, for some parameters, the network has two stable equilibrium states: one in which effector T cells are strongly regulated by regulatory T cells and another in which effector T cells are not regulated because the regulatory T cell population is vanishingly small. We then simulate different types of perturbations, such as the introduction of an antigen into a virgin system, and look at the state into which the system falls. We find that whether or not the interaction network switches from the regulated (tolerant state to the unregulated state depends on the strength of the antigenic stimulus and the state from which the network has been perturbed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the interaction network studied in this paper plays an essential part in generating and maintaining tolerance against allergens and self-antigens.

  9. The brain microvascular endothelium supports T cell proliferation and has potential for alloantigen presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Wheway

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (EC form the inner lining of blood vessels and are positioned between circulating lymphocytes and tissues. Hypotheses have formed that EC may act as antigen presenting cells based on the intimate interactions with T cells, which are seen in diseases like multiple sclerosis, cerebral malaria (CM and viral neuropathologies. Here, we investigated how human brain microvascular EC (HBEC interact with and support the proliferation of T cells. We found HBEC to express MHC II, CD40 and ICOSL, key molecules for antigen presentation and co-stimulation and to take up fluorescently labeled antigens via macropinocytosis. In co-cultures, we showed that HBEC support and promote the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, which both are key in CM pathogenesis, particularly following T cell receptor activation and co-stimulation. Our findings provide novel evidence that HBEC can trigger T cell activation, thereby providing a novel mechanism for neuroimmunological complications of infectious diseases.

  10. Incomplete effector/memory differentiation of antigen-primed CD8+ T cells in gene gun DNA-vaccinated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Stryhn, Anette; Hansen, Nils Jacob Vest

    2003-01-01

    DNA vaccination is an efficient way to induce CD8+ T cell memory, but it is still unclear to what extent such memory responses afford protection in vivo. To study this, we induced CD8+ memory responses directed towards defined viral epitopes, using DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant MHC class I......-restricted epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus covalently linked to beta2-microglobulin. This vaccine construct primed for a stronger recall response than did a more conventional minigene construct. Despite this, vaccinated mice were only protected against systemic infection whereas protection against...... sites. Thus, our DNA vaccine induces a long-lived memory CD8+ T cell population that provides efficient protection against high-dose systemic infection. However, viral replication in solid non-lymphoid organs is not curtailed sufficiently fast to prevent significant virus-induced inflammation. Our...

  11. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Furusawa

    Full Text Available The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification.

  12. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification.

  13. Effective antigen presentation to helper T cells by human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Ruhaifah K; Vickers, Mark A; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Hall, Andrew M; Barker, Robert N; Walsh, Garry M

    2016-12-01

    Although eosinophils are inflammatory cells, there is increasing attention on their immunomodulatory roles. For example, murine eosinophils can present antigen to CD4 + T helper (Th) cells, but it remains unclear whether human eosinophils also have this ability. This study determined whether human eosinophils present a range of antigens, including allergens, to activate Th cells, and characterized their expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules required for effective presentation. Human peripheral blood eosinophils purified from non-allergic donors were pulsed with the antigens house dust mite extract (HDM), Timothy Grass extract (TG) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD), before co-culture with autologous CD4 + Th cells. Proliferative and cytokine responses were measured, with eosinophil expression of HLA-DR/DP/DQ and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 determined by flow cytometry. Eosinophils pulsed with HDM, TG or PPD drove Th cell proliferation, with the response strength dependent on antigen concentration. The cytokine responses varied with donor and antigen, and were not biased towards any particular Th subset, often including combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Eosinophils up-regulated surface expression of HLA-DR/DP/DQ, CD80, CD86 and CD40 in culture, increases that were sustained over 5 days when incubated with antigens, including HDM, or the major allergens it contains, Der p I or Der p II. Human eosinophils can, therefore, act as effective antigen-presenting cells to stimulate varied Th cell responses against a panel of antigens including HDM, TG or PPD, an ability that may help to determine the development of allergic disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Positions priming in briefly presented search arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgeirsson, Arni Gunnar; Kristjánsson, Árni; Kyllingsbæk, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Repetition priming in visual search has been a topic of extensive research since Maljkovic & Nakayama [1994, Memory & Cognition, 22, 657-672] presented the first detailed studies of such effects. Their results showed large reductions in reaction times when target color was repeated on consecutive...... the targets are oddly colored alphanumeric characters. The effects arise at very low exposure durations and benefit accuracy at all exposure durations towards the subjects’ ceiling. We conclude that temporally constricted experimental conditions can add to our understanding priming in visual search...... pop-out search trials. Such repetition effects have since been generalized to a multitude of target attributes. Priming has primarily been investigated using self-terminating visual search paradigms, comparing differences in response times. Response accuracy has predominantly served as a control...

  15. Caspase-2-dependent dendritic cell death, maturation, and priming of T cells in response to Brucella abortus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinna Li

    presentation, and T cell priming.

  16. T cell ignorance is bliss: T cells are not tolerized by Langerhans cells presenting human papillomavirus antigens in the absence of costimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Woodham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 infections are intra-epithelial, and thus, HPV16 is known to interact with Langerhans cells (LCs, the resident epithelial antigen-presenting cells (APCs. The current paradigm for APC-mediated induction of T cell anergy is through delivery of T cell receptor signals via peptides on MHC molecules (signal 1, but without costimulation (signal 2. We previously demonstrated that LCs exposed to HPV16 in vitro present HPV antigens to T cells without costimulation, but it remained uncertain if such T cells would remain ignorant, become anergic, or in the case of CD4+ T cells, differentiate into Tregs. Here we demonstrate that Tregs were not induced by LCs presenting only signal 1, and through a series of in vitro immunizations show that CD8+ T cells receiving signal 1+2 from LCs weeks after consistently receiving signal 1 are capable of robust effector functions. Importantly, this indicates that T cells are not tolerized but instead remain ignorant to HPV, and are activated given the proper signals. Keywords: T cell anergy, T cell ignorance, Immune tolerance, Human papillomavirus, HPV16, Langerhans cells

  17. T-Cell Therapy Using Interleukin-21-Primed Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphocytes Combined With Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphocyte Antigen-4 Blockade Results in Long-Term Cell Persistence and Durable Tumor Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Aude G; Roberts, Ilana M; Thompson, John A; Margolin, Kim A; Bhatia, Shailender; Lee, Sylvia M; Sloan, Heather L; Lai, Ivy P; Farrar, Erik A; Wagener, Felecia; Shibuya, Kendall C; Cao, Jianhong; Wolchok, Jedd D; Greenberg, Philip D; Yee, Cassian

    2016-11-01

    Purpose Peripheral blood-derived antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) provide a readily available source of effector cells that can be administered with minimal toxicity in an outpatient setting. In metastatic melanoma, this approach results in measurable albeit modest clinical responses in patients resistant to conventional therapy. We reasoned that concurrent cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) checkpoint blockade might enhance the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred CTLs. Patients and Methods Autologous MART1-specific CTLs were generated by priming with peptide-pulsed dendritic cells in the presence of interleukin-21 and enriched by peptide-major histocompatibility complex multimer-guided cell sorting. This expeditiously yielded polyclonal CTL lines uniformly expressing markers associated with an enhanced survival potential. In this first-in-human strategy, 10 patients with stage IV melanoma received the MART1-specific CTLs followed by a standard course of anti-CTLA-4 (ipilimumab). Results The toxicity profile of the combined treatment was comparable to that of ipilimumab monotherapy. Evaluation of best responses at 12 weeks yielded two continuous complete remissions, one partial response (PR) using RECIST criteria (two PRs using immune-related response criteria), and three instances of stable disease. Infused CTLs persisted with frequencies up to 2.9% of CD8 + T cells for as long as the patients were monitored (up to 40 weeks). In patients who experienced complete remissions, PRs, or stable disease, the persisting CTLs acquired phenotypic and functional characteristics of long-lived memory cells. Moreover, these patients also developed responses to nontargeted tumor antigens (epitope spreading). Conclusion We demonstrate that combining antigen-specific CTLs with CTLA-4 blockade is safe and produces durable clinical responses, likely reflecting both enhanced activity of transferred cells and improved recruitment of new responses

  18. T-Cell Therapy Using Interleukin-21–Primed Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphocytes Combined With Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphocyte Antigen-4 Blockade Results in Long-Term Cell Persistence and Durable Tumor Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Aude G.; Roberts, Ilana M.; Thompson, John A.; Margolin, Kim A.; Bhatia, Shailender; Lee, Sylvia M.; Sloan, Heather L.; Lai, Ivy P.; Farrar, Erik A.; Wagener, Felecia; Shibuya, Kendall C.; Cao, Jianhong; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral blood–derived antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) provide a readily available source of effector cells that can be administered with minimal toxicity in an outpatient setting. In metastatic melanoma, this approach results in measurable albeit modest clinical responses in patients resistant to conventional therapy. We reasoned that concurrent cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) checkpoint blockade might enhance the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred CTLs. Patients and Methods Autologous MART1-specific CTLs were generated by priming with peptide-pulsed dendritic cells in the presence of interleukin-21 and enriched by peptide-major histocompatibility complex multimer-guided cell sorting. This expeditiously yielded polyclonal CTL lines uniformly expressing markers associated with an enhanced survival potential. In this first-in-human strategy, 10 patients with stage IV melanoma received the MART1-specific CTLs followed by a standard course of anti–CTLA-4 (ipilimumab). Results The toxicity profile of the combined treatment was comparable to that of ipilimumab monotherapy. Evaluation of best responses at 12 weeks yielded two continuous complete remissions, one partial response (PR) using RECIST criteria (two PRs using immune-related response criteria), and three instances of stable disease. Infused CTLs persisted with frequencies up to 2.9% of CD8+ T cells for as long as the patients were monitored (up to 40 weeks). In patients who experienced complete remissions, PRs, or stable disease, the persisting CTLs acquired phenotypic and functional characteristics of long-lived memory cells. Moreover, these patients also developed responses to nontargeted tumor antigens (epitope spreading). Conclusion We demonstrate that combining antigen-specific CTLs with CTLA-4 blockade is safe and produces durable clinical responses, likely reflecting both enhanced activity of transferred cells and improved recruitment of new responses

  19. Effector CD4+ T cells recognize intravascular antigen presented by patrolling monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhorpe, Clare L V; Norman, M Ursula; Hall, Pam; Snelgrove, Sarah L; Finsterbusch, Michaela; Li, Anqi; Lo, Camden; Tan, Zhe Hao; Li, Songhui; Nilsson, Susan K; Kitching, A Richard; Hickey, Michael J

    2018-02-21

    Although effector CD4 + T cells readily respond to antigen outside the vasculature, how they respond to intravascular antigens is unknown. Here we show the process of intravascular antigen recognition using intravital multiphoton microscopy of glomeruli. CD4 + T cells undergo intravascular migration within uninflamed glomeruli. Similarly, while MHCII is not expressed by intrinsic glomerular cells, intravascular MHCII-expressing immune cells patrol glomerular capillaries, interacting with CD4 + T cells. Following intravascular deposition of antigen in glomeruli, effector CD4 + T-cell responses, including NFAT1 nuclear translocation and decreased migration, are consistent with antigen recognition. Of the MHCII + immune cells adherent in glomerular capillaries, only monocytes are retained for prolonged durations. These cells can also induce T-cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, monocyte depletion reduces CD4 + T-cell-dependent glomerular inflammation. These findings indicate that MHCII + monocytes patrolling the glomerular microvasculature can present intravascular antigen to CD4 + T cells within glomerular capillaries, leading to antigen-dependent inflammation.

  20. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-01-01

    of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells was markedly impaired in B(-/-) mice infected with either virus strain. Thus, our results indicate that B cells play an important role in antiviral immunity not only as Ab producers, but also in promoting an optimal and sustained T cell response. The T cell defects......In this study, we investigate the state of T cell-mediated immunity in B cell-deficient (B(-/-)) mice infected with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus known to differ markedly in their capacity to persist. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the more persisting virus, virus......-specific CD8(+) T cells are initially generated that are qualitatively similar to those in wild-type mice. However, although cell numbers are well sustained over time, the capacity to produce cytokines is rapidly impaired. In similarly infected B(-/-) BALB/c mice, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are completely...

  1. Frequency patterns of T-cell exposed motifs in immunoglobulin heavy chain peptides presented by MHCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Bremel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEM. TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM. Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of T-cell exposed motif re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by clonal expansion that develop along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  2. Heterologous prime-boost regimens with a recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral vector and adjuvanted F4 protein elicit polyfunctional HIV-1-specific T-Cell responses in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN ('A'), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 ('P'), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques. Besides

  3. Donor T cells primed on leukemia lysate-pulsed recipient APCs mediate strong graft-versus-leukemia effects across MHC barriers in full chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Koestner, Wolfgang; Hapke, Martin; Schlaphoff, Verena; Länger, Florian; Baumann, Rolf; Koenecke, Christian; Cornberg, Markus; Welte, Karl; Blazar, Bruce R; Sauer, Martin G

    2009-04-30

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of host origin drive graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects but can also trigger life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) across major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers. We show that in vitro priming of donor lymphocytes can circumvent the need of recipient-derived APCs in vivo for mediating robust GVL effects and significantly diminishes the risk of severe GVHD. In vitro, generated and expanded T cells (ETCs) mediate anti-leukemia effects only when primed on recipient-derived APCs. Loading of APCs in vitro with leukemia cell lysate, chimerism status of the recipient, and timing of adoptive transfer after HCT are important factors determining the outcome. Delayed transfer of ETCs resulted in strong GVL effects in leukemia-bearing full chimera (FC) and mixed chimera (MC) recipients, which were comparable with the GVL/GVHD rates observed after the transfer of naive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). Upon early transfer, GVL effects were more pronounced with ETCs but at the expense of significant GVHD. The degree of GVHD was most severe in MCs after transfer of ETCs that had been in vitro primed either on nonpulsed recipient-derived APCs or with donor-derived APCs.

  4. Differential requirements of CD4(+) T-cell signals for effector cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) priming and functional memory CTL development at higher CD8(+) T-cell precursor frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeshappa, Channakeshava S; Nanjundappa, Roopa H; Xie, Yufeng; Freywald, Andrew; Xu, Qingyong; Xiang, Jim

    2013-04-01

    Increased CD8(+) T-cell precursor frequency (PF) precludes the requirement of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells for primary CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the key questions of whether unhelped CTLs generated at higher PF are functional effectors, and whether unhelped CTLs can differentiate into functional memory cells at higher PF are unclear. In this study, ovalbumin (OVA) -pulsed dendritic cells (DC(OVA)) derived from C57BL/6, CD40 knockout (CD40(-/-)) or CD40 ligand knockout (CD40L(-/-)) mice were used to immunize C57BL/6, Ia(b-/-), CD40(-/-) or CD40L(-/-) mice, whose PF was previously increased with transfer of 1 × 10(6) CD8(+) T cells derived from OVA-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic OTI, OTI(CD40(-/-)) or OTI(CD40L(-/-)) mice. All the immunized mice were then assessed for effector and memory CTL responses. Following DC immunization, relatively comparable CTL priming occurred without CD4(+) T-cell help and Th-provided CD40/CD40L signalling. In addition, the unhelped CTLs were functional effectors capable of inducing therapeutic immunity against established OVA-expressing tumours. In contrast, the functional memory development of CTLs was severely impaired in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help and CD40/CD40L signalling. Finally, unhelped memory CTLs failed to protect mice against lethal tumour challenge. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CD4(+) T-cell help at higher PF, is not required for effector CTL priming, but is required for functional memory CTL development against cancer. Our data may impact the development of novel preventive and therapeutic approaches in cancer patients with compromised CD4(+) T-cell functions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2013-01-01

    receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells...

  6. Priming of CD8 T Cells by Adenoviral Vectors Is Critically Dependent on B7 and Dendritic Cells but Only Partially Dependent on CD28 Ligation on CD8 T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen N; Steffensen, Maria A; Christensen, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    expression resulted in a delayed primary response, whereas memory CD8 T cells generated in CD28-deficient mice appeared almost normal in terms of both phenotype and effector cytokine profile, but they exhibited a significantly reduced proliferative capacity upon secondary challenge while retaining immediate...... in vivo effector capabilities: in vivo cytotoxicity and short-term in vivo protective capacity. Overall, our data point to an absolute requirement for professional APCs and the expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 for efficient CD8 T cell priming by adenoviral vectors. Additionally, our......Adenoviral vectors have long been forerunners in the development of effective CD8 T cell-based vaccines; therefore, it is imperative that we understand the factors controlling the induction of robust and long-lasting transgene-specific immune responses by these vectors. In this study, we...

  7. Rejection of a kidney transplant does not always lead to priming of cytotoxic T cells against mismatched donor HLA class I antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, C. A.; Versteeg-van der Voort Maarschalk, M. F.; Roelen, D. L.; ten Berge, I. J.; Claas, F. H.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed that graft rejection is often associated with the presence of primed cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) with a high avidity for donor cells. Similar high avidity CTLs have been found in individuals who have formed IgG anti-HLA antibodies. The presence of such CTLs to a

  8. A sub-population of circulating porcine gammadelta T cells can act as professional antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, H-H; Denyer, M S; Wileman, T E

    2002-09-10

    A sub-population of circulating porcine gammadelta T cells express cell surface antigens associated with antigen presenting cells (APCs), and are able to take up soluble antigen very effectively. Functional antigen presentation by gammadelta T cells to memory helper T cells was studied by inbred pig lymphocytes immunised with ovalbumin (OVA). After removing all conventional APCs from the peripheral blood of immunised pigs, the remaining lymphocytes still proliferated when stimulated with OVA. When gammadelta T cells were further depleted, OVA specific proliferation was abolished, but reconstitution with gammadelta T cells restored proliferation. The proliferation was blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against MHC class II or CD4, and by pre-treatment of gammadelta T cells with chloroquine. These results indicate that a sub-population of circulating porcine gammadelta T cells act as APCs and present antigen via MHC class II.

  9. Optimizing HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell induction by recombinant BCG in prime-boost regimens with heterologous viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Richard; Bridgeman, Anne; Bourne, Charles; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Sadoff, Jerald C; Both, Gerald W; Joseph, Joan; Fulkerson, John; Hanke, Tomáš

    2011-12-01

    The desire to induce HIV-1-specific responses soon after birth to prevent breast milk transmission of HIV-1 led us to propose a vaccine regimen which primes HIV-1-specific T cells using a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (rBCG) vaccine. Because attenuated live bacterial vaccines are typically not sufficiently immunogenic as stand-alone vaccines, rBCG-primed T cells will likely require boost immunization(s). Here, we compared modified Danish (AERAS-401) and Pasteur lysine auxotroph (222) strains of BCG expressing the immunogen HIVA for their potency to prime HIV-1-specific responses in adult BALB/c mice and examined four heterologous boosting HIVA vaccines for their immunogenic synergy. We found that both BCG.HIVA(401) and BCG.HIVA(222) primed HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell-mediated responses. The strongest boosts were delivered by human adenovirus-vectored HAdV5.HIVA and sheep atadenovirus-vectored OAdV7.HIVA vaccines, followed by poxvirus MVA.HIVA; the weakest was plasmid pTH.HIVA DNA. The prime-boost regimens induced T cells capable of efficient in vivo killing of sensitized target cells. We also observed that the BCG.HIVA(401) and BCG.HIVA(222) vaccines have broadly similar immunologic properties, but display a number of differences mainly detected through distinct profiles of soluble intercellular signaling molecules produced by immune splenocytes in response to both HIV-1- and BCG-specific stimuli. These results encourage further development of the rBCG prime-boost regimen. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Friends not foes: CTLA-4 blockade and mTOR inhibition cooperate during CD8+ T cell priming to promote memory formation and metabolic readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedicord, Virginia A; Cross, Justin R; Montalvo-Ortiz, Welby; Miller, Martin L; Allison, James P

    2015-03-01

    During primary Ag encounter, T cells receive numerous positive and negative signals that control their proliferation, function, and differentiation, but how these signals are integrated to modulate T cell memory has not been fully characterized. In these studies, we demonstrate that combining seemingly opposite signals, CTLA-4 blockade and rapamycin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition, during in vivo T cell priming leads to both an increase in the frequency of memory CD8(+) T cells and improved memory responses to tumors and bacterial challenges. This enhanced efficacy corresponds to increased early expansion and memory precursor differentiation of CD8(+) T cells and increased mitochondrial biogenesis and spare respiratory capacity in memory CD8(+) T cells in mice treated with anti-CTLA-4 and rapamycin during immunization. Collectively, these results reveal that mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition cooperates with rather than antagonizes blockade of CTLA-4, promoting unrestrained effector function and proliferation, and an optimal metabolic program for CD8(+) T cell memory. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to the M. tuberculosis Ag85B-TB10.4 promoted by adjuvanted subunit, adenovector or heterologous prime boost vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Tara; Christensen, Jan P; Billeskov, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    recruited to the site of infection, at the onset of infection. However, compared to CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells showed more extensive recruitment and were the main T cell subset proliferating at the site of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Heterologous prime boost based on H4, produced an additive effect...

  12. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  13. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma with unusual clinical presentation of rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Young, Ken H

    2017-03-01

    Primary extranodal lymphoma is known to occur in nose, gastrointestinal tract, skin, bone, and central nervous system. However, it is extremely rare for primary lymphoma to arise in skeletal muscle. We report a case of a 32-year-old man who presented initially with fever and fatigue. He had a history of alcohol abuse. Laboratory studies and computerized tomography scan showed results consistent with rhabdomyolysis, but the cause of the rhabdomyolysis was undetermined. After biopsy of abdominal skeletal muscle with histologic examination and T-cell receptor gamma chain gene rearrangement analysis, the diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma was established. After two cycles of the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide regimen, the patient's symptoms greatly improved. This is the third reported case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma arising in skeletal muscle reported in the literature and which presented clinically with rhabdomyolysis. The alcohol abuse during the clinical course likely worsens the pathologic process of the rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Lack of Both Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing Proteins 1 and 2 Primes T Cells for Activation-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimsetty, Sashi G; Shigeoka, Alana A; Scheinok, Andrew A; Gavin, Amanda L; Ulevitch, Richard J; McKay, Dianne B

    2017-08-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod)-containing proteins Nod1 and Nod2 play important roles in the innate immune response to pathogenic microbes, but mounting data suggest these pattern recognition receptors might also play key roles in adaptive immune responses. Targeting Nod1 and Nod2 signaling pathways in T cells is likely to provide a new strategy to modify inflammation in a variety of disease states, particularly those that depend on Ag-induced T cell activation. To better understand how Nod1 and Nod2 proteins contribute to adaptive immunity, this study investigated their role in alloantigen-induced T cell activation and asked whether their absence might impact in vivo alloresponses using a severe acute graft versus host disease model. The study provided several important observations. We found that the simultaneous absence of Nod1 and Nod2 primed T cells for activation-induced cell death. T cells from Nod1 × 2 -/- mice rapidly underwent cell death upon exposure to alloantigen. The Nod1 × 2 -/- T cells had sustained p53 expression that was associated with downregulation of its negative regulator MDM2. In vivo, mice transplanted with an inoculum containing Nod1 × 2 -/- T cells were protected from severe graft versus host disease. The results show that the simultaneous absence of Nod1 and Nod2 is associated with accelerated T cell death upon alloantigen encounter, suggesting these proteins might provide new targets to ameliorate T cell responses in a variety of inflammatory states, including those associated with bone marrow or solid organ transplantation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces Fas-dependent activation-induced cell death in superantigen-primed T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, Iris A; Nagarkatti, Mitzi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Nagarkatti, Prakash S [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, PO Box 980613, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0613 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Immune response against a foreign antigen is characterized by a growth phase, in which antigen-specific T cells clonally expand, followed by a decline phase in which the activated T cells undergo apoptosis, a process termed activation-induced cell death (AICD). In the current study, we have investigated the phase at which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) acts to downregulate the antigen-specific T cell response. To this end, C57BL/6 +/+ mice were injected with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) into the footpads (10 {mu}g/footpad), and simultaneously treated with TCDD (10 or 50 {mu}g/kg intraperitoneally). At various time points, the draining lymph node (LN) cells were analyzed for SEA-activated T cells. The data demonstrated that in C57BL/6 +/+ mice, TCDD treatment did not alter the growth phase but facilitated the decline phase of SEA-reactive T cells. TCDD caused a significant decrease in the percentage and absolute numbers of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} SEA-responsive T cells expressing V{beta}3{sup +} and V{beta}11{sup +} but did not affect SEA-nonresponsive V{beta}8{sup +} T cells. Upon in vitro culture, TCDD-exposed SEA-immunized LN cells exhibited increased levels of apoptosis when compared with the vehicle controls. When Fas-deficient (C57BL/6 lpr/lpr) or Fas ligand defective (C57BL/6 gld/gld) mice were treated with TCDD, they failed to exhibit a decrease in percentage and cellularity of SEA-reactive T cells, thereby suggesting a role of Fas-Fas ligand interactions in the TCDD-induced downregulation of SEA-reactive T cell response. The resistance to TCDD-induced decrease in T cell responsiveness to SEA seen in Fas- and FasL-mutant mice was neither due to decreased aryl hydrocabon receptor (AhR) expression nor to altered T cell responsiveness to SEA. The current study demonstrates that TCDD does not prevent T cell activation, but prematurely induces Fas-based AICD, which may contribute to the deletion of antigen-primed T cells. (orig.)

  16. Transfer of in vivo primed transgenic T cells supports allergic lung inflammation and FIZZ1 and Ym1 production in an IL-4Rα and STAT6 dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan Achsah D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD4+ T helper type 2 (TH2 cells, their cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and the transcription factor STAT6 are known to regulate various features of asthma including lung inflammation, mucus production and airway hyperreactivity and also drive alternative activation of macrophages (AAM. However, the precise roles played by the IL-4/IL-13 receptors and STAT6 in inducing AAM protein expression and modulating specific features of airway inflammation are still unclear. Since TH2 differentiation and activation plays a pivotal role in this disease, we explored the possibility of developing an asthma model in mice using T cells that were differentiated in vivo. Results In this study, we monitored the activation and proliferation status of adoptively transferred allergen-specific naïve or in vivo primed CD4+ T cells. We found that both the naïve and in vivo primed T cells expressed similar levels of CD44 and IL-4. However, in vivo primed T cells underwent reduced proliferation in a lymphopenic environment when compared to naïve T cells. We then used these in vivo generated effector T cells in an asthma model. Although there was reduced inflammation in mice lacking IL-4Rα or STAT6, significant amounts of eosinophils were still present in the BAL and lung tissue. Moreover, specific AAM proteins YM1 and FIZZ1 were expressed by epithelial cells, while macrophages expressed only YM1 in RAG2-/- mice. We further show that FIZZ1 and YM1 protein expression in the lung was completely dependent on signaling through the IL-4Rα and STAT6. Consistent with the enhanced inflammation and AAM protein expression, there was a significant increase in collagen deposition and smooth muscle thickening in RAG2-/- mice compared to mice deficient in IL-4Rα or STAT6. Conclusions These results establish that transfer of in vivo primed CD4+ T cells can induce allergic lung inflammation. Furthermore, while IL-4/IL-13 signaling through IL-4Rα and STAT6 is

  17. Presentation of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein by dendritic cells: the underlying mechanism of HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Sharrón L; Schell, Todd D; Acheampong, Edward; Rahman, Saifur; Khan, Zafar K; Jain, Pooja

    2009-11-01

    HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of a debilitating neurologic disorder, HAM/TSP. This disease features a robust immune response including the oligoclonal expansion of CD8+ CTLs specific for the viral oncoprotein Tax. The key pathogenic process resulting in the proliferation of CTLs and the presentation of Tax peptide remains uncharacterized. We have investigated the role of APCs, particularly DCs, in priming of the anti-Tax CTL response under in vitro and in vivo conditions. We investigated two routes (direct vs. indirect) of Tax presentation using live virus, infected primary CD4+/CD25+ T cells, and the CD4+ T cell line (C8166, a HTLV-1-mutated line that only expresses Tax). Our results indicated that DCs are capable of priming a pronounced Tax-specific CTL response in cell cultures consisting of naïve PBLs as well as in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice (line HHD II). DCs were able to direct the presentation of Tax successfully through infected T cells, live virus, and cell-free Tax. These observations were comparable with those made with a known stimulant of DC maturation, a combination of CD40L and IFN-gamma. Our studies clearly establish a role for this important immune cell component in HTLV-1 immuno/neuropathogenesis and suggest that modulation of DC functions could be an important tool for therapeutic interventions.

  18. Human Asymptomatic Epitope Peptide/CXCL10-Based Prime/Pull Vaccine Induces Herpes Simplex Virus-Specific Gamma Interferon-Positive CD107+ CD8+ T Cells That Infiltrate the Cornea and Trigeminal Ganglia of Humanized HLA Transgenic Rabbits and Protect against Ocular Herpes Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif A; Srivastava, Ruchi; Vahed, Hawa; Roy, Soumyabrata; Walia, Sager S; Kim, Grace J; Fouladi, Mona A; Yamada, Taikun; Ly, Vincent T; Lam, Cynthia; Lou, Anthony; Nguyen, Vivianna; Boldbaatar, Undariya; Geertsema, Roger; Fraser, Nigel W; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2018-06-13

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a prevalent human pathogen that infects the cornea causing potentially blinding herpetic disease. A clinical herpes vaccine is still lacking. In the present study, a novel prime/pull vaccine was tested in Human Leukocyte Antigen- (HLA-) transgenic rabbit model of ocular herpes (HLA Tg rabbit). Three asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptide epitopes were selected from the HSV-1 membrane glycoprotein C (UL44 400-408 ), the DNA replication binding helicase (UL9 196-204 ), and the tegument protein (UL25 572-580 ), all preferentially recognized by CD8 + T cells from "naturally protected" HSV-1-seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who never had recurrent corneal herpetic disease). HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these three ASYMP CD8 + T cell peptide epitopes (UL44 400-408 , UL9 196-204 and UL25 572-580 ), delivered subcutaneously with CpG 2007 adjuvant (prime). Fifteen days later, half of the rabbits received a topical ocular treatment with a recombinant neurotropic AAV8 vector, expressing the T cell-attracting CXCL10 chemokine (pull). The frequency, function of HSV-specific CD8 + T cells induced by the prime/pull vaccine were assessed in peripheral blood, cornea, and trigeminal ganglia (TG). Compared to peptides alone, the peptides/CXCL10 prime/pull vaccine generated frequent polyfunctional gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ + ) CD107 + CD8 + T cells that infiltrated both the cornea and TG. CD8 + T cells mobilization into cornea and TG of prime/pull- vaccinated rabbits was associated with a significant reduction in corneal herpes infection and disease following an ocular HSV-1 challenge (McKrae). These findings draw attention to the novel prime/pull vaccine strategy to mobilize anti-viral CD8 + T cells into tissues protecting them against herpes infection and disease. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need for a vaccine against widespread herpes simplex virus infections. The present study demonstrates that immunization of HLA

  19. CD4+ T cell-mediated rejection of MHC class II-positive tumor cells is dependent on antigen secretion and indirect presentation on host APCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner; Fauskanger, Marte; Manzke, Melanie; Lundin, Katrin U; Corthay, Alexandre; Bogen, Bjarne; Tveita, Anders Aune

    2018-05-11

    Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells have been shown to mediate efficient anti-tumor immune responses against cancer. Such responses can occur through direct binding to MHC class II (MHC II)-expressing tumor cells or indirectly via activation of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) that take up and present the tumor antigen. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells reactive against an epitope within the Ig light chain variable region of a murine B cell lymphoma can reject established tumors. Given the presence of MHC II molecules at the surface of lymphoma cells, we investigated whether MHC II-restricted antigen presentation on tumor cells alone was required for rejection. Variants of the A20 B lymphoma cell line that either secreted or intracellularly retained different versions of the tumor-specific antigen revealed that antigen secretion by the MHC II-expressing tumor cells was essential both for the priming and effector phase of CD4+ T cell-driven anti-tumor immune responses. Consistent with this, genetic ablation of MHC II in tumor cells, both in the case of B lymphoma and B16 melanoma, did not preclude rejection of tumors by tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. These findings demonstrate that MHC class II expression on tumor cells themselves is not required for CD4+ T cell-mediated rejection, and that indirect display on host APC is sufficient for effective tumor elimination. These results support the importance of tumor-infiltrating APC as mediators of tumor cell killing by CD4+ T cells. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Fusion-Expressed CTB Improves Both Systemic and Mucosal T-Cell Responses Elicited by an Intranasal DNA Priming/Intramuscular Recombinant Vaccinia Boosting Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugan Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous study showed that CTB (Cholera toxin subunit B can be used as a genetic adjuvant to enhance the systemic immune responses. To further investigate whether it can also be used as a genetic adjuvant to improve mucosal immune responses, we constructed DNA and recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV vaccines expressing OVA-CTB fusion antigen. Female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an intranasal DNA priming/intramuscular rTTV boosting regimen. OVA specific T-cell responses were measured by IFN-γ ELISPOT and specific antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Compared to the nonadjuvant group (pSV-OVA intranasal priming/rTTV-OVA intramuscular boosting, pSV-OVA-CTB intranasal priming/rTTV-OVA-CTB intramuscular boosting group significantly improved the magnitudes of T-cell responses at spleen (1562±567 SFCs/106 splenocytes versus 330±182 SFCs/106 splenocytes, P<0.01, mesenteric LN (96±83 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 1±2 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P<0.05, draining LNs of respiratory tract (109±60 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 2±2 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P<0.01 and female genital tract (89±48 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 23±21 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P<0.01. These results collectively demonstrated that fusion-expressed CTB could act as a potent adjuvant to improve both systemic and mucosal T-cell responses.

  1. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting multiple lymphomatous polyposis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Hokama; Nobuyuki Takasu; Jiro Fujita; Takeaki Tomoyose; Yu-ichi Yamamoto; Takako Watanabe; Tetsuo Hirata; Fukunori Kinjo; Seiya Kato; Koichi Ohshima; Hiroshi Uezato

    2008-01-01

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (HLP) is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. It has been reported that most MLP are observed in cases with mantle cell lymphoma of B-cell type. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Colonoscopy revealed MLP throughout the colon and histopathological findings of ATLL cell infiltration. The patient died despite combination of chemotherapy. The literature of manifestations of colonic involvement of ATLL is reviewed and the importance of endoscopic evaluation to differentiate ATLL intestinal lesions from opportunistic infectious enterocolitis is discussed.

  2. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self ...

  3. Protein-scaffold Directed Nanoscale Assembly of T Cell Ligands: Artificial Antigen Presentation with Defined Valency, Density and Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mason R; Tolbert, Stephanie V; Wen, Fei

    2018-05-07

    Tuning antigen presentation to T cells is a critical step in investigating key aspects of T cell activation. However, existing technologies have limited ability to control the spatial and stoichiometric organization of T cell ligands on 3D surfaces. Here, we developed an artificial antigen presentation platform based on protein-scaffold directed assembly that allows fine control over the spatial and stoichiometric organization of T cell ligands on a 3D yeast-cell surface. Using this system, we observed that the T cell activation threshold on a 3D surface is independent of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) valency, but instead determined by the overall pMHC surface density. When intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was co-assembled with pMHC, it enhanced antigen recognition sensitivity by 6-fold. Further, T cells responded with different magnitudes to varying ratios of pMHC and ICAM-1 and exhibited a maximum response at a ratio of 15% pMHC and 85% ICAM-1, introducing an additional parameter for tuning T cell activation. This protein-scaffold directed assembly technology is readily transferrable to acellular surfaces for translational research as well as large-scale T-cell manufacturing.

  4. AMP affects intracellular Ca2+ signaling, migration, cytokine secretion and T cell priming capacity of dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Panther

    Full Text Available The nucleotide adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP can be released by various cell types and has been shown to elicit different cellular responses. In the extracellular space AMP is dephosphorylated to the nucleoside adenosine which can then bind to adenosine receptors. However, it has been shown that AMP can also activate A(1 and A(2a receptors directly. Here we show that AMP is a potent modulator of mouse and human dendritic cell (DC function. AMP increased intracellular Ca(2+ concentration in a time and dose dependent manner. Furthermore, AMP stimulated actin-polymerization in human DCs and induced migration of immature human and bone marrow derived mouse DCs, both via direct activation of A(1 receptors. AMP strongly inhibited secretion of TNF-α and IL-12p70, while it enhanced production of IL-10 both via activation of A(2a receptors. Consequently, DCs matured in the presence of AMP and co-cultivated with naive CD4(+CD45RA(+ T cells inhibited IFN-γ production whereas secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 was up-regulated. An enhancement of Th2-driven immune response could also be observed when OVA-pulsed murine DCs were pretreated with AMP prior to co-culture with OVA-transgenic naïve OTII T cells. An effect due to the enzymatic degradation of AMP to adenosine could be ruled out, as AMP still elicited migration and changes in cytokine secretion in bone-marrow derived DCs generated from CD73-deficient animals and in human DCs pretreated with the ecto-nucleotidase inhibitor 5'-(alpha,beta-methylene diphosphate (APCP. Finally, the influence of contaminating adenosine could be excluded, as AMP admixed with adenosine desaminase (ADA was still able to influence DC function. In summary our data show that AMP when present during maturation is a potent regulator of dendritic cell function and point out the role for AMP in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders.

  5. OX62+OX6+OX35+ rat dendritic cells are unable to prime CD4+ T cells for an effective immune response following acute burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Nadeem

    2013-01-01

    Co-stimulatory molecules expressed on Dendritic Cells (DCs) function to coordinate an efficient immune response by T cells in the peripheral lymph nodes. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cell-mediated immune suppression following burn injury may be related to dysfunctional DCs residing in gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), such as Mesenteric Lymph Nodes (MLN). Therefore, we studied co-stimulatory molecules expressed on burn rat MLN DCs as an index of functional DCs that would mount an effective normal CD4+ T cell immune response. In a rat model of 30% Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) scald burn, OX62+OX6+OX35+ DCs and CD4+ T cells were isolated from MLN of day 3 post-burn and sham control rats. DCs were tested for their expression of co-stimulatory molecules, and prime CD4+ T cell (DC:CD4+T cell co-culture assays) to determine an effector immune response such as CD4+ T cell proliferation. The surface receptor expressions of MLN DCs co-stimulatory molecules, i.e., MHC-II, CD40, CD80 (B7-1), and CD86 (B7-2) were determined by Flow cytometry (quantitatively) and confocal microscopy (qualitatively). Tritiated thymidine and CFDA-SE determined CD4+ T cell proliferation following co-incubation with DCs. Cytokine milieu of MLN (IL-12 and IL-10) was assessed by mRNA determination by RT-PCR. The results showed down-regulated expressions of co-stimulatory markers (CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHC-II) of MLN DCs obtained from burn-injured rats, as well as lack of ability of these burn-induced DCs to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation in co-culture assays, as compared to the sham rats. Moreover, anti-CD40 stimulation of affected burn MLN DCs did not reverse this alteration. Furthermore, a marked up-regulation of mRNA IL-10 and down-regulation of mRNA IL-12 in burn MLN as compared to sham animals was also observed. To surmise, the data indicated that dysfunctional OX62+OX6+OX35+ rat MLN DCs may contribute to CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune suppression observed following acute burn injury.

  6. OX62+OX6+OX35+ rat dendritic cells are unable to prime CD4+ T cells for an effective immune response following acute burn injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Nadeem

    2013-01-01

    Co-stimulatory molecules expressed on Dendritic Cells (DCs) function to coordinate an efficient immune response by T cells in the peripheral lymph nodes. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cell-mediated immune suppression following burn injury may be related to dysfunctional DCs residing in gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), such as Mesenteric Lymph Nodes (MLN). Therefore, we studied co-stimulatory molecules expressed on burn rat MLN DCs as an index of functional DCs that would mount an effective normal CD4+ T cell immune response. In a rat model of 30% Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) scald burn, OX62+OX6+OX35+ DCs and CD4+ T cells were isolated from MLN of day 3 post-burn and sham control rats. DCs were tested for their expression of co-stimulatory molecules, and prime CD4+ T cell (DC:CD4+T cell co-culture assays) to determine an effector immune response such as CD4+ T cell proliferation. The surface receptor expressions of MLN DCs co-stimulatory molecules, i.e., MHC-II, CD40, CD80 (B7-1), and CD86 (B7-2) were determined by Flow cytometry (quantitatively) and confocal microscopy (qualitatively). Tritiated thymidine and CFDA-SE determined CD4+ T cell proliferation following co-incubation with DCs. Cytokine milieu of MLN (IL-12 and IL-10) was assessed by mRNA determination by RT-PCR. The results showed down-regulated expressions of co-stimulatory markers (CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHC-II) of MLN DCs obtained from burn-injured rats, as well as lack of ability of these burn-induced DCs to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation in co-culture assays, as compared to the sham rats. Moreover, anti-CD40 stimulation of affected burn MLN DCs did not reverse this alteration. Furthermore, a marked up-regulation of mRNA IL-10 and down-regulation of mRNA IL-12 in burn MLN as compared to sham animals was also observed. To surmise, the data indicated that dysfunctional OX62+OX6+OX35+ rat MLN DCs may contribute to CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune suppression observed following acute burn injury

  7. Langerin negative dendritic cells promote potent CD8+ T-cell priming by skin delivery of live adenovirus vaccine microneedle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Veronique; Hervouet, Catherine; Becker, Pablo D; Chorro, Laurent; Carlin, Leo M; Herath, Shanthi; Papagatsias, Timos; Barbaroux, Jean-Baptiste; Oh, Sea-Jin; Benlahrech, Adel; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Dickson, George; Patterson, Steven; Kwon, Sung-Yun; Geissmann, Frederic; Klavinskis, Linda S

    2013-02-19

    Stabilization of virus protein structure and nucleic acid integrity is challenging yet essential to preserve the transcriptional competence of live recombinant viral vaccine vectors in the absence of a cold chain. When coupled with needle-free skin delivery, such a platform would address an unmet need in global vaccine coverage against HIV and other global pathogens. Herein, we show that a simple dissolvable microneedle array (MA) delivery system preserves the immunogenicity of vaccines encoded by live recombinant human adenovirus type 5 (rAdHu5). Specifically, dried rAdHu5 MA immunization induced CD8(+) T-cell expansion and multifunctional cytokine responses equipotent with conventional injectable routes of immunization. Intravital imaging demonstrated MA cargo distributed both in the epidermis and dermis, with acquisition by CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis. The MA immunizing properties were attributable to CD11c(+) MHCII(hi) CD8α(neg) epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(neg)) CD11b(+) langerin (Lang; CD207)(neg) DCs, but neither Langerhans cells nor Lang(+) DCs were required for CD8(+) T-cell priming. This study demonstrates an important technical advance for viral vaccine vectors progressing to the clinic and provides insights into the mechanism of CD8(+) T-cell priming by live rAdHu5 MAs.

