WorldWideScience

Sample records for prerequisites learning objectives

  1. Students' Perceptions on Intrapreneurship Education--Prerequisites for Learning Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansikas, Juha; Murphy, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to understand the prerequisites for learning organisations (LO) as perceived by university students. Intrapreneurship education offers possibilities to increase student's adaptation of learning organisation's climate and behaviour. By analysing students' perceptions, more information about learning organisation…

  2. Students' Perceptions on Intrapreneurship Education--Prerequisites for Learning Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansikas, Juha; Murphy, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to understand the prerequisites for learning organisations (LO) as perceived by university students. Intrapreneurship education offers possibilities to increase student's adaptation of learning organisation's climate and behaviour. By analysing students' perceptions, more information about learning organisation…

  3. LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS: PREREQUISITE FOR SUCCESSFUL TOURISM ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa Kraleva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, each and every organization, including the tourism organizations should be learning organizations. The globalization and the competition affect the process of working of tourism organizations, where only the organizations which have knowledge, and are learning organizations can succeed. In a time of constant change, tourism organizations can have a competitive advantage only if they can do something or offer something different than their competitors. Many organizations in order to enable the learning process, should firstly undertake changes in the organization design, the organizational culture and the leadership style. The paper discusses the relevance of implementing the process of learning organizations as a concept for successful tourism organizations.

  4. Learning organizations: Prerequisite for successful tourism organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Natasa Kraleva

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, each and every organization, including the tourism organizations should be learning organizations. The globalization and the competition affect the process of working of tourism organizations, where only the organizations which have knowledge, and are learning organizations can succeed. In a time of constant change, tourism organizations can have a competitive advantage only if they can do something or offer something different than their competitors. Many organizations in order to ...

  5. LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS: PREREQUISITE FOR SUCCESSFUL TOURISM ORGANIZATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Natasa Kraleva

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, each and every organization, including the tourism organizations should be learning organizations. The globalization and the competition affect the process of working of tourism organizations, where only the organizations which have knowledge, and are learning organizations can succeed. In a time of constant change, tourism organizations can have a competitive advantage only if they can do something or offer something different than their competitors. Many organizations in order to ...

  6. A systematic review of prerequisites for implementing assessment for learning in classroom practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitink, M.C.; Kleij, van der F.M.; Veldkamp, B.P.; Schildkamp, K.; Kippers, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Although many researchers acknowledge that Assessment for Learning can significantly enhance student learning, the factors facilitating or hindering its implementation in daily classroom practice are unclear. A systematic literature review was conducted to reveal prerequisites needed for Assessment

  7. Learning Objects and Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Donna M.; Tompkins, Catherine J.

    2006-01-01

    Virtual AGE (vAGE) is an asynchronous educational environment that utilizes learning objects focused on gerontology and a learning anytime/anywhere philosophy. This paper discusses the benefits of asynchronous instruction and the process of creating learning objects. Learning objects are "small, reusable chunks of instructional media" Wiley…

  8. Quality Partnership as a Contextual Prerequisite of Successful Learning of Young and Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubetic, Maja; Ercegovac, Ina Reic; Koludrovic, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses quality partnership as a prerequisite for the functioning of the institutions of early and pre-school education and for the child's overall development and learning. Considering that child's development and learning take place in different contexts (family, educational institutions, clubs, local and wider communities), the…

  9. Choosing for learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Emans, Bruno; Meijer, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Choosing for learning objects discusses eight educational ambitions and the possible roles of learning objects in realising these ambitions. The eight educational ambitions are: (1) Creating independent learning pathways, for example for lifelong learners; (2) Making education more flexible; (3) Res

  10. Choosing for learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Emans, Bruno; Meijer, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Choosing for learning objects discusses eight educational ambitions and the possible roles of learning objects in realising these ambitions. The eight educational ambitions are: (1) Creating independent learning pathways, for example for lifelong learners; (2) Making education more flexible; (3) Res

  11. Choosing for learning objects

    OpenAIRE

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Emans, Bruno; Meijer, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Choosing for learning objects discusses eight educational ambitions and the possible roles of learning objects in realising these ambitions. The eight educational ambitions are: (1) Creating independent learning pathways, for example for lifelong learners; (2) Making education more flexible; (3) Responding to differences between students; (4) The joint development of learning materials together with other institutions or external parties; (5) Attuning to professional practice; (6) Attuning to...

  12. Defining Learning Objectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍鑫红

    2014-01-01

    <正>This article attempts to introduce the teacher to developments in the area of specifying learning objectives.When you have studied this article carefully,you should be able to(a)distinguish between statements of aims and statements of objectives,(b)discuss the merits of writing objectives from the point of view of the learner,and(c)write both complete and abbreviated statements of learning objectives for different language skills,functions,and notions.

  13. Learning Objects Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blåbjerg, Niels Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Learning Objects Web er et DEFF projekt som Aalborg Universitetsbibliotek har initieret. Projektet tager afsæt i de resultater og erfaringer som er opnået med vores tidligere projekt Streaming Webbased Information Modules (SWIM). Vi har et internationalt netværk af interessenter som giver os...... sparring og feedback i forhold til udviklingskoncept både omkring de teoretiske rammer og i forhold til praktisk anvendelse af vores undervisningskoncept. Med disse rygstød og input har vi forfulgt ønsket om at videreudvikle SWIM i det nye projekt Learning Objects Web. Udgivelsesdato: juni...

  14. Active Learning: A Prerequisite for Language Development in the Mixed Ability Class (MAC of Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Harraw Verma

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students tend to pay more attention to their core subject classes rather than on an English language class. They all come from different social and academic backgrounds and their knowledge of English language varies from one another. A mixed ability group throws many challenges to an English language teacher teaching to a grown up or rather adult group of learners who always pre-define their interests and needs. The primary and the most important challenge in front of the language teacher teaching engineering students is - how to promote active learning in MAC situation? A language teacher to overcome the problems of a mixed ability classroom and promote active learning needs to adopt a number of strategies. The paper studies the MAC situation in an English language classroom of engineering students and makes an attempt to re-define methods for active learning a prerequisite for language development in an engineering classroom.

  15. From learning objects to learning activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses and questions the current metadata standards for learning objects from a pedagogical point of view. From a social constructivist approach, the paper discusses how learning objects can support problem based, self-governed learning activities. In order to support this approach......, it is argued that it is necessary to focus on learning activities rather than on learning objects. Further, it is argued that descriptions of learning objectives and learning activities should be separated from learning objects. The paper presents a new conception of learning objects which supports problem...... based, self-governed activities. Further, a new way of thinking pedagogy into learning objects is introduced. It is argued that a lack of pedagogical thinking in learning objects is not solved through pedagogical metadata. Instead, the paper suggests the concept of references as an alternative...

  16. Digital Literacy: A Prerequisite for Effective Learning in a Blended Learning Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chun Meng; Chaw, Lee Yen

    2016-01-01

    Blended learning has propelled into mainstream education in recent years with the help of digital technology. Commonly available digital devices and the Internet have made access to learning resources such as learning management systems, online libraries, digital media, etc. convenient and flexible for both lecturers and students. Beyond the…

  17. Using Learning Objects in Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minović, Miroslav; Milovanović, Miloš; Starcevic, Dusan

    Our research in game based learning area is moving from traditional web-based Learning Management Systems towards game-based Learning Management Systems, with the intention of integrating upsides of using games in university education. This paper gives insight in to our recent work in area of reusability of Learning Objects between web-based LMSs and game-based LMSs. One of the major issues was how to use classical Learning Objects in development of educational games. We decided to apply a Model Driven Approach to Learning Objects repurposing, which represents a two-step process. Web based Learning Object is transformed into more abstract model and then returned enriched with game specific attributes to a platform specific model. For that purpose we propose a new term Educational Game Learning Object (EGLO). Different games that use different environment and settings can simply reuse Educational Game Learning Objects. Another contribution of our work is a software tool that can be used to import, transform, edit and add metadata, store and export Learning Objects. Applicability of this approach is demonstrated in one simple example.

  18. Refactoring of Learning Objects for Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaševičius, Robertas

    We analyze the problem of refactoring of learning object (LO) for m-Learning. We apply methods adopted from software engineering domain for redesigning the structure and user interface of a LO and aim both at increasing usability and accessibility of the learning material. We evaluate usability of a LO from the user interface point of view, following the user interface development principles that are common both for human-computer interaction (HCI) and e-Learning domains. We propose the LO refactoring framework based on user interface usability principles. In a case study, we demonstrate the refactoring of an array-sorting LO for a mobile device.

  19. Elaborazione didattica di Learning Objects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Guerra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available L’idea di un modello didattico problematico per la realizzazione di Learning Objects riprende i temi del problematicismo pedagogico e si impegna a definire un’ipotesi formativa complessa capace di valorizzare la possibile positiva compresenza integrata di strategie didattiche diverse (finanche antitetiche ma componibili in una logica appunto di matrice problematicista. Il punto di partenza del modello proposto è rappresentato dalla opportunità di definire tre tipologie fondamentali di Learning Objects, rispettivamente centrati sull’oggetto, sul processo e sul soggetto dell’apprendimento.

  20. Learning to Place New Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yun; Lim, Marcus; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2011-01-01

    The ability to place objects in the environment is an important skill for a personal robot. An object should not only be placed stably, but should also be placed in its preferred location/orientation. For instance, a plate is preferred to be inserted vertically into the slot of a dish-rack as compared to be placed horizontally in it. Unstructured environments such as homes have a large variety of object types as well as of placing areas. Therefore our algorithms should be able to handle placing new object types and new placing areas. These reasons make placing a challenging manipulation task. In this work, we propose a supervised learning algorithm for finding good placements given the point-clouds of the object and the placing area. It learns to combine the features that capture support, stability and preferred placements using a shared sparsity structure in the parameters. Even when neither the object nor the placing area is seen previously in the training set, our algorithm predicts good placements. In ext...

  1. Learning-Style Assessment in Online Courses: A Prerequisite for Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicco, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Educational researchers have extensively documented the benefits of utilizing learning styles in the processes of teaching and learning from early childhood to Adult Education (Burke & Dunn, 2003; Cicco, 2009). This article examines the need to consider and employ learning-styles instruction in the online classroom. Adult learners are unique…

  2. Interprofessional learning objectives for health team simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, Elaine; King, Sharla; LoVerso, Tatiana; Ansell, L Dawn

    2013-06-01

    Interprofessional health team simulations are often developed using learning objectives that relate to competency statements. Educators then assume these learning objectives are relevant to students participating in the simulation. However, evaluating the link between learning objectives and outcomes is often difficult in authentic simulation environments with multiple human factors. This article suggests one process for revising learning objectives based on review of the simulation, the debriefing, and the student feedback on reported learning. Implications for curriculum integration are discussed. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Prerequisites for Emotional Intelligence Formation in Second Language Learning and Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklashova, Tatiana A.; Galishnikova, Elena M.; Khafizova, Liliya A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the topic is due to the enhancing role of emotional intelligence in second language learning. The article aims to substantiate that emotional intelligence (EI) strengthens training quality of future professionals, gives it an emotional color, and thereby increases a variety of intellectual skills. The leading methodical approaches…

  4. Mechanism for Learning Object retrieval supporting adaptivity

    CERN Document Server

    Chawla, Sonal

    2010-01-01

    In today’s world designing adaptable course material requires new technical knowledge which involves a need for a uniform protocol that allows organizing resources with emphasis on quality and Learning. This can be achieved by bundling the resources in a known and prescribed fashion called Learning objects. Learning Objects are composed of two aspects namely “Learning “ and “Object”. The Learning aspect of Learning objects refers to Education. Since Education is a process so the primary aim of learning objects tends to be facilitating acquisition, assessment and conversion of content into Learning objects while fostering the assimilation of these Learning objects into learning modules and instruction. The Object part of Learning objects relates to the Digital Electronic format of the resources i.e. to say that it deals with the physical resource that forms the Learning objects. The objects in LOs are analogous to objects used in object-oriented modeling (OOM). The analogy helps visual...

  5. Constraints on reusability of learning objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Hussmann, Peter Munkebo; Jensen, Anne Skov;

    2010-01-01

    objects have been proclaimed as important elements in e-learning for a long time, and there are good reasons to believe in the benefits of interactive multimedia as well as flexible and modular learning objects. Nevertheless the use and reuse of learning objects on a large scale seems to be a slow success...

  6. Learning medical English: a prerequisite for successful academic and professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, Nataša; Vuletić, Aleksandar; Jovković, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process.

  7. Learning medical English: A prerequisite for successful academic and professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosavljević Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process.

  8. Database functionality for learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessink, O.D.T.; Beeftink, H.H.; Hartog, R.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of student-activating digital learning material in six research projects revealed several shortcomings in the current learning management systems. Once the SCORM 2004 and the IMS Sharable State Persistence specifications are implemented in learning management systems, some of these

  9. Database functionality for learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessink, O.D.T.; Beeftink, H.H.; Hartog, R.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of student-activating digital learning material in six research projects revealed several shortcomings in the current learning management systems. Once the SCORM 2004 and the IMS Sharable State Persistence specifications are implemented in learning management systems, some of these s

  10. Using Learning Games to Meet Learning Objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question on how learning games can be used to meet with the different levels in Bloom’s and the SOLO taxonomy, which are commonly used for evaluating the learning outcome of educational activities. The paper discusses the quality of game-based learning outcomes based on a...

  11. Complex perspectives on learning objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Guldbrand Nielsen, Dorte

    2006-01-01

    opposite perspectives: objectives as context-free theory-based rules versus objectives as personal practice-based guidelines. The students favoured theory-based objectives, which should be defined by experts conclusively as minimum levels and checklists. The senior doctors preferred practice...

  12. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...

  13. Learning Objects Reusability Effectiveness Metric (LOREM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torky Ibrahim Sultan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research we aim to propose an advanced metric to evaluate the effectiveness of learning objects in order to be reused in new contexts. By the way learning objects reusability is achieving economic benefits from educational technology as it saving time and improving quality, but in case of choosing unsuitable learning object it may be less benefit than creating the learning object from scratch. Actually learning objects reusability can facilitate systems development and adaptation. By surveying the current evaluation metrics, we found that while they cover essential aspects, they enables all reviewers of learning objects to evaluate all criteria without paying attention to their roles in creating the learning object which affect their capability to evaluate specific criteria. Our proposed Approach (LOREM is evaluating learning objects based on a group of Aspects which measure their level of effectiveness in order to be reused in other contexts. LOREM classifies reviewers into 3 categories; 1. Academic Group: (Subject Expert Matter “SME” and Instructor. 2. Technical Group: (Instructional Designer “ID”, LO Developer and LO Designer. 3. Students group. The authorization of reviewers in these several categories are differentiated according to reviewer's type, e.g., (Instructor, LO Developer and their area of expert (their expertise subjects for academic and students reviewers.

  14. Increasing Student Interactions with Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulconer, Emily Kaye

    2017-01-01

    As educators, we recognize the importance of strong student learning objectives. We also know that students benefit by being well informed of expectations. Existing literature offers little guidance in methods and teaching strategies to apply in exposing students to their learning objectives. In this article, we discuss the use of specific…

  15. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were t...

  16. Tagging the didactic functionality of learning objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Skafte; Brostroem, Stig

    2002-01-01

    From a components-in-a-network point of view, the most important issues are: a didactically based typing of the learning objects themselves; the entire design superstructure, into which the learning objects must be fitted; and the symmetry of the interfaces, as seen by each pair of the triad...

  17. Overcoming the Limitations of Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, David; Waters, Sandie; Dawson, Deonne; Lambert, Brent; Barclay, Matthew; Wade, David; Nelson, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of issues that face individuals who would use learning objects for instructional purposes. These issues include problems with decontextualization, enabling meaningful reusability, and overcoming biases toward didactic approaches in the use of learning objects. We discuss these problems in some detail, and present a project-based…

  18. Authoring Systems Delivering Reusable Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nicola Sammour

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A three layer e-learning course development model has been defined based on a conceptual model of learning content object. It starts by decomposing the learning content into small chunks which are initially placed in a hierarchic structure of units and blocks. The raw content components, being the atomic learning objects (ALO, were linked to the blocks and are structured in the database. We set forward a dynamic generation of LO's using re-usable e-learning raw materials or ALO’s In that view we need a LO authoring/ assembling system fitting the requirements of interoperability and reusability and starting from selecting the raw learning content from the learning materials content database. In practice authoring systems are used to develop e-learning courses. The company EDUWEST has developed an authoring system that is database based and will be SCORM compliant in the near future.

  19. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-07-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom's taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom's taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  20. Repurposeable Learning Objects Linked to Teaching and Learning Styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Dunning

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia learning objects are an essential component of high quality, technology-mediated instruction. Learning objects allow the student to use the content learned in a particular part of a course and; 1. demonstrate mastery of the content, 2. apply that knowledge to solving a problem, and 3. use the content in a critical thinking exercise that both demonstrates mastery and allows the student to place the content within the context of the larger topic of the course. The difficulty associated with the use of learning objects on a broad scale is that they require programming skills most professors and instructors do not possess. Learning objects also tend to be custom productions and are defined in terms of the programming and code terminology, further limiting the professor's ability to understand how they are created. Learning objects defined in terms of styles of learning and teaching allow professors and instructors to develop a deeper understanding of the learning objects and the design process. A set of learning objects has been created that are designed for some of the important styles of learning and teaching. They include; visual learning, writing skills, critical thinking, time-revealed scenarios, case studies and empirical observation. The learning objects are designed and described in terms that the average instructor can readily understand , redesign and incorporate into their own courses. They are also designed in such a way that they can readily be repurposed for new applications in other courses and subject areas, with little or no additional programming.

  1. Brief Review on Learning Objects in Online Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yingli; Yin Guizhi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Learning objects are the important in online learning environment.An increasingly large literature is about it,but some questions and problems exist in the literature.This article will briefly review the definition and evaluation of learning objects,and discuss some of the problems as well.

  2. Educational Rationale Metadata for Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Carey

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Instructors searching for learning objects in online repositories will be guided in their choices by the content of the object, the characteristics of the learners addressed, and the learning process embodied in the object. We report here on a feasibility study for metadata to record process-oriented information about instructional approaches for learning objects, though a set of Educational Rationale [ER] tags which would allow authors to describe the critical elements in their design intent. The prototype ER tags describe activities which have been demonstrated to be of value in learning, and authors select the activities whose support was critical in their design decisions. The prototype ER tag set consists descriptors of the instructional approach used in the design, plus optional sub-elements for Comments, Importance and Features which implement the design intent. The tag set was tested by creators of four learning object modules, three intended for post-secondary learners and one for K-12 students and their families. In each case the creators reported that the ER tag set allowed them to express succinctly the key instructional approaches embedded in their designs. These results confirmed the overall feasibility of the ER tag approach as a means of capturing design intent from creators of learning objects. Much work remains to be done before a usable ER tag set could be specified, including evaluating the impact of ER tags during design to improve instructional quality of learning objects.

  3. CanCore: Metadata for Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norm Friesen

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The vision of reusable digital learning resources or objects, made accessible through coordinated repository architectures and metadata technologies, has gained considerable attention within distance education and training communities. However, the pivotal role of metadata in this vision raises important and longstanding issues about classification, description and meaning. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this vision, focusing specifically on issues of semantics. It will describe the CanCore Learning Object Metadata Application Profile as an important first step in addressing these issues in the context of the discovery, reuse and management of learning resources or objects.

  4. Quantifying the Reuse of Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kristine; Sweeney, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of one case study from a larger project, which aims to quantify the claimed efficiencies of reusing learning objects to develop e-learning resources. The case study describes how an online inquiry project "Diabetes: A waste of energy" was developed by searching for, evaluating, modifying and then…

  5. Students’ Views on Different Learning Objects Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsis, Antonios; Hormova, Hara; Mikropoulos, Tassos

    2014-01-01

    The paper attempts to compare students’ views on three different Learning Objects (LOs), also known as Web-Based Learning Tools (WBLTs), which are used for educational purposes aiming at natural disaster readiness. Following an iterative development process, 100 LOs of various types are being pro...

  6. Actively learning object names across ambiguous situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, George; Yu, Chen; Shiffrin, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that people can use the co-occurrence of words and objects in ambiguous situations (i.e., containing multiple words and objects) to learn word meanings during a brief passive training period (Yu & Smith, 2007). However, learners in the world are not completely passive but can affect how their environment is structured by moving their heads, eyes, and even objects. These actions can indicate attention to a language teacher, who may then be more likely to name the attended objects. Using a novel active learning paradigm in which learners choose which four objects they would like to see named on each successive trial, this study asks whether active learning is superior to passive learning in a cross-situational word learning context. Finding that learners perform better in active learning, we investigate the strategies and discover that most learners use immediate repetition to disambiguate pairings. Unexpectedly, we find that learners who repeat only one pair per trial--an easy way to infer this pair-perform worse than those who repeat multiple pairs per trial. Using a working memory extension to an associative model of word learning with uncertainty and familiarity biases, we investigate individual differences that correlate with these assorted strategies. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...... then successfully applied to activity recognition, activity simulation and multi-target tracking. Our method compares favourably with respect to previously reported results using Hidden Markov Models and Relational Particle Filtering....

  8. Learning in Organizations - an Object Relations Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Siig

    Learning in organizations – an object relations perspective As a researcher with a primary interest in the study of learning environments in organizations I have conducted a number of empirical research projects primarily concerning work places in the state sector. The aim of the research has been...... of organizations as learning environments for the employees. Theoretically I draw on object relations theory. Within this tradition the theoretical point of departure is twofold: the study of work conditions in hospitals carried out by Menzies (1975) and Hinschelwood & Skogstad (2000). With regard to the first...

  9. Using Learning Objects to Teach Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2004-01-01

    The idea of using "Learning Objects" in teaching has become very popular in the last few years. Although the concept of using objects in teaching is not new, the power of the computer technology and the Internet gives educators large opportunities and endless combination of possibilities in applying new theories to web-based education.…

  10. [Competency-based medical education: National Catalogue of Learning Objectives in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, M; Bender, M J; Adili, F; Arbab, D; Heinemann, M K; Hofmann, H S; König, S; Küper, M A; Obertacke, U; Rennekampff, H-O; Rolle, U; Rücker, M; Sader, R; Tingart, M; Tolksdorf, M M; Tronnier, V; Will, B; Walcher, F

    2013-04-01

    Competency-based medical education is a prerequisite to prepare students for the medical profession. A mandatory professional qualification framework is a milestone towards this aim. The National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) of the German Medical Faculty Association (MFT) and the German Medical Association will constitute a basis for a core curriculum of undergraduate medical training. The Surgical Working Group on Medical Education (CAL) of the German Association of Surgeons (DGCH) aims at formulating a competency-based catalogue of learning objectives for surgical undergraduate training to bridge the gap between the NKLM and the learning objectives of individual medical faculties. This is intended to enhance the prominence and visibility of the surgical discipline in the context of medical education. On the basis of different faculty catalogues of learning objectives, the catalogue of learning objectives of the German Association of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery and the Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives representatives of all German Surgical Associations cooperated towards a structured selection process of learning objectives and the definition of levels and areas of competencies. After completion the catalogue of learning objectives will be available online on the webpage of the DGCH.

  11. Learn Objective-C for Java Developers

    CERN Document Server

    Bucanek, James

    2009-01-01

    Learn Objective-C for Java Developers will guide experienced Java developers into the world of Objective-C. It will show them how to take their existing language knowledge and design patterns and transfer that experience to Objective-C and the Cocoa runtime library. This is the express train to productivity for every Java developer who dreamt of developing for Mac OS X or iPhone, but felt that Objective-C was too intimidating. So hop on and enjoy the ride!

  12. Commentary: Prerequisite Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Most biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology classes have extensive prerequisite or co-requisite requirements, often including introductory chemistry, introductory biology, and organic chemistry coursework. But what is the function of these prerequisites? While it seems logical that a basic understanding of biological and…

  13. Clearly Communicating the Learning Objective Matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    Explicitly communicating objectives is a tenet of effective instruction for students with learning difficulties, yet the practice is often overlooked in research. This case study of a novice middle school geography teacher illustrates how the qualitative and quantitative differences in the ways a teacher communicates the learner expectation can…

  14. Learning Objects Recommendation System: Issues and Approaches for Retrieving, Indexing and Recomend Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo AZAMBUJA SILVEIRA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some important issues regarding the the management of Learning objects covering searching over repositories and different approaches of recommendation systems and presents a multiagent system based application model for indexing, retrieving and recommending learning objects stored in different and heterogeneous repositories. The objects within these repositories are described by filled fields using different metadata (data about data standards. The searching mechanism covers several different learning object repositories and the same object can be described in these repositories by the use of different types of fields. Aiming to improve accuracy and coverage in terms of recovering a learning object and improve the relevance of the results we propose an information retrieval model based on a multiagent system approach and an ontological model to describe the covered knowledge domain.

  15. Unstructured Object Recognition using Morphological Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kar

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A technique of object recognition which can detect absence or presence of objects of interest without making explicit use of their underlying geometric structure is deemed suitable for many practical applications. In this work, a method of recognising unstructured objects has been presented, wherein several gray patterns are input as examples to a morphological rule-based learning algorithm. The output of the algorithm are the corresponding gray structuring elements capable of recognising patterns in query images. The learning is carried out offline before recognition of the queries. The technique has been tested to identify fuel pellet surface imperfections. Robustness wrt intensity, orientation, and shape variations of the query patterns is built into the method. Moreover, simplicity of the recognition process leading to reduced computational time makes the method attractive to solve many practical problems.

  16. BENEFITS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING - LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY CERTIFICATES â€" A PREREQUISITE FOR THE BUSINESS GRADUATE

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Learning a new language at any age is an enormously rewarding experience in many ways. Studying a foreign language helps students understand English grammar better and improves their overall communication and problem-solving skills. Beyond the intellectual benefits, knowledge of a foreign language facilitates travel, enhances career opportunities, and enables one to learn more about different peoples and cultures. In Romania, languages continue to struggle to gain the status of key learning a...

  17. Benefits, Barriers and Prerequisites for Web 2.0 Learning Activities in the Classroom: The View of Greek Pioneer Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaigeorgiou, George; Grammatikopoulou, Athina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the learning benefits and the challenges of Web 2.0 educational activities when applied in typical learning settings and as perceived by pioneer educators with extensive Web 2.0 experience. Design/Methodology/Approach: The testimonies of 26 Greek primary and secondary education teachers were collected. All…

  18. Multimedia Learning Systems Based on IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Kleinberger, Thomas; Muller, Paul

    One of the "hottest" topics in recent information systems and computer science is metadata. Learning Object Metadata (LOM) appears to be a very powerful mechanism for representing metadata, because of the great variety of LOM Objects. This is on of the reasons why the LOM standard is repeatedly cited in projects in the field of eLearning…

  19. Intelligent Discovery for Learning Objects Using Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The concept of learning objects has been applied in the e-learning field to promote the accessibility, reusability, and interoperability of learning content. Learning Object Metadata (LOM) was developed to achieve these goals by describing learning objects in order to provide meaningful metadata. Unfortunately, the conventional LOM lacks the…

  20. Learning object repositories as knowledge management systems

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, a number of international initiatives that recognize the importance of sharing and reusing digital educational resources among educational communities through the use of Learning Object Repositories (LORs) have emerged. Typically, these initiatives focus on collecting digital educational resources that are offered by their creators for open access and potential reuse. Nevertheless, most of the existing LORs are designed more as digital repositories, rather than as Knowled...

  1. A Learning Object Approach To Evidence based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabin Visram

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the philosophy, development and framework of the body of elements formulated to provide an approach to evidence-based learning sustained by Learning Objects and web based technology Due to the demands for continuous improvement in the delivery of healthcare and in the continuous endeavour to improve the quality of life, there is a continuous need for practitioner's to update their knowledge by accomplishing accredited courses. The rapid advances in medical science has meant increasingly, there is a desperate need to adopt wireless schemes, whereby bespoke courses can be developed to help practitioners keep up with expanding knowledge base. Evidently, without current best evidence, practice risks becoming rapidly out of date, to the detriment of the patient. There is a need to provide a tactical, operational and effective environment, which allows professional to update their education, and complete specialised training, just-in-time, in their own time and location. Following this demand in the marketplace the information engineering group, in combination with several medical and dental schools, set out to develop and design a conceptual framework which form the basis of pioneering research, which at last, enables practitioner's to adopt a philosophy of life long learning. The body and structure of this framework is subsumed under the term Object oriented approach to Evidence Based learning, Just-in-time, via Internet sustained by Reusable Learning Objects (The OEBJIRLO Progression. The technical pillars which permit this concept of life long learning are pivoted by the foundations of object oriented technology, Learning objects, Just-in-time education, Data Mining, intelligent Agent technology, Flash interconnectivity and remote wireless technology, which allow practitioners to update their professional skills, complete specialised training which leads to accredited qualifications. This paper sets out to develop and

  2. Dynamic Learning Objects to Teach Java Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhamurthy, Uma; Al Shawkani, Khuloud

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a model for teaching Java Programming Language through Dynamic Learning Objects. The design of the learning objects was based on effective learning design principles to help students learn the complex topic of Java Programming. Visualization was also used to facilitate the learning of the concepts. (Contains 1 figure and 2…

  3. Dynamic Learning Objects to Teach Java Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhamurthy, Uma; Al Shawkani, Khuloud

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a model for teaching Java Programming Language through Dynamic Learning Objects. The design of the learning objects was based on effective learning design principles to help students learn the complex topic of Java Programming. Visualization was also used to facilitate the learning of the concepts. (Contains 1 figure and 2…

  4. Deep Learning through Reusable Learning Objects in an MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Rosalyn; Adams, Ruifang Hope

    2013-01-01

    It has well been established that it is important to be able to leverage any organization's processes and core competencies to sustain its competitive advantage. Thus, one learning objective of an online MBA is to teach students how to apply the VRIO (value, rarity, inimitable, operationalized) model, developed by Barney and Hesterly (2006), in…

  5. Deep Learning through Reusable Learning Objects in an MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Rosalyn; Adams, Ruifang Hope

    2013-01-01

    It has well been established that it is important to be able to leverage any organization's processes and core competencies to sustain its competitive advantage. Thus, one learning objective of an online MBA is to teach students how to apply the VRIO (value, rarity, inimitable, operationalized) model, developed by Barney and Hesterly (2006), in…

  6. Learning Vector Quantization for Classifying Astronomical Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The sizes of astronomical surveys in different wavebands are increas-ing rapidly. Therefore, automatic classification of objects is becoming ever moreimportant. We explore the performance of learning vector quantization (LVQ) inclassifying multi-wavelength data. Our analysis concentrates on separating activesources from non-active ones. Different classes of X-ray emitters populate distinctregions of a multidimensional parameter space. In order to explore the distributionof various objects in a multidimensional parameter space, we positionally cross-correlate the data of quasars, BL Lacs, active galaxies, stars and normal galaxiesin the optical, X-ray and infrared bands. We then apply LVQ to classify them withthe obtained data. Our results show that LVQ is an effective method for separatingAGNs from stars and normal galaxies with multi-wavelength data.

  7. On Prerequisites of Interpreters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文

    2006-01-01

    Interpreters are invariably playing a crucial role in international affairs. Those who regularly read pictorials or watch TV news programs know best why interpreters are always placed between two leaders. That is because interpreters are indispensable if any two VIPs aim to achieve further understanding, to eliminate bilateral distrust or even establish alliance with each other, a fact may partly account for why so many students are swarming into translation schools. Are they able to become interpreters? What are the prerequisites for an interpreter? This article will, taking into operative factors as complete as possible, provide a basic framework under which prerequisites of interpreters are structured.

  8. Learning object models from few examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ishan; Wang, Yuxiong; Hebert, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Current computer vision systems rely primarily on fixed models learned in a supervised fashion, i.e., with extensive manually labelled data. This is appropriate in scenarios in which the information about all the possible visual queries can be anticipated in advance, but it does not scale to scenarios in which new objects need to be added during the operation of the system, as in dynamic interaction with UGVs. For example, the user might have found a new type of object of interest, e.g., a particular vehicle, which needs to be added to the system right away. The supervised approach is not practical to acquire extensive data and to annotate it. In this paper, we describe techniques for rapidly updating or creating models using sparsely labelled data. The techniques address scenarios in which only a few annotated training samples are available and need to be used to generate models suitable for recognition. These approaches are crucial for on-the-fly insertion of models by users and on-line learning.

  9. The Power of Objectives: Moving beyond Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jack J.; Phillips, Patti P.

    2010-01-01

    Although the need for project objectives is obvious, their value and role are much broader than most think. In this article, we explore the need for higher levels of objectives, along with tips and techniques to develop them properly. More important, we examine the benefits of objectives from many perspectives. In today's competitive environment,…

  10. Arithmetic: Prerequisite to Algebra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotman, Jack W.

    Drawing from research and observations at Lansing Community College (Michigan) (LCC), this paper argues that typical arithmetic courses do little to prepare students to master algebra, and proposes an alternative set of arithmetic skills as actual prerequisites to algebra. The first section offers a description of the algebra sequence at LCC,…

  11. Elaboration of Statistics Learning Objects for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Tapia Moreno

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile learning (m-learning allows a person to study using a mobile computer device anywhere and anytime. In this work we report the elaboration of learning objects for the teaching of introductory statistics using cellular phones.

  12. Hybrid Multiagent System for Automatic Object Learning Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana; de La Prieta, Fernando; López, Vivian F.

    The rapid evolution within the context of e-learning is closely linked to international efforts on the standardization of learning object metadata, which provides learners in a web-based educational system with ubiquitous access to multiple distributed repositories. This article presents a hybrid agent-based architecture that enables the recovery of learning objects tagged in Learning Object Metadata (LOM) and provides individualized help with selecting learning materials to make the most suitable choice among many alternatives.

  13. Improving learning of anatomy with reusable learning objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of modern educational technologies is useful for learning, durability, sociability, and upgrading professionalism. The aim of this study was evaluating the effect of reusable learning objects on improving learning of anatomy. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study. Fourteen (reusable learning objects RLO from different parts of anatomy of human body including thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were prepared for medical student in Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2009. The length of the time for RLO was between 11-22 min. Because their capacities were low, so they were easy to use with cell phone or MP4. These materials were available to the students before the classes. The mean scores of students in anatomy of human body group were compared to the medical students who were not used this method and entered the university in 2008. A questionnaire was designed by the researcher to evaluate the effect of RLO and on, content, interest and motivation, participation, preparation and attitude. Result: The mean scores of anatomy of human body of medical student who were entered the university in 2009 have been increased compare to the students in 2008, but this difference was not significant. Based on the questionnaire data, it was shown that the RLO had a positive effect on improving learning anatomy of human body (75.5% and the effective relationship (60.6%. The students were interested in using RLO (74.6%, some students (54.2% believed that this method should be replaced by lecture. Conclusion: The use of RLO could promote interests and effective communication among the students and led to increasing self-learning motivation.

  14. Learning Objectives for Master's theses at DTU Management Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Thorp; Rasmussen, Birgitte; Hinz, Hector Nøhr

    2010-01-01

    that you formulate precise and useful learning objectives for your Master's thesis. These notes of inspiration have been written to help you do exactly this. The notes discuss the requirements for the learning objectives, examples of learning objectives and the assessment criteria defined by DTU Management......Learning objectives are normally formulated when you participate in a DTU course. It is namely the teacher’s task to formulate learning objectives and then evaluate your fulfilment of the learning objectives when assessing you exam or replacement assignment. With Master's theses it is, however......, different. The DTU Study Handbook states that:”Learning objectives are an integrated part of the supervision”, which provides you with the opportunity – naturally in cooperation with your supervisor – to formulate learning objectives for your Master's thesis. There are at least three good reasons for being...

  15. The Design, Development, and Use of Multimedia Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Claire; Boyle, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper concerns the development and use of learning objects to address a real and urgent educational problem--the teaching and learning of introductory programming. The paper outlines the design principles and development process involved in creating self-contained learning objects that are pedagogically rich. It describes how the objects were…

  16. An Investigation on the Correlation of Learner Styles and Learning Objects Characteristics in a Proposed Learning Objects Management Model (LOMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanapu, Supachanun; Fung, Chun Che; Kerdprasop, Nittaya; Chamnongsri, Nisachol; Niwattanakul, Suphakit

    2016-01-01

    The issues of accessibility, management, storage and organization of Learning Objects (LOs) in education systems are a high priority of the Thai Government. Incorporating personalized learning or learning styles in a learning object management system to improve the accessibility of LOs has been addressed continuously in the Thai education system.…

  17. Learning objects and interactive whiteboards: a evaluation proposal of learning objects for mathematics teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Henrique Fiscarelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current conditions of the classroom learning tend to be a one-way process based in teacher exposition, this make a negative impact on learning make it a mechanical and not meaningful activity. One possibility to improve the quality of teaching is to innovate methodologies and varying forms of presenting information to students, such as the use of technology in the teaching process. The Interactive Whiteboard (IBW is one of the technologies that are being implemented in Brazilian schools. One of the promising possibilities to add value to the use of LDI in classroom are "learning objects" (LO. However, one problem is that often the LO are not fully suited to the dynamics of IWB, whether functional or pedagogical point of view. The objective of this study is to analyze and propose a set of indicators that evaluate the learning objects for use in conjunction with Interactive Whiteboards. The selection and definition of evaluation indicators was carried from the literature review on the subject and based on LDI experiences of use in Municipal Elementary School. After defining the set of indicators was conducted a evaluation of a sample of 30 OA utilized to teaching mathematics in 3rd grade of elementary school. The results of the evaluation indicate that the proposed indicators are suitable for a pre-analysis of OA and assisting in the process of selection of these.

  18. Learning object repositories as knowledge management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios G. Sampson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, a number of international initiatives that recognize the importance of sharing and reusing digital educational resources among educational communities through the use of Learning Object Repositories (LORs have emerged. Typically, these initiatives focus on collecting digital educational resources that are offered by their creators for open access and potential reuse. Nevertheless, most of the existing LORs are designed more as digital repositories, rather than as Knowledge Management Systems (KMS. By exploiting KMSs functionalities in LORs would bare the potential to support the organization and sharing of educational communities’ explicit knowledge (depicted in digital educational resources constructed by teachers and/or instructional designers and tacit knowledge (depicted in teachers’ and students’ experiences and interactions of using digital educational resources available in LORs. Within this context, in this paper we study the design and the implementation of fourteen operating LORs from the KMSs’ perspective, so as to identify additional functionalities that can support the management of educational communities’ explicit and tacit knowledge. Thus, we propose a list of essential LORs’ functionalities, which aim to facilitate the organization and sharing of educational communities’ knowledge. Finally, we present the added value of these functionalities by identifying their importance towards addressing the current demands of web-facilitated educational communities, as well as the knowledge management activities that they execute.

  19. Participative Knowledge Production of Learning Objects for E-Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodero, Juan Manuel; Aedo, Ignacio; Diaz, Paloma

    2002-01-01

    Defines a learning object as any digital resource that can be reused to support learning and thus considers electronic books as learning objects. Highlights include knowledge management; participative knowledge production, i.e. authoring electronic books by a distributed group of authors; participative knowledge production architecture; and…

  20. Reuse of Learning Objects in Context: Technical and Human Aspects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, A.

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the application of learning technology standards for learning objects and the differences in reuse in university, corporate, and military contexts. This is addressed from two different perspectives: the technology involving learning objects and the human aspects that

  1. Participative Knowledge Production of Learning Objects for E-Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodero, Juan Manuel; Aedo, Ignacio; Diaz, Paloma

    2002-01-01

    Defines a learning object as any digital resource that can be reused to support learning and thus considers electronic books as learning objects. Highlights include knowledge management; participative knowledge production, i.e. authoring electronic books by a distributed group of authors; participative knowledge production architecture; and…

  2. Mobile Authoring of Open Educational Resources as Reusable Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinshuk; Jesse, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    E-learning technologies have allowed authoring and playback of standardized reusable learning objects (RLO) for several years. Effective mobile learning requires similar functionality at both design time and runtime. Mobile devices can play RLO using applications like SMILE, mobile access to a learning management system (LMS), or other systems…

  3. Object Familiarity Facilitates Foreign Word Learning in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Maria D.; Cole, Caitlin A.; Oromendia, Mercedes; Koenig, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Studying how children learn words in a foreign language can shed light on how language learning changes with development. In one experiment, we examined whether three-, four-, and five-year-olds could learn and remember words for familiar and unfamiliar objects in their native English and a foreign language. All age groups could learn and remember…

  4. The Game Object Model and expansive learning: Creation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Game Object Model and expansive learning: Creation, instantiation, ... into the design, integration, evaluation and use of video games in learning and teaching. ... individual understanding of the role of games in education and transformed ...

  5. Learning Objects: The Answer to the Knowledge Economy's Predicament?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Sloep, P.B. (2004) Learning Objects: the Answer to the Knowledge Economy's Predicament? In Jochems, W., R. Koper, and J. van Merriënboer (Eds). Integrated E-Learning. London: Routledge/Falmer. pp. 139-15

  6. Developing Learning Objectives for Accounting Ethics Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Linda A.; Fisher, Dann G.; Braun, Robert L.; Swanson, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to offer a set of core knowledge learning objectives for accounting ethics education. Using Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives, we develop learning objectives in six content areas: codes of ethical conduct, corporate governance, the accounting profession, moral development, classical ethics theories, and…

  7. Utopia2000: An Online Learning-Object Management Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspillaga, Macarena

    2002-01-01

    Describes Utopia2002, a database that contains learning objects that enables faculty to design and develop interactive Web-based instruction. Topics include advanced distributed learning; sharable content objects (SCOs) and sharable content object reference model (SCORM); instructional systems design process; templates; and quality assurance. (LRW)

  8. Developing Learning Objectives for Accounting Ethics Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Linda A.; Fisher, Dann G.; Braun, Robert L.; Swanson, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to offer a set of core knowledge learning objectives for accounting ethics education. Using Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives, we develop learning objectives in six content areas: codes of ethical conduct, corporate governance, the accounting profession, moral development, classical ethics theories, and…

  9. Building Assessment Web Service from Question Type Learning Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Reklaitis, Vytautas; Baniulis, Kazys; Aukstakalnis, Nerijus

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the TestTool system as an established testing system model, the one that is being used in real educational settings and supports self-assessment as well as testing learning practices. We then elaborate how this learning object-based system is being re-engineered and extended within the context of Web service oriented architecture. Testing Web service implementation along with considerations regarding how e-learning services from distributed Learning Objects could be c...

  10. E-sharing: development and use of learning objects repository

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Maria José Angélico; Pereira, Rui Humberto; Pérez Cota, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    — In the new learning environments, built width digital technologies, the need to promote quality of education resources, commonly known as Learning Objects, which can support formal and informal distance learning, emerge as one of the biggest challenge that educational institutions will have to face. Due to the fact that is expensive, the reuse and sharing became very important issue. This article presents a Learning Object Repository which aims to store, to disse...

  11. Building Assessment Web Service from Question Type Learning Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Reklaitis, Vytautas; Baniulis, Kazys; Aukstakalnis, Nerijus

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the TestTool system as an established testing system model, the one that is being used in real educational settings and supports self-assessment as well as testing learning practices. We then elaborate how this learning object-based system is being re-engineered and extended within the context of Web service oriented architecture. Testing Web service implementation along with considerations regarding how e-learning services from distributed Learning Objects could be c...

  12. Design of Learning Objects for Concept Learning: Effects of Multimedia Learning Principles and an Instructional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Thomas K. F.; Churchill, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests using multimedia learning principles in the design of instructional material. However, these principles may not be sufficient for the design of learning objects for concept learning in mathematics. This paper reports on an experimental study that investigated the effects of an instructional approach, which includes two teaching…

  13. Design of Learning Objects for Concept Learning: Effects of Multimedia Learning Principles and an Instructional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Thomas K. F.; Churchill, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests using multimedia learning principles in the design of instructional material. However, these principles may not be sufficient for the design of learning objects for concept learning in mathematics. This paper reports on an experimental study that investigated the effects of an instructional approach, which includes two teaching…

  14. Analisi di un campione significativo di Learning Objects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Guerra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Il lavoro analizza sul piano pedagogico e didattico il concetto di Learning Object (LO a partire dalla rilevazione diretta dei modelli formativi sottostanti, in forma esplicita o implicita, un campione significativo di Learning Objects identificato all’interno di rilevanti esperienze di e-learning universitarie e non universitarie prodotte in diverse nazioni, allo scopo di giungere alla messa a punto di una modellistica problematica di tipo didattico dei Learning Objects, funzionale alla costruzione di algoritmi differenziati di progettazione, realizzazione, erogazione e valutazione di LO, anche nella prospettiva dei Learning Artifacts.

  15. An Exploratory Study into the Efficacy of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W. Farha

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects have quickly become a widely accepted approach to instructional technology, particularly in on-line and computer-based learning environments. While there is a substantial body of literature concerning learning objects, very little of it verifies their efficacy. This research investigated the effectiveness of learning objects by comparing learning outcomes using a learning object with outcomes using a traditional textbook-based method of instruction. Participants were 327 undergraduate college students at a traditional public four-year coed institution, a private four-year women’s college, a private four-year engineering institution, and a public two-year community college. Through a series of independent samples t-tests and Analyses of Variance, results revealed mean scores for the learning object group that were nearly three times higher than the mean scores for the textbook-taught group. Gaming experience, age, gender, and learner preference were evaluated for their potential influence on the results; no statistically significant differences were found, implying that the learning object itself was central to the outcomes achieved. The future of learning objects is bright, and more empirical research is called for in the area of learning object effectiveness.

  16. Adaptive Object Re-Ranking Mechanism for Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Y. Yen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous Learning (U-Learning, as an emerging learning paradigm, makes it possible for learners to carry out the learning activities at any places and at anytime. With the advantages of the devices, learners can obtain a variety of supplementary materials from the Internet. In the scope of distance learning, LOR (Learning Object Repository stands for managing and sharing of learning related materials (known as learning objects. However, some challenges may raise while performing these activities. For instance, a huge amount of learning objects may appear while learners utilize the search service provided by LOR. Learners have to spend time on collecting relevant resources for specific purposes. This situation may discourage the reusability of learning objects especially in a ubiquitous environment. In this paper, based on systematic re-examination of reuse scenarios, an adaptive mechanism, as a resource discovery and search middleware, was proposed to assist learners in obtaining possible objects under ubiquitous environment. Achievement of the proposed mechanism can produce search results adaptive to specific situations in order of similarity degree based on the mixed information. We try to filter out some irrelevant results by using the past usage history, current geographical information and input query, so as to enhance the efficiency of learning objects retrieval in a ubiquitous environment. As a pilot test, Apple iPhone was utilized to be the major client testbed.

  17. Learned filters for object detection in multi-object visual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatescu, Victor; Wong, Sebastien; McDonnell, Mark D.; Kearney, David

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the application of learned convolutional filters in multi-object visual tracking. The filters were learned in both a supervised and unsupervised manner from image data using artificial neural networks. This work follows recent results in the field of machine learning that demonstrate the use learned filters for enhanced object detection and classification. Here we employ a track-before-detect approach to multi-object tracking, where tracking guides the detection process. The object detection provides a probabilistic input image calculated by selecting from features obtained using banks of generative or discriminative learned filters. We present a systematic evaluation of these convolutional filters using a real-world data set that examines their performance as generic object detectors.

  18. A NOVEL APPROACH FOR SELECTION OF LEARNING OBJECTS FOR PERSONALIZED DELIVERY OF E-LEARNING CONTENT

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha, D; C. DEISY

    2013-01-01

    Personalized E-learning, as an intelligent package of technology enhanced education tends to overrule the traditional practices of static web based E-learning systems. Delivering suitable learning objects according to the learners’ knowledge, preferences and learning styles makes up the personalized E-learning. This paper proposes a novel approach for classifying and selecting learning objects for different learning styles proposed by Felder and Silverman The methodology adhere...

  19. Creating and Using Learning Objects in Qualitative Research Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.; Spong, Jennifer L.; Chenail, Jan; Liscio, Michele; McLean, Lenworth G.; Cox, Holly G.; Shepherd, Brenda; Mowzoon, Nura C.

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the lessons learned and the educational materials generated from a doctoral course on qualitative data analysis, a group of doctoral students, their professor, and a linguistics consultant launched an on-going project to create a series of reusable learning objects designed to help other groups of students and professors learn how to…

  20. Providing Author-Defined State Data Storage to Learning Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassahun, A.; Beulens, A.J.M.; Hartog, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Two major trends in eLearning are the shift from presentational towards activating learning objects and the shift from proprietary towards SCORM conformant delivery systems. In a large program on the design, development and use of digital learning material for food and biotechnology in higher educat

  1. Form over Substance: Learning Objectives in the Business Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Leonard; Rosetti, Joseph L.; King, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    While members of the business faculty community have been advocating active learning in the classroom, it appears that textbooks encourage learning from a passive perspective. A review of learning objectives from 16 textbooks used in Financial Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Finance, and Marketing demonstrates a focus on basically the same set…

  2. Generative Learning Objects Instantiated with Random Numbers Based Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Bogdan Chirila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of interactive e-learning content requires special skills like programming techniques, web integration, graphic design etc. Generally, online educators do not possess such skills and their e-learning products tend to be static like presentation slides and textbooks. In this paper we propose a new interactive model of generative learning objects as a compromise betweenstatic, dull materials and dynamic, complex software e-learning materials developed by specialized teams. We find that random numbers based automatic initialization learning objects increases content diversity, interactivity thus enabling learners’ engagement. The resulted learning object model is at a limited level of complexity related to special e-learning software, intuitive and capable of increasing learners’ interactivity, engagement and motivation through dynamic content. The approach was applied successfully on several computer programing disciplines.

  3. Learning Object-Orientation through ICT-mediated Apprenticeship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjuk, A.; Berge, O.; Bennedsen, J.;

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we show how sociocultural theories inform the design of a course in object-oriented programming. An essential learning objective within this philosophy is the programming processes as such. To move toward this learning goal, the course design incorporates a combination of the so...

  4. On the Concepts of Usability and Reusability of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel-Angel Sicilia

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available “Reusable learning objects” oriented towards increasing their potential reusability are required to satisfy concerns about their granularity and their independence of concrete contexts of use. Such requirements also entail that the definition of learning object “usability,” and the techniques required to carry out their “usability evaluation” must be substantially different from those commonly used to characterize and evaluate the usability of conventional educational applications. In this article, a specific characterization of the concept of learning object usability is discussed, which places emphasis on “reusability,” the key property of learning objects residing in repositories. The concept of learning object reusability is described as the possibility and adequacy for the object to be usable in prospective educational settings, so that usability and reusability are considered two interrelated – and in many cases conflicting – properties of learning objects. Following the proposed characterization of two characteristics or properties of learning objects, a method to evaluate usability of specific learning objects will be presented.

  5. Searching for and Positioning of Contextualized Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldiris, Silvia; Graf, Sabine; Fabregat, Ramon; Mendez, Nestor Dario Duque

    2012-01-01

    Learning object economies are marketplaces for the sharing and reuse of learning objects (LO). There are many motivations for stimulating the development of the LO economy. The main reason is the possibility of providing the right content, at the right time, to the right learner according to adequate quality standards in the context of a lifelong…

  6. Object tracking with hierarchical multiview learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Building a robust appearance model is useful to improve tracking performance. We propose a hierarchical multiview learning framework to construct the appearance model, which has two layers for tracking. On the top layer, two different views of features, grayscale value and histogram of oriented gradients, are adopted for representation under the cotraining framework. On the bottom layer, for each view of each feature, three different random subspaces are generated to represent the appearance from multiple views. For each random view submodel, the least squares support vector machine is employed to improve the discriminability for concrete and efficient realization. These two layers are combined to construct the final appearance model for tracking. The proposed hierarchical model assembles two types of multiview learning strategies, in which the appearance can be described more accurately and robustly. Experimental results in the benchmark dataset demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve better performance than many existing state-of-the-art algorithms.

  7. Assessing Complex Learning Objectives through Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Mead, C.; Buxner, S.; Semken, S. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    A significant obstacle to improving the quality of education is the lack of easy-to-use assessments of higher-order thinking. Most existing assessments focus on recall and understanding questions, which demonstrate lower-order thinking. Traditionally, higher-order thinking is assessed with practical tests and written responses, which are time-consuming to analyze and are not easily scalable. Computer-based learning environments offer the possibility of assessing such learning outcomes based on analysis of students' actions within an adaptive learning environment. Our fully online introductory science course, Habitable Worlds, uses an intelligent tutoring system that collects and responds to a range of behavioral data, including actions within the keystone project. This central project is a summative, game-like experience in which students synthesize and apply what they have learned throughout the course to identify and characterize a habitable planet from among hundreds of stars. Student performance is graded based on completion and accuracy, but two additional properties can be utilized to gauge higher-order thinking: (1) how efficient a student is with the virtual currency within the project and (2) how many of the optional milestones a student reached. In the project, students can use the currency to check their work and "unlock" convenience features. High-achieving students spend close to the minimum amount required to reach these goals, indicating a high-level of concept mastery and efficient methodology. Average students spend more, indicating effort, but lower mastery. Low-achieving students were more likely to spend very little, which indicates low effort. Differences on these metrics were statistically significant between all three of these populations. We interpret this as evidence that high-achieving students develop and apply efficient problem-solving skills as compared to lower-achieving student who use more brute-force approaches.

  8. Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom’s taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom’s taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  9. A Critique of Stephen Downes' "Learning Objects": A Chinese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuhua (Oscar Lin

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper by Stephen Downes recommends a way of sharing online teaching/ course materials to accelerate course development and make education more cost-effective. His paper is a review of basic information about learning objects (LOs and includes examples that illustrate such technical terms as XML and TML. His paper, however, does not identify several important issues such as: a the level of granularity of learning objects; b selection and integration of learning objects in an appropriate way to form higher level units of study; c training of professors in the use of learning objects; d appropriate use of metadata to facilitate composition of higher level units; and e the potential of computer agents to facilitate the dynamic composition of personalized lessons. An unorganized aggregate of learning objects simply does not constitute a course. In order to create a properly designed final course, student and instructor interaction must be built in.

  10. Learning Object Metadata in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Koutoumanos, Anastasios; Retalis, Symeon; Papaspyrou, Nikolaos

    2000-01-01

    The plethora and variance of learning resources embedded in modern web-based learning environments require a mechanism to enable their structured administration. This goal can be achieved by defining metadata on them and constructing a system that manages the metadata in the context of the learning

  11. FORUM: Affective Learning. Pursuing and Measuring Affective Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of "Communication Education" is to publish the best research on communication and learning. Researchers study the communication-learning interface in many ways, but a common approach is to explore how instructor and student communication can lead to better learning outcomes. Although scholars have long classified learning…

  12. Elluminate Article: Learning Object Repository Network (LORNet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Henri

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The publisher of IRRODL, The Canadian Institute of Distance Education Research (CIDER, is pleased to link here to a series of eight online seminars that took place over Spring 2005, using Elluminate live e-learning and collaborative solutions. These interactive CIDER Sessions disseminate research emanating from Canada's vibrant DE research community, and we feel these archived recordings are highly relevant to many in the international distance education research community. To access these sessions, you must first download FREE software. Visit http://www.elluminate.com/support/ to download this software.

  13. Learning Photometric Invariance for Object Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez, J.M.; Gevers, T.; López, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Color is a powerful visual cue in many computer vision applications such as image segmentation and object recognition. However, most of the existing color models depend on the imaging conditions that negatively affect the performance of the task at hand. Often, a reflection model (e.g., Lambertian o

  14. Layered Learning Design: Towards an Integration of Learning Design and Learning Object Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The use of ICT to enhance teaching and learning depends on effective design, which operates at many levels of granularity from the small to the very large. This reflects the range of educational problems from course design down to the design of activities focused on specific learning objectives. For maximum impact these layers of design need to be…

  15. Student objectives and learning experiences in a global health elective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, David; Zayas, Luis E; Koyfman, Alex

    2012-10-01

    International health electives offer unique experiences for medical students to develop clinical skills and cultural competencies in unique and diverse environments. Medical students have been increasingly pursuing these learning opportunities despite the challenges. However, their goals in pursuing these opportunities and the relation between their learning objectives and actual experiences have not been studied adequately. It is important to assess these programs based on student objectives and whether those objectives are met. Thirty-seven medical students from five cohorts at a US medical school completed pre-post questionnaires regarding their global health elective objectives and learning experiences. The questionnaires included mostly open-ended questions and a Likert-scale rating of their overall experience. Qualitative thematic analysis involved inductive coding and followed a content-driven immersion-crystallization approach. Quantitative program evaluation measures yielded descriptive statistics. Five general objectives and four types of learning experiences were identified. Student objectives were: (1) to observe the practice and organization of health care in another country; (2) improve medical/surgical skills; (3) improve language skills; (4) learn about another culture; and (5) deepen knowledge of infectious diseases. All of their objectives were achieved. Moreover, one learning theme, "self-reflection and personal growth," was not a student objective. Quantitative assessment showed that most students had a favorable elective experience. Program challenges were also identified. Students in a global health elective were able to fulfill self-identified learning objectives, while also gaining other unexpected yet important lessons. Students' learning objectives also should be considered in evaluating learning experiences in international health electives.

  16. Learning object development for the Anatomy teaching in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Lustosa Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the development of the learning object called “Disciplinary Complement of Anatomy” for the teaching and learning of Anatomy subject. Methods: this is a methodological study on the construction of the learning object to complement the studies in the subject, using the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation model in the instructional design. Results: as a virtual class, the learning object was developed according to the steps of Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation and it was implemented in Prezi® as a virtual environment. Conclusion: the virtual class was set up in an innovative strategy that allowed autonomy in learning and managing technologies in the educational process, articulating ethics in the study of Anatomy.

  17. A Framework for the Flexible Content Packaging of Learning Objects and Learning Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasiak, Jason; Agostinho, Shirley; Burnett, Ian; Drury, Gerrard; Goodes, Jason; Bennett, Sue; Lockyer, Lori; Harper, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a platform-independent method for packaging learning objects and learning designs. The method, entitled a Smart Learning Design Framework, is based on the MPEG-21 standard, and uses IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM) to provide bibliographic, technical, and pedagogical descriptors for the retrieval and description of learning…

  18. Online learning of objects in a biologically motivated visual architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersing, Heiko; Kirstein, Stephan; Götting, Michael; Brandl, Holger; Dunn, Mark; Mikhailova, Inna; Goerick, Christian; Steil, Jochen; Ritter, Helge; Körner, Edgar

    2007-08-01

    We present a biologically motivated architecture for object recognition that is capable of online learning of several objects based on interaction with a human teacher. The system combines biological principles such as appearance-based representation in topographical feature detection hierarchies and context-driven transfer between different levels of object memory. Training can be performed in an unconstrained environment by presenting objects in front of a stereo camera system and labeling them by speech input. The learning is fully online and thus avoids an artificial separation of the interaction into training and test phases. We demonstrate the performance on a challenging ensemble of 50 objects.

  19. Adaptive Learning Objects Sequencing for Competence-Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Demetrios, Sampson

    2006-01-01

    Lifelong learning refers to the activities people perform throughout their life to improve their competence in a particular field. Although adaptive educational hypermedia systems (AEHS) bare the potential to provide personalized learning experiences based on individual’s knowledge, skills, and comp

  20. POOLkits: Applying Object Oriented Principles from Software Engineering to Physics Object Oriented Learning -- Preliminary Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Thomas; Aubrecht, Gordon

    2012-04-01

    Object-oriented development depends upon the creation of generic pieces that can be built into more complex parts. In physics, we begin teaching basic principles and then develop more complex systems, a fertile environment to develop learning objects. Each learning object consists of observable quantities, such as the physical properties of a block of wood, and operators that act on the object, such as force. Additionally, each object can also include an assessment operator that evaluates the impact of the learning object on student comprehension. The physics object-oriented learning kits (POOLkits) will be developed to enhance student understanding of physics concepts, as well as, build a framework for developing a software object based on the physics concept. A POOLkit can be extended, similar to the concept of extending classes in object-oriented programming, as physics knowledge expands. The expectation for these POOLkits would be to provide physics students with a solid foundation in the first principles to be able to derive more complex formulae and have the understanding of the process with a secondary benefit of enhancing the object-oriented programming capabilities of physics students.

  1. Hierarchical image segmentation for learning object priors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xingwei [TEMPLE UNIV.; Latecki, Longin J [TEMPLE UNIV.; Li, Nan [TEMPLE UNIV.

    2010-11-10

    The proposed segmentation approach naturally combines experience based and image based information. The experience based information is obtained by training a classifier for each object class. For a given test image, the result of each classifier is represented as a probability map. The final segmentation is obtained with a hierarchial image segmentation algorithm that considers both the probability maps and the image features such as color and edge strength. We also utilize image region hierarchy to obtain not only local but also semi-global features as input to the classifiers. Moreover, to get robust probability maps, we take into account the region context information by averaging the probability maps over different levels of the hierarchical segmentation algorithm. The obtained segmentation results are superior to the state-of-the-art supervised image segmentation algorithms.

  2. Fragment-based learning of visual object categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegdé, Jay; Bart, Evgeniy; Kersten, Daniel

    2008-04-22

    When we perceive a visual object, we implicitly or explicitly associate it with a category we know. It is known that the visual system can use local, informative image fragments of a given object, rather than the whole object, to classify it into a familiar category. How we acquire informative fragments has remained unclear. Here, we show that human observers acquire informative fragments during the initial learning of categories. We created new, but naturalistic, classes of visual objects by using a novel "virtual phylogenesis" (VP) algorithm that simulates key aspects of how biological categories evolve. Subjects were trained to distinguish two of these classes by using whole exemplar objects, not fragments. We hypothesized that if the visual system learns informative object fragments during category learning, then subjects must be able to perform the newly learned categorization by using only the fragments as opposed to whole objects. We found that subjects were able to successfully perform the classification task by using each of the informative fragments by itself, but not by using any of the comparable, but uninformative, fragments. Our results not only reveal that novel categories can be learned by discovering informative fragments but also introduce and illustrate the use of VP as a versatile tool for category-learning research.

  3. Technology and human issues in reusing learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Strijker, Allard

    2004-01-01

    Reusing learning objects is as old as retelling a story or making use of libraries and textbooks, and in electronic form has received an enormous new impetus because of the World Wide Web and Web technologies. Are we at the brink of changing the "shape and form of learning, ... of being able to trul

  4. An OWL Ontology for Metadata of Interactive Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Bruno N.; Santos, Rafael; Alves, Bruno; Areão, Andreza S.; Yokoyama, Marcos H.; Guimarães, Marcelo P.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to present the importance of Interactive Learning Objects (ILO) to improve the teaching-learning process by assuring a constant interaction among teachers and students, which in turn, allows students to be constantly supported by the teacher. The paper describes the ontology that defines the ILO available on the…

  5. Technology and Human Issues in Reusing Learning Objects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Strijker, Allard

    2004-01-01

    Reusing learning objects is as old as retelling a story or making use of libraries and textbooks, and in electronic form has received an enormous new impetus because of the World Wide Web and Web technologies. Are we at the brink of changing the "shape and form of learning, ... of being able to trul

  6. Methodology for Evaluating Quality and Reusability of Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Bireniene, Virginija; Serikoviene, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the scientific model and several methods for the expert evaluation of quality of learning objects (LOs) paying especial attention to LOs reusability level. The activities of eQNet Quality Network for a European Learning Resource Exchange (LRE) aimed to improve reusability of LOs of European Schoolnet's LRE…

  7. A Process of Creating Learning Objects from a Congress Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tovar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the work carried out on recovering, manipulating, unificating, labeling and processing of documents developed within the congresses of TAEE (Technologies Applied to the Teaching of Electronics. The process developed consists of the creation of digital objects and documents arising from the extraction of metadata which define each digital object as a learning object. With the joint between a learning object and its metadata some information extrapolation is possible in multiple environments. Thus, these units of information permit the implementation of web environments, the study and analysis of their contents and the creation of file structures for their incorporation in repositories in a massive way.

  8. Learning Faster by Discovering and Exploiting Object Similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Janež

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the question: “Is it possible to speed up the learning process of an autonomous agent by performing experiments in a more complex environment (i.e., an environment with a greater number of different objects?” To this end, we use a simple robotic domain, where the robot has to learn a qualitative model predicting the change in the robot’s distance to an object. To quantify the environment’s complexity, we defined cardinal complexity as the number of objects in the robot’s world, and behavioural complexity as the number of objects’ distinct behaviours. We propose Error reduction merging (ERM, a new learning method that automatically discovers similarities in the structure of the agent’s environment. ERM identifies different types of objects solely from the data measured and merges the observations of objects that behave in the same or similar way in order to speed up the agent’s learning. We performed a series of experiments in worlds of increasing complexity. The results in our simple domain indicate that ERM was capable of discovering structural similarities in the data which indeed made the learning faster, clearly superior to conventional learning. This observed trend occurred with various machine learning algorithms used inside the ERM method.

  9. Development and assessment of learning objects about intramuscular medication administration

    OpenAIRE

    Lilian Mayumi Chinen Tamashiro; Heloisa Helena Ciqueto Peres

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to develop and assess a learning object about intramuscular medication administration for nursing undergraduates and nurses. METHOD: a random, intentional and non-probabilistic sample was selected of nurses from a Brazilian social network of nursing and students from the Undergraduate Program at the University of São Paulo School of Nursing to serve as research subjects and assess the object. RESULTS: the participants, 8 nurses and 8 students, studied the object and answered an as...

  10. Technical Evaluation Report 40: The International Learning Object Metadata Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norm Friesen

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of projects and organizations is currently making digital learning resources (learning objects available to instructors, students, and designers via systematic, standards-based infrastructures. One standard that is central to many of these efforts and infrastructures is known as Learning Object Metadata (IEEE 1484.12.1-2002, or LOM. This report builds on Report #11 in this series, and discusses the findings of the author's recent study of ways in which the LOM standard is being used internationally.

  11. Mechanisms of object recognition: what we have learned from pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Fabian A; Wasserman, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral studies of object recognition in pigeons have been conducted for 50 years, yielding a large body of data. Recent work has been directed toward synthesizing this evidence and understanding the visual, associative, and cognitive mechanisms that are involved. The outcome is that pigeons are likely to be the non-primate species for which the computational mechanisms of object recognition are best understood. Here, we review this research and suggest that a core set of mechanisms for object recognition might be present in all vertebrates, including pigeons and people, making pigeons an excellent candidate model to study the neural mechanisms of object recognition. Behavioral and computational evidence suggests that error-driven learning participates in object category learning by pigeons and people, and recent neuroscientific research suggests that the basal ganglia, which are homologous in these species, may implement error-driven learning of stimulus-response associations. Furthermore, learning of abstract category representations can be observed in pigeons and other vertebrates. Finally, there is evidence that feedforward visual processing, a central mechanism in models of object recognition in the primate ventral stream, plays a role in object recognition by pigeons. We also highlight differences between pigeons and people in object recognition abilities, and propose candidate adaptive specializations which may explain them, such as holistic face processing and rule-based category learning in primates. From a modern comparative perspective, such specializations are to be expected regardless of the model species under study. The fact that we have a good idea of which aspects of object recognition differ in people and pigeons should be seen as an advantage over other animal models. From this perspective, we suggest that there is much to learn about human object recognition from studying the "simple" brains of pigeons.

  12. Learning object for teacher training aimed to develop communication skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Esmeralda RODRÍGUEZ RAMÍREZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results and reflections obtained across a research aimed to analyze the quality criteria of an opened learning object oriented to develop communication skills in order to be able to report and validate it according to its content, pedagogic structure, technological structure, graphical and textual language and usability to teacher training, in order to base it theoretically, pedagogically and technologically. The research question was: Which are the quality criteria that a learning object aimed to develop communication skills must cover? Under a quantitative approach, there were electronic questionnaires applied to: 34 Technological University teachers, eight experts about of communicative competence, teaching, technology and graphic design. The results indicated that some of the quality criteria of learning object are: the effective managing of the learning content, the balanced composition of his pedagogic structure, the technological structure efficiency and the proper managing of graphical and textual language.

  13. The Analysis of the Relationship between Primary Learning Styles and Learning Objects in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between the primary learning styles of students and different learning objects presented simultaneously in an online learning environment in the context of the usage levels of these objects. A total of 103 sophomores from a Turkish State University participated in the study. Felder-Solomon Index of…

  14. Learning Object Relationships which determine the Outcome of Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fichtl, Severin; Alexander, John; Kraft, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    and motor programs for the new behaviour; here we focus only on the sensory aspect: learning to recognise situations in which the new behaviour succeeds. We experimented with learning these situations in a realistic physical simulation of a robotic manipulator interacting with various objects, where......Infants extend their repertoire of behaviours from initially simple behaviours with single objects to complex behaviours dealing with spatial relationships among objects. We are interested in the mechanisms underlying this development in order to achieve similar development in artificial systems...

  15. Individualized Learning Through Non-Linear use of Learning Objects: With Examples From Math and Stat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rootzén, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to ensure individualized learning that is fun, inspiring and innovative. We believe that when you enjoy, your brain will open up and learning will be easier and more effective. The methods use a non-linear learning environment based on self-contained learning objects which are pieced t...

  16. The Learning Object Economy: Implications For Developing Faculty Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The COHERE Group

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolving use of learning technologies and systems, such as learning object systems, to support more social learning environments in which learners have more agency than ever before to construct their own learning experiences is an innovation that involves both faculty and learners in a process of difficult sociocultural change. Programs of faculty support that acknowledge that faculty’s learning needs extend beyond the development of technical skills to the development of new pedagogical skills are indicated. This paper argues that the evolving concept of learning objects systems, and the "economy" that is emerging around the idea of sharable, reusable learning objects managed by repositories, presents new challenges and opportunities for our community. Faculty working with these systems may need to be supported through a personal process of reconceptualizing the nature of teaching and learning within these environments. This process of personal transformation has the potential for change in institutional policy and practice, the institutional cultural change of which Tony Bates (2000 and others speak (cf. Advisory Committee for Online Learning, 2000. The Collaboration for Online Higher Education Research (COHERE is an alliance of eight research-intensive Canadian universities that is examining these challenges through a multi-pronged research program, one focus of which is supporting faculty as they research their own practice related to technology-enhanced teaching innovations. More specifically, this paper is itself a collaboration among the COHERE partners to share our collective belief about the potential for faculty and institutional transformation through participation in these "e-learning evolutions".

  17. The Inclusion Potential of Student Production of Digital Learning Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2016-01-01

    -secondary schools. The project explored teacher-designed frameworks that engage students’ agency as digital producers of learning objects for their peers. The findings indicate that digital production facilitates students’ learning processes and qualifies their learning outcome when executed within a teacher......This account of the inclusion potential of students’ digital production is based on the large-scale research and development project Students’ Digital Production and Students as Learning Designers (2013–2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Education. The target groups were primary and lower......-designed framework that accommodates and empowers students’ agency. The Danish parliament passed the Law of Inclusion In 2012 with the objective that by 2015, 96% of all students would be included in normal classes. Inclusion was not part of the initial research agenda, but this changed unexpectedly during...

  18. Conversation and Object Manipulation Influence Children's Learning in a Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jant, Erin A; Haden, Catherine A; Uttal, David H; Babcock, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The effects of parent-child conversation and object manipulation on children's learning, transfer of knowledge, and memory were examined in two museum exhibits and conversations recorded at home. Seventy-eight children (Mage  = 4.9) and their parents were randomly assigned to receive conversation cards featuring elaborative questions about exhibit objects, the physical objects themselves, both, or neither, before their exhibit visits. Dyads who received the cards engaged in more elaborative talk and joint nonverbal activities with objects in the first exhibit than those who did not. Dyads who received objects engaged in the most parent-child joint talk. Results also illustrate transfer of information across exhibits and from museum to home. Implications for understanding mechanisms of informal learning and transfer are discussed.

  19. Development of learning object from IP-based television programme

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahkhair, Sanaz

    2013-01-01

    The TAMALLE+[1, 2] is a prototype system that supports learners in their television viewing, enhancing informal language learning via interactive television and mobile phones. In this paper we describe a learner-centred study designed to elicit criteria for selection of those language learning object whose annotation or explanation through TAMALLE+ system could best enhance the advanced learner’s understanding of popular broadcast television programmes in English. We identified two main areas...

  20. Learning Spatial Object Localization from Vision on a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Leitner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined machine learning and computer vision approach for robots to localize objects. It allows our iCub humanoid to quickly learn to provide accurate 3D position estimates (in the centimetre range of objects seen. Biologically inspired approaches, such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and Genetic Programming (GP, are trained to provide these position estimates using the two cameras and the joint encoder readings. No camera calibration or explicit knowledge of the robot's kinematic model is needed. We find that ANN and GP are not just faster and have lower complexity than traditional techniques, but also learn without the need for extensive calibration procedures. In addition, the approach is localizing objects robustly, when placed in the robot's workspace at arbitrary positions, even while the robot is moving its torso, head and eyes.

  1. Learning AND-OR templates for object recognition and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Zhangzhang; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a framework for unsupervised learning of a hierarchical reconfigurable image template--the AND-OR Template (AOT) for visual objects. The AOT includes: 1) hierarchical composition as "AND" nodes, 2) deformation and articulation of parts as geometric "OR" nodes, and 3) multiple ways of composition as structural "OR" nodes. The terminal nodes are hybrid image templates (HIT) [17] that are fully generative to the pixels. We show that both the structures and parameters of the AOT model can be learned in an unsupervised way from images using an information projection principle. The learning algorithm consists of two steps: 1) a recursive block pursuit procedure to learn the hierarchical dictionary of primitives, parts, and objects, and 2) a graph compression procedure to minimize model structure for better generalizability. We investigate the factors that influence how well the learning algorithm can identify the underlying AOT. And we propose a number of ways to evaluate the performance of the learned AOTs through both synthesized examples and real-world images. Our model advances the state of the art for object detection by improving the accuracy of template matching.

  2. Learning Objects and Grasp Affordances through Autonomous Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Detry, Renaud; Pugeault, Nicolas;

    2009-01-01

    We describe a system for autonomous learning of visual object representations and their grasp affordances on a robot-vision system. It segments objects by grasping and moving 3D scene features, and creates probabilistic visual representations for object detection, recognition and pose estimation...... image sequences as well as (3) a number of built-in behavioral modules on the one hand, and autonomous exploration on the other hand, the system is able to generate object and grasping knowledge through interaction with its environment....

  3. Learning Objects and Grasp Affordances through Autonomous Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Detry, Renaud; Pugeault, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We describe a system for autonomous learning of visual object representations and their grasp affordances on a robot-vision system. It segments objects by grasping and moving 3D scene features, and creates probabilistic visual representations for object detection, recognition and pose estimation...... image sequences as well as (3) a number of built-in behavioral modules on the one hand, and autonomous exploration on the other hand, the system is able to generate object and grasping knowledge through interaction with its environment....

  4. Learning Content Selection Rules for Generating Object Descriptions in Dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, P W; 10.1613/jair.1591

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental requirement of any task-oriented dialogue system is the ability to generate object descriptions that refer to objects in the task domain. The subproblem of content selection for object descriptions in task-oriented dialogue has been the focus of much previous work and a large number of models have been proposed. In this paper, we use the annotated COCONUT corpus of task-oriented design dialogues to develop feature sets based on Dale and Reiters (1995) incremental model, Brennan and Clarks (1996) conceptual pact model, and Jordans (2000b) intentional influences model, and use these feature sets in a machine learning experiment to automatically learn a model of content selection for object descriptions. Since Dale and Reiters model requires a representation of discourse structure, the corpus annotations are used to derive a representation based on Grosz and Sidners (1986) theory of the intentional structure of discourse, as well as two very simple representations of discourse structure based purel...