  8. Superantigen-primed T cells exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) replicate poorly following recall encounter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulconer, Laura; Camacho, Iris; Nagarkatti, Mitzi [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, 980613, Richmond, VA (United States); Nagarkatti, Prakash S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, 980613, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    The current study investigated the effect of tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the ability of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA)-primed T cells to divide by dual-labeling the cells with 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and antibodies against the specific T cell receptors. C57BL/6 wild-type mice were injected ip with TCDD (10 {mu}g/kg body weight) followed by hind footpad injections of SEA (10 {mu}g/footpad). The draining popliteal lymph nodes (PLN) were harvested 1-4 days posttreatment, labeled with CFSE and cultured for 1-4 days without further stimulation or in the presence of the recall antigen. TCDD-exposed SEA-reactive V{beta}3+ and V{beta}11+ T cells showed decreased cell divisions upon in vitro culture in the absence of any stimulation, which correlated with increased levels of apoptosis. The recall cell-division response was also defective in SEA-reactive T cells isolated from TCDD-exposed mice. However, during the recall response, cells from TCDD-exposed mice did not exhibit a defect in apoptosis, suggesting the defective recall response may result from a state of anergy rather than increased apoptosis. Using AhR knockout (KO) mice, we found AhR involvement in the regulation of defective cell division and apoptosis induced by TCDD. Together, these data demonstrate, while TCDD-induced apoptosis may account for the decreased primary T cell proliferative response, that the reduced cell division seen during subsequent exposure to recall antigen may result from a state of anergy. The study also demonstrates that a combined use of superantigen and CFSE may offer a simple and useful tool to monitor the ability of immunotoxicants to alter the proliferative responsiveness of antigen-specific T cells. (orig.)

  9. Local HPV Recombinant Vaccinia Boost Following Priming with an HPV DNA Vaccine Enhances Local HPV-Specific CD8+ T Cell Mediated Tumor Control in the Genital Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yun-Yan; Peng, Shiwen; Han, Liping; Qiu, Jin; Song, Liwen; Tsai, Yachea; Yang, Benjamin; Roden, Richard B.S.; Trimble, Cornelia L.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are expressed in all human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected cells, from initial infection in the genital tract to metastatic cervical cancer. Intramuscular vaccination of women with high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) twice with a naked DNA vaccine, pNGVL4a-sig/E7(detox)/HSP70, and a single boost with HPVE6/E7 recombinant vaccinia vaccine (TA-HPV) elicited systemic HPV-specific CD8 T cell responses that could traffic to the lesion and was associated with regression in some patients (NCT00788164). Experimental Design Here we examine whether alteration of this vaccination regimen by administration of TA-HPV vaccination in the cervicovaginal tract, rather than IM delivery, can more effectively recruit antigen-specific T cells in an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model of HPV16+ cervical cancer (TC-1 luc). Results We found that pNGVL4a-sig/E7(detox)/HSP70 vaccination followed by cervicovaginal vaccination with TA-HPV increased accumulation of total and E7-specific CD8+ T cells in the cervicovaginal tract and better controlled E7-expressing cervicovaginal TC-1 luc tumor than IM administration of TA-HPV. Furthermore, the E7-specific CD8+ T cells in the cervicovaginal tract generated through the cervicovaginal route of vaccination expressed the α4β7 integrin and CCR9, which are necessary for the homing of the E7-specific CD8+ T cells to the cervicovaginal tract. Finally, we show that cervicovaginal vaccination with TA-HPV can induce potent local HPV-16 E7 antigen-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses regardless of whether an HPV DNA vaccine priming vaccination was administered IM or within the cervicovaginal tract. Conclusions Our results support future clinical translation using cervicovaginal TA-HPV vaccination. PMID:26420854

  10. AMP Affects Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling, Migration, Cytokine Secretion and T Cell Priming Capacity of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Elisabeth; Dürk, Thorsten; Ferrari, Davide; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Grimm, Melanie; Sorichter, Stephan; Cicko, Sanja; Herouy, Yared; Norgauer, Johannes; Idzko, Marco; Müller, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine-5′-monophosphate (AMP) can be released by various cell types and has been shown to elicit different cellular responses. In the extracellular space AMP is dephosphorylated to the nucleoside adenosine which can then bind to adenosine receptors. However, it has been shown that AMP can also activate A1 and A2a receptors directly. Here we show that AMP is a potent modulator of mouse and human dendritic cell (DC) function. AMP increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a time and dose dependent manner. Furthermore, AMP stimulated actin-polymerization in human DCs and induced migration of immature human and bone marrow derived mouse DCs, both via direct activation of A1 receptors. AMP strongly inhibited secretion of TNF-α and IL-12p70, while it enhanced production of IL-10 both via activation of A2a receptors. Consequently, DCs matured in the presence of AMP and co-cultivated with naive CD4+CD45RA+ T cells inhibited IFN-γ production whereas secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 was up-regulated. An enhancement of Th2-driven immune response could also be observed when OVA-pulsed murine DCs were pretreated with AMP prior to co-culture with OVA-transgenic naïve OTII T cells. An effect due to the enzymatic degradation of AMP to adenosine could be ruled out, as AMP still elicited migration and changes in cytokine secretion in bone-marrow derived DCs generated from CD73-deficient animals and in human DCs pretreated with the ecto-nucleotidase inhibitor 5′-(alpha,beta-methylene) diphosphate (APCP). Finally, the influence of contaminating adenosine could be excluded, as AMP admixed with adenosine desaminase (ADA) was still able to influence DC function. In summary our data show that AMP when present during maturation is a potent regulator of dendritic cell function and point out the role for AMP in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders. PMID:22624049

  11. The activation of the adaptive immune system: cross-talk between antigen-presenting cells, T cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, Joke M M; Arens, Ramon; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of T and B cells that express clonally distributed antigen receptors. To achieve functional adaptive immune responses, antigen-specific T cell populations are stimulated by professional antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DCs), which provide crucial stimulatory signals for efficient expansion and development of effector functions. Antigen-specific B cells receive costimulatory signals from helper T cells to stimulate affinity maturation and isotype switching. Here we elaborate on the interactions between DCs, T cells and B cells, and on the important signals for efficient induction of adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast cancer instructs dendritic cells to prime interleukin 13–secreting CD4+ T cells that facilitate tumor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspord, Caroline; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander; Gallegos, Mike; Tindle, Sasha; Burton, Elizabeth C.; Su, Dan; Marches, Florentina; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, A. Karolina

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported (Bell, D., P. Chomarat, D. Broyles, G. Netto, G.M. Harb, S. Lebecque, J. Valladeau, J. Davoust, K.A. Palucka, and J. Banchereau. 1999. J. Exp. Med. 190: 1417–1426) that breast cancer tumors are infiltrated with mature dendritic cells (DCs), which cluster with CD4+ T cells. We now show that CD4+ T cells infiltrating breast cancer tumors secrete type 1 (interferon γ) as well as high levels of type 2 (interleukin [IL] 4 and IL-13) cytokines. Immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections revealed intense IL-13 staining on breast cancer cells. The expression of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 in breast cancer cells suggests that IL-13 actually delivers signals to cancer cells. To determine the link between breast cancer, DCs, and CD4+ T cells, we implanted human breast cancer cell lines in nonobese diabetic/LtSz-scid/scid β2 microglobulin–deficient mice engrafted with human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and autologous T cells. There, CD4+ T cells promote early tumor development. This is dependent on DCs and can be partially prevented by administration of IL-13 antagonists. Thus, breast cancer targets DCs to facilitate its development. PMID:17438063

  13. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone marrow necrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnaw Najmaddin SH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bone marrow necrosis is a clinicopathological condition diagnosed most often at postmortem examination, but it is also seen during the course of malignancy and is not always associated with a poor prognosis. The morphological features of bone marrow necrosis are disruption of the normal marrow architecture and necrosis of myeloid tissue and medullary stroma. Non-malignant conditions associated with bone marrow necrosis are sickle cell anemia, infections, drugs (sulfasalazine, interferon α, all-trans retinoic acid, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and fludarabine, disseminated intravascular coagulation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute graft versus host diseases. The malignant causes are leukemia, lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. Herein we report the case of a patient with precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow necrosis at initial presentation. Case presentation A 10-year-old Kurdish boy was presented with generalized bone pain and fever of 1 month’s duration which was associated with sweating, easy fatigability, nose bleeding, breathlessness and severe weight loss. On examination, we observed pallor, tachypnea, tachycardia, low blood pressure, fever, petechial hemorrhage, ecchymoses, tortuous dilated veins over the chest and upper part of abdomen, multiple small cervical lymph node enlargements, mildly enlarged spleen, palpable liver and gross abdominal distention. Blood analysis revealed pancytopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging results showed mediastinal widening on a planar chest X-ray and diffuse focal infiltration of the axial bone marrow on magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral vertebrae. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy examination showed extensive bone marrow necrosis. Immunophenotyping analysis of the bone marrow biopsy confirmed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as CD3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl

  14. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma presenting as orbital cellulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhaimy, Hanis; Aziz, Hayati Abdul; Vasudevan, Suresh; Hui Hui, Siah

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To report an aggressive case of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) of the ethmoid sinus presenting as orbital cellulitis Method: Case report Results: A 56-year-old male presented with right eye redness, reduced vision, and periorbital swelling for 5 weeks duration associated with a two-month history of blocked nose. The visual acuity of the right eye was 6/18. The eye was proptosed with periorbital oedema and conjunctival chemosis. The pupil was mid-dilated but there was no relative afferent pupillary defect. The fundus was normal. The extraocular movements were restricted in all directions of gaze. Nasal endoscopy revealed pansinusitis that corresponded with CT scan orbit and paranasal sinuses findings. Despite treatment, he showed no clinical improvement. Ethmoidal sinus biopsies performed revealed extranodal NKTCL. Further imaging showed involvement of the right orbital contents and its adnexa with intracranial extension into the right cavernous sinus and meninges over right temporal fossa. The patient underwent chemotherapy. However he succumbed to his illness two months after the diagnosis. Conclusion: Extranodal NKTCL is a great mimicker. This case demonstrated how an acute initial presentation of extranodal NKTCL can present as orbital cellulitis with pansinusitis. PMID:28194321

  15. Characterization of the antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response induced by prime-boost strategies with CAF01 and CpG adjuvants administered by the intranasal and subcutaneous routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCiabattini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The design of heterologous prime-boost vaccine combinations that optimally shape the immune response is of critical importance for the development of next generation vaccines. Here we tested different prime-boost combinations using the tuberculosis vaccine antigen H56 with CAF01 or CpG ODN 1821 adjuvants, administered by the parenteral and nasal routes. By using peptide-MHC class II tetramers, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were tracked following primary and booster immunizations. Both parenteral priming with H56 plus CAF01 and nasal priming with H56 plus CpG elicited significant expansion of CD4+ tetramer-positive T cells in the spleen, however only parenterally primed cells responded to booster immunization. Subcutaneous priming with H56 and CAF01 followed by nasal boosting with H56 and CpG showed the greater expansion of CD4+ tetramer-positive T cells in the spleen and lungs compared to all the other homologous and heterologous prime-boost combinations. Nasal boosting exerted a recruitment of primed CD4+ T cells into lungs that was stronger in subcutaneously than nasally primed mice, in accordance with different chemokine receptor expression induced by primary immunization. These data demonstrate that subcutaneous priming is fundamental for eliciting CD4+ T cells that can be efficiently boosted by the nasal route and results in the recruitment of antigen-experienced cells into the lungs. Combination of different vaccine formulations and routes of delivery for priming and boosting is a strategic approach for improving and directing vaccine-induced immune responses.

  16. Viral sequestration of antigen subverts cross presentation to CD8(+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Tewalt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells (T(CD8+ are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector T(CD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated T(CD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the T(CD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation

  17. Effect of low-dose irradiation upon T cell subsets involved in the response of primed A/J mice to SaI cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Williams, W.L.; Tokuda, Sei

    1988-01-01

    A/Jax (A/J) mice primed to Sarcoma I (SaI) exhibit an augmented response in association with low-dose (0.15 Gy) irradiation. This phenomenon is best demonstrated in tumour neutralization (Winn assay) or cell transfer experiments utilizing mice depleted of thymus-derived (T) cells. It is particularly dependent upon the duration of priming and the growth characteristics of the tumour in the primary host. The importance of these two variables appears to relate to their influence upon the cell types responsible for the host response, and includes both an effector and a suppressor component. Radiation-induced inhibition of the suppressor component appears responsible for low-dose augmentation and results in injury to a T cell of the Lyt-1 - 2 + phenotype. In Winn assays employing equal numbers of immune spleen cells and SaI cells, the smallest tumours are associated with Lyt-1-positive (Lyt-1 + 2 - and Lyt-1 + 2 + ) cells and exposure to 0.15 Gy markedly inhibits their anti-SaI activity. Thus, even though the effect is in the opposite direction, both the effector and suppressor components of the anti-SaI response in A/J mice are exceedingly radiosensitive. (author)

  18. Expansion and retention of pulmonary CD4+ T cells after prime boost vaccination correlates with improved longevity and strength of immunity against tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lydia M; Wehrly, Tara D; Crane, Deborah D; Bosio, Catharine M

    2017-05-02

    Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain SchuS4 (Ftt) is a highly virulent intracellular bacterium. Inhalation of 10 or fewer organisms results in an acute and potentially lethal disease called pneumonic tularemia. Ftt infections occur naturally in the U.S. and Ftt was developed as a bioweapon. Thus, there is a need for vaccines that protect against this deadly pathogen. Although a live vaccine strain of Francisella tularensis (LVS) exists, LVS fails to generate long-lived protective immunity against modest challenge doses of Ftt. We recently identified an important role for high avidity CD4 + T cells in short-term protection and hypothesized that expanding this pool of cells would improve overall vaccine efficacy with regard to longevity and challenge dose. In support of our hypothesis, application of a prime/boost vaccination strategy increased the pool of high avidity CD4 + T cells which correlated with improved survival following challenge with either increased doses of virulent Ftt or at late time points after vaccination. In summary, we demonstrate that both epitope selection and vaccination strategies that expand antigen-specific T cells correlate with superior immunity to Ftt as measured by survival. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. HIV-1 Subtype C Mosaic Gag Expressed by BCG and MVA Elicits Persistent Effector T Cell Responses in a Prime-Boost Regimen in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsungai Ivai Jongwe

    Full Text Available Over 90% of HIV/AIDS positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with highly heterogeneous HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C viruses. One of the best ways to reduce the burden of this disease is the development of an affordable and effective prophylactic vaccine. Mosaic immunogens are computationally designed to overcome the hurdle of HIV diversity by maximizing the expression of potential T cell epitopes. Mycobacterium bovis BCG ΔpanCD auxotroph and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1C mosaic Gag (GagM were tested in a prime-boost regimen to demonstrate immunogenicity in a mouse study. The BCG-GagM vaccine was stable and persisted 11.5 weeks post vaccination in BALB/c mice. Priming with BCG-GagM and boosting with MVA-GagM elicited higher Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses than the BCG-GagM only and MVA-GagM only homologous vaccination regimens. The heterologous vaccination also generated a more balanced and persistent CD4+ and CD8+ T cell Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT response with a predominant effector memory phenotype. A Th1 bias was induced by the vaccines as determined by the predominant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. This study shows that a low dose of MVA (104 pfu can effectively boost a BCG prime expressing the same mosaic immunogen, generating strong, cellular immune responses against Gag in mice. Our data warrants further evaluation in non-human primates. A low dose vaccine would be an advantage in the resource limited countries of sub-Saharan Africa and India (where the predominating virus is HIV-1 subtype C.

  20. Priming T-cell responses with recombinant measles vaccine vector in a heterologous prime-boost setting in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Diane L; Santra, Sampa; Swett-Tapia, Cindy; Custers, Jerome; Song, Kaimei; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh; Naim, Hussein; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lifton, Michelle; Goudsmit, Jaap; Letvin, Norman; Roederer, Mario; Radošević, Katarina

    2012-09-07

    Licensed live attenuated virus vaccines capable of expressing transgenes from other pathogens have the potential to reduce the number of childhood immunizations by eliciting robust immunity to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Recombinant attenuated measles virus (rMV) derived from the Edmonston Zagreb vaccine strain was engineered to express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag protein for the purpose of evaluating the immunogenicity of rMV as a vaccine vector in rhesus macaques. rMV-Gag immunization alone elicited robust measles-specific humoral and cellular responses, but failed to elicit transgene (Gag)-specific immune responses, following aerosol or intratracheal/intramuscular delivery. However, when administered as a priming vaccine to a heterologous boost with recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 expressing the same transgene, rMV-Gag significantly enhanced Gag-specific T lymphocyte responses following rAd5 immunization. Gag-specific humoral responses were not enhanced, however, which may be due to either the transgene or the vector. Cellular response priming by rMV against the transgene was highly effective even when using a suboptimal dose of rAd5 for the boost. These data demonstrate feasibility of using rMV as a priming component of heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens for pathogens requiring strong cellular responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Conventional CD11chigh Dendritic Cells Are Important for T Cell Priming during the Initial Phase of Plasmodium yoelii Infection, but Are Dispensable at Later Time Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueffing, Kristina; Abberger, Hanna; Westendorf, Astrid M; Matuschewski, Kai; Buer, Jan; Hansen, Wiebke

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate adaptive immune responses to pathogens. During malaria infection pro- and anti-inflammatory T cell responses have to be tightly balanced to ensure parasite clearance without induction of severe immune pathologies. However, the precise role of CD11c high DCs in this process is still discussed controversially. Here, we demonstrate that long-term depletion of conventional CD11c high DCs in Plasmodium yoelii ( P. yoelii )-infected diphtheria toxin (DT)-treated RosaiDTR/CD11c-cre mice interferes with the activation of CD8 + and CD4 + T cells as well as CD4 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells at early time points during infection. Moreover, systemic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α were decreased in P. yoelii -infected mice deficient for CD11c high DCs compared to infected RosaiDTR controls. To further elucidate the importance of CD11c high DCs during the later phase of infection, we treated RosaiDTR/CD11c-cre and control mice with DT only from day 4 of P. yoelii infection onward. Strikingly, this approach had no impact on the activation and IFN-γ production of CD4 + and CD8 + effector T cells. These results indicate that CD11c high DCs play a crucial role in eliciting effector T cell responses during the initial phase, but are dispensable during ongoing infection with P. yoelii .

  2. Conventional CD11chigh Dendritic Cells Are Important for T Cell Priming during the Initial Phase of Plasmodium yoelii Infection, but Are Dispensable at Later Time Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ueffing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate adaptive immune responses to pathogens. During malaria infection pro- and anti-inflammatory T cell responses have to be tightly balanced to ensure parasite clearance without induction of severe immune pathologies. However, the precise role of CD11chigh DCs in this process is still discussed controversially. Here, we demonstrate that long-term depletion of conventional CD11chigh DCs in Plasmodium yoelii (P. yoelii-infected diphtheria toxin (DT-treated RosaiDTR/CD11c-cre mice interferes with the activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells as well as CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells at early time points during infection. Moreover, systemic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α were decreased in P. yoelii-infected mice deficient for CD11chigh DCs compared to infected RosaiDTR controls. To further elucidate the importance of CD11chigh DCs during the later phase of infection, we treated RosaiDTR/CD11c-cre and control mice with DT only from day 4 of P. yoelii infection onward. Strikingly, this approach had no impact on the activation and IFN-γ production of CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells. These results indicate that CD11chigh DCs play a crucial role in eliciting effector T cell responses during the initial phase, but are dispensable during ongoing infection with P. yoelii.

  3. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  4. Different levels of immunogenicity of two strains of Fowlpox virus as recombinant vaccine vectors eliciting T-cell responses in heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Matthew G; van Maurik, Andre; Zago, Manola; Newton, Angela T; Anderson, Richard J; Howard, M Keith; Schneider, Jörg; Skinner, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    The FP9 strain of F has been described as a more immunogenic recombinant vaccine vector than the Webster FPV-M (FPW) strain (R. J. Anderson et al., J. Immunol. 172:3094-3100, 2004). This study expands the comparison to include two separate recombinant antigens and multiple, rather than single, independent viral clones derived from the two strains. Dual-poxvirus heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens using individual clones of recombinant FP9 or FPW in combination with recombinant modified V Ankara expressing the same antigen were evaluated for their ability to elicit T-cell responses against recombinant antigens from Plasmodium berghei (circumsporozoite protein) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein). Gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays of the responses to specific epitopes confirmed the approximately twofold-greater cellular immunogenicity of FP9 compared to FPW, when given as the priming or boosting immunization. Equality of transgene expression in mouse cells infected with the two strains in vitro was verified by Western blotting. Directed partial sequence analysis and PCR analysis of FPW and comparison to available whole-genome sequences revealed that many loci that are mutated in the highly attenuated and culture-adapted FP9 strain are wild type in FPW, including the seven multikilobase deletions. These "passage-specific" alterations are hypothesized to be involved in determining the immunogenicity of fowlpox virus as a recombinant vaccine vector.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-containing T-cell lymphoma presents with hemophagocytic syndrome mimicking malignant histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, I J; Hsu, Y H; Lin, M T; Cheng, A L; Wang, C H; Weiss, L M

    1993-09-15

    The previously designated malignant histiocytosis (MH) may include lymphoid neoplasms of T-cell lineage as well as patients with benign virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS). In this study, the association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with T cell lymphomas which present with clinicopathologic features indistinguishable from malignant histiocytosis (MH) was investigated further. Four adult patients, three women and one man, were admitted because of fever, cutaneous lesions, hepatosplenomegaly, and jaundice. Laboratory examinations revealed pancytopenia, abnormal liver functions and coagulopathy. All patients ran a fulminant course terminating in a hemophagocytic syndrome within 1 month. Immunophenotypic study, Southern blot analysis, and in situ hybridization were performed on the specimens obtained from the four patients. The biopsy-necropsy specimens from skin, liver, spleen, and bone marrow showed infiltration of atypical large cells with reactive histiocytosis and florid hemophagocytosis activity. Based on the clinical and histologic findings, these cases would have been designated as MH by previous criteria. Immunophenotypic, Southern blot, and in situ hybridization studies, however, showed clonotypic proliferation of EBV genomes in the nuclei of the large atypical cells that expressed T-cell antigens. Therefore, these patients should be diagnosed as a recently described EBV-associated peripheral T-cell lymphoma (EBV-PTCL). EBV-PTCL may present with a fulminant hemophagocytic syndrome indistinguishable from the previously designated MH. This finding represents a step forward in our changing concept regarding MH, some of which only recently has been suggested to be of T-cell lymphoma origin. Differentiation from benign VAHS is clinically important. Features useful in this distinction are tabulated and discussed.

  6. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. → An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. → Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. → This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  7. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hui [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Peng, Ji-Run, E-mail: pengjr@medmail.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Qiao, Shi-Shi [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Leng, Xi-Sheng, E-mail: lengxs2003@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  8. Airway eosinophils accumulate in the mediastinal lymph nodes but lack antigen-presenting potential for naive T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijt, Leonie S.; Vos, Nanda; Hijdra, Daniëlle; de Vries, Victor C.; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Lambrecht, Bart N.

    2003-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with eosinophils. Although eosinophils are considered to be effector cells, recent studies have reported their ability to activate primed Th2 cells. In this study, we investigated whether eosinophils are capable of presenting Ag to unprimed

  9. Differences between primed allogeneic T-cell responses and the primary mixed leucocyte reaction. Primed T cells become independent of the blocking effects of monoclonal antibodies against IL-1 beta and the CD5, CD11a (LFA-1), and CD11c (p 150,95) molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Morling, N

    1988-01-01

    .01) and the purified protein derivative (PPD) induced lymphocyte transformation response (42%, P less than or equal to 0.01) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas primed allogeneic responses to PBMC and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cell lines were unaffected by this MoAb. In addition, preliminary data...... monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) directed against (i) adhesion molecules belonging to the CD11 cluster of leucocyte antigens (CD11a, LFA-1; CD11b, MAC1 = CR3; and CD11c, p 150,95); (ii) various T cell-related antigens (CD2, CD4, CD5 and CD8); and (iii) recombinant IL-1 beta. The CD5-, CD11a- and CD11c...

  10. Donor T cells primed on leukemia lysate-pulsed recipient APCs mediate strong graft-versus-leukemia effects across MHC barriers in full chimeras

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Arnab; Koestner, Wolfgang; Hapke, Martin; Schlaphoff, Verena; Länger, Florian; Baumann, Rolf; Koenecke, Christian; Cornberg, Markus; Welte, Karl; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of host origin drive graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects but can also trigger life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) across major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers. We show that in vitro priming of donor lymphocytes can circumvent the need of recipient-derived APCs in vivo for mediating robust GVL effects and significantly diminishes the risk of severe GVHD. In vitro, generated and expanded T cel...

  11. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma presenting as orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhaimy, Hanis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report an aggressive case of extranodal natural killer lymphoma (NKTCL of the ethmoid sinus presenting as orbital cellulitisMethod: Case reportResults: A 56-year-old male presented with right eye redness, reduced vision, and periorbital swelling for 5 weeks duration associated with a two-month history of blocked nose. The visual acuity of the right eye was 6/18. The eye was proptosed with periorbital oedema and conjunctival chemosis. The pupil was mid-dilated but there was no relative afferent pupillary defect. The fundus was normal. The extraocular movements were restricted in all directions of gaze. Nasal endoscopy revealed pansinusitis that corresponded with CT scan orbit and paranasal sinuses findings. Despite treatment, he showed no clinical improvement. Ethmoidal sinus biopsies performed revealed extranodal NKTCL. Further imaging showed involvement of the right orbital contents and its adnexa with intracranial extension into the right cavernous sinus and meninges over right temporal fossa. The patient underwent chemotherapy. However he succumbed to his illness two months after the diagnosis.Conclusion: Extranodal NKTCL is a great mimicker. This case demonstrated how an acute initial presentation of extranodal NKTCL can present as orbital cellulitis with pansinusitis.

  12. Targeting the genital tract mucosa with a lipopeptide/recombinant adenovirus prime/boost vaccine induces potent and long-lasting CD8+ T cell immunity against herpes: importance of MyD88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-11-01

    Targeting of the mucosal immune system of the genital tract with subunit vaccines has failed to induce potent and durable local CD8(+) T cell immunity, which is crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral pathogens, including HSV type 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8(+) T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide vaccine and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8(+) T cell epitope (gB(498-505)), and both were delivered intravaginally in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared with mice immunized with the homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo) vaccine, the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice 1) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells, detected in both the genital tract draining nodes and in the vaginal mucosa; 2) had significantly lower virus titers; 3) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and 4) did not succumb to lethal infection (p herpes infection and disease.

  13. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  14. First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Intranasally Administered Replication-Competent Sendai Virus–Vectored HIV Type 1 Gag Vaccine: Induction of Potent T-Cell or Antibody Responses in Prime-Boost Regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyombayire, Julien; Anzala, Omu; Gazzard, Brian; Karita, Etienne; Bergin, Philip; Hayes, Peter; Kopycinski, Jakub; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Jackson, Akil; Bizimana, Jean; Farah, Bashir; Sayeed, Eddy; Parks, Christopher L.; Inoue, Makoto; Hironaka, Takashi; Hara, Hiroto; Shu, Tsugumine; Matano, Tetsuro; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Park, Harriet; Gilmour, Jill; Lombardo, Angela; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna S.; Cox, Josephine H.

    2017-01-01

    Background. We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype intranasally administered, replication-competent Sendai virus (SeV)–vectored, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine. Methods. Sixty-five HIV-1–uninfected adults in Kenya, Rwanda, and the United Kingdom were assigned to receive 1 of 4 prime-boost regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months, respectively; ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients, 12:4): priming with a lower-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with an adenovirus 35–vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) given intramuscularly (SLA); priming with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly (SHA); priming with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly, followed by boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (ASH); and priming and boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (SHSH). Results. All vaccine regimens were well tolerated. Gag-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot–determined response rates and geometric mean responses were higher (96% and 248 spot-forming units, respectively) in groups primed with SeV-Gag and boosted with Ad35-GRIN (SLA and SHA) than those after a single dose of Ad35-GRIN (56% and 54 spot-forming units, respectively) or SeV-Gag (55% and 59 spot-forming units, respectively); responses persisted for ≥8 months after completion of the prime-boost regimen. Functional CD8+ T-cell responses with greater breadth, magnitude, and frequency in a viral inhibition assay were also seen in the SLA and SHA groups after Ad35-GRIN boost, compared with those who received either vaccine alone. SeV-Gag did not boost T-cell counts in the ASH group. In contrast, the highest Gag-specific antibody titers were seen in the ASH group. Mucosal antibody responses were sporadic. Conclusions. SeV-Gag primed functional, durable HIV-specific T-cell

  15. First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Intranasally Administered Replication-Competent Sendai Virus-Vectored HIV Type 1 Gag Vaccine: Induction of Potent T-Cell or Antibody Responses in Prime-Boost Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyombayire, Julien; Anzala, Omu; Gazzard, Brian; Karita, Etienne; Bergin, Philip; Hayes, Peter; Kopycinski, Jakub; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Jackson, Akil; Bizimana, Jean; Farah, Bashir; Sayeed, Eddy; Parks, Christopher L; Inoue, Makoto; Hironaka, Takashi; Hara, Hiroto; Shu, Tsugumine; Matano, Tetsuro; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Park, Harriet; Gilmour, Jill; Lombardo, Angela; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna S; Cox, Josephine H

    2017-01-01

     We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype intranasally administered, replication-competent Sendai virus (SeV)-vectored, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine.  Sixty-five HIV-1-uninfected adults in Kenya, Rwanda, and the United Kingdom were assigned to receive 1 of 4 prime-boost regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months, respectively; ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients, 12:4): priming with a lower-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with an adenovirus 35-vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) given intramuscularly (S L A); priming with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly (S H A); priming with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly, followed by boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (AS H ); and priming and boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (S H S H ).  All vaccine regimens were well tolerated. Gag-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot-determined response rates and geometric mean responses were higher (96% and 248 spot-forming units, respectively) in groups primed with SeV-Gag and boosted with Ad35-GRIN (S L A and S H A) than those after a single dose of Ad35-GRIN (56% and 54 spot-forming units, respectively) or SeV-Gag (55% and 59 spot-forming units, respectively); responses persisted for ≥8 months after completion of the prime-boost regimen. Functional CD8 + T-cell responses with greater breadth, magnitude, and frequency in a viral inhibition assay were also seen in the S L A and S H A groups after Ad35-GRIN boost, compared with those who received either vaccine alone. SeV-Gag did not boost T-cell counts in the AS H group. In contrast, the highest Gag-specific antibody titers were seen in the AS H group. Mucosal antibody responses were sporadic.  SeV-Gag primed functional, durable HIV-specific T-cell responses and boosted antibody

  16. Tumor Immunology meets…Immunology: Modified cancer cells as professional APC for priming naïve tumor-specific CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Nasser Eddine, Farah; Ramia, Elise; Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Accolla, Roberto S

    2017-01-01

    Although recent therapeutic approaches have revitalized the enthusiasm of the immunological way to combat cancer, still the comprehension of immunity against tumors is largely incomplete. Due to their specific function, CD8+ T cells with cytolytic activity (CTL) have attracted the attention of most investigators because CTL are considered the main effectors against tumor cells. Nevertheless, CTL activity and persistence is largely dependent on the action of CD4+ T helper cells (TH). Thus establishment of tumor-specific TH cell response is key to the optimal response against cancer. Here we describe emerging new strategies to increase the TH cell recognition of tumor antigens. In particular, we review recent data indicating that tumor cells themselves can act as surrogate antigen presenting cells for triggering TH response and how these findings can help in constructing immunotherapeutic protocols for anti-cancer vaccine development.

  17. Prevention of SIV rectal transmission and priming of T cell responses in macaques after local pre-exposure application of tenofovir gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Cranage

    2008-08-01

    modified virus outcomes (n = 2, while all untreated macaques and three of four macaques given placebo gel were infected, as were two of three animals receiving tenofovir gel after challenge. Moreover, analysis of lymphoid tissues post mortem failed to reveal sequestration of SIV in the protected animals. We found a strong positive association between the concentration of tenofovir in the plasma 15 min after rectal application of gel and the degree of protection in the six animals challenged with virus at this time point. Moreover, colorectal explants from non-SIV challenged tenofovir-treated macaques were resistant to infection ex vivo, whereas no inhibition was seen in explants from the small intestine. Tissue-specific inhibition of infection was associated with the intracellular detection of tenofovir. Intriguingly, in the absence of seroconversion, Gag-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma-secreting T cells were detected in the blood of four of seven protected animals tested, with frequencies ranging from 144 spot forming cells (SFC/10(6 PBMC to 261 spot forming cells (SFC/10(6 PBMC.These results indicate that colorectal pretreatment with ARV drugs, such as tenofovir, has potential as a clinically relevant strategy for the prevention of HIV transmission. We conclude that plasma tenofovir concentration measured 15 min after rectal administration may serve as a surrogate indicator of protective efficacy. This may prove to be useful in the design of clinical studies. Furthermore, in vitro intestinal explants served as a model for drug distribution in vivo and susceptibility to virus infection. The finding of T cell priming following exposure to virus in the absence of overt infection is provocative. Further studies would reveal if a combined modality microbicide and vaccination strategy is feasible by determining the full extent of local immune responses induced and their protective potential.

  18. FasL Mediates T-Cell Eradication of Tumor Cells Presenting Low Levels of Antigens | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    One approach to cancer immunotherapy, as opposed to therapeutic vaccination, is the transfusion of large numbers of tumor-specific killer T cells (cytotoxic T cells or CTLs) into patients. The body’s own defense killer T cells are a subgroup of T lymphocytes (a type of white blood cells) that are capable of inducing death in tumor cells. CTLs can cause the death of target cells either by releasing granules containing toxic molecules including perforin, or by producing a membrane protein called Fas ligand (FasL) which on interaction with the tumor cell results in cell death.

  19. Heat shock protein 90-mediated peptide-selective presentation of cytosolic tumor antigen for direct recognition of tumors by CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Matsuzaki, Junko; Caballero, Otavia L; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Odunsi, Kunle; Old, Lloyd J; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2012-04-15

    Tumor Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells play important functions in tumor immunosurveillance, and in certain cases they can directly recognize HLA class II-expressing tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanism of intracellular Ag presentation to CD4(+) T cells by tumor cells has not yet been well characterized. We analyzed two naturally occurring human CD4(+) T cell lines specific for different peptides from cytosolic tumor Ag NY-ESO-1. Whereas both lines had the same HLA restriction and a similar ability to recognize exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein, only one CD4(+) T cell line recognized NY-ESO-1(+) HLA class II-expressing melanoma cells. Modulation of Ag processing in melanoma cells using specific molecular inhibitors and small interfering RNA revealed a previously undescribed peptide-selective Ag-presentation pathway by HLA class II(+) melanoma cells. The presentation required both proteasome and endosomal protease-dependent processing mechanisms, as well as cytosolic heat shock protein 90-mediated chaperoning. Such tumor-specific pathway of endogenous HLA class II Ag presentation is expected to play an important role in immunosurveillance or immunosuppression mediated by various subsets of CD4(+) T cells at the tumor local site. Furthermore, targeted activation of tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells by vaccination or adoptive transfer could be a suitable strategy for enhancing the efficacy of tumor immunotherapy.

  20. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  1. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J. (UC); (UW-MED)

    2014-10-02

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.

  2. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P[2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells

  3. Retinoic acid induction of CD1d expression primes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells for killing by CD8+ invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghnewa, Yasmeen G; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Vandenberghe, Elisabeth; Browne, Paul V; McElligott, Anthony M; Doherty, Derek G

    2017-10-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are cytotoxic T cells that respond to glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. Therapeutic activation of iNKT cells with α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) can prevent and reverse tumor growth in mice and clinical trials involving α-GalCer-stimulated iNKT cells are ongoing in humans. B cells express CD1d, however, we show that CD1d expression is reduced on B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). B cells from CLL patients pulsed with α-GalCer failed to stimulate cytolytic degranulation by iNKT cell lines, but could present the more potent glycolipid analogue, 7DW8-5. Retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α) agonists induced CD1d expression by CLL B cells, restoring their ability to present α-GalCer to CD8α + iNKT cells, resulting in cytolytic degranulation. Thus, RAR-α agonists can augment the anti-tumor activities of iNKT cells against CLL cells in vitro. Their inclusion in iNKT cell-based therapies may benefit patients with CLL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cytotoxic T cell recognition of an endogenous class I HLA peptide presented by a class II HLA molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B P; Madrigal, A; Parham, P

    1990-09-01

    Human leukocytes were stimulated in vitro with peptides corresponding in sequence to the highly variable helix of the alpha 1 domain of various HLA-B and -C molecules. A CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T cell line, CTL-AV, that is specific for the HLA-B7 peptide presented by HLA-DR11.1 was obtained. The HLA-DR11.2 molecule, which only differs at three residues from HLA-DR11.1, did not present the HLA-B7 peptide to CTL-AV. Peptides from the alpha 1 domain helix of other HLA-A and HLA-B molecules, but not HLA-C molecules, competed with the HLA-B7 peptide for binding to HLA-DR11.1. A cell line (WT50) that coexpresses HLA-B7 and HLA-DR11.1 was killed by CTL-AV in the absence of any added HLA-B7 peptide. The processing and presentation of HLA-B7 in these cells appears to be through the endogenous, and not the exogenous, pathway of antigen presentation. Thus, Brefeldin A inhibits presentation and chloroquine does not. Furthermore, introduction of purified HLA-B7 molecules into HLA-DR11.1+, HLA-B7- cells by cytoplasmic loading via osmotic lysis of pinosomes, but not by simple incubation, rendered them susceptible to CTL-AV killing. These results provide an example of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presentation of a constitutively synthesized self protein that uses the endogenous pathway of antigen presentation. They also emphasize the capacity for presentation of MHC peptides by MHC molecules.

  5. Local HPV Recombinant Vaccinia Boost Following Priming with an HPV DNA Vaccine Enhances Local HPV-Specific CD8+ T-cell-Mediated Tumor Control in the Genital Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yun-Yan; Peng, Shiwen; Han, Liping; Qiu, Jin; Song, Liwen; Tsai, Yachea; Yang, Benjamin; Roden, Richard B S; Trimble, Cornelia L; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2016-02-01

    Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are expressed in all human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected cells, from initial infection in the genital tract to metastatic cervical cancer. Intramuscular vaccination of women with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) twice with a naked DNA vaccine, pNGVL4a-sig/E7(detox)/HSP70, and a single boost with HPVE6/E7 recombinant vaccinia vaccine (TA-HPV) elicited systemic HPV-specific CD8 T-cell responses that could traffic to the lesion and was associated with regression in some patients (NCT00788164). Here, we examine whether alteration of this vaccination regimen by administration of TA-HPV vaccination in the cervicovaginal tract, rather than intramuscular (IM) delivery, can more effectively recruit antigen-specific T cells in an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model of HPV16(+) cervical cancer (TC-1 luc). We found that pNGVL4a-sig/E7(detox)/HSP70 vaccination followed by cervicovaginal vaccination with TA-HPV increased accumulation of total and E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the cervicovaginal tract and better controlled E7-expressing cervicovaginal TC-1 luc tumor than IM administration of TA-HPV. Furthermore, the E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the cervicovaginal tract generated through the cervicovaginal route of vaccination expressed the α4β7 integrin and CCR9, which are necessary for the homing of the E7-specific CD8(+) T cells to the cervicovaginal tract. Finally, we show that cervicovaginal vaccination with TA-HPV can induce potent local HPV-16 E7 antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell immune responses regardless of whether an HPV DNA vaccine priming vaccination was administered IM or within the cervicovaginal tract. Our results support future clinical translation using cervicovaginal TA-HPV vaccination. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  8. The Role of B Cells for in Vivo T Cell Responses to a Friend Virus-Induced Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kirk R.; Klarnet, Jay P.; Gieni, Randall S.; Hayglass, Kent T.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1990-08-01

    B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells and accessory cells for T cell responses. This study evaluated the role of B cells in the induction of protective T cell immunity to a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced leukemia (FBL). B cell-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor-specific CD4^+ helper and CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell responses after priming with FBL or a recombinant vaccinia virus containing F-MuLV antigens. Moreover, these mice had diminished T cell responses to the vaccinia viral antigens. Tumor-primed T cells transferred into B cell-deficient mice effectively eradicated disseminated FBL. Thus, B cells appear necessary for efficient priming but not expression of tumor and viral T cell immunity.