  5. Comparison of three assessment methodologies of virtual learning objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin INSUASTY PORTILLA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to exemplify the evaluation of a Learning Object «Construir la Geometría» using three different proposals that produce similar results for the object being evaluated. We describe two ways to perform an assessment, the internal and external; are used for evaluating proposals Rodríguez Sanz, Dodero et al. (2008, Morales Morgado (2007 and the assessment instrument used in the Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes (Mexico.

  6. Object tracking by transitive learning using perspective transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Wei, Zhenzhong

    2016-10-01

    Object tracking is a core subject in computer vision and has significant meaning in both theory and practice. In this paper, we propose a novel tracking method, in which a robust discriminative classifier is built basing on both object and context information. In this method, we consider multiple frames of local invariant features on and around the object, and construct the object template and context template. To overcome the limitation of the invariant representations, we also design a non-parametric learning algorithm using transitive matching perspective transformation, which is called as LUPT (Learning Using Perspective Transformation). This learning algorithm can keep adding new object appearance into the object template and avoid improper updating when occlusions appear. In this paper, we also analyze the asymptotic stability of our method and prove its drift-free capability in long term tracking. Extensive experiments using challenging publicly available video sequences that cover most of the critical conditions in tracking demonstrate the enhanced strength and robustness of our method. Moreover, in comparison with several state-of -the-art tracking systems, our method shows superior performance in most of cases, especially in long time sequences.

  7. Development and assessment of learning objects about intramuscular medication administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Mayumi Chinen Tamashiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to develop and assess a learning object about intramuscular medication administration for nursing undergraduates and nurses.METHOD: a random, intentional and non-probabilistic sample was selected of nurses from a Brazilian social network of nursing and students from the Undergraduate Program at the University of São Paulo School of Nursing to serve as research subjects and assess the object.RESULTS: the participants, 8 nurses and 8 students, studied the object and answered an assessment instrument that included the following criteria: educational aspects (relevance of the theme, objectives and texts/hypertexts, interface of the environment (navigation, accessibility and screen design and didactic resources (interactivity and presentation of resources. In total, 128 significant answers were obtained, 124 (97% of which were positive, assessed as excellent and satisfactory, considered as a flexible, dynamic, objective resources that is appropriate to the nursing learning process.CONCLUSION: the educational technology shows a clear and easily understandable language and the teaching method could be applied in other themes, contributing to the education and training of nursing professionals, positively affecting nursing teaching, stimulating the knowledge, autonomous and independent learning, aligned with the new professional education requirements.

  8. The Analysis of the Relationship between Primary Learning Styles and Learning Objects in an Online Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Özdemir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationships between the primary learning styles of students and different learning objects presented simultaneously in an online learning environment in the context of the usage levels of these objects. A total of 103 sophomores from a Turkish State University participated in the study. Felder-Solomon Index of Learning-Styles (F-SILS was used to determine the learning styles of the participants. Four different types of learning objects (i.e. video lecturing, audio lecturing, PDF lecturing and subject comprehension tests were prepared for the course ‘Basic database operations with MySQL’. Koper’s (2003 classification model was used in selecting these learning objects. Descriptive analysis methods were used to determine the distribution of the participants according to their learning styles. Independent-Samples T-Test and the Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon test were used to test the differences between learning styles and learning objects. The usage levels of the learning objects were analysed in the context of interdimensional primary learning styles in the scale of the F-SILS. Those with sensory and visual learning styles were in the majority among the primary learning styles of participants. The study did not include the findings of students with other primary learning styles due to their small sample size. The findings of the study on the usage frequencies of subject comprehension tests and the duration of video lectures by primarily visual and sensory students demonstrated a significant difference on behalf of the primary sensory students. On the other hand, there was no statistically significant difference between students with primarily sensory styles and students with primarily visual styles in terms of the reading frequency of PDF lectures and the listening frequency of audio lectures.

  9. An Approach to Metadata Generation for Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez D., Victor; Zapata G., Alfredo; Vidal C., Christian; Segura N., Alejandra; Prieto M., Manuel

    Metadata describe instructional resources and define their nature and use. Metadata are required to guarantee reusability and interchange of instructional resources into e-Learning systems. However, fulfilment of large metadata attributes is a hard and complex task for almost all LO developers. As a consequence many mistakes are made. This can cause the impoverishment of data quality in indexing, searching and recovering process. We propose a methodology to build Learning Objects from digital resources. The first phase includes automatic preprocessing of resources using techniques from information retrieval. Initial metadata obtained in this first phase are then used to search similar LO to propose missed metadata. The second phase considers assisted activities that merge computer advice with human decisions. Suggestions are based on metadata of similar Learning Object using fuzzy logic theory.

  10. Exploring Characterizations of Learning Object Repositories Using Data Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Alejandra; Vidal, Christian; Menendez, Victor; Zapata, Alfredo; Prieto, Manuel

    Learning object repositories provide a platform for the sharing of Web-based educational resources. As these repositories evolve independently, it is difficult for users to have a clear picture of the kind of contents they give access to. Metadata can be used to automatically extract a characterization of these resources by using machine learning techniques. This paper presents an exploratory study carried out in the contents of four public repositories that uses clustering and association rule mining algorithms to extract characterizations of repository contents. The results of the analysis include potential relationships between different attributes of learning objects that may be useful to gain an understanding of the kind of resources available and eventually develop search mechanisms that consider repository descriptions as a criteria in federated search.

  11. Learning Spatial Object Localization from Vision on a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Leitner

    2012-12-01

    We find that ANN and GP are not just faster and have lower complexity than traditional techniques, but also learn without the need for extensive calibration procedures. In addition, the approach is localizing objects robustly, when placed in the robot’s workspace at arbitrary positions, even while the robot is moving its torso, head and eyes.

  12. Documentation Report, Self-Paced Physics, Classification of Learning Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD.

    The purpose of this study was to develop a taxonomy which would categorize high level physics problem-solving behaviors, and to examine the usefulness of such a classification system. This classification of learning objectives is based on complexity, a nonarbitrary measure which does not rely upon comparison between students but rather is based on…

  13. Indexing Learning Objects: Vocabularies and Empirical Investigation of Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, Suzanne; De Hoog, Robert; Wielinga, Bob; Anjewierden, Anjo

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the LOM standard and instructional design specifications, as well as domain specific indexing vocabularies, a structured indexing vocabulary for the more elementary learning objects is advisable in order to support retrieval tasks of developers. Furthermore, because semantic indexing is seen as a difficult task, three issues…

  14. Transforming Clinical Imaging Data for Virtual Reality Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelease, Robert B.; Rosset, Antoine

    2008-01-01

    Advances in anatomical informatics, three-dimensional (3D) modeling, and virtual reality (VR) methods have made computer-based structural visualization a practical tool for education. In this article, the authors describe streamlined methods for producing VR "learning objects," standardized interactive software modules for anatomical sciences…

  15. Personalised Learning Object System Based on Self-Regulated Learning Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alharbi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulated learning has become an important construct in education research in the last few years. Selfregulated learning in its simple form is the learner’s ability to monitor and control the learning process. There is increasing research in the literature on how to support students become more self-regulated learners. However, the advancement in the information technology has led to paradigm changes in the design and development of educational content. The concept of learning object instructional technology has emerged as a result of this shift in educational technology paradigms. This paper presents the results of a study that investigated the potential educational effectiveness of a pedagogical framework based on the self-regulated learning theories to support the design of learning object systems to help computer science students. A prototype learning object system was developed based on the contemporary research on self-regulated learning. The system was educationally evaluated in a quasi-experimental study over two semesters in a core programming languages concepts course. The evaluation revealed that a learning object system that takes into consideration contemporary research on self-regulated learning can be an effective learning environment to support computer science education.

  16. Mobile Authoring of Open Educational Resources as Reusable Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Kinshuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available E-learning technologies have allowed authoring and playback of standardized reusable learning objects (RLO for several years. Effective mobile learning requires similar functionality at both design time and runtime. Mobile devices can play RLO using applications like SMILE, mobile access to a learning management system (LMS, or other systems which deploy content to mobile learners (Castillo & Ayala, 2008; Chu, Hwang, & Tseng, 2010; Hsu & Chen, 2010; Nakabayashi, 2009; Zualkernan, Nikkhah, & Al-Sabah, 2009. However, implementations which author content in a mobile context do not typically permit reuse across multiple contexts due to a lack of standardization. Standards based (IMS and SCORM authoring implementations exist for non-mobile platforms (Gonzalez-Barbone & Anido-Rifon, 2008; Griffiths, Beauvoir, Liber, & Barrett-Baxendale, 2009; Téllez, 2010; Yang, Chiu, Tsai, & Wu, 2004. However, this paradigm precludes capturing learning where and when it occurs. Consequently, RLO authored for e-learning lack learner generated content, especially with timely, relevant, and location aware examples.

  17. HIERARCHICAL DEEP LEARNING ARCHITECTURE FOR 10K OBJECTS CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Laxman Katole

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of visual object recognition architectures based on Convolutional Neural Networks & Convolutional Deep Belief Networks paradigms has revolutionized artificial Vision Science. These architectures extract & learn the real world hierarchical visual features utilizing supervised & unsupervised learning approaches respectively. Both the approaches yet cannot scale up realistically to provide recognition for a very large number of objects as high as 10K. We propose a two level hierarchical deep learning architecture inspired by divide & conquer principle that decomposes the large scale recognition architecture into root & leaf level model architectures. Each of the root & leaf level models is trained exclusively to provide superior results than possible by any 1-level deep learning architecture prevalent today. The proposed architecture classifies objects in two steps. In the first step the root level model classifies the object in a high level category. In the second step, the leaf level recognition model for the recognized high level category is selected among all the leaf models. This leaf level model is presented with the same input object image which classifies it in a specific category. Also we propose a blend of leaf level models trained with either supervised or unsupervised learning approaches. Unsupervised learning is suitable whenever labelled data is scarce for the specific leaf level models. Currently the training of leaf level models is in progress; where we have trained 25 out of the total 47 leaf level models as of now. We have trained the leaf models with the best case top-5 error rate of 3.2% on the validation data set for the particular leaf models. Also we demonstrate that the validation error of the leaf level models saturates towards the above mentioned accuracy as the number of epochs are increased to more than sixty. The top-5 error rate for the entire two-level architecture needs to be computed in conjunction with

  18. Virtual learning object and environment: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira; Bezerril, Manacés Dos Santos; Mariz, Camila Maria Santos; Fernandes, Maria Isabel Domingues; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the concept of virtual learning object and environment according to Rodgers' evolutionary perspective. Descriptive study with a mixed approach, based on the stages proposed by Rodgers in his concept analysis method. Data collection occurred in August 2015 with the search of dissertations and theses in the Bank of Theses of the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel. Quantitative data were analyzed based on simple descriptive statistics and the concepts through lexicographic analysis with support of the IRAMUTEQ software. The sample was made up of 161 studies. The concept of "virtual learning environment" was presented in 99 (61.5%) studies, whereas the concept of "virtual learning object" was presented in only 15 (9.3%) studies. A virtual learning environment includes several and different types of virtual learning objects in a common pedagogical context. Analisar o conceito de objeto e de ambiente virtual de aprendizagem na perspectiva evolucionária de Rodgers. Estudo descritivo, de abordagem mista, realizado a partir das etapas propostas por Rodgers em seu modelo de análise conceitual. A coleta de dados ocorreu em agosto de 2015 com a busca de dissertações e teses no Banco de Teses e Dissertações da Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior. Os dados quantitativos foram analisados a partir de estatística descritiva simples e os conceitos pela análise lexicográfica com suporte do IRAMUTEQ. A amostra é constituída de 161 estudos. O conceito de "ambiente virtual de aprendizagem" foi apresentado em 99 (61,5%) estudos, enquanto o de "objeto virtual de aprendizagem" em apenas 15 (9,3%). Concluiu-se que um ambiente virtual de aprendizagem reúne vários e diferentes tipos de objetos virtuais de aprendizagem em um contexto pedagógico comum.

  19. Object-oriented user interfaces for personalized mobile learning

    CERN Document Server

    Alepis, Efthimios

    2014-01-01

    This book presents recent research in mobile learning and advanced user interfaces. It is shown how the combination of this fields can result in personalized educational software that meets the requirements of state-of-the-art mobile learning software. This book provides a framework that is capable of incorporating the software technologies, exploiting a wide range of their current advances and additionally investigating ways to go even further by providing potential solutions to future challenges. The presented approach uses the well-known Object-Oriented method in order to address these challenges. Throughout this book, a general model is constructed using Object-Oriented Architecture. Each chapter focuses on the construction of a specific part of this model, while in the conclusion these parts are unified. This book will help software engineers build more sophisticated personalized software that targets in mobile education, while at the same time retaining a high level of adaptivity and user-friendliness w...

  20. Learning to Place New Objects in a Scene

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yun; Zheng, Changxi; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2012-01-01

    Placing is a necessary skill for a personal robot to have in order to perform tasks such as arranging objects in a disorganized room. The object placements should not only be stable but also be in their semantically preferred placing areas and orientations. This is challenging because an environment can have a large variety of objects and placing areas that may not have been seen by the robot before. In this paper, we propose a learning approach for placing multiple objects in different placing areas in a scene. Given point-clouds of the objects and the scene, we design appropriate features and use a graphical model to encode various properties, such as the stacking of objects, stability, object-area relationship and common placing constraints. The inference in our model is an integer linear program, which we solve efficiently via an LP relaxation. We extensively evaluate our approach on 98 objects from 16 categories being placed into 40 areas. Our robotic experiments show a success rate of 98% in placing kno...

  1. Maintenance and Exchange of Learning Objects in a Web Services Based e-Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Gottfried; Westerkamp, Peter

    2004-01-01

    "Web services" enable partners to exploit applications via the Internet. Individual services can be composed to build new and more complex ones with additional and more comprehensive functionality. In this paper, we apply the Web service paradigm to electronic learning, and show how to exchange and maintain learning objects is a…

  2. Learning Objects and Learning Content Management Systems in Engineering Education: Implications of New Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoer, Ellen; Dopper, Sofia

    2006-01-01

    Learning objects and learning content management systems are considered to be "the next wave in engineering education". The results of experiments with these new trends in ICT in engineering education are described in this paper. The prospects were examined and the concepts of reusability of content for teachers and for personalized…

  3. Algorithms for Learning Preferences for Sets of Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; Eaton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A method is being developed that provides for an artificial-intelligence system to learn a user's preferences for sets of objects and to thereafter automatically select subsets of objects according to those preferences. The method was originally intended to enable automated selection, from among large sets of images acquired by instruments aboard spacecraft, of image subsets considered to be scientifically valuable enough to justify use of limited communication resources for transmission to Earth. The method is also applicable to other sets of objects: examples of sets of objects considered in the development of the method include food menus, radio-station music playlists, and assortments of colored blocks for creating mosaics. The method does not require the user to perform the often-difficult task of quantitatively specifying preferences; instead, the user provides examples of preferred sets of objects. This method goes beyond related prior artificial-intelligence methods for learning which individual items are preferred by the user: this method supports a concept of setbased preferences, which include not only preferences for individual items but also preferences regarding types and degrees of diversity of items in a set. Consideration of diversity in this method involves recognition that members of a set may interact with each other in the sense that when considered together, they may be regarded as being complementary, redundant, or incompatible to various degrees. The effects of such interactions are loosely summarized in the term portfolio effect. The learning method relies on a preference representation language, denoted DD-PREF, to express set-based preferences. In DD-PREF, a preference is represented by a tuple that includes quality (depth) functions to estimate how desired a specific value is, weights for each feature preference, the desired diversity of feature values, and the relative importance of diversity versus depth. The system applies statistical

  4. From Learning Object to Learning Cell: A Resource Organization Model for Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengquan; Yang, Xianmin; Cheng, Gang; Wang, Minjuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new model for organizing learning resources: Learning Cell. This model is open, evolving, cohesive, social, and context-aware. By introducing a time dimension into the organization of learning resources, Learning Cell supports the dynamic evolution of learning resources while they are being used. In addition, by introducing a…

  5. Educational potential of topic maps and learning objects for m-learning in the knowledge society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel MARZAL

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present topic maps as a model for managing digital education content and learning objects for the design of digital teaching materials as the building blocks for an ideal educational model for the knowledge society: mlearning. We assess the educational benefits of topic maps using double entry tables for m-learning and propose criteria for determining the effectiveness of learning objects in mlearning. The findings reveal a need for further research for the effective management of educational content specific to mlearning, which is considered in pedagogical models such as in connectivism.

  6. A Data Mining Approach to Improve Re-Accessibility and Delivery of Learning Knowledge Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitha, Sai; Mehrotra, Deepti; Bansal, Abhay

    2014-01-01

    Today Learning Management Systems (LMS) have become an integral part of learning mechanism of both learning institutes and industry. A Learning Object (LO) can be one of the atomic components of LMS. A large amount of research is conducted into identifying benchmarks for creating Learning Objects. Some of the major concerns associated with LO are…

  7. Using learning styles in learning objects: a case study in a colombian public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Pérez-Gutiérrez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: computer-programming courses aren’t easy to study. Some authors have studied the difficulties in learning programming to support developing learning materials for basic programming courses. In Colombia there is an approach to teaching programming using an active learning approach (Interactive Learning Objects – ILOs as one of the components that reinforce their pedagogical model, by supporting the generation of high-level programming skills. Objective: we want to explore the possibilities of using Learning Styles and Team Learning to increase the learning levels of Computer Programming students. Methods: this study was applied outside of the classroom in order to encourage autonomous learning. To do this we’ll pick a sample and apply a series of comparative tests between research groups. Results: the objective was met by effectively showing that providing content based LS and team-based leaning can improve a student’s performance. The intervention group grades were better than those of the comparison group though they should be analyzed further to get a more accurate conclusion. Conclusion: This study will give us the chance to see whether the strategy can be applied to the Francisco de Paula Santander University students.

  8. Personalised learning object based on multi-agent model and learners’ learning styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppamas Pukkhem

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-agent model is proposed in which learning styles and a word analysis technique to create a learning object recommendation system are used. On the basis of a learning style-based design, a concept map combination model is proposed to filter out unsuitable learning concepts from a given course. Our learner model classifies learners into eight styles and implements compatible computational methods consisting of three recommendations: i non-personalised, ii preferred feature-based, and iii neighbour-based collaborative filtering. The analysis of preference error (PE was performed by comparing the actual preferred learning object with the predicted one. In our experiments, the feature-based recommendation algorithm has the fewest PE.

  9. Delivery of Learning Knowledge Objects Using Fuzzy Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitha, A. Sai; Mehrotra, Deepti; Bansal, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    e-Learning industry is rapidly changing and the current learning trends are based on personalized, social and mobile learning, content reusability, cloud-based and talent management. The learning systems have attained a significant growth catering to the needs of a wide range of learners, having different approaches and styles of learning. Objects…

  10. Web based Interactive 3D Learning Objects for Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hesse

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an approach to create and integrate interactive 3D learning objects of high quality for higher education into a learning management system. The use of these resources allows to visualize topics, such as electro-technical and physical processes in the interior of complex devices. This paper addresses the challenge of combining rich interactivity and adequate realism with 3D exercise material for distance elearning.

  11. Assessing Program Learning Objectives to Improve Undergraduate Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Carrie

    2014-03-01

    Our physics undergraduate program has five program learning objectives (PLOs) focusing on (1) physical principles, (2) mathematical expertise, (3) experimental technique, (4) communication and teamwork, and (5) research proficiency. One PLO is assessed each year, with the results guiding modifications in our curriculum and future assessment practices; we have just completed our first cycle of assessing all PLOs. Our approach strives to maximize the ease and applicability of our assessment practices while maintaining faculty's flexibility in course design and delivery. Objectives are mapped onto our core curriculum with identified coursework collected as direct evidence. We've utilized mostly descriptive rubrics, applying them at the course and program levels as well as sharing them with the students. This has resulted in more efficient assessment that is also applicable to reaccreditation efforts, higher inter-rater reliability than with other rubric types, and higher quality capstone projects. We've also found that the varied quality of student writing can interfere with our assessment of other objectives. This poster outlines our processes, resources, and how we have used PLO assessment to strengthen our undergraduate program.

  12. The Inclusion Potential of Student Production of Digital Learning Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2016-01-01

    This account of the inclusion potential of students’ digital production is based on the large-scale research and development project Students’ Digital Production and Students as Learning Designers (2013–2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Education. The target groups were primary and lower......-designed framework that accommodates and empowers students’ agency. The Danish parliament passed the Law of Inclusion In 2012 with the objective that by 2015, 96% of all students would be included in normal classes. Inclusion was not part of the initial research agenda, but this changed unexpectedly during...... the project. Specifically, students who did not participate or participated only sporadically in everyday school activities at the beginning of the project adopted new positions as participants and agents. We understand these changes as inclusive processes initiated by the combination of teacher...

  13. Discriminative object tracking via sparse representation and online dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuan; Zhang, Wensheng; Li, Cuihua; Lin, Shuyang; Qu, Yanyun; Zhang, Yinghua

    2014-04-01

    We propose a robust tracking algorithm based on local sparse coding with discriminative dictionary learning and new keypoint matching schema. This algorithm consists of two parts: the local sparse coding with online updated discriminative dictionary for tracking (SOD part), and the keypoint matching refinement for enhancing the tracking performance (KP part). In the SOD part, the local image patches of the target object and background are represented by their sparse codes using an over-complete discriminative dictionary. Such discriminative dictionary, which encodes the information of both the foreground and the background, may provide more discriminative power. Furthermore, in order to adapt the dictionary to the variation of the foreground and background during the tracking, an online learning method is employed to update the dictionary. The KP part utilizes refined keypoint matching schema to improve the performance of the SOD. With the help of sparse representation and online updated discriminative dictionary, the KP part are more robust than the traditional method to reject the incorrect matches and eliminate the outliers. The proposed method is embedded into a Bayesian inference framework for visual tracking. Experimental results on several challenging video sequences demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach.

  14. Learning Object to Enhance Introductory Programming Understanding: Does the Size Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Reginamary; Hin, Hew Soon; Choo, Koo Ah

    2014-01-01

    Learning Object (LO) is the breakdown of larger content into smaller pieces of information that accomplishes a single learning outcome. The smaller piece of content is incorporated with multimedia elements to promote meaningful learning. The prevailing focus on learning objects for introductory programming promising in terms of enhancing the…

  15. Learning to Detect Objects from Eye-Tracking Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P Papadopoulous

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the bottlenecks in computer vision, especially in object detection, is the need for a large amount of training data. Typically, this is acquired by manually annotating images by hand. In this study, we explore the possibility of using eye-trackers to provide training data for supervised machine learning. We have created a new large scale eye-tracking dataset, collecting fixation data for 6270 images from the Pascal VOC 2012 database. This represents 10 of the 20 classes included in the Pascal database. Each image was viewed by 5 observers, and a total of over 178k fixations have been collected. While previous attempts at using fixation data in computer vision were based on a free-viewing paradigm, we used a visual search task in order to increase the proportion of fixations on the target object. Furthermore, we divided the dataset into five pairs of semantically similar classes (cat/dog, bicycle/motorbike, horse/cow, boat/aeroplane and sofa/diningtable, with the observer having to decide which class each image belonged to. This kept the observer's task simple, while decreasing the chance of them using the scene gist to identify the target parafoveally. In order to alleviate the central bias in scene viewing, the images were presented to the observers with a random offset. The goal of our project is to use the eye-tracking information in order to detect and localise the attended objects. Our model so far, based on features representing the location of the fixations and an appearance model of the attended regions, can successfully predict the location of the target objects in over half of images.

  16. A Privacy - Learning Objects Identity System for Smartphones Based on a Virtual Learning Environment Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeThanhHieu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are widely used today, with many features such as GPS map navigation, capturingphotos with camera equipment such as digital camera, internet connection via wifi or 3G devices thatfunction as computers. These devices are being used for various purposes including online learning, wherelearners can study from anywhere and anytime for example in the street, home, office and school. However,identifing a method by which teachers in these virtural environements can remember their learners “faces”in the classroom or manage "Identification Number Student" (ID student or user is not reliable when theteacher cannot see all of the learners in the class or know who is online from a particular account. In thispaper, we propose a system, Android Virtual Learner Identify (AVLI, which collects images captured bythe face of the learning object directly from the camera, the location of the learner by identifing where thelearner is studying and configuration of information including Time, Mac, IP addresses, IMEI number andlocation via GPS. The systen then saves learner profiles to help the teacher or education managers on theVirtual Learning Environment (VLE identify learning object. We used the VLE that we built onmobile.ona.vn domain. We implemented the AVLI prototype Android phone with solution passwordencryption and images taken directly from the camera to ensure that the information is transmitted andstored securely in the Virtual Learning Environment System Database (VLE Data of learning objects whilepreserving the ability to identify learning objects by a teacher or education manager.In addition, we solve the problem of image size on a smartphone device by compressing images.We demonstrate our solution which is secure enough to prevent fraud of the learner as well as thetransmission of data from the client device to the server with three layers of protection by taking imagesdirectly from the camera, converting images from string and encoding

  17. Object tracking by occlusion detection via structured sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2013-06-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object\\'s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for non-sparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that our tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Learning to Appraise the Quality of Qualitative Research Articles: A Contextualized Learning Object for Constructing Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Helping beginning qualitative researchers critically appraise qualitative research articles is a common learning objective for introductory methodology courses. To aid students in achieving competency in appraising the quality of qualitative research articles, a multi-part activity incorporating the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme's (CASP)…

  19. Activities Joining Learning Objectives to Assessments in Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palen, Stacy E.; Larson, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, accreditation boards and other governing bodies have been pushing hard for explicit learning goals and quantitative measures of assessment for general education courses such as Astronomy 101. This added assessment burden can be problematic, especially for harried adjuncts teaching multiple courses at multiple institutions. It would be helpful to have a field-tested set of combined hands-on activities and assessment tools that help instructors meet these assessment requirements. The authors have produced just such a set. We have been using hands-on activities in our classrooms for more than 15 years. These activities require no special equipment or preparation and can be completed within an hour by most students working in groups of two or three. The sections of each activity are arranged in steps, guiding the students from initial knowledge-level questions or practice to a final evaluation or synthesis of what they have just accomplished. Students thus get practice thinking at higher cognitive levels. A recent addition to these activities is the inclusion of formalized learning objectives and accompanying pre- and post-activity questions. The pre-activity questions address common misconceptions, relate familiar analogous terrestrial examples to the activity, and act as a brief refresher meta-concepts like scale factors, measurements, and basic mathematics review. The post-activity questions review the most important concepts introduced in the activity. We present a number of examples as well as a summary as to how we have initiated their use in a large lecture setting of 300 students, in smaller classrooms of 15 students, and in a community college online course.

  20. Developing Goals and Objectives for Gameplay and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces goals in games and then potential differences between learning goals and goalsin games, as well as the difficulties that may occur when implementing learning goals in games....

  1. Psychology Teaching Resources in the MERLOT Digital Learning Objects Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Pilati, Michelle L.; King, Beverly R.

    2008-01-01

    MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching) is a free multidisciplinary catalog of digital learning materials, peer reviews, learning assignments, and member comments designed to facilitate faculty instruction. The catalog's goal is to expand the quantity and quality of peer-reviewed online teaching materials. We…

  2. Psychology Teaching Resources in the MERLOT Digital Learning Objects Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Pilati, Michelle L.; King, Beverly R.

    2008-01-01

    MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching) is a free multidisciplinary catalog of digital learning materials, peer reviews, learning assignments, and member comments designed to facilitate faculty instruction. The catalog's goal is to expand the quantity and quality of peer-reviewed online teaching materials. We…

  3. EDUCATEE'S THESAURUS AS AN OBJECT OF MEASURING LEARNED MATERIAL OF THE DISTANCE LEARNING COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Aleksandrovich RYBANOV

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring and control over the process of studying the distance learning course are based on solving the problem of making out an adequate integral mark to the educatee for mastering entire study course, by testing results. It is suggested to use the degree of correspondence between educatee's thesaurus and the study course thesaurus as an integral mark for the degree of mastering the distance learning course. Study course thesaurus is a set of the course objects with relations between them specified. The article considers metrics of the study course thesaurus complexity, made on the basis of the graph theory and the information theory. It is suggested to use the amount of information contained in the study course thesaurus graph as the metrics of the study course thesaurus complexity. Educatee's thesaurus is considered as an object of measuring educational material learned at the semantic level and is assessed on the basis of amount of information contained in its graph, taking into account the factors of learning the thesaurus objects.

  4. Learning Sparse Representation for Objective Image Retargeting Quality Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiuping; Shao, Feng; Lin, Weisi; Jiang, Gangyi

    2017-04-13

    The goal of image retargeting is to adapt source images to target displays with different sizes and aspect ratios. Different retargeting operators create different retargeted images, and a key problem is to evaluate the performance of each retargeting operator. Subjective evaluation is most reliable, but it is cumbersome and labor-consuming, and more importantly, it is hard to be embedded into online optimization systems. This paper focuses on exploring the effectiveness of sparse representation for objective image retargeting quality assessment. The principle idea is to extract distortion sensitive features from one image (e.g., retargeted image) and further investigate how many of these features are preserved or changed in another one (e.g., source image) to measure the perceptual similarity between them. To create a compact and robust feature representation, we learn two overcomplete dictionaries to represent the distortion sensitive features of an image. Features including local geometric structure and global context information are both addressed in the proposed framework. The intrinsic discriminative power of sparse representation is then exploited to measure the similarity between the source and retargeted images. Finally, individual quality scores are fused into an overall quality by a typical regression method. Experimental results on several databases have demonstrated the superiority of the proposed method.

  5. Lack of Set Theory Relevant Prerequisite Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan-Dunlap, Hamide

    2006-01-01

    Many students struggle with college mathematics topics due to a lack of mastery of prerequisite knowledge. Set theory language is one such prerequisite for linear algebra courses. Many students' mistakes on linear algebra questions reveal a lack of mastery of set theory knowledge. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative analysis of a…

  6. MODeLeR: A Virtual Constructivist Learning Environment and Methodology for Object-Oriented Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, John W.; Koonce, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This article contains a description of the organization and method of use of an active learning environment named MODeLeR, (Multimedia Object Design Learning Resource), a tool designed to facilitate the learning of concepts pertaining to object modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML). MODeLeR was created to provide an authentic,…

  7. Learning Objects as Tools for Teaching Information Literacy Online: A Survey of Librarian Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Lori S.; Baures, Lisa; Niedbala, Mona; Bishop, Corinne; Cantrell, Sarah; Perez, Alice; Silfen, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Based on information gathered from two discussion sessions moderated by members of the Education and Behavioral Sciences Section's Online Learning Research Committee a survey was conducted to identify how librarians use course/learning management systems and learning objects to deliver instruction. Objectives of the study were to identify the…

  8. Advanced Technology for the Re-use of Learning Objects in a Course Management System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, A.; Collis, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    The creation, labelling, use, and re-use of learning objects is an important area of development involving learning technology. In the higher education context, instructors typically use a course management system (CMS) to organize and manage their own learning objects. The needs and practices of in

  9. Learning from Objects: A Future for 21st Century Urban Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    In this technological age, where mind and body are increasingly disconnected in the classroom, object-based learning--along with strong museum-school partnerships--provide many benefits for student learning. In this article, the author first outlines some of the special mind-body connections that object-based learning in museums affords learners…

  10. XLearning Object Organization Behaviors in a Home-Made Learning Content Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Yavuzz; Simsek, Huseyin

    2006-01-01

    This study designed, implemented and evaluated a learning content management system to facilitate creating both standard based and free style learning objects. The system, BULeCoMas, also enabled users to tag learning objects with usage data and tools supported with components accommodated under a Global Activity Center, are Global Task Pool,…

  11. Whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmy, Nabil Gad; Ismaeel, Dina Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present an analysis of how the structure and design of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects can be effective and efficient in terms of Performance, Time on task, and Learning Efficiency. The study explored two treatments, namely whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects,…

  12. Virtual learning object and environment: a concept analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pétala Tuani Candidode Oliveira Salvador; Manacés dos Santos Bezerril; Camila Maria Santos Mariz; Maria Isabel Domingues Fernandes; José Carlos Amado Martins; Viviane Euzébia Pereira Santos

    2017-01-01

    ...). [...]the integration of digital learning with ICTs reduced significantly the barrier to innovative education and helped to overcome time and space as restrictions in traditional teaching models, thus...

  13. Improving a Deep Learning based RGB-D Object Recognition Model by Ensemble Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakerberg, Andreas; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Heder, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Augmenting RGB images with depth information is a well-known method to significantly improve the recognition accuracy of object recognition models. Another method to im- prove the performance of visual recognition models is ensemble learning. However, this method has not been widely explored...... in combination with deep convolutional neural network based RGB-D object recognition models. Hence, in this paper, we form different ensembles of complementary deep convolutional neural network models, and show that this can be used to increase the recognition performance beyond existing limits. Experiments...

  14. iLab 20M: A Large-scale Controlled Object Dataset to Investigate Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    iLab-20M: A large-scale controlled object dataset to investigate deep learning Ali Borji1 Saeed Izadi2 Laurent Itti3 1Center for Research in Computer...the emer- gence of highly popular deep learning models. While be- ing very useful for learning invariance to object inter- and intra-class shape...knowledge delivery to CNNs. We also discuss how our analyses can lead the field to develop more efficient deep learning methods. 1. Introduction

  15. What's in a Prerequisite? A Mixed-Methods Approach to Identifying the Impact of a Prerequisite Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Brian K; Lee, Amanda K; Alam, Usman; Dang, Jennifer V; Dacanay, Samantha J; Morgado, Pedro; Pirino, Giorgia; Brunner, Jo Ellen; Castillo, Leanne A; Chan, Valerie W; Sandholtz, Judith H

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of prerequisites in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics curricula, there has been minimal effort to assess their value in a data-driven manner. Using both quantitative and qualitative data, we examined the impact of prerequisites in the context of a microbiology lecture and lab course pairing. Through interviews and an online survey, students highlighted a number of positive attributes of prerequisites, including their role in knowledge acquisition, along with negative impacts, such as perhaps needlessly increasing time to degree and adding to the cost of education. We also identified a number of reasons why individuals do or do not enroll in prerequisite courses, many of which were not related to student learning. In our particular curriculum, students did not believe the microbiology lecture course impacted success in the lab, which agrees with our analysis of lab course performance using a previously established "familiarity" scale. These conclusions highlight the importance of soliciting and analyzing student feedback, and triangulating these data with quantitative performance metrics to assess the state of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics curricula.

  16. What’s in a Prerequisite? A Mixed-Methods Approach to Identifying the Impact of a Prerequisite Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Brian K.; Lee, Amanda K.; Alam, Usman; Dang, Jennifer V.; Dacanay, Samantha J.; Morgado, Pedro; Pirino, Giorgia; Brunner, Jo Ellen; Castillo, Leanne A.; Chan, Valerie W.; Sandholtz, Judith H.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of prerequisites in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics curricula, there has been minimal effort to assess their value in a data-driven manner. Using both quantitative and qualitative data, we examined the impact of prerequisites in the context of a microbiology lecture and lab course pairing. Through interviews and an online survey, students highlighted a number of positive attributes of prerequisites, including their role in knowledge acquisition, along with negative impacts, such as perhaps needlessly increasing time to degree and adding to the cost of education. We also identified a number of reasons why individuals do or do not enroll in prerequisite courses, many of which were not related to student learning. In our particular curriculum, students did not believe the microbiology lecture course impacted success in the lab, which agrees with our analysis of lab course performance using a previously established “familiarity” scale. These conclusions highlight the importance of soliciting and analyzing student feedback, and triangulating these data with quantitative performance metrics to assess the state of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics curricula. PMID:28232587

  17. Similarity dependency of the change in ERP component N1 accompanying with the object recognition learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Wataru; Wang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Performance during object recognition across views is largely dependent on inter-object similarity. The present study was designed to investigate the similarity dependency of object recognition learning on the changes in ERP component N1. Human subjects were asked to train themselves to recognize novel objects with different inter-object similarity by performing object recognition tasks. During the tasks, images of an object had to be discriminated from the images of other objects irrespective of the viewpoint. When objects had a high inter-object similarity, the ERP component, N1 exhibited a significant increase in both the amplitude and the latency variation across objects during the object recognition learning process, and the N1 amplitude and latency variation across the views of the same objects decreased significantly. In contrast, no significant changes were found during the learning process when using objects with low inter-object similarity. The present findings demonstrate that the changes in the variation of N1 that accompany the object recognition learning process are dependent upon the inter-object similarity and imply that there is a difference in the neuronal representation for object recognition when using objects with high and low inter-object similarity.

  18. The Experience of Using the Scrum Process in the Production of Learning Objects for Blended Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Winckler de BETTIO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The technological resources used for pedagogical innovation in the form of distance education have increasingly been incorporated into face-to-face education. This article describes the experience of the Federal University of Lavras - Brazil - with new ways to apply technology in face-to-face undergraduate courses. This paper presents (i the strategy for the selection of course content, which was premised on the diversification of areas of knowledge and on promoting the permanent incorporation of the resources developed in the teaching-learning process, (ii the organization of the production process of Learning Objects based on the Scrum method, (iii the set of best practices, inspired by the management of agile software development, as well as the contextual motivation of its use.