  9. Repopulated antigen presenting cells induced an imbalanced differentiation of the helper T cells in whole body gamma irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Ran; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Kee [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic irradiation of cancer patients, although it may be protected by several antioxidant agents against free radicals, often induces chronic sequelae such as inflammation (allergic inflammation). This is a limiting factor for radiotherapy. Following radiotherapy, the inflammation or injury can occur in any organ with a high radiosensitivity such as the lung, bladder, kidney, liver, stomach and intestine. The mechanism by which ionizing radiation initiates inflammation is, however, poorly understood. In recent studies, it was suggested that a factor for irradiation-induced inflammation might be the over production of IL-4 that enhances fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. During the early stages after irradiation, type 2 of the helper T cells might be the major source of IL-4, and later on there seems to be an activation of the other IL-4 producing cell types, e.q. macrophages or mast cells. This is interesting because inflammation is classically seen to be dominated by Th1 cells secreting IFN-{gamma}. In the previous study, we were interested in the enhancement of the IL-4 and the IgE production during the development of immune cells after {gamma}-irradiation. We were able to deduce that IL-4 production was increased because of the shifted differentiation of the naive Th cells by the repopulated antigen presenting cells after irradiation. The aim of the present study was to precisely define whether antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of whole body irradiation-treated mice could influence the shifted differentiation of the Th cells. This view can be demonstrated by confirming that the shifted functional status of the Th cells is induced by the altered function of the repopulated macrophages after whole body irradiation (WBI)

  10. Langerhans cells favor skin flora tolerance through limited presentation of bacterial antigens and induction of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aar, Angelic M. G.; Picavet, Daisy I.; Muller, Femke J.; de Boer, Leonie; van Capel, Toni M. M.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Bos, Jan D.; Janssen, Hans; George, Thaddeus C.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; van Ham, S. Marieke; Teunissen, Marcel B. M.; de Jong, Esther C.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms preventing detrimental T-cell responses against commensal skin bacteria remain elusive. Using monocyte-derived and skin-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we demonstrate that epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), the DCs in the most superficial layer of the skin, have a poor capacity to

  11. Native IgG2a(b) is barely antigenic to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T cells owing to inefficient internalization by professional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnes, K; Hannestad, K

    2000-04-01

    Peptide epitopes derived from immunoglobulin variable regions represent tumour-specific antigens on B-cell neoplasms and can be recognized by syngeneic, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells. Immunoglobulin peptide/MHC class II complexes may also be involved in autoimmunity and CD4+ T-cell-mediated B-cell regulation. Thus, the IgG2a(b) H-chain allopeptide gamma2a(b) 435-451 presented on I-Ad mimics the epitope implicated in herpes simplex virus-induced autoimmune stromal keratitis and is the target of T helper 1 (Th1) clones that suppress IgG2a(b) production in vivo. We here report that spleen and thymus cells constitutively present the autologous gamma2a(b) epitope to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma as a function of the animal housing conditions (specific pathogen-free or not) and the serum levels of IgG2a(b). Constitutive presentation in the spleen was predominantly performed by dendritic cells. Whereas spleen cells poorly presented native IgG2a(b) to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma, IgG2a(b) in the form of immune complexes were presented > 200-fold more efficiently owing to internalization via low-affinity FcgammaR on macrophages. The antigenicity could also be improved by homotypic aggregation and by targeting IgG2a(b) to complement receptors on the A20 B-cell lymphoma. Mice without detectable IgG2a(b)-containing immune complexes typically exhibited minimal constitutive presentation. Nevertheless, native IgG2a(b) can sensitize antigen-presenting cells in vivo, as mice that were devoid of immune complexes and carried an IgG2a(b)-producing tumour did present constitutively, even at physiological IgG2a(b) serum levels. Whereas the amounts of IgG released from most B-cell lymphomas may be too low to allow spontaneous priming of tumour-specific MHC class II-restricted T cells, administration of tumour immunoglobulin in aggregated form might improve the efficacy of idiotype vaccination.

  12. Reduced IL-7R T Cell Expression and Increased Plasma sCD127 in Late Presenting HIV-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans J; Jespersen, Sofie; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2017-01-01

    homeostasis. This study aimed to describe IL-7R and IL-7 before and after initiation of cART in late presenting HIV-infected individuals, and the impact on immune recovery and T cell subset distribution after initiation of cART. METHODS: A total of 100 HIV-infected individuals initiating cART were included......BACKGROUND: Late presentation of HIV infection is associated with reduced chance of optimal immune recovery after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) and the corresponding receptor, IL-7 receptor (IL-7R) made up of CD127 and CD132, are crucial for T cell...

  13. Indirect presentation in the thymus limits naive and regulatory T-cell differentiation by promoting deletion of self-reactive thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Jin Yan; Wirasinha, Rushika C; Chan, Anna; Howard, Debbie R; Goodnow, Christopher C; Daley, Stephen R

    2018-02-07

    Acquisition of T-cell central tolerance involves distinct pathways of self-antigen presentation to thymocytes. One pathway termed indirect presentation requires a self-antigen transfer step from thymic epithelial cells (TECs) to bone marrow-derived cells before the self-antigen is presented to thymocytes. The role of indirect presentation in central tolerance is context-dependent, potentially due to variation in self-antigen expression, processing and presentation in the thymus. Here, we report experiments in mice in which TECs expressed a membrane-bound transgenic self-antigen, hen egg lysozyme (HEL), from either the insulin (insHEL) or thyroglobulin (thyroHEL) promoter. Intrathymic HEL expression was less abundant and more confined to the medulla in insHEL mice compared with thyroHEL mice. When indirect presentation was impaired by generating mice lacking MHC class II expression in bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells, insHEL-mediated thymocyte deletion was abolished, whereas thyroHEL-mediated deletion occurred at a later stage of thymocyte development and Foxp3 + regulatory T-cell differentiation increased. Indirect presentation increased the strength of T-cell receptor signalling that both self-antigens induced in thymocytes, as assessed by Helios expression. Hence, indirect presentation limits the differentiation of naive and regulatory T cells by promoting deletion of self-reactive thymocytes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Recipient dendritic cells, but not B cells, are required antigen-presenting cells for peripheral alloreactive CD8+ T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, J L; Lucas, C L; Haspot, F; Gaspar, J Kurtz C; Guzman, A; Sykes, M

    2010-03-01

    Induction of mixed allogeneic chimerism is a promising approach for achieving donor-specific tolerance, thereby obviating the need for life-long immunosuppression for solid organ allograft acceptance. In mice receiving a low dose (3Gy) of total body irradiation, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation combined with anti-CD154 tolerizes peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells, allowing achievement of mixed chimerism with specific tolerance to donor. With this approach, peripheral CD8 T-cell tolerance requires recipient MHC class II, CD4 T cells, B cells and DCs. Recipient-type B cells from chimeras that were tolerant to donor still promoted CD8 T-cell tolerance, but their role could not be replaced by donor-type B cells. Using recipients whose B cells or DCs specifically lack MHC class I and/or class II or lack CD80 and CD86, we demonstrate that dendritic cells (DCs) must express CD80/86 and either MHC class I or class II to promote CD8 tolerance. In contrast, B cells, though required, did not need to express MHC class I or class II or CD80/86 to promote CD8 tolerance. Moreover, recipient IDO and IL-10 were not required. Thus, antigen presentation by recipient DCs and not by B cells is critical for peripheral alloreactive CD8 T cell tolerance.

  15. Spontaneous CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses directed against cancer testis antigens are present in the peripheral blood of testicular cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Hayden; Hutton, Paul; Chaudhri, Shalini; Porfiri, Emilio; Patel, Prashant; Viney, Richard; Moss, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Cancer/testis antigen (CTAg) expression is restricted to spermatogenic cells in an immune-privileged site within the testis. However, these proteins are expressed aberrantly by malignant cells and T-cell responses against CTAgs develop in many cancer patients. We investigated the prevalence, magnitude and phenotype of CTAg-specific T cells in the blood of patients with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). CD8 + and CD4 + T-cell responses against MAGE-A family antigens were present in 44% (20/45) of patients' samples assayed by ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT. The presence of MAGE-specific CD8 + T cells was further determined following short-term in vitro expansion through the use of pMHC-I multimers containing known immunogenic peptides. Longitudinal analysis revealed that the frequency of MAGE-specific T cells decreased by 89% following orchidectomy suggesting that persistence of tumor antigen is required to sustain CTAg-specific T-cell immunity. Notably, this decrease correlated with a decline in the global effector/memory T-cell pool following treatment. Spontaneous T-cell immunity against CTAg proteins therefore develops in many patients with testicular cancer and may play an important role in the excellent clinical outcome of patients with this tumor subtype. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dynamics of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells and of Treg induction upon hepatic AAV gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Q Perrin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tolerogenic hepatic microenvironment impedes clearance of viral infections but is an advantage in viral vector gene transfer, which often results in immune tolerance induction to transgene products. Although the underlying tolerance mechanism has been extensively studied, our understanding of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells remains limited. To address this, we administered hepatotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV8 vector expressing cytoplasmic ovalbumin (OVA into wt mice followed by adoptive transfer of transgenic OVA-specific T cells. We find that that the liver-draining lymph nodes (celiac and portal are the major sites of MHC II presentation of the virally encoded antigen, as judged by in vivo proliferation of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells (requiring professional antigen-presenting cells, e.g., macrophages and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg induction. Antigen presentation in the liver itself contributes to activation of CD4+ T cells egressing from the liver. Hepatic-induced Treg rapidly disseminate through the systemic circulation. By contrast, a secreted OVA transgene product is presented in multiple organs, and OVA-specific Treg emerge in both the thymus and periphery. In summary, liver draining lymph nodes play an integral role in hepatic antigen presentation and peripheral Treg induction, which results in systemic regulation of the response to viral gene products.

  17. Memory CD4(+)CCR5(+) T cells are abundantly present in the gut of newborn infants to facilitate mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunders, Madeleine J.; van der Loos, Chris M.; Klarenbeek, Paul L.; van Hamme, John L.; Boer, Kees; Wilde, Jim C. H.; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, Rene A. W.; Kootstra, Neeltje; Pals, Steven T.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2012-01-01

    Despite potential clinical importance, target cells for mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 have not yet been identified. Cord blood-derived CD4(+) T cells are largely naive and do not express CCR5, the mandatory coreceptor for transmitted HIV-1 R5 strains in infants. In the present study, we

  18. Independent priming of location and color in identification of briefly presented letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásgeirsson, Árni Gunnar; Kristjánsson, Árni; Bundesen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Attention shifts are facilitated if the items to be attended remain the same across trials. Some researchers argue that this priming effect is perceptual, whereas others propose that priming is postperceptual, involving facilitated response selection. The experimental findings have not been consistent regarding the roles of variables such as task difficulty, response repetition, expectancies, and decision-making. Position priming, when repetition of a target position facilitates responses on a subsequent trial, is another source of disagreement among researchers. Experimental results have likewise been inconsistent as to whether position priming is dependent on the repetition of target features or has an independent effect on attention shifts. We attempted to isolate the perceptual components of priming by presenting brief (10-180 ms) search arrays to eight healthy observers. The task was to identify a color-singleton letter among distractors. All stimulus presentation contingencies were randomized, and responses were unspeeded, to avoid effects of observer expectation and postperceptual effects. Repeating target color and/or position strongly improved performance. The effects of color and position repetition were independent of one another and were stable across participants. The results argue for a strong perceptual component in priming, which biases selection toward recent target features and positions, showing that perceptual mechanisms are sufficient to produce priming in visual search and that such effects can be elicited with limited sensory evidence. The results are the first to demonstrate independent priming of color and position in the identification of briefly presented, postmasked stimuli.

  19. Systemic LPS Translocation Activates Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells but Is Dispensable for the Breakdown of CD8+ T Cell Peripheral Tolerance in Irradiated Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Espinosa-Carrasco

    Full Text Available Lymphodepletion is currently used to enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic T lymphocyte adoptive transfer immunotherapy against cancer. This beneficial effect of conditioning regimens is due, at least in part, to promoting the breakdown of peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance. Lymphodepletion by total body irradiation induces systemic translocation of commensal bacteria LPS from the gastrointestinal tract. Since LPS is a potent activator of the innate immune system, including antigen presenting dendritic cells, we hypothesized that LPS translocation could be required for the breakdown of peripheral tolerance observed in irradiated mice. To address this issue, we have treated irradiated mice with antibiotics in order to prevent LPS translocation and utilized them in T cell adoptive transfer experiments. Surprisingly, we found that despite of completely blocking LPS translocation into the bloodstream, antibiotic treatment did not prevent the breakdown of peripheral tolerance. Although irradiation induced the activation of cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells in the lymphoid tissue, LPS could not solely account for this effect. Activation of dendritic cells by mechanisms other than LPS translocation is sufficient to promote the differentiation of potentially autoreactive CD8+ T cells into effectors in irradiated mice. Our data indicate that LPS translocation is dispensable for the breakdown of CD8+ T cell tolerance in irradiated mice.

  20. T-Cell lymphoproliferative disorder of hand-mirror cell morphology presenting in an eosinophilic loculated peritoneal effusion, with omental "caking"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufankjian Dearon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells with "hand mirror" morphology have not, to the best of our knowledge, been described in a primary effusion sample. This paper describes a case of T-cell lymphoma with eosinophilia in a patient with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis. Rarely, a T-cell lymphoproliferative process may mimic primary peritoneal carcinomatosis, clinically suggested by a presentation in CT imaging of omental caking with bilateral massive loculated effusions in a patient without lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly. Methods A 60 year old caucasian male presented with vague abdominal discomfort and increasing abdominal girth. Computed tomography showed a two centimeter thick omental cake and a small loculated effusion. The clinical presentation and imaging findings were most consistent with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytologic evaluation of the effusion was undertaken for diagnostic study. Results Rapid intraprocedural interpretation of the effusion sample showed a monomorphic population of cells with "hand-mirror" cell morphology exhibiting cytoplasmic extensions (uropodia with 3–5 course dark cytoplasmic granules and a rim of vacuolated cytoplasm capping the opposing "mirror head" side. These cells were seen within a background of mature eosinophils. Flow cytometric evaluation of the ascites fluid demonstrated an atypical T-cell population with the following immunophenotype: CD2-, CD3+, CD4-, CD5-, CD7-, CD8+, CD56+. T-cell receptor (TCR gene rearrangement was positive for clonal TCR-gamma gene rearrangement, supporting the diagnosis of a T-lymphoprolifereative disorder. Conclusion A T-cell lymphoproliferative process may present with "hand mirror" morphology in an effusion sample. These cells may show polar cytoplasmic vacuolization and 3–5 course granules within the "handle" of these unique cells. Cytoplasm shows peripheral constriction around the nucleus.

  1. Dynamic imaging of experimental Leishmania donovani-induced hepatic granulomas detects Kupffer cell-restricted antigen presentation to antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Beattie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs represent the major phagocytic population within the liver and provide an intracellular niche for the survival of a number of important human pathogens. Although KCs have been extensively studied in vitro, little is known of their in vivo response to infection and their capacity to directly interact with antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells. Here, using a combination of approaches including whole mount and thin section confocal microscopy, adoptive cell transfer and intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that KCs represent the only detectable population of mononuclear phagocytes within granulomas induced by Leishmania donovani infection that are capable of presenting parasite-derived peptide to effector CD8(+ T cells. This restriction of antigen presentation to KCs within the Leishmania granuloma has important implications for the identification of new candidate vaccine antigens and for the design of novel immuno-therapeutic interventions.

  2. Analysis of detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from CD4+ T cell line: interaction with antigen presenting cells promotes coalescing of lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Colleen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid rafts present on the plasma membrane play an important role in spatiotemporal regulation of cell signaling. Physical and chemical characterization of lipid raft size and assessment of their composition before, and after cell stimulation will aid in developing a clear understanding of their regulatory role in cell signaling. We have used visual and biochemical methods and approaches for examining individual and lipid raft sub-populations isolated from a mouse CD4+ T cell line in the absence of detergents. Results Detergent-free rafts were analyzed before and after their interaction with antigen presenting cells. We provide evidence that the average diameter of lipid rafts isolated from un-stimulated T cells, in the absence of detergents, is less than 100 nm. Lipid rafts on CD4+ T cell membranes coalesce to form larger structures, after interacting with antigen presenting cells even in the absence of a foreign antigen. Conclusions Findings presented here indicate that lipid raft coalescence occurs during cellular interactions prior to sensing a foreign antigen.

  3. DNA vaccine delivered by a needle-free injection device improves potency of priming for antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses after rAd5 boost in a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney S Graham

    Full Text Available DNA vaccine immunogenicity has been limited by inefficient delivery. Needle-free delivery of DNA using a CO2-powered Biojector® device was compared to delivery by needle and syringe and evaluated for safety and immunogenicity.Forty adults, 18-50 years, were randomly assigned to intramuscular (IM vaccinations with DNA vaccine, VRC-HIVDNA016-00-VP, (weeks 0, 4, 8 by Biojector® 2000™ or needle and syringe (N/S and boosted IM at week 24 with VRC-HIVADV014-00-VP (rAd5 with N/S at 10(10 or 10(11 particle units (PU. Equal numbers per assigned schedule had low (≤500 or high (>500 reciprocal titers of preexisting Ad5 neutralizing antibody.120 DNA and 39 rAd5 injections were given; 36 subjects completed follow-up research sample collections. IFN-γ ELISpot response rates were 17/19 (89% for Biojector® and 13/17 (76% for N/S delivery at Week 28 (4 weeks post rAd5 boost. The magnitude of ELISpot response was about 3-fold higher in Biojector® compared to N/S groups. Similar effects on response rates and magnitude were observed for CD8+, but not CD4+ T-cell responses by ICS. Env-specific antibody responses were about 10-fold higher in Biojector-primed subjects.DNA vaccination by Biojector® was well-tolerated and compared to needle injection, primed for greater IFN-γ ELISpot, CD8+ T-cell, and antibody responses after rAd5 boosting.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00109629.

  4. An Antigen-Presenting and Apoptosis-Inducing Polymer Microparticle Prolongs Alloskin Graft Survival by Selectively and Markedly Depleting Alloreactive CD8+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selectively depleting the pathogenic T cells is a fundamental strategy for the treatment of allograft rejection and autoimmune disease since it retains the overall immune function of host. The concept of killer artificial antigen-presenting cells (KaAPCs has been developed by co-coupling peptide–major histocompatibility complex (pMHC multimer and anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb onto the polymeric microparticles (MPs to induce the apoptosis of antigen-specific T cells. But little information is available about its in vivo therapeutic potential and mechanism. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI-coated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid microparticle (PLGA MP was fabricated as a cell-sized scaffold to covalently co-couple H-2Kb-Ig dimer and anti-Fas mAb for the generation of alloantigen-presenting and apoptosis-inducing MPs. Intravenous infusions of the biodegradable KaAPCs prolonged the alloskin graft survival for 43 days in a single MHC-mismatched murine model, depleted the most of H-2Kb-alloreactive CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood, spleen, and alloskin graft in an antigen-specific manner and anti-Fas-dependent fashion. The cell-sized KaAPCs circulated throughout vasculature into liver, kidney, spleen, lymph nodes, lung, and heart, but few ones into local allograft at early stage, with a retention time up to 36 h in vivo. They colocalized with CD8+ T cells in secondary lymphoid organs while few ones contacted with CD4+ T cells, B cells, macrophage, and dendritic cells, or internalized by phagocytes. Importantly, the KaAPC treatment did not significantly impair the native T cell repertoire or non-pathogenic immune cells, did not obviously suppress the overall immune function of host, and did not lead to visible organ toxicity. Our results strongly document the high potential of PLGA MP-based KaAPCs as a novel antigen-specific immunotherapy for allograft rejection and autoimmune disorder. The in vivo mechanism of alloinhibition, tissue

  5. Systematic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease presenting as a persistent fever and cough: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Fereshteh; Ghafourian, Firouzeh; Masir, Noraidah

    2014-08-27

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is an extremely rare disorder and classically arises following primary acute or chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection. It is characterized by clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected T-cells with an activated cytotoxic phenotype. This disease has a rapid clinical course and is more frequent in Asia and South America, with relatively few cases being reported in Western countries. The clinical and pathological features of the disease overlap with other conditions including infectious mononucleosis, chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and natural killer cell malignancies. We describe the rare case of systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease in a 16-year-old Malay boy. He presented with a six-month history of fever and cough, with pulmonary and mediastinal lymphadenopathy and severe pancytopenia. Medium- to large-sized, CD8+ and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA-positive atypical lymphoid cells were present in the bone marrow aspirate. He subsequently developed fatal virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome and died due to sepsis and multiorgan failure. Although systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is a disorder which is rarely encountered in clinical practice, our case report underlines the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic approach in the management of this disease. A high level of awareness of the disease throughout the diagnosis process for young patients who present with systemic illness and hemophagocytic syndrome may be of great help for the clinical diagnosis of this disease.

  6. Independent priming of location and color in identification of briefly presented letters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ásgeirsson, Árni Gunnar; Kristjánsson, Árni; Bundesen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Attention shifts are facilitated if the items to be attended remain the same across trials. Some researchers argue that this priming effect is perceptual, whereas others propose that priming is postperceptual, inv olv ing f acilitated response selection. The experimental f indings hav e not been...... was to identify a color-singleton letter among distractors. All stimulus presentation contingencies were randomized, and responses were unspeeded, to av oid ef f ects of observ er expectation and postperceptual ef f ects. Repeating target color and/or position strongly improv ed perf ormance. The ef f ects...... of color and position repetition were independent of one another and were stable across participants. The results argue for a strong perceptual component in priming, which biases selection toward recent target features and positions, showing that perceptual mechanisms are suf f icient to produce priming...

  7. Bivalent promoter marks and a latent enhancer may prime the leukaemia oncogene LMO1 for ectopic expression in T-cell leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, S H; Thoms, J; Sive, J I; Calero-Nieto, F J; Kinston, S J; Schütte, J; Knezevic, K; Lock, R B; Pimanda, J E; Göttgens, B

    2013-06-01

    LMO1 is a transcriptional regulator and a T-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) oncogene. Although first identified in association with a chromosomal translocation in T-ALL, the ectopic expression of LMO1 occurs far more frequently in the absence of any known mutation involving its locus. Given that LMO1 is barely expressed in any haematopoietic lineage, and activation of transcriptional drivers in leukaemic cells is not well described, we investigated the regulation of this gene in normal haematopoietic and leukaemic cells. We show that LMO1 has two promoters that drive reporter gene expression in transgenic mice to neural tissues known to express endogenous LMO1. The LMO1 promoters display bivalent histone marks in multiple blood lineages including T-cells, and a 3' flanking region at LMO1 +57 contains a transcriptional enhancer that is active in developing blood cells in transgenic mouse embryos. The LMO1 promoters become activated in T-ALL together with the 3' enhancer, which is bound in primary T-ALL cells by SCL/TAL1 and GATA3. Taken together, our results show that LMO1 is poised for expression in normal progenitors, where activation of SCL/TAL1 together with a breakdown of epigenetic repression of LMO1 regulatory elements induces ectopic LMO1 expression that contributes to the development and maintenance of T-ALL.

  8. Adaptive response to mutagenesis and its molecular basis in a human T-cell leukemia line primed with a low dose of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, P.K.; Xiang, X.Q.; Sun, W.Z.; Liu, X.Y.; Zhang, Y.P.; Wei, K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect was studied of a low dose of γ-ray preexposure on the frequency and molecular spectrum of radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus in a human T-cell leukemia line. When the cells were preexposed to 0.01 Gy of γ-rays, the yield of mutations induced by a subsequent 2-Gy challenge dose was reduced by 60%, compared with the 2 Gy of irradiation alone. The data of Southern blot analysis showed that 47% of the mutants induced by 2 Gy in the cells without low-dose preexposure were of the deletion or rearranged mutations type. In contrast, in the low-dose radioadapted cells the proportion of this type of 2-Gy-induced mutations decreased to 28%. This is close to the control level (22%) of spontaneous mutations. Our results confirm that a low dose of γ-ray preexposure leads to a decreased susceptibility to gene deletions and rearrangements after high-dose irradiation. (orig.)

  9. Interleukin 6 Present in Inflammatory Ascites from Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Patients Promotes Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2-Expressing Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Chandralega Kampan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEpithelial ovarian cancer (EOC remains a highly lethal gynecological malignancy. Ascites, an accumulation of peritoneal fluid present in one-third of patients at presentation, is linked to poor prognosis. High levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs in ascites are correlated with tumor progression and reduced survival. Malignant ascites harbors high levels of Tregs expressing the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2, as well as pro-inflammatory factors such as interleukin 6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF. IL-6 is also associated with poor prognosis. Herein, we study the effect of IL-6 and TNF present in ascites on the modulation of TNFR2 expression on T cells, and specifically Tregs.MethodsAscites and respective peripheral blood sera were collected from 18 patients with advanced EOC and soluble biomarkers, including IL-6, sTNFR2, IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF, were quantified using multiplexed bead-based immunoassay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy donors were incubated with cell-free ascites for 48 h (or media as a negative control. In some experiments, IL-6 or TNF within the ascites were neutralized by using monoclonal antibodies. The phenotype of TNFR2+ Tregs and TNFR2− Tregs were characterized post incubation in ascites. In some experiments, cell sorted Tregs were utilized instead of PBMC.ResultsHigh levels of immunosuppressive (sTNFR2, IL-10, and TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF were present in malignant ascites. TNFR2 expression on all T cell subsets was higher in post culture in ascites and highest on CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ Tregs, resulting in an increased TNFR2+ Treg/effector T cell ratio. Furthermore, TNFR2+ Tregs conditioned in ascites expressed higher levels of the functional immunosuppressive molecules programmed cell death ligand-1, CTLA-4, and GARP. Functionally, TNFR2+ Treg frequency was inversely correlated with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ production by effector T cells, and was

  10. Subliminal presentation of emotionally negative vs positive primes increases the perceived beauty of target stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Era, Vanessa; Candidi, Matteo; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-11-01

    Emotions have a profound influence on aesthetic experiences. Studies using affective priming procedures demonstrate, for example, that inducing a conscious negative emotional state biases the perception of abstract stimuli towards the sublime (Eskine et al. Emotion 12:1071-1074, 2012. doi: 10.1037/a0027200). Moreover, subliminal happy facial expressions have a positive impact on the aesthetic evaluation of abstract art (Flexas et al. PLoS ONE 8:e80154, 2013). Little is known about how emotion influences aesthetic perception of non-abstract, representational stimuli, especially those that are particularly relevant for social behaviour, like human bodies. Here, we explore whether the subliminal presentation of emotionally charged visual primes modulates the explicit subjective aesthetic judgment of body images. Using a forward/backward masking procedure, we presented subliminally positive and negative, arousal-matched, emotional or neutral primes and measured their effect on the explicit evaluation of perceived beauty (high vs low) and emotion (positive vs negative) evoked by abstract and body images. We found that negative primes increased subjective aesthetic evaluations of target bodies or abstract images in comparison with positive primes. No influence of primes on the emotional dimension of the targets was found, thus ruling out an unspecific arousal effect and strengthening the link between emotional valence and aesthetic appreciation. More specifically, that subliminal negative primes increase beauty ratings compared to subliminal positive primes indicates a clear link between negative emotions and positive aesthetic evaluations and vice versa, suggesting a possible link between negative emotion and the experience of sublime in art. The study expands previous research by showing the effect of subliminal negative emotions on the subjective aesthetic evaluation not only of abstract but also of body images.

  11. EFFECT OF LIPOSOMAL CLODRONATE-DEPENDENT DEPLETION OF PROFESSIONAL ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELLS ON NUMBERS AND PHENOTYPE OF CANINE CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ REGULATORY T CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kriston F.; Stokes, John V.; Gunnoe, Sagen A.; Follows, Joyce S.; Shafer, Lydia; Ammari, Mais G.; Archer, Todd M.; Thomason, John M.; Mackin, Andrew J.; Pinchuk, Lesya M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to control autoreactivity during and subsequent to the development of the peripheral immune system. Professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes, have an important role in inducing Tregs. For the first time, this study evaluated proportions and phenotypes of Tregs in canine peripheral blood depleted of professional APCs, utilizing liposomal clodronate (LC) and multicolor flow cytometry analysis. Our results demonstrate that LC exposure promoted short term decreases followed by significant increases in the proportions or absolute numbers of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs in dogs. In general, the LC-dependent Treg fluctuations were similar to the changes in the levels of CD14+ monocytes in Walker hounds. However, the proportions of monocytes showed more dramatic changes compared to the proportions of Tregs that were visually unchanged after LC treatment over the study period. At the same time, absolute Treg numbers showed, similarly to the levels of CD14+ monocytes, significant compensatory gains as well as the recovery during the normalization period. We confirm the previous data that CD4+ T cells with the highest CD25 expression were highly enriched for FOXP3. Furthermore, for the first time, we report that CD4+CD25lowFOXP3+ is the major regulatory T cell subset affected by LC exposure. The increases within the lowest CD25 expressers of CD4+FOXP3+ cells together with compensatory gains in the proportion of CD14+ monocytes during compensatory and normalization periods suggest the possible direct or indirect roles of monocytes in active recruitment and generation of Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells. PMID:25950023

  12. Accessory signals in T-T cell interactions between antigen- and alloantigen-specific, human memory T cells generated in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Ryder, L P; Georgsen, J

    1990-01-01

    The potential of activated HLA class II-positive T cells as antigen-/alloantigen-presenting cells remains controversial. In our model system we use in vitro-primed, HLA class II-specific T cells of the memory T-cell phenotype, CD4+, CD29+ (4B4+), and CD45RO+ (UCHL-1). We have previously shown......), or a calcium ionophore (A23187) enabled Ta to elicit alloantigen-specific memory T-cell responses and to present purified protein derivative (PPD) to PPD-specific T-cell lines. The addition of irradiated, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines (EBV-LCL) (but not their supernatants) had a similar but less...

  13. Multiple dendritic cell populations activate CD4+ T cells after viral stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele M Mount

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a heterogeneous cell population that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. CD8alpha DC play a prominent, and sometimes exclusive, role in driving amplification of CD8(+ T cells during a viral infection. Whether this reliance on a single subset of DC also applies for CD4(+ T cell activation is unknown. We used a direct ex vivo antigen presentation assay to probe the capacity of flow cytometrically purified DC populations to drive amplification of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells following infection with influenza virus by different routes. This study examined the contributions of non-CD8alpha DC populations in the amplification of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells in cutaneous and systemic influenza viral infections. We confirmed that in vivo, effective immune responses for CD8(+ T cells are dominated by presentation of antigen by CD8alpha DC but can involve non-CD8alpha DC. In contrast, CD4(+ T cell responses relied more heavily on the contributions of dermal DC migrating from peripheral lymphoid tissues following cutaneous infection, and CD4 DC in the spleen after systemic infection. CD4(+ T cell priming by DC subsets that is dependent upon the route of administration raises the possibility that vaccination approaches could be tailored to prime helper T cell immunity.

  14. Immunologic effects of whole body ultraviolet (uv) irradiation. II. Defect in splenic adherent cell antigen presentation for stimulation of T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Fox, I.J.; Greene, M.I.; Benacerraf, B.; Germain, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation has been shown to alter many parameters of the immunologic reactivity of mice. The altered responsiveness of uv-irradiated mice, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and primary in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses to T-dependent antigens, has recently been correlated with a functional defect in the splenic adherent cell population of these animals. The present studies describe a model of this altered responsiveness, which allows further clarification of the effects of external uv irradiation on the splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) in its interactions with T cells

  15. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and dendritic cells (MoDC from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  16. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  17. Conditional ablation of CD205+ conventional dendritic cells impacts the regulation of T-cell immunity and homeostasis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Tomohiro; Murakami, Ryuichi; Takagi, Hideaki; Sato, Kaori; Sato, Yumiko; Otsuka, Haruna; Ohno, Michiko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Ohara, Osamu; Hikida, Masaki; Malissen, Bernard; Sato, Katsuaki

    2012-07-10

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are composed of multiple subsets that play a dual role in inducing immunity and tolerance. However, it is unclear how CD205(+) conventional DCs (cDCs) control immune responses in vivo. Here we generated knock-in mice with the selective conditional ablation of CD205(+) cDCs. CD205(+) cDCs contributed to antigen-specific priming of CD4(+) T cells under steady-state conditions, whereas they were dispensable for antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses under inflammatory conditions. In contrast, CD205(+) cDCs were required for antigen-specific priming of CD8(+) T cells to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) mediated through cross-presentation. Although CD205(+) cDCs were involved in the thymic generation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), they maintained the homeostasis of CD4(+) Tregs and CD4(+) effector T cells in peripheral and mucosal tissues. On the other hand, CD205(+) cDCs were involved in the inflammation triggered by Toll-like receptor ligand as well as bacterial and viral infections. Upon microbial infections, CD205(+) cDCs contributed to the cross-priming of CD8(+) T cells for generating antimicrobial CTLs to efficiently eliminate pathogens, whereas they suppressed antimicrobial CD4(+) T-cell responses. Thus, these findings reveal a critical role for CD205(+) cDCs in the regulation of T-cell immunity and homeostasis in vivo.

  18. Comparison of microglia and infiltrating CD11c+ cells as antigen presenting cells for T cell proliferation and cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Løbner, Morten; Cédile, Oriane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue-resident antigen-presenting cells (APC) exert a major influence on the local immune environment. Microglia are resident myeloid cells in the central nervous system (CNS), deriving from early post-embryonic precursors, distinct from adult hematopoietic lineages. Dendritic cells...... (DC) and macrophages infiltrate the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Microglia are not considered to be as effective APC as DC or macrophages. METHODS: In this work we compared the antigen presenting capacity of CD11c+ and CD11c- microglia subsets with infiltrating CD11c......+ APC, which include DC. The microglial subpopulations (CD11c- CD45dim CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD45dim CD11b+) as well as infiltrating CD11c+ CD45high cells were sorted from CNS of C57BL/6 mice with EAE. Sorted cells were characterised by flow cytometry for surface phenotype and by quantitative real-time PCR...

  19. Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Respond to Antigen-Presenting Cells Exposed to Lipids from Olea europaea Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abos Gracia, Beatriz; López Relaño, Juan; Revilla, Ana; Castro, Lourdes; Villalba, Mayte; Martín Adrados, Beatriz; Regueiro, Jose Ramon; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Martínez Naves, Eduardo; Gómez Del Moral, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Allergic sensitization might be influenced by the lipids present in allergens, which can be recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of olive pollen lipids in human APCs, including monocytes as well as monocyte-derived macrophages (Mϕ) and dendritic cells (DCs). Lipids were extracted from olive (Olea europaea) pollen grains. Invariant (i)NKT cells, monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs were obtained from buffy coats of healthy blood donors, and their cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. iNKT cytotoxicity was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Gene expression of CD1A and CD1D was performed by RT-PCR, and the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α cytokines by monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that monocytes and monocyte-derived Mϕ treated with olive pollen lipids strongly activate iNKT cells. We observed several phenotypic modifications in the APCs upon exposure to pollen-derived lipids. Both Mϕ and monocytes treated with olive pollen lipids showed an increase in CD1D gene expression, whereas upregulation of cell surface CD1d protein occurred only in Mϕ. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of human serum enhance their surface CD1d expression when exposed to olive pollen lipids. Finally, olive pollen lipids were able to stimulate the production of IL-6 but downregulated the production of lipopolysaccharide- induced IL-10 by Mϕ. Olive pollen lipids alter the phenotype of monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs, resulting in the activation of NKT cells, which have the potential to influence allergic immune responses. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. How Do CD4+ T Cells Detect and Eliminate Tumor Cells That Either Lack or Express MHC Class II Molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner; Tveita, Anders Aune; Fauskanger, Marte; Schjesvold, Fredrik; Lorvik, Kristina Berg; Hofgaard, Peter O.; Omholt, Hilde; Munthe, Ludvig A.; Dembic, Zlatko; Corthay, Alexandre; Bogen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor-specific antigen by host antigen-presenting cells (APCs) appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315), where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR-transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-γ stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed. PMID:24782871

  1. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  2. Functions of NKG2D in CD8+ T cells: an opportunity for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Kushal; Perez, Cynthia; Rojas, Lourdes Beatriz Plaza; Burke, Brianna; Guevara-Patino, Jose A

    2018-02-05

    Natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) is a type II transmembrane receptor. NKG2D is present on NK cells in both mice and humans, whereas it is constitutively expressed on CD8 + T cells in humans but only expressed upon T-cell activation in mice. NKG2D is a promiscuous receptor that recognizes stress-induced surface ligands. In NK cells, NKG2D signaling is sufficient to unleash the killing response; in CD8 + T cells, this requires concurrent activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR). In this case, the function of NKG2D is to authenticate the recognition of a stressed target and enhance TCR signaling. CD28 has been established as an archetype provider of costimulation during T-cell priming. It has become apparent, however, that signals from other costimulatory receptors, such as NKG2D, are required for optimal T-cell function outside the priming phase. This review will focus on the similarities and differences between NKG2D and CD28; less well-described characteristics of NKG2D, such as the potential role of NKG2D in CD8 + T-cell memory formation, cancer immunity and autoimmunity; and the opportunities for targeting NKG2D in immunotherapy.Cellular and Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 5 February 2018; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.161.

  3. Upregulation of immunoproteasome subunits in myositis indicates active inflammation with involvement of antigen presenting cells, CD8 T-cells and IFNΓ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetam Ghannam

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM infiltration of immune cells into muscle and upregulation of MHC-I expression implies increased antigen presentation and involvement of the proteasome system. To decipher the role of immunoproteasomes in myositis, we investigated individual cell types and muscle tissues and focused on possible immune triggers. METHODS: Expression of constitutive (PSMB5, -6, -7 and corresponding immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8, -9, -10 was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in muscle biopsies and sorted peripheral blood cells of patients with IIM, non-inflammatory myopathies (NIM and healthy donors (HD. Protein analysis in muscle biopsies was performed by western blot. Affymetrix HG-U133 platform derived transcriptome data from biopsies of different muscle diseases and from immune cell types as well as monocyte stimulation experiments were used for validation, coregulation and coexpression analyses. RESULTS: Real-time RT-PCR revealed significantly increased expression of immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8/-9/-10 in DC, monocytes and CD8+ T-cells in IIM. In muscle biopsies, the immunosubunits were elevated in IIM compared to NIM and exceeded levels of matched blood samples. Proteins of PSMB8 and -9 were found only in IIM but not NIM muscle biopsies. Reanalysis of 78 myositis and 20 healthy muscle transcriptomes confirmed these results and revealed involvement of the antigen processing and presentation pathway. Comparison with reference profiles of sorted immune cells and healthy muscle confirmed upregulation of PSMB8 and -9 in myositis biopsies beyond infiltration related changes. This upregulation correlated highest with STAT1, IRF1 and IFNγ expression. Elevation of T-cell specific transcripts in active IIM muscles was accompanied by increased expression of DC and monocyte marker genes and thus reflects the cell type specific involvement observed in peripheral blood. CONCLUSIONS: Immunoproteasomes seem to indicate

  4. Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type (ENKTL-NT): An Update on Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, and Natural History in North American and European Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M; Pan, Zenggang; Gru, Alejandro A; Freud, Aharon G; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Otto, Brad; Barrionuevo, Carlos; Baiocchi, Robert A; Rochford, Rosemary; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-12-01

    Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL-NT) is an aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma most commonly occurring in East Asia and Latin America but with increasing incidence in the United States. Data on epidemiology, disease presentation, and outcome for European and North American ("Western") cases are very limited. We review published landmark clinical studies on ENKTL-NT in the West and report in detail recent data, including our institutional experience. We highlight key observations in its epidemiology, natural history, and trends in clinical management. In the USA, ENKTL-NT is more common among Asian Pacific Islanders (API) and Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic whites. Published studies indicate less heterogeneity in clinical presentation in Western ENKTL-NT compared to Asian patients. While there is variation in age at diagnosis, presence of antecedent lymphoproliferative disorders, and outcomes among racial/ethnic groups, the universal association of ENKTL-NT with EBV and the poor response of this neoplasm to anthracycline-based therapy is consistent across all geographic areas. Data on epidemiology, disease presentation, and clinical outcomes in mature T cell and NK cell (T/NK cell) neoplasms, including ENKTL-NT, in Europe and North America are very limited. As the classification and diagnostic characterization of the currently recognized T/NK cell lymphoma disease entities continue to evolve, gaps and inconsistencies in data reporting across different studies are being recognized. Despite these limitations, several studies from the USA suggest that the incidence of ENKTL-NT is higher in Asian Pacific Islanders (API) and non-white Hispanics and that outcomes may be worse in non-whites. However, the universal association of ENKTL-NT with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) across all ethnic groups suggests a common pathogenesis. Given the overlap between the entities included in the category of T/NK cell neoplasms, there is a need to further define

  5. Upregulation of Immunoproteasome Subunits in Myositis Indicates Active Inflammation with Involvement of Antigen Presenting Cells, CD8 T-Cells and IFNγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khetam; Martinez-Gamboa, Lorena; Spengler, Lydia; Krause, Sabine; Smiljanovic, Biljana; Bonin, Marc; Bhattarai, Salyan; Grützkau, Andreas; Burmester, Gerd-R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) infiltration of immune cells into muscle and upregulation of MHC-I expression implies increased antigen presentation and involvement of the proteasome system. To decipher the role of immunoproteasomes in myositis, we investigated individual cell types and muscle tissues and focused on possible immune triggers. Methods Expression of constitutive (PSMB5, -6, -7) and corresponding immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8, -9, -10) was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in muscle biopsies and sorted peripheral blood cells of patients with IIM, non-inflammatory myopathies (NIM) and healthy donors (HD). Protein analysis in muscle biopsies was performed by western blot. Affymetrix HG-U133 platform derived transcriptome data from biopsies of different muscle diseases and from immune cell types as well as monocyte stimulation experiments were used for validation, coregulation and coexpression analyses. Results Real-time RT-PCR revealed significantly increased expression of immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8/-9/-10) in DC, monocytes and CD8+ T-cells in IIM. In muscle biopsies, the immunosubunits were elevated in IIM compared to NIM and exceeded levels of matched blood samples. Proteins of PSMB8 and -9 were found only in IIM but not NIM muscle biopsies. Reanalysis of 78 myositis and 20 healthy muscle transcriptomes confirmed these results and revealed involvement of the antigen processing and presentation pathway. Comparison with reference profiles of sorted immune cells and healthy muscle confirmed upregulation of PSMB8 and -9 in myositis biopsies beyond infiltration related changes. This upregulation correlated highest with STAT1, IRF1 and IFNγ expression. Elevation of T-cell specific transcripts in active IIM muscles was accompanied by increased expression of DC and monocyte marker genes and thus reflects the cell type specific involvement observed in peripheral blood. Conclusions Immunoproteasomes seem to indicate IIM activity and

  6. Distinct Gut-Derived Bacteria Differentially Affect Three Types of Antigen-Presenting Cells and Impact on NK- and T-Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Hansen, Anne Marie Valentin; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Objectives Gut bacteria are assumed essential for development and maintenance of a balanced immune system. Specifically, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by gut bacteria is important for polarisation of the immune response. This experiment was designed to reveal similarities...... and differences between the reaction patterns of three types of human APCs when stimulated with intestinal bacteria. Furthermore, the effect of these APCs on NK-cells and T-cells was examined. Methodology The APCs used in this study were blood monocytes, blood dendritic cells, and dendritic cells differentiated...... from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells constitute a commonly used model of dendritic cell function. The APCs were cultured for 18 h with four different gut bacteria: Lactobacillus acidophilus X37, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 12246, E. coli Nissle 1917 or Bifidobacterium longum Q46. Results...