  19. Digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Passos Vaz da Costa

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the creation of a digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system at a public university of Piaui. Method: A methodological study applied to technological production based on the pedagogical framework of problem-based learning. The methodology for creating the learning object observed the stages of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation recommended for contextualized instructional design. The revised taxonomy of Bloom was used to list the educational goals. Results: The four modules of the developed learning object were inserted into the educational platform Moodle. The theoretical assumptions allowed the design of an important online resource that promotes effective learning in the scope of nursing education. Conclusion: This study should add value to nursing teaching practices through the use of digital learning objects for teaching diagnostic reasoning applied to skin and skin appendages.

  20. An Automatic and Dynamic Approach for Personalized Recommendation of Learning Objects Considering Students Learning Styles: An Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano A. DORÇA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Content personalization in educational systems is an increasing research area. Studies show that students tend to have better performances when the content is customized according to his/her preferences. One important aspect of students particularities is how they prefer to learn. In this context, students learning styles should be considered, due to the importance of this feature to the adaptivity process in such systems. Thus, this work presents an efficient approach for personalization of the teaching process based on learning styles. Our approach is based on an expert system that implements a set of rules which classifies learning objects according to their teaching style, and then automatically filters learning objects according to students' learning styles. The best adapted learning objects are ranked and recommended to the student. Preliminary experiments suggest promising results.

  1. Model of Recommendation System for for Indexing and Retrieving the Learning Object based on Multiagent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Lima Rocha Campos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a multiagent system application model for indexing, retrieving and recommendation learning objects stored in different and heterogeneous repositories. The objects within these repositories are described by filled fields using different metadata standards. The searching mechanism covers several different learning object repositories and the same object can be described in these repositories by the use of different types of fields. Aiming to improve accuracy and coverage in terms of recovering a learning object and improve the signification of the results we propose an information retrieval model based on the multiagent system approach and an ontological model to describe the knowledge domain covered.

  2. Deep learning for class-generic object detection

    OpenAIRE

    Huval, Brody; Coates, Adam; Ng, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the use of deep neural networks for the novel task of class generic object detection. We show that neural networks originally designed for image recognition can be trained to detect objects within images, regardless of their class, including objects for which no bounding box labels have been provided. In addition, we show that bounding box labels yield a 1% performance increase on the ImageNet recognition challenge.

  3. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Learning Java Objects

    OpenAIRE

    S. Abu-Naser1; Ahmed, A; al-Masri, N; Deeb, A; E. Moshtaha; M. AbuLamdy

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the design of a web based intelligent tutoring system for teaching Java objects to students to overcome the difficulties they face. The basic idea of this system is a systematic introduction into the concept of Java objects. The system presents the topic of Java objects and administers automatically generated problems for the students to solve. The system is dynamically adapted at run time to the student’s individual progress. The system provides explicit suppo...

  4. How do newcomers learn to use an object?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    Newcomers have to learn everyday tasks in a practice to become competent practitioners (Goodwin, 1994) or members (Sacks, 1989; Schegloff, 2007). Over time they develop a professional vision (Goodwin, 1994) on the practice, enabling them to make relevant assessments about the practice and tasks...

  5. Learning Spatial Relations between Objects From 3D Scenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fichtl, Severin; Alexander, John; Guerin, Frank;

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing cognitive development during the first years of human life may be the result of a set of developmental mechanisms which are in continuous operation [1]. One such mechanism identified is the ability of the developing child to learn effective preconditions for their behaviours. It has been...

  6. OAEditor--A Framework for Editing Adaptive Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joao Carlos Rodrigues; Cabral, Lucidio dos Anjos Formiga; Oiveira, Ronei dos Santos; Bezerra, Lucimar Leandro; de Melo, Nisston Moraes Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Distance Learning supported by the WEB is a reality which is growing fast and, like any technological or empirical innovation, it reveals positive and negative aspects. An important aspect is in relation to the monitoring of the activities done by the students since an accurate online assessment of the knowledge acquired is an open and, therefore,…

  7. Refitting existing simulations to meet with new learning objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lainema, Timo; Henriksen, Thomas Duus; Saarinen, Eeli

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the application possibilities of business simulation games in teaching. By application possibilities we mean the different ways of arranging the learning sessions using the one and same simulation game. Thus, we are not discussing what kind of games should be built for certai...

  8. Learned value and object perception: Accelerated perception or biased decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajsic, Jason; Perera, Harendri; Pratt, Jay

    2017-02-01

    Learned value is known to bias visual search toward valued stimuli. However, some uncertainty exists regarding the stage of visual processing that is modulated by learned value. Here, we directly tested the effect of learned value on preattentive processing using temporal order judgments. Across four experiments, we imbued some stimuli with high value and some with low value, using a nonmonetary reward task. In Experiment 1, we replicated the value-driven distraction effect, validating our nonmonetary reward task. Experiment 2 showed that high-value stimuli, but not low-value stimuli, exhibit a prior-entry effect. Experiment 3, which reversed the temporal order judgment task (i.e., reporting which stimulus came second), showed no prior-entry effect, indicating that although a response bias may be present for high-value stimuli, they are still reported as appearing earlier. However, Experiment 4, using a simultaneity judgment task, showed no shift in temporal perception. Overall, our results support the conclusion that learned value biases perceptual decisions about valued stimuli without speeding preattentive stimulus processing.

  9. Strategies for Reuse of Learning Objects: Context Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijker, Allard; Collis, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Based on research in ten projects in a university, corporate learning, and military context, a set of dimensions is found that can help decision makers to develop strategies for reuse (Strijker, 2004). This article describes how these dimensions and their relation with human and technical aspects can be used in a reuse strategy. The dimensions can…

  10. A critique of Stephen Downes' article, "Learning Objects" -- A perspective from Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muain H. Jamlan

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available With the availability of technology, hardware, and software, learning objects become fundamental to the learning process and change the way in which learning materials are designed. The vast development of technology forces both teacher and learner to modify their roles. Teachers become facilitators, while learners became active and responsible for selecting modes and styles of learning. Assuming this attitude of implementing technology in the learning process and seeking new methods of facilitating learning, universities and colleges have to adopt new techniques. One of these new techniques is the use of learning objects. Although learning objects are considered products of technology developed in the USA, Japan, and European countries, universities in the Middle East have been influenced by this development. While there are differences in the quantity and quality of these technologies available in many Middle East countries, computer applications, especially those that deploy the Internet, have now become available. Educational authorities in Middle East countries are now turning to the availability of learning objects. Let me clarify some of the issues Downes discusses in his article on learning objects, Vol. 2, No. 1 of the International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning.

  11. A Workflow for Learning Objects Lifecycle and Reuse: Towards Evaluating Cost Effective Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade Learning Objects (LOs) have gained a lot of attention as a common format for developing and sharing digital educational content in the field of technology-enhanced learning. The main advantage of LOs is considered to be their potential for component-based reuse in different learning settings supporting different learning…

  12. The Role of Professional Objects in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitter, Ilya; de Bruijn, Elly; Simons, Robert-Jan; ten Cate, Olle

    2012-01-01

    We study project-based, technology-enhanced learning environments in higher education, which should produce, by means of specific mechanisms, learning outcomes in terms of transferable knowledge and learning-, thinking-, collaboration- and regulation-skills. Our focus is on the role of objects from professional practice serving as boundary objects…

  13. Learning New Names for New Objects: Cortical Effects as Measured by Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Katri; Laine, Matti; Renvall, Kati; Saarinen, Timo; Martin, Nadine; Salmelin, Riitta

    2004-01-01

    We tracked the evolvement of naming-related cortical dynamics with magnetoencephalography when five normal adults successfully learned names and/or meanings of unfamiliar objects. In all subjects, the learning of new names was associated with pronounced cortical effects. The learning effect was of long latency and emerged as a change of activation…

  14. Holistic Approach to Learning and Teaching Introductory Object-Oriented Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Neena; Whitfield, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a holistic approach to designing an introductory, object-oriented programming course. The design is grounded in constructivism and pedagogy of phenomenography. We use constructive alignment as the framework to align assessments, learning, and teaching with planned learning outcomes. We plan learning and teaching activities,…

  15. Analyzing the Quality of Students Interaction in a Distance Learning Object-Oriented Programming Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Elizabeth Simão

    2015-01-01

    Teaching object-oriented programming to students in an in-classroom environment demands well-thought didactic and pedagogical strategies in order to guarantee a good level of apprenticeship. To teach it on a completely distance learning environment (e-learning) imposes possibly other strategies, besides those that the e-learning model of Open…

  16. Instructional Learning Objects in the Digital Classroom: Effectively Measuring Impact on Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrino, Jacline L.

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrating library impact on student success is critical for all academic libraries today. This article discusses how the library of a large online university serving non-traditional students evaluated how customized point-of-need learning objects (LOs) embedded in the learning management system impacted student learning. Using a comprehensive…

  17. Analyzing the Quality of Students Interaction in a Distance Learning Object-Oriented Programming Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Elizabeth Simão

    2015-01-01

    Teaching object-oriented programming to students in an in-classroom environment demands well-thought didactic and pedagogical strategies in order to guarantee a good level of apprenticeship. To teach it on a completely distance learning environment (e-learning) imposes possibly other strategies, besides those that the e-learning model of Open…

  18. Twelve-Month-Olds Learn Novel Word-Object Pairings Differing Only in Stress Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Infants at 1;2 demonstrate difficulty in accessing subtle phonetic information about newly learned word-object pairings (Stager & Werker, 1997). In this study, we examined whether or not infants can access subtle prosodic information such as lexical stress in a word learning task. We tested infants younger than 1;2 to see if they could learn two…

  19. Specialized Mathematics Courses, Secondary Level: Learning Objectives, Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehigh County Community Coll., Schnecksville, PA.

    In this document, detailed objectives for the following courses are listed: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry, Advanced Mathematics, Personal Business Mathematics, and Business Mathematics. Each objective is keyed to an expected level of achievement: awareness, knowledge, application, mastery, reinforcement, and…

  20. Specialized Mathematics Courses, Secondary Level: Learning Objectives, Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehigh County Community Coll., Schnecksville, PA.

    In this document, detailed objectives for the following courses are listed: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry, Advanced Mathematics, Personal Business Mathematics, and Business Mathematics. Each objective is keyed to an expected level of achievement: awareness, knowledge, application, mastery, reinforcement, and…

  1. Evaluation of a Learning Object Based Learning Environment in Different Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ünal Çakıroğlu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning Objects (LOs are web based learning resources presented by Learning Object Repositories (LOR. For recent years LOs have begun to take place on web and it is suggested that appropriate design of LOs can make positive impact on learning. In order to support learning, research studies recommends LOs should have been evaluated pedagogically and technologically, and the content design created by using LOs should have been designed through appropriate instructional models. Since the use of LOs have recently begun, an exact pedagogical model about efficient use of LOs has not been developed. In this study a LOR is designed in order to be used in mathematics education. The LOs in this LOR have been evaluated pedagogically and technologically by mathematics teachers and field experts. In order to evaluate the designed LO based environment, two different questionnaires have been used. These questionnaires are developed by using the related literature about web based learning environments evaluation criteria and also the items are discussed with the field experts for providing the validity. The reliability of the questionnaires is calculated cronbach alpha = 0.715 for the design properties evaluation survey and cronbach alpha =0.726 for pedagogic evaluation. Both of two questionnaires are five point Likert type. The first questionnaire has the items about “Learning Support of LOs, Competency of LOR, The importance of LOs in mathematics education, the usability of LOs by students”. “The activities on LOs are related to outcomes of subjects, there are activities for students have different learning styles. There are activities for wondering students.” are examples for items about learning support of LOs. “System helps for exploration of mathematical relations”, “I think teaching mathematics with this system will be enjoyable.” are example items for importance of LOs in mathematics education. In the competency of LOR title,

  2. ATTITUDES OF STUDENTS TOWARDS LEARNING OBJECTS IN WEB-BASED LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BASAL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Language education is important in the rapidly changing world. Every year much effort has spent on preparing teaching materials for language education. Since positive attitudes of learners towards a teaching material enhance the effectiveness of that material, it is important to determine the attitudes of learners towards the material used. Learning objects (LOs are a new type of material on which many studies have been conducted in recent years. The aim of this study is to determine the attitudes of students towards LOs in web-based language learning. To this end, the study was conducted in English I Course at the Department of Computer Programming in Kırıkkale University in 2010-2011 Fall Semester. Seventy LOs appropriate for six-week long lecture program were integrated into the Learning Management System (LMS of Kırıkkale University. The study group consisted of 38 students. After the six weeks long implementation period of the study, an attitude scale was administered to the students. The findings indicated that students in web based language education have positive attitudes towards LOs.

  3. [Digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Cecília Passos Vaz; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo

    2015-12-01

    To describe the creation of a digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system at a public university of Piaui. A methodological study applied to technological production based on the pedagogical framework of problem-based learning. The methodology for creating the learning object observed the stages of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation recommended for contextualized instructional design. The revised taxonomy of Bloom was used to list the educational goals. The four modules of the developed learning object were inserted into the educational platform Moodle. The theoretical assumptions allowed the design of an important online resource that promotes effective learning in the scope of nursing education. This study should add value to nursing teaching practices through the use of digital learning objects for teaching diagnostic reasoning applied to skin and skin appendages.

  4. An Assistant for Loading Learning Object Metadata: An Ontology Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, Ana; Deco, Claudia; Romano, Agustín; Tomé, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, the development of different Repositories of Learning Objects has been increased. Users can retrieve these resources for reuse and personalization through searches in web repositories. The importance of high quality metadata is key for a successful retrieval. Learning Objects are described with metadata usually in the standard…

  5. An Assistant for Loading Learning Object Metadata: An Ontology Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, Ana; Deco, Claudia; Romano, Agustín; Tomé, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, the development of different Repositories of Learning Objects has been increased. Users can retrieve these resources for reuse and personalization through searches in web repositories. The importance of high quality metadata is key for a successful retrieval. Learning Objects are described with metadata usually in the standard…

  6. Teaching and Assessing Ethics as a Learning Objective: One School's Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Carl R.; Christensen, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a ten-year effort to establish ethics as a learning objective for all business students, to assess the effectiveness in achieving that learning objective and to incorporate ethical conduct as a part of the school's organizational culture. First, it addresses the importance of ethics instruction for all business…

  7. Cognitive Task Analysis of Experts in Designing Multimedia Learning Object Guideline (M-LOG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Palanisamy, Punithavathy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and develop a set of guidelines for multimedia learning objects to inform instructional designers (IDs) about the procedures involved in the process of content analysis. This study was motivated by the absence of standardized procedures in the beginning phase of the multimedia learning object design which is…

  8. APA's Learning Objectives for Research Methods and Statistics in Practice: A Multimethod Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Rice, Diana; Foels, Rob; Folmsbee, Leah; Vladescu, Jason; Lissman, Rachel; Matulewicz, Ryan; Bopp, Kara

    2009-01-01

    Research methods and statistics courses constitute a core undergraduate psychology requirement. We analyzed course syllabi and faculty self-reported coverage of both research methods and statistics course learning objectives to assess the concordance with APA's learning objectives (American Psychological Association, 2007). We obtained a sample of…

  9. The Challenges of Teaching Qualitative Coding: Can a Learning Object Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddon, Mary-Beth; Raby, Rebecca; Sharpe, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Challenged by some of the inherent difficulties in teaching qualitative data analysis, three instructors created an interactive digital learning object entitled "Sleuthing the Layered Text: Investigating Coding." In this paper we assess the effectiveness of that learning object as a tool for teaching qualitative coding. On the face of it, learning…

  10. ELO-Tool: Taking Action in the Challenge of Assembling Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Valencia, Liliana Patricia; Navarro, Antonio; Kloos, Carlos Delgado; Aedo, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, a wide range of initiatives are focused on providing solutions relating to the integration and reuse of different types of learning objects. This paper deals with the assembly of learning objects, one of the most difficult components for reuse. Our proposal takes into account the requirements and competencies defined for each learning…

  11. APA's Learning Objectives for Research Methods and Statistics in Practice: A Multimethod Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Rice, Diana; Foels, Rob; Folmsbee, Leah; Vladescu, Jason; Lissman, Rachel; Matulewicz, Ryan; Bopp, Kara

    2009-01-01

    Research methods and statistics courses constitute a core undergraduate psychology requirement. We analyzed course syllabi and faculty self-reported coverage of both research methods and statistics course learning objectives to assess the concordance with APA's learning objectives (American Psychological Association, 2007). We obtained a sample of…

  12. Definition of a Learning Object from Perspectives of In-Service Teachers (Case of Duzce Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat ARSLAN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects, as a relatively new technological concept, have drawn much attention from educators because these dijital resources are easily accessible, relatively easy to use due to their limited size and focus, interactive, and adaptable to many different educational contexts. Despite the fact that learning objects have the great potential to improve teaching and learning experiences by providing teachers reusable learning materials and reducing costs, the lack of a “working and clear” definition of these materials has restricted their effective and efficient use. This study aimed to explore elementary school teacher perceptions of their use of learning objects from a qualitative research paradigm in order to reveal the extent to which teachers understand concept of learning object and its instruction approach. The method of the study was based on descriptive phenomenology. Data were collected using multiple methods, including the semi-structured interview, field observation reports, and photos from nine in-service elementary school teachers from different departments in Duzce, Turkey. Methods of data analysis were based on Giorgi’s method of descriptive phenomenology including four stages of content analysis: data coding, developing themes, organizing code and themes, describing findings. Overall findings of the study indicate that teachers use learning objects in their lesson activities without explicit recognition; however they generally fail to understand the exact meaning of a learning object approach and its applications in the classroom. Participants understood different properties of learning objects. Almost all participants perceive objectivity as the most important characteristic of the learning object.  In addition, a majority of the teachers recognized the value of a learning object’s reusability. In-service teachers’ vague perceptions of the definition and usage of learning objects indicated that they used these

  13. Definition of a Learning Object from Perspectives of In-Service Teachers (Case of Duzce Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat ARSLAN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects, as a relatively new technological concept, have drawn much attention from educators because these dijital resources are easily accessible, relatively easy to use due to their limited size and focus, interactive, and adaptable to many different educational contexts. Despite the fact that learning objects have the great potential to improve teaching and learning experiences by providing teachers reusable learning materials and reducing costs, the lack of a “working and clear” definition of these materials has restricted their effective and efficient use. This study aimed to explore elementary school teacher perceptions of their use of learning objects from a qualitative research paradigm in order to reveal the extent to which teachers understand concept of learning object and its instruction approach. The method of the study was based on descriptive phenomenology. Data were collected using multiple methods, including the semi-structured interview, field observation reports, and photos from nine in-service elementary school teachers from different departments in Duzce, Turkey. Methods of data analysis were based on Giorgi’s method of descriptive phenomenology including four stages of content analysis: data coding, developing themes, organizing code and themes, describing findings. Overall findings of the study indicate that teachers use learning objects in their lesson activities without explicit recognition; however they generally fail to understand the exact meaning of a learning object approach and its applications in the classroom. Participants understood different properties of learning objects. Almost all participants perceive objectivity as the most important characteristic of the learning object.  In addition, a majority of the teachers recognized the value of a learning object’s reusability. In-service teachers’ vague perceptions of the definition and usage of learning objects indicated that they used these

  14. Brazilian Proposal for Agent-Based Learning Objects Metadata Standard - OBAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Rosa Maria; Ribeiro, Alexandre; da Silva, Júlia Marques Carvalho; Santos, Elder Rizzon; Primo, Tiago; Bez, Marta

    This paper presents the Agent Based Learning Objects - OBAA standard proposal. The main goal of the research was to establish a standardized specification of the technical and functional requirements of interoperable learning objects. In our context, interoperability regards the operation of the content inside Web, Digital TV and mobile environments, supporting accessibility and pedagogical issues. In this proposal it has been explored the convergence among the multi-agent systems, learning object and ubiquitous computing technologies, allowing the authoring, storage and recovery of learning object in varied contexts and through different digital platforms. The result of this research was the definition of the OBAA proposal containing the requirements, specifications and architectures that will compose the Brazilian standard for the management, transmission, storage, search, editing and use of interoperable learning object.

  15. Exploring emerging learning needs: a UK-wide consultation on environmental sustainability learning objectives for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, Sarah C; Mortimer, Frances; Inman, Alice; Braithwaite, Isobel; Thompson, Trevor

    2015-12-24

    This study aimed to engage wide-ranging stakeholders and develop consensus learning objectives for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. A UK-wide consultation garnered opinions of healthcare students, healthcare educators and other key stakeholders about environmental sustainability in medical education. The policy Delphi approach informed this study. Draft learning objectives were revised iteratively during three rounds of consultation: online questionnaire or telephone interview, face-to-face seminar and email consultation. Twelve draft learning objectives were developed based on review of relevant literature. In round one, 64 participants' median ratings of the learning objectives were 3.5 for relevance and 3.0 for feasibility on a Likert scale of one to four. Revisions were proposed, e.g. to highlight relevance to public health and professionalism. Thirty three participants attended round two. Conflicting opinions were explored. Added content areas included health benefits of sustainable behaviours. To enhance usability, restructuring provided three overarching learning objectives, each with subsidiary points. All participants from rounds one and two were contacted in round three, and no further edits were required. This is the first attempt to define consensus learning objectives for medical students about environmental sustainability. Allowing a wide range of stakeholders to comment on multiple iterations of the document stimulated their engagement with the issues raised and ownership of the resulting learning objectives.

  16. Optimization of deep learning algorithms for object classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, András.

    2017-02-01

    Deep learning is currently the state of the art algorithm for image classification. The complexity of these feedforward neural networks have overcome a critical point, resulting algorithmic breakthroughs in various fields. On the other hand their complexity makes them executable in tasks, where High-throughput computing powers are available. The optimization of these networks -considering computational complexity and applicability on embedded systems- has not yet been studied and investigated in details. In this paper I show some examples how this algorithms can be optimized and accelerated on embedded systems.

  17. Learning Objects in the Study of Mathematical Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Josué Antunes de; Nunes, Taise Costa de Souza; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2015-12-01

    This work is the result of a survey that aimed to produce Applets(animations) using the GeoGebra software applied to the study of trigonometric functions. We opted for the choice of this software, because of its easy usability, have nice interface and is very didactic, allowing the realization of a simple graphic to complex constructions. The choice of the contents of trigonometric functions, was due to the concern of many students want to learn the appropriate behavior involving these functions, because in practice beyond the calculations, the students require two-dimensional images to construct the graphics, Therefore, the use of the GeoGebra software can assist in building and viewing these charts. We used a metodology qualiquantitative to collection and data analysis, based on the application of questionnaires and observations having as use of didactic engineering for the formulation of didactic sequences. To the application of this methodology, a minicurs was given, with twenty hours, to the Mathematic and Physic students at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), Campus Januária. The results were found satisfactory, since the use of GeoGebra software provided a significant learning for the academics.

  18. Digital learning objects in nursing consultation: technology assessment by undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, DeniseTolfo; Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado

    2010-01-01

    This study followed the teaching-learning process about the nursing consultation, based on digital learning objects developed through the active Problem Based Learning method. The goals were to evaluate the digital learning objects about nursing consultation, develop cognitive skills on the subject using problem based learning and identify the students' opinions on the use of technology. This is an exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 71 students in the sixth period of the nursing program at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. The data was collected through a questionnaire to evaluate the learning objects. The results showed positive agreement (58%) on the content, usability and didactics of the proposed computer-mediated activity regarding the nursing consultation. The application of materials to the students is considered positive.

  19. International Service and Public Health Learning Objectives for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C.; Duron, Vincent; Creigh, Peter; McIntosh, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to improve the education of medical students involved in a longitudinal perinatal health improvement project in Gowa, Malawi. Design: We conducted qualitative interviews with students who participated in the project, reviewed their quantitative reports, and assessed the application of methodologies consonant with the learning…

  20. Incremental online object learning in a vehicular radar-vision fusion framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhengping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weng, Juyang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luciw, Matthew [IEEE; Zeng, Shuqing [IEEE

    2010-10-19

    In this paper, we propose an object learning system that incorporates sensory information from an automotive radar system and a video camera. The radar system provides a coarse attention for the focus of visual analysis on relatively small areas within the image plane. The attended visual areas are coded and learned by a 3-layer neural network utilizing what is called in-place learning, where every neuron is responsible for the learning of its own signal processing characteristics within its connected network environment, through inhibitory and excitatory connections with other neurons. The modeled bottom-up, lateral, and top-down connections in the network enable sensory sparse coding, unsupervised learning and supervised learning to occur concurrently. The presented work is applied to learn two types of encountered objects in multiple outdoor driving settings. Cross validation results show the overall recognition accuracy above 95% for the radar-attended window images. In comparison with the uncoded representation and purely unsupervised learning (without top-down connection), the proposed network improves the recognition rate by 15.93% and 6.35% respectively. The proposed system is also compared with other learning algorithms favorably. The result indicates that our learning system is the only one to fit all the challenging criteria for the development of an incremental and online object learning system.

  1. Sequencing of contents and learning objects - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zapata Ros

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta es la segunda parte del artículo del mismo nombre publicado en el número anterior de RED. En él planteamos una visión de la selección y de la secuenciación de contenidos de enseñanza, en el contexto de la planificación curricular, desde la perspectiva de las corrientes del pensamiento constructivista. Señalamos la importancia de contar, en el campo de la formación apoyada en redes, con herramientas y criterios autónomos que guíen este proceso desde unas bases propias, externas y con preeminencia sobre las que derivan de la configuración de las herramientas tecnológicas, y desde la necesidad de contar con estándares de formato de intercambio de datos Si en general este planteamiento es importante adquiere especial relevancia en el contexto del e-learning de propósito general, tanto en el de formación como en el e-learning empresarial o en el universitario. Y por supuesto en el contexto de la formación reglada y de formación informal, o de la no reglada. También señalamos las necesidades que plantea la industria del e-learning en la actualidad en relación con el diseño instruccional de objetos de aprendizaje, necesidades que constituyen una prioridad y un desafío. En la primera parte desarrollamos la perspectiva constructivista y la conceptualización de servicios y herramientas tecnológicas como recursos educativos, así como una revisión de los conceptos vinculados con el e-learning, objetos de aprendizaje, OAR y reusabilidad. En esta parte abordaremos la fundamentación de las teorías que rigen los procedimientos de selección de contenidos, los presupuestos básicos y la descripción de las técnicas de secuenciación. En particular nos centraremos en tres de ellas: La técnica de análisis de contenidos, la técnica de análisis de la tarea y la Teoría de la Elaboración. Por último como conclusión, en la tercera parte, intentaremos abordar, no en su resolución sino solo en su propuesta como enunciado

  2. Advanced prerequisite for E-infinity theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M. Saladin [Department of Physics, University of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Department of Astrophysics, Cairo University (Egypt); Department of Physics, Mansura University (Egypt)

    2006-11-15

    This is the third of a series of papers written with the primary aim of communicating necessary theoretical background knowledge required for an in-depth study of E-infinity theory. Compared to the previous two papers [El Naschie MS. Elementary prerequisites for E-infinity (Recommended background readings in nonlinear dynamics, geometry and topology). Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2006;30(3):579-605; El Naschie MS. Intermediate prerequisites for E-infinity theory. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2006;30(3):622-8], the present one may be described as advanced.

  3. The Teaching of Quality: Convergent Participation for the Professional Development of Learning Object Designers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griff Richards

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the perceived effectiveness of a collaborative evaluation process for teaching qualitative aspects of learning object design in a distance education course at Athabasca University in Alberta, Canada. Working in groups of four, 24 distance students in a graduate level instructional design course participated in two 2-hour audio conferences, using a convergent participation model for the evaluation of learning objects. After the first conference, which featured study and application of the nine criteria of the Learning Object Review Instrument (LORI, the participants independently rated a set of learning objects. In the second audio conference they reconvened to compare and discuss their ratings. Six to nine months later the participants reported favorable outcomes from the experience in their understanding of learning objects, and confidence in determining learning object quality. In judging the impact on their subsequent design efforts, the most frequent comments indicated that the convergent participation experience provided both an appreciation of the complexity of learning object design and a method for judging their quality.

  4. Learning a hierarchical deformable template for rapid deformable object parsing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Long Leo; Chen, Yuanhao; Yuille, Alan

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we address the tasks of detecting, segmenting, parsing, and matching deformable objects. We use a novel probabilistic object model that we call a hierarchical deformable template (HDT). The HDT represents the object by state variables defined over a hierarchy (with typically five levels). The hierarchy is built recursively by composing elementary structures to form more complex structures. A probability distribution--a parameterized exponential model--is defined over the hierarchy to quantify the variability in shape and appearance of the object at multiple scales. To perform inference--to estimate the most probable states of the hierarchy for an input image--we use a bottom-up algorithm called compositional inference. This algorithm is an approximate version of dynamic programming where approximations are made (e.g., pruning) to ensure that the algorithm is fast while maintaining high performance. We adapt the structure-perceptron algorithm to estimate the parameters of the HDT in a discriminative manner (simultaneously estimating the appearance and shape parameters). More precisely, we specify an exponential distribution for the HDT using a dictionary of potentials, which capture the appearance and shape cues. This dictionary can be large and so does not require handcrafting the potentials. Instead, structure-perceptron assigns weights to the potentials so that less important potentials receive small weights (this is like a "soft" form of feature selection). Finally, we provide experimental evaluation of HDTs on different visual tasks, including detection, segmentation, matching (alignment), and parsing. We show that HDTs achieve state-of-the-art performance for these different tasks when evaluated on data sets with groundtruth (and when compared to alternative algorithms, which are typically specialized to each task).

  5. Multi-agent reinforcement learning based on policies of global objective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In general-sum games, taking all agent's collective rationality into account, we define agents' global objective,and propose a novel multi-agent reinforcement learning(RL) algorithm based on global policy. In each learning step, all agents commit to select the global policy to achieve the global goal. We prove this learning algorithm converges given certain restrictions on stage games of learned Q values, and show that it has quite lower computation time complexity than already developed multi-agent learning algorithms for general-sum games. An example is analyzed to show the algorithm' s merits.

  6. View-Invariant Object Category Learning, Recognition, and Search: How Spatial and Object Attention are Coordinated Using Surface-Based Attentional Shrouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazl, Arash; Grossberg, Stephen; Mingolla, Ennio

    2009-01-01

    How does the brain learn to recognize an object from multiple viewpoints while scanning a scene with eye movements? How does the brain avoid the problem of erroneously classifying parts of different objects together? How are attention and eye movements intelligently coordinated to facilitate object learning? A neural model provides a unified…

  7. Occlusion detection via structured sparse learning for robust object tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios, these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object’s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for nonsparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Extensive experimental results show that our proposed tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art trackers.

  8. Manifold learning for object tracking with multiple nonlinear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Silva, Jorge G; Marques, Jorge S; Lemos, Joao M

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel manifold learning algorithm for high-dimensional data sets. The scope of the application focuses on the problem of motion tracking in video sequences. The framework presented is twofold. First, it is assumed that the samples are time ordered, providing valuable information that is not presented in the current methodologies. Second, the manifold topology comprises multiple charts, which contrasts to the most current methods that assume one single chart, being overly restrictive. The proposed algorithm, Gaussian process multiple local models (GP-MLM), can deal with arbitrary manifold topology by decomposing the manifold into multiple local models that are probabilistic combined using Gaussian process regression. In addition, the paper presents a multiple filter architecture where standard filtering techniques are integrated within the GP-MLM. The proposed approach exhibits comparable performance of state-of-the-art trackers, namely multiple model data association and deep belief networks, and compares favorably with Gaussian process latent variable models. Extensive experiments are presented using real video data, including a publicly available database of lip sequences and left ventricle ultrasound images, in which the GP-MLM achieves state of the art results.

  9. Early age-dependent impairments of context-dependent extinction learning, object recognition, and object-place learning occur in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescholleck, Valentina; Emma André, Marion Agnès; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2014-03-01

    The hippocampus is vulnerable to age-dependent memory decline. Multiple forms of memory depend on adequate hippocampal function. Extinction learning comprises active inhibition of no longer relevant learned information concurrent with suppression of a previously learned reaction. It is highly dependent on context, and evidence exists that it requires hippocampal activation. In this study, we addressed whether context-based extinction as well as hippocampus-dependent tasks, such as object recognition and object-place recognition, are equally affected by moderate aging. Young (7-8 week old) and older (7-8 month old) Wistar rats were used. For the extinction study, animals learned that a particular floor context indicated that they should turn into one specific arm (e.g., left) to receive a food reward. On the day after reaching the learning criterion of 80% correct choices, the floor context was changed, no reward was given and animals were expected to extinguish the learned response. Both, young and older rats managed this first extinction trial in the new context with older rats showing a faster extinction performance. One day later, animals were returned to the T-maze with the original floor context and renewal effects were assessed. In this case, only young but not older rats showed the expected renewal effect (lower extinction ratio as compared to the day before). To assess general memory abilities, animals were tested in the standard object recognition and object-place memory tasks. Evaluations were made at 5 min, 1 h and 7 day intervals. Object recognition memory was poor at short-term and intermediate time-points in older but not young rats. Object-place memory performance was unaffected at 5 min, but impaired at 1 h in older but not young rats. Both groups were impaired at 7 days. These findings support that not only aspects of general memory, but also context-dependent extinction learning, are affected by moderate aging. This may reflect less flexibility in

  10. Object Recognition in Clutter: Cortical Responses Depend on the Type of Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eHegdé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies suggest that the visual system uses prior knowledge of visual objects to recognize them in visual clutter, and posit that the strategies for recognizing objects in clutter may differ depending on whether or not the object was learned in clutter to begin with. We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of human subjects. We trained subjects to recognize naturalistic, yet novel objects in strong or weak clutter. We then tested subjects’ recognition performance for both sets of objects in strong clutter. We found many brain regions that were differentially responsive to objects during object recognition depending on whether they were learned in strong or weak clutter. In particular, the responses of the left fusiform gyrus reliably reflected, on a trial-to-trial basis, subjects’ object recognition performance for objects learned in the presence of strong clutter. These results indicate that the visual system does not use a single, general-purpose mechanism to cope with clutter. Instead, there are two distinct spatial patterns of activation whose responses are attributable not to the visual context in which the objects were seen, but to the context in which the objects were learned.

  11. The Use of Reusable Learning Objects to Enhance the Delivery of Veterinary Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman-Waterhouse, Emily; Silva-Fletcher, Ayona; Whittlestone, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The increased demand from learners in higher education to access resources flexibly has resulted in considerable development in the use of Reusable Learning Objects (RLO) via a blended learning format across the sector. This critical review sets out to identify what is currently known about RLO and how those concepts can be applied to…

  12. A Meta-Relational Approach for the Definition and Management of Hybrid Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Antonio; Fernandez-Pampillon, Ana Ma.; Fernandez-Chamizo, Carmen; Fernandez-Valmayor, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Electronic learning objects (LOs) are commonly conceived of as digital units of information used for teaching and learning. To facilitate their classification for pedagogical planning and retrieval purposes, LOs are complemented with metadata (e.g., the author). These metadata are usually restricted by a set of predetermined tags to which the…

  13. Flexibility for Fairness: Crafting Business Rules for Student Learning Objectives. Ask the Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potemski, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Across the United States, a wide cross-section of administrators and teachers are learning the ins and outs of setting, assessing, and scoring student learning objectives (SLOs). An SLO is a set of goals that measures an educator's progress in achieving student growth targets. SLOs are particularly helpful for teachers in nontested subjects and…

  14. An Achievement Degree Analysis Approach to Identifying Learning Problems in Object-Oriented Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinjawi, Arwa A.; Al-Nuaim, Hana A.; Krause, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Students often face difficulties while learning object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts. Many papers have presented various assessment methods for diagnosing learning problems to improve the teaching of programming in computer science (CS) higher education. The research presented in this article illustrates that although max-min composition is…

  15. Experiences Gained Using a Set of SCORM Compliant Reusable Learning Objects for Teaching Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe, Eileen; Sherry, Elizabeth; Magee, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    A collaboration between three higher education institutions in Ireland and two European partners has resulted in the design and development of reusable learning objects for undergraduate programming students that would assist in their learning. This international project conducted extensive research of over 600 students' examination scripts in…

  16. New Pedagogies and Re-Usable Learning Objects: Toward a Different Role for an LMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Betty; Strijker, Allard

    While the idea of reusing objects in digital learning environments is not new, continual strides are being made toward improving the prospects of reusability. A major trend in company training settings is to think of reusability in terms of a LMS (learning management system), but instructor use and pedagogies are little considered. This paper…

  17. "Analysis" in Teaching with Cases: A Revisit to Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzouk, Nabil Y.; Razzouk, Jay N.

    2008-01-01

    "Analysis", the core of graduate business education is probably one of the least understood and most misrepresented learning activities. Everyone seems to claim that they know it, yet most seem unable to actually define it or practice it. This paper reviews Bloom's taxonomy of learning objectives with a special focus on "analysis." More…

  18. Tool Support for Collaborative Teaching and Learning of Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ratzer, Anne Vinter

    2002-01-01

    Modeling is central to doing and learning object-oriented development. We present a new tool, Ideogramic UML, for gesture-based collaborative modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which can be used to collaboratively teach and learn modeling. Furthermore, we discuss how we have...... effectively used Ideogramic UML to teach object-oriented modeling and the UML to groups of students using the UML for project assignments....

  19. Building communities for the exchange of learning objects: theoretical foundations and requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Koper

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce overall costs of developing high-quality digital courses (including both the content, and the learning and teaching activities, the exchange of learning objects has been recognized as a promising solution. This article makes an inventory of the issues involved in the exchange of learning objects within a community. It explores some basic theories, models and specifications and provides a theoretical framework containing the functional and non-functional requirements to establish an exchange system in the educational field. Three levels of requirements are discussed. First, the non-functional requirements that deal with the technical conditions to make learning objects interoperable. Second, some basic use cases (activities are identified that must be facilitated to enable the technical exchange of learning objects, e.g. searching and adapting the objects. Third, some basic use cases are identified that are required to establish the exchange of learning objects in a community, e.g. policy management, information and training. The implications of this framework are then discussed, including recommendations concerning the identification of reward systems, role changes and evaluation instruments.

  20. Rapid e-Learning Tools Selection Process for Cognitive and Psychomotor Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David Tawei; Huang, Yung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a decision making process for the selection of rapid e-learning tools that could match different learning domains. With the development of the Internet, the speed of information updates has become faster than ever. E-learning has rapidly become the mainstream for corporate training and academic instruction. In order to reduce…

  1. Rapid e-Learning Tools Selection Process for Cognitive and Psychomotor Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David Tawei; Huang, Yung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a decision making process for the selection of rapid e-learning tools that could match different learning domains. With the development of the Internet, the speed of information updates has become faster than ever. E-learning has rapidly become the mainstream for corporate training and academic instruction. In order to reduce…

  2. Learning from and with Museum Objects: Design Perspectives, Environment, and Emerging Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Henriikka; Enkenberg, Jorma

    2013-01-01

    Sociocultural approaches emphasize the systemic, context-bound nature of learning, which is mediated by other people, physical and conceptual artifacts, and tools. However, current educational systems tend not to approach learning from the systemic perspective, and mostly situate learning within classroom environments. This design-based research…

  3. Learn Objective-C on the Mac for OS X and iOS

    CERN Document Server

    Knaster, Scott; Malik, Waqar

    2012-01-01

    Learn to write apps for some of today's hottest technologies, including the iPhone and iPad (using iOS), as well as the Mac (using OS X). It starts with Objective-C, the base language on which the native iOS software development kit (SDK) and the OS X are based. Learn Objective-C on the Mac: For OS X and iOS, Second Edition updates a best selling book and is an extensive, newly updated guide to Objective-C. Objective-C is a powerful, object-oriented extension of C, making this update the perfect follow-up to Dave Mark's bestselling Learn C on the Mac. Whether you're an experienced C programmer

  4. Rapid Production of E-Learning Materials with Reusable Learning Objects: Experiences from the Global Academy for Extension Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Holz-Clause

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Open educational resources, institutional collaborations, and content reusability approaches have been quickly emerging to minimize the time and money spent on developing e-learning materials. Reusing content with reusable learning objects (RLOs is carving a new path for research on reusing and repurposing available high quality e-learning content. Prior research shows that this component-based approach best fits how educators prefer to access materials. In this paper, without arguing the merits and demerits of RLOs as a concept, the authors present an effective and affordable approach to creating e-learning materials with RLOs. The authors also present how they have implemented the proposed RLO approach in converting learning modules of the Global Academy for Extension Practice into multiple e-learning material formats.

  5. Prerequisites for Forming the Institutional Concept of the National Economy Competitiveness under Conditions of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaremenko Oleh L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to prove that under conditions of globalization there have developed objective and subjective prerequisites for forming the institutional concept of the national economy. The objective prerequisites are the newest information and communication technologies, post-industrial trends and market transformation of civilization intensified by globalization. Under such conditions instability and volatility of the institutional environment both within national economies and at the international level are observed. The aggravation of the global competition between national economies actualizes the role of such institutional factors as political system, property, public administration, economic organization, culture, etc. The subjective prerequisites are related to the fact that the institutional economic theory is currently one of the leading trends in the modern world and Ukrainian economic thought. Interest in it is explained not only by the fact that it overcomes the limitations of a number of prerequisites for the mainstream, but also because it allows considering the modern economic processes in complex

  6. Changes in visual object recognition precede the shape bias in early noun learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan N Yee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two of the most formidable skills that characterize human beings are language and our prowess in visual object recognition. They may also be developmentally intertwined. Two experiments, a large sample cross-sectional study and a smaller sample 6-month longitudinal study of 18- 24 month olds tested a hypothesized developmental link between changes in the visual object representation and noun learning. Previous findings in visual object recognition indicate that children’s ability to recognize common basic level categories from sparse structural shape representations of object shape emerges between the ages of 18 and 24 months, is related to noun vocabulary size, and is lacking in children with language delay. Other research shows that in artificial noun learning tasks, during this same developmental period, young children systematically generalize object names by shape, that this shape bias predicts future noun learning, and is lacking in children with language delay. The two experiments examine the developmental relation between visual object recognition and the shape bias for the first time. The results show that developmental changes in visual object recognition systematically preceded the emergence of the shape bias. The results suggest a developmental pathway in which early changes in visual object recognition that are themselves linked to category learning enable the discovery of higher-order regularities in category structure and thus the shape bias in novel noun learning tasks. The proposed developmental pathway has implications for understanding the role of specific experience in the development of both visual object recognition and the shape bias in early noun learning.

  7. Aspects on Teaching/Learning with Object Oriented Programming for Entry Level Courses of Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Clara Amelia; Conte, Marcos Fernando; Riso, Bernardo Goncalves

    This work presents a proposal for Teaching/Learning, on Object Oriented Programming for Entry Level Courses of Engineering and Computer Science, on University. The philosophy of Object Oriented Programming comes as a new pattern of solution for problems, where flexibility and reusability appears over the simple data structure and sequential…

  8. A Mobile Service Oriented Multiple Object Tracking Augmented Reality Architecture for Education and Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanarungrot, Sasithorn; White, Martin; Newbury, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of our service-oriented architecture to support mobile multiple object tracking augmented reality applications applied to education and learning scenarios. The architecture is composed of a mobile multiple object tracking augmented reality client, a web service framework, and dynamic content providers. Tracking of…

  9. Using learning objects that promote understanding of mathematical knowledge: good practices in secondary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz ARELLANO SÁNCHEZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to analyze the skills developed in students and how do the processes of construction of geometrical knowledge using learning objects (LO for math three high school students are improved. The research question was: which skills did the students develop when they were using learning objects and how was their geometrical understanding process improved? The methodology used was a mixed approach. Results showed that the use of learning objects effectively develops student’s skills in communication and computing. Promoting further understanding of geometry concepts. It is concluded that OA act as tools to assist the student in understanding geometry thereby promoting the use of technology for educational purposes.

  10. Everyday objects of learning about health and healing and implications for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitari, Wanja

    2006-02-01

    The role of science education in rural development is of great interest to science educators. In this study I investigated how residents of rural Kirumi, Kenya, approach health and healing, through discussions and semistructured and in-depth interviews with 150 residents, 3 local herbalists, and 2 medical researchers over a period of 6 months. I constructed objects of learning by looking for similarities and differences within interpretive themes. Objects of learning found comprise four types of personal learning tools, three types of relational learning tools, three genres of moral obligation, and five genres of knowledge guarding. Findings show that rural people use (among other learning tools) inner sensing to engage thought processes that lead to health and healing knowledge. The sociocultural context is also an important component in learning. Inner sensing and residents' sociocultural context are not presently emphasized in Kenyan science teaching. I discuss the potential use of rural objects of learning in school science, with specific reference to a health topic in the Kenyan science curriculum. In addition, the findings add to the literature in the Science, Technology, Society, and Environment (STSE) approach to science education, and cross-cultural and global science education.

  11. Reinforced AdaBoost learning for object detection with local pattern representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Han, David K; Ko, Hanseok

    2013-01-01

    A reinforced AdaBoost learning algorithm is proposed for object detection with local pattern representations. In implementing AdaBoost learning, the proposed algorithm employs an exponential criterion as a cost function and Newton's method for its optimization. In particular, we introduce an optimal selection of weak classifiers minimizing the cost function and derive the reinforced predictions based on a judicial confidence estimate to determine the classification results. The weak classifier of the proposed method produces real-valued predictions while that of the conventional AdaBoost method produces integer valued predictions of +1 or -1. Hence, in the conventional learning algorithms, the entire sample weights are updated by the same rate. On the contrary, the proposed learning algorithm allows the sample weights to be updated individually depending on the confidence level of each weak classifier prediction, thereby reducing the number of weak classifier iterations for convergence. Experimental classification performance on human face and license plate images confirm that the proposed method requires smaller number of weak classifiers than the conventional learning algorithm, resulting in higher learning and faster classification rates. An object detector implemented based on the proposed learning algorithm yields better performance in field tests in terms of higher detection rate with lower false positives than that of the conventional learning algorithm.

  12. Application of Scientific Approaches for Evaluation of Quality of Learning Objects in eQNet Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Serikoviene, Silvija

    The paper is aimed to analyse the application of several scientific approaches, methods, and principles for evaluation of quality of learning objects for Mathematics subject. The authors analyse the following approaches to minimise subjectivity level in expert evaluation of the quality of learning objects, namely: (1) principles of multiple criteria decision analysis for identification of quality criteria, (2) technological quality criteria classification principle, (3) fuzzy group decision making theory to obtain evaluation measures, (4) normalisation requirement for criteria weights, and (5) scalarisation method for learning objects quality optimisation. Another aim of the paper is to outline the central role of social tagging to describe usage, attention, and other aspects of the context; as well as to help to exploit context data towards making learning object repositories more useful, and thus enhance the reuse. The applied approaches have been used practically for evaluation of learning objects and metadata tagging while implementing European eQNet and te@ch.us projects in Lithuanian comprehensive schools in 2010.

  13. Development of Generative Learning Objects Using Feature Diagrams and Generative Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vytautas STUIKYS; Robertas DAMASEVICIUS

    2008-01-01

    Learning Objects (LOs) play a key role for supporting eLearning. In general, however, the development of LOs remains a vague issue, because there is still no clearly defined and widely adopted LO specification and development methodology. We combined two technological paradigms (feature diagrams (FDs) and generative techniques) into a coherent methodology to enhance reusability and productivity in the development of LOs. FDs are used for knowledge representation, modelling variability of the ...

  14. Integrating language and content learning objectives : the Bilkent University adjunct model

    OpenAIRE

    Doğan, Egemen Barış

    2003-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. In response to a global interest in learning English, many instructional approaches, methods, and techniques have been developed. Some have been short-lived, and others have sustained themselves for longer periods of time. Content-based instruction (CBI) — a particular approach to CBI involving a pairing of language and content classes with shared language and content learning objectives — have been considered as viable ways to teach la...

  15. Tangible Objects: The Missing Attribute in Multimedia Learning Systems for Preschoolers

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Kien Tsong; Lili Budiman; Toh Seong Chong; Zarina Samsudin; Wan Ahmad Jaafar Wan Yahaya

    2012-01-01

    Based on the idea of constructivism, cognitivism, Atkinson & Shiffrin and Kieras & Meyer’s EPIC human memory theories, tangible objects are considered the missing attribute in digital multimedia learning systems for preschoolers. Because of negligence to this attribute, a learning gap emerges between preschoolers and multimedia system. The gap is reflected in the cognitive capability of a preschooler whose cognition is still in a state of preoperational level and the condition of ...

  16. Multivoxel Object Representations in Adult Human Visual Cortex Are Flexible: An Associative Learning Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoussi, Mehdi; Berry, Isabelle; VanRullen, Rufin; Reddy, Leila

    2016-06-01

    Learning associations between co-occurring events enables us to extract structure from our environment. Medial-temporal lobe structures are critical for associative learning. However, the role of the ventral visual pathway (VVP) in associative learning is not clear. Do multivoxel object representations in the VVP reflect newly formed associations? We show that VVP multivoxel representations become more similar to each other after human participants learn arbitrary new associations between pairs of unrelated objects (faces, houses, cars, chairs). Participants were scanned before and after 15 days of associative learning. To evaluate how object representations changed, a classifier was trained on discriminating two nonassociated categories (e.g., faces/houses) and tested on discriminating their paired associates (e.g., cars/chairs). Because the associations were arbitrary and counterbalanced across participants, there was initially no particular reason for this cross-classification decision to tend toward either alternative. Nonetheless, after learning, cross-classification performance increased in the VVP (but not hippocampus), on average by 3.3%, with some voxels showing increases of up to 10%. For example, a chair multivoxel representation that initially resembled neither face nor house representations was, after learning, classified as more similar to that of faces for participants who associated chairs with faces and to that of houses for participants who associated chairs with houses. Additionally, learning produced long-lasting perceptual consequences. In a behavioral priming experiment performed several months later, the change in cross-classification performance was correlated with the degree of priming. Thus, VVP multivoxel representations are not static but become more similar to each other after associative learning.

  17. Analyzing the Quality of Students Interaction in a Distance Learning Object-Oriented Programming Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Simão Carvalho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching object-oriented programming to students in an in-classroom environment demands well-thought didactic and pedagogical strategies in order to guarantee a good level of apprenticeship. To teach it on a completely distance learning environment (e-learning imposes possibly other strategies, besides those that the e-learning model of Open University of Portugal dictates. This article analyses the behavior of the students of the 1st cycle in Computer Science while interacting with the object-oriented programming (OOP discipline available to them on the Moodle platform. Through the evaluation of the level of interaction achieved in a group of relevant selected actions by the students, it is possible to identify their relevancy to the success of the programming learning process. Data was extracted from Moodle, numerically analyzed, and, with the use of some charts, behavior patterns of students were identified. This paper points out potential new approaches to be considered in e-learning in order to enhance programming learning results, besides confirming a high level of drop-out and a low level of interaction, thus finding no clear correlation between students’ success and the number of online actions (especially in forums, which reveals a possible failure of the main pillar on which the e-learning model relies.

  18. Toward Self-Referential Autonomous Learning of Object and Situation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damerow, Florian; Knoblauch, Andreas; Körner, Ursula; Eggert, Julian; Körner, Edgar

    Most current approaches to scene understanding lack the capability to adapt object and situation models to behavioral needs not anticipated by the human system designer. Here, we give a detailed description of a system architecture for self-referential autonomous learning which enables the refinement of object and situation models during operation in order to optimize behavior. This includes structural learning of hierarchical models for situations and behaviors that is triggered by a mismatch between expected and actual action outcome. Besides proposing architectural concepts, we also describe a first implementation of our system within a simulated traffic scenario to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

  19. Smart learning objects for smart education in computer science theory, methodology and robot-based implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Stuikys, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents the challenges, vision and context to design smart learning objects (SLOs) through Computer Science (CS) education modelling and feature model transformations. It presents the latest research on the meta-programming-based generative learning objects (the latter with advanced features are treated as SLOs) and the use of educational robots in teaching CS topics. The introduced methodology includes the overall processes to develop SLO and smart educational environment (SEE) and integrates both into the real education setting to provide teaching in CS using constructivist a

  20. Linking Learning Objects to eMM Metrics on Learning Delivery: A Case Study of IT Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kattiya TAWSOPAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to create the reusable learning objects (RLOs and to evaluate the use of RLOs for designing the architecture of the obtained reusable learning objects under any Learning Management System (LMS according to e-learning standard for measuring the reuse by e-Learning Maturity Model (eMM. The instruments employed are LMS in the type of Moodle v.1.3.1, ReLOAD Plug-in Program v.2.5.5, Protégé Program v.3.4.4 and spreadsheet of eMM v.2.3. The results obtained from the construction of RLO lessons revealed that it helps reducing time consumed for the lecturer in preparing teaching content. Finally, we obtain RLO tracking and eMM benchmark which means we can get RLO that can be tracked as well as a tool for evaluating the effectiveness of e-learning used in Thailand’s institutes.

  1. Humanoid infers Archimedes' principle: understanding physical relations and object affordances through cumulative learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ajaz Ahmad; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Sandini, Giulio; Morasso, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    Emerging studies indicate that several species such as corvids, apes and children solve 'The Crow and the Pitcher' task (from Aesop's Fables) in diverse conditions. Hidden beneath this fascinating paradigm is a fundamental question: by cumulatively interacting with different objects, how can an agent abstract the underlying cause-effect relations to predict and creatively exploit potential affordances of novel objects in the context of sought goals? Re-enacting this Aesop's Fable task on a humanoid within an open-ended 'learning-prediction-abstraction' loop, we address this problem and (i) present a brain-guided neural framework that emulates rapid one-shot encoding of ongoing experiences into a long-term memory and (ii) propose four task-agnostic learning rules (elimination, growth, uncertainty and status quo) that correlate predictions from remembered past experiences with the unfolding present situation to gradually abstract the underlying causal relations. Driven by the proposed architecture, the ensuing robot behaviours illustrated causal learning and anticipation similar to natural agents. Results further demonstrate that by cumulatively interacting with few objects, the predictions of the robot in case of novel objects converge close to the physical law, i.e. the Archimedes principle: this being independent of both the objects explored during learning and the order of their cumulative exploration.

  2. LABRADOR: a learning autonomous behavior-based robot for adaptive detection and object retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Brian; Moseley, Mark; Brookshire, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    As part of the TARDEC-funded CANINE (Cooperative Autonomous Navigation in a Networked Environment) Program, iRobot developed LABRADOR (Learning Autonomous Behavior-based Robot for Adaptive Detection and Object Retrieval). LABRADOR was based on the rugged, man-portable, iRobot PackBot unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) equipped with an explosives ordnance disposal (EOD) manipulator arm and a custom gripper. For LABRADOR, we developed a vision-based object learning and recognition system that combined a TLD (track-learn-detect) filter based on object shape features with a color-histogram-based object detector. Our vision system was able to learn in real-time to recognize objects presented to the robot. We also implemented a waypoint navigation system based on fused GPS, IMU (inertial measurement unit), and odometry data. We used this navigation capability to implement autonomous behaviors capable of searching a specified area using a variety of robust coverage strategies - including outward spiral, random bounce, random waypoint, and perimeter following behaviors. While the full system was not integrated in time to compete in the CANINE competition event, we developed useful perception, navigation, and behavior capabilities that may be applied to future autonomous robot systems.

  3. Assuring the Quality of Agricultural Learning Repositories: Issues for the Learning Object Metadata Creation Process of the CGIAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Thomas; Beniest, Jan

    The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Re- search (CGIAR) has established a digital repository to share its teaching and learning resources along with descriptive educational information based on the IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM) standard. As a critical component of any digital repository, quality metadata are critical not only to enable users to find more easily the resources they require, but also for the operation and interoperability of the repository itself. Studies show that repositories have difficulties in obtaining good quality metadata from their contributors, especially when this process involves many different stakeholders as is the case with the CGIAR as an international organization. To address this issue the CGIAR began investigating the Open ECBCheck as well as the ISO/IEC 19796-1 standard to establish quality protocols for its training. The paper highlights the implications and challenges posed by strengthening the metadata creation workflow for disseminating learning objects of the CGIAR.

  4. Creating Learning Objects to Enhance the Educational Experiences of American Sign Language Learners: An Instructional Development Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Conceição

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been given to involving the deaf community in distance teaching and learning or in designing courses that relate to their language and culture. This article reports on the design and development of video-based learning objects created to enhance the educational experiences of American Sign Language (ASL hearing participants in a distance learning course and, following the course, the creation of several new applications for use of the learning objects. The learning objects were initially created for the web, as a course component for review and rehearsal. The value of the web application, as reported by course participants, led us to consider ways in which the learning objects could be used in a variety of delivery formats: CD-ROM, web-based knowledge repository, and handheld device. The process to create the learning objects, the new applications, and lessons learned are described.

  5. Semantic Web, Reusable Learning Objects, Personal Learning Networks in Health: Key Pieces for Digital Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Stathis Th; Wharrad, Heather; Windle, Richard; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge existing in the World Wide Web is exponentially expanding, while continuous advancements in health sciences contribute to the creation of new knowledge. There are a lot of efforts trying to identify how the social connectivity can endorse patients' empowerment, while other studies look at the identification and the quality of online materials. However, emphasis has not been put on the big picture of connecting the existing resources with the patients "new habits" of learning through their own Personal Learning Networks. In this paper we propose a framework for empowering patients' digital health literacy adjusted to patients' currents needs by utilizing the contemporary way of learning through Personal Learning Networks, existing high quality learning resources and semantics technologies for interconnecting knowledge pieces. The framework based on the concept of knowledge maps for health as defined in this paper. Health Digital Literacy needs definitely further enhancement and the use of the proposed concept might lead to useful tools which enable use of understandable health trusted resources tailored to each person needs.

  6. Retrieval of Similar Objects in Simulation Data Using Machine Learning Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu-Paz, E; Cheung, S-C; Kamath, C

    2003-06-19

    Comparing the output of a physics simulation with an experiment is often done by visually comparing the two outputs. In order to determine which simulation is a closer match to the experiment, more quantitative measures are needed. This paper describes our early experiences with this problem by considering the slightly simpler problem of finding objects in a image that are similar to a given query object. Focusing on a dataset from a fluid mixing problem, we report on our experiments using classification techniques from machine learning to retrieve the objects of interest in the simulation data. The early results reported in this paper suggest that machine learning techniques can retrieve more objects that are similar to the query than distance-based similarity methods.

  7. Deep learning based multi-category object detection in aerial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Lars W.; Schuchert, Tobias; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    Multi-category object detection in aerial images is an important task for many applications such as surveillance, tracking or search and rescue tasks. In recent years, deep learning approaches using features extracted by convolutional neural networks (CNN) significantly improved the detection accuracy on detection benchmark datasets compared to traditional approaches based on hand-crafted features as used for object detection in aerial images. However, these approaches are not transferable one to one on aerial images as the used network architectures have an insufficient resolution of feature maps for handling small instances. This consequently results in poor localization accuracy or missed detections as the network architectures are explored and optimized for datasets that considerably differ from aerial images in particular in object size and image fraction occupied by an object. In this work, we propose a deep neural network derived from the Faster R-CNN approach for multi- category object detection in aerial images. We show how the detection accuracy can be improved by replacing the network architecture by an architecture especially designed for handling small object sizes. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of different parameters of the detection framework on the detection accuracy for small objects. Finally, we demonstrate the suitability of our network for object detection in aerial images by comparing our network to traditional baseline approaches and deep learning based approaches on the publicly available DLR 3K Munich Vehicle Aerial Image Dataset that comprises multiple object classes such as car, van, truck, bus and camper.

  8. Discriminative kernel feature extraction and learning for object recognition and detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Hong; Olsen, Søren Ingvor; Zhu, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Feature extraction and learning is critical for object recognition and detection. By embedding context cue of image attributes into the kernel descriptors, we propose a set of novel kernel descriptors called context kernel descriptors (CKD). The motivation of CKD is to use the spatial consistency...... codebook and reduced CKD are discriminative. We report superior performance of our algorithm for object recognition on benchmark datasets like Caltech-101 and CIFAR-10, as well as for detection on a challenging chicken feet dataset....

  9. Resident Space Object Characterization and Behavior Understanding via Machine Learning and Ontology-based Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, R.; Linares, R.; Gaylor, D.; Jah, M.; Walls, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present an end-to-end approach that employs machine learning techniques and Ontology-based Bayesian Networks (BN) to characterize the behavior of resident space objects. State-of-the-Art machine learning architectures (e.g. Extreme Learning Machines, Convolutional Deep Networks) are trained on physical models to learn the Resident Space Object (RSO) features in the vectorized energy and momentum states and parameters. The mapping from measurements to vectorized energy and momentum states and parameters enables behavior characterization via clustering in the features space and subsequent RSO classification. Additionally, Space Object Behavioral Ontologies (SOBO) are employed to define and capture the domain knowledge-base (KB) and BNs are constructed from the SOBO in a semi-automatic fashion to execute probabilistic reasoning over conclusions drawn from trained classifiers and/or directly from processed data. Such an approach enables integrating machine learning classifiers and probabilistic reasoning to support higher-level decision making for space domain awareness applications. The innovation here is to use these methods (which have enjoyed great success in other domains) in synergy so that it enables a "from data to discovery" paradigm by facilitating the linkage and fusion of large and disparate sources of information via a Big Data Science and Analytics framework.

  10. Learning invariant object recognition from temporal correlation in a hierarchical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Markus; Würtz, Rolf P

    2014-06-01

    Invariant object recognition, which means the recognition of object categories independent of conditions like viewing angle, scale and illumination, is a task of great interest that humans can fulfill much better than artificial systems. During the last years several basic principles were derived from neurophysiological observations and careful consideration: (1) Developing invariance to possible transformations of the object by learning temporal sequences of visual features that occur during the respective alterations. (2) Learning in a hierarchical structure, so basic level (visual) knowledge can be reused for different kinds of objects. (3) Using feedback to compare predicted input with the current one for choosing an interpretation in the case of ambiguous signals. In this paper we propose a network which implements all of these concepts in a computationally efficient manner which gives very good results on standard object datasets. By dynamically switching off weakly active neurons and pruning weights computation is sped up and thus handling of large databases with several thousands of images and a number of categories in a similar order becomes possible. The involved parameters allow flexible adaptation to the information content of training data and allow tuning to different databases relatively easily. Precondition for successful learning is that training images are presented in an order assuring that images of the same object under similar viewing conditions follow each other. Through an implementation with sparse data structures the system has moderate memory demands and still yields very good recognition rates.

  11. Recalling Prerequisite Material in a Calculus II Course to Improve Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokry, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses preparation assignments used in a Calculus II course that cover material from prerequisite courses. Prior to learning new material, students work on problems outside of class involving concepts from algebra, trigonometry, and Calculus I. These problems are directly built upon in order to answer Calculus II questions,…

  12. Recalling Prerequisite Material in a Calculus II Course to Improve Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokry, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses preparation assignments used in a Calculus II course that cover material from prerequisite courses. Prior to learning new material, students work on problems outside of class involving concepts from algebra, trigonometry, and Calculus I. These problems are directly built upon in order to answer Calculus II questions,…

  13. Cloud Computing and Multi Agent System to improve Learning Object Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Gil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paradigm of Learning Object provides Educators and Learners with the ability to access an extensive number of learning resources. To do so, this paradigm provides different technologies and tools, such as federated search platforms and storage repositories, in order to obtain information ubiquitously and on demand. However, the vast amount and variety of educational content, which is distributed among several repositories, and the existence of various and incompatible standards, technologies and interoperability layers among repositories, constitutes a real problem for the expansion of this paradigm. This study presents an agent-based architecture that uses the advantages provided by Cloud Computing platforms to deal with the open issues on the Learning Object paradigm.

  14. Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning for Cognitive Radio-Based Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo Victor R.; Paffenroth, Randy; Wyglinski, Alexander M.; Hackett, Timothy M.; Bilen, Sven G.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on cognitive radios has addressed the performance of various machine-learning and optimization techniques for decision making of terrestrial link properties. In this paper, we present our recent investigations with respect to reinforcement learning that potentially can be employed by future cognitive radios installed onboard satellite communications systems specifically tasked with radio resource management. This work analyzes the performance of learning, reasoning, and decision making while considering multiple objectives for time-varying communications channels, as well as different cross-layer requirements. Based on the urgent demand for increased bandwidth, which is being addressed by the next generation of high-throughput satellites, the performance of cognitive radio is assessed considering links between a geostationary satellite and a fixed ground station operating at Ka-band (26 GHz). Simulation results show multiple objective performance improvements of more than 3.5 times for clear sky conditions and 6.8 times for rain conditions.

  15. Challenges of Transitioning to an e-Learning System with Learning Objects Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspopovic, Miroslava; Cvetanovic, Svetlana; Jankulovic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    In order for higher education institutions, which implements blended and/or online learning to remain competitive and innovative it needs to keep up with the cutting edge technological and educational advances. This task is usually very difficult, keeping in mind the budget constraints that many institutions have. This usually implies that…

  16. Resisting Rote: The Importance of Active Learning for All Course Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fata-Hartley, Cori

    2011-01-01

    Many college science educators have moved away from the traditional lecture format and toward learner-centered classroom environments. Yet many of us struggle to cover large content loads, reverting at times to rote memorization. This paper suggests rote memorization simply does not work and students must be actively engaged to learn. (Contains 1…

  17. The Use of Learning Objects and Learning Styles in a Multi-Agent Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanghua; Joy, Mike; Griffiths, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive learning and teaching strategies are increasingly demanded in order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the education process, but few intelligent education systems exist, which are dynamic and able to satisfy individual students' requirements. In an attempt to overcome these limitations, we have developed a multi-agent…

  18. Tracking Student Achievement in Music Performance: Developing Student Learning Objectives for Growth Model Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Student achievement growth data are increasingly used for assessing teacher effectiveness and tracking student achievement in the classroom. Guided by the student learning objective (SLO) framework, music teachers are now responsible for collecting, tracking, and reporting student growth data. Often, the reported data do not accurately reflect the…

  19. Evaluation of a Digital Learning Object for the Monty Hall Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBattista, David

    2011-01-01

    The Monty Hall dilemma (MHD) is a remarkably difficult probability problem with a counterintuitive solution. Undergraduate students used an interactive digital learning object that provided a set-based, animated explanation of the solution to the MHD and let them play games designed to increase understanding of the solution. More than 60% of users…

  20. An Analysis of Learning Objectives and Content Coverage in Introductory Psychology Syllabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Natalie; Hackathorn, Jana; Brown, Carrie M.; Garczynski, Amy; Solomon, Erin D.; Tennial, Rachel; Sanborn, Ursula A.; Gurung, Regan A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory psychology is one of the most popular undergraduate courses and often serves as the gateway to choosing psychology as an academic major. However, little research has examined the typical structure of introductory psychology courses. The current study examined student learning objectives (SLOs) and course content in introductory…

  1. Tracking Student Achievement in Music Performance: Developing Student Learning Objectives for Growth Model Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Student achievement growth data are increasingly used for assessing teacher effectiveness and tracking student achievement in the classroom. Guided by the student learning objective (SLO) framework, music teachers are now responsible for collecting, tracking, and reporting student growth data. Often, the reported data do not accurately reflect the…

  2. The Game Object Model and Expansive Learning: Creation, Instantiation, Expansion, and Re-representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, Alan; Molomo, Bolepo; Blignaut, Seugnet

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the collaborative development, instantiation, expansion and re-representation as research instrument of the Game Object Model (GOM) are explored from a Cultural Historical Activity Theory perspective. The aim of the paper is to develop insights into the design, integration, evaluation and use of video games in learning and teaching.…

  3. Discriminative kernel feature extraction and learning for object recognition and detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Hong; Olsen, Søren Ingvor; Zhu, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Feature extraction and learning is critical for object recognition and detection. By embedding context cue of image attributes into the kernel descriptors, we propose a set of novel kernel descriptors called context kernel descriptors (CKD). The motivation of CKD is to use the spatial consistency...

  4. Evaluating the Impact of Action Plans on Trainee Compliance with Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods research study evaluated the use of technology-based action plans as a way to help improve compliance with the learning objectives of an online training event. It explored how the action planning strategy impacted subjects in a treatment group and compared them to subjects in a control group who did not get the action plan. The…

  5. Determining Areas of Weakness in Introductory Programming as a Foundation for Reusable Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe, Eileen; Sherry, Elisabeth; Magee, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Teaching programming to novices has proved challenging for both learner and lecturer due to the abstraction and complexity of the subject matter. The work described in this paper is part of an EU funded Minerva project called TUPULO (Teaching Undergraduate Programming Using Learning Objects) which aims to address the challenges faced by novice…

  6. A Learning Research Informed Design and Evaluation of a Web-Enhanced Object Oriented Programming Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantaki, Stavroula C.; Retalis, Symeon D.

    2007-01-01

    "Object-Oriented Programming" subject is included in the ACM Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate and Graduate Degree Programs in Computer Science as well as in Curriculum for K-12 Computer Science. In a few research studies learning problems and difficulties have been recorded, and therefore, specific pedagogical guidelines and…

  7. Learning Mathematics by Designing, Programming, and Investigating with Interactive, Dynamic Computer-Based Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Neil; Buteau, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    As part of their undergraduate mathematics curriculum, students at Brock University learn to create and use computer-based tools with dynamic, visual interfaces, called Exploratory Objects, developed for the purpose of conducting pure or applied mathematical investigations. A student's Development Process Model of creating and using an Exploratory…

  8. Online learning and fusion of orientation appearance models for robust rigid object tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marras, Ioannis; Alabort, Joan; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    We present a robust framework for learning and fusing different modalities for rigid object tracking. Our method fuses data obtained from a standard visual camera and dense depth maps obtained by low-cost consumer depths cameras such as the Kinect. To combine these two completely different modalitie

  9. Online learning and fusion of orientation appearance models for robust rigid object tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marras, Ioannis; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a robust framework for learning and fusing of orientation appearance models based on both texture and depth information for rigid object tracking. Our framework fuses data obtained from a standard visual camera and dense depth maps obtained by low-cost consumer depth cameras such as the

  10. Category Specificity in Normal Episodic Learning: Applications to Object Recognition and Category-Specific Agnosia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukach, Cindy M.; Bub, Daniel N.; Masson, Michael E. J.; Lindsay, D. Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Studies of patients with category-specific agnosia (CSA) have given rise to multiple theories of object recognition, most of which assume the existence of a stable, abstract semantic memory system. We applied an episodic view of memory to questions raised by CSA in a series of studies examining normal observers' recall of newly learned attributes…

  11. RuleML-Based Learning Object Interoperability on the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biletskiy, Yevgen; Boley, Harold; Ranganathan, Girish R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present paper aims to describe an approach for building the Semantic Web rules for interoperation between heterogeneous learning objects, namely course outlines from different universities, and one of the rule uses: identifying (in)compatibilities between course descriptions. Design/methodology/approach: As proof of concept, a rule…

  12. Depth Value Pre-Processing for Accurate Transfer Learning Based RGB-D Object Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakerberg, Andreas; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    of an existing deeplearning based RGB-D object recognition model, namely the FusionNet proposed by Eitel et al. First, we showthat encoding the depth values as colorized surface normals is beneficial, when the model is initialized withweights learned from training on ImageNet data. Additionally, we show...

  13. An Analysis of Learning Objectives and Content Coverage in Introductory Psychology Syllabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Natalie; Hackathorn, Jana; Brown, Carrie M.; Garczynski, Amy; Solomon, Erin D.; Tennial, Rachel; Sanborn, Ursula A.; Gurung, Regan A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory psychology is one of the most popular undergraduate courses and often serves as the gateway to choosing psychology as an academic major. However, little research has examined the typical structure of introductory psychology courses. The current study examined student learning objectives (SLOs) and course content in introductory…

  14. Objectivity and Emancipation in Learning Disabilities: Holism from the Perspective of Critical Realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a critique of holism within the learning disabilities field, based on its incipient subjectivism. It examines the issue of objective, scientific study in relation to the works of Richard Iano, Mary Poplin, and Lous Heshusius and recommends consideration of the perspective of critical realism, based on the writing of Roy…

  15. Designing Learning Object Repositories as Systems for Managing Educational Communities Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, a number of international initiatives that recognize the importance of sharing and reusing digital educational resources among educational communities through the use of Learning Object Repositories (LORs) have emerged. Typically, these initiatives focus on collecting digital educational resources that are offered by their…

  16. Diagram, a Learning Environment for Initiation to Object-Oriented Modeling with UML Class Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Py, Dominique; Auxepaules, Ludovic; Alonso, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents Diagram, a learning environment for object-oriented modelling (OOM) with UML class diagrams. Diagram an open environment, in which the teacher can add new exercises without constraints on the vocabulary or the size of the diagram. The interface includes methodological help, encourages self-correcting and self-monitoring, and…

  17. Second Graders Learn Animal Adaptations through Form and Function Analogy Object Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C.; Baldwin, Samantha; Schell, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the use of form and function analogy object boxes to teach second graders (n = 21) animal adaptations. The study used a pretest-posttest design to examine animal adaptation content learned through focused analogy activities as compared with reading and Internet searches for information about adaptations of animals followed by…

  18. Diagram, a Learning Environment for Initiation to Object-Oriented Modeling with UML Class Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Py, Dominique; Auxepaules, Ludovic; Alonso, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents Diagram, a learning environment for object-oriented modelling (OOM) with UML class diagrams. Diagram an open environment, in which the teacher can add new exercises without constraints on the vocabulary or the size of the diagram. The interface includes methodological help, encourages self-correcting and self-monitoring, and…

  19. Learning Social Studies via Objects in Museums: Investigation into Turkish Elementary School Students' Lived Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kaya; Filiz, Nilufer; Yilmaz, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Based on a descriptive phenomenological research design, this study investigated Turkish elementary school students' experiences in learning social studies via objects in museums. After students visited four different museums during the teaching of three thematic units at sixth grade level, their lived experiences were elicited. Purposeful…

  20. The Use of Concrete Learning Objects Taken from the History of Mathematics in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bütüner, Suphi Önder

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to reveal the effects of teaching with concrete learning objects taken from the history of mathematics on student achievement. Being a quasi-experimental study, it was conducted with two grade 8 classes in a secondary school located in Trabzon. The experimental group consisted of 27 students and the control group consisted of 25.…

  1. Finding the Right Mix: Teaching Methods as Predictors for Student Progress on Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    This study extends existing student ratings research by exploring how teaching methods, individually and collectively, influence a minimum standard of student achievement on learning objectives and how class size impacts this influence. Twenty teaching methods were used to predict substantial or exceptional progress on each of 12 learning…

  2. Cerebellar potentiation and learning a whisker-based object localization task with a time response window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Negah; Owens, Cullen B; Bosman, Laurens W J; Spanke, Jochen K; Lindeman, Sander; Gong, Wei; Potters, Jan-Willem; Romano, Vincenzo; Voges, Kai; Moscato, Letizia; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Negrello, Mario; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-29

    Whisker-based object localization requires activation and plasticity of somatosensory and motor cortex. These parts of the cerebral cortex receive strong projections from the cerebellum via the thalamus, but it is unclear whether and to what extent cerebellar processing may contribute to such a sensorimotor task. Here, we subjected knock-out mice, which suffer from impaired intrinsic plasticity in their Purkinje cells and long-term potentiation at their parallel fiber-to-Purkinje cell synapses (L7-PP2B), to an object localization task with a time response window (RW). Water-deprived animals had to learn to localize an object with their whiskers, and based upon this location they were trained to lick within a particular period ("go" trial) or refrain from licking ("no-go" trial). L7-PP2B mice were not ataxic and showed proper basic motor performance during whisking and licking, but were severely impaired in learning this task compared with wild-type littermates. Significantly fewer L7-PP2B mice were able to learn the task at long RWs. Those L7-PP2B mice that eventually learned the task made unstable progress, were significantly slower in learning, and showed deficiencies in temporal tuning. These differences became greater as the RW became narrower. Trained wild-type mice, but not L7-PP2B mice, showed a net increase in simple spikes and complex spikes of their Purkinje cells during the task. We conclude that cerebellar processing, and potentiation in particular, can contribute to learning a whisker-based object localization task when timing is relevant. This study points toward a relevant role of cerebellum-cerebrum interaction in a sophisticated cognitive task requiring strict temporal processing.