  7. Primary murine CD4+ T cells fail to acquire the ability to produce effector cytokines when active Ras is present during Th1/Th2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available Constitutive Ras signaling has been shown to augment IL-2 production, reverse anergy, and functionally replace many aspects of CD28 co-stimulation in CD4+ T cells. These data raise the possibility that introduction of active Ras into primary T cells might result in improved functionality in pathologic situations of T cell dysfunction, such as cancer or chronic viral infection. To test the biologic effects of active Ras in primary T cells, CD4+ T cells from Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor Transgenic mice were transduced with an adenovirus encoding active Ras. As expected, active Ras augmented IL-2 production in naive CD4+ T cells. However, when cells were cultured for 4 days under conditions to promote effector cell differentiation, active Ras inhibited the ability of CD4+ T cells to acquire a Th1 or Th2 effector cytokine profile. This differentiation defect was not due to deficient STAT4 or STAT6 activation by IL-12 or IL-4, respectively, nor was it associated with deficient induction of T-bet and GATA-3 expression. Impaired effector cytokine production in active Ras-transduced cells was associated with deficient demethylation of the IL-4 gene locus. Our results indicate that, despite augmenting acute activation of naïve T cells, constitutive Ras signaling inhibits the ability of CD4+ T cells to properly differentiate into Th1/Th2 effector cytokine-producing cells, in part by interfering with epigenetic modification of effector gene loci. Alternative strategies to potentiate Ras pathway signaling in T cells in a more regulated fashion should be considered as a therapeutic approach to improve immune responses in vivo.

  8. De novo alloreactive memory CD8+ T cells develop following allogeneic challenge when CNI immunosuppression is delayed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Matyas, M; Gareau, A J; Hirsch, G M; Lee, T D G

    2015-01-01

    Allospecific memory T cells are a recognized threat to the maintenance of solid-organ transplants. Limited information exists regarding the development of alloreactive memory T cells when post-transplant immunosuppression is present. The clinical practice of delaying calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) initiation post-transplant may permit the development of a de novo allospecific memory population. We investigated the development of de novo allospecific memory CD8+ T cells following the introduction of CNI immunosuppression in a murine model using allogeneic cell priming. Recipient mice alloprimed with splenocytes from fully mismatched donors received cyclosporine (CyA), initiated at 0, 2, 6, or 10days post-prime. Splenocytes from recipients were analyzed by flow cytometry or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for evidence of memory cell formation. Memory and effector CD8+ T cell development was prevented when CyA was initiated at 0day or 2days post-prime (p0.05). Delaying CyA up to 6days or later post-prime permits the development of functional de novo allospecific memory CD8+ T cells. The development of this potentially detrimental T cell population in patients could be prevented by starting CNI immunosuppression early post-transplant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayendra Dasari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients.

  10. Increased numbers of preexisting memory CD8 T cells and decreased T-bet expression can restrain terminal differentiation of secondary effector and memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Cui, Weiguo; Dominguez, Claudia X; Chen, Jonathan H; Hand, Timothy W; Kaech, Susan M

    2011-10-15

    Memory CD8 T cells acquire effector memory cell properties after reinfection and may reach terminally differentiated, senescent states ("Hayflick limit") after multiple infections. The signals controlling this process are not well understood, but we found that the degree of secondary effector and memory CD8 T cell differentiation was intimately linked to the amount of T-bet expressed upon reactivation and preexisting memory CD8 T cell number (i.e., primary memory CD8 T cell precursor frequency) present during secondary infection. Compared with naive cells, memory CD8 T cells were predisposed toward terminal effector (TE) cell differentiation because they could immediately respond to IL-12 and induce T-bet, even in the absence of Ag. TE cell formation after secondary (2°) or tertiary infections was dependent on increased T-bet expression because T-bet(+/-) cells were resistant to these phenotypic changes. Larger numbers of preexisting memory CD8 T cells limited the duration of 2° infection and the amount of IL-12 produced, and consequently, this reduced T-bet expression and the proportion of 2° TE CD8 T cells that formed. Together, these data show that over repeated infections, memory CD8 T cell quality and proliferative fitness is not strictly determined by the number of serial encounters with Ag or cell divisions, but is a function of the CD8 T cell differentiation state, which is genetically controlled in a T-bet-dependent manner. This differentiation state can be modulated by preexisting memory CD8 T cell number and the intensity of inflammation during reinfection. These results have important implications for vaccinations involving prime-boost strategies.

  11. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL-NT): An update on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and natural history in North American and European cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Pan, Zenggang; Gru, Alejandro A.; Freud, Aharon G.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Otto, Brad; Barrionuevo, Carlos; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Rochford, Rosemary; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL-NT) is an aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma most commonly occurring in East Asia and Latin America but with increasing incidence in the U.S. Data on epidemiology, disease presentation, and outcome for European and North American (“Western”) cases are very limited. We review published landmark clinical studies on ENKTL-NT in the West and report in detail recent data, including our institutional experience. We highlight key observations in its epidemiology, natural history, and trends in clinical management. In the U.S., ENKTL-NT is more common among Asian Pacific Islanders (API) and Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic whites. Published studies indicate less heterogeneity in clinical presentation in Western ENKTL-NT compared to Asian patients. While there is variation in age at diagnosis, presence of antecedent lymphoproliferative disorders, and outcomes among racial/ethnic groups, the universal association of ENKTL-NT with EBV and the poor response of this neoplasm to anthracycline-based therapy are consistent across all geographic areas. PMID:27778143

  12. T cell immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Bülbül Başkan

    2013-01-01

    Since birth, our immune system is constantly bombarded with self-antigens and foreign pathogens. To stay healthy, complex immune strategies have evolved in our immune system to maintain self-tolerance and to defend against foreign pathogens. Effector T cells are the key players in steering the immune responses to execute immune functions. While effector T cells were initially identified to be immune promoting, recent studies unraveled negative regulatory functions of effector T cells...

  13. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    -specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  14. B7.1 expression on tumor cells circumvents the need of professional antigen presentation for in vitro propagation of cytotoxic T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzi, G; Protti, M P; Rugarli, C; Bellone, M

    1996-01-01

    In vitro propagation of tumor-specific CTLs, to be used for identification of tumor antigens (Ag) and/or adoptive immunotherapy, is hampered by the need of large amounts of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) used for periodical cycles of restimulation. We evaluated whether RMA T lymphoma cells, stably transfected with the cDNA encoding for the B7.1 costimulatory molecule, provided the activation signals to CD8+ T lymphocytes in the absence of professional APC and CD4+ helper cells. We demonstrate here that long-term CD8+ cell lines can be efficiently propagated in vitro by repeated cycles of stimulation with tumor cells stably expressing B7.1. Professional APC and CD4+ helper cells are not required as far as interleukin 2 is exogenously provided. Furthermore, CD8+ blasts needed both signal 1 (Ag in the contest of the MHC molecule) and signal 2 (interaction of costimulatory molecules) for restimulation. T cell blasts in the presence of signal 1 or 2 only still retained their effector potential but did not undergo clonal expansion. These results are very promising for further applications of specific immunotherapies in humans.

  15. The modality-switch effect: Visually and aurally presented prime sentences activate our senses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eScerrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Verifying different sensory modality properties for concepts results in a processing cost known as the Modality-Switch Effect. It has been argued that this cognitive cost is the result of a perceptual simulation. This paper extends this argument and reports an experiment investigating whether the effect is the result of an activation of sensory information which can also be triggered by perceptual linguistically described stimuli. Participants were first exposed to a prime sentence describing a light or a sound’s perceptual property (e.g. The light is flickering, The sound is echoing, then required to perform a property-verification task on a target sentence (e.g. Butter is yellowish, Leaves rustle. The content modalities of the prime and target sentences could be compatible (i.e. in the same modality: e.g. visual-visual or not (i.e. in different modalities. Crucially, we manipulated the stimuli’s presentation modality such that half of the participants was faced with written sentences while the other half was faced with aurally presented sentences. Results show a cost when two different modalities alternate, compared to when the same modality is repeated with both visual and aural stimuli presentations. This result supports the embodied and grounded cognition view which claims that conceptual knowledge is grounded into the perceptual system. Specifically, this evidence suggests that sensory modalities can be pre-activated through the simulation of either read or listened linguistic stimuli describing visual or acoustic perceptual properties.

  16. Cis-acting pathways selectively enforce the non-immunogenicity of shed placental antigen for maternal CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Siean Tay

    Full Text Available Maternal immune tolerance towards the fetus and placenta is thought to be established in part by pathways that attenuate T cell priming to antigens released from the placenta into maternal blood. These pathways remain largely undefined and their existence, at face value, seems incompatible with a mother's need to maintain a functional immune system during pregnancy. A particular conundrum is evident if we consider that maternal antigen presenting cells, activated in order to prime T cells to pathogen-derived antigens, would also have the capacity to prime T cells to co-ingested placental antigens. Here, we address this paradox using a transgenic system in which placental membranes are tagged with a strong surrogate antigen (ovalbumin. We find that although a remarkably large quantity of acellular ovalbumin-containing placental material is released into maternal blood, splenic CD8 T cells in pregnant mice bearing unmanipulated T cell repertoires are not primed to ovalbumin even if the mice are intravenously injected with adjuvants. This failure was largely independent of regulatory T cells, and instead was linked to the intrinsic characteristics of the released material that rendered it selectively non-immunogenic, potentially by sequestering it from CD8α(+ dendritic cells. The release of ovalbumin-containing placental material into maternal blood thus had no discernable impact on CD8 T cell priming to soluble ovalbumin injected intravenously during pregnancy, nor did it induce long-term tolerance to ovalbumin. Together, these results outline a major pathway governing the maternal immune response to the placenta, and suggest how tolerance to placental antigens can be maintained systemically without being detrimental to host defense.

  17. Cis-Acting Pathways Selectively Enforce the Non-Immunogenicity of Shed Placental Antigen for Maternal CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chin-Siean; Tagliani, Elisa; Collins, Mary K.; Erlebacher, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Maternal immune tolerance towards the fetus and placenta is thought to be established in part by pathways that attenuate T cell priming to antigens released from the placenta into maternal blood. These pathways remain largely undefined and their existence, at face value, seems incompatible with a mother's need to maintain a functional immune system during pregnancy. A particular conundrum is evident if we consider that maternal antigen presenting cells, activated in order to prime T cells to pathogen-derived antigens, would also have the capacity to prime T cells to co-ingested placental antigens. Here, we address this paradox using a transgenic system in which placental membranes are tagged with a strong surrogate antigen (ovalbumin). We find that although a remarkably large quantity of acellular ovalbumin-containing placental material is released into maternal blood, splenic CD8 T cells in pregnant mice bearing unmanipulated T cell repertoires are not primed to ovalbumin even if the mice are intravenously injected with adjuvants. This failure was largely independent of regulatory T cells, and instead was linked to the intrinsic characteristics of the released material that rendered it selectively non-immunogenic, potentially by sequestering it from CD8α+ dendritic cells. The release of ovalbumin-containing placental material into maternal blood thus had no discernable impact on CD8 T cell priming to soluble ovalbumin injected intravenously during pregnancy, nor did it induce long-term tolerance to ovalbumin. Together, these results outline a major pathway governing the maternal immune response to the placenta, and suggest how tolerance to placental antigens can be maintained systemically without being detrimental to host defense. PMID:24391885

  18. Delineation of canine parvovirus T cell epitopes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T cell clones from immunized dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.C.M. Poelen (Martien); R.H. Meloen; J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThree synthetic peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of VP2 of canine parvovirus (CPV) which were recently shown to represent three distinct T cell epitopes for BALB/c mice could prime BALB/c mice for a CPV-specific proliferative T cell response upon immunization. Proliferative

  19. IL-12-mediated STAT4 signaling and TCR signal strength cooperate in the induction of CD40L in human and mouse CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Regina; Hartung, Anett; Zehn, Dietmar; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    CD40L is one of the key molecules bridging the activation of specific T cells and the maturation of professional and nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells including B cells. CD4(+) T cells have been regarded as the major T-cell subset that expresses CD40L upon cognate activation; however, we demonstrate here that a putative CD8(+) helper T-cell subset expressing CD40L is induced in human and murine CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in mice immunized with antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. IL-12 and STAT4-mediated signaling was the major instructive cytokine signal boosting the ability of CD8(+) T cells to express CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, TCR signaling strength modulated CD40L expression in CD8(+) T cells after primary differentiation in vitro as well as in vivo. The induction of CD40L in CD8(+) T cells regulated by IL-12 and TCR signaling may enable CD8(+) T cells to respond autonomously of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we propose that under proinflammatory conditions, a self-sustaining positive feedback loop could facilitate the efficient priming of T cells stimulated by high affinity peptide displaying APCs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Memory T Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Qianqian eZhang; Qianqian eZhang; Fadi G. Lakkis

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a key feature of adaptive immunity. It provides the organism with long-lived and robust protection against infection. In organ transplantation, memory T cells pose a significant threat by causing allograft rejection that is generally resistant to immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of memory T cell biology is needed to improve the survival of transplanted organs without compromising the host’s ability to fight infections. This review...

  1. Autoreactive T cells in MRL/Mpr-lpr/lpr mice. Characterization of the lymphokines produced and analysis of antigen-presenting cells required

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, K.M.; Ju, S.T.; Lu, C.Y.; Sy, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lymph node cells from 4-wk-old MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice, but not from MRL/Mp-+/+ mice, when cultured in vitro for 5 to 7 days, will spontaneously proliferate and produce IL-2. We examined the expression of several cell surface Ag on lymph node cells from MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice before and after in vitro culture. There is an increase in the expression of Thy-1, L3T4, IL-2R, T cell activating protein, T cell receptor, and T3 complex on the surface of cultured cells. Cultured cells produced IL-3, IFN-gamma, and small but detectable amounts of IL-1 in addition to IL-2. Gamma irradiation of APC from young MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice or treatment of APC with a mAb (J11D) and C, completely abrogated their stimulatory capacity. These experiments suggest that B cells are the predominant APC responsible in the activation of autoreactive T cells in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice. Lymph node cells from C57BL/6-lpr/lpr or C3H-lpr/lpr mice were unable to spontaneously proliferate or produce IL-2. Lymph node cells from (MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr x C57BL/6-lpr/lpr) F1 mice or (C3H-lpr/lpr x MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr) F1 mice did proliferate and produced IL-2 after in vitro culture. Using T cells from these F1 animals and APC from each parental haplotype, we found that APC from MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice induced more proliferation and greater amounts of IL-2, when compared to APC from F1 animals. APC from C57BL6-lpr/lpr mice or C3H-lpr/lpr were unable to induce spontaneous proliferation and IL-2 production. Therefore, B cells from MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice appear to possess unique features that enable them to activate autoreactive T cells more effectively than B cells from other mice bearing the lpr/lpr gene

  2. Driving CAR T-cells forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Hollie J.; Rafiq, Sarwish; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2017-01-01

    The engineered expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on the surface of T cells enables the redirection of T-cell specificity. Early clinical trials using CAR T cells for the treatment of patients with cancer showed modest results, but the impressive outcomes of several trials of CD19-targeted CAR T cells in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies have generated an increased enthusiasm for this approach. Important lessons have been derived from clinical trials of CD19-specific CAR T cells, and ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in haematological and solid malignancies. In this Review, we discuss these trials and present strategies that can increase the antitumour efficacy and safety of CAR T-cell therapy. Given the fast-moving nature of this field, we only discuss studies with direct translational application currently or soon-to-be tested in the clinical setting. PMID:27000958

  3. Hit-and-run, hit-and-stay, and commensal bacteria present different peptide content when viewed from the perspective of the T cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lu; De Groot, Anne S; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-11-27

    Different types of bacteria face different pressures from the immune system, with those that persist ("hit-and-stay") potentially having to adapt more in order to escape than those prone to short-lived infection ("hit-and-run"), and with commensal bacteria potentially different from both due to additional physical mechanisms for avoiding immune detection. The Janus Immunogenicity Score (JIS) was recently developed to assess the likelihood of T cell recognition of an antigen, using an analysis that considers both binding of a peptide within the antigen by major histocompatability complex (MHC) and recognition of the peptide:MHC complex by cognate T cell receptor (TCR). This score was shown to be predictive of T effector vs. T regulatory or null responses in experimental data, as well as to distinguish viruses representative of the hit-and-stay vs. hit-and-run phenotypes. Here, JIS-based analyses were conducted in order to characterize the extent to which the pressure to avoid T cell recognition is manifested in genomic differences among representative hit-and-run, hit-and-stay, and commensal bacteria. Overall, extracellular proteins were found to have different JIS profiles from cytoplasmic ones. Contrasting the bacterial groups, extracellular proteins were shown to be quite different across the groups, much more so than intracellular proteins. The differences were evident even at the level of corresponding peptides in homologous protein pairs from hit-and-run and hit-and-stay bacteria. The multi-level analysis of patterns of immunogenicity across different groups of bacteria provides a new way to approach questions of bacterial immune camouflage or escape, as well as to approach the selection and optimization of candidates for vaccine design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Djekic, Aleksandra; M?ller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirect...

  5. Adult T-cell leukemia on the east coast of Kii Peninsula--presentation of an anti-ATLA-negative case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karitani, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koh, T; Iwata, Y; Tanaka, I; Minami, N; Shirakawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Nineteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) have been found in the last seven years along the east coast of Kii Peninsula in Japan. The leukemic cells were of the immunologically inducer/helper T-cell phenotype. The prognosis was very poor (median survival time, 85 days), and most of the patients had fatal complications of pulmonary infections. Antibody against ATL-associated antigen (anti-ATLA) was detected in sera from 9 of 10 patients who were born along the coast. However, it was not detected in one patient who was born in a district surrounded by mountains. Although he had neither superficial lymphadenopathy nor skin lesions, he showed rapid clinical deterioration. His leukemic cells appeared to be extremely bizarre with marked nuclear deformation compared with those of the other patients. In surface marker studies the leukemic cells reacted positively with OKT3, OKT4 and OKIa-1 monoclonal antibodies. The characteristics of the anti-ATLA-negative case are discussed in comparison with the other ATL cases.

  6. Cytotoxic human CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Berg, Pablo J.; van Leeuwen, Ester M.; ten Berge, Ineke J.; van Lier, Rene

    2008-01-01

    The induction of adaptive immune responses critically depends on helper signals provided by CD4(+) T cells. These signals not only license antigen presenting cells (APC) to activate naïve CD8(+) T cells leading to the formation of vast numbers of cytotoxic T lymphocytes but also support the

  7. From primed concepts to action: A meta-analysis of the behavioral effects of incidentally presented words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Evan; Chen, Qijia; McAdams, Maxwell; Yi, Jessica; Hepler, Justin; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis assessed the behavioral impact of and psychological processes associated with presenting words connected to an action or a goal representation. The average and distribution of 352 effect sizes (analyzed using fixed-effects and random-effects models) was obtained from 133 studies (84 reports) in which word primes were incidentally presented to participants, with a nonopposite control group, before measuring a behavioral dependent variable. Findings revealed a small behavioral priming effect (dFE = 0.332, dRE = 0.352), which was robust across methodological procedures and only minimally biased by the publication of positive (vs. negative) results. Theory testing analyses indicated that more valued behavior or goal concepts (e.g., associated with important outcomes or values) were associated with stronger priming effects than were less valued behaviors. Furthermore, there was some evidence of persistence of goal effects over time. These results support the notion that goal activation contributes over and above perception-behavior in explaining priming effects. In summary, theorizing about the role of value and satisfaction in goal activation pointed to stronger effects of a behavior or goal concept on overt action. There was no evidence that expectancy (ease of achieving the goal) moderated priming effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4+ T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J.

    2005-01-01

    To track epitope-specific CD4 + T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA 323-339 epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA II , replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4 + T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4 + T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA 323-339 epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4 + T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection

  9. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  10. Increased numbers of pre-existing memory CD8 T cells and decreased T-bet expression can restrain terminal differentiation of secondary effector and memory CD8 T cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cui, Weiguo; Dominguez, Claudia; Chen, Jonathan H.; Hand, Timothy W.; Kaech, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells acquire TEM properties following reinfection, and may reach terminally differentiated, senescent states (“Hayflick limit”) after multiple infections. The signals controlling this process are not well understood, but we found that the degree of 2o effector and memory CD8 T cell differentiation was intimately linked to the amount of T-bet expressed upon reactivation and pre-existing memory CD8 T cell number (i.e., 1o memory CD8 T cell precursor frequency) present during secondary infection. Compared to naïve cells, memory CD8 T cells were predisposed towards terminal effector (TE) cell differentiation because they could immediately respond to IL-12 and induce T-bet, even in the absence of antigen. TE cell formation following 2o or 3o infections was dependent on increased T-bet expression because T-bet+/− cells were resistant to these phenotypic changes. Larger numbers of pre-existing memory CD8 T cells limited the duration of 2o infection and the amount of IL-12 produced, and consequently, this reduced T-bet expression and the proportion of 2o TE CD8 T cells that formed. Together, these data show that, over repeated infections, memory CD8 T cell quality and proliferative fitness is not strictly determined by the number of serial encounters with antigen or cell divisions, but is a function of the CD8 T cell differentiation state, which is genetically controlled in a T-bet-dependent manner. This differentiation state can be modulated by pre-existing memory CD8 T cell number and the intensity of inflammation during reinfection. These results have important implications for vaccinations involving prime-boost strategies. PMID:21930973

  11. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, H. W.; van den Boom, M. D.; Spits, H.; Hooijberg, E.; Schumacher, T. N.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T

  12. Cross–dressers turn on T cells

    OpenAIRE

    YEWDELL, JONATHAN W.; DOLAN, BRIAN P.

    2011-01-01

    Memory T cells remember viruses from previous infections, providing immunity by facilitating the killing of infected cells. For this, they exploit cross-dressing, the transfer of antigens between antigen-presenting cells.

  13. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  14. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  15. Specific Schistosoma mansoni rat T cell clones. I. Generation and functional analysis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, J; Dissous, C; Dessaint, J P; Louis, J; Engers, H; Capron, A

    1985-06-01

    In an attempt to determine the role of schistosome-specific T cells in the immune mechanisms developed during schistosomiasis, Schistosoma mansoni-specific T cells and clones were generated in vitro and some of their functions analyzed in vitro and in vivo in the fischer rat model. The data presented here can be summarized as follows: a) Lymph node cells (LNC) from rats primed with the excretory/secretory antigens-incubation products (IPSm) of adult worms proliferate in vitro only in response to the homologous schistosome antigens and not to unrelated antigens (Ag) such as ovalbumin (OVA) or Dipetalonema viteae and Fasciola hepatica parasite extracts. b) After in vitro restimulation of the primed LNC population with IPSm in the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and maintenance in IL 2-containing medium, the frequency of IPSm-specific T cells is increased and the T cells can be restimulated only in the presence of APC possessing the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. c) Following appropriate limiting dilution assays (LDA) (1 cell/well), 10 IPSm-specific T cell clones were obtained, and two of four maintained in culture were tested for their helper activity because they expressed only the W3/13+ W3/25+ surface phenotypes. d) The two highly proliferating IPSm-specific T cell clones (G5 and E23) exhibit an IPSm-dependent helper activity, as shown by the increase in IgG production by IPSm-primed B cells. e) IPSm-T cell clone (G5) as well as IPSm-T cell lines when injected in S. mansoni-infested rats can exert an in vivo helper activity, which is characterized by an accelerated production of IgG antibodies specific for the previously identified 30 to 40 kilodaltons (kd) schistosomula surface antigens (Ag). As recent studies have demonstrated that rat monoclonal antibodies recognize some incubation products of adult S. mansoni as well as one of the 30 to 40 kd schistosomula surface antigens, and taking into account the fact that the T cell

  16. T-cell epitopes from viral and tumor associated antigens: induction and analysis of antigen-specific T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nastke, Maria-Dorothea

    2005-01-01

    T cells are important effectors in the defense of human pathogens entering the organism. CD8+ T cells recognize peptides which are presented by MHC class I molecules and lyse cells which are infected by virus or intracellular pathogens. Moreover, they are able to destroy cancer cells. CD4+ T cells recognize peptides from exogenous proteins acquired by endocytosis or from internalized plasma membrane proteins which are presented on MHC class II. CD4+ T cells play an important role in the defen...

  17. Durable protection of rhesus macaques immunized with a replicating adenovirus-SIV multigene prime/protein boost vaccine regimen against a second SIVmac251 rectal challenge: role of SIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkevitch, Nina V; Patterson, L Jean; Aldrich, M Kristine; Wu, Yichen; Venzon, David; Florese, Ruth H; Kalyanaraman, V S; Pal, Ranajit; Lee, Eun Mi; Zhao, Jun; Cristillo, Anthony; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2006-09-15

    Previously, priming with replication-competent adenovirus-SIV multigenic vaccines and boosting with envelope subunits strongly protected 39% of rhesus macaques against rectal SIV(mac251) challenge. To evaluate protection durability, eleven of the protected and two SIV-infected unimmunized macaques that controlled viremia were re-challenged rectally with SIV(mac251). Strong protection was observed in 8/11 vaccinees, including two exhibiting protected macaques. Durable protection was associated with significantly increased SIV-specific ELISPOT responses and lymphoproliferative responses to p27 at re-challenge. After CD8 depletion, 2 of 8 re-challenged, protected vaccinees maintained protection against re-challenge.

  18. Engineering CAR-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Jun; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor redirected T cells (CAR-T cells) have achieved inspiring outcomes in patients with B cell malignancies, and are now being investigated in other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. CAR-T cells are generated by the T cells from patients' or donors' blood. After the T cells are expanded and genetically modified, they are reinfused into the patients. However, many challenges still need to be resolved in order for this technology to gain widespread adoption. In this review, we first discuss the structure and evolution of chimeric antigen receptors. We then report on the tools used for production of CAR-T cells. Finally, we address the challenges posed by CAR-T cells.

  19. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  20. Dendritic cells pulsed with Pythium insidiosum (1,3)(1,6)-β-glucan, Heat-inactivated zoospores and immunotherapy prime naïve T cells to Th1 differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledur, Pauline C; Tondolo, Juliana S M; Jesus, Francielli P K; Verdi, Camila M; Loreto, Érico S; Alves, Sydney H; Santurio, Janio M

    2018-03-01

    Pythiosis is a life-threatening disease caused by the fungus-like microorganism Pythium insidiosum that can lead to death if not treated. Since P. insidiosum has particular cell wall characteristics, pythiosis is difficult to treat, as it does not respond well to traditional antifungal drugs. In our study, we investigated a new immunotherapeutic approach with potential use in treatment and in the acquisition of immunity against pythiosis. Dendritic cells from both human and mouse, pulsed with P. insidiosum heat-inactivated zoospore, (1,3)(1,6)-β-glucan and the immunotherapeutic PitiumVac ® efficiently induced naïve T cell differentiation in a Th1 phenotype by the activation of specific Th1 cytokine production in vitro. Heat-inactivated zoospores showed the greatest Th1 response among the tested groups, with a significant increase in IL-6 and IFN-γ production in human cells. In mice cells, we also observed a Th17 pathway induction, with an increase on the IL-17A levels in lymphocytes cultured with β-glucan pulsed DCs. These results suggest a potential use of DCs pulsed with P. insidiosum antigens as a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment and acquisition of immunity against pythiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms behind functional avidity maturation in T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak, Martin; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    During an immune response antigen-primed B-cells increase their antigen responsiveness by affinity maturation mediated by somatic hypermutation of the genes encoding the antigen-specific B-cell receptor (BCR) and by selection of higher-affinity B cell clones. Unlike the BCR, the T-cell receptor...

  2. Malaria drives T cells to exhaustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N Wykes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a significant global burden but after >30 years of effort there is no vaccine on the market. While the complex life cycle of the parasite presents several challenges, many years of research have also identified several mechanisms of immune evasion by Plasmodium spp.. Recent research on malaria, has investigated the Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 pathway which mediates exhaustion of T cells, characterized by poor effector functions and recall responses and in some cases loss of the cells by apoptosis. Such studies have shown exhaustion of CD4+ T cells and an unappreciated role for CD8+ T cells in promoting sterile immunity against blood stage malaria. This is because PD-1 mediates up to a 95% reduction in numbers and functional capacity of parasite-specific CD8+ T cells, thus masking their role in protection. The role of T cell exhaustion during malaria provides an explanation for the absence of sterile immunity following the clearance of acute disease which will be relevant to future malaria-vaccine design and suggests the need for novel therapeutic solutions. This review will thus examine the role of PD-1-mediated T cell exhaustion in preventing lasting immunity against malaria.

  3. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Martin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability, and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo and central memory (CD62Lhi cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit

  4. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  5. The translocon protein Sec61 mediates antigen transport from endosomes in the cytosol for cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehner, Matthias; Marschall, Andrea L; Bos, Erik; Schloetel, Jan-Gero; Kreer, Christoph; Fehrenschild, Dagmar; Limmer, Andreas; Ossendorp, Ferry; Lang, Thorsten; Koster, Abraham J; Dübel, Stefan; Burgdorf, Sven

    2015-05-19

    The molecular mechanisms regulating antigen translocation into the cytosol for cross-presentation are under controversial debate, mainly because direct data is lacking. Here, we have provided direct evidence that the activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) translocon protein Sec61 is essential for endosome-to-cytosol translocation. We generated a Sec61-specific intrabody, a crucial tool that trapped Sec61 in the ER and prevented its recruitment into endosomes without influencing Sec61 activity and antigen presentation in the ER. Expression of this ER intrabody inhibited antigen translocation and cross-presentation, demonstrating that endosomal Sec61 indeed mediates antigen transport across endosomal membranes. Moreover, we showed that the recruitment of Sec61 toward endosomes, and hence antigen translocation and cross-presentation, is dependent on dendritic cell activation by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. These data shed light on a long-lasting question regarding antigen cross-presentation and point out a role of the ER-associated degradation machinery in compartments distinct from the ER. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor rejection induced by CD70-mediated quantitative and qualitative effects on effector CD8+ T cell formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Ramon; Schepers, Koen; Nolte, Martijn A.; van Oosterwijk, Michiel F.; van Lier, René A. W.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.

    2004-01-01

    In vivo priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells results in their expansion and differentiation into effector T cells followed by contraction into a memory T cell population that can be maintained for life. Recent evidence suggests that after initial antigenic stimulation, the magnitude and kinetics

  7. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  8. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  9. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  10. Adoptive T cell therapy targeting CD1 and MR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingxi eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential.

  11. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T

  12. Characterization of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in the Peripheral Blood and Skin Injection Sites of Melanoma Patients Treated with mRNA Electroporated Autologous Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71% patients screened, CD8+ T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8+ T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8+ T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8+ T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  13. Characterization of CD8+ T-cell responses in the peripheral blood and skin injection sites of melanoma patients treated with mRNA electroporated autologous dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benteyn, Daphné; Van Nuffel, An M T; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Corthals, Jurgen; Heirman, Carlo; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Bonehill, Aude

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL) stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8(+) T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs) and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71%) patients screened, CD8(+) T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8(+) T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8(+) T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8(+) T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  14. Stimulation with lysates of Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae maximizes cross-reactivity of anti-fungal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Shivashni S; Virassamy, Balaji; Halliday, Catriona; Clancy, Leighton; Chen, Sharon; Meyer, Wieland; Sorrell, Tania C; Gottlieb, David J

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by filamentous fungi and yeasts are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed hematology patients. We previously published a method to expand Aspergillus fumigatus-specific T cells for clinical cell therapy. In the present study, we investigated expansion of T cells specific for other fungal pathogens and creation of a broadly reactive panfungal T-cell product. Fungal strains selected were those frequently observed in the clinical hematology setting and included Aspergillus, Candida, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Lomentospora/Scedosporium. Four T-cell cultures specific to each fungus were established. We selected lysates of Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae to expand panfungal T cells. Allelic restriction of anti-fungal activity was determined through the use of specific major histocompatibility complex class II-blocking antibodies. Individual T-cell cultures specific to each fungus could be expanded in vitro, generating predominantly CD4(+) T cells of which 8% to 20% were fungus-specific. We successfully expanded panfungal T cells from the peripheral blood (n = 8) and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-primed stem cell products (n = 3) of normal donors by using a combination of lysates from Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae. Anti-fungal activity was mediated through human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles and was maintained when antigen-presenting cells from partially HLA-DRB1-matched donors were used to stimulate T cells. We demonstrate a method to manufacture panfungal T-cell products with specificity against a range of clinical fungal pathogens by use of the blood and stem cells of healthy donors as the starting material. The safety and efficacy of these products will need to be tested clinically. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A proteomic view at T cell costimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Lichtenfels

    Full Text Available The "two-signal paradigm" in T cell activation predicts that the cooperation of "signal 1," provided by the T cell receptor (TCR through engagement of major histocompatility complex (MHC-presented peptide, with "signal 2″ provided by costimulatory molecules, the prototype of which is CD28, is required to induce T cell effector functions. While the individual signalling pathways are well understood, little is known about global changes in the proteome pattern during TCR/CD28-mediated activation. Therefore, comparative 2-DE-based proteome analyses of CD3(+ CD69(- resting T cells versus cells incubated with (i the agonistic anti-CD3 antibody OKT3 mimicking signal 1 in absence or presence of IL-2 and/or with (ii the agonistic antibody 15E8 triggering CD28-mediated signaling were performed. Differentially regulated spots were defined leading to the identification of proteins involved in the regulation of the metabolism, shaping and maintenance of the cytoskeleton and signal transduction. Representative members of the differentially expressed protein families, such as calmodulin (CALM, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2 (GDIR2, and platelet basic protein (CXCL7, were independently verified by flow cytometry. Data provide a detailed map of individual protein alterations at the global proteome level in response to TCR/CD28-mediated T cell activation.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin...

  17. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  18. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria...... vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information......, and discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  19. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system......The immune system is a tightly regulated and complex system. An important part of this immune regulation is the assurance of tolerance toward self-antigens to maintain immune homeostasis. However, in recent years, antigen-specific cellular immune responses toward several normal self....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still...

  20. Case report 429: Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Hino, Megumu; Torizuka, Kanji; Kyoto Univ.; Uchiyama, Takahashi; Uchino, Haruto

    1987-01-01

    The radiological and pathological skeletal manifestations in a case of adult T-cell leukemia are presented. The authors have emphasized the presence of multiple areas of localized subperiosteal resorption as a helpful finding in the differential diagnosis between adult T-cell leukemia and multiple myeloma and hyperparathyroidism. A possible mechanism for these radiological features and its similarity to those of other T-cell malignancies are discussed briefly. (orig./SHA)

  1. Metabolic Adaptation of Human CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cells to T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Jones

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Linking immunometabolic adaptation to T-cell function provides insight for the development of new therapeutic approaches in multiple disease settings. T-cell activation and downstream effector functions of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells are controlled by the strength of interaction between the T-cell receptor (TCR and peptides presented by human leukocyte antigens (pHLA. The role of TCR–pHLA interactions in modulating T-cell metabolism is unknown. Here, for the first time, we explore the relative contributions of the main metabolic pathways to functional responses in human CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Increased expression of hexokinase II accompanied by higher basal glycolysis is demonstrated in CD4+ T-cells; cytokine production in CD8+ T-cells is more reliant on oxidative phosphorylation. Using antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones and altered peptide ligands, we demonstrate that binding affinity tunes the underlying metabolic shift. Overall, this study provides important new insight into how metabolic pathways are controlled during antigen-specific activation of human T-cells.

  2. Gap junctions at the dendritic cell-T cell interface are key elements for antigen-dependent T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Raul; Tobar, Jaime A; Shoji, Kenji F; De Calisto, Jaime; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bono, Maria R; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sáez, Juan C

    2009-07-01

    The acquired immune response begins with Ag presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) to naive T cells in a heterocellular cell-cell contact-dependent process. Although both DCs and T cells are known to express connexin43, a gap junction protein subunit, the role of connexin43 on the initiation of T cell responses remains to be elucidated. In the present work, we report the formation of gap junctions between DCs and T cells and their role on T cell activation during Ag presentation by DCs. In cocultures of DCs and T cells, Lucifer yellow microinjected into DCs is transferred to adjacent transgenic CD4(+) T cells, only if the specific antigenic peptide was present at least during the first 24 h of cocultures. This dye transfer was sensitive to gap junction blockers, such as oleamide, and small peptides containing the extracellular loop sequences of conexin. Furthermore, in this system, gap junction blockers drastically reduced T cell activation as reflected by lower proliferation, CD69 expression, and IL-2 secretion. This lower T cell activation produced by gap junction blockers was not due to a lower expression of CD80, CD86, CD40, and MHC-II on DCs. Furthermore, gap junction blocker did not affect polyclonal activation of T cell induced with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 Abs in the absence of DCs. These results strongly suggest that functional gap junctions assemble at the interface between DCs and T cells during Ag presentation and that they play an essential role in T cell activation.

  3. Differentiation, distribution and gammadelta T cell-driven regulation of IL-22-producing T cells in tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu Yao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation, distribution and immune regulation of human IL-22-producing T cells in infections remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model that M. tuberculosis infection resulted in apparent increases in numbers of T cells capable of producing IL-22 de novo without in vitro Ag stimulation, and drove distribution of these cells more dramatically in lungs than in blood and lymphoid tissues. Consistently, IL-22-producing T cells were visualized in situ in lung tuberculosis (TB granulomas by confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, indicating that mature IL-22-producing T cells were present in TB granuloma. Surprisingly, phosphoantigen HMBPP activation of Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells down-regulated the capability of T cells to produce IL-22 de novo in lymphocytes from blood, lung/BAL fluid, spleen and lymph node. Up-regulation of IFNgamma-producing Vgamma2Vdelta2 T effector cells after HMBPP stimulation coincided with the down-regulated capacity of these T cells to produce IL-22 de novo. Importantly, anti-IFNgamma neutralizing Ab treatment reversed the HMBPP-mediated down-regulation effect on IL-22-producing T cells, suggesting that Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell-driven IFNgamma-networking function was the mechanism underlying the HMBPP-mediated down-regulation of the capability of T cells to produce IL-22. These novel findings raise the possibility to ultimately investigate the function of IL-22 producing T cells and to target Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells for balancing potentially hyper-activating IL-22-producing T cells in severe TB.

  4. T Cell Subset and Stimulation Strength-Dependent Modulation of T Cell Activation by Kv1.3 Blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Ping Fung-Leung

    Full Text Available Kv1.3 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed on T cells that plays an important role in T cell activation. Previous studies have shown that blocking Kv1.3 channels in human T cells during activation results in reduced calcium entry, cytokine production, and proliferation. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effects of Kv1.3 blockers on the response of different human T cell subsets under various stimulation conditions. Our studies show that, unlike the immune suppressor cyclosporine A, the inhibitory effect of Kv1.3 blockers was partial and stimulation strength dependent, with reduced inhibitory efficacy on T cells under strengthened anti-CD3/CD28 stimulations. T cell responses to allergens including house dust mites and ragweed were partially reduced by Kv1.3 blockers. The effect of Kv1.3 inhibition was dependent on T cell subsets, with stronger effects on CCR7- effector memory compared to CCR7+ central memory CD4 T cells. Calcium entry studies also revealed a population of CD4 T cells resistant to Kv1.3 blockade. Activation of CD4 T cells was accompanied with an increase in Kv1.3 currents but Kv1.3 transcripts were found to be reduced, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism in the regulation of Kv1.3 activities. In summary, Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cell activation in a manner that is highly dependent on the T cell identity and stimulation strength, These findings suggest that Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cells in a unique, conditional manner, further refining our understanding of the therapeutic potential of Kv1.3 blockers.