  3. Online Object Tracking, Learning and Parsing with And-Or Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianfu; Lu, Yang; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2016-12-23

    This paper presents a method, called AOGTracker, for simultaneously tracking, learning and parsing (TLP) of unknown objects in video sequences with a hierarchical and compositional And-Or graph (AOG) representation. The TLP method is formulated in the Bayesian framework with a spatial and a temporal dynamic programming (DP) algorithms inferring object bounding boxes on-the-fly. During online learning, the AOG is discriminatively learned using latent SVM [1] to account for appearance (e.g., lighting and partial occlusion) and structural (e.g., different poses and viewpoints) variations of a tracked object, as well as distractors (e.g., similar objects) in background. Three key issues in online inference and learning are addressed: (i) maintaining purity of positive and negative examples collected online, (ii) controling model complexity in latent structure learning, and (iii) identifying critical moments to re-learn the structure of AOG based on its intrackability. The intrackability measures uncertainty of an AOG based on its score maps in a frame. In experiments, our AOGTracker is tested on two popular tracking benchmarks with the same parameter setting: the TB-100/50/CVPR2013 benchmarks [2], [3], and the VOT benchmarks [4] - VOT 2013, 2014, 2015 and TIR2015 (thermal imagery tracking). In the former, our AOGTracker outperforms state-of-the-art tracking algorithms including two trackers based on deep convolutional network [5], [6]. In the latter, our AOGTracker outperforms all other trackers in VOT2013 and is comparable to the state-of-the-art methods in VOT2014, 2015 and TIR2015.

  4. The political economy of health promotion: part 2, national provision of the prerequisites of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    Governmental authorities of wealthy developed nations differ in their professed commitments and activity related to the provision of the prerequisites of health through public policy action. Part 1 of this article showed how nations identified as social democratic or liberal welfare states were those where such commitments are present. Nations identified as conservative or Latin welfare states were less likely to express such commitments. However, the political economy literature suggests that despite their expressed commitments to provision of the prerequisites of health, liberal welfare states fare rather poorly in implementing these commitments. The opposite is seen for conservative welfare states. Social democratic welfare states show both commitments and public policy consistent with this objective. Part 2 of this article documents the extent to which public policy activity that provides the prerequisites of health through public policy action differs among varying welfare state regimes. Despite extensive rhetoric concerning the prerequisites of health, nations identified as liberal welfare states do a rather poor job of meeting these goals and show evidence of adverse health outcomes. In contrast, social democratic welfare states fare better in providing such prerequisites--consistent with their rhetorical statements--with better health outcomes. Interestingly, conservative--and to a lesser extent Latin--nations fare well in providing the prerequisites of health despite their lack of explicit commitment to such concepts. Findings suggest that health promoters have to concern themselves with the broad strokes of public policymaking whether or not these policy activities are identified as health promotion activities.

  5. A discriminative learning framework with pairwise constraints for video object classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rong; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Jie; Hauptmann, Alexander G

    2006-04-01

    To deal with the problem of insufficient labeled data in video object classification, one solution is to utilize additional pairwise constraints that indicate the relationship between two examples, i.e., whether these examples belong to the same class or not. In this paper, we propose a discriminative learning approach which can incorporate pairwise constraints into a conventional margin-based learning framework. Different from previous work that usually attempts to learn better distance metrics or estimate the underlying data distribution, the proposed approach can directly model the decision boundary and, thus, require fewer model assumptions. Moreover, the proposed approach can handle both labeled data and pairwise constraints in a unified framework. In this work, we investigate two families of pairwise loss functions, namely, convex and nonconvex pairwise loss functions, and then derive three pairwise learning algorithms by plugging in the hinge loss and the logistic loss functions. The proposed learning algorithms were evaluated using a people identification task on two surveillance video data sets. The experiments demonstrated that the proposed pairwise learning algorithms considerably outperform the baseline classifiers using only labeled data and two other pairwise learning algorithms with the same amount of pairwise constraints.

  6. Objects Classification by Learning-Based Visual Saliency Model and Convolutional Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Yang, Yongjia

    2016-01-01

    Humans can easily classify different kinds of objects whereas it is quite difficult for computers. As a hot and difficult problem, objects classification has been receiving extensive interests with broad prospects. Inspired by neuroscience, deep learning concept is proposed. Convolutional neural network (CNN) as one of the methods of deep learning can be used to solve classification problem. But most of deep learning methods, including CNN, all ignore the human visual information processing mechanism when a person is classifying objects. Therefore, in this paper, inspiring the completed processing that humans classify different kinds of objects, we bring forth a new classification method which combines visual attention model and CNN. Firstly, we use the visual attention model to simulate the processing of human visual selection mechanism. Secondly, we use CNN to simulate the processing of how humans select features and extract the local features of those selected areas. Finally, not only does our classification method depend on those local features, but also it adds the human semantic features to classify objects. Our classification method has apparently advantages in biology. Experimental results demonstrated that our method made the efficiency of classification improve significantly. PMID:27803711

  7. Learning object location predictors with boosting and grammar-guided feature extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eads, Damian Ryan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosten, Edward [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Helmbold, David [UC/SANTA CRUZ

    2009-01-01

    The authors present BEAMER: a new spatially exploitative approach to learning object detectors which shows excellent results when applied to the task of detecting objects in greyscale aerial imagery in the presence of ambiguous and noisy data. There are four main contributions used to produce these results. First, they introduce a grammar-guided feature extraction system, enabling the exploration of a richer feature space while constraining the features to a useful subset. This is specified with a rule-based generative grammer crafted by a human expert. Second, they learn a classifier on this data using a newly proposed variant of AdaBoost which takes into account the spatially correlated nature of the data. Third, they perform another round of training to optimize the method of converting the pixel classifications generated by boosting into a high quality set of (x,y) locations. lastly, they carefully define three common problems in object detection and define two evaluation criteria that are tightly matched to these problems. Major strengths of this approach are: (1) a way of randomly searching a broad feature space, (2) its performance when evaluated on well-matched evaluation criteria, and (3) its use of the location prediction domain to learn object detectors as well as to generate detections that perform well on several tasks: object counting, tracking, and target detection. They demonstrate the efficacy of BEAMER with a comprehensive experimental evaluation on a challenging data set.

  8. Understanding spermatogenesis is a prerequisite for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Wolfgang

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Throughout spermatogenesis multiplication, maturation and differentiation of germ cells results in the formation of the male gamete. The understanding of spermatogenesis needs detailed informations about the organization of the germinal epithelium, the structure and function of different types of germ cells, endocrine and paracrine cells and mechanisms, intratesticular and extratesticular regulation of spermatogenesis. Normal germ cells must be discriminated from malformed, apoptotic and degenerating germ cells and tumor cells. Identification of the border line between normal and disturbed spermatogenesis substantiate the diagnosis of impaired male fertility. The profound knowledge of the complicate process of spermatogenesis and all cells or cell systems involved with is the prerequisite to develop concepts for therapy of male infertility or to handle germ cells in the management of assisted reproduction.

  9. Learning-Based Object Identification and Segmentation Using Dual-Energy CT Images for Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Limor; Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Karl, W Clem; Ishwar, Prakash

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, baggage screening at airports has included the use of dual-energy X-ray computed tomography (DECT), an advanced technology for nondestructive evaluation. The main challenge remains to reliably find and identify threat objects in the bag from DECT data. This task is particularly hard due to the wide variety of objects, the high clutter, and the presence of metal, which causes streaks and shading in the scanner images. Image noise and artifacts are generally much more severe than in medical CT and can lead to splitting of objects and inaccurate object labeling. The conventional approach performs object segmentation and material identification in two decoupled processes. Dual-energy information is typically not used for the segmentation, and object localization is not explicitly used to stabilize the material parameter estimates. We propose a novel learning-based framework for joint segmentation and identification of objects directly from volumetric DECT images, which is robust to streaks, noise and variability due to clutter. We focus on segmenting and identifying a small set of objects of interest with characteristics that are learned from training images, and consider everything else as background. We include data weighting to mitigate metal artifacts and incorporate an object boundary field to reduce object splitting. The overall formulation is posed as a multilabel discrete optimization problem and solved using an efficient graph-cut algorithm. We test the method on real data and show its potential for producing accurate labels of the objects of interest without splits in the presence of metal and clutter.

  10. Neural correlates of object-in-place learning in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangjin; Delcasso, Sébastien; Lee, Inah

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) process spatiotemporally discrete events while maintaining goal-directed task demands. Although some studies have reported that neural activities in the two regions are coordinated, such observations have rarely been reported in an object-place paired-associate (OPPA) task in which animals must learn an object-in-place rule. In this study, we recorded single units and local field potentials simultaneously from the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and PFC as rats learned that object A, but not object B, was rewarded in place 1, but not in place 2 (vice versa for object B). Both hippocampus and PFC are required for normal performance in this task. PFC neurons fired in association with the regularity of the occurrence of a certain type of event independent of space, whereas neuronal firing in CA1 was spatially localized for representing a discrete place. Importantly, the differential firing patterns were observed in tandem with common learning-related changes in both regions. Specifically, once OPPA learning occurred and rats used an object-in-place strategy, (i) both CA1 and PFC neurons exhibited spatially more similar and temporally more synchronized firing patterns, (ii) spiking activities in both regions were more phase-locked to theta rhythms, (iii) CA1-mPFC coherence in theta oscillation was maximal before entering a critical place for decision making. The results demonstrate differential as well as common neural dynamics between hippocampus and PFC in acquiring the OPPA task and strongly suggest that both regions form a unified functional network for processing an episodic event. PMID:22114269

  11. Improved object optimal synthetic description, modeling, learning, and discrimination by GEOGINE computational kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A.; Dacquino, Gianfranco

    2005-03-01

    GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Invariants for n-Dimensional shape/texture optimal synthetic representation, description and learning, was presented in previous conferences elsewhere recently. Improved computational algorithms based on the computational invariant theory of finite groups in Euclidean space and a demo application is presented. Progressive model automatic generation is discussed. GEOGINE can be used as an efficient computational kernel for fast reliable application development and delivery in advanced biomedical engineering, biometric, intelligent computing, target recognition, content image retrieval, data mining technological areas mainly. Ontology can be regarded as a logical theory accounting for the intended meaning of a formal dictionary, i.e., its ontological commitment to a particular conceptualization of the world object. According to this approach, "n-D Tensor Calculus" can be considered a "Formal Language" to reliably compute optimized "n-Dimensional Tensor Invariants" as specific object "invariant parameter and attribute words" for automated n-Dimensional shape/texture optimal synthetic object description by incremental model generation. The class of those "invariant parameter and attribute words" can be thought as a specific "Formal Vocabulary" learned from a "Generalized Formal Dictionary" of the "Computational Tensor Invariants" language. Even object chromatic attributes can be effectively and reliably computed from object geometric parameters into robust colour shape invariant characteristics. As a matter of fact, any highly sophisticated application needing effective, robust object geometric/colour invariant attribute capture and parameterization features, for reliable automated object learning and discrimination can deeply benefit from GEOGINE progressive automated model generation computational kernel performance. Main operational advantages over previous

  12. The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine Resident: competence acquisition and achievement of learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristrell, J; Oliva, J C; Casanovas, A; Comet, R; Jordana, R; Navarro, M

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident (CBIMR) is a computer program that was validated to analyze the acquisition of competences in teams of Internal Medicine residents. To analyze the characteristics of the rotations during the Internal Medicine residency and to identify the variables associated with the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of learning objectives and resident satisfaction. All residents of our service (n=20) participated in the study during a period of 40 months. The CBIMR consisted of 22 self-assessment questionnaires specific for each rotation, with items on services (clinical workload, disease protocolization, resident responsibilities, learning environment, service organization and teamwork) and items on educational outcomes (acquisition of clinical and communication skills, achievement of learning objectives, overall satisfaction). Associations between services features and learning outcomes were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. An intense clinical workload, high resident responsibilities and disease protocolization were associated with the acquisition of clinical skills. High clinical competence and teamwork were both associated with better communication skills. Finally, an adequate learning environment was associated with increased clinical competence, the achievement of educational goals and resident satisfaction. Potentially modifiable variables related with the operation of clinical services had a significant impact on the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of educational goals, and resident satisfaction during the specialized training in Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Learning representations for object classification using multi-stage optimal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiming; Liu, Xiuwen; Mio, Washington

    2008-01-01

    Learning data representations is a fundamental challenge in modeling neural processes and plays an important role in applications such as object recognition. Optimal component analysis (OCA) formulates the problem in the framework of optimization on a Grassmann manifold and a stochastic gradient method is used to estimate the optimal basis. OCA has been successfully applied to image classification problems arising in a variety of contexts. However, as the search space is typically very high dimensional, OCA optimization often requires expensive computational cost. In multi-stage OCA, we first hierarchically project the data onto several low-dimensional subspaces using standard techniques, then OCA learning is performed hierarchically from the lowest to the highest levels to learn about a subspace that is optimal for data discrimination based on the K-nearest neighbor classifier. One of the main advantages of multi-stage OCA lies in the fact that it greatly improves the computational efficiency of the OCA learning algorithm without sacrificing the recognition performance, thus enhancing its applicability to practical problems. In addition to the nearest neighbor classifier, we illustrate the effectiveness of the learned representations on object classification used in conjunction with classifiers such as neural networks and support vector machines.

  14. Depth-Aware Salient Object Detection and Segmentation via Multiscale Discriminative Saliency Fusion and Bootstrap Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hangke; Liu, Zhi; Du, Huan; Sun, Guangling; Le Meur, Olivier; Ren, Tongwei

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel depth-aware salient object detection and segmentation framework via multiscale discriminative saliency fusion (MDSF) and bootstrap learning for RGBD images (RGB color images with corresponding Depth maps) and stereoscopic images. By exploiting low-level feature contrasts, mid-level feature weighted factors and high-level location priors, various saliency measures on four classes of features are calculated based on multiscale region segmentation. A random forest regressor is learned to perform the discriminative saliency fusion (DSF) and generate the DSF saliency map at each scale, and DSF saliency maps across multiple scales are combined to produce the MDSF saliency map. Furthermore, we propose an effective bootstrap learning-based salient object segmentation method, which is bootstrapped with samples based on the MDSF saliency map and learns multiple kernel support vector machines. Experimental results on two large datasets show how various categories of features contribute to the saliency detection performance and demonstrate that the proposed framework achieves the better performance on both saliency detection and salient object segmentation.

  15. Understand and analyzing learning objects: A foundation for long-term substantiality and use for e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-liang Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the genres of learning objects (LOs within eight e-learning courses that provide boating safety instruction in the United States. Guided by findings from our literature review, five genres of LOs emerged during the analysis, including interactive and non-interactive graphics, interactive and non-interactive animations, and interactive text feedback. We surveyed the use of each genre of LOs within the courses and found that more non-interactive LOs than interactive LOs were adopted. Also, interactive text feedback was the most popular interactive genre available for seven courses. In our discussion, we explore potential management mechanisms of LOs in digital repositories. Our genre analysis provides a foundation for appropriate deconstruction of LOs into components, which can assist with the management of digital repositories. Effective deconstruction of LOs allows instructors and designers to successfully discover LOs that they need and reuse them in new learning units.

  16. On hierarchical models for visual recognition and learning of objects, scenes, and activities

    CERN Document Server

    Spehr, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In many computer vision applications, objects have to be learned and recognized in images or image sequences. This book presents new probabilistic hierarchical models that allow an efficient representation of multiple objects of different categories, scales, rotations, and views. The idea is to exploit similarities between objects and object parts in order to share calculations and avoid redundant information. Furthermore inference approaches for fast and robust detection are presented. These new approaches combine the idea of compositional and similarity hierarchies and overcome limitations of previous methods. Besides classical object recognition the book shows the use for detection of human poses in a project for gait analysis. The use of activity detection is presented for the design of environments for ageing, to identify activities and behavior patterns in smart homes. In a presented project for parking spot detection using an intelligent vehicle, the proposed approaches are used to hierarchically model...

  17. Holistic approach to learning and teaching introductory object-oriented programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Neena; Whitfield, Richard

    2010-06-01

    This article describes a holistic approach to designing an introductory, object-oriented programming course. The design is grounded in constructivism and pedagogy of phenomenography. We use constructive alignment as the framework to align assessments, learning, and teaching with planned learning outcomes. We plan learning and teaching activities, and media with an understanding of variation theory and the ways in which students learn to program. We outline the implementation of the course, and discuss the findings from the first cycle of an action research study with a small sample of undergraduate students. An investigation of the preferred (deep/surface) learning approaches of the students led us to believe that these approaches can be influenced through course design. Personal constructs of the students, elicited through the repertory grid technique, revealed that rich inventories of learning resources are highly valued. We comment on the transformational processes of the experience of the participants, and identify areas for further refinement and investigation in the next action research cycle.

  18. Learning to Explore the Structure of Kinematic Objects in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eBuckmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study tested the quantity and quality of human exploration learning in a virtual environment. Given the everyday experience of humans with physical object exploration, we document substantial practice gains in the time, force, and number of actions needed to classify the structure of virtual chains, marking the joints as revolute, prismatic, or rigid. In line with current work on skill acquisition, participants could generalize the new and efficient psychomotor patterns of object exploration to novel objects. On the one hand, practice gains in exploration performance could be captured by a negative exponential practice function. On the other hand, they could be linked to strategies and strategy change. After quantifying how much was learned in object exploration and identifying the time course of practice-related gains in exploration efficiency (speed, we identified what was learned. First, we identified strategy components that were associated with efficient (fast exploration performance: sequential processing, simultaneous use of both hands, low use of pulling rather than pushing, and low use of force. Only the latter was beneficial irrespective of the characteristics of the other strategy components. Second, we therefore characterized efficient exploration behavior by strategies that simultaneously take into account the abovementioned strategy components. We observed that participants maintained a high level of flexibility, sampling from a pool of exploration strategies trading the level of psycho-motoric challenges with exploration speed. We discuss the findings pursuing the aim of advancing intelligent object exploration by combining analytic (object exploration in humans and synthetic work (object exploration in robots in the same virtual environment.

  19. Creative Generation of 3D Objects with Deep Learning and Innovation Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel Anthony; Risi, Sebastian; Clune, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Advances in supervised learning with deep neural networks have enabled robust classification in many real world domains. An interesting question is if such advances can also be leveraged effectively for computational creativity. One insight is that because evolutionary algorithms are free from...... strict requirements of mathematical smoothness, they can exploit powerful deep learning representations through arbitrary computational pipelines. In this way, deep networks trained on typical supervised tasks can be used as an ingredient in an evolutionary algorithm driven towards creativity....... To highlight such potential, this paper creates novel 3D objects by leveraging feedback from a deep network trained only to recognize 2D images. This idea is tested by extending previous work with Innovation Engines, i.e. a principled combination of deep learning and evolutionary algorithms for computational...

  20. Creative Generation of 3D Objects with Deep Learning and Innovation Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel Anthony; Risi, Sebastian; Clune, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Advances in supervised learning with deep neural networks have enabled robust classification in many real world domains. An interesting question is if such advances can also be leveraged effectively for computational creativity. One insight is that because evolutionary algorithms are free from...... strict requirements of mathematical smoothness, they can exploit powerful deep learning representations through arbitrary computational pipelines. In this way, deep networks trained on typical supervised tasks can be used as an ingredient in an evolutionary algorithm driven towards creativity....... To highlight such potential, this paper creates novel 3D objects by leveraging feedback from a deep network trained only to recognize 2D images. This idea is tested by extending previous work with Innovation Engines, i.e. a principled combination of deep learning and evolutionary algorithms for computational...

  1. Multi-agent system for Knowledge-based recommendation of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea RODRÍGUEZ MARÍN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning Object (LO is a content unit being used within virtual learning environments, which -once found and retrieved- may assist students in the teaching - learning process. Such LO search and retrieval are recently supported and enhanced by data mining techniques. In this sense, clustering can be used to find groups holding similar LOs so that from obtained groups, knowledge-based recommender systems (KRS can recommend more adapted and relevant LOs. In particular, prior knowledge come from LOs previously selected, liked and ranked by the student to whom the recommendation will be performed. In this paper, we present a KRS for LOs, which uses a conventional clustering technique, namely K-means, aimed at finding similar LOs and delivering resources adapted to a specific student. Obtained promising results show that proposed KRS is able to both retrieve relevant LO and improve the recommendation precision.Learning Object (LO is a content unit being used within virtual learning environments, which -once found and retrieved- may assist students in the teaching - learning process. Such LO search and retrieval are recently supported and enhanced by data mining techniques. In this sense, clustering can be used to find groups holding similar LOs so that from obtained groups, knowledge-based recommender systems (KRS can recommend more adapted and relevant LOs. In particular, prior knowledge come from LOs previously selected, liked and ranked by the student to whom the recommendation will be performed. In this paper, we present a KRS for LOs, which uses a conventional clustering technique, namely K-means, aimed at finding similar LOs and delivering resources adapted to a specific student. Obtained promising results show that proposed KRS is able to both retrieve relevant LO and improve the recommendation precision.

  2. Self-Learning Embedded System for Object Identification in Intelligent Infrastructure Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Villaverde

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of new horizons in the field of travel assistant management leads to the development of cutting-edge systems focused on improving the existing ones. Moreover, new opportunities are being also presented since systems trend to be more reliable and autonomous. In this paper, a self-learning embedded system for object identification based on adaptive-cooperative dynamic approaches is presented for intelligent sensor’s infrastructures. The proposed system is able to detect and identify moving objects using a dynamic decision tree. Consequently, it combines machine learning algorithms and cooperative strategies in order to make the system more adaptive to changing environments. Therefore, the proposed system may be very useful for many applications like shadow tolls since several types of vehicles may be distinguished, parking optimization systems, improved traffic conditions systems, etc.

  3. Construction and validation of a virtual learning object on intestinal elimination stoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecílio Soares Rodrigues Braga

    Full Text Available Objective.To construct and validate a virtual learning object (VLO on intestinal elimination stoma. Methods. Applied, descriptive and quantitative study. In 2014, eight stoma therapists and eight experts in computer science took part of the research. The VLO included four steps: i planning, ii construction of VLO and changes of content; iii development of dynamic, and iv conclusion and analysis. The VLO was inserted into the Moodle virtual learning environment. The ergonomic and pedagogical validation of the VLO was performed. Results. The experts appreciated the VLO satisfactorily, and scored it between good and full agreement. Conclusion. The VLO on intestinal elimination stoma is a tool that can be implemented at undergraduate programs in nursing and continuing education programs for nurses in clinical practice, contributing significantly to improve the theoretical skills necessary for the care of ostomized people safely, with quality and enabling self-care.

  4. Self-Learning Embedded System for Object Identification in Intelligent Infrastructure Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Monica; Perez, David; Moreno, Felix

    2015-11-17

    The emergence of new horizons in the field of travel assistant management leads to the development of cutting-edge systems focused on improving the existing ones. Moreover, new opportunities are being also presented since systems trend to be more reliable and autonomous. In this paper, a self-learning embedded system for object identification based on adaptive-cooperative dynamic approaches is presented for intelligent sensor's infrastructures. The proposed system is able to detect and identify moving objects using a dynamic decision tree. Consequently, it combines machine learning algorithms and cooperative strategies in order to make the system more adaptive to changing environments. Therefore, the proposed system may be very useful for many applications like shadow tolls since several types of vehicles may be distinguished, parking optimization systems, improved traffic conditions systems, etc.

  5. Self-Learning Embedded System for Object Identification in Intelligent Infrastructure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Monica; Perez, David; Moreno, Felix

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of new horizons in the field of travel assistant management leads to the development of cutting-edge systems focused on improving the existing ones. Moreover, new opportunities are being also presented since systems trend to be more reliable and autonomous. In this paper, a self-learning embedded system for object identification based on adaptive-cooperative dynamic approaches is presented for intelligent sensor’s infrastructures. The proposed system is able to detect and identify moving objects using a dynamic decision tree. Consequently, it combines machine learning algorithms and cooperative strategies in order to make the system more adaptive to changing environments. Therefore, the proposed system may be very useful for many applications like shadow tolls since several types of vehicles may be distinguished, parking optimization systems, improved traffic conditions systems, etc. PMID:26593920

  6. The Role of Reusable Learning Objects in Occupational Therapy Entry-Level Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Gee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Out of early research, Cisco Systems (1999 have built an impressive foundation that advocates for reusable learning objects (RLOs. As the need for online methods for delivering both formal and informal educational content has increased, the prospect of greater influence through carefully constructed RLOs has grown. RLOs are any digital resource that can be used and reused to enhance online learning. RLOs typically are small, discrete, self-contained digital objects that may be sequenced, combined, and used within a variety of instructional activities. RLOs have been implemented in nursing, pharmacy, and physician assistant programs. However, there is a lack of literature regarding RLOs in occupational therapy education. An attitudinal survey was administered to occupational therapy students after they had used an RLO focused on goal writing. Student preferences toward RLO content, instructional design, and eLearning were generally positive. Nearly three-quarters of the students who responded to the survey indicated that the RLO presented was beneficial. All respondents noted that they would use the RLO for future occupational therapy courses. It is argued that incorporating RLOs offers a cost-effective, efficient learning tool, and also adds credibility to the given curriculum program as being innovative with instructing occupational-therapy related concepts.

  7. A convolutional learning system for object classification in 3-D Lidar data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Danil

    2010-05-01

    In this brief, a convolutional learning system for classification of segmented objects represented in 3-D as point clouds of laser reflections is proposed. Several novelties are discussed: (1) extension of the existing convolutional neural network (CNN) framework to direct processing of 3-D data in a multiview setting which may be helpful for rotation-invariant consideration, (2) improvement of CNN training effectiveness by employing a stochastic meta-descent (SMD) method, and (3) combination of unsupervised and supervised training for enhanced performance of CNN. CNN performance is illustrated on a two-class data set of objects in a segmented outdoor environment.

  8. Embedded or linked learning objects: Implications for content development, course design and classroom use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Kopp

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the idea of embedding and linking to existing content in learning object repositories and investigates teacher-designer use of learning objects within one high school mathematics course in an online school. This qualitative case study supports and extends the learning object literature, and brings forward context-specific examples of issues around repository design, autonomy and self-containment, technical support and granularity. Moreover, these findings have implications for building learning objects and repositories that could better support teachers in their instructional design and pedagogical decision-making. Résumé : La présente recherche étudie la possibilité d’effectuer un emboîtement et d’établir des liens avec le contenu existant dans les référentiels sur les objets d’apprentissage et explore l’utilisation par les enseignants-concepteurs des objets d’apprentissage au sein d’un cours de mathématique du secondaire donné dans une école en ligne. Cette étude de cas qualitative appuie et vise la littérature sur les objets d’apprentissage et met en avant plan des exemples de questions touchant la conception de référentiels, l’autonomie et l’indépendance, le soutien technique et la granularité propres au contexte. De plus, ces conclusions ont des répercussions sur l’élaboration d’objets et de référentiels d’apprentissage qui pourraient mieux appuyer les enseignants dans le cadre de leur conception pédagogique et de leur prise de décision touchant l’enseignement.

  9. Active learning in the lecture theatre using 3D printed objects [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Smith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to conceptualize 3D shapes is central to understanding biological processes. The concept that the structure of a biological molecule leads to function is a core principle of the biochemical field. Visualisation of biological molecules often involves vocal explanations or the use of two dimensional slides and video presentations. A deeper understanding of these molecules can however be obtained by the handling of objects. 3D printed biological molecules can be used as active learning tools to stimulate engagement in large group lectures. These models can be used to build upon initial core knowledge which can be delivered in either a flipped form or a more didactic manner. Within the teaching session the students are able to learn by handling, rotating and viewing the objects to gain an appreciation, for example, of an enzyme’s active site or the difference between the major and minor groove of DNA. Models and other artefacts can be handled in small groups within a lecture theatre and act as a focal point to generate conversation. Through the approach presented here core knowledge is first established and then supplemented with high level problem solving through a "Think-Pair-Share" cooperative learning strategy. The teaching delivery was adjusted based around experiential learning activities by moving the object from mental cognition and into the physical environment. This approach led to students being able to better visualise biological molecules and a positive engagement in the lecture. The use of objects in teaching allows the lecturer to create interactive sessions that both challenge and enable the student.

  10. Innovation, creativitiy and entrepreneurship competence in higher education. Learning objectives and measurement.

    OpenAIRE

    Boza Garcia, Andres; Cuenca González, María Llanos; Fernández Diego, Marta; Ruiz Font, Leonor; Gordo Monzó, Mari Luz; Alarcón Valero, Faustino; Alemany Díaz, María del Mar; Poler Escoto, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    In the permanent change context, innovation has become a vital value for the survival and development of organisations. The development of this increasingly important value will help students to improve their skills and to adapt to their future jobs in accordance with required characteristics. Competency describes what training participants should be able to do at the end of such training. Competency is acquired through the various learning objectives to be achieved. Innovation ...

  11. Social interaction facilitates word learning in preverbal infants: Word-object mapping and word segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakuno, Yoko; Omori, Takahide; Yamamoto, Jun-Ichi; Minagawa, Yasuyo

    2017-08-01

    In natural settings, infants learn spoken language with the aid of a caregiver who explicitly provides social signals. Although previous studies have demonstrated that young infants are sensitive to these signals that facilitate language development, the impact of real-life interactions on early word segmentation and word-object mapping remains elusive. We tested whether infants aged 5-6 months and 9-10 months could segment a word from continuous speech and acquire a word-object relation in an ecologically valid setting. In Experiment 1, infants were exposed to a live tutor, while in Experiment 2, another group of infants were exposed to a televised tutor. Results indicate that both younger and older infants were capable of segmenting a word and learning a word-object association only when the stimuli were derived from a live tutor in a natural manner, suggesting that real-life interaction enhances the learning of spoken words in preverbal infants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Syllable division: Prerequisite to dyslexics' literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A R; Hutcheson, L

    1988-01-01

    Skill in reading long words is prerequisite to dyslexics' literacy. Instant recognition of printed symbols is easy for those readers with photographic memories, but dyslexics often fail to recognize visually many long words which are actually familiar to them auditorially. Scientific, automatic, multisensory procedures for dividing longer words into easily read syllables can enable students to translate visual symbols rapidly and thereby to read, write, or spell accurately words of any length.Over one thousand dyslexics, aged seven to fifteen, guided the interdisciplinary team at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital in Dallas to develop, observe results, and test specific structured, sequential steps in working out longer words. The ten-year study (1965-1975) in the Language Laboratory of the Hospital established the Alphabetic Phonics curriculum which is now used successfully, not only in remedial groups but in regular classes of any size or age, in public and private schools in 45 states and six foreign countries.The newly-established Aylett Royall Cox Institute in Dallas prepares teachers and Master Instructors to train both students and other teachers. Comparable Alphabetic Phonics Teacher Training Centers are already established in Houston and Lubbock, Texas, in Oklahoma City, and at Columbia University Teachers College in New York.

  13. Perseverative Interference with Object-in-Place Scene Learning in Rhesus Monkeys with Bilateral Ablation of Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Mark G.; Browning, Philip G. F.; Mitchell, Anna S.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical disconnection of the frontal cortex and inferotemporal cortex severely impairs many aspects of visual learning and memory, including learning of new object-in-place scene memory problems, a monkey model of episodic memory. As part of a study of specialization within prefrontal cortex in visual learning and memory, we tested monkeys with…

  14. Cognitive characteristics of learning Java, an object-oriented programming language

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Garry Lynn

    Industry and Academia are moving from procedural programming languages (e.g., COBOL) to object-oriented programming languages, such as Java for the Internet. Past studies in the cognitive aspects of programming have focused primarily on procedural programming languages. Some of the languages used have been Pascal, C, Basic, FORTAN, and COBOL. Object-oriented programming (OOP) represents a new paradigm for computing. Industry is finding that programmers are having difficulty shifting to this new programming paradigm. This instruction in OOP is currently starting in colleges and universities across the country. What are the cognitive aspects for this new OOP language Java? When is a student developmentally ready to handle the cognitive characteristics of the OOP language Java? Which cognitive teaching style is best for this OOP language Java? Questions such as the aforementioned are the focus of this research Such research is needed to improve understanding of the learning process and identify students' difficulties with OOP methods. This can enhance academic teaching and industry training (Scholtz, 1993; Sheetz, 1997; Rosson, 1990). Cognitive development as measured by the Propositional Logic Test, cognitive style as measured by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator, and physical hemispheric dominance as measured by a self-report survey were obtained from thirty-six university students studying Java programming. Findings reveal that physical hemispheric dominance is unrelated to cognitive and programming language variables. However, both procedural and object oriented programming require Piaget's formal operation cognitive level as indicated by the Propositional Logic Test. This is consistent with prior research A new finding is that object oriented programming also requires formal operation cognitive level. Another new finding is that object oriented programming appears to be unrelated to hemispheric cognitive style as indicated by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator (HMI

  15. Video Cases in Teacher Education: A review study on intended and achieved learning objectives by video cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Walter; Van der Werff, Anne; Hummel, Hans; Van Geert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This literature review focuses on the use of video cases in the education of preservice teachers as a means of achieving higher order learning objectives that are necessary for gaining situated knowledge. An overview of both intended and achieved learning objectives in relevant studies involving

  16. Video Cases in Teacher Education: A review study on intended and achieved learning objectives by video cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Walter; Van der Werff, Anne; Hummel, Hans; Van Geert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This literature review focuses on the use of video cases in the education of preservice teachers as a means of achieving higher order learning objectives that are necessary for gaining situated knowledge. An overview of both intended and achieved learning objectives in relevant studies involving the

  17. Object learning improves feature extraction but does not improve feature selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Holm

    Full Text Available A single glance at your crowded desk is enough to locate your favorite cup. But finding an unfamiliar object requires more effort. This superiority in recognition performance for learned objects has at least two possible sources. For familiar objects observers might: 1 select more informative image locations upon which to fixate their eyes, or 2 extract more information from a given eye fixation. To test these possibilities, we had observers localize fragmented objects embedded in dense displays of random contour fragments. Eight participants searched for objects in 600 images while their eye movements were recorded in three daily sessions. Performance improved as subjects trained with the objects: The number of fixations required to find an object decreased by 64% across the 3 sessions. An ideal observer model that included measures of fragment confusability was used to calculate the information available from a single fixation. Comparing human performance to the model suggested that across sessions information extraction at each eye fixation increased markedly, by an amount roughly equal to the extra information that would be extracted following a 100% increase in functional field of view. Selection of fixation locations, on the other hand, did not improve with practice.

  18. Classification and identification of small objects in complex urban-forested LIDAR data using machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basener, William F.; Basener, Abigail

    2017-05-01

    Classification in LIDAR data is the process of determining points on terrain types and objects, often with the goal of determining land use and/or building footprints. In this paper we endeavor to classify terrain types and objects at a high level of detail in a complex scene that includes buildings, forested areas, and steep hillsides. Our object classes include buildings, building rooftop structures, forest trees, landscape trees, landscape bushes, cars, light posts of varying sizes, fences, paved surfaces, and grass. Our classification method of choice is a Random Forest, but we also investigate other machine learning methods including K-Nearest Neightbors and Linear Discriminant Analysis. We evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithms for accuracy, required training sample size, and runtime.

  19. Prediction-learning in Infants as a Mechanism for Gaze Control during Object Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eSchlesinger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We are pursuing the hypothesis that visual exploration and learning in young infants is achieved by producing gaze-sample sequences that are sequentially predictable. Our recent analysis of infants' gaze patterns during image free-viewing (Schlesinger & Amso, 2013 provides support for this idea. In particular, this work demonstrates that infants' gaze samples are more easily learnable than those produced by adults, as well as those produced by three artificial-observer models. In the current study, we extend these findings to a well-studied object-perception task, by investigating 3-month-olds' gaze patterns as they view a moving, partially-occluded object. We first use infants' gaze data from this task to produce a set of corresponding center-of-gaze (COG sequences. Next, we generate two simulated sets of COG samples, from image-saliency and random-gaze models, respectively. Finally, we generate learnability estimates for the three sets of COG samples by presenting each as a training set to an SRN. There are two key findings. First, as predicted, infants COG samples from the occluded-object task are learned by a pool of simple recurrent networks faster than the samples produced by the yoked, artificial-observer models. Second, we also find that resetting activity in the recurrent layer increases the network’s prediction errors, which further implicates the presence of temporal structure in infants’ COG sequences. We conclude by relating our findings to the role of image-saliency and prediction-learning during the development of object perception.

  20. OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED PRACTICAL EXAMINATION AS A LEARNING AND EVALUATION TOOL FOR BIOCHEMISTRY- FIRST EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyabati Devi Rajkumari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Assessment plays an important role in helping learners identify their own learning needs. The objective structured practical examination assesses practical skills in an objective and structured manner with direct observation of the students’ performance during planned clinical test. The aim of the study is to evaluate OSPE as a method of learning and formative assessment to the practical skill and to explore faculty perception of OSPE as a learning and assessment tool. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 98 students of first year MBBS student admitted for 2015-16 batch of Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, were the subjects for the study. Day one- Group A (1-50 students were evaluated by OSPE method of assessment. Day two- Group B (51-98 were evaluated by standard practical examination. To avoid examiners Bias on Day 3- Group C (51- 98 who were evaluated by SPE were evaluated by OSPE with minor variations. Group A underwent OSPE. Questionnaire was given to students after the assessment on the fourth day to get the feedback. RESULTS Independent sample t-test comparing mean percent scores of OSPE and SPE between the groups. There is no statistically significant difference in the mean percent scores for OSPE and SPE among the two groups. Paired sample t-test comparing mean percent scores of OSPE and SPE of group B students. The mean percentage score for OSPE is higher than the percentage scores obtained in SPE among the group B students, but the difference was not found to be statistically significant. The feedback from the students showed that more than 80% agreed that OSPE was less stressful to perform that it was a more objective assessment. CONCLUSION In conclusion, OSPE has several distinct advantages. From our first experience, we found that OSPE was more objective, measured practical skills better and eliminated examiner bias.

  1. Pharmacology education for nurse prescribing students – a lesson in reusable learning objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bath-Hextall Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift away from a biological science to a social science model of nursing care has resulted in a reduction in pharmacology knowledge and understanding in pre-registration nursing students. This has a significant impact on nurse prescribing training where pharmacology is a critical component of the course from a patient safety perspective. Methods Reusable learning objects (RLOs are electronic resources based on a single learning objective which use high quality graphics and audio to help engagement with the material and to facilitate learning. This study used questionnaire data from three successive cohorts of nurse prescribing students (n = 84 to evaluate the use of RLOs focussed around pharmacology concepts to promote the understanding of these concepts in students. A small number of students (n = 10 were followed up by telephone interview one year after qualification to gain further insight into students' perceptions of the value of RLOs as an educational tool. Results Students' perceptions of their own understanding of pharmacology concepts increased substantially following the introduction of RLOs to supplement the pharmacology component of the course. Student evaluation of the RLOs themselves was extremely positive with a number of students continuing to access these tools post-qualification. Conclusion The use of RLOs to support the pharmacology component of nurse prescribing courses successfully resulted in a perceived increase in pharmacology understanding, with some students directly implicating these educational tools in developing confidence in their own prescribing abilities.

  2. A Cognitive Skill Classification Based on Multi Objective Optimization Using Learning Vector Quantization for Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Aries Syufagi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, serious games and game technology are poised to transform the way of educating and training students at all levels. However, pedagogical value in games do not help novice students learn, too many memorizing and reduce learning process due to no information of player’s ability. To asses the cognitive level of player ability, we propose a Cognitive Skill Game (CSG. CSG improves this cognitive concept to monitor how players interact with the game. This game employs Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ for optimizing the cognitive skill input classification of the player. CSG is using teacher’s data to obtain the neuron vector of cognitive skill pattern supervise. Three clusters multi objective XE "multi objective"  target will be classified as; trial and error, carefully and, expert cognitive skill. In the game play experiments employ 33 respondent players demonstrates that 61% of players have high trial and error, 21% have high carefully, and 18% have high expert cognitive skill. CSG may provide information to game engine when a player needs help or when wanting a formidable challenge. The game engine will provide the appropriate tasks according to players’ ability. CSG will help balance the emotions of players, so players do not get bored and frustrated. 

  3. Object-based classification of earthquake damage from high-resolution optical imagery using machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, James; Oommen, Thomas; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Levin, Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Object-based approaches in the segmentation and classification of remotely sensed images yield more promising results compared to pixel-based approaches. However, the development of an object-based approach presents challenges in terms of algorithm selection and parameter tuning. Subjective methods are often used, but yield less than optimal results. Objective methods are warranted, especially for rapid deployment in time-sensitive applications, such as earthquake damage assessment. Herein, we used a systematic approach in evaluating object-based image segmentation and machine learning algorithms for the classification of earthquake damage in remotely sensed imagery. We tested a variety of algorithms and parameters on post-event aerial imagery for the 2011 earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand. Results were compared against manually selected test cases representing different classes. In doing so, we can evaluate the effectiveness of the segmentation and classification of different classes and compare different levels of multistep image segmentations. Our classifier is compared against recent pixel-based and object-based classification studies for postevent imagery of earthquake damage. Our results show an improvement against both pixel-based and object-based methods for classifying earthquake damage in high resolution, post-event imagery.

  4. A cultural side effect: Learning to read interferes with identity processing of familiar objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine eKolinsky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the neuronal recycling hypothesis (Dehaene & Cohen, 2007, we examined whether reading acquisition has a cost for the recognition of nonlinguistic visual materials. More specifically, we checked whether the ability to discriminate between mirror images, which develops through literacy acquisition, interferes with object identity judgments, and whether interference strength varies as a function of the nature of the nonlinguistic material. To these aims we presented illiterate, late literate (who learned to read at adult age, and early literate adults with an orientation-independent, identity-based same-different comparison task in which they had to respond same to both physically identical and mirrored or plane-rotated images of pictures of familiar objects (Experiment 1 or of geometric shapes (Experiment 2. Interference from irrelevant orientation variations was stronger with plane rotations than with mirror images, and stronger with geometric shapes than with objects. Illiterates were the only participants almost immune to mirror variations, but only for familiar objects. Thus, the process of unlearning mirror-image generalization, necessary to acquire literacy in the Latin alphabet, has a cost for a basic function of the visual ventral object recognition stream, i.e., identification of familiar objects. This demonstrates that neural recycling is not just an adaptation to multi-use but a process of at least partial exaptation.

  5. A Cognitive Skill Classification Based On Multi Objective Optimization Using Learning Vector Quantization for Serious Games

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    Moh. Aries Syufagi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, serious games and game technology are poised to transform the way of educating and training students at all levels. However, pedagogical value in games do not help novice students learn, too many memorizing and reduce learning process due to no information of player’s ability. To asses the cognitive level of player ability, we propose a Cognitive Skill Game (CSG. CSG improves this cognitive concept to monitor how players interact with the game. This game employs Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ for optimizing the cognitive skill input classification of the player. CSG is using teacher’s data to obtain the neuron vector of cognitive skill pattern supervise. Three clusters multi objective target will be classified as; trial and error, carefully and, expert cognitive skill. In the game play experiments using 33 respondent players demonstrates that 61% of players have high trial and error cognitive skill, 21% have high carefully cognitive skill, and 18% have high expert cognitive skill. CSG may provide information to game engine when a player needs help or when wanting a formidable challenge. The game engine will provide the appropriate tasks according to players’ ability. CSG will help balance the emotions of players, so players do not get bored and frustrated. Players have a high interest to finish the game if the player is emotionally stable. Interests in the players strongly support the procedural learning in a serious game.

  6. Incremental Structured Dictionary Learning for Video Sensor-Based Object Tracking

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    Ming Xue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To tackle robust object tracking for video sensor-based applications, an online discriminative algorithm based on incremental discriminative structured dictionary learning (IDSDL-VT is presented. In our framework, a discriminative dictionary combining both positive, negative and trivial patches is designed to sparsely represent the overlapped target patches. Then, a local update (LU strategy is proposed for sparse coefficient learning. To formulate the training and classification process, a multiple linear classifier group based on a K-combined voting (KCV function is proposed. As the dictionary evolves, the models are also trained to timely adapt the target appearance variation. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging image sequences compared with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm achieves a more favorable performance. We also illustrate its relay application in visual sensor networks.

  7. Academic Performance in MBA Programs: Do Prerequisites Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Donald Gene; Nance, William R.; White, Darin W.

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have examined criteria used in Master of Business Administration (MBA) admissions decisions. However, prior research has not examined predictive ability of undergraduate prerequisite courses in core business disciplines. The authors investigated whether undergraduate prerequisite courses predicted MBA success by analyzing the…

  8. Academic Performance in MBA Programs: Do Prerequisites Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Donald Gene; Nance, William R.; White, Darin W.

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have examined criteria used in Master of Business Administration (MBA) admissions decisions. However, prior research has not examined predictive ability of undergraduate prerequisite courses in core business disciplines. The authors investigated whether undergraduate prerequisite courses predicted MBA success by analyzing the…

  9. Object-Based Image Classification of Summer Crops with Machine Learning Methods

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    José M. Peña

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The strategic management of agricultural lands involves crop field monitoring each year. Crop discrimination via remote sensing is a complex task, especially if different crops have a similar spectral response and cropping pattern. In such cases, crop identification could be improved by combining object-based image analysis and advanced machine learning methods. In this investigation, we evaluated the C4.5 decision tree, logistic regression (LR, support vector machine (SVM and multilayer perceptron (MLP neural network methods, both as single classifiers and combined in a hierarchical classification, for the mapping of nine major summer crops (both woody and herbaceous from ASTER satellite images captured in two different dates. Each method was built with different combinations of spectral and textural features obtained after the segmentation of the remote images in an object-based framework. As single classifiers, MLP and SVM obtained maximum overall accuracy of 88%, slightly higher than LR (86% and notably higher than C4.5 (79%. The SVM+SVM classifier (best method improved these results to 89%. In most cases, the hierarchical classifiers considerably increased the accuracy of the most poorly classified class (minimum sensitivity. The SVM+SVM method offered a significant improvement in classification accuracy for all of the studied crops compared to the conventional decision tree classifier, ranging between 4% for safflower and 29% for corn, which suggests the application of object-based image analysis and advanced machine learning methods in complex crop classification tasks.

  10. Learning Object Location Predictors with Boosting and Grammar-Guided Feature Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Eads, Damian; Helmbold, David

    2009-01-01

    We present BEAMER: a new spatially exploitative approach to learning object detectors which shows excellent results when applied to the task of detecting objects in greyscale aerial imagery in the presence of ambiguous and noisy data. There are four main contributions used to produce these results. First, we introduce a grammar-guided feature extraction system, enabling the exploration of a richer feature space while constraining the features to a useful subset. This is specified with a rule-based generative grammar crafted by a human expert. Second, we learn a classifier on this data using a newly proposed variant of AdaBoost which takes into account the spatially correlated nature of the data. Third, we perform another round of training to optimize the method of converting the pixel classifications generated by boosting into a high quality set of (x, y) locations. Lastly, we carefully define three common problems in object detection and define two evaluation criteria that are tightly matched to these proble...

  11. Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning-based Deep Neural Networks for Cognitive Space Communications

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    Ferreria, Paulo; Paffenroth, Randy; Wyglinski, Alexander M.; Hackett, Timothy; Bilen, Sven; Reinhart, Richard; Mortensen, Dale

    2017-01-01

    Future communication subsystems of space exploration missions can potentially benefit from software-defined radios (SDRs) controlled by machine learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose a novel hybrid radio resource allocation management control algorithm that integrates multi-objective reinforcement learning and deep artificial neural networks. The objective is to efficiently manage communications system resources by monitoring performance functions with common dependent variables that result in conflicting goals. The uncertainty in the performance of thousands of different possible combinations of radio parameters makes the trade-off between exploration and exploitation in reinforcement learning (RL) much more challenging for future critical space-based missions. Thus, the system should spend as little time as possible on exploring actions, and whenever it explores an action, it should perform at acceptable levels most of the time. The proposed approach enables on-line learning by interactions with the environment and restricts poor resource allocation performance through virtual environment exploration. Improvements in the multiobjective performance can be achieved via transmitter parameter adaptation on a packet-basis, with poorly predicted performance promptly resulting in rejected decisions. Simulations presented in this work considered the DVB-S2 standard adaptive transmitter parameters and additional ones expected to be present in future adaptive radio systems. Performance results are provided by analysis of the proposed hybrid algorithm when operating across a satellite communication channel from Earth to GEO orbit during clear sky conditions. The proposed approach constitutes part of the core cognitive engine proof-of-concept to be delivered to the NASA Glenn Research Center SCaN Testbed located onboard the International Space Station.

  12. Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning-Based Deep Neural Networks for Cognitive Space Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreria, Paulo Victor R.; Paffenroth, Randy; Wyglinski, Alexander M.; Hackett, Timothy M.; Bilen, Sven G.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale J.

    2017-01-01

    Future communication subsystems of space exploration missions can potentially benefit from software-defined radios (SDRs) controlled by machine learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose a novel hybrid radio resource allocation management control algorithm that integrates multi-objective reinforcement learning and deep artificial neural networks. The objective is to efficiently manage communications system resources by monitoring performance functions with common dependent variables that result in conflicting goals. The uncertainty in the performance of thousands of different possible combinations of radio parameters makes the trade-off between exploration and exploitation in reinforcement learning (RL) much more challenging for future critical space-based missions. Thus, the system should spend as little time as possible on exploring actions, and whenever it explores an action, it should perform at acceptable levels most of the time. The proposed approach enables on-line learning by interactions with the environment and restricts poor resource allocation performance through virtual environment exploration. Improvements in the multiobjective performance can be achieved via transmitter parameter adaptation on a packet-basis, with poorly predicted performance promptly resulting in rejected decisions. Simulations presented in this work considered the DVB-S2 standard adaptive transmitter parameters and additional ones expected to be present in future adaptive radio systems. Performance results are provided by analysis of the proposed hybrid algorithm when operating across a satellite communication channel from Earth to GEO orbit during clear sky conditions. The proposed approach constitutes part of the core cognitive engine proof-of-concept to be delivered to the NASA Glenn Research Center SCaN Testbed located onboard the International Space Station.

  13. Reaching Consensus on Essential Biomedical Science Learning Objectives in a Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Leandra; Walton, Joanne N; Walker, Judith; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2016-04-01

    This article describes how the University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry reached consensus on essential basic biomedical science objectives for DMD students and applied the information to the renewal of its DMD curriculum. The Delphi Method was used to build consensus among dental faculty members and students regarding the relevance of over 1,500 existing biomedical science objectives. Volunteer panels of at least three faculty members (a basic scientist, a general dentist, and a dental specialist) and a fourth-year dental student were formed for each of 13 biomedical courses in the first two years of the program. Panel members worked independently and anonymously, rating each course objective as "need to know," "nice to know," "irrelevant," or "don't know." Panel members were advised after each round which objectives had not yet achieved a 75% consensus and were asked to reconsider their ratings. After a maximum of three rounds to reach consensus, a second group of faculty experts reviewed and refined the results to establish the biomedical science objectives for the renewed curriculum. There was consensus on 46% of the learning objectives after round one, 80% after round two, and 95% after round three. The second expert group addressed any remaining objectives as part of its review process. Only 47% of previous biomedical science course objectives were judged to be essential or "need to know" for the general dentist. The consensus reached by participants in the Delphi Method panels and a second group of faculty experts led to a streamlined, better integrated DMD curriculum to prepare graduates for future practice.

  14. Sucrose-induced obesity impairs novel object recognition learning in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Nicole; Kanarek, Robin B

    2009-01-08

    In addition to its metabolic consequences, obesity may lead to impairments in learning and memory. To test this possibility, male Long-Evans rats were fed ground chow, or chow and either a 32% sucrose solution or hydrogenated vegetable fat (Crisco) for eight weeks. Cognitive behavior was then assessed using a novel object recognition task. To determine if there was a relationship between cognitive behavior and glucose metabolism, performance on the novel object recognition task was correlated with fasting blood glucose levels and responses on an oral glucose tolerance test. Rats fed sucrose or fat consumed more calories, gained more weight, and had larger epididymal fat pads than rats fed only chow. Additionally, fasting blood glucose levels, and the area under the glucose curve following an oral glucose tolerance test were greater in rats consuming a supplemental source of fat or sucrose than in those eating only chow. During training when rats were presented with two identical objects in an open field, time spent exploring the objects did not differ as a function of dietary conditions. However, when rats were tested 1 h later with one familiar and one novel object, rats given sucrose spent significantly less time exploring the novel object than rats eating only chow. The percent of time spent exploring the novel object was negatively correlated with fasting blood glucose levels, final body weights, and epididymal fat pad weights. It is hypothesized that the impairment in object recognition in rats eating sucrose is due, at least in part, to diet-induced alterations in glucose metabolism.

  15. Active learning of novel sound-producing objects: motor reactivation and enhancement of visuo-motor connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew J; James, Karin Harman

    2013-02-01

    Our experience with the world commonly involves physical interaction with objects enabling us to learn associations between multisensory information perceived during an event and our actions that create an event. The interplay among active interactions during learning and multisensory integration of object properties is not well understood. To better understand how action might enhance multisensory associative recognition, we investigated the interplay among motor and perceptual systems after active learning. Fifteen participants were included in an fMRI study during which they learned visuo-auditory-motor associations between novel objects and the sounds they produce, either through self-generated actions on the objects (active learning) or by observing an experimenter produce the actions (passive learning). Immediately after learning, behavioral and BOLD fMRI measures were collected while perceiving the objects used during unisensory and multisensory training in associative perception and recognition tasks. Active learning was faster and led to more accurate recognition of audiovisual associations than passive learning. Functional ROI analyses showed that in motor, somatosensory, and cerebellar regions there was greater activation during both the perception and recognition of actively learned associations. Finally, functional connectivity between visual- and motor-related processing regions was enhanced during the presentation of actively learned audiovisual associations. Overall, the results of the current study clarify and extend our own previous work [Butler, A. J., James, T. W., & Harman James, K. Enhanced multisensory integration and motor reactivation after active motor learning of audiovisual associations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23, 3515-3528, 2011] by providing several novel findings and highlighting the task-based nature of motor reactivation and retrieval after active learning.

  16. Practicing doctors' perceptions on new learning objectives for Vietnamese medical schools

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    Dung Do Van

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of the process to develop more community-oriented medical teaching in Vietnam, eight medical schools prepared a set of standard learning objectives with attention to the needs of a doctor working with the community. Because they were prepared based on government documents and the opinions of the teachers, it was necessary to check them with doctors who had already graduated and were working at different sites in the community. Methods Each of the eight medical faculties asked 100 practising recent graduates to complete a questionnaire to check the relevance of the skills that the teachers considered most important. We used mean and standard deviation to summarize the scores rated by the respondents for each skill and percentile at four points: p50, p25, p10 and p5 to describe the variation of scores among the respondents. Correlation coefficient was used to measure the relationship between skill levels set by the teachers and the perception of practicing doctors regarding frequency of using skills and priority for each skill. Additional information was taken from the records of focus group discussions to clarify, explain or expand on the results from the quantitative data. Results In many cases the skills considered important by teachers were also rated as highly necessary and/or frequently used by the respondents. There were, however, discrepancies: some skills important to teachers were seldom used and not considered important by the doctors. In focus group discussions the doctors also identified skills that are not taught at all in the medical schools but would be needed by practising doctors. Conclusion Although most of the skills and skill levels included in the learning objectives by the teachers were consistent with the opinions of their graduates, the match was not perfect. The experience of the graduates and their additional comments should be included as inputs to the definition of learning objectives for

  17. From brain synapses to systems for learning and memory: Object recognition, spatial navigation, timed conditioning, and movement control.

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    Grossberg, Stephen

    2015-09-24

    This article provides an overview of neural models of synaptic learning and memory whose expression in adaptive behavior depends critically on the circuits and systems in which the synapses are embedded. It reviews Adaptive Resonance Theory, or ART, models that use excitatory matching and match-based learning to achieve fast category learning and whose learned memories are dynamically stabilized by top-down expectations, attentional focusing, and memory search. ART clarifies mechanistic relationships between consciousness, learning, expectation, attention, resonance, and synchrony. ART models are embedded in ARTSCAN architectures that unify processes of invariant object category learning, recognition, spatial and object attention, predictive remapping, and eye movement search, and that clarify how conscious object vision and recognition may fail during perceptual crowding and parietal neglect. The generality of learned categories depends upon a vigilance process that is regulated by acetylcholine via the nucleus basalis. Vigilance can get stuck at too high or too low values, thereby causing learning problems in autism and medial temporal amnesia. Similar synaptic learning laws support qualitatively different behaviors: Invariant object category learning in the inferotemporal cortex; learning of grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal and hippocampal cortices during spatial navigation; and learning of time cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system during adaptively timed conditioning, including trace conditioning. Spatial and temporal processes through the medial and lateral entorhinal-hippocampal system seem to be carried out with homologous circuit designs. Variations of a shared laminar neocortical circuit design have modeled 3D vision, speech perception, and cognitive working memory and learning. A complementary kind of inhibitory matching and mismatch learning controls movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory.

  18. Intelligent Video Object Classification Scheme using Offline Feature Extraction and Machine Learning based Approach

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    Chandra Mani Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of objects in video stream is important because of its application in many emerging areas such as visual surveillance, content based video retrieval and indexing etc. The task is far more challenging because the video data is of heavy and highly variable nature. The processing of video data is required to be in real-time. This paper presents a multiclass object classification technique using machine learning approach. Haar-like features are used for training the classifier. The feature calculation is performed using Integral Image representation and we train the classifier offline using a Stage-wise Additive Modeling using a Multiclass Exponential loss function (SAMME. The validity of the method has been verified from the implementation of a real-time human-car detector. Experimental results show that the proposed method can accurately classify objects, in video, into their respective classes. The proposed object classifier works well in outdoor environment in presence of moderate lighting conditions and variable scene background. The proposed technique is compared, with other object classification techniques, based on various performance parameters.

  19. Teaching tools in Evidence Based Practice: evaluation of reusable learning objects (RLOs for learning about Meta-analysis

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    Wharrad Heather

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All healthcare students are taught the principles of evidence based practice on their courses. The ability to understand the procedures used in systematically reviewing evidence reported in studies, such as meta-analysis, are an important element of evidence based practice. Meta-analysis is a difficult statistical concept for healthcare students to understand yet it is an important technique used in systematic reviews to pool data from studies to look at combined effectiveness of treatments. In other areas of the healthcare curricula, by supplementing lectures, workbooks and workshops with pedagogically designed, multimedia learning objects (known as reusable learning objects or RLOs we have shown an improvement in students' perceived understanding in subjects they found difficult. In this study we describe the development and evaluation of two RLOs on meta-analysis. The RLOs supplement associated lectures and aim to improve students' understanding of meta-analysis in healthcare students. Methods Following a quality controlled design process two RLOs were developed and delivered to two cohorts of students, a Master in Public Health course and Postgraduate diploma in nursing course. Students' understanding of five key concepts of Meta-analysis were measured before and after a lecture and again after RLO use. RLOs were also evaluated for their educational value, learning support, media attributes and usability using closed and open questions. Results Students rated their understanding of meta-analysis as improved after a lecture and further improved after completing the RLOs (Wilcoxon paired test, p Conclusions Meta-analysis RLOs that are openly accessible and unrestricted by usernames and passwords provide flexible support for students who find the process of meta-analysis difficult.

  20. What's in a Prerequisite? A Mixed-Methods Approach to Identifying the Impact of a Prerequisite Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Brian K.; Lee, Amanda K.; Alam, Usman; Dang, Jennifer V.; Dacanay, Samantha J.; Morgado, Pedro; Pirino, Giorgia; Brunner, Jo Ellen; Castillo, Leanne A.; Chan, Valerie W.; Sandholtz, Judith H.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of prerequisites in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics curricula, there has been minimal effort to assess their value in a data-driven manner. Using both quantitative and qualitative data, we examined the impact of prerequisites in the context of a microbiology lecture and lab course pairing.…

  1. A Mobile Outdoor Augmented Reality Method Combining Deep Learning Object Detection and Spatial Relationships for Geovisualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jinmeng; Qiao, Yanjun; Ren, Fu; Wang, Junxing; Du, Qingyun

    2017-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to develop a robust, fast and markerless mobile augmented reality method for registration, geovisualization and interaction in uncontrolled outdoor environments. We propose a lightweight deep-learning-based object detection approach for mobile or embedded devices; the vision-based detection results of this approach are combined with spatial relationships by means of the host device's built-in Global Positioning System receiver, Inertial Measurement Unit and magnetometer. Virtual objects generated based on geospatial information are precisely registered in the real world, and an interaction method based on touch gestures is implemented. The entire method is independent of the network to ensure robustness to poor signal conditions. A prototype system was developed and tested on the Wuhan University campus to evaluate the method and validate its results. The findings demonstrate that our method achieves a high detection accuracy, stable geovisualization results and interaction.

  2. Learning the dynamics and time-recursive boundary detection of deformable objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Walter; Cetin, Müjdat; Chan, Raymond; Willsky, Alan S

    2008-11-01

    We propose a principled framework for recursively segmenting deformable objects across a sequence of frames. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method on left ventricular segmentation across a cardiac cycle. The approach involves a technique for learning the system dynamics together with methods of particle-based smoothing as well as nonparametric belief propagation on a loopy graphical model capturing the temporal periodicity of the heart. The dynamic system state is a low-dimensional representation of the boundary, and the boundary estimation involves incorporating curve evolution into recursive state estimation. By formulating the problem as one of state estimation, the segmentation at each particular time is based not only on the data observed at that instant, but also on predictions based on past and future boundary estimates. Although this paper focuses on left ventricle segmentation, the method generalizes to temporally segmenting any deformable object.

  3. A Mobile Outdoor Augmented Reality Method Combining Deep Learning Object Detection and Spatial Relationships for Geovisualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmeng Rao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a robust, fast and markerless mobile augmented reality method for registration, geovisualization and interaction in uncontrolled outdoor environments. We propose a lightweight deep-learning-based object detection approach for mobile or embedded devices; the vision-based detection results of this approach are combined with spatial relationships by means of the host device’s built-in Global Positioning System receiver, Inertial Measurement Unit and magnetometer. Virtual objects generated based on geospatial information are precisely registered in the real world, and an interaction method based on touch gestures is implemented. The entire method is independent of the network to ensure robustness to poor signal conditions. A prototype system was developed and tested on the Wuhan University campus to evaluate the method and validate its results. The findings demonstrate that our method achieves a high detection accuracy, stable geovisualization results and interaction.

  4. Transforming clinical imaging and 3D data for virtual reality learning objects: HTML5 and mobile devices implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelease, Robert B; Nieder, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    Web deployable anatomical simulations or "virtual reality learning objects" can easily be produced with QuickTime VR software, but their use for online and mobile learning is being limited by the declining support for web browser plug-ins for personal computers and unavailability on popular mobile devices like Apple iPad and Android tablets. This article describes complementary methods for creating comparable, multiplatform VR learning objects in the new HTML5 standard format, circumventing platform-specific limitations imposed by the QuickTime VR multimedia file format. Multiple types or "dimensions" of anatomical information can be embedded in such learning objects, supporting different kinds of online learning applications, including interactive atlases, examination questions, and complex, multi-structure presentations. Such HTML5 VR learning objects are usable on new mobile devices that do not support QuickTime VR, as well as on personal computers. Furthermore, HTML5 VR learning objects can be embedded in "ebook" document files, supporting the development of new types of electronic textbooks on mobile devices that are increasingly popular and self-adopted for mobile learning. © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. A Case Study of an International E-Learning Training Division: Meeting Objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory McGreal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the work of the Commonwealth of Learning’s (COL eLearning with International Organisations (eLIO section. Participants in the investigation included a representative sample of the learners (N = 15, their supervisors (N = 5, and the COL staff, including all of the eLIO staff (N = 10. The methodology consisted of an examination of all relevant documents, interviews that formed a learning history, and a sample survey. The investigation concluded that the eLIO achieved its goal of developing a distance learning model, and it met or exceeded identified objectives, with a high degree of satisfaction expressed by all participants. This included teaching +2000 satisfied learners; partnering with eight international organizations; achieving a 62% female participation rate and a high completion rate (75% in the courses provided; testing, piloting, and delivering two new elearning courses; conducting needs analyses; recruiting/training highly qualified tutors; monitoring; and using appropriate technologies. Shortcomings of the programmes include the lack of pre- and post-tests, little analysis of pricing structures, some unclear instructions (a need for plain English, unclear copyright licensing, only very limited use of available OER software, and the absence of a succession plan for the manager. Based on the high level of satisfaction amo

  6. Preverbal Infants Use Object Features and Motion Cues in Social Learning

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    Hiu Mei Chow

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown preverbal infants possess the ability to learn social rules presented in complex perceptual environment, but little is known about how they do it. We investigated the relative contribution of two perceptual cues in social learning. Three groups of six- to twelve-month-old infants were habituated to repeated events in which two agents helped or hindered a climber by pushing it up or down a hill, and who subsequently laughed (when helped or cried.(when hindered. The three groups then received a test dishabituating stimulus such that for group 1, the climber cried when pushed up the hill and laughed when pushed down; for group 2, the identities of the agents (as defined by geometric shape and color were reversed; for group 3, the agents kept their identities but reversed their pushing direction. We found infants looked significantly longer in all three dishabituating conditions. The results from group 1 suggest that infants successfully associated the social events with consequential emotions. The discriminability in group 2 and 3 suggests that simple motion direction and complex object (agent identity cues are both effective for emotion-related social learning.

  7. Do screencasts help to revise prerequisite mathematics? An investigation of student performance and perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Birgit; Jordan, Camilla R.; Lowe, Tim W.; Mestel, Ben D.

    2014-02-01

    Basic calculus skills that are prerequisites for advanced mathematical studies continue to be a problem for a significant proportion of higher education students. While there are many types of revision material that could be offered to students, in this paper we investigate whether short, narrated video recordings of mathematical explanations (screencasts) are a useful tool to enhance student learning when revisiting prerequisite topics. We report on the outcomes of a study that was designed to both measure change in student performance before and after watching screencasts, and to capture students' perception of the usefulness of screencasts in their learning. Volunteers were recruited from students enrolled on an entry module for the Mathematics Master of Science programme at the Open University to watch two screencasts sandwiched between two online calculus quizzes. A statistical analysis of student responses to the quizzes shows that screencasts can have a positive effect on student performance. Further analysis of student feedback shows that student confidence was increased by watching the screencasts. Student views on the value of screencasts for their learning indicated that they appreciated being able to watch a problem being solved and explained by an experienced mathematician; hear the motivation for a particular problem-solving approach; engage more readily with the material being presented, thereby retaining it more easily. The positive student views and impact on student scores indicate that short screencasts could play a useful role in revising prerequisite mathematics.

  8. English- and Mandarin-learning infants' discrimination of actions and objects in dynamic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Tardif, Twila; Pulverman, Rachel; Casasola, Marianella; Zhu, Liqi; Zheng, Xiaobei; Meng, Xiangzhi

    2015-10-01

    The present studies examined the role of linguistic experience in directing English and Mandarin learners' attention to aspects of a visual scene. Specifically, they asked whether young language learners in these 2 cultures attend to differential aspects of a word-learning situation. Two groups of English and Mandarin learners, 6-8-month-olds (n = 65) and 17-19-month-olds (n = 91), participated in 2 studies, based on a habituation paradigm, designed to test infants' discrimination between actions and objects in dynamic events. In Study 1, these stimuli were presented in silence, whereas in Study 2, a verbal label accompanied videos. Results showed that 6-8-month-olds could discriminate action changes but not object changes, whereas 17-19-month-olds could discriminate both types of changes. However, there were only very subtle cross-linguistic differences in these patterns when the scenes were presented together with a verbal label. These findings show strong evidence for universal developmental trends in attention, with somewhat weaker evidence that the differences in the types of words Mandarin- versus English-learning children produce or are exposed to affect attention to different aspects of a scene in the first 2 years of life. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Object detection with DoG scale-space: a multiple kernel learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilufar, Sharmin; Ray, Nilanjan; Zhang, Hong

    2012-08-01

    Difference of Gaussians (DoG) scale-space for an image is a significant way to generate features for object detection and classification. While applying DoG scale-space features for object detection/classification, we face two inevitable issues: dealing with high dimensional data and selecting/weighting of proper scales. The scale selection process is mostly ad-hoc to date. In this paper, we propose a multiple kernel learning (MKL) method for both DoG scale selection/weighting and dealing with high dimensional scale-space data. We design a novel shift invariant kernel function for DoG scale-space. To select only the useful scales in the DoG scale-space, a novel framework of MKL is also proposed. We utilize a 1-norm support vector machine (SVM) in the MKL optimization problem for sparse weighting of scales from DoG scale-space. The optimized data-dependent kernel accommodates only a few scales that are most discriminatory according to the large margin principle. With a 2-norm SVM this learned kernel is applied to a challenging detection problem in oil sand mining: to detect large lumps in oil sand videos. We tested our method on several challenging oil sand data sets. Our method yields encouraging results on these difficult-to-process images and compares favorably against other popular multiple kernel methods.

  10. The Prerequisites for Successful Teaching and Learning of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Greg

    2013-01-01

    The report of the European Union High Level Group of Experts on Literacy presents a clear statement of their vision for the future of literacy in our continent. The first part of the statement is: "All citizens of Europe shall be literate, so as to achieve their aspirations as individuals, family members, workers and citizens." How is…

  11. Prerequisite Skills That Support Learning through Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Rebecca P. F.; Dickson, Chata A.; Martineau, Meaghan; Ahearn, William H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between tasks that require delayed discriminations such as delayed imitation and delayed matching to sample on acquisition of skills using video modeling. Twenty-nine participants with an ASD diagnosis were assessed on a battery of tasks including both immediate and delayed imitation and…

  12. Transforming Clinical Imaging and 3D Data for Virtual Reality Learning Objects: HTML5 and Mobile Devices Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelease, Robert B.; Nieder, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Web deployable anatomical simulations or "virtual reality learning objects" can easily be produced with QuickTime VR software, but their use for online and mobile learning is being limited by the declining support for web browser plug-ins for personal computers and unavailability on popular mobile devices like Apple iPad and Android…

  13. Transforming Clinical Imaging and 3D Data for Virtual Reality Learning Objects: HTML5 and Mobile Devices Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelease, Robert B.; Nieder, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Web deployable anatomical simulations or "virtual reality learning objects" can easily be produced with QuickTime VR software, but their use for online and mobile learning is being limited by the declining support for web browser plug-ins for personal computers and unavailability on popular mobile devices like Apple iPad and Android…

  14. The Pedagogy of Critical Thinking: Object Design Implications for Improving Students' Thoughtful Engagement within E-Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcaen, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author described how a model of teaching critical thinking couples with the development of learning objects may help respond to broader calls for critical thinking both as a central goal in education and as a key aspect in the ecology of 21st century e-learning environment. The model developed by the Canadian Critical Thinking…

  15. Associative vocabulary learning: development and testing of two paradigms for the (re- acquisition of action- and object-related words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Freundlieb

    Full Text Available Despite a growing number of studies, the neurophysiology of adult vocabulary acquisition is still poorly understood. One reason is that paradigms that can easily be combined with neuroscientfic methods are rare. Here, we tested the efficiency of two paradigms for vocabulary (re- acquisition, and compared the learning of novel words for actions and objects. Cortical networks involved in adult native-language word processing are widespread, with differences postulated between words for objects and actions. Words and what they stand for are supposed to be grounded in perceptual and sensorimotor brain circuits depending on their meaning. If there are specific brain representations for different word categories, we hypothesized behavioural differences in the learning of action-related and object-related words. Paradigm A, with the learning of novel words for body-related actions spread out over a number of days, revealed fast learning of these new action words, and stable retention up to 4 weeks after training. The single-session Paradigm B employed objects and actions. Performance during acquisition did not differ between action-related and object-related words (time*word category: p = 0.01, but the translation rate was clearly better for object-related (79% than for action-related words (53%, p = 0.002. Both paradigms yielded robust associative learning of novel action-related words, as previously demonstrated for object-related words. Translation success differed for action- and object-related words, which may indicate different neural mechanisms. The paradigms tested here are well suited to investigate such differences with neuroscientific means. Given the stable retention and minimal requirements for conscious effort, these learning paradigms are promising for vocabulary re-learning in brain-lesioned people. In combination with neuroimaging, neuro-stimulation or pharmacological intervention, they may well advance the understanding of

  16. Associative vocabulary learning: development and testing of two paradigms for the (re-) acquisition of action- and object-related words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlieb, Nils; Ridder, Volker; Dobel, Christian; Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Baumgaertner, Annette; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Gerloff, Christian; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Liuzzi, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing number of studies, the neurophysiology of adult vocabulary acquisition is still poorly understood. One reason is that paradigms that can easily be combined with neuroscientfic methods are rare. Here, we tested the efficiency of two paradigms for vocabulary (re-) acquisition, and compared the learning of novel words for actions and objects. Cortical networks involved in adult native-language word processing are widespread, with differences postulated between words for objects and actions. Words and what they stand for are supposed to be grounded in perceptual and sensorimotor brain circuits depending on their meaning. If there are specific brain representations for different word categories, we hypothesized behavioural differences in the learning of action-related and object-related words. Paradigm A, with the learning of novel words for body-related actions spread out over a number of days, revealed fast learning of these new action words, and stable retention up to 4 weeks after training. The single-session Paradigm B employed objects and actions. Performance during acquisition did not differ between action-related and object-related words (time*word category: p = 0.01), but the translation rate was clearly better for object-related (79%) than for action-related words (53%, p = 0.002). Both paradigms yielded robust associative learning of novel action-related words, as previously demonstrated for object-related words. Translation success differed for action- and object-related words, which may indicate different neural mechanisms. The paradigms tested here are well suited to investigate such differences with neuroscientific means. Given the stable retention and minimal requirements for conscious effort, these learning paradigms are promising for vocabulary re-learning in brain-lesioned people. In combination with neuroimaging, neuro-stimulation or pharmacological intervention, they may well advance the understanding of language learning

  17. Curriculum development for a national cardiotocography education program: a Delphi survey to obtain consensus on learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellesen, Line; Hedegaard, Morten; Bergholt, Thomas; Colov, Nina P; Hoegh, Stinne; Sorensen, Jette L

    2015-08-01

    To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. A three-round Delphi survey. One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching experience and clinical obstetric experience. Following national and international guidelines, the research group determined six topics as important when using CTG: fetal physiology, equipment, indication, interpretation, clinical management, and communication/responsibility. In the first Delphi round, participants listed one to five learning objectives within the predefined topics. Responses were analyzed by a directed approach to content analysis. Phrasing was modified in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy. In the second and third Delphi rounds, participants rated each objective on a five-point relevance scale. Consensus was predefined as objectives with a mean rating value of ≥ 3. A prioritized list of CTG learning objectives. A total of 42 midwives and obstetricians from 21 maternity units were invited to participate, of whom 26 completed all three Delphi rounds, representing 18 maternity units. The final prioritized list included 40 objectives. The highest ranked objectives emphasized CTG interpretation and clinical management. The lowest ranked objectives emphasized fetal physiology. Mean ratings of relevance ranged from 3.15 to 5.00. National consensus on CTG learning objectives was achieved using the Delphi methodology. This was an initial step in developing a valid CTG education program. A prioritized list of objectives will clarify which topics to emphasize in a CTG education program. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. PBL triggers in relation to students' generated learning issues and predetermined faculty objectives: Study in a Malaysian public university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslai, Nurul Hidayati; Salam, Abdus

    2016-01-01

    Foundational elements of problem based learning (PBL) are triggers, tutors and students. Ineffective triggers are important issues for students' inability to generate appropriate learning issues. The objective of this study was to evaluate PBL triggers and to determine similarities of students' generated learning issues with predetermined faculty objectives. It was a retrospective study conducted in 2014 analyzing all 24 PBL-triggers used at Centre for Foundation Studies, International Islamic University Malaysia, in four semesters during two consecutive years 2011 and 2012. Triggers were used as textual and illustration format equally in each semester. Total 16 PBL-triggers with highest and lowest achieving similarities of learning issues with predetermined faculty objectives were selected equally from each semester and format. The trigger quality and learning issues related to predetermine faculty objectives were analyzed and presented as mean and percent distribution. Mean similarities score of students' generated learning issues were 3.4 over 5 predetermined faculty objectives which was 68%, varied from 58% to 79%. More than 70% similarities were generated from five textual and four illustrated triggers, while PBL, it is the designing considering influential variables that influence higher outcomes. Triggers should have planned clues that lead students to generate issues correlate with faculty objectives. Educational institution should emphasize on training needs of faculty at regular interval to develop and re-in force teachers' skills in trigger design, thereby to promote a sustainable educational and organizational development.