  5. Syntactic Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Janet L.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the syntactic priming task, a paradigm involving the presentation of a phrasal or clausal context, followed by the presentation of a target item for lexical decision or naming. Notes that response times are faster for targets syntactically congruent with the preceding context than for incongruent targets. Outlines how to administer this…

  6. Vaginal type-II mucosa is an inductive site for primary CD8+ T-cell mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichuan; Sui, Yongjun; Kato, Shingo; Hogg, Alison E.; Steel, Jason C.; Morris, John C.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2014-01-01

    The structured lymphoid tissues are considered the only inductive sites where primary T cell immune responses occur. The naïve T cells in structured lymphoid tissues, once being primed by antigen -bearing dendritic cells, differentiate into memory T cells and traffic back to the mucosal sites through the bloodstream. Contrary to this belief, here we show that the vaginal type-II mucosa itself, despite lack of structured lymphoid tissues, can act as an inductive site during primary CD8+ T cell immune responses. We provide evidence that the vaginal mucosa supports both the local immune priming of naïve CD8+ T cells and the local expansion of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, thereby demonstrating a different paradigm for primary mucosal T cell immune induction. PMID:25600442

  7. Bioinformatics Tools for the Prediction of T-Cell Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    T-cell responses are activated by specific peptides, called epitopes, presented on the cell surface by MHC molecules. Binding of peptides to the MHC is the most selective step in T-cell antigen presentation and therefore an essential factor in the selection of potential epitopes. Several in-vitro...

  8. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients....... The malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant...... T cells enhance proliferation of the malignant cells in an SE- and MHC class II-dependent manner. Furthermore, SE and, in addition, alloantigen presentation by malignant CTCL cells to irradiated nonmalignant CD4(+) T-cell lines also enhance proliferation of the malignant cells. The growth...

  9. Extrathymic T Cell Lymphopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Guy-Grand, Delphine; Azogui, Orly; Celli, Susanna; Darche, Sylvie; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Kourilsky, Philippe; Vassalli, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of thymopoiesis, T lymphocytes are nevertheless present, mainly in the gut epithelium. Ontogeny of the extrathymic pathway and the extent of its involvement in euthymic mice are controversial. These questions have been addressed by assessing the expression of recombinase activating gene (RAG) through the use of green fluorescent protein RAG2 transgenic mouse models. In athymic mice, T lymphopoiesis occurs mainly in the mesenteric lymph node and less in the Peyer's patches. Onto...

  10. Participation of L3T4 in T cell activation in the absence of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens. Inhibition by anti-L3T4 antibodies is a function both of epitope density and mode of presentation of anti-receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B

    1987-01-01

    two monoclonal antibodies, KJ16-133.18 and F23.1, that recognize a determinant encoded by the T cell receptor V beta 8 gene family. These antibodies were used to select two clones of T cells with surface phenotype Thy-1.2+, L3T4+, Lyt-2-, KJ16-133.18+, F23.1+, IA-, IE-. One of these clones (E9.D4......The recognition of many class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-associated antigens by T cells requires the participation of the L3T4 molecule. It has been proposed that this molecule acts to stabilize low affinity binding to antigen in association with MHC and thereby increases the avidity...... of T cell/antigen interactions. By using antibodies against the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to activate T cells, thereby circumventing the requirement for antigen presenting cells and MHC-associated antigen, we have been able to study the function of L3T4 in the absence of class II MHC. We have used...

  11. Dissociating markers of senescence and protective ability in memory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prlic

    Full Text Available No unique transcription factor or biomarker has been identified to reliably distinguish effector from memory T cells. Instead a set of surface markers including IL-7Rα and KLRG1 is commonly used to predict the potential of CD8 effector T cells to differentiate into memory cells. Similarly, these surface markers together with the tumor necrosis factor family member CD27 are frequently used to predict a memory T cell's ability to mount a recall response. Expression of these markers changes every time a memory cell is stimulated and repeated stimulation can lead to T cell senescence and loss of memory T cell responsiveness. This is a concern for prime-boost vaccine strategies which repeatedly stimulate T cells with the aim of increasing memory T cell frequency. The molecular cues that cause senescence are still unknown, but cell division history is likely to play a major role. We sought to dissect the roles of inflammation and cell division history in developing T cell senescence and their impact on the expression pattern of commonly used markers of senescence. We developed a system that allows priming of CD8 T cells with minimal inflammation and without acquisition of maximal effector function, such as granzyme expression, but a cell division history similar to priming with systemic inflammation. Memory cells derived from minimal effector T cells are fully functional upon rechallenge, have full access to non-lymphoid tissue and appear to be less senescent by phenotype upon rechallenge. However, we report here that these currently used biomarkers to measure senescence do not predict proliferative potential or protective ability, but merely reflect initial priming conditions.

  12. Non Hodgkin T cell lymphoma: an atypical clinical presentation Linfoma não Hodgkin de células T citotóxico: uma apresentação clínica atípica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Maio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic lymphomas comprise a spectrum of peripheral T-cell lymphomas that can have a initial or late cutaneous presentation. We describe a 46-year-old man from Cape Verde, with a dermatosis involving his face and trunk, consisting of monomorphic papules with a smooth surface and both motor and sensory polyneuropathy.The hypothesis of leprosy was supported by the clinical and initial hystopathological findings and the patient was referred to our hospital with suspected Hansen's disease. In the new skin and lymph node biopsies a lymphocyte population was identified whose immunohystochemistry study allowed the diagnosis of T-cell lymphoma with expression of cytotoxic markers. The patient was started on chemotherapy with initial remission of the skin lesions but, subsequently, progression of systemic disease.Os linfomas citotóxicos compreendem um espectro de linfomas de células T periféricos e linfomas Natural Killer que podem ter expressão cutânea primária ou secundária. Descrevemos o caso de um homem com 46 anos de idade, natural de Cabo Verde,com dermatose envolvendo a face e tronco constituída por pápulas monomorfas superfície lisa e polineuropatia sensitivo motora.A hipótese de Hanseníase foi colocada suportada por achados histopatológicos sugestivos sendo o doente referenciado à consulta de Doença de Hansen do nosso hospital. Em biopsia de pele e de gânglio identificou-se proliferação linfocitária cujo estudo imunohistoquímico permitiu o diagnóstico de linfoma T com expressão de marcadores citotóxicos. Iniciou quimioterapia verificando-se inicialmente remissão parcial das lesões cutâneas mas posteriormente a progressão da doença sistémica.

  13. T-cell proliferative responses following sepsis in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallal, Ousama; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kohn, Annamarie; Muraskas, Jonathan K; Namak, Shahla Y; Alattar, Mohammad H; Sayeed, Mohammed M

    2003-01-01

    Both experimental and clinical evidence suggest a suppression of T-cell function in burn and sepsis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate splenocyte and purified T-cell proliferative response and IL-2 production in septic neonatal rats. We also examined if alterations in T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production in neonatal sepsis is due to elevation in PGE2. PGE2 is known to play a significant role in T-cell suppression during sepsis in adults. Sepsis was induced in 15-day-old neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats by implanting 0.1 cm3 of fecal pellet impregnated with Escherichia coli (50 CFU) and Bacteroides fragilis (10(3) CFU). Animals receiving fecal pellets without the bacteria were designated as sterile. A group of septic and sterile rats were treated with PGE2 synthesis inhibitors, NS398 and resveratrol. These treatments of animals allowed us to evaluate the role of PGE2 in T-cell suppression during neonatal sepsis. Splenocytes as well as purified T cells were prepared and then proliferative response and IL-2 productive capacities were measured. A significant suppression of splenocyte proliferation and IL-2 production was noticed in both sterile and septic animals compared to the T cells from unoperated control rats. In contrast, the proliferation and IL-2 production by nylon wool purified T cells in sterile rats was not significantly different from control rats, whereas, a significant suppression in Con A-mediated T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production noticed in septic rat T cells compared to the sterile and control rat T cells. Such decrease in T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production was accompanied with 20-25% deaths in neonates implanted with septic pellets. No mortality was noted in sterile-implanted neonates. Treatment of animals with COX-1 inhibitor had no effect on T-cell proliferation response in both septic and sterile groups, whereas COX-2 inhibitor abrogated the decrease in T-cell proliferative response in the septic group. The treatment

  14. CAR T cell therapy for breast cancer: harnessing the tumor milieu to drive T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgain, Pradip; Tawinwung, Supannikar; D'Elia, Lindsey; Sukumaran, Sujita; Watanabe, Norihiro; Hoyos, Valentina; Lulla, Premal; Brenner, Malcolm K; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2018-05-10

    The adoptive transfer of T cells redirected to tumor via chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has produced clinical benefits for the treatment of hematologic diseases. To extend this approach to breast cancer, we generated CAR T cells directed against mucin1 (MUC1), an aberrantly glycosylated neoantigen that is overexpressed by malignant cells and whose expression has been correlated with poor prognosis. Furthermore, to protect our tumor-targeted cells from the elevated levels of immune-inhibitory cytokines present in the tumor milieu, we co-expressed an inverted cytokine receptor linking the IL4 receptor exodomain with the IL7 receptor endodomain (4/7ICR) in order to transform the suppressive IL4 signal into one that would enhance the anti-tumor effects of our CAR T cells at the tumor site. First (1G - CD3ζ) and second generation (2G - 41BB.CD3ζ) MUC1-specific CARs were constructed using the HMFG2 scFv. Following retroviral transduction transgenic expression of the CAR±ICR was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro CAR/ICR T cell function was measured by assessing cell proliferation and short- and long-term cytotoxic activity using MUC1+ MDA MB 468 cells as targets. In vivo anti-tumor activity was assessed using IL4-producing MDA MB 468 tumor-bearing mice using calipers to assess tumor volume and bioluminescence imaging to track T cells. In the IL4-rich tumor milieu, 1G CAR.MUC1 T cells failed to expand or kill MUC1+ tumors and while co-expression of the 4/7ICR promoted T cell expansion, in the absence of co-stimulatory signals the outgrowing cells exhibited an exhausted phenotype characterized by PD-1 and TIM3 upregulation and failed to control tumor growth. However, by co-expressing 2G CAR.MUC1 (signal 1 - activation + signal 2 - co-stimulation) and 4/7ICR (signal 3 - cytokine), transgenic T cells selectively expanded at the tumor site and produced potent and durable tumor control in vitro and in vivo. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of targeting breast

  15. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Taco W; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Barendregt, Barbara H; Klarenbeek, Paul; aan de Kerk, Daan J; Baars, Paul A; Jansen, Machiel H; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A W; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B(+)T(-)NK(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined immunodeficiencies with a variety of clinical presentations. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a 6-year-old boy with normal lymphocyte counts, who suffered from recurrent pneumonia and disseminated mollusca contagiosa. Since proliferative responses of T cells and NK cells to γc -cytokines were severely impaired, we performed IL2RG gene analysis, showing a heterozygous mutation in the presence of a single X-chromosome. Interestingly, an IL2RG reversion to normal predominated in both naïve and antigen-primed CD8(+) T cells and increased over time. Only the revertant CD8(+) T cells showed normal expression of CD132 and the various CD8(+) T cell populations had a different T-cell receptor repertoire. Finally, a fraction of γδ(+) T cells and differentiated CD4(+)CD27(-) effector-memory T cells carried the reversion, whereas NK or B cells were repeatedly negative. In conclusion, in a patient with a novel IL2RG mutation, gene-reverted CD8(+) T cells accumulated over time. Our data indicate that selective outgrowth of particular T-cell subsets may occur following reversion at the level of committed T progenitor cells.

  16. Systemic immunological tolerance to ocular antigens is mediated by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-expressing CD8+ T cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Thomas S.; Brincks, Erik L.; Gurung, Prajwal; Kucaba, Tamara A.; Ferguson, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic immunological tolerance to Ag encountered in the eye restricts the formation of potentially damaging immune responses that would otherwise be initiated at other anatomical locations. We previously demonstrated that tolerance to Ag administered via the anterior chamber (AC) of the eye required FasL-mediated apoptotic death of inflammatory cells that enter the eye in response to the antigenic challenge. Moreover, the systemic tolerance induced after AC injection of Ag was mediated by CD8+ regulatory T cells. The present study examined the mechanism by which these CD8+ regulatory T cells mediate tolerance after AC injection of Ag. AC injection of Ag did not prime CD4+ T cells, and led to increased TRAIL expression by splenic CD8+ T cells. Unlike wildtype mice, Trail−/− or Dr5−/− mice did not develop tolerance to Ag injected into the eye, even though responding lymphocytes underwent apoptosis in the AC of the eyes of these mice. CD8+ T cells from Trail−/− mice that were first injected AC with Ag were unable to transfer tolerance to naïve recipient wildtype mice, but CD8+ T cells from AC-injected wildtype or Dr5−/− mice could transfer tolerance. Importantly, the transferred wildtype (Trail+/+) CD8+ T cells were also able to decrease the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells into the eye; however, Trail−/− CD8+ T cells were unable to limit the inflammatory cell ingress. Together, our data suggest that “helpless” CD8+ regulatory T cells generated after AC injection of Ag enforce systemic tolerance in a TRAIL-dependent manner to inhibit inflammation in the eye. PMID:21169546

  17. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells......Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...

  18. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  19. The Living Eye “Disarms” Uncommitted Autoreactive T Cells by Converting Them to FoxP3+ Regulatory Cells Following Local Antigen Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ru; Horai, Reiko; Silver, Phyllis B; Mattapallil, Mary J; Zárate-Bladés, Carlos R; Chong, Wai Po; Chen, Jun; Rigden, Rachael C; Villasmil, Rafael; Caspi, Rachel R

    2011-01-01

    Immune privilege is used by the eye, brain, reproductive organs and gut to preserve structural and functional integrity in the face of inflammation. The eye is arguably the most vulnerable, and therefore also the most “privileged” of tissues, but paradoxically, remains subject to destructive autoimmunity. It has been proposed, although never proven in vivo, that the eye can induce T regulatory cells (Tregs) locally. Using FoxP3-GFP reporter mice expressing a retina-specific T cell receptor, we now show that uncommitted T cells rapidly convert in the living eye to FoxP3+ Tregs in a process involving retinal antigen recognition, de novo FoxP3 induction and proliferation. This takes place within the ocular tissue and is supported by retinoic acid, which is normally present in the eye due to its function in the chemistry of vision. Non-converted T cells showed evidence of priming, but appeared restricted from expressing effector function in the eye. Preexisting ocular inflammation impeded conversion of uncommitted T cells into Tregs. Importantly, retina-specific T cells primed in vivo before introduction into the eye were resistant to Treg conversion in the ocular environment, and instead caused severe uveitis. Thus, uncommitted T cells can be disarmed, but immune privilege is unable to protect from uveitogenic T cells that have acquired effector function prior to entering the eye. These findings shed new light on the phenomenon of immune privilege and on its role, as well as its limitations, in actively controlling immune responses in the tissue. PMID:22238462

  20. Structural elements recognized by abacavir-induced T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yerly, Daniel; Pompeu, Yuri Andreiw; Schutte, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    of autoimmune destruction. The structural elements recognized by drug-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) in vivo are poorly defined. Drug-stimulated T cells express TCRs specific for peptide/HLA complexes, but the characteristics of peptides (sequence, or endogenous or exogenous origin) presented in the context...

  1. Low interleukin-2 concentration favors generation of early memory T cells over effector phenotypes during chimeric antigen receptor T-cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, Tanja; Luostarinen, Annu; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Keto, Joni; Arvas, Mikko; Belt, Heini; Koponen, Jonna; Loskog, Angelica; Mustjoki, Satu; Porkka, Kimmo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Korhonen, Matti

    2017-06-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy offers new options for cancer treatment. Clinical results suggest that T-cell persistence, depending on T-cell memory, improves efficacy. The use of interleukin (IL)-2 for in vitro T-cell expansion is not straightforward because it drives effector T-cell differentiation but does not promote the formation of T-cell memory. We have developed a cost-effective expansion protocol for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with an early memory phenotype. Lymphocytes were transduced with third-generation lentiviral vectors and expanded using CD3/CD28 microbeads. The effects of altering the IL-2 supplementation (0-300 IU/mL) and length of expansion (10-20 days) on the phenotype of the T-cell products were analyzed. High IL-2 levels led to a decrease in overall generation of early memory T cells by both decreasing central memory T cells and augmenting effectors. T memory stem cells (T SCM , CD95 + CD45RO - CD45RA + CD27 + ) were present variably during T-cell expansion. However, their presence was not IL-2 dependent but was linked to expansion kinetics. CD19-CAR T cells generated in these conditions displayed in vitro antileukemic activity. In summary, production of CAR T cells without any cytokine supplementation yielded the highest proportion of early memory T cells, provided a 10-fold cell expansion and the cells were functionally potent. The number of early memory T cells in a T-cell preparation can be increased by simply reducing the amount of IL-2 and limiting the length of T-cell expansion, providing cells with potentially higher in vivo performance. These findings are significant for robust and cost-effective T-cell manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid and sustained CD4(+) T-cell-independent immunity from adenovirus-encoded vaccine antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Bartholdy, Christina; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2007-01-01

    -linked lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived epitopes was long-lived and protective. Notably, in contrast to full-length protein, the response elicited with the beta(2)-microglobulin-linked LCMV-derived epitope was CD4(+) T-cell independent. Furthermore, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells primed...... in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help were sustained in the long term and able to expand and control a secondary challenge with LCMV. Our results demonstrate that modifications to the antigen used in adenovirus vaccines may be used to improve the induced T-cell response. Such a strategy for CD4(+) T-cell...... to that elicited with an adenovirus-encoded minimal epitope covalently linked to beta(2)-microglobulin. We demonstrate that the beta(2)-microglobulin-linked epitope induced an accelerated and augmented CD8(+) T-cell response. Furthermore, the immunity conferred by vaccination with beta(2)-microglobulin...

  3. LOCAL IMMUNITY BY TISSUE-RESIDENT CD8+ MEMORY T CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eGebhardt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infection primes a CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response that gives rise to a long-lived population of circulating memory cells able to provide protection against systemic reinfection. Despite this, effective CD8+ T cell surveillance of barrier tissues such as skin and mucosa typically wanes with time, resulting in limited T cell-mediated protection in these peripheral tissues. However, recent evidence suggests that a specialized subset of CD103+ memory T cells can permanently lodge and persist in peripheral tissues, and that these cells can compensate for the loss of peripheral immune surveillance by circulating memory T cells. Here, we review evolving concepts regarding the generation and long-term persistence of these tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM in epithelial and neuronal tissues. We further discuss the role of TRM cells in local infection control and their contribution to localized immune phenomena, in both mice and humans.

  4. Phosphoinositide 3–kinase γ participates in T cell receptor–induced T cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcázar, Isabela; Marqués, Miriam; Kumar, Amit; Hirsch, Emilio; Wymann, Matthias; Carrera, Ana C.; Barber, Domingo F.

    2007-01-01

    Class I phosphoinositide 3–kinases (PI3Ks) constitute a family of enzymes that generates 3-phosphorylated polyphosphoinositides at the cell membrane after stimulation of protein tyrosine (Tyr) kinase–associated receptors or G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). The class I PI3Ks are divided into two types: class IA p85/p110 heterodimers, which are activated by Tyr kinases, and the class IB p110γ isoform, which is activated by GPCR. Although the T cell receptor (TCR) is a protein Tyr kinase–associated receptor, p110γ deletion affects TCR-induced T cell stimulation. We examined whether the TCR activates p110γ, as well as the consequences of interfering with p110γ expression or function for T cell activation. We found that after TCR ligation, p110γ interacts with Gαq/11, lymphocyte-specific Tyr kinase, and ζ-associated protein. TCR stimulation activates p110γ, which affects 3-phosphorylated polyphosphoinositide levels at the immunological synapse. We show that TCR-stimulated p110γ controls RAS-related C3 botulinum substrate 1 activity, F-actin polarization, and the interaction between T cells and antigen-presenting cells, illustrating a crucial role for p110γ in TCR-induced T cell activation. PMID:17998387

  5. Suppressor T-cell factor(s) display an altered pattern of Igh (immunoglobulin heavy chain locus) genetic restriction when developed in an Igh-congeneic host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HayGlass, K.T.; Naides, S.J.; Benacerraf, B.; Sy, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Suppressor T cell factor(s) (TsF 1 ) inhibit the in vivo priming of azobenzenearsonate-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. The activity of TsF 1 is restricted by genes linked to Igh-1 allotypic markers. TsF 1 obtained from B6.Igh-1/sup n/ mice was unable to suppress the immune response in B6.Igh-1/sup b/ mice and vice versa. However, TsF 1 prepared from B6.Igh-1/sup n/ T cells parked in an Igh-congeneic B6.Igh-1/sup b/ environment displays an additional restriction specificity of the host. Thus, TsF 1 prepared from these Igh-chimeric mice suppressed immune responses in both B6.Igh-1/sup n/ (donor) and B6.Igh-1/sup b/ (recipient) mice but not in mice of the unrelated strain BALB/c.Igh-1/sup a/. The results indicate that the establishment of the suppressor T-cell repertoire is dependent not only upon the genetic background of the individual T cell but also upon the influence of Igh-linked determinants present when T-cell clones are selected during the response

  6. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  7. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    relapsed lymphoma following genetic modi - fi cation of tumor-antigen presenting cells and T-lymphocyte transfer. Blood 110:2838–2845 4. Heslop HE et...CD4þCD25þFOXP3þ regulatory T cells of both healthy subjects and type 1 diabetic patients. J Immunol 2006;177:8338–47. 32. HeslopHE, SlobodKS,PuleMA

  8. Oral dendritic cells mediate antigen-specific tolerance by stimulating TH1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarell, Laurent; Lombardi, Vincent; Louise, Anne; Saint-Lu, Nathalie; Chabre, Henri; Moussu, Hélène; Betbeder, Didier; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2008-09-01

    A detailed characterization of oral antigen-presenting cells is critical to improve second-generation sublingual allergy vaccines. To characterize oral dendritic cells (DCs) within lingual and buccal tissues from BALB/c mice with respect to their surface phenotype, distribution, and capacity to polarize CD4(+) T-cell responses. In situ analysis of oral DCs was performed by immunohistology. Purified DCs were tested in vitro for their capacity to capture, process, and present the ovalbumin antigen to naive CD4(+) T cells. In vivo priming of ovalbumin-specific T cells adoptively transferred to BALB/c mice was analyzed by cytofluorometry in cervical lymph nodes after sublingual administration of mucoadhesive ovalbumin. Three subsets of oral DCs with a distinct tissue distribution were identified: (1) a minor subset of CD207(+) Langerhans cells located in the mucosa itself, (2) a major subpopulation of CD11b(+)CD11c(-) and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) myeloid DCs at the mucosal/submucosal interface, and (3) B220(+)120G8(+) plasmacytoid DCs found in submucosal tissues. Purified myeloid and plasmacytoid oral DCs capture and process the antigen efficiently and are programmed to elicit IFN-gamma and/or IL-10 production together with a suppressive function in naive CD4(+) T cells. Targeting the ovalbumin antigen to oral DCs in vivo by using mucoadhesive particles establishes tolerance in the absence of cell depletion through the stimulation of IFN-gamma and IL-10-producing CD4(+) regulatory T cells in cervical lymph nodes. The oral immune system is composed of various subsets of tolerogenic DCs organized in a compartmentalized manner and programmed to induce T(H)1/regulatory T-cell responses.

  9. High epitope expression levels increase competition between T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almut Scherer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Both theoretical predictions and experimental findings suggest that T cell populations can compete with each other. There is some debate on whether T cells compete for aspecific stimuli, such as access to the surface on antigen-presenting cells (APCs or for specific stimuli, such as their cognate epitope ligand. We have developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study T cell competition. Our model shows that the expression level of foreign epitopes per APC determines whether T cell competition is mainly for specific or aspecific stimuli. Under low epitope expression, competition is mainly for the specific epitope stimuli, and, hence, different epitope-specific T cell populations coexist readily. However, if epitope expression levels are high, aspecific competition becomes more important. Such between-specificity competition can lead to competitive exclusion between different epitope-specific T cell populations. Our model allows us to delineate the circumstances that facilitate coexistence of T cells of different epitope specificity. Understanding mechanisms of T cell coexistence has important practical implications for immune therapies that require a broad immune response.

  10. T cell motility as modulator of interactions with dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Volker Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the balance of costimulatory and inhibitory signals during interactions with dendritic cells (DCs determines T cell transition from a naïve to an activated or tolerant/anergic status. While many of these molecular interactions are well reproduced in reductionist in vitro assays, the highly dynamic motility of naïve T cells in lymphoid tissue acts as an additional lever to fine-tune their activation threshold. T cell detachment from DCs providing suboptimal stimulation allows them to search for DCs with higher levels of stimulatory signals, while storing a transient memory of short encounters. In turn, adhesion of weakly reactive T cells to DCs presenting pMHC with low affinity is prevented by lipid mediators. Finally, controlled recruitment of CD8+ T cells to cognate DC – CD4+ T cell clusters shapes memory T cell formation and the quality of the immune response. Dynamic physiological lymphocyte motility therefore constitutes a mechanism to mitigate low avidity T cell activation and to improve the search for optimal DCs, while contributing to peripheral tolerance induction in the absence of inflammation.

  11. Roles of T Cells in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinglei Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available γδ T cells are a minor population of T cells that express the TCR γδ chains, mainly distributed in the mucosal and epithelial tissue and accounting for less than 5% of the total T cells in the peripheral blood. By bridging innate and adaptive immunity, γδ T cells play important roles in the anti-infection, antitumor, and autoimmune responses. Previous research on γδ T cells was primarily concentrated on infectious diseases and tumors, whereas their functions in autoimmune diseases attracted much attention. In this paper, we summarized the various functions of γδ T cells in two prototypical autoimmune connective tissue diseases, that is, SLE and RA, elaborating on their antigen-presenting capacity, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, immunomodulatory effects, and auxiliary function for B cells, which contribute to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and pathogenic autoantibodies, ultimately leading to the onset of these autoimmune diseases. Elucidation of the roles of γδ T cells in autoimmune diseases is not only conducive to in-depth understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, but also beneficial in providing theoretical support for the development of γδ T-cell-targeted therapy.

  12. Parathyroid hormone dependent T cell proliferation in uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, E; Ladefoged, Jens; Brandi, L

    1993-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is combined with an impairment of the immune system. The T cell may be a target for the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Rats with CRF have high blood levels of PTH. Therefore, the present investigation examined some aspects of the T cell function in both normal...... and CRF rats before and after parathyroidectomy and after an isogenic kidney transplantation. The T cell proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was significantly higher in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures obtained from CRF rats than from normal rats. After...... parathyroidectomy the T cells of normal as well as of uremic rats could still be significantly stimulated by PHA, but now no significant difference was seen. When CRF was reversed after an isogenic kidney transplantation and PTH reversed to levels in the normal range, the T cell proliferative response to PHA...

  13. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered...... from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) responded by IFN-gamma production following stimulation with Leishmania antigens whereas cells from patients recovered from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) showed a mixed pattern of IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses. The cells producing these cytokines were predominantly CD4......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  14. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Robbie L.; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2013-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia is a rare and unusual malignancy characterized by the proliferation of small- to medium-sized prolymphocytes of postthymic origin with distinctive clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features. Involvement of the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and skin can occur. The clinical course is typically very aggressive with poor response to conventional chemotherapy and short survival rates, and the only potential long-ter...

  15. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  16. Diminished primary and secondary influenza virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in CD4-depleted Ig(-/-) mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberdy, J M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Branum, K

    2000-01-01

    Optimal expansion of influenza virus nucleoprotein (D(b)NP(366))-specific CD8(+) T cells following respiratory challenge of naive Ig(-/-) microMT mice was found to require CD4(+) T-cell help, and this effect was also observed in primed animals. Absence of the CD4(+) population was consistently...

  17. CD4/CD8/Dendritic cell complexes in the spleen: CD8+ T cells can directly bind CD4+ T cells and modulate their response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinov, Aleksandr; Galgano, Alessia; Krenn, Gerald; Tanchot, Corinne; Vasseur, Florence

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help to CD8+ T cell responses requires that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells interact with the same antigen presenting dendritic cell (Ag+DC), but it remains controversial whether helper signals are delivered indirectly through a licensed DC and/or involve direct CD4+/CD8+ T cell contacts and/or the formation of ternary complexes. We here describe the first in vivo imaging of the intact spleen, aiming to evaluate the first interactions between antigen-specific CD4+, CD8+ T cells and Ag+DCs. We show that in contrast to CD4+ T cells which form transient contacts with Ag+DC, CD8+ T cells form immediate stable contacts and activate the Ag+DC, acquire fragments of the DC membranes by trogocytosis, leading to their acquisition of some of the DC properties. They express MHC class II, and become able to present the specific Marilyn peptide to naïve Marilyn CD4+ T cells, inducing their extensive division. In vivo, these CD8+ T cells form direct stable contacts with motile naïve CD4+ T cells, recruiting them to Ag+DC binding and to the formation of ternary complexes, where CD4+ and CD8+ T cells interact with the DC and with one another. The presence of CD8+ T cells during in vivo immune responses leads to the early activation and up-regulation of multiple functions by CD4+ T lymphocytes. Thus, while CD4+ T cell help is important to CD8+ T cell responses, CD8+ T cells can interact directly with naïve CD4+ T cells impacting their recruitment and differentiation. PMID:28686740

  18. Clinical applications of gamma delta T cells with multivalent immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells hold promise for adoptive immunotherapy because of their reactivity to bacteria, viruses, and tumors. However, these cells represent a small fraction (1-5% of the peripheral T-cell pool and require activation and propagation to achieve clinical benefit. Aminobisphosphonates specifically expand the Vgamma9Vdelta2 subset of gamma delta T cells and have been used in clinical trials of cancer where objective responses were detected. The Vgamma9Vdelta2 TCR heterodimer binds multiple ligands and results in a multivalent attack by a monoclonal T cell population. Alternatively, populations of gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoire could be infused for broad-range specificity. However, this goal has been restricted by a lack of applicable expansion protocols for non-Vgamma9Vdelta2 cells. Recent advances using immobilized antigens, agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, tumor-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC, or combinations of activating mAbs and aAPC have been successful in expanding gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoires. Immobilized MHC Class-I chain-related A was a stimulus for gamma delta T cells expressing TCRdelta1 isotypes, and plate-bound activating antibodies have expanded Vdelta1 and Vdelta2 cells ex vivo. Clinically-sufficient quantities of TCRdelta1, TCRdelta2, and TCRdelta1negTCRdelta2neg have been produced following co-culture on aAPC, and these subsets displayed differences in memory phenotype and reactivity to tumors in vitro and in vivo. Gamma delta T cells are also amenable to genetic modification as evidenced by introduction of alpha beta TCRs, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, and drug-resistance genes. This represents a promising future for the clinical application of oligoclonal or polyclonal gamma delta T cells in autologous and allogeneic settings that builds on current trials testing the safety and efficacy of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells.

  19. Pregnancy promotes tolerance to future offspring by programming selective dysfunction in long-lived maternal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Brendan M; Xu, Rong; Wherry, E John; Porrett, Paige M

    2017-04-01

    Fetal antigen available during pregnancy induces the proliferation of maternal T cells. It is unknown, however, whether these antigen-activated T cells differentiate into long-lived memory T cells that are capable of mediating rapid-recall responses to tissue antigens. To test the hypothesis that pregnancy induces an alternative fate in fetal-specific maternal T cells, we used a murine model to track longitudinally fetal-specific T cells in pregnant and postpartum animals and test the response of these cells when challenged with the same antigen during sequential pregnancy or skin transplantation. Fetal-specific CD8 + T cells were robustly primed during pregnancy but failed to acquire robust effector functions. These primed cells persisted long term in postpartum animals, frequently maintained a programmed death 1 (PD-1) + phenotype, and failed to expand or produce cytokines robustly in response to second pregnancy or skin transplantation. However, whereas there was no impact on second pregnancy as a result of the persistence of fetal-primed memory CD8 + T cells in the mother, skin grafts bearing the same antigen were rejected more rapidly. Altogether, our data suggest that fetal antigen exposure during pregnancy induces the differentiation of long-lived maternal CD8 + T cells with context-dependent, selective effector dysfunction. This programmed effector dysfunction provides temporal and systemic restraint of maternal anti-fetal alloreactivity to promote reproductive fitness efficiently, while preserving potentially protective effector T cell responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama

    2006-01-01

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pek Siew Lim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA and calcium ionomycin (I as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278. Keywords: EL4 T cell, Microarray, T cell activation, Inducible genes

  2. In vitro analysis of cytotoxic T cell recruitment mediated by the DC-derived chemokine CCL17

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) licensing in cross-priming requires physical interaction of several rare immune cells, i.e. cytotoxic T cells (CTL), and cross-presenting DCs. Here we describe a novel in vitro method of analyzing chemokine effects on complex recruitment events in a multi-cellular system. To study CTL recruitment towards CCL17-producing DCs, we established a co-culture system of murine splenic DCs with polyclonal splenic CTL from donor mice, which enables visualization of cell motility and...

  3. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  4. Fragmentation of SIV-gag vaccine induces broader T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Benlahrech

    Full Text Available High mutation rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV allows escape from T cell recognition preventing development of effective T cell vaccines. Vaccines that induce diverse T cell immune responses would help overcome this problem. Using SIV gag as a model vaccine, we investigated two approaches to increase the breadth of the CD8 T cell response. Namely, fusion of vaccine genes to ubiquitin to target the proteasome and increase levels of MHC class I peptide complexes and gene fragmentation to overcome competition between epitopes for presentation and recognition.three vaccines were compared: full-length unmodified SIV-mac239 gag, full-length gag fused at the N-terminus to ubiquitin and 7 gag fragments of equal size spanning the whole of gag with ubiquitin-fused to the N-terminus of each fragment. Genes were cloned into a replication defective adenovirus vector and immunogenicity assessed in an in vitro human priming system. The breadth of the CD8 T cell response, defined by the number of distinct epitopes, was assessed by IFN-γ-ELISPOT and memory phenotype and cytokine production evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed an increase of two- to six-fold in the number of epitopes recognised in the ubiquitin-fused fragments compared to the ubiquitin-fused full-length gag. In contrast, although proteasomal targeting was achieved, there was a marked reduction in the number of epitopes recognised in the ubiquitin-fused full-length gag compared to the full-length unmodified gene, but there were no differences in the number of epitope responses induced by non-ubiquitinated full-length gag and the ubiquitin-fused mini genes. Fragmentation and ubiquitination did not affect T cell memory differentiation and polyfunctionality, though most responses were directed against the Ad5 vector.Fragmentation but not fusion with ubiquitin increases the breadth of the CD8 T vaccine response against SIV-mac239 gag. Thus gene fragmentation of HIV vaccines may maximise

  5. Functional and morphological recovery of the T-cell compartment in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraal, G.; Hilst, B. van der; Boden, D.

    1979-01-01

    The recovery of the T-cell compartment in mice after lethal irradiation and reconstitution was studied using functional and morphological parameters. T-helper cell activity, determined by the direct SRBC-plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, recovered in a similar fashion as T-memory function which was studied by adoptive transfer of carrier-primed cells. Both functions returned to control levels in 2.5 to 3 months. Using immunoperoxidase staining of frozen sections with anti-T cell serum, the morphological recovery of the T-cell dependent areas in the white pulp of the spleen could be studied and compared with the functional recovery. (author)

  6. HBV-specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cells in hepatocellular carcinoma are less cytolytic toward tumor cells and suppress CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanzhi; Zhen, Shoumei; Song, Bin

    2017-08-01

    In East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, chronic infection is the main cause of the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, an aggressive cancer with low survival rate. Cytotoxic T cell-based immunotherapy is a promising treatment strategy. Here, we investigated the possibility of using HBV-specific CD4 + cytotoxic T cells to eliminate tumor cells. The naturally occurring HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were identified by HBV peptide pool stimulation. We found that in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4 + T cells and cytotoxic CD8 + T cells were present at similar numbers. But compared to the CD8 + cytotoxic T cells, the CD4 + cytotoxic T cells secreted less cytolytic factors granzyme A (GzmA) and granzyme B (GzmB), and were less effective at eliminating tumor cells. In addition, despite being able to secrete cytolytic factors, CD4 + T cells suppressed the cytotoxicity mediated by CD8 + T cells, even when CD4 + CD25 + regulator T cells were absent. Interestingly, we found that interleukin 10 (IL-10)-secreting Tr1 cells were enriched in the cytotoxic CD4 + T cells. Neutralization of IL-10 abrogated the suppression of CD8 + T cells by CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Neither the frequency nor the absolute number of HBV-specific CD4 + cytotoxic T cells were correlated with the clinical outcome of advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Together, this study demonstrated that in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, CD4 + T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was present naturally in the host and had the potential to exert antitumor immunity, but its capacity was limited and was associated with immunoregulatory properties. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Role of innate T cells in anti-bacterial immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifang eGao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Innate T cells are a heterogeneous group of αβ and γδ T cells that respond rapidly (<2 hours upon activation. These innate T cells also share a non MHC class I or II restriction requirement for antigen recognition. Three major populations within the innate T cell group are recognized, namely Invariant NKT cells (iNKT; Mucosal associated invariant T cells (MAIT and gamma delta T cells. These cells recognize foreign/self-lipid presented by non-classical MHC molecules, such as CD1d, MR1 and CD1a.They are activated during the early stages of bacterial infection and act as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this review we focus on the functional properties of these 3 innate T cell populations and how they are purposed for antimicrobial defense. Furthermore we address the mechanisms through which their effector functions are targeted for bacterial control and compare this in human and murine systems. Lastly we speculate on future roles of these cell types in therapeutic settings such as vaccination.

  8. The role of CD8+ T cells during allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bueno

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation can be considered as replacement therapy for patients with end-stage organ failure. The percent of one-year allograft survival has increased due, among other factors, to a better understanding of the rejection process and new immunosuppressive drugs. Immunosuppressive therapy used in transplantation prevents activation and proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes, although not fully preventing chronic rejection. Recognition by recipient T cells of alloantigens expressed by donor tissues initiates immune destruction of allogeneic transplants. However, there is controversy concerning the relative contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to allograft rejection. Some animal models indicate that there is an absolute requirement for CD4+ T cells in allogeneic rejection, whereas in others CD4-depleted mice reject certain types of allografts. Moreover, there is evidence that CD8+ T cells are more resistant to immunotherapy and tolerance induction protocols. An intense focal infiltration of mainly CD8+CTLA4+ T lymphocytes during kidney rejection has been described in patients. This suggests that CD8+ T cells could escape from immunosuppression and participate in the rejection process. Our group is primarily interested in the immune mechanisms involved in allograft rejection. Thus, we believe that a better understanding of the role of CD8+ T cells in allograft rejection could indicate new targets for immunotherapy in transplantation. Therefore, the objective of the present review was to focus on the role of the CD8+ T cell population in the rejection of allogeneic tissue.

  9. In vitro Th1 and Th2 cell polarization is severely influenced by the initial ratio of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Lars; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    by even small percentages (99% naïve CD4+ T cells resulted in better Th1 and Th2 polarization with significant reduced fractions of IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells, respectively. Moreover, the Th2 primed >99% naïve CD4+ T cells showed significantly higher ratio of IL-4+:IFN-γ+ (>4 fold) and GATA-3:+T......-bet+ (>3 fold) CD4+ T cells when compared with the standard purified >90-95% naïve CD4+ T cells primed under the same culture conditions. This suggests immunomagnetic bead separation, a low cost and easy available technique, with few modifications to the manufacturer's protocol as an attractive alternative...... for laboratories not having a cell sorter. Taken together, we report that it is essential to use rigorously purified (>99%) naïve CD4+ T cells for optimal initial in vitro Th1 and Th2 priming....

  10. CD4+ T Cells Mediate Aspergillosis Vaccine Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arevalo, Diana; Kalkum, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive effector CD4 + T cells play essential roles in the defense against fungal infections, especially against invasive aspergillosis (IA). Such protective CD4 + T cells can be generated through immunization with specialized antifungal vaccines, as has been demonstrated for pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus infections in mouse experiments. Adaptive transfer of fungal antigen-specific CD4 + T cells conferred protection onto non-immunized naive mice, an experimental approach that could potentially become a future treatment option for immunosuppressed IA patients, focusing on the ultimate goal to improve their otherwise dim chances for survival. Here, we describe the different techniques to analyze CD4 + T cell immune responses after immunization with a recombinant fungal protein. We present three major methods that are used to analyze the role of CD4 + T cells in protection against A. fumigatus challenge. They include (1) transplantation of CD4 + T cells from vaccinated mice into immunosuppressed naive mice, observing increasing protection of the cell recipients, (2) depletion of CD4 + T cells from vaccinated mice, which abolishes vaccine protection, and (3) T cell proliferation studies following stimulation with overlapping synthetic peptides or an intact protein vaccine. The latter can be used to validate immunization status and to identify protective T cell epitopes in vaccine antigens. In the methods detailed here, we used versions of the well-studied Asp f3 protein expressed in a bacterial host, either as the intact full length protein or its N-terminally truncated version, comprised of residues 15-168. However, these methods are generally applicable and can well be adapted to study other protein-based subunit vaccines.

  11. c-MPL provides tumor-targeted T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells with costimulation and cytokine signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Christopher D; Brenner, Daniel A; Mukherjee, Malini; Hirsch, Rachel A; Ott, Leah; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Dakhova, Olga; Orange, Jordan S; Brenner, Malcolm K; Lin, Charles Y; Arber, Caroline

    2017-12-21

    Adoptively transferred T-cell receptor (TCR)-engineered T cells depend on host-derived costimulation and cytokine signals for their full and sustained activation. However, in patients with cancer, both signals are frequently impaired. Hence, we developed a novel strategy that combines both essential signals in 1 transgene by expressing the nonlymphoid hematopoietic growth factor receptor c-MPL (myeloproliferative leukemia), the receptor for thrombopoietin (TPO), in T cells. c-MPL signaling activates pathways shared with conventional costimulatory and cytokine receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that host-derived TPO, present in the tumor microenvironment, or pharmacological c-MPL agonists approved by the US Food and Drug Administration could deliver both signals to c-MPL-engineered TCR-transgenic T cells. We found that c-MPL + polyclonal T cells expand and proliferate in response to TPO, and persist longer after adoptive transfer in immunodeficient human TPO-transgenic mice. In TCR-transgenic T cells, c-MPL activation enhances antitumor function, T-cell expansion, and cytokine production and preserves a central memory phenotype. c-MPL signaling also enables sequential tumor cell killing, enhances the formation of effective immune synapses, and improves antileukemic activity in vivo in a leukemia xenograft model. We identify the type 1 interferon pathway as a molecular mechanism by which c-MPL mediates immune stimulation in T cells. In conclusion, we present a novel immunotherapeutic strategy using c-MPL-enhanced transgenic T cells responding to either endogenously produced TPO (a microenvironment factor in hematologic malignancies) or c-MPL-targeted pharmacological agents. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Expansion of mycobacterium-reactive gamma delta T cells by a subset of memory helper T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, L M; Haftel, H M; Park, H S; Lin, M S; Romzek, N C; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1995-04-01

    Human gamma delta T cells expressing the V gamma 9/V delta 2 T-cell receptor have been previously found to proliferate in response to certain microorganisms and to expand throughout life, presumably because of extrathymic activation by foreign antigens. In vitro expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells by mycobacteria has been previously shown to be dependent on accessory cells. In order to gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in the expansion of these cells, we have undertaken to identify the peripheral blood subset of cells on which proliferation of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells in response to mycobacteria is dependent. Contrary to their role in antigen presentation to alpha beta T cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, such as monocytes, B cells, and dendritic cells, were unable to provide the cellular support for the expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. Selective depletion of T-cell subsets, as well as the use of highly purified T-cell populations, indicated that the only subset of peripheral blood cells that could expand V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells were CD4+ CD45RO+ CD7- alpha beta T cells. These cells underwent distinct intracellular signaling events after stimulation with the mycobacterial antigen. Expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells by alpha beta T cells was dependent on cell-cell contact. This is the first evidence that a small subset of the memory helper T-cell population is exclusively responsible for the peripheral expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. These data illustrate a unique aspect of antigen recognition by gamma delta T cells and provide new means to study their immune defense role.

  13. Dynamics of human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I) infection of CD4+ T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katri, Patricia; Ruan, Shigui

    2004-11-01

    Stilianakis and Seydel (Bull. Math. Biol., 1999) proposed an ODE model that describes the T-cell dynamics of human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I) infection and the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Their model consists of four components: uninfected healthy CD4+ T-cells, latently infected CD4+ T-cells, actively infected CD4+ T-cells, and ATL cells. Mathematical analysis that completely determines the global dynamics of this model has been done by Wang et al. (Math. Biosci., 2002). In this note, we first modify the parameters of the model to distinguish between contact and infectivity rates. Then we introduce a discrete time delay to the model to describe the time between emission of contagious particles by active CD4+ T-cells and infection of pure cells. Using the results in Culshaw and Ruan (Math. Biosci., 2000) in the analysis of time delay with respect to cell-free viral spread of HIV, we study the effect of time delay on the stability of the endemically infected equilibrium. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  14. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  15. Masked priming effect reflects evidence accumulated by the prime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Sachiko; Norris, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    In the same-different match task, masked priming is observed with the same responses but not different responses. Norris and Kinoshita's (2008) Bayesian reader account of masked priming explains this pattern based on the same principle as that explaining the absence of priming for nonwords in the lexical decision task. The pattern of priming follows from the way the model makes optimal decisions in the two tasks; priming does not depend on first activating the prime and then the target. An alternative explanation is in terms of a bias towards responding "same" that exactly counters the facilitatory effect of lexical access. The present study tested these two views by varying both the degree to which the prime predicts the response and the visibility of the prime. Unmasked primes produced effects expected from the view that priming is influenced by the degree to which the prime predicts the response. In contrast, with masked primes, the size of priming for the same response was completely unaffected by predictability. These results rule out response bias as an explanation of the absence of masked priming for different responses and, in turn, indicate that masked priming is not a consequence of automatic lexical access of the prime.

  16. Isatis tinctoria L. combined with co-stimulatory molecules blockade prolongs survival of cardiac allografts in alloantigen-primed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiangpeng; Chen, Jibing; Qin, Qing; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yongzhi; Lan, Tianshu; Xu, Shuo; Wang, Feiyu; Xia, Junjie; Ekberg, Henrik; Qi, Zhongquan; Liu, Zhongchen

    2010-05-01

    Memory T cells present a unique challenge in transplantation. Although memory T cells express robust immune responses to invading pathogens, they may be resistant to the effects of immunosuppressive therapies used to prolong graft survival. In previous studies, we found that compound K, the synthesized analogue of highly unsaturated fatty acids from Isatis tinctoria L., reduced acute cardiac allograft rejection in mice (Wang et al., 2009 [1]). Here, we further investigated the effect of compound K on cardiac allograft rejection in alloantigen-primed mice. We found that compound K significantly inhibited CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). In vivo, compound K combined with anti-CD154 and anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) significantly extended the survival time of heart grafts in alloantigen-primed mice with no obvious toxic side effects. Furthermore, our data suggests that compound K works by reducing the expression of both IL-2 and IFN-gamma within the graft rather than enhancing expression of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Compound K can also inhibit the alloresponses of memory T cells, while increasing the proportion of CD4(+) memory T cells in the spleen of the recipients and significantly reducing the level of alloantibodies in the serum. Our study highlights the unique immune effects of compound K that may be further explored for clinical use in extending the survival of transplant grafts. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  18. Use of internal control T-cell populations in the flow cytometric evaluation for T-cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alicia M; Shallenberger, Wendy; Ten Eyck, Stephen P; Craig, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Flow cytometry is an important tool for identification of neoplastic T-cells, but immunophenotypic abnormalities are often subtle and must be distinguished from nonneoplastic subsets. Use of internal control (IC) T-cells in the evaluation for T-cell neoplasms was explored, both as a quality measure and as a reference for evaluating abnormal antigen expression. All peripheral blood specimens (3-month period), or those containing abnormal T-cells (29-month period), stained with CD45 V500, CD2 V450, CD3 PE-Cy7, CD7 PE, CD4 Per-CP-Cy5.5, CD8 APC-H7, CD56 APC, CD16&57 FITC, were evaluated. IC T-cells were identified (DIVA, BD Biosciences) and median fluorescence intensity (MFI) recorded. Selected files were merged and reference templates generated (Infinicyt, Cytognos). IC T-cells were present in all specimens, including those with abnormal T-cells, but subsets were less well-represented. IC T-cell CD3 MFI differed between instruments (p = 0.0007) and subsets (p < 0.001), but not specimen categories, and served as a longitudinal process control. Merged files highlighted small unusual IC-T subsets: CD2+(dim) (0.25% total), CD2- (0.03% total). An IC reference template highlighted neoplastic T-cells, but was limited by staining variability (IC CD3 MFI reference samples different from test (p = 0.003)). IC T-cells present in the majority of specimens can serve as positive and longitudinal process controls. Use of IC T-cells as an internal reference is limited by variable representation of subsets. Analysis of merged IC T-cells from previously analyzed patient samples can alert the interpreter to less-well-recognized non-neoplastic subsets. However, application of a merged file IC reference template was limited by staining variability. © 2016 Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  19. Expression of inhibitory receptors on intratumoral T cells modulates the activity of a T cell-bispecific antibody targeting folate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Jens; Thommen, Daniela S.; Herzig, Petra; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Levitsky, Victor; Savic, Spasenija; Moersig, Wolfgang; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A.; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; von Bergwelt-Baildon, M.; Lardinois, Didier; Müller, Philipp; Karanikas, Vaios; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT T-cell bispecific antibodies (TCBs) are a novel therapeutic tool designed to selectively recruit T-cells to tumor cells and simultaneously activate them. However, it is currently unknown whether the dysfunctional state of T-cells, embedded into the tumor microenvironment, imprints on the therapeutic activity of TCBs. We performed a comprehensive analysis of activation and effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs) in different tumor types, upon stimulation by a TCB targeting folate receptor 1 and CD3 (FolR1-TCB). We observed a considerable heterogeneity in T-cell activation, cytokine production and tumor cell killing upon exposure to FolR1-TCB among different FolR1-expressing tumors. Of note, tumors presenting with a high frequency of PD-1hi TILs displayed significantly impaired tumor cell killing and T-cell function. Further characterization of additional T-cell inhibitory receptors revealed that PD-1hi TILs defined a T-cell subset with particularly high levels of multiple inhibitory receptors compared with PD-1int and PD-1neg T-cells. PD-1 blockade could restore cytokine secretion but not cytotoxicity of TILs in a subset of patients with scarce PD-1hi expressing cells; in contrast, patients with abundance of PD-1hi expressing T-cells did not benefit from PD-1 blockade. Our data highlight that FolR1-TCB is a promising novel immunotherapeutic treatment option which is capable of activating intratumoral T-cells in different carcinomas. However, its therapeutic efficacy may be substantially hampered by a pre-existing dysfunctional state of T-cells, reflected by abundance of intratumoral PD-1hi T-cells. These findings present a rationale for combinatorial approaches of TCBs with other therapeutic strategies targeting T-cell dysfunction. PMID:27057429

  20. Peripheral T cell lymphoma: clinical utility of romidepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawey K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Zain, Kathryn SaweyNYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USAIntroduction: Direct therapeutic targets, such as aberrant tumor cell genes and tumor cell markers, have been the focus of cancer treatment for more than 50 years. The resulting damage to normal cells and emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells after exposure to conventional chemotherapy have led researchers to study indirect targets, like the tumor vasculature. A more recent indirect approach involves targeting the epigenetic modifiers, DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to be active cytotoxic agents in T cell lymphoma. The current treatments approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for relapsed cutaneous T cell lymphoma are vorinostat and romidepsin. The diversity and rarity of peripheral T cell lymphomas present a challenge for effective treatment. With their poor overall survival rate, new targeted therapies need to be developed.Keywords: peripheral T cell lymphoma, treatment, romidepsin

  1. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Trautwein-Weidner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity.

  2. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H.; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P.; Gregg, Randal K.

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter. When

  3. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P; Gregg, Randal K

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter

  4. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Teng; Stark, R.; Borysiewicz, L.K.; Weetman, A.P. (Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK)); Munro, A.J. (Department of Clinical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); McHardy Young, S. (Department of Medicine, Central Middlesex Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cell subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dualcolour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR(la) and CDw26/Tal (p<0.025 in both cases). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the primed population containing memory cells, also increased (p<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting T cells or in the CD4 to CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contrasuppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (p<0.025). The changes did not appear to be related to antithyroid drug treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients continued such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contrasuppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine. The T cell changes could also contribute to the worsening of ophthalmopathy seen in some radioiodine-treated patients. (author).

  5. T-cell help permits memory CD8(+) T-cell inflation during cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Senta M; Torti, Nicole; Mandaric, Sanja; Oxenius, Annette

    2011-08-01

    CD4(+) T cells are implied to sustain CD8(+) T-cell responses during persistent infections. As CD4(+) T cells are often themselves antiviral effectors, they might shape CD8(+) T-cell responses via help or via controlling antigen load. We used persistent murine CMV (MCMV) infection to dissect the impact of CD4(+) T cells on virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, distinguishing between increased viral load in the absence of CD4(+) T cells and CD4(+) T-cell-mediated helper mechanisms. Absence of T-helper cells was associated with sustained lytic MCMV replication and led to a slow and gradual reduction of the size and function of the MCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell pool. However, when virus replication was controlled in the absence of CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T-cell function was comparably impaired, but in addition CD8(+) T-cell inflation, a hallmark of CMV infection, was completely abolished. Thus, CD8(+) T-cell inflation during latent CMV infection is strongly dependent on CD4(+) T-cell helper functions, which can partially be compensated by ongoing lytic viral replication in the absence of CD4(+) T cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation

  7. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.

  8. Large, but not small, antigens require time- and temperature-dependent processing in accessory cells before they can be recognized by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    We have studied if antigens of different size and structure all require processing in antigen-presenting cells of guinea-pigs before they can be recognized by T cells. The method of mild paraformaldehyde fixation was used to stop antigen-processing in the antigen-presenting cells. As a measure...... of antigen presentation we used the proliferative response of appropriately primed T cells during a co-culture with the paraformaldehyde-fixed and antigen-exposed presenting cells. We demonstrate that the large synthetic polypeptide antigen, dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine, requires processing. After an initial......-dependent and consequently energy-requiring. Processing is strongly inhibited by the lysosomotrophic drug, chloroquine, suggesting a lysosomal involvement in antigen processing. The existence of a minor, non-lysosomal pathway is suggested, since small amounts of antigen were processed even at 10 degrees C, at which...

  9. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Swadling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA, or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3 vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA, encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut, used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy, determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells

  10. Retinoic acid: an educational "vitamin elixir" for gut-seeking T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J Rodrigo; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2004-10-01

    T cell priming by dendritic cells (DC) from gut-associated lymphoid tissues gives rise to effector cells with pronounced gut tropism. The mechanism for DC-dependent imprinting of gut specificity has remained unknown. New findings point to retinoic acid, which is uniquely produced by intestinal DC, but not by DC from other lymphoid organs.

  11. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  12. Bystander chronic infection negatively impacts development of CD8+ T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelekati, Erietta; Shin, Haina; Doering, Travis A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Ziegler, Carly G.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Dawson, Lucas; Liboon, Jennifer; Wolski, David; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Katsikis, Peter D.; Shen, Hao; Roos, David S.; Haining, W. Nicholas; Lauer, Georg M.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological evidence suggests that chronic infections impair immune responses to unrelated pathogens and vaccines. The underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear and distinguishing effects on priming versus development of immunological memory has been challenging. We investigated whether bystander chronic infections impact differentiation of memory CD8+ T cells, the hallmark of protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Chronic bystander infections impaired development of memory CD8+ T cells in several mouse models and humans. These effects were independent of initial priming and were associated with chronic inflammatory signatures. Chronic inflammation negatively impacted the number of bystander CD8+ T cells and their memory development. Distinct underlying mechanisms of altered survival and differentiation were revealed with the latter regulated by the transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1. Thus, exposure to prolonged bystander inflammation impairs the effector to memory transition. These data have relevance for immunity and vaccination during persisting infections and chronic inflammation. PMID:24837104

  13. Aging impairs recipient T cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors in response to transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Shen

    Full Text Available As increasing numbers of older people are listed for solid organ transplantation, there is an urgent need to better understand how aging modifies alloimmune responses. Here, we investigated whether aging impairs the ability of donor dendritic cells or recipient immunity to prime alloimmune responses to organ transplantation.Using murine experimental models, we found that aging impaired the host environment to expand and activate antigen specific CD8(+ T cells. Additionally, aging impaired the ability of polyclonal T cells to induce acute allograft rejection. However, the alloimmune priming capability of donor dendritic cells was preserved with aging.Aging impairs recipient responses, both T cell intrinsic and extrinsic, in response to organ transplantation.

  14. TCR tuning of T cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Ho; Sprent, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    After selection in the thymus, the post-thymic T cell compartments comprise heterogenous subsets of naive and memory T cells that make continuous T cell receptor (TCR) contact with self-ligands bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. T cell recognition of self-MHC ligands elicits covert TCR signaling and is particularly important for controlling survival of naive T cells. Such tonic TCR signaling is tightly controlled and maintains the cells in a quiescent state to avoid autoimmunity. Here, we review how naive and memory T cells are differentially tuned and wired for TCR sensitivity to self and foreign ligands. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  16. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  17. Redirecting T cells to eradicate B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: bispecific T-cell engagers and chimeric antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoss, I; Bargou, R C; Nagorsen, D; Friberg, G R; Baeuerle, P A; Forman, S J

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in antibody technology to harness T cells for cancer immunotherapy, particularly in the difficult-to-treat setting of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL), have led to innovative methods for directing cytotoxic T cells to specific surface antigens on cancer cells. One approach involves administration of soluble bispecific (or dual-affinity) antibody-based constructs that temporarily bridge T cells and cancer cells. Another approach infuses ex vivo-engineered T cells that express a surface plasma membrane-inserted antibody construct called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Both bispecific antibodies and CARs circumvent natural target cell recognition by creating a physical connection between cytotoxic T cells and target cancer cells to activate a cytolysis signaling pathway; this connection allows essentially all cytotoxic T cells in a patient to be engaged because typical tumor cell resistance mechanisms (such as T-cell receptor specificity, antigen processing and presentation, and major histocompatibility complex context) are bypassed. Both the bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibody construct blinatumomab and CD19-CARs are immunotherapies that have yielded encouraging remission rates in CD19-positive r/r ALL, suggesting that they might serve as definitive treatments or bridging therapies to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. With the introduction of these immunotherapies, new challenges arise related to unique toxicities and distinctive pathways of resistance. An increasing body of knowledge is being accumulated on how to predict, prevent, and manage such toxicities, which will help to better stratify patient risk and tailor treatments to minimize severe adverse events. A deeper understanding of the precise mechanisms of action and immune resistance, interaction with other novel agents in potential combinations, and optimization in the manufacturing process will help to advance immunotherapy outcomes in the r

  18. T Cell Genesis: In Vitro Veritas Est?

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, Patrick M.; Singh, Jastaranpreet; Xhiku, Sintia; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    T cells, as orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, serve important physiological and potentially therapeutic roles, for example in cancer immunotherapy. T cells are readily isolated from patients; however, the yield of antigen-specific T cells is limited, thus making their clinical use challenging. Therefore, the generation of T lymphocytes from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in vitro provides an attractive method for large-scale pr...

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M

    2016-03-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin (I) as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278.

  20. CAR-T cells are serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours.

  1. Harnessing the Power of T Cells: The Promising Hope for a Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bridie Clemens

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation vaccines that utilize T cells could potentially overcome the limitations of current influenza vaccines that rely on antibodies to provide narrow subtype-specific protection and are prone to antigenic mismatch with circulating strains. Evidence from animal models shows that T cells can provide heterosubtypic protection and are crucial for immune control of influenza virus infections. This has provided hope for the design of a universal vaccine able to prime against diverse influenza virus strains and subtypes. However, multiple hurdles exist for the realisation of a universal T cell vaccine. Overall primary concerns are: extrapolating human clinical studies, seeding durable effective T cell resident memory (Trm, population human leucocyte antigen (HLA coverage, and the potential for T cell-mediated immune escape. Further comprehensive human clinical data is needed during natural infection to validate the protective role T cells play during infection in the absence of antibodies. Furthermore, fundamental questions still exist regarding the site, longevity and duration, quantity, and phenotype of T cells needed for optimal protection. Standardised experimental methods, and eventually simplified commercial assays, to assess peripheral influenza-specific T cell responses are needed for larger-scale clinical studies of T cells as a correlate of protection against influenza infection. The design and implementation of a T cell-inducing vaccine will require a consensus on the level of protection acceptable in the community, which may not provide sterilizing immunity but could protect the individual from severe disease, reduce the length of infection, and potentially reduce transmission in the community. Therefore, increasing the standard of care potentially offered by T cell vaccines should be considered in the context of pandemic preparedness and zoonotic infections, and in combination with improved antibody vaccine targeting methods

  2. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    in genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...... to bacterial derived luminal antigen, localize to the intestinal mucosa and induce colitis. Adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice resulted in reduced monocyte recruitment to the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) compared to Cre- controls. Inflammatory cytokines...

  3. IRF8 dependent classical dendritic cells are essential for intestinal T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, K.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 dependent DCs have reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8ab+ andCD4+CD8......aa+ T cells; the latter requiring b8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103+CD11b- DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI derived MLN DCs......, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. Finally, mice with a DC deletion in IRF8 lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8...

  4. Clonal analysis of T-cell responses to herpes simplex virus: isolation, characterization and antiviral properties of an antigen-specific helper T-cell clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K N; Nash, A A; Sia, D Y; Wildy, P

    1984-12-01

    A herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific long-term T-cell clone has been established from the draining lymph node cells of BALB/c mice; the cells required repeated in vitro restimulation with UV-irradiated virus. The established T-cell clone expresses the Thy-1 and Lyt-1+2,3- surface antigens. For optimal proliferation of the cloned cells, both the presence of specific antigen and an exogenous source of T-cell growth factor are required. The proliferative response of the cloned T cells was found to be virus-specific but it did not distinguish between HSV-1 and HSV-2. Adoptive cell transfer of the cloned T cells helped primed B cells to produce anti-herpes antibodies: the response was antigen-specific and cell dose-dependent. The clone failed to produce a significant DTH reaction in vivo, but did produce high levels of macrophage-activating factor. Furthermore, the T-cell clone could protect from HSV infection, as measured by a reduction in local virus growth, and by enhanced survival following the challenge of mice with a lethal dose of virus. The mechanism(s) whereby this clone protects in vivo is discussed.

  5. [gammadelta T cells stimulated by zoledronate kill osteosarcoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Yang, Chao; Cao, Zhen-Guo; Li, Zhao-Xu; Ye, Zhao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of human γδT cells from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo and evaluate the relavent pathways. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)of healthy donors were stimulated by single dose zoledronate and cultured in the present of IL-2 for two weeks, analysising the percentage of γδT cells on a FACSCalibur cytometer.Study the cytotoxicity of γδT cells against the osteosarcoma line HOS using LDH release assay kit. Pre-treatment of γδT cells with anti-human γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A to bolck the relavent pathways for evaluating the mechenisms of its cytotoxicity. In vivo, BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously osteosarcoma cell HOS for developing hypodermal tumors. And they were randomized into two groups: unteated group, γδT cell therapy group. Tumor volume and weight of the two groups were compared. After two weeks of culture, γδT cells from zoledronate-stimulated PBMCs could reach (95±3)%. When the E:T as 6:1, 12:1, 25:1, 50:1, the percentage of osteosarcoma cell HOS killed by γδT cells was 26.8%, 31.5%, 37.8%, 40.9%, respectively.When anti-huma γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A blocked the relavent pathways, the percentage was 32.3%, 4.7%, 16.7% ( E:T as 25:1), respectively. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rate of the group of γδT cell therapy was 42.78%. γδT cells derived from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate can acquired pure γδT cells. And they show strong cytoxicity against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo.

  6. The Vast Universe of T Cell Diversity: Subsets of Memory Cells and Their Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandus, Camilla; Usatorre, Amaia Martínez; Viganò, Selena; Zhang, Lianjun; Romero, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor confers specificity for antigen recognition to T cells. By the first encounter with the cognate antigen, reactive T cells initiate a program of expansion and differentiation that will define not only the ultimate quantity of specific cells that will be generated, but more importantly their quality and functional heterogeneity. Recent achievements using mouse model infection systems have helped to shed light into the complex network of factors that dictate and sustain memory T cell differentiation, ranging from antigen load, TCR signal strength, metabolic fitness, transcriptional programs, and proliferative potential. The different models of memory T cell differentiation are discussed in this chapter, and key phenotypic and functional attributes of memory T cell subsets are presented, both for mouse and human cells. Therapeutic manipulation of memory T cell generation is expected to provide novel unique ways to optimize current immunotherapies, both in infection and cancer.

  7. Vaginal immunization to elicit primary T-cell activation and dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pettini

    Full Text Available Primary T-cell activation at mucosal sites is of utmost importance for the development of vaccination strategies. T-cell priming after vaginal immunization, with ovalbumin and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant as model vaccine formulation, was studied in vivo in hormone-synchronized mice and compared to the one induced by the nasal route. Twenty-four hours after both vaginal or nasal immunization, antigen-loaded dendritic cells were detected within the respective draining lymph nodes. Vaginal immunization elicited a strong recruitment of antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells into draining lymph nodes that was more rapid than the one observed following nasal immunization. T-cell clonal expansion was first detected in iliac lymph nodes, draining the genital tract, and proliferated T cells disseminated towards distal lymph nodes and spleen similarly to what observed following nasal immunization. T cells were indeed activated by the antigen encounter and acquired homing molecules essential to disseminate towards distal lymphoid organs as confirmed by the modulation of CD45RB, CD69, CD44 and CD62L marker expression. A multi-type Galton Watson branching process, previously used for in vitro analysis of T-cell proliferation, was applied to model in vivo CFSE proliferation data in draining lymph nodes 57 hours following immunization, in order to calculate the probabilistic decision of a cell to enter in division, rest in quiescence or migrate/die. The modelling analysis indicated that the probability of a cell to proliferate was higher following vaginal than nasal immunization. All together these data show that vaginal immunization, despite the absence of an organized mucosal associated inductive site in the genital tract, is very efficient in priming antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells and inducing their dissemination from draining lymph nodes towards distal lymphoid organs.

  8. Prime-Boost Vaccination Using Chemokine-Fused gp120 DNA and HIV Envelope Peptides Activates Both Immediate and Long-Term Memory Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine candidates with improved immunogenicity and induction of mucosal T-cell immunity are needed. A prime-boost strategy using a novel HIV glycoprotein 120 DNA vaccine was employed to immunize rhesus macaques. The DNA vaccine encoded a chimeric gp120 protein in fusion with monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, which was hypothesized to improve the ability of antigen-presenting cells to capture viral antigen through chemokine receptor-mediated endocytosis. DNA vaccination induced virus-reactive T cells in peripheral blood, detectable by T cell proliferation, INFγ ELISPOT and sustained IL-6 production, without humoral responses. With a peptide-cocktail vaccine containing a set of conserved polypeptides of HIV-1 envelope protein, given by nasogastric administration, primed T-cell immunity was significantly boosted. Surprisingly, long-term and peptide-specific mucosal memory T-cell immunity was detected in both vaccinated macaques after one year. Therefore, data from this investigation offer proof-of-principle for potential effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy with a chemokine-fused gp120 DNA and warrant further testing in the nonhuman primate models for developing as a potential HIV vaccine candidate in humans.

  9. Regulation of T cell responses in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijvelde, Gijsbrecht Henricus Maria van

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics of atherosclerosis is the chronic inflammatory response in which T cells and NKT cells are very important. In this thesis several methods to modulate the activity of these T and NKT cells in atherosclerosis are described. The induction of regulatory T cells

  10. The numerology of T cell functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haining, W Nicholas

    2012-01-27

    Memory T cells are heterogeneous in phenotype and function. In this issue of Immunity, Newell et al. (2012) use a new flow cytometry platform to show that the functional heterogeneity of the human T cell compartment is even greater than previously thought. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Numerology of T Cell Functional Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Haining, W. Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Memory T cells are heterogeneous in phenotype and function. In this issue of Immunity Newell et al. (2012) use a new flow cytometry platform to show that the functional heterogeneity in the human T cell compartment is even greater than expected.

  12. Local induction of immunosuppressive CD8+ T cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fleissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In contrast to intestinal CD4(+ regulatory T cells (T(regs, the generation and function of immunomodulatory intestinal CD8(+ T cells is less well defined. To dissect the immunologic mechanisms of CD8(+ T cell function in the mucosa, reactivity against hemagglutinin (HA expressed in intestinal epithelial cells of mice bearing a MHC class-I-restricted T-cell-receptor specific for HA was studied. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HA-specific CD8(+ T cells were isolated from gut-associated tissues and phenotypically and functionally characterized for the expression of Foxp3(+ and their suppressive capacity. We demonstrate that intestinal HA expression led to peripheral induction of HA-specific CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cells. Antigen-experienced CD8(+ T cells in this transgenic mouse model suppressed the proliferation of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells in vitro. Gene expression analysis of suppressive HA-specific CD8(+ T cells revealed a specific up-regulation of CD103, Nrp1, Tnfrsf9 and Pdcd1, molecules also expressed on CD4(+ T(reg subsets. Finally, gut-associated dendritic cells were able to induce HA-specific CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that gut specific antigen presentation is sufficient to induce CD8(+ T(regsin vivo which may maintain intestinal homeostasis by down-modulating effector functions of T cells.

  13. Local induction of immunosuppressive CD8+ T cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleissner, Diana; Hansen, Wiebke; Geffers, Robert; Buer, Jan; Westendorf, Astrid M

    2010-10-20

    In contrast to intestinal CD4(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)), the generation and function of immunomodulatory intestinal CD8(+) T cells is less well defined. To dissect the immunologic mechanisms of CD8(+) T cell function in the mucosa, reactivity against hemagglutinin (HA) expressed in intestinal epithelial cells of mice bearing a MHC class-I-restricted T-cell-receptor specific for HA was studied. HA-specific CD8(+) T cells were isolated from gut-associated tissues and phenotypically and functionally characterized for the expression of Foxp3(+) and their suppressive capacity. We demonstrate that intestinal HA expression led to peripheral induction of HA-specific CD8(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Antigen-experienced CD8(+) T cells in this transgenic mouse model suppressed the proliferation of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Gene expression analysis of suppressive HA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed a specific up-regulation of CD103, Nrp1, Tnfrsf9 and Pdcd1, molecules also expressed on CD4(+) T(reg) subsets. Finally, gut-associated dendritic cells were able to induce HA-specific CD8(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. We demonstrate that gut specific antigen presentation is sufficient to induce CD8(+) T(regs)in vivo which may maintain intestinal homeostasis by down-modulating effector functions of T cells.

  14. T Cells and Pathogenesis of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome and Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis A. Ennis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We previously hypothesized that increased capillary permeability observed in both hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS may be caused by hantavirus-specific cytotoxic T cells attacking endothelial cells presenting viral antigens on their surface based on clinical observations and in vitro experiments. In HCPS, hantavirus-specific T cell responses positively correlated with disease severity. In HFRS, in one report, contrary to HCPS, T cell responses negatively correlated with disease severity, but in another report the number of regulatory T cells, which are thought to suppress T cell responses, negatively correlated with disease severity. In rat experiments, in which hantavirus causes persistent infection, depletion of regulatory T cells helped infected rats clear virus without inducing immunopathology. These seemingly contradictory findings may suggest delicate balance in T cell responses between protection and immunopathogenesis. Both too strong and too weak T cell responses may lead to severe disease. It is important to clarify the role of T cells in these diseases for better treatment (whether to suppress T cell functions and protection (vaccine design which may need to take into account viral factors and the influence of HLA on T cell responses.

  15. Memory CD8 T cells mediate severe immunopathology following respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Schmidt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8 T cells can provide protection from re-infection by respiratory viruses such as influenza and SARS. However, the relative contribution of memory CD8 T cells in providing protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is currently unclear. To address this knowledge gap, we utilized a prime-boost immunization approach to induce robust memory CD8 T cell responses in the absence of RSV-specific CD4 T cells and antibodies. Unexpectedly, RSV infection of mice with pre-existing CD8 T cell memory led to exacerbated weight loss, pulmonary disease, and lethal immunopathology. The exacerbated disease in immunized mice was not epitope-dependent and occurred despite a significant reduction in RSV viral titers. In addition, the lethal immunopathology was unique to the context of an RSV infection as mice were protected from a normally lethal challenge with a recombinant influenza virus expressing an RSV epitope. Memory CD8 T cells rapidly produced IFN-γ following RSV infection resulting in elevated protein levels in the lung and periphery. Neutralization of IFN-γ in the respiratory tract reduced morbidity and prevented mortality. These results demonstrate that in contrast to other respiratory viruses, RSV-specific memory CD8 T cells can induce lethal immunopathology despite mediating enhanced viral clearance.

  16. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  17. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas L Lintermans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations support a key role for T lymphocytes in these disease pathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies in several autoimmune diseases have demonstrated a significant role for a specific subset of CD4+ T cells termed effector memory T cells. This expanded population of effector memory T cells may contribute to tissue injury and disease progression. These cells exert multiple pro-inflammatory functions through the release of effector cytokines. Many of these cytokines have been detected in the inflammatory lesions and participate in the vasculitic reaction, contributing to recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, NK cells, B cells and T cells. In addition, functional impairment of regulatory T cells paralyzes anti-inflammatory effects in vasculitic disorders. Interestingly, activation of effector memory T cells in uniquely dependent on the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel providing an anchor for specific drug targeting. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ T cells in the context of vascular inflammation and describe the evidence supporting the role of different T cell subsets in vascular inflammation. Selective targeting of pathogenic effector memory T cells might enable a more tailored therapeutic approach that avoids unwanted adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression by modulating the effector functions of T cell responses to inhibit the development of vascular inflammation.

  18. T cell clones which share T cell receptor epitopes differ in phenotype, function and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yssel, H.; Blanchard, D.; Boylston, A.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, we described a monoclonal antibody (3D6) that reacts with the T cell receptor (Ti) of the T leukemic cell line HPB-ALL and that cross-reacts with 2-10% of the T cells of normal healthy individuals. In this study we report the establishment of T cell clones that are 3D6+ but that differ in

  19. T cell responses in senior patients with community-acquired pneumonia related to disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Bi, Ying; Zhou, Shao-Wei; Chen, Zi-Dan; Wen, Jun; Shi, Jin; Mao, Ling; Wang, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Senior individuals older than 65 years of age are at a disproportionally higher risk of developing pneumonia. Impaired capacity to defend against airway infections may be one of the reasons. It is generally believed that weaker regulatory T cell responses may be beneficial to host defense against pathogens. In senior patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the frequencies and functions of regulatory T cells. Interestingly, we found that compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, senior pneumonia patients presented lower frequencies of Foxp3-expressing and Helios-expressing CD4 + T cells. The quantity of Foxp3 and Helios being expressed, measured by their mRNA transcription levels, was also lower in CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients. Furthermore, following TCR and TGF-β stimulation, pneumonia patients presented impaired capacity to upregulate Foxp3 and Helios. Functional analyses revealed that CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients secreted lower amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β, two cytokines critical to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. Also, the expression of granzyme B and perforin, which were cytolytic molecules potentially utilized by regulatory T cells to mediate the elimination of antigen-presenting cells and effector T cells, were reduced in CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients. In addition, the CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients presented reduced capacity to suppress effector CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation. Moreover, the value of pneumonia severity index was inversely correlated with several parameters of regulatory T cell function. Together, our results demonstrated that senior pneumonia patients presented a counterintuitive impairment in regulatory T cell responses that was associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  1. [TNF-α, diabetes type 1 and regulatory T cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryba, Monika; Myśliwska, Jolanta

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on animal models of diabetes as well as human regulatory T cells have shown that α impairs the ability of these cells to prevent the disease. NOD mice treated with α had decreased frequency of regulatory T cells, whereas anti-TNF administration induced the increase in the number of these cells and disease prevention. The action of α also influenced the suppressive potential of Tregs. Increased susceptibility of Tregs to the modulatory effects of α involves signaling through TNFR2 that is expressed on the surface of this cell population. It seems that α neutralization may rescue regulatory T cells and restore their function in several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. This review describes recent data concerning regulatory T cells in the context of inflammation that is present during diabetes type 1. It describes how TNF contributes to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, what is the impact of this cytokine on regulatory T cell population and therapeutic effects that result from its neutralization in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  3. Tolerogenic dendritic cells for regulatory T cell induction in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena eRaker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are (DC highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells (APC that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy and induction of regulatory T cells. These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DC as a therapeutic strategy for induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In the recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DC have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of regulatory T cells, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DC. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DC therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DC with focus on IL-10-modulated DC as inducers of regulatory T cells and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy.

  4. Acute T- cell lymphoblastic lymphoma - A case report | Sumba | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We highlight the case of a two year old female who presented with a two month history of left posterior auricular swelling. The swelling developed following trauma, was painless and progressively enlarging. After extensive evaluation the mass was noted to be an extramedullary presentation of Acute T cell lymphoblastic ...

  5. Semi-allogeneic dendritic cells can induce antigen-specific T-cell activation, which is not enhanced by concurrent alloreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, James W; Cowled, Chris J; Darling, David; Guinn, Barbara-Ann; Farzaneh, Farzin; Noble, Alistair; Galea-Lauri, Joanna

    2007-12-01

    Alloreactive T-cell responses are known to result in the production of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines capable of activating and maturing dendritic cells (DC). However, it is unclear whether these allogeneic responses could also act as an adjuvant for concurrent antigen-specific responses. To examine effects of simultaneous alloreactive and antigen-specific T-cell responses induced by semi-allogeneic DC. Semi-allogeneic DC were generated from the F(1) progeny of inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6 and C3H, or C57BL/6 and DBA). We directly primed antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cells from OT-I and OT-II mice, respectively, in the absence of allogeneic responses, in vitro, and in the presence or absence of alloreactivity in vivo. In vitro, semi-allogeneic DC cross-presented ovalbumin (OVA) to naïve CD8(+) OT-I transgenic T-cells, primed naïve CD4(+) OT-II transgenic T-cells and could stimulate strong alloreactive T-cell proliferation in a primary mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). In vivo, semi-allogeneic DC migrated efficiently to regional lymph nodes but did not survive there as long as autologous DC. In addition, they were not able to induce cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity to a target peptide, and only weakly stimulated adoptively transferred OT-II cells. The CD4(+) response was unchanged in allo-tolerized mice, indicating that alloreactive T-cell responses could not provide help for concurrently activated antigen-specific responses. In an EL4 tumour-treatment model, vaccination with semi-allogeneic DC/EL4 fusion hybrids, but not allogeneic DC/EL4 hybrids, significantly increased mouse survival. Expression of self-Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) by semi-allogeneic DC can cause the induction of antigen-specific immunity, however, concurrently activated allogeneic bystander responses do not provide helper or adjuvant effects.

  6. The role of Protein Kinase Cη in T cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R.J. Gascoigne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase Cη (PKCη is a member of the novel PKC subfamily, which also includes δ, ε, and θ isoforms. Compared to the other novel PKCs, the function of PKCη in the immune system is largely unknown. Several studies have started to reveal the role of PKCη, particularly in T cells. PKCη is highly expressed in T cells, and is upregulated during thymocyte positive selection. Interestingly, like the θ isoform, PKCη is also recruited to the immunological synapse that is formed between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. However, unlike PKCθ, which becomes concentrated to the central region of the synapse, PKCη remains in a diffuse pattern over the whole area of the synapse, suggesting distinctive roles of these two isoforms in signal transduction. Although PKCη is dispensable for thymocyte development, further analysis of PKCη− or PKCθ−deficient and double knockout mice revealed the redundancy of these two isoforms in thymocyte development. In contrast, PKCη rather than PKCθ, plays an important role for T cell homeostatic proliferation, which requires recognition of self-antigen. Another piece of evidence demonstrating that PKCη and PKCθ have isoform specific as well as redundant roles come from the analysis of CD4 to CD8 T cell ratios in the periphery of these knockout mice. Deficiency in PKCη or PKCθ had opposing effects as PKCη knockout mice had a higher ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells compared to that of wild-type mice, whereas PKCθ-deficient mice had a lower ratio. Biochemical studies showed that calcium flux and NFκB translocation is impaired in PKCη-deficient T cells upon TCR crosslinking stimulation, a character shared with PKCθ-deficient T cells. However, unlike the case with PKCθ, the mechanistic study of PKCη is at early stage and the signaling pathways involving PKCη, at least in T cells, are essentially unknown. In this review, we will cover the topics mentioned above as well as provide some

  7. PGE2 suppresses intestinal T cell function in thermal injury: a cause of enhanced bacterial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, M A; Fazal, N; Namak, S Y; Haque, F; Ravindranath, T; Sayeed, M M

    2001-09-01

    Increased gut bacterial translocation in burn and trauma patients has been demonstrated in a number of previous studies, however, the mechanism for such an increased gut bacterial translocation in injured patients remains poorly understood. Utilizing a rat model of burn injury, in the present study we examined the role of intestinal immune defense by analyzing the T cell functions. We investigated if intestinal T cells dysfunction contributes to bacterial translocation after burn injury. Also our study determined if burn-mediated alterations in intestinal T cell functions are related to enhanced release of PGE2. Finally, we examined whether or not burn-related alterations in intestinal T cell function are due to inappropriate activation of signaling molecule P59fyn, which is required for T cell activation and proliferation. The results presented here showed an increase in gut bacterial accumulation in mesenteric lymph nodes after thermal injury. This was accompanied by a decrease in the intestinal T cell proliferative responses. Furthermore, the treatments of burn-injured animals with PGE2 synthesis blocker (indomethacin or NS398) prevented both the decrease in intestinal T cell proliferation and enhanced bacterial translocation. Finally, our data suggested that the inhibition of intestinal T cell proliferation could result via PGE2-mediated down-regulation of the T cell activation-signaling molecule P59fyn. These findings support a role of T cell-mediated immune defense against bacterial translocation in burn injury.

  8. Immune Thrombocytopenia in a Child with T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Tokeji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with persistent thrombocytopenia during maintenance chemotherapy with mercaptopurine and methotrexate for T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. He was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP after thorough investigations for the relapse of lymphoma and was successfully treated with immunoglobulin and steroids. ITP is known to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but rarely with T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or in children. Diagnosis of ITP with lymphoma is challenging due to the many factors affecting platelet counts, and ITP often complicates the diagnosis or treatment course of lymphoma. The underlying mechanism of ITP with NHL is still unclear. Drug-induced immunomodulation with a reduction of regulatory T cells might have contributed to the development of ITP in our case.

  9. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  10. Microenvironmental cues enhance mesenchymal stem cell-mediated immunomodulation and regulatory T-cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadle, Rohini L; Abdou, Salma A; Villarreal-Ponce, Alvaro P; Soares, Marc A; Sultan, Darren L; David, Joshua A; Massie, Jonathan; Rifkin, William J; Rabbani, Piul; Ceradini, Daniel J

    2018-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to both have powerful immunosuppressive properties and promote allograft tolerance. Determining the environmental oxygen tension and inflammatory conditions under which MSCs are optimally primed for this immunosuppressive function is essential to their utilization in promoting graft tolerance. Of particular interest is the mechanisms governing the interaction between MSCs and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which is relatively unknown. We performed our experiments utilizing rat bone marrow derived MSCs. We observed that priming MSCs in hypoxia promotes maintenance of stem-like characteristics, with greater expression of typical MSC cell-surface markers, increased proliferation, and maintenance of differentiation potential. Addition of autologous MSCs to CD4+/allogeneic endothelial cell (EC) co-culture increases regulatory T cell (Treg) proliferation, which is further enhanced when MSCs are primed in hypoxia. Furthermore, MSC-mediated Treg expansion does not require direct cell-cell contact. The expression of indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase, a mediator of MSC immunomodulation, increases when MSCs are primed in hypoxia, and inhibition of IDO significantly decreases the expansion of Tregs. Priming with inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα increases also expression of markers associated with MSC immunomodulatory function, but decreases MSC proliferation. The expression of IDO also increases when MSCs are primed with inflammatory cytokines. However, there is no increase in Treg expansion when MSCs are primed with IFNγ, suggesting an alternate mechanism for inflammatory-stimulated MSC immunomodulation. Overall, these results suggest that MSCs primed in hypoxia or inflammatory conditions are optimally primed for immunosuppressive function. These results provide a clearer picture of how to enhance MSC immunomodulation for clinical use.

  11. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  12. Malignant T Cells Secrete Galectins and Induce Epidermal Hyperproliferation and Disorganized Stratification in a Skin Model of Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thode, Christenze; Andersen, Anders Woetmann; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL) are the most common primary skin lymphomas; which are characterized by an accumulation of malignant T cells in the skin. The early lesion resembles both clinically and histologically benign inflammatory disorders, which also presents with hyperproliferative epide...... in CTCL.Journal of Investigative Dermatology accepted article preview online, 09 July 2014; doi:10.1038/jid.2014.284....

  13. Nuclear Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein co-regulates T cell factor 1-mediated transcription in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai V. Kuznetsov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp family of actin-nucleating factors are present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The role of nuclear WASp for T cell development remains incompletely defined. Methods We performed WASp chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq in thymocytes and spleen CD4+ T cells. Results WASp was enriched at genic and intergenic regions and associated with the transcription start sites of protein-coding genes. Thymocytes and spleen CD4+ T cells showed 15 common WASp-interacting genes, including the gene encoding T cell factor (TCF12. WASp KO thymocytes had reduced nuclear TCF12 whereas thymocytes expressing constitutively active WASpL272P and WASpI296T had increased nuclear TCF12, suggesting that regulated WASp activity controlled nuclear TCF12. We identify a putative DNA element enriched in WASp ChIP-seq samples identical to a TCF1-binding site and we show that WASp directly interacted with TCF1 in the nucleus. Conclusions These data place nuclear WASp in proximity with TCF1 and TCF12, essential factors for T cell development.

  14. Systemic immunological tolerance to ocular antigens is mediated by TRAIL-expressing CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Thomas S; Brincks, Erik L; Gurung, Prajwal; Kucaba, Tamara A; Ferguson, Thomas A

    2011-01-15

    Systemic immunological tolerance to Ag encountered in the eye restricts the formation of potentially damaging immune responses that would otherwise be initiated at other anatomical locations. We previously demonstrated that tolerance to Ag administered via the anterior chamber (AC) of the eye required Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic death of inflammatory cells that enter the eye in response to the antigenic challenge. Moreover, the systemic tolerance induced after AC injection of Ag was mediated by CD8(+) regulatory T cells. This study examined the mechanism by which these CD8(+) regulatory T cells mediate tolerance after AC injection of Ag. AC injection of Ag did not prime CD4(+) T cells and led to increased TRAIL expression by splenic CD8(+) T cells. Unlike wild-type mice, Trail(-/-) or Dr5(-/-) mice did not develop tolerance to Ag injected into the eye, even though responding lymphocytes underwent apoptosis in the AC of the eyes of these mice. CD8(+) T cells from Trail(-/-) mice that were first injected via the AC with Ag were unable to transfer tolerance to naive recipient wild-type mice, but CD8(+) T cells from AC-injected wild-type or Dr5(-/-) mice could transfer tolerance. Importantly, the transferred wild-type (Trail(+/+)) CD8(+) T cells were also able to decrease the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells into the eye; however, Trail(-/-) CD8(+) T cells were unable to limit the inflammatory cell ingress. Together, our data suggest that "helpless" CD8(+) regulatory T cells generated after AC injection of Ag enforce systemic tolerance in a TRAIL-dependent manner to inhibit inflammation in the eye.

  15. CD8+ T cells from a novel T cell receptor transgenic mouse induce liver-stage immunity that can be boosted by blood-stage infection in rodent malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shong Lau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To follow the fate of CD8+ T cells responsive to Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection, we generated an MHC I-restricted TCR transgenic mouse line against this pathogen. T cells from this line, termed PbT-I T cells, were able to respond to blood-stage infection by PbA and two other rodent malaria species, P. yoelii XNL and P. chabaudi AS. These PbT-I T cells were also able to respond to sporozoites and to protect mice from liver-stage infection. Examination of the requirements for priming after intravenous administration of irradiated sporozoites, an effective vaccination approach, showed that the spleen rather than the liver was the main site of priming and that responses depended on CD8α+ dendritic cells. Importantly, sequential exposure to irradiated sporozoites followed two days later by blood-stage infection led to augmented PbT-I T cell expansion. These findings indicate that PbT-I T cells are a highly versatile tool for studying multiple stages and species of rodent malaria and suggest that cross-stage reactive CD8+ T cells may be utilized in liver-stage vaccine design to enable boosting by blood-stage infections.

  16. Genetically Modified T-Cell-Based Adoptive Immunotherapy in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixin Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of hematological malignancies remain limited in treatment options. Immune system modulation serves as a promising therapeutic approach to eliminate malignant cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs play a central role in antitumor immunity; unfortunately, nonspecific approaches for targeted recognition of tumor cells by CTLs to mediate tumor immune evasion in hematological malignancies imply multiple mechanisms, which may or may not be clinically relevant. Recently, genetically modified T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy approaches, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy and engineered T-cell receptor (TCR T-cell therapy, promise to overcome immune evasion by redirecting the specificity of CTLs to tumor cells. In clinic trials, CAR-T-cell- and TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy have produced encouraging clinical outcomes, thereby demonstrating their therapeutic potential in mitigating tumor development. The purpose of the present review is to (1 provide a detailed overview of the multiple mechanisms for immune evasion related with T-cell-based therapies; (2 provide a current summary of the applications of CAR-T-cell- as well as neoantigen-specific TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy and routes taken to overcome immune evasion; and (3 evaluate alternative approaches targeting immune evasion via optimization of CAR-T and TCR-T-cell immunotherapies.

  17. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  18. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    The formation of higher order apoptotic structures at the mitochondrion precedes cellular collapse dead. Tracking bax multimerization at mitochondria wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342. Apoptotic T-cells ...

  19. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  20. T cells in multiple myeloma display features of exhaustion and senescence at the tumor site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Zelle-Rieser

    2016-11-01

    patients were more severely impaired than peripheral T cells. While our data suggest that terminally differentiated cells are preferentially deleted by therapy, immune-checkpoint molecules were still present on T cells supporting the potential of checkpoint inhibitors to reactivate T cells in myeloma patients in combination therapies. However, additional avenues to restore anti-myeloma T cell responses are urgently needed.

  1. Cerebellar T-cell lymphoma: an unusual primary intracranial neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorr, J.R.; Ragland, R.L.; Stone, B.B.; Woda, B.A.; Gelber, N.D.

    1992-01-01

    Primary T-cell lymphoma within the central nervous system is extremely rare. Imaging characteristics appear indistinguishable from the more common B-cell lymphoma. A case of such a primary tumor is discussed and the MRI and CT findings presented. (orig.)

  2. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Lambert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  3. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CD4+ T cell effects on CD8+ T cell location defined using bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Azadniv

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes of the CD8+ class are critical in delivering cytotoxic function and in controlling viral and intracellular infections. These cells are "helped" by T lymphocytes of the CD4+ class, which facilitate their activation, clonal expansion, full differentiation and the persistence of memory. In this study we investigated the impact of CD4+ T cells on the location of CD8+ T cells, using antibody-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion and imaging the antigen-driven redistribution of bioluminescent CD8+ T cells in living mice. We documented that CD4+ T cells influence the biodistribution of CD8+ T cells, favoring their localization to abdominal lymph nodes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that this was associated with an increase in the expression of specific integrins. The presence of CD4+ T cells at the time of initial CD8+ T cell activation also influences their biodistribution in the memory phase. Based on these results, we propose the model that one of the functions of CD4+ T cell "help" is to program the homing potential of CD8+ T cells.

  5. Endogenous T-Cell Therapy: Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Cassian; Lizee, Greg; Schueneman, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy represents a robust means of augmenting the tumor-reactive effector population in patients with cancer by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded T cells. Three approaches have been developed to achieve this goal: the use of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or tumor-infiltrating lymphocytess extracted from patient biopsy material; the redirected engineering of lymphocytes using vectors expressing a chimeric antigen receptor and T-cell receptor; and third, the isolation and expansion of often low-frequency endogenous T cells (ETCs) reactive to tumor antigens from the peripheral blood of patients. This last form of adoptive transfer of T cells, known as ETC therapy, requires specialized methods to isolate and expand from peripheral blood the very low-frequency tumor-reactive T cells, methods that have been developed over the last 2 decades, to the point where such an approach may be broadly applicable not only for the treatment of melanoma but also for that of other solid tumor malignancies. One compelling feature of ETC is the ability to rapidly deploy clinical trials following identification of a tumor-associated target epitope, a feature that may be exploited to develop personalized antigen-specific T-cell therapy for patients with almost any solid tumor. With a well-validated antigen discovery pipeline in place, clinical studies combining ETC with agents that modulate the immune microenvironment can be developed that will transform ETC into a feasible treatment modality.

  6. Aberrant phenotypes in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, N; Ralfkiaer, E; Pallesen, G

    1989-01-01

    Seventy six peripheral T cell lymphomas were examined immunohistologically to test their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against 11 T cell associated antigens (CD1-8, CD27, UCHL1, and the T cell antigen receptor). Sixty two (82%) lymphomas showed aberrant phenotypes, and four main categories were distinguished as follows: (i) lack of one or several pan-T cell antigens (49, 64% of the cases); (ii) loss of both the CD4 and CD8 antigens (11, 15% of the cases); (iii) coexpression of the CD4 and CD8 antigens (13, 17% of the cases); and (iv) expression of the CD1 antigen (eight, 11% of the cases). No correlation was seen between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and the histological subtype. It is concluded that the demonstration of an aberrant phenotype is a valuable supplement to histological assessment in the diagnosis of peripheral T cell lymphomas. It is recommended that the panel of monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens should be fairly large, as apparently any antigen may be lost in the process of malignant transformation. Images Figure PMID:2469701

  7. Structural characteristics of an antigen required for its interaction with Ia and recognition by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1987-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the residues within an immunogenic peptide that endow it with the capacity to interact with Ia and to be recognized by T cells is presented. Ia interacts with only a few of the peptide residues and overall exhibits a very broad specificity. Some residues appear to interact...... both with Ia and with T cells, leading to a model in which a peptide antigen is 'sandwiched' between Ia and the T-cell receptor....

  8. T Cells and Pathogenesis of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome and Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Francis A. Ennis; Masanori Terajima

    2011-01-01

    We previously hypothesized that increased capillary permeability observed in both hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) may be caused by hantavirus-specific cytotoxic T cells attacking endothelial cells presenting viral antigens on their surface based on clinical observations and in vitro experiments. In HCPS, hantavirus-specific T cell responses positively correlated with disease severity. In HFRS, in one report, contrary to HCPS, T cell ...

  9. Increased Incidence of T-Cell Malignancies in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Goda; van den Broek, Esther C; Stam, Olga CG; van Noesel, C.J.M.; Tonino, Sanne H.; Kater, Armon P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with chemotherapy-refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) in whom postmortem examination showed hepatosplenomegaly, with both multiple small-cellular CLL lesions and large-cellular, monoclonal T-cell infiltrates. Following this case, the co-incidence of T-cell malignancies and CLL was studied using Dutch and American cancer registry databases. Analysis showed an excess risk for T-cell malignancies in CLL patients, with increased standardized incidence ratios compare...

  10. T cell subpopulations in lymph nodes may not be predictive of patient outcome in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Han-Seung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune response has been proposed to be an important factor in determining patient outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC. Previous studies have concentrated on characterizing T cell populations in the primary tumour where T cells with regulatory effect (Foxp3+ Tregs have been identified as both enhancing and diminishing anti-tumour immune responses. No previous studies have characterized the T cell response in the regional lymph nodes in CRC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse CD4, CD8 or Foxp3+ T cell populations in the regional lymph nodes of patients with stage II CRC (n = 31, with (n = 13 or without (n = 18 cancer recurrence after 5 years of follow up, to determine if the priming environment for anti-tumour immunity was associated with clinical outcome. Results The proportions of CD4, CD8 or Foxp3+ cells in the lymph nodes varied widely between and within patients, and there was no association between T cell populations and cancer recurrence or other clinicopathological characteristics. Conclusions These data indicate that frequency of these T cell subsets in lymph nodes may not be a useful tool for predicting patient outcome.

  11. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Weiping; Weetman, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cells subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dual-colour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR (Ia) and CDW 26/Ta 1 (P<0.025 in both case). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the prime population containing memory cells, also increased (P<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting cells or in the CD4/CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contra-suppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (P<0.025). The change did not appear to be related to antithyroid drugs treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients convinced such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contra-suppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine therapy

  12. A gut-homing, oligoclonal CD4+ T cell population in severe-combined immunodeficient mice expressing a rearranged, transgenic class I-restricted alpha beta T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, J; Rudolphi, A; Spiess, S

    1995-01-01

    We studied the peripheral T cell compartment of H-2b severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice that express a transgenic (tg) alpha beta T cell receptor (TcR) specific for the H-Y (male) epitope presented by the H-2 class I Db molecule. Large populations of CD3+ NK1.1-TCR beta T+ T cells were...

  13. Membranes of activated CD4+ T cells expressing T cell receptor (TcR) alpha beta or TcR gamma delta induce IgE synthesis by human B cells in the presence of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gascan, H.; Aversa, G. G.; Gauchat, J. F.; van Vlasselaer, P.; Roncarolo, M. G.; Yssel, H.; Kehry, M.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    In the present study it is demonstrated that human B cells can be induced to switch to IgE production following a contact-mediated signal provided by activated T cell receptor (TcR) gamma delta+, CD4+ and TcR alpha beta+, CD4+ T cell clones and interleukin (IL)-4. The signal provided by these T cell

  14. Memory T follicular helper CD4 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scott eHale

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available T follicular helper (Tfh cells are the subset of CD4 T helper cells that are required for generation and maintenance of germinal center reactions and the generation of long-lived humoral immunity. This specialized T helper subset provides help to cognate B cells via their expression of CD40 ligand, IL-21, IL-4, and other molecules. Tfh cells are characterized by their expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR5, expression of the transcriptional repressor Bcl6, and their capacity to migrate to the follicle and promote germinal center B cell responses. Until recently, it remained unclear whether Tfh cells differentiated into memory cells and whether they maintain their Tfh commitment at the memory phase. This review will highlight several recent studies that support the idea of Tfh-committed CD4 T cells at the memory stage of the immune response. The implication of these findings is that memory Tfh cells retain their capacity to recall their Tfh-specific effector functions upon reactivation to provide help for B cell responses and play an important role in prime and boost vaccination or during recall responses to infection. The markers that are useful for distinguishing Tfh effector and memory cells, as well as the limitations of using these markers will be discussed. Tfh effector and memory generation, lineage maintenance, and plasticity relative to other T helper lineages (Th1, Th2, Th17, etc will also be discussed. Ongoing discoveries regarding the maintenance and lineage stability versus plasticity of memory Tfh cells will improve strategies that utilize CD4 T cell memory to modulate antibody responses during prime and boost vaccination.

  15. HTLV 1 associated adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia a clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic tale of three cases from non-endemic region of south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiq Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by human T-cell lymphotrophic virus-1, affects mostly adults with systemic involvement and poor prognosis. Diagnosis of adult T-Cell leukemia/Lymphoma is challenging. The clinico-pathologic and immuno-phenotypic features of the three cases will be presented.

  16. FOXO3 regulates CD8 T cell memory by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A Sullivan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T cell responses have three phases: expansion, contraction, and memory. Dynamic alterations in proliferation and apoptotic rates control CD8 T cell numbers at each phase, which in turn dictate the magnitude of CD8 T cell memory. Identification of signaling pathways that control CD8 T cell memory is incomplete. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway controls cell growth in many cell types by modulating the activity of FOXO transcription factors. But the role of FOXOs in regulating CD8 T cell memory remains unknown. We show that phosphorylation of Akt, FOXO and mTOR in CD8 T cells occurs in a dynamic fashion in vivo during an acute viral infection. To elucidate the potentially dynamic role for FOXO3 in regulating homeostasis of activated CD8 T cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, we infected global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV. We found that FOXO3 deficiency induced a marked increase in the expansion of effector CD8 T cells, preferentially in the spleen, by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Mechanistically, the enhanced accumulation of proliferating CD8 T cells in FOXO3-deficient mice was not attributed to an augmented rate of cell division, but instead was linked to a reduction in cellular apoptosis. These data suggested that FOXO3 might inhibit accumulation of growth factor-deprived proliferating CD8 T cells by reducing their viability. By virtue of greater accumulation of memory precursor effector cells during expansion, the numbers of memory CD8 T cells were strikingly increased in the spleens of both global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice. The augmented CD8 T cell memory was durable, and FOXO3 deficiency did not perturb any of the qualitative attributes of memory T cells. In summary, we have identified FOXO3 as a critical regulator of CD8 T cell memory, and therapeutic modulation of FOXO3 might enhance vaccine-induced protective immunity against intracellular pathogens.

  17. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Specifically Suppress IFN-γ Production and Antitumor Cytotoxic Activity of Vδ2 T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Sacchi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available γδ T cells represent less than 5% of circulating T cells; they exert a potent cytotoxic function against tumor or infected cells and secrete cytokines like conventional αβ T cells. As αβ T cells γδ T cells reside in the typical T cell compartments (the lymph nodes and spleen, but are more widely distributed in tissues throughout the body. For these reasons, some investigators are exploring the possibility of immunotherapies aimed to expand and activate Vδ2 T cells, or using them as Chimeric Antigen Receptor carriers. However, the role of immunosuppressive microenvironment on Vδ2 T cells during infections and cancers has not been completely elucidated. In particular, the effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC, largely expanded in such pathologies, were not explored. In the present work, we demonstrated that MDSC may inhibit IFN-γ production and degranulation of phosphoantigen-activated Vδ2 T cells. Moreover, the Vδ2 T cells cytotoxic activity against the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Daudi and Jurkat cell line were impaired by MDSC. The Arginase I seems to be involved in the impairment of Vδ2 T cell function induced by both tumor cells and MDSC. These data open a key issue in the context of Vδ2-targeted immunoteraphy, suggesting the need of combined strategies aimed to boost Vδ2 T cells circumventing tumor- and MDSC-induced Vδ2 T cells suppression.

  18. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  19. CD1b-mycolic acid tetramers demonstrate T-cell fine specificity for mycobacterial lipid tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Iwany, Sarah K; Fodran, Peter; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Gapin, Laurent; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Moody, D Branch

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesizes a thick cell wall comprised of mycolic acids (MA), which are foreign antigens for human T cells. T-cell clones from multiple donors were used to determine the fine specificity of MA recognition by human αβ T cells. Most CD1-presented lipid antigens contain

  20. Type I interferons as stimulators of DC-mediated cross-priming: impact on anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eSchiavoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of potent tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses is a fundamental objective in anticancer therapeutic strategies. This event requires that antigen-presenting cells (APC present tumor-associated antigens (Ag on their MHC class-I molecule, in a process termed cross-presentation. Dendritic cells (DC are particularly keen on this task and can induce the cross-priming of CD8+ T cells, when exposed to danger or inflammatory signals that stimulate their activation. Type I interferons (IFN-I, a family of long-known immunostimulatory cytokines, have been proven to produce optimal activation signal for DC-induced cross-priming. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidences have suggested that IFN-I -stimulated cross-priming by DC against tumor-associated Ag is a key mechanism for cancer immunosurveillance and may be usefully exploited to boost anti-tumor CD8+ T-cell responses. Here, we will review the cross-presentation properties of different DC subsets, with special focus on cell-associated and tumor Ag, and discuss how IFN-I can modify this function, with the aim of identifying more specific and effective strategies for improving anticancer responses.

  1. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. GLYCAN-DIRECTED CAR-T CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Migliorini, Denis; King, Tiffany R; Mandel, Ulla; June, Carl H; Posey, Avery D

    2018-01-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing in the treatment of a variety of hematopoietic cancers, including pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma, with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. CARs are genetically encoded artificial T cell receptors that combine the antigen specificity of an antibody with the machinery of T cell activation. However, implementation of CAR technology in the treatment of solid tumors has been progressing much slower. Solid tumors are characterized by a number of challenges that need to be overcome, including cellular heterogeneity, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), and, in particular, few known cancer-specific targets. Post-translational modifications that differentially occur in malignant cells generate valid cell surface, cancer-specific targets for CAR-T cells. We previously demonstrated that CAR-T cells targeting an aberrant O-glycosylation of MUC1, a common cancer marker associated with changes in cell adhesion, tumor growth, and poor prognosis, could control malignant growth in mouse models. Here, we discuss the field of glycan-directed CAR-T cells and review the different classes of antibodies specific for glycan-targeting, including the generation of high affinity O-glycopeptide antibodies. Finally, we discuss historic and recently investigated glycan targets for CAR-T cells and provide our perspective on how targeting the tumor glycoproteome and/or glycome will improve CAR-T immunotherapy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Christina M; Comrie, William A; Hyun, Young-Min

    2012-01-01

    T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells...

  4. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  5. T-cell receptor transfer into human T cells with ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koste, L; Beissert, T; Hoff, H; Pretsch, L; Türeci, Ö; Sahin, U

    2014-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer for cancer immunotherapy requires genetic modification of T cells with recombinant T-cell receptors (TCRs). Amphotropic retroviral vectors (RVs) used for TCR transduction for this purpose are considered safe in principle. Despite this, TCR-coding and packaging vectors could theoretically recombine to produce replication competent vectors (RCVs), and transduced T-cell preparations must be proven free of RCV. To eliminate the need for RCV testing, we transduced human T cells with ecotropic RVs so potential RCV would be non-infectious for human cells. We show that transfection of synthetic messenger RNA encoding murine cationic amino-acid transporter 1 (mCAT-1), the receptor for murine retroviruses, enables efficient transient ecotropic transduction of human T cells. mCAT-1-dependent transduction was more efficient than amphotropic transduction performed in parallel, and preferentially targeted naive T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ecotropic TCR transduction results in antigen-specific restimulation of primary human T cells. Thus, ecotropic RVs represent a versatile, safe and potent tool to prepare T cells for the adoptive transfer.

  6. Potential use of [gammadelta] T cell-based vaccines in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Wajid A. Khan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is a fast advancing methodology involving one of two approaches: 1 compounds targeting immune checkpoints, and 2 cellular immunomodulators. The latter approach is still largely experimental and features in vitro generated, live immune effector cells or antigen-presenting cells (APC. [gammadelta] T cells are known for their efficient in vitro tumor killing activities. Consequently, many laboratories worldwide are currently testing the tumor killing function of [gammadelta] T cells in clinical trials. Reported benefits are modest; however, these studies have demonstrated that large [gammadelta] T cell infusions were well tolerated. Here, we discuss the potential of using human [gammadelta] T cells not as effector cells but as a novel cellular vaccine for treatment of cancer patients. Antigen-presenting [gammadelta] T cells do not require to home to tumor tissues but, instead, need to interact with endogenous, tumor-specific [alphabeta] T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Newly mobilised effector [alphabeta] T cells are then thought to overcome the immune blockade by creating proinflammatory conditions fit for effector T cell homing to and killing of tumor cells. Immunotherapy may include tumor antigen-loaded [gammadelta] T cells alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  7. The Non-structural Protein 5 and Matrix Protein Are Antigenic Targets of T Cell Immunity to Genotype 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokhtar, Helen; Pedrera, Miriam; Frossard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the cause of one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine worldwide. Efforts to develop a next-generation vaccine have largely focused on envelope glycoproteins to target virus-neutralizing antibody responses...... proposed that T cell-mediated immunity plays a key role. Therefore, we hypothesized that conserved T cell antigens represent prime candidates for the development a novel PRRS vaccine. Antigens were identified by screening a proteome-wide synthetic peptide library with T cells from cohorts of pigs rendered...... attractive vaccine candidate T cell antigens, which should be evaluated further in the context of PRRSV vaccine development....

  8. Adoptive T cell cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhandzhugazyan, Karine N.; Guldberg, Per; Kirkin, Alexei F.

    2018-06-01

    Tumour heterogeneity and off-target toxicity are current challenges of cancer immunotherapy. Karine Dzhandzhugazyan, Per Guldberg and Alexei Kirkin discuss how epigenetic induction of tumour antigens in antigen-presenting cells may form the basis for multi-target therapies.

  9. The role and mechanics of dendritic cells in tumor antigen acquisition and presentation following laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Sean M.; Dawkins, Bryan A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2018-02-01

    We extend our model of the antitumor immune response initiated by laser-immunotherapy treatment to more closely examine key steps in the immune response 1) tumor antigen acquisition by antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) and 2) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) priming by lymphatic DCs. Specifically we explore the formation of DC-CTL complexes that lead to CTL priming. We find that the bias in the dissociation rate of the complex influences the outcome of treatment. In particular, a bias towards priming favors a rapid activated CTL response and the clearance of tumors.

  10. Influence of adenovirus and MVA vaccines on the breadth and hierarchy of T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollier, Christine S; Hill, Adrian V S; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo

    2016-08-31

    Viral-vectored vaccines are in clinical development for several infectious diseases where T-cell responses can mediate protection, and responses to sub-dominant epitopes is needed. Little is known about the influence of MVA or adenoviral vectors on the hierarchy of the dominant and sub-dominant T-cell epitopes. We investigated this aspect in mice using a malaria immunogen. Our results demonstrate that the T-cell hierarchy is influenced by the timing of analysis, rather than by the vector after a single immunization, with hierarchy changing over time. Repeated homologous immunization reduced the breadth of responses, while heterologous prime-boost induced the strongest response to the dominant epitope, albeit with only modest response to the sub-dominant epitopes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of 4-1BB receptor in the control played by CD8(+ T cells on IFN-gamma production by Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Palma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antigen-specific IFN-gamma producing CD4(+ T cells are the main mediators of protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection both under natural conditions and following vaccination. However these cells are responsible for lung damage and poor vaccine efficacy when not tightly controlled. Discovering new tools to control nonprotective antigen-specific IFN-gamma production without affecting protective IFN-gamma is a challenge in tuberculosis research. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Immunization with DNA encoding Ag85B, a candidate vaccine antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, elicited in mice a low but protective CD4(+ T cell-mediated IFN-gamma response, while in mice primed with DNA and boosted with Ag85B protein a massive increase in IFN-gamma response was associated with loss of protection. Both protective and non-protective Ag85B-immunization generated antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells which suppressed IFN-gamma-secreting CD4(+ T cells. However, ex vivo ligation of 4-1BB, a member of TNF-receptor super-family, reduced the massive, non-protective IFN-gamma responses by CD4(+ T cells in protein-boosted mice without affecting the low protective IFN-gamma-secretion in mice immunized with DNA. This selective inhibition was due to the induction of 4-1BB exclusively on CD8(+ T cells of DNA-primed and protein-boosted mice following Ag85B protein stimulation. The 4-1BB-mediated IFN-gamma inhibition did not require soluble IL-10, TGF-beta, XCL-1 and MIP-1beta. In vivo Ag85B stimulation induced 4-1BB expression on CD8(+ T cells and in vivo 4-1BB ligation reduced the activation, IFN-gamma production and expansion of Ag85B-specific CD4(+ T cells of DNA-primed and protein-boosted mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antigen-specific suppressor CD8(+ T cells are elicited through immunization with the mycobacterial antigen Ag85B. Ligation of 4-1BB receptor further enhanced their suppressive activity on IFN-gamma-secreting CD4(+ T cells. The selective

  12. Subliminal semantic priming in speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Daltrozzo

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported subliminal repetition and semantic priming in the visual modality. We transferred this paradigm to the auditory modality. Prime awareness was manipulated by a reduction of sound intensity level. Uncategorized prime words (according to a post-test were followed by semantically related, unrelated, or repeated target words (presented without intensity reduction and participants performed a lexical decision task (LDT. Participants with slower reaction times in the LDT showed semantic priming (faster reaction times for semantically related compared to unrelated targets and negative repetition priming (slower reaction times for repeated compared to semantically related targets. This is the first report of semantic priming in the auditory modality without conscious categorization of the prime.

  13. Transfer of primed CD4+OX40- T lymphocytes induces increased immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1997-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen non-adherent mononuclear cells were is......-specific memory T cells that have returned to a resting state....

  14. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  15. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  16. Biogenesis and function of T cell-derived exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Alonso

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins and nucleic acids confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes.

  17. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C; Fernandes, Ninoshka R J; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell's antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function.

  18. An unexpected antibody response to an engineered influenza virus modifies CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul G; Brown, Scott A; Yue, Wen; So, Jenny; Webby, Richard J; Doherty, Peter C

    2006-02-21

    The ovalbumin(323-339) peptide that binds H2I-A(b) was engineered into the globular heads of hemagglutinin (H) molecules from serologically non-cross-reactive H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses, the aim being to analyze recall CD4+ T cell responses in a virus-induced respiratory disease. Prime/challenge experiments with these H1ova and H3ova viruses in H2(b) mice gave the predicted, ovalbumin-specific CD4+ T cell response but showed an unexpectedly enhanced, early expansion of viral epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in spleen and a greatly diminished inflammatory process in the virus-infected respiratory tract. At the same time, the primary antibody response to the H3N2 challenge virus was significantly reduced, an effect that has been associated with preexisting neutralizing antibody in other experimental systems. Analysis of serum from the H1ova-primed mice showed low-level binding to H3ova but not to the wild-type H3N2 virus. Experiments with CD4+ T cell-depleted and Ig-/- mice indicated that this cross-reactive Ig is indeed responsible for the modified pathogenesis after respiratory challenge. Furthermore, the effect does not seem to be virus-dose related, although it does require infection. These findings suggest intriguing possibilities for vaccination and, at the same time, emphasize that engineered modifications in viruses may have unintended immunological consequences.

  19. Human mesenchymal stromal cells transiently increase cytokine production by activated T cells before suppressing T-cell proliferation: effect of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerquis, Jessica; Romieu-Mourez, Raphaëlle; François, Moïra; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Young, Yoon Kow; Zhao, Jing; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress T-cell proliferation, especially after activation with inflammatory cytokines. We compared the dynamic action of unprimed and interferon (IFN)-γ plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-pretreated human bone marrow-derived MSCs on resting or activated T cells. MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at high MSC-to-PBMC ratios in the absence or presence of concomitant CD3/CD28-induced T-cell activation. The kinetic effects of MSCs on cytokine production and T-cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed. Unprimed MSCs increased the early production of IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs before suppressing T-cell proliferation. In non-activated PBMC co-cultures, low levels of IL-2 and IL-10 synthesis were observed with MSCs in addition to low levels of CD69 expression by T cells and no T-cell proliferation. MSCs also decreased apoptosis in resting and activated T cells and inhibited the transition of these cells into the sub-G0/G1 and the S phases. With inhibition of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, MSCs increased CD3/CD28-induced T-cell proliferation. After priming with IFN-γ plus TNF-α, MSCs were less potent at increasing cytokine production by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs and more effective at inhibiting T-cell proliferation but had preserved anti-apoptotic functions. Unprimed MSCs induce a transient increase in IFN-γ and IL-2 synthesis by activated T cells. Pre-treatment of MSCs with IFN-γ plus TNF-α may increase their effectiveness and safety in vivo. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Blocking of PDL-1 interaction enhances primary and secondary CD8 T cell response to herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudragouda Channappanavar

    Full Text Available The blocking of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1 has been shown to enhance virus-specific CD8 T cell function during chronic viral infections. Though, how PDL-1 blocking at the time of priming affects the quality of CD8 T cell response to acute infections is not well understood and remains controversial. This report demonstrates that the magnitude of the primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection is subject to control by PDL-1. Our results showed that after footpad HSV-1 infection, PD-1 expression increases on immunodominant SSIEFARL peptide specific CD8 T cells. Additionally, post-infection, the level of PDL-1 expression also increases on CD11c+ dendritic cells. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-PDL-1 monoclonal antibody given one day prior to and three days after cutaneous HSV-1 infection, resulted in a marked increase in effector and memory CD8 T cell response to SSIEFARL peptide. This was shown by measuring the quantity and quality of SSIEFARL-specific CD8 T cells by making use of ex-vivo assays that determine antigen specific CD8 T cell function, such as intracellular cytokine assay, degranulation assay to measure cytotoxicity and viral clearance. Our results are discussed in terms of the beneficial effects of blocking PDL-1 interactions, while giving prophylactic vaccines, to generate a more effective CD8 T cell response to viral infection.

  1. Suppression of IL-7-dependent Effector T-cell Expansion by Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells and PGE2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, James L; Vaes, Bart; Hull, Caroline; Sabbah, Shereen; Hayday, Thomas; Wang, Nancy S; DiPiero, Anthony; Lehman, Nicholas A; Taggart, Jen M; Carty, Fiona; English, Karen; Pinxteren, Jef; Deans, Robert; Ting, Anthony E; Tree, Timothy I M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell depletion therapy is used to prevent acute allograft rejection, treat autoimmunity and create space for bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation. The evolved response to T-cell loss is a transient increase in IL-7 that drives compensatory homeostatic proliferation (HP) of mature T cells. Paradoxically, the exaggerated form of this process that occurs following lymphodepletion expands effector T-cells, often causing loss of immunological tolerance that results in rapid graft rejection, autoimmunity, and exacerbated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). While standard immune suppression is unable to treat these pathologies, growing evidence suggests that manipulating the incipient process of HP increases allograft survival, prevents autoimmunity, and markedly reduces GVHD. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) are a clinical grade immunomodulatory cell therapy known to alter γ-chain cytokine responses in T-cells. Herein, we demonstrate that MAPC regulate HP of human T-cells, prevent the expansion of Th1, Th17, and Th22 effectors, and block the development of pathogenic allograft responses. This occurs via IL-1β-primed secretion of PGE2 and activates T-cell intrinsic regulatory mechanisms (SOCS2, GADD45A). These data provide proof-of-principle that HP of human T-cells can be targeted by cellular and molecular therapies and lays a basis for the development of novel strategies to prevent immunopathology in lymphodepleted patients. PMID:26216515

  2. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... recognition utilizing DNA barcode labeled MHC multimers to screen peripheral blood lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy donor samples. Signif-icantly more TAA specific T cell responses were detected in breast cancer patients than healthy donors for both HLA-A*0201 (P

  3. A chemically inert drug can stimulate T cells in vitro by their T cell receptor in non-sensitised individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, Olivier B.; Strasser, Ingrid; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Cerny, Andreas; Pichler, Werner J.

    2004-01-01

    Drugs can interact with T cell receptors (TCR) after binding to peptide-MHC structures. This binding may involve the formation of a stable, covalent bond between a chemically reactive drug and MHC or the peptide embedded within. Alternatively, if the drug is chemically inert, the binding may be non-covalent and readily reversible. Both types of drug presentation account for a substantial number of adverse side effects to drugs. Presently no tests are available to predict the ability of chemically inert drugs to stimulate an immune response. Here we present data on the successful induction of a primary T cell immune response in vitro against a chemically inert drug using blood from healthy individuals, previously not exposed to the drug. Blood lymphocytes were stimulated by the chemically inert drug sulfamethoxazole and the protein-reactive drug-metabolite sulfamethoxazole-nitroso in the presence of IL-2. 9/10 individuals reacted in response to sulfamethoxazole-nitroso, but only three reacted to the chemically inert compound sulfamethoxazole. Drug reactive T cells could be detected after 14-35 days of cell culture by drug-specific proliferation or cytotoxicity, which was MHC-restricted. These cells were CD4, CD8 positive or CD4/CD8 double positive and T cell clones generated secreted Th0 type cytokines. Drug interaction lead to down-regulation of specific TCR. These data confirm the ability of chemically inert drugs to stimulate certain T cells by their TCR and may provide the opportunity to screen new drugs for their ability to interact with TCRs

  4. Interleukin 4: signalling mechanisms and control of T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, W E

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic type I cytokine that controls both growth and differentiation among haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. Its receptor is a heterodimer. One chain, the IL-4R alpha chain, binds IL-4 with high affinity and determines the nature of the biochemical signals that are induced. The second chain, gamma c, is required for the induction of such signals. IL-4-mediated growth depends upon activation events that involve phosphorylation of Y497 of IL-4R alpha, leading to the binding and phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 in haemopoietic cells and of IRS-1 in non-haemopoietic cells. By contrast, IL-4-mediated differentiation events depend upon more distal regions of the IL-4R alpha chain that include a series of STAT-6 binding sites. The distinctive roles of these receptor domains was verified by receptor-reconstruction experiments. The 'growth' and 'differentiation' domains of the IL-4R alpha chain, independently expressed as chimeric structures with a truncated version of the IL-2R beta chain, were shown to convey their functions to the hybrid receptor. The critical role of STAT-6 in IL-4-mediated gene activation and differentiation was made clear by the finding that lymphocytes from STAT-6 knockout mice are strikingly deficient in these functions but have retained the capacity to grow, at least partially, in response to IL-4. IL-4 plays a central role in determining the phenotype of naive CD4+ T cells. In the presence of IL-4, newly primed naive T cells develop into IL-4 producers while in its absence they preferentially become gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) producers. Recently, a specialized subpopulation of T cells, CD4+/NK1.1+ cells, has been shown to produce large amounts of IL-4 upon stimulation. Two examples of mice with deficiencies in these cells are described--beta 2-microglobulin knockout mice and SJL mice. Both show defects in the development of IL-4-producing cells and in the increase in serum IgE in response to stimulation with the

  5. Prime Slaughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    of primality and factorization into playful interactions, addressed to primary and early secondary school children. Taking into account individual needs expressed by children regarding play, during a participatory design processes aimed at enhancing learning in museums, Prime Slaughter allows for multiple......Starting from the difficulty of creating playful representation of domain-specific abstract concepts, this study discusses the design of Prime Slaughter, a computer game aimed at facilitating individual sense-making of abstract mathematical concepts. Specifically the game proposes a transposition...

  6. Enhanced gastric cancer growth potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from gastric cancer tissues educated by CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongman; Zhao, Xiangdong; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Chen, Bin; Sun, Li; Xu, Changgen; Shen, Bo; Wang, Mei; Xu, Wenrong; Zhu, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Gastric cancer mesenchymal stem cells (GC-MSCs) can promote the development of tumour growth. The tumour-promoting role of tumour-associated MSCs and T cells has been demonstrated. T cells as the major immune cells may influence and induce a pro-tumour phenotype in MSCs. This study focused on whether CD4 + T cells can affect GC-MSCs to promote gastric cancer growth. CD4 + T cells upregulation of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in GC-MSCs through the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (p-STAT3) signalling pathway was confirmed by immunofluorescence, western blotting and RT-PCR. Migration of GC cells was detected by Transwell migration assay, and apoptosis of GC cells was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide double staining. CD4 + T cell-primed GC-MSCs promoted GC growth in a subcutaneously transplanted tumour model in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Gastric cancer mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by activated CD4 + T cells promoted migration of GC cells and enhanced GC growth potential in BALB/c nu/nu xenografts. PD-L1 upregulation of GC-MSCs stimulated by CD4 + T cells was mediated through the p-STAT3 signalling pathway. CD4 + T cells-primed GC-MSCs have greater GC volume and growth rate-promoting role than GC-MSCs, with cancer cell-intrinsic PD-1/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling activation. This study showed that GC-MSCs are plastic. The immunophenotype of GC-MSCs stimulated by CD4 + T cells has major changes that may influence tumour cell growth. This research was based on the interaction between tumour cells, MSCs and immune cells, providing a new understanding of the development and immunotherapy of GC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Malignant T cells express lymphotoxin alpha and drive endothelial activation in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Christensen, Louise; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    Lymphotoxin α (LTα) plays a key role in the formation of lymphatic vasculature and secondary lymphoid structures. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is the most common primary lymphoma of the skin and in advanced stages, malignant T cells spreads through the lymphatic to regional lymph nodes...

  8. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  9. Transfer of allogeneic CD4+ T cells rescues CD8+ T cells in anti-PD-L1–resistant tumors leading to tumor eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arina, Ainhoa; Karrison, Theodore; Galka, Eva; Schreiber, Karin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Schreiber, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells can stabilize the size of solid tumors over long periods of time by exclusively recognizing antigen cross-presented on tumor stroma. However, these tumors eventually escape T cell–mediated growth control. The aim of this study was to eradicate such persistent cancers. In our model, the SIYRYYGL antigen is expressed by cancer cells that lack the MHC-I molecule Kb needed for direct presentation, but the antigen is picked up and cross-presented by tumor stroma. A single injection of antigen-specific 2C CD8+ T cells caused long-term inhibition of tumor growth, but without further intervention, tumors started to progress after approximately 3 months. Escape was associated with reduced numbers of circulating 2C cells. Tumor-infiltrating 2C cells produced significantly less TNFα and expressed more of the “exhaustion” markers PD-1 and Tim-3 than T cells from lymphoid organs. High-dose local ionizing radiation, depletion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, infusions of additional 2C cells, and antibodies blocking PD-L1 did not prevent tumor escape. In contrast, adoptive transfer of allogeneic CD4+ T cells restored the numbers of circulating Ag-specific CD8+ T cells and their intratumoral function, resulting in tumor eradication. These CD4+ T cells had no antitumor effects in the absence of CD8+ T cells and recognized the alloantigen cross-presented on tumor stroma. CD4+ T cells might also be effective in cancer patients when PD1/PD-L1 blockade does not rescue intratumoral CD8+ T-cell function and tumors persist. PMID:28077434

  10. Synthetic biology approaches to engineer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J; Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-08-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral T cell lymphoma: Not otherwise specified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha H Pai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL is a heterogeneous group of hematological tumors originating from mature T cells, which constitutes less than 15% of all non-Hodgkins lymphomas in adults. Primary cutaneous PTCL-not otherwise specified (NOS represent a subgroup of PTCLs with no consistent immunophenotypic, genetic or clinical features. PTCL-NOS frequently has an aggressive course with a tendency for systemic involvement, however, a well-defined therapeutic and prognostic approach has not been outlined yet. We report a case of PTCL-NOS with multiple cutaneous lesions in a young adult male with an emphasis on the treatment modality used.

  12. Sex differences in T cells in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Ashlee J; Sullivan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and end-organ damage. There is a sex difference in blood pressure (BP) that begins in adolescence and continues into adulthood, in which men have a higher prevalence of hypertension compared with women until the sixth decade of life. Less than 50% of hypertensive adults in the United States manage to control their BP to recommended levels using current therapeutic options, and women are more likely than are men to have uncontrolled high BP. This, is despite the facts that more women compared with men are aware that they have hypertension and that women are more likely to seek treatment for the disease. Novel therapeutic targets need to be identified in both sexes to increase the percentage of hypertensive individuals with controlled BP. The purpose of this article was to review the available literature on the role of T cells in BP control in both sexes, and the potential therapeutic application/implications of targeting immune cells in hypertension. A search of PubMed was conducted to determine the impact of sex on T cell-mediated control of BP. The search terms included sex, gender, estrogen, testosterone, inflammation, T cells, T regulatory cells, Th17 cells, hypertension, and blood pressure. Additional data were included from our laboratory examinations of cytokine expression in the kidneys of male and female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and differential gene expression in both the renal cortex and mesenteric arterial bed of male and female SHRs. There is a growing scientific literature base regarding the role of T cells in the pathogenesis of hypertension and BP control; however, the majority of these studies have been performed exclusively in males, despite the fact that both men and women develop hypertension. There is increasing evidence that although T cells also mediate BP in females, there are distinct differences in both the T-cell profile and the functional impact of sex

  13. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. CCR6 is expressed on an IL-10-producing, autoreactive memory T cell population with context-dependent regulatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Gruarin, Paola; Häringer, Barbara; Steinfelder, Svenja; Lozza, Laura; Steckel, Bodo; Weick, Anja; Sugliano, Elisa; Jarrossay, David; Kühl, Anja A; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Abrignani, Sergio; Sallusto, Federica; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Geginat, Jens

    2010-03-15

    Interleukin (IL)-10 produced by regulatory T cell subsets is important for the prevention of autoimmunity and immunopathology, but little is known about the phenotype and function of IL-10-producing memory T cells. Human CD4(+)CCR6(+) memory T cells contained comparable numbers of IL-17- and IL-10-producing cells, and CCR6 was induced under both Th17-promoting conditions and upon tolerogenic T cell priming with transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In normal human spleens, the majority of CCR6(+) memory T cells were in the close vicinity of CCR6(+) myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs), and strikingly, some of them were secreting IL-10 in situ. Furthermore, CCR6(+) memory T cells produced suppressive IL-10 but not IL-2 upon stimulation with autologous immature mDCs ex vivo, and secreted IL-10 efficiently in response to suboptimal T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation with anti-CD3 antibodies. However, optimal TCR stimulation of CCR6(+) T cells induced expression of IL-2, interferon-gamma, CCL20, and CD40L, and autoreactive CCR6(+) T cell lines responded to various recall antigens. Notably, we isolated autoreactive CCR6(+) T cell clones with context-dependent behavior that produced IL-10 with autologous mDCs alone, but that secreted IL-2 and proliferated upon stimulation with tetanus toxoid. We propose the novel concept that a population of memory T cells, which is fully equipped to participate in secondary immune responses upon recognition of a relevant recall antigen, contributes to the maintenance of tolerance under steady-state conditions.

  15. Microglia Induce Neurotoxic IL-17+ γδ T Cells Dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Derkow

    Full Text Available Interleukin-17 (IL-17 acts as a key regulator in central nervous system (CNS inflammation. γδ T cells are an important innate source of IL-17. Both IL-17+ γδ T cells and microglia, the major resident immune cells of the brain, are involved in various CNS disorders such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. Also, activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways contributes to CNS damage. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation and interaction of these cellular and molecular components remain unclear.In this study, we investigated the crosstalk between γδ T cells and microglia activated by TLRs in the context of neuronal damage. To this end, co-cultures of IL-17+ γδ T cells, neurons, and microglia were analyzed by immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, ELISA and multiplex immunoassays.We report here that IL-17+ γδ T cells but not naïve γδ T cells induce a dose- and time-dependent decrease of neuronal viability in vitro. While direct stimulation of γδ T cells with various TLR ligands did not result in up-regulation of CD69, CD25, or in IL-17 secretion, supernatants of microglia stimulated by ligands specific for TLR2, TLR4, TLR7, or TLR9 induced activation of γδ T cells through IL-1β and IL-23, as indicated by up-regulation of CD69 and CD25 and by secretion of vast amounts of IL-17. This effect was dependent on the TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88 expressed by both γδ T cells and microglia, but did not require the expression of TLRs by γδ T cells. Similarly to cytokine-primed IL-17+ γδ T cells, IL-17+ γδ T cells induced by supernatants derived from TLR-activated microglia also caused neurotoxicity in vitro. While these neurotoxic effects required stimulation of TLR2, TLR4, or TLR9 in microglia, neuronal injury mediated by bone marrow-derived macrophages did not require TLR signaling. Neurotoxicity mediated by IL-17+ γδ T cells required a direct cell-cell contact between T

  16. Antigen localization controls T cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; van Maren, Wendy W C; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Den Brok, Martijn H M G M; Wagenaars, Jori A L; van der Schaaf, Alie; Jansen, Eric J R; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde; Figdor, Carl G; Adema, Gosse J

    2011-08-01

    Effective antitumor immunotherapy requires the identification of suitable target Ags. Interestingly, many of the tumor Ags used in clinical trials are present in preparations of secreted tumor vesicles (exosomes). In this study, we compared T cell responses elicited by murine MCA101 fibrosarcoma tumors expressing a model Ag at different localizations within the tumor cell in association with secreted vesicles (exosomes), as a nonsecreted cell-associated protein, or as secreted soluble protein. Remarkably, we demonstrated that only the tumor-secreting vesicle-bound Ag elicited a strong Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell response, CD4(+) T cell help, Ag-specific Abs, and a decrease in the percentage of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells in the tumor. Moreover, in a therapeutic tumor model of cryoablation, only in tumors secreting vesicle-bound Ag could Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells still be detected up to 16 d after therapy. We concluded that the localization of an Ag within the tumor codetermines whether a robust immunostimulatory response is elicited. In vivo, vesicle-bound Ag clearly skews toward a more immunogenic phenotype, whereas soluble or cell-associated Ag expression cannot prevent or even delay outgrowth and results in tumor tolerance. This may explain why particular immunotherapies based on these vesicle-bound tumor Ags are potentially successful. Therefore, we conclude that this study may have significant implications in the discovery of new tumor Ags suitable for immunotherapy and that their location should be taken into account to ensure a strong antitumor immune response.

  17. Proinflammatory T Cell Status Associated with Early Life Adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwenspoek, Martha M C; Hengesch, Xenia; Leenen, Fleur A D; Schritz, Anna; Sias, Krystel; Schaan, Violetta K; Mériaux, Sophie B; Schmitz, Stephanie; Bonnemberger, Fanny; Schächinger, Hartmut; Vögele, Claus; Turner, Jonathan D; Muller, Claude P

    2017-12-15

    Early life adversity (ELA) has been associated with an increased risk for diseases in which the immune system plays a critical role. The ELA immune phenotype is characterized by inflammation, impaired cellular immunity, and immunosenescence. However, data on cell-specific immune effects are largely absent. Additionally, stress systems and health behaviors are altered in ELA, which may contribute to the generation of the ELA immune phenotype. The present investigation tested cell-specific immune differences in relationship to the ELA immune phenotype, altered stress parameters, and health behaviors in individuals with ELA ( n = 42) and those without a history of ELA (control, n = 73). Relative number and activation status (CD25, CD69, HLA-DR, CD11a, CD11b) of monocytes, NK cells, B cells, T cells, and their main subsets were assessed by flow cytometry. ELA was associated with significantly reduced numbers of CD69 + CD8 + T cells ( p = 0.022), increased numbers of HLA-DR + CD4 and HLA-DR + CD8 T cells ( p ELA also showed a trend toward higher numbers of CCR4 + CXCR3 - CCR6 + CD4 T cells. Taken together, our data suggest an elevated state of immune activation in ELA, in which particularly T cells are affected. Although several aspects of the ELA immune phenotype were related to increased activation markers, neither stress nor health-risk behaviors explained the observed group differences. Thus, the state of immune activation in ELA does not seem to be secondary to alterations in the stress system or health-risk behaviors, but rather a primary effect of early life programming on immune cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  19. The immunoregulatory role of CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells in disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van der HJ; Molling, J.W.; Blomberg - van der Flier, von B.M.E.; Nishi, N.; Kolgen, W; Eertwegh, van den A.J.M.; Pinedo, H.M.; Giaccone, G.; Scheper, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells constitute a T cell subpopulation that shares several characteristics with NK cells. NKT cells are characterized by a narrow T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire, recognize glycolipid antigen in the context of the monomorphic CD1d antigen-presenting molecule, and

  20. A dynamic course of T cell defects in individuals at risk for mood disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, G.; Schiweck, C.; Mesman, E.; Grosse, L.; De Wit, H.; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    Objectives: T cell abnormalities have been repeatedly reported in adult patients with mood disorders, suggesting a role of these cells in the pathogenesis of these disorders. In the present study, we explored the dynamics of circulating T cell subsets over time in a population at high familial risk

  1. A dynamic course of T cell defects in individuals at risk for mood disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, G.; Schiweck, C.; Mesman, E.; Grosse, L.; De Wit, H.; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: T cell abnormalities have been repeatedly reported in adult patients with mood disorders, suggesting a role of these cells in the pathogenesis of these disorders. In the present study, we explored the dynamics of circulating T cell subsets over time in a population at high familial risk

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (Car T Cell Therapy In Hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Ataca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well demonstrated that immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and cause less off-target toxicities. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR modified T cells. On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the beneficiaries of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical-clinical studies, effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  3. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  4. T Cell Phenotype and T Cell Receptor Repertoire in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Patas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While a link between inflammation and the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD is supported by a growing body of evidence, little is known about the contribution of aberrant adaptive immunity in this context. Here, we conducted in-depth characterization of T cell phenotype and T cell receptor (TCR repertoire in MDD. For this cross-sectional case–control study, we recruited antidepressant-free patients with MDD without any somatic or psychiatric comorbidities (n = 20, who were individually matched for sex, age, body mass index, and smoking status to a non-depressed control subject (n = 20. T cell phenotype and repertoire were interrogated using a combination of flow cytometry, gene expression analysis, and next generation sequencing. T cells from MDD patients showed significantly lower surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, which are known to be central to T cell differentiation and trafficking. In addition, we observed a shift within the CD4+ T cell compartment characterized by a higher frequency of CD4+CD25highCD127low/− cells and higher FOXP3 mRNA expression in purified CD4+ T cells obtained from patients with MDD. Finally, flow cytometry-based TCR Vβ repertoire analysis indicated a less diverse CD4+ T cell repertoire in MDD, which was corroborated by next generation sequencing of the TCR β chain CDR3 region. Overall, these results suggest that T cell phenotype and TCR utilization are skewed on several levels in patients with MDD. Our study identifies putative cellular and molecular signatures of dysregulated adaptive immunity and reinforces the notion that T cells are a pathophysiologically relevant cell population in this disorder.

  5. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Early programming and late-acting checkpoints governing the development of CD4 T cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhume, Kunal; McKinstry, K Kai

    2018-04-27

    CD4 T cells contribute to protection against pathogens through numerous mechanisms. Incorporating the goal of memory CD4 T cell generation into vaccine strategies thus offers a powerful approach to improve their efficacy, especially in situations where humoral responses alone cannot confer long-term immunity. These threats include viruses such as influenza that mutate coat proteins to avoid neutralizing antibodies, but that are targeted by T cells that recognize more conserved protein epitopes shared by different strains. A major barrier in the design of such vaccines is that the mechanisms controlling the efficiency with which memory cells form remain incompletely understood. Here, we discuss recent insights into fate decisions controlling memory generation. We focus on the importance of three general cues: interleukin-2, antigen, and costimulatory interactions. It is increasingly clear that these signals have a powerful influence on the capacity of CD4 T cells to form memory during two distinct phases of the immune response. First, through 'programming' that occurs during initial priming, and second, through 'checkpoints' that operate later during the effector stage. These findings indicate that novel vaccine strategies must seek to optimize cognate interactions, during which interleukin-2-, antigen, and costimulation-dependent signals are tightly linked, well beyond initial antigen encounter to induce robust memory CD4 T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. T cell cytokine responses to stimulation with Ureaplasma parvum in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Yael D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey F; Nathan, Elizabeth A; Watts, Rory; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Payne, Matthew S; Ireland, Demelza J

    2016-08-01

    Ureaplasma spp. are a common vaginal microorganism causally linked to inflammation-driven preterm birth (PTB). The nature of the immune response to Ureaplasma spp. may influence PTB risk. This study sought to define maternal T cell cytokine responses to in vitro stimulation with Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3 (UpSV3) in vaginally colonised (UP+) and non-colonised (UP-) pregnant women. Whole blood flow cytometry demonstrated an increase (p=0.027) in the baseline frequency of IFNγ-positive CD3(+)CD4(-)(CD8(+)) T cells in UP+ women. UpSV3 stimulation resulted in a significant and specific increase (p=0.001) in the frequency of IFNγ-positive CD3(+)CD4(-)(CD8(+)) T cells, regardless of vaginal colonisation status. UpSV3 stimulation also increased the frequency of IFNγ-positive CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells, particularly in the UP+ group (p=0.003). This is the first published study to examine T cell responses to Ureaplasma spp. Future appropriately-powered studies are needed to assess whether insufficient priming or a loss of tolerance to Ureaplasma spp. is occurring in UP+ women at risk of PTB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. APRIL modulates B and T cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Jens V.; López-Fraga, Marta; Elustondo, Fernando A.; Carvalho-Pinto, Carla E.; Rodríguez, Dolores; Gómez-Caro, Ruth; de Jong, Joan; Martínez-A, Carlos; Medema, Jan Paul; Hahne, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The TNF-like ligands APRIL and BLyS are close relatives and share the capacity to bind the receptors TACI and BCMA. BLyS has been shown to play an important role in B cell homeostasis and autoimmunity, but the biological role of APRIL remains less well defined. Analysis of T cells revealed an

  9. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieffer, Tom E. C.; Faas, Marijke M.; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Prins, Jelmer R.

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the

  10. Antigen-driven T-cell turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, Christophe; Ferguson, Neil M.; de Wolf, Frank; Ghani, Azra C.; Garnett, Geoff P.; Anderson, Roy M.

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to characterize the distribution of cell turnover rates within a population of T lymphocytes. Previous models of T-cell dynamics have assumed a constant uniform turnover rate; here we consider turnover in a cell pool subject to clonal proliferation in response to

  11. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  13. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  14. Thioredoxin priming prolongs lung allograft survival by promoting immune tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanbo Hu

    Full Text Available Tolerance to allograft antigen is the major challenge and final goal of transplant medicine. Our previous study demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 (Trx priming of donor lung significantly protected allogeneic lung graft. To determine whether Trx priming of donor lung inhibits allograft rejection, extends allograft survival and induces immune tolerance, orthotopic left lung transplantation was performed from Lewis to Sprague-Dawley rats without immunosuppression. Donor lungs were primed with Trx at 4°C for 4 hr prior to transplantation. After up to 37 days post-transplantation, allograft lung morphology, recipient T cell and humoral alloantigen-specific immune responses were examined. We found that Trx-primed lungs exhibited much reduced acute rejection and associated lung injuries resulting in loss of graft functional area at 5-37 days post-transplant in contrast to the control groups. CD4+ T cells from the recipients with Trx-primed grafts responded to the stimulation of dendritic cells (DCs of donor origin, in contrast to DCs from the third party, with significantly reduced proliferation. Consistent with above findings, we observed that CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in spleen cells from the recipients with Trx-primed grafts were significantly increased compared to controls, and CD4+ T cells from the recipients with Trx-primed grafts produced much higher levels of immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10 when stimulated with allogeneic donor DCs. In addition, humoral immune tolerance was also induced as there was no significant increase levels of serum antibodies against donor antigens in Trx-lung recipients when re-challenged with allogeneic donor antigens. Our results demonstrate that one-time Trx-priming of donor lung grafts prior to transplantation significantly prolongs the survival of the grafts through inducing or promoting cellular and humoral alloantigen-specific immune tolerance, which might be associated with the induction of

  15. Insights into cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity after CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jordan; Turtle, Cameron J

    2018-04-03

    T-cells engineered to express CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CD19 CAR-T cells) can achieve high response rates in patients with refractory/relapsed (R/R) CD19+ hematologic malignancies. Nonetheless, the efficacy of CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy can be offset by significant toxicities, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity. In this report of our presentation at the 2018 Second French International Symposium on CAR-T cells (CAR-T day), we describe the clinical presentations of CRS and neurotoxicity in a cohort of 133 adults treated with CD19 CAR-T cells at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and provide insights into the mechanisms contributing to these toxicities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. CD4+CD62L+ Central Memory T Cells Can Be Converted to Foxp3+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Chang Li, Xian; Xiao, Xiang; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral Foxp3+ Treg pool consists of naturally arising Treg (nTreg) and adaptive Treg cells (iTreg). It is well known that naive CD4+ T cells can be readily converted to Foxp3+ iTreg in vitro, and memory CD4+ T cells are resistant to conversion. In this study, we investigated the induction of Foxp3+ T cells from various CD4+ T-cell subsets in human peripheral blood. Though naive CD4+ T cells were readily converted to Foxp3+ T cells with TGF-β and IL-2 treatment in vitro, such Foxp3+ T cells did not express the memory marker CD45RO as do Foxp3+ T cells induced in the peripheral blood of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) patients. Interestingly, a subset of human memory CD4+ T cells, defined as CD62L+ central memory T cells, could be induced by TGF-β to differentiate into Foxp3+ T cells. It is well known that Foxp3+ T cells derived from human CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro are lack suppressive functions. Our data about the suppressive functions of CD4+CD62L+ central memory T cell-derived Foxp3+ T cells support this conception, and an epigenetic analysis of these cells showed a similar methylation pattern in the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylated region as the naive CD4+ T cell-derived Foxp3+ T cells. But further research showed that mouse CD4+ central memory T cells also could be induced to differentiate into Foxp3+ T cells, such Foxp3+ T cells could suppress the proliferation of effector T cells. Thus, our study identified CD4+CD62L+ central memory T cells as a novel potential source of iTreg. PMID:24155942

  17. Interleukin 17-producing γδT cells promote hepatic regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra; Graffeo, Christopher S; Gulati, Rishabh; Jamal, Mohsin; Narayan, Suchithra; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Barilla, Rocky; Deutsch, Michael; Greco, Stephanie H; Ochi, Atsuo; Tomkötter, Lena; Blobstein, Reuven; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel M; Gelbstein, Yisroel; Van Heerden, Eliza; Miller, George

    2014-08-01

    Subsets of leukocytes synergize with regenerative growth factors to promote hepatic regeneration. γδT cells are early responders to inflammation-induced injury in a number of contexts. We investigated the role of γδT cells in hepatic regeneration using mice with disruptions in Tcrd (encodes the T-cell receptor δ chain) and Clec7a (encodes C-type lectin domain family 7 member a, also known as DECTIN1). We performed partial hepatectomies on wild-type C57BL/6, CD45.1, Tcrd(-/-), or Clec7a(-/-) mice. Cells were isolated from livers of patients and mice via mechanical and enzymatic digestion. γδT cells were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In mice, partial hepatectomy up-regulated expression of CCL20 and ligands of Dectin-1, which was associated with recruitment and activation of γδT cells and their increased production of interleukin (IL)-17 family cytokines. Recruited γδT cells induced production of IL-6 by antigen-presenting cells and suppressed expression of interferon gamma by natural killer T cells, promoting hepatocyte proliferation. Absence of IL-17-producing γδT cells or deletion of Dectin-1 prevented development of regenerative phenotypes in subsets of innate immune cells. This slowed liver regeneration and was associated with reduced expression of regenerative growth factors and cell cycle regulators. Conversely, exogenous administration of IL-17 family cytokines or Dectin-1 ligands promoted regeneration. More broadly, we found that γδT cells are required for inflammatory responses mediated by IL-17 and Dectin-1. γδT cells regulate hepatic regeneration by producing IL-22 and IL-17, which have direct mitogenic effects on hepatocytes and promote a regenerative phenotype in hepatic leukocytes, respectively. Dectin-1 ligation is required for γδT cells to promote hepatic regeneration. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Suppression of pro-inflammatory T-cell responses by human mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chan-Yu; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Moser, Bernhard; Topley, Nicholas; Eberl, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    Human γδ T cells reactive to the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP) contribute to acute inflammatory responses. We have previously shown that peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated infections with HMB-PP producing bacteria are characterized by locally elevated γδ T-cell frequencies and poorer clinical outcome compared with HMB-PP negative infections, implying that γδ T cells may be of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic value in acute disease. The regulation by local tissue cells of these potentially detrimental γδ T-cell responses remains to be investigated. Freshly isolated γδ or αβ T cells were cultured with primary mesothelial cells derived from omental tissue, or with mesothelial cell-conditioned medium. Stimulation of cytokine production and proliferation by peripheral T cells in response to HMB-PP or CD3/CD28 beads was assessed by flow cytometry. Resting mesothelial cells were potent suppressors of pro-inflammatory γδ T cells as well as CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T cells. The suppression of γδ T-cell responses was mediated through soluble factors released by primary mesothelial cells and could be counteracted by SB-431542, a selective inhibitor of TGF-β and activin signalling. Recombinant TGF-β1 but not activin-A mimicked the mesothelial cell-mediated suppression of γδ T-cell responses to HMB-PP. The present findings indicate an important regulatory function of mesothelial cells in the peritoneal cavity by dampening pro-inflammatory T-cell responses, which may help preserve the tissue integrity of the peritoneal membrane in the steady state and possibly during the resolution of acute inflammation.

  19. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses in MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, JS; Guidon, A; Sparks, S; Osborne, R; Juel, VC; Massey, JM; Sanders, DB; Weinhold, KJ; Guptill, JT

    2014-01-01

    Muscle specific tyrosine kinase myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is a form of autoimmune MG that predominantly affects women and has unique clinical features, including prominent bulbar weakness, muscle atrophy, and excellent response to therapeutic plasma exchange. Patients with MuSK MG have predominantly IgG4 autoantibodies directed against MuSK on the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Lymphocyte functionality has not been reported in this condition. The goal of this study was to characterize T-cell responses in patients with MuSK MG. Intracellular production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21 by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells was measured by polychromatic flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 11 Musk MG patients and 10 healthy controls. Only one MuSK MG patient was not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) were also included in our analysis to determine if changes in T cell function were due to altered Treg frequencies. CD8+ T-cells from MuSK MG patients had higher frequencies of polyfunctional responses than controls, and CD4+ T-cells had higher IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IL-17. MuSK MG patients had a higher percentage of CD4+ T-cells producing combinations of IFN-gamma/IL-2/TNF-gamma, TNF-alpha/IL-2, and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha. Interestingly, Treg numbers and CD39 expression were not different from control values. MuSK MG patients had increased frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cytokines and were primed for polyfunctional proinflammatory responses that cannot be explained by a defect in Treg function or number. PMID:24378287

  20. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christina M.; Comrie, William A.; Hyun, Young-Min; Chung, Hung-Li; Fedorchuk, Christine A.; Lim, Kihong; Brakebusch, Cord; McGrath, James L.; Waugh, Richard E.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Kim, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells to arrive in the correct location following chemokine gradients (“go” signal) as well as to receive appropriate T-cell receptor (TCR) activation signals upon cognate antigen recognition (“stop” signal). However, the mechanisms by which T cells regulate these go and stop signals remain unclear. We found that overexpression of the hematopoietic-specific RhoH protein in the presence of chemokine signals resulted in decreased Rap1–GTP and LFA-1 adhesiveness to ICAM-1, thus impairing T-cell chemotaxis; while in the presence of TCR signals, there were enhanced and sustained Rap1–GTP and LFA-1 activation as well as prolonged T:APC conjugates. RT-PCR analyses of activated CD4+ T cells and live images of T-cell migration and immunological synapse (IS) formation revealed that functions of RhoH took place primarily at the levels of transcription and intracellular distribution. Thus, we conclude that RhoH expression provides a key molecular determinant that allows T cells to switch between sensing chemokine-mediated go signals and TCR-dependent stop signals. PMID:22689994

  1. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis

    2006-01-01

    Neurons have been neglected as cells with a major immune-regulatory function because they do not express major histocompatibility complex class II. Our data show that neurons are highly immune regulatory, having a crucial role in governing T-cell response and central nervous system (CNS) inflamma......Neurons have been neglected as cells with a major immune-regulatory function because they do not express major histocompatibility complex class II. Our data show that neurons are highly immune regulatory, having a crucial role in governing T-cell response and central nervous system (CNS......) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between...... neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to CD25+ TGF-beta1+ CTLA-4+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells that suppress encephalitogenic T cells and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Suppression is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4...

  2. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  3. Natural killer T cells in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, Godfrey S; VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A

    2011-01-01

    Cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system participate in the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of medium and large arteries. Natural killer T (NKT) cells express surface markers characteristic of natural killer cells and conventional T cells and bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. The development and activation of NKT cells is dependent upon CD1d, a MHC-class I-type molecule that presents lipids, especially glycolipids to the TCR on NKT cells...

  4. Programmed Death-1 expression on Epstein Barr virus specific CD8+ T cells varies by stage of infection, epitope specificity, and T-cell receptor usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Greenough

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programmed Death-1 (PD-1 is an inhibitory member of the CD28 family of molecules expressed on CD8+ T cells in response to antigenic stimulation. To better understand the role of PD-1 in antiviral immunity we examined the expression of PD-1 on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells during acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM and convalescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flow cytometry, we observed higher frequencies of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells and higher intensity of PD-1 expression on EBV-specific CD8+ T cells during AIM than during convalescence. PD-1 expression during AIM directly correlated with viral load and with the subsequent degree of CD8+ T cell contraction in convalescence. Consistent differences in PD-1 expression were observed between CD8+ T cells with specificity for two different EBV lytic antigen epitopes. Similar differences were observed in the degree to which PD-1 was upregulated on these epitope-specific CD8+ T cells following peptide stimulation in vitro. EBV epitope-specific CD8+ T cell proliferative responses to peptide stimulation were diminished during AIM regardless of PD-1 expression and were unaffected by blocking PD-1 interactions with PD-L1. Significant variability in PD-1 expression was observed on EBV epitope-specific CD8+ T cell subsets defined by V-beta usage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that PD-1 expression is not only dependent on the degree of antigen presentation, but also on undefined characteristics of the responding cell that segregate with epitope specificity and V-beta usage.

  5. CD4+ Primary T Cells Expressing HCV-Core Protein Upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, Suppressing CD4 and CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127lowPD-1highTIM-3high regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein. PMID:24465502

  6. CD4+ primary T cells expressing HCV-core protein upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, suppressing CD4 and CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Fernandez-Ponce

    Full Text Available Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127(lowPD-1(highTIM-3(high regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein.

  7. HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors exist in a CD28-CD8+ T cell subset and increase with loss of CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D E; Yang, L; Luo, W; Wang, X; Rodgers, J R

    1999-06-18

    To determine whether the CD28-CD8+ T cells that develop during HIV infection contain HIV-specific cytotoxic precursor cells. CD8 subpopulations from six asymptomatic HIV-positive adults, with varying degrees of CD4 T cell loss, were sorted by flow cytometry and HIV-specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocyte frequencies were measured. Three populations of CD8 T cells were tested: CD28+CD5-- T cells, CD28-CD57+ T cells (thought to be memory cells) and CD28-CD57- T cells (function unknown). Sorted CD8 subsets were stimulated with antigen presenting cells expressing HIV-1 Gag/Pol molecules. Cytotoxic T cell assays on Gag/Pol expressing 51Cr-labeled Epstein-Barr virus transformed autologous B cells lines or control targets were performed after 2 weeks. Specific lysis and precursor frequencies were calculated. Both CD28 positive and CD28-CD57+ populations contained appreciable numbers of precursors (9-1720 per 10(6) CD8+ T cells). However, the CD28-CD57- population had fewer precursors in five out of six people studied. More CD28 positive HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors were found in patients with CD4:CD8 ratios > 1, whereas more CD28-CD57+ precursors were found in patients whose CD4:CD8 ratios were < 1 (r2, 0.68). Memory HIV-specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes are found in both CD28 positive and CD28-CD8+ cells, however, a CD28-CD57- subpopulation had fewer. Because CD28-CD57+ cells are antigen-driven with limited diversity, the loss of CD28 on CD8 T cells during disease progression may reduce the response to new HIV mutations; this requires further testing.

  8. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, D. M.; Kater, A. P.; Hazenberg, M. D.; Hagenbeek, A.; Kersten, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be

  9. Ability of γδ T cells to modulate the Foxp3 T cell response is dependent on adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchun Liang

    Full Text Available Whether γδ T cells inhibit or enhance the Foxp3 T cell response depends upon their activation status. The critical enhancing effector in the supernatant is adenosine. Activated γδ T cells express adenosine receptors at high levels, which enables them to deprive Foxp3+ T cells of adenosine, and to inhibit their expansion. Meanwhile, cell-free supernatants of γδ T cell cultures enhance Foxp3 T cell expansion. Thus, inhibition and enhancement by γδ T cells of Foxp3 T cell response are a reflection of the balance between adenosine production and absorption by γδ T cells. Non-activated γδ T cells produce adenosine but bind little, and thus enhance the Foxp3 T cell response. Activated γδ T cells express high density of adenosine receptors and have a greatly increased ability to bind adenosine. Extracellular adenosine metabolism and expression of adenosine receptor A2ARs by γδ T cells played a major role in the outcome of γδ and Foxp3 T cell interactions. A better understanding of the functional conversion of γδ T cells could lead to γδ T cell-targeted immunotherapies for related diseases.

  10. Prime Slaughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    of primality and factorization into playful interactions, addressed to primary and early secondary school children. Taking into account individual needs expressed by children regarding play, during a participatory design processes aimed at enhancing learning in museums, Prime Slaughter allows for multiple...... forms of play and their integration. A simple working prototype has already been developed; it will be tested and re-designed through participatory workshops, involving a group of children in our target group....

  11. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease.

  12. Cancer Immunotherapy Using CAR-T Cells: From the Research Bench to the Assembly Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Silva, Diogo; Ramos, Carlos A

    2018-02-01

    The focus of cancer treatment has recently shifted toward targeted therapies, including immunotherapy, which allow better individualization of care and are hoped to increase the probability of success for patients. Specifically, T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs; CAR-T cells) have generated exciting results. Recent clinical successes with this cutting-edge therapy have helped to push CAR-T cells toward approval for wider use. However, several limitations need to be addressed before the widespread use of CAR-T cells as a standard treatment. Here, a succinct background on adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT)is given. A brief overview of the structure of CARs, how they are introduced into T cells, and how CAR-T cell expansion and selection is achieved in vitro is then presented. Some of the challenges in CAR design are discussed, as well as the difficulties that arise in large-scale CAR-T cell manufacture that will need to be addressed to achieve successful commercialization of this type of cell therapy. Finally, developments already on the horizon are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Direct Ex Vivo Analysis of Activated, Fas-sensitive Autoreactive T Cells in Human Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowska, Katarzyna D.; Ausubel, Lara J.; Modabber, Yalda; Slovik, Elissa; Messersmith, Wells; Hafler, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of clonally expanded and persistent T cells recognizing the immunodominant autoantigenic peptide of myelin basic protein (MBP)p85-99 was directly measured ex vivo in subjects with typical relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). T cells expressing mRNA transcripts encoding T cell receptor (TCR)-α and -β chains found in T cell clones previously isolated from these subjects recognizing the MBPp85-99 epitope were examined. In contrast to frequencies of 1 in 105–106 as measured by limiting dilution analysis, estimates of the T cell frequencies expressing MBPp85-99–associated TCR chain transcripts were as high as 1 in 300. These high frequencies were confirmed by performing PCR on single T cells isolated by flow cytometry. MBPp85-99 TCR transcripts were present in IL-2 receptor α–positive T cells which were induced to undergo Fas-mediated cell death upon antigen stimulation. These data demonstrate that at least a subpopulation of patients with MS can have a very high frequency of activated autoreactive T cells. PMID:9151896

  14. Andrographolide Ameliorate Rheumatoid Arthritis by Promoting the Development of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaimin Rifa’i

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide is important material present in Andrographis paniculata. This material can promote T cell to develop into regulatory T cell, CD4+CD25+. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells, a component of the innate immune response, which play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, have become the focus of numerous studies over the last decade. These cells have the potential to be exploited to treat autoimmune disease. These cells inhibit the immune response in an Ag-nonspecific manner, interacting with other T cells. These T cell populations actively control the properties of other immune cells by suppressing their functional activity to prevent autoimmunity but also influence the immune response to allergens as well as against tumor cells and pathogens. In this experiment we showed that active compound from Andrographis paniculata namely andrographolide can induce active regulatory T cell that has an efficacy to cure rheumatoid arthritis mice model.

  15. Association of inclusion body myositis with T cell large granular lymphocytic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberg, Steven A; Pinkus, Jack L; Amato, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    SEE HOHLFELD AND SCHULZE-KOOPS DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW053 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Inclusion body myositis and T cell large granular lymphocytic leukaemia are rare diseases involving pathogenic cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. After encountering four patients with both disorders, we...... prospectively screened 38 patients with inclusion body myositis for the presence of expanded large granular lymphocyte populations by standard clinical laboratory methods (flow cytometry, examination of blood smears, and T cell receptor gene rearrangements), and performed muscle immunohistochemistry for CD8, CD......57, and TIA1. Most (22/38; 58%) patients with inclusion body myositis had aberrant populations of large granular lymphocytes in their blood meeting standard diagnostic criteria for T cell large granular lymphocytic leukaemia. These T cell populations were clonal in 20/20 patients and stably present...

  16. The role of cytokine signaling in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    abraham, Robert; Zhang, Qiang; Ødum, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) displays immunosuppressive properties and phenotypic plasticity. The malignant T cells in CTCL can possess features of immunomodulating regulatory T cells (Treg) and IL-17-producing helper T cells (Th17) depending on the stimuli they receive from antigen presenting...... therapeutic agents may potentially exploit the phenotypic plasticity of CTCL such that the malignant T cells become vulnerable to antitumor immunity....... cells and other sources. IL-2-type cytokines activate STAT5 to promote expression of Treg-related FoxP3, while various cytokines can activate STAT3 to induce synthesis of IL-10 and IL-17. When the Treg phenotype is activated in the early stages of CTCL, “immune evasion” can occur, allowing the clonal T...

  17. Accessing complexity: the dynamics of virus-specific T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, P C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2000-01-01

    -specific CD8(+ )T cells. Analysis to date with both naturally acquired and experimentally induced infections has established that the numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells present during both the acute and memory phases of the host response are more than tenfold in excess of previously suspected values....... The levels are such that the virus-specific CD8(+) set is readily detected in the human peripheral blood lymphocyte compartment, particularly during persistent infections. Experimentally, it is now possible to measure the extent of cycling for tetramer (+)CD8(+) T cells during the acute and memory phases...... of the host response to viruses. Dissection of the phenotypic, functional, and molecular diversity of CD8(+) T cell populations has been greatly facilitated. It is hoped it will also soon be possible to analyze CD4(+) T cell populations in this way. Though these are early days and there is an enormous amount...

  18. CXCR5-Dependent Entry of CD8 T Cells into Rhesus Macaque B-Cell Follicles Achieved through T-Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Victor I; Deleage, Claire; Trivett, Matthew T; Jain, Sumiti; Coren, Lori V; Breed, Matthew W; Kramer, Joshua A; Thomas, James A; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Ott, David E

    2017-06-01

    Follicular helper CD4 T cells, T FH , residing in B-cell follicles within secondary lymphoid tissues, are readily infected by AIDS viruses and are a major source of persistent virus despite relative control of viral replication. This persistence is due at least in part to a relative exclusion of effective antiviral CD8 T cells from B-cell follicles. To determine whether CD8 T cells could be engineered to enter B-cell follicles, we genetically modified unselected CD8 T cells to express CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), the chemokine receptor implicated in cellular entry into B-cell follicles. Engineered CD8 T cells expressing human CXCR5 (CD8 hCXCR5 ) exhibited ligand-specific signaling and chemotaxis in vitro Six infected rhesus macaques were infused with differentially fluorescent dye-labeled autologous CD8 hCXCR5 and untransduced CD8 T cells and necropsied 48 h later. Flow cytometry of both spleen and lymph node samples revealed higher frequencies of CD8 hCXCR5 than untransduced cells, consistent with preferential trafficking to B-cell follicle-containing tissues. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of thin-sectioned lymphoid tissues demonstrated strong preferential localization of CD8 hCXCR5 T cells within B-cell follicles with only rare cells in extrafollicular locations. CD8 hCXCR5 T cells were present throughout the follicles with some observed near infected T FH In contrast, untransduced CD8 T cells were found in the extrafollicular T-cell zone. Our ability to direct localization of unselected CD8 T cells into B-cell follicles using CXCR5 expression provides a strategy to place highly effective virus-specific CD8 T cells into these AIDS virus sanctuaries and potentially suppress residual viral replication. IMPORTANCE AIDS virus persistence in individuals under effective drug therapy or those who spontaneously control viremia remains an obstacle to definitive treatment. Infected follicular helper CD4 T cells, T FH , present inside B-cell follicles represent a

  19. LAG-3 Represents a Marker of CD4+ T Cells with Regulatory Activity in Patients with Bone Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ti, Yunfan; Wang, Yicun; Guo, Guodong; Jiang, Hui; Chang, Menghan; Qian, Hongbo; Zhao, Jianning; Sun, Guojing

    2018-04-19

    The lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) is a CD4 homolog with binding affinity to MHC class II molecules. It is thought that LAG-3 exerts a bimodal function, such that co-ligation of LAG-3 and CD3 could deliver an inhibitory signal in conventional T cells, whereas, on regulatory T cells, LAG-3 expression could promote their inhibitory function. In this study, we investigated the role of LAG-3 expression on CD4 + T cells in patients with long bone fracture. We found that LAG-3 + cells represented approximately 13% of peripheral blood CD4 + T cells on average. Compared to LAG-3 - CD4 + T cells, LAG-3 + CD4 + T cells presented significantly higher Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression. Directly ex vivo or with TCR stimulation, LAG-3 + CD4 + T cells expressed significantly higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-β than LAG-3 - CD4 + T cells. Interestingly, blocking the LAG-3-MHC class II interaction actually increased the IL-10 expression by LAG-3 + CD4 + T cells. The frequency of LAG-3 + CD4 + T cell was positively correlated with restoration of healthy bone function in long bone fracture patients. These results together suggested that LAG-3 is a marker of CD4 + T cells with regulatory function; at the same time, LAG-3 might have limited the full suppressive potential of Treg cells.

  20. Rapid selection of escape mutants by the first CD8 T cell responses in acute HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The recent failure of a vaccine that primes T cell responses to control primary HIV-1 infection has raised doubts about the role of CD8+ T cells in early HIV-1 infection. We studied four patients who were identified shortly after HIV-1 infection and before seroconversion. In each patient there was very rapid selection of multiple HIV-1 escape mutants in the transmitted virus by CD8 T cells, including examples of complete fixation of non-synonymous substitutions within 2 weeks. Sequencing by single genome amplification suggested that the high rate of virus replication in acute infection gave a selective advantage to virus molecules that contained simultaneous and gained sequential T cell escape mutations. These observations show that whilst early HIV-1 specific CD8 T cells can act against virus, rapid escape means that these T cell responses are unlikely to benefit the patient and may in part explain why current HIV-1 T cell vaccines may not be protective.