  19. Libraries in Second Life: New Approaches to Education, Information Sharing, Learning Object Implementation, User Interactions and Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Smith Nash

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life continue to expand the way they provide information, learning activities, and educational applications. This paper explores the types of learning activities that take place in Second Life and discusses how learning takes place, with a view toward developing effective instructional strategies. As learning objects are being launched in Second Life, new approaches to collaboration, interactivity, and cognition are being developed. Many learning-centered islands appeal to individuals who benefit from interaction with peers and instructors, and who can access learning objects such as information repositories, simulations, and interactive animations. The key advantages that Second Life offers include engaging and meaningful interaction with fellow learners, media-rich learning environments with embedded video, graphics, and interactive quizzes and assessments, an engaging environment for simulations such as virtual labs, and culturally inclusive immersive environments. However, because of the steep learning curve, technical difficulties, and cultural diversity, learners may become frustrated in Second Life. Since Second Life is social learning environment that emphasizes the creation of a self, effective learning requires step-by-step empowerment of that new, constructed self.

  20. Libraries in Second Life: New Approaches to Education, Information Sharing, Learning Object Implementation, User Interactions and Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Smith Nash

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life continue to expand the way they provide information, learning activities, and educational applications. This paper explores the types of learning activities that take place in Second Life and discusses how learning takes place, with a view toward developing effective instructional strategies. As learning objects are being launched in Second Life, new approaches to collaboration, interactivity, and cognition are being developed. Many learning-centered islands appeal to individuals who benefit from interaction with peers and instructors, and who can access learning objects such as information repositories, simulations, and interactive animations. The key advantages that Second Life offers include engaging and meaningful interaction with fellow learners, media-rich learning environments with embedded video, graphics, and interactive quizzes and assessments, an engaging environment for simulations such as virtual labs, and culturally inclusive immersive environments. However, because of the steep learning curve, technical difficulties, and cultural diversity, learners may become frustrated in Second Life. Since Second Life is social learning environment that emphasizes the creation of a self, effective learning requires step-by-step empowerment of that new, constructed self.

  1. A Machine Learning based Efficient Software Reusability Prediction Model for Java Based Object Oriented Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Maggo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Software reuse refers to the development of new software systems with the likelihood of completely or partially using existing components or resources with or without modification. Reusability is the measure of the ease with which previously acquired concepts and objects can be used in new contexts. It is a promising strategy for improvements in software quality, productivity and maintainability as it provides for cost effective, reliable (with the consideration that prior testing and use has eliminated bugs and accelerated (reduced time to market development of the software products. In this paper we present an efficient automation model for the identification and evaluation of reusable software components to measure the reusability levels (high, medium or low of procedure oriented Java based (object oriented software systems. The presented model uses a metric framework for the functional analysis of the Object oriented software components that target essential attributes of reusability analysis also taking into consideration Maintainability Index to account for partial reuse. Further machine learning algorithm LMNN is explored to establish relationships between the functional attributes. The model works at functional level rather than at structural level. The system is implemented as a tool in Java and the performance of the automation tool developed is recorded using criteria like precision, recall, accuracy and error rate. The results gathered indicate that the model can be effectively used as an efficient, accurate, fast and economic model for the identification of procedure based reusable components from the existing inventory of software resources.

  2. THE USE OF LEARNING OBJECTS IN PHYSICS CLASSES: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INCLUSION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Mesquita Melques

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This work corresponds to a Master research that has as a research field a classroom of 1st year of high school a public school in the state schools in the city of Presidente Prudente/São Paulo, Brazil. The main objective is to investigate the contribution of the use of Educational Objects (OE in physics classes to the inclusion process, using as tool the Banco Internacional de Objetos Educacionais. For this, we seek to achieve the following objectives: to analyze how the OE can be inserted in physics classes, based on the Curriculum Official of São Paulo, to analyze whether the OE pre-selected contemplate accessibility, favoring its use by students with disabilities, to analyze whether the selected OE contribute to the inclusion of students with intellectual disabilities in the process of teaching and learning of physics. Due to resources as audio, image, dynamic situations and opportunities to perform practical experiences and working together, the preliminary results indicate that the OE selected from evaluation criteria pre-defined can contribute not only with the school inclusion of all students but also to social inclusion, particularly for students with disabilities.

  3. Fast automated segmentation of multiple objects via spatially weighted shape learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Shekhar S.; Dowling, Jason A.; Greer, Peter B.; Martin, Jarad; Wratten, Chris; Pichler, Peter; Fripp, Jurgen; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have proved successful in automatic segmentation by using shape and appearance priors in a number of areas such as prostate segmentation, where accurate contouring is important in treatment planning for prostate cancer. The ASM approach however, is heavily reliant on a good initialisation for achieving high segmentation quality. This initialisation often requires algorithms with high computational complexity, such as three dimensional (3D) image registration. In this work, we present a fast, self-initialised ASM approach that simultaneously fits multiple objects hierarchically controlled by spatially weighted shape learning. Prominent objects are targeted initially and spatial weights are progressively adjusted so that the next (more difficult, less visible) object is simultaneously initialised using a series of weighted shape models. The scheme was validated and compared to a multi-atlas approach on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images of 38 cancer patients and had the same (mean, median, inter-rater) Dice’s similarity coefficients of (0.79, 0.81, 0.85), while having no registration error and a computational time of 12-15 min, nearly an order of magnitude faster than the multi-atlas approach.

  4. Prerequisites of the Passage to a Regime of Inflation Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Minica

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The article synthetically presents the main prerequisites of the institutional and technical order we should consider in the context of the National Bank’s adopting a complex policy of inflation targeting.

  5. Epistemological considerations on neuroimaging--a crucial prerequisite for neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian G; Huber, Johannes

    2009-07-01

    Whereas ethical considerations on imaging techniques and interpretations of neuroimaging results flourish, there is not much work on their preconditions. In this paper, therefore, we discuss epistemological considerations on neuroimaging and their implications for neuroethics. Neuroimaging uses indirect methods to generate data about surrogate parameters for mental processes, and there are many determinants influencing the results, including current hypotheses and the state of knowledge. This leads to an interdependence between hypotheses and data. Additionally, different levels of description are involved, especially when experiments are designed to answer questions pertaining to broad concepts like the self, empathy or moral intentions. Interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks are needed to integrate findings from the life sciences and the humanities and to translate between them. While these epistemological issues are not specific for neuroimaging, there are some reasons why they are of special importance in this context: Due to their inferential proximity, 'neuro-images' seem to be self-evident, suggesting directness of observation and objectivity. This has to be critically discussed to prevent overinterpretation. Additionally, there is a high level of attention to neuroimaging, leading to a high frequency of presentation of neuroimaging data and making the critical examination of their epistemological properties even more pressing. Epistemological considerations are an important prerequisite for neuroethics. The presentation and communication of the results of neuroimaging studies, the potential generation of new phenomena and new 'dysfunctions' through neuroimaging, and the influence on central concepts at the foundations of ethics will be important future topics for this discipline.

  6. Learning Actions, Objects and Types of Interaction: A Methodological Analysis of Expansive Learning among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantavuori, Juhana; Engeström, Yrjö; Lipponen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyzes a collaborative learning process among Finnish pre-service teachers planning their own learning in a self-regulated way. The study builds on cultural-historical activity theory and the theory of expansive learning, integrating for the first time an analysis of learning actions and an analysis of types of interaction. We examine…

  7. A single-rate context-dependent learning process underlies rapid adaptation to familiar object dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N Ingram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor learning has been extensively studied using dynamic (force-field perturbations. These induce movement errors that result in adaptive changes to the motor commands. Several state-space models have been developed to explain how trial-by-trial errors drive the progressive adaptation observed in such studies. These models have been applied to adaptation involving novel dynamics, which typically occurs over tens to hundreds of trials, and which appears to be mediated by a dual-rate adaptation process. In contrast, when manipulating objects with familiar dynamics, subjects adapt rapidly within a few trials. Here, we apply state-space models to familiar dynamics, asking whether adaptation is mediated by a single-rate or dual-rate process. Previously, we reported a task in which subjects rotate an object with known dynamics. By presenting the object at different visual orientations, adaptation was shown to be context-specific, with limited generalization to novel orientations. Here we show that a multiple-context state-space model, with a generalization function tuned to visual object orientation, can reproduce the time-course of adaptation and de-adaptation as well as the observed context-dependent behavior. In contrast to the dual-rate process associated with novel dynamics, we show that a single-rate process mediates adaptation to familiar object dynamics. The model predicts that during exposure to the object across multiple orientations, there will be a degree of independence for adaptation and de-adaptation within each context, and that the states associated with all contexts will slowly de-adapt during exposure in one particular context. We confirm these predictions in two new experiments. Results of the current study thus highlight similarities and differences in the processes engaged during exposure to novel versus familiar dynamics. In both cases, adaptation is mediated by multiple context-specific representations. In the case of familiar

  8. E-learning objects and actor-networks as configuring information literacy teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Trine Louise

    2017-01-01

    libraries produced and implemented e-learning objects in information literacy teaching. The material was collected through interviews, observations, documents and feedback sessions. Analysis. Latour´s concept of translation and Callon´s four translation moments are used to analyze the network building......Introduction. With actor-network theory (ANT) as the theoretical lens the aim of the paper is to examine attempts to build network for shaping information literacy teaching. Method. The paper is based on a study of a project in 2014-2016 where information professionals representing ten educational...... that a network configuring information literacy teaching based on new interactive roles has not been stabilized. Conclusion. The paper concludes that the strength of ANT is first of all the mediation of an overview of different kinds of actors involved in network building. Further, the paper proposes to combine...

  9. E-learning objects and actor-networks as configuring information literacy teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Trine Louise

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. With actor-network theory (ANT) as the theoretical lens the aim of the paper is to examine attempts to build network for shaping information literacy teaching. Method. The paper is based on a study of a project in 2014-2016 where information professionals representing ten educational...... libraries produced and implemented e-learning objects in information literacy teaching. The material was collected through interviews, observations, documents and feedback sessions. Analysis. Latour´s concept of translation and Callon´s four translation moments are used to analyze the network building...... that a network configuring information literacy teaching based on new interactive roles has not been stabilized. Conclusion. The paper concludes that the strength of ANT is first of all the mediation of an overview of different kinds of actors involved in network building. Further, the paper proposes to combine...

  10. A Model for Semi-Automatic Composition of Educational Content from Open Repositories of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Rodríguez Marín

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects (LOs repositories are important in building educational content and should allow search, retrieval and composition processes to be successfully developed to reach educational goals. However, such processes require so much time-consuming and not always provide the desired results. Thus, the aim of this paper is to propose a model for the semiautomatic composition of LOs, which are automatically recovered from open repositories. For the development of model, various text similarity measures are discussed, while for calibration and validation some comparison experiments were performed using the results obtained by teachers. Experimental results show that when using a value of k (number of LOs selected of at least 3, the percentage of similarities between the model and such made by experts exceeds 75%. To conclude, it can be established that the model proposed allows teachers to save time and effort for LOs selection by performing a pre-filter process.

  11. La interfaz del objeto de aprendizaje/ The interface of the Learning Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo hace parte del proceso de investigación documental y teórico, que se realizó en el marco de la investigación mencionada, con el fin de dar soporte conceptual a los importantes aportes que hace el diseño gráfico al proceso de construcción de objetos de aprendizaje. Se presenta a continuación un breve recorrido por las diferentes concepciones de los conceptos de interfaz y usabilidad, en tanto fundamentales en el logro, en primera instancia, de la comunicación y, en segunda instancia, la potenciación de los aprendizajes. This article is a part of the documental and theoretical process of investigation, of the project mention before, this has as a purpose to give a conceptual support to the important contributions from the graphic design to the process of construction of learning objects. In this is presented a brief journey about the different conceptions of the notion of interface and usability, as well as they are fundamental to consolidate of, in first place, the communication and, in second place, the promotion of the learning process.

  12. Multi-objective group scheduling with learning effect in the cellular manufacturing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Taghavi-fard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Group scheduling problem in cellular manufacturing systems consists of two major steps. Sequence of parts in each part-family and the sequence of part-family to enter the cell to be processed. This paper presents a new method for group scheduling problems in flow shop systems where it minimizes makespan (Cmax and total tardiness. In this paper, a position-based learning model in cellular manufacturing system is utilized where processing time for each part-family depends on the entrance sequence of that part. The problem of group scheduling is modeled by minimizing two objectives of position-based learning effect as well as the assumption of setup time depending on the sequence of parts-family. Since the proposed problem is NP-hard, two meta heuristic algorithms are presented based on genetic algorithm, namely: Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II and non-dominated rank genetic algorithm (NRGA. The algorithms are tested using randomly generated problems. The results include a set of Pareto solutions and three different evaluation criteria are used to compare the results. The results indicate that the proposed algorithms are quite efficient to solve the problem in a short computational time.

  13. Collaboration with service users to develop reusable learning objects: the ROOT to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle, Mary; Needham, Yvonne; Dearing, Mary

    2012-11-01

    The involvement of service users in the education of health workers is seen as an important component within the curriculum. It is thought to facilitate the students into developing a deeper understanding around the real lives of their patients, and therefore ensuring their care is more person centred. The subject area focused upon was developing students' awareness of the needs of people with a learning disability. Recent incidents in the press have highlighted examples of poor quality care and a lack of understanding by health and social care professionals in regard to their needs. This article highlights a number of key issues which must be considered when involving service users, namely consent, ethical practice and collaboration. This article will describe the participation of service users in the development of reusable learning objects (RLO's) and make recommendations on the optimum way to undertake such an activity. From this process a framework has been developed, described as the ROOT to success. The ROOT element of the structure relates to Relationship, Organization, Outcome and Team. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Learning-based stochastic object models for use in optimizing imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolly, Steven R.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Yu, Lifeng; Li, Hua

    2017-03-01

    It is widely known that the optimization of imaging systems based on objective, or task-based, measures of image quality via computer-simulation requires use of a stochastic object model (SOM). However, the development of computationally tractable SOMs that can accurately model the statistical variations in anatomy within a specified ensemble of patients remains a challenging task. Because they are established by use of image data corresponding a single patient, previously reported numerical anatomical models lack of the ability to accurately model inter- patient variations in anatomy. In certain applications, however, databases of high-quality volumetric images are available that can facilitate this task. In this work, a novel and tractable methodology for learning a SOM from a set of volumetric training images is developed. The proposed method is based upon geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models, which characterize the inter-structural centroid variations and the intra-structural shape variations of each individual anatomical structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations learned from training data. By use of the GAD models, random organ shapes and positions can be generated and integrated to form an anatomical phantom. The randomness in organ shape and position will reflect the variability of anatomy present in the training data. To demonstrate the methodology, a SOM corresponding to the pelvis of an adult male was computed and a corresponding ensemble of phantoms was created. Additionally, computer-simulated X-ray projection images corresponding to the phantoms were computed, from which tomographic images were reconstructed.

  15. Rasgos Pedagógicos de los Objetos de Aprendizaje Pedagogical Features of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiappe Laverde Andres

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Los objetos de aprendizaje (OA son considerados hoy como una alternativa viable e interesante para el desarrollo de contenidos para programas educativos mediados por las Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC. No obstante la pertinencia del tema para el momento actual de la educación superior en toda Latinoamérica, es preciso reflexionar más en profundidad acerca de lo que significan los OA y su impacto en el proceso educativo. El estudio de los rasgos pedagógicos de los objetos de aprendizaje coloca a la comunidad académica frente a un escenario que requiere la pronta identificación de sus retos y limitaciones de cara a la inminente ejecución de procesos de incorporación de los OA en las dinámicas de las instituciones educativas. Learning objects (LO are regarded today as a viable and interesting alternative for development of content for educational programs mediated by information and communication technologies (ICT. Attending the relevance of this topic just for this historic moment of higher education throughout Latin America, we need to think more deeply about what LO means and its impact on the educational process. The study of the pedagogical features of learning objects placed to the academic community in front of a scenario that requires prompt identification of their challenges and constraints facing the imminent execution of incorporation processes of LO in educational institutions dynamics.

  16. Interactive Physics: the role of interactive learning objects in teaching Physics in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, R. M.; Cámara, M. E.; Arranz, F. J.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the results of a Project in educational innovation entitled "Interactive Physics". We have developed resources for teaching Physics for students of Engineering, with an emphasis in conceptual reinforcement and addressing the shortcomings of students entering the University. The resources developed include hypertext, graphics, equations, quizzes and more elaborated problems that cover the customary syllabus in first-year Physics: kinematics and dynamics, Newton laws, electricity and magnetism, elementary circuits… The role of vector quantities is stressed and we also provide help for the most usual mathematical tools (calculus and trigonometric formulas). The structure and level of detail of the resources are fitted to the conceptual difficulties that most of the students find. Some of the most advanced resources we have developed are interactive simulations. These are real simulations of key physical situations, not only animations. They serve as learning objects, in the well known sense of small reusable digital objects that are self-contained and tagged with metadata. In this sense, we use them to link concepts and content through interaction with active engagement of the student. The development of an interactive simulation involves several steps. First, we identify common pitfalls in the conceptual framework of the students and the points in which they stumble frequently. Then we think of a way to make clear the physical concepts using a simulation. After that, we program the simulation (using Flash or Java) and finally the simulation is tested with the students, and we reelaborate some parts of it in terms of usability. In our communication, we discuss the usefulness of these interactive simulations in teaching Physics for engineers, and their integration in a more comprehensive b-learning system.

  17. Reinforcement learning modulates the stability of cognitive control settings for object selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony William Sali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive flexibility reflects both a trait that reliably differs between individuals and a state that can fluctuate moment-to-moment. Whether individuals can undergo persistent changes in cognitive flexibility as a result of reward learning is less understood. Here, we investigated whether reinforcing a periodic shift in an object selection strategy can make an individual more prone to switch strategies in a subsequent unrelated task. Participants completed two different choice tasks in which they selected one of four objects in an attempt to obtain a hidden reward on each trial. During a training phase, objects were defined by color. Participants received either consistent reward contingencies in which one color was more often rewarded, or contingencies in which the color that was more often rewarded changed periodically and without warning. Following the training phase, all participants completed a test phase in which reward contingencies were defined by spatial location and the location that was more often rewarded remained constant across the entire task. Those participants who received inconsistent contingencies during training continued to make more variable selections during the test phase in comparison to those who received the consistent training. Furthermore, a difference in the likelihood to switch selections on a trial-by-trial basis emerged between training groups: participants who received consistent contingencies during training were less likely to switch object selections following an unrewarded trial and more likely to repeat a selection following reward. Our findings provide evidence that the extent to which priority shifting is reinforced modulates the stability of cognitive control settings in a persistent manner, such that individuals become generally more or less prone to shifting priorities in the future.

  18. A Case Study from Golden Gate University: Using Course Objectives to Facilitate Blended Learning in Shortened Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerth, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses utilizing course objectives to drive the change of existing 10-15 week undergraduate courses into 8-week courses that feature blended learning tools. To begin the redesign process, instructors and a faculty mentor revisit course objectives for currency, and with an eye toward blended course restructuring. The restructuring is…

  19. Performance Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    objectives may direct students’ learning (Duchastel and Merrill, 1973; Kapfer , 1970; Kibler et al., 1974), since such objectives may provide...matter learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 62(1): 67-70 (1971). Kapfer , P. G. Behavioral objectives and the curriculum processor. Educational

  20. Usage Volume and Trends Indicate Academic Library Online Learning Objects and Tutorials Are Being Used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Muriel Lavallee Warren

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Hess, A. N., & Hristova, M. (2016. To search or to browse: How users navigate a new interface for online library tutorials. College & Undergraduate Libraries, 23(2, 168-183. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10691316.2014.963274 Objective – To discover how users interact with a new online interface for learning objects, user preferences for types of access when given both browsing and searching options, and user needs for tutorial subject matter. Design – Mixed methods, with quantitative analysis of web traffic and qualitative analysis of recorded search terms through grounded textual theory. Setting – An academic library in the Western United States of America. Subjects – Users of the Libraries’ online tutorials and learning objects. Methods – The researchers collected web traffic statistics and organically occurring searches from the Libraries’ tutorial access interface. They defined the collection period as the 2013/2014 academic year, with collection beginning in September 2013 and ending in April 2014. Web traffic for organic searches, facilitated searches (search results accessed through clicking on particular words in a tag cloud, and categorical browsing was collected via Google Analytics. They categorized other interaction types (accessing featured content, leaving the page, etc. under an umbrella term of “other.” Their analysis of web traffic was limited to unique page views, with unique page views defined as views registered to different browser sessions. Unique page views were analyzed to determine which types of interface interaction occurred most frequently, both on-campus and off-campus, and whether there were differences in types of interaction preferred over time or by users with different points of origin. Individual organic search keywords and phrases, and the dates and times of those searches, were separately collected and recorded. One of the researchers coded the recorded organic search terms using

  1. Communication in Health Professions: A European consensus on inter- and multi-professional learning objectives in German

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmann, Cadja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Communication is object of increasing attention in the health professions. Teaching communication competencies should already begin in undergraduate education or pre-registration training.The aim of this project was to translate the Health Professions Core Communication Curriculum (HPCCC, an English catalogue of learning objectives, into German to make its content widely accessible in the German-speaking countries. This catalogue lists 61 educational objectives and was agreed on by 121 international communication experts. A European reference framework for inter- and multi-professional curriculum development for communication in the health professions in German-speaking countries should be provided.Method: The German version of the HPCCC was drafted by six academics and went through multiple revisions until consensus was reached. The learning objectives were paired with appropriate teaching and assessment tools drawn from the database of the teaching Committee of the European Association for Communication Health Care (tEACH.Results: The HPCCC learning objectives are now available in German and can be applied for curriculum planning and development in the different German-speaking health professions, the educational objectives can also be used for inter-professional purposes. Examples for teaching methods and assessment tools are given for using and implementing the objectives.Conclusion: The German version of the HPCCC with learning objectives for communication in health professions can contribute significantly to inter- and multi-professional curriculum development in the health care professions in the German-speaking countries. Examples for teaching methods and assessment tools from the materials compiled by tEACH supplement the curricular content and provide suggestions for practical implementation of the learning objectives in teaching and assessment. The relevance of the German HPCCC to the processes of curriculum

  2. Supporting Interoperability and Reusability of Learning Objects: The Virtual Campus Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nitto, Elisabetta; Mainetti, Luca; Monga, Mattia; Sbattella, Licia; Tedesco, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    E-learning has the potential to offer significant advantages over traditional classroom learning. However, it requires a complete redefinition of the dynamics of interaction between the various actors of a classroom. Moreover, in this context, the authoring of instructional material requires much more time than in traditional learning. Therefore,…

  3. Multifaceted Learning Objective Assessment in a Mechanical Engineering Capstone Design Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nicholas S.

    This thesis details multi method research approaches that have been used to study student learning objective instruction and assessment in the mechanical engineering (ME) capstone course at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). A primary focus of the research is to evaluate the pilot implementation of a Writing Fellows (WF) program in the ME capstone course, which has been assessed using a variety of techniques. The assessment generally indicates positive results. In particular, students favor the continuation of the program and find it more helpful than group consultations within the University Writing Center (UWC) alone. Self-assessment by the students indicates higher confidence in their communication skills, while preliminary analysis suggests that the writing fellow improved the scores of graded assignments by approximately one-third of a letter grade overall. Assessment efforts also highlight the need for deeper interaction between the WF and engineering faculty. A secondary focus of this research presents a methodology that has been developed and used to analyze how the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology's (ABET's) current Criterion 3 Student Outcomes (SOs) have been assessed in UNR's ME capstone class over several academic years. The methodology generally finds levels of ABET SO assessment in agreement with departmental and industry-held expectations for capstone courses at large. Finally, an analysis of student grades in the capstone course finds significant differences across semesters and identifies several potential causes.

  4. Field-Testing Reusable Learning Objects Related to Sensory Over-Responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Gee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is an increased need for dynamic, mobile, and relevant parent and caregiver education related to autism spectrum disorders (ASD and Sensory Processing (SP. This need may be due to the increased incidence of the conditions’ co-morbidity and the revision of the diagnostic criteria of ASD. Reusable learning objects (RLOs have been implemented as instructional tools as a part of, or adjunct to, formal health care education programs. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the appropriateness of RLOs as a part of routine patient and caregiver instruction of children with ASD. Method. A semi-structured interview/rating scale was implemented among three practicing occupational therapists to ascertain their opinions regarding six prototype RLOs related to sensory processing for caregivers of children with ASD. Results. The participants’ perspectives revealed that the SP-based prototype RLOs were a viable and valuable option to be included as a resource for parents and caregivers of children with ASD. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that RLOs related to SP were valuable, especially related to their subject matter, accessibility, and reusability. Furthermore, the participants indirectly identified the strengths related to the foundational concepts of RLOs and how they could be applied to other therapeutic and behavioral topics for parents and caregivers of children with ASD.

  5. Introducing objective structured practical examination as a method of learning and evaluation for undergraduate pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Kirti; Sharma, Mukesh; Matreja, Prithpal Singh; Giri, Vishal Prakash

    2016-10-01

    Assessment method can influence student learning. Use of objective structured practical examination (OSPE) has been reported in various institutes with great benefits. We evaluated OSPE for the assessment of practical skills in pharmacology examination for undergraduate medical students and compared it with conventional practical examination (CPE). After sensitizing the 2(nd) year MBBS students to OSPE, the students were divided into four batches with twenty students in each batch. Students were assessed by attending five OSPE stations, each for duration of 5 min. The effectiveness was assessed through a student's feedback questionnaire and was checked for its reliability by Cronbach's alpha. The result of OSPE was compared with that of CPE of the same batch. Cronbach's alpha of the feedback questionnaire was 0.71, with high internal consistency. The feedback given was categorized into three domains: cognitive, psychomotor, and affective, and an assessment was also done for its further use. In cognitive domain, 74% of the students felt that the questions asked and the syllabus taught were well correlated. In psychomotor domain, 81% agreed that it is excellent for assessing the applied part of the subject. Seventy percent of students opined that it was associated with lesser stress than CPE. On overall assessment, 76% rated this methodology as good/satisfactory and 23% as excellent in terms of better scoring. There was a significant difference in the mean score between the results of OSPE and CPE (P pharmacology examinations for undergraduate students.

  6. Assessment of Online Information Literacy Learning Objects For First Year Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Bordignon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The main objective was to determine whether information literacy (IL learning objects (LOs impact student IL competency, specifically in a foundational first year English composition course. The primary research question was: What is the effectiveness of IL LOs compared to face-to-face instruction in terms of students’ skill acquisition? Methods – The methods involved testing student IL competency through a multiple-choice test given pre- and post-IL intervention. Effectiveness was measured by assessing whether IL competency improves after exposure to one of two interventions: online IL LOs or face-to-face librarian-led workshop. Over two semesters, equal sections of the course were tested for each of these interventions. For the IL LOs group, students first completed a pre-test, then they worked independently through three online IL LOs. The three IL LOs were videos comprised of animation, screen casting, and video capture on these topics: Finding Articles at Seneca Libraries (hereafter referred to as Finding Articles, Finding Articles on Current Issues, and Popular and Scholarly Sources. The students were then given the same test again. For the face-to-face group, the pre- and post-tests were also required for the same number of sections. This study was conducted under institutional ethics approval. Results – Descriptive analysis revealed student test scores increased for both interventions, IL LOs and face-to-face. Test scores increased, on average, between 14 to 37%. In comparing post-tests, results revealed a statistically significant difference only with the first topic, Finding Articles. In this case, the IL LOs (video group outperformed the face-to-face group by at least 10%. No significance, in terms of performance from pre- and post-test scores, was found for the other two topics. Conclusion – Both IL LO and face-to-face library led workshop interventions had a positive impact on students’ IL skill acquisition

  7. Integration and Deployment of Educational Games in e-Learning Environments: The Learning Object Model Meets Educational Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Javier; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Martinez-Ortiz, Ivan; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2009-01-01

    Game-based learning is becoming popular in the academic discussion of Learning Technologies. However, even though the educational potential of games has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, the integration of the games into educational processes and how to efficiently deliver the games to the students are still open questions. This paper…

  8. An Automatic and Dynamic Approach for Personalized Recommendation of Learning Objects Considering Students Learning Styles: An Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorça, Fabiano A.; Araújo, Rafael D.; de Carvalho, Vitor C.; Resende, Daniel T.; Cattelan, Renan G.

    2016-01-01

    Content personalization in educational systems is an increasing research area. Studies show that students tend to have better performances when the content is customized according to his/her preferences. One important aspect of students particularities is how they prefer to learn. In this context, students learning styles should be considered, due…

  9. Migration of E-Learning Objects from Database to IMS XML Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Giedrius BALBIERIS; Reklaitis, Vytautas

    2003-01-01

    Since establishment of World Wide Web a number of e-learning tools and resources have been created and successfully used in every educational institution. Established standards such as IMS and SCORM currently provide means for e-learning asset portability and reuse. Most of such implementations have a database back-end. Data from such a back-end RDBMS can be exported into IMS XML and used by standard compliant e-learning platforms. After reviewing facilitating technologies and similar solutio...

  10. Migration of E-Learning Objects from Database to IMS XML Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Giedrius BALBIERIS; Reklaitis, Vytautas

    2003-01-01

    Since establishment of World Wide Web a number of e-learning tools and resources have been created and successfully used in every educational institution. Established standards such as IMS and SCORM currently provide means for e-learning asset portability and reuse. Most of such implementations have a database back-end. Data from such a back-end RDBMS can be exported into IMS XML and used by standard compliant e-learning platforms. After reviewing facilitating technologies and similar solutio...

  11. Are There Linguistic Prerequisites for Contact-Induced Language Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Sarah Grey

    Observation of language change caused by language contact tend not to support theories put forth by Meillet, Jakobson, Weinreich, and others that there are linguistic prerequisites for such change. A theory of the social factors that determine what kinds of language change will take place as a result of contact begins with the recognition of two…

  12. Cognitive and Neural Prerequisites for Time in Language: Any Answers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Marianne; Indefrey, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In the position article to this volume, Klein outlines a set of questions that are relevant for furthering the linguist's understanding of what the cognitive and neural prerequisites for time in language might be. He also declares a certain skepticism regarding the likelihood that new methods from other disciplines will provide answers to those…

  13. Prerequisites in behavioral science and business: opportunities for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, David G; Lange, Brian M; Madden, Robert D; Tacha, Koko K

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on recent dental school graduates to understand and successfully utilize patient management and business management strategies to run a productive dental office. Dental schools are faced with the dilemma to either add more credit hours in their already crowded curriculum or adjust predental school requirements. All fifty-nine U.S. dental schools were assessed online to determine admission requirements in the areas of behavioral science and business education. Results show that only 11.9 percent of the schools require prerequisite course work in behavioral science and no school requires prerequisite course work in business. However, 64.4 percent and 30.5 percent of schools encouraged or recommended prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business, respectively. We suggest that the dental education community involve key stakeholders to discuss the incorporation of prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business. Additional courses in these disciplines would provide dental students better backgrounds from which the dental curriculum could build a more advanced and applied perspective to better prepare students for practice.

  14. Should College Algebra be a Prerequisite for Taking Psychology Statistics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibulkin, Amy E.; Butler, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    In order to consider whether a course in college algebra should be a prerequisite for taking psychology statistics, we recorded students' grades in elementary psychology statistics and in college algebra at a 4-year university. Students who earned credit in algebra prior to enrolling in statistics for the first time had a significantly higher mean…

  15. Are There Linguistic Prerequisites for Contact-Induced Language Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Sarah Grey

    Observation of language change caused by language contact tend not to support theories put forth by Meillet, Jakobson, Weinreich, and others that there are linguistic prerequisites for such change. A theory of the social factors that determine what kinds of language change will take place as a result of contact begins with the recognition of two…

  16. 76 FR 14678 - Communications Unit Leader Prerequisite and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... the entire collection increasing from the initial reported cost of $48,840 to $49,084. Analysis Agency... Burden Cost (operating/maintaining): $18,315. COML Train the Trainer Prerequisites Verification Frequency..., or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g...

  17. Guiding Age 10-11 Students to Notice the Salient Features of Physical Change Models in Chemistry Digital Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Brenda; Mahaffy, Peter; Martin, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on one Grade 5 class (9 females; 9 males) who worked in student-pairs to view five digital learning object (DLO) lessons created by the authors and meant to introduce students to the nature of models, the particle nature of matter, and physical change. Specifically, the paper focuses on whether DLO design elements could assist…

  18. Individual Differences in Navigation between Sharable Content Objects--An Evaluation Study of a Learning Module Prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Boris; Urbas, Leon

    2003-01-01

    Reports the design and evaluation of a prototype for learning modules compliant to the SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) standard for use with hypermedia systems in Web-based instruction. Discusses a study of undergraduates that considered relations between individual differences in learner characteristics, including intrinsic…

  19. Evaluation of Learning Environments for Object-Oriented Programming: Measuring Cognitive Load with a Novel Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Murat Pasa

    2016-01-01

    Various methods and tools have been proposed to overcome the learning obstacles for Object-Oriented Programming (OOP). However, it remains difficult especially for novice learners. The problem may be not only adopting an instructional method, but also an Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Learners employ IDEs as a means to solve programming…

  20. Learning of Syllable-Object Relations by Preverbal Infants: The Role of Temporal Synchrony and Syllable Distinctiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Lakshmi J.

    2010-01-01

    The role of temporal synchrony and syllable distinctiveness in preverbal infants' learning of word-object relations was investigated. In Experiment 1, 7- and 8-month-olds (N=64) were habituated under conditions where two "similar-sounding" syllables, /tah/ and /gah/, were spoken simultaneously with the motions of one of two sets of…

  1. Learning and Innovation in Agriculture and Rural Development: The Use of the Concepts of Boundary Work and Boundary Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tisenkopfs, T.; Kunda, I.; Sumane, S.; Brunori, G.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Moschitz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The paper explores the role of boundary work and boundary objects in enhancing learning and innovation processes in hybrid multi-actor networks for sustainable agriculture (LINSA). Design/Methodology/Approach: Boundary work in LINSA is analysed on the basis of six case studies carried out i

  2. Make2Learn with IoT: Engaging children into joyful design and making of interactive connected objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Divitini, Monica; Giannakos, Michail; Mora, Simone

    2017-01-01

    The Make2Learn workshop aims to explore the introduction in the learning processes of tools and methods for creative and joyful ideation, design and prototyping of Internet of Things (IoT) artifacts. IoT technologies offer opportunities to re-think everyday objects towards being more engaging......, playful or educational than their ordinary selves. At the same time, a variety of environments have been developed to introduce making principles to children, e.g. via activities in museum, fablabs and hackerspaces. Making IoT artefacts enable children to foster co-creativity and joy in learning processes...... and to construct knowledge; leading to STEM concepts. Making activities for IoT often have a broad perspective that includes not just digital fabrication, but also design thinking concepts such as problem elaboration, brainstorming, ideation and reflection; enabling learning activities that “alternate abstract...

  3. English- and Chinese-Learning Infants Map Novel Labels to Objects and Actions Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheri C. Y.; Tardif, Twila; Chen, Jie; Pulverman, Rachel B.; Zhu, Liqi; Meng, Xiangzhi

    2011-01-01

    Research based on naturalistic and checklist methods has revealed differences between English and Chinese monolingual children in their trajectories of learning nouns and verbs. However, studies based on controlled laboratory designs (e.g., Imai et al., 2008) have yielded a more mixed picture. Guided by a multidimensional view of word learning (in…

  4. Effects of Cues and Real Objects on Learning in a Mobile Device Supported Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tzu-Chien; Lin, Yi-Chun; Paas, Fred

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether arrow-line cues can improve the effectiveness and efficiency of learning in a mobile device supported learning environment on leaf morphology of plants, either with or without the use of real plants. A cued and un-cued condition, in which primary school students used text and pictures on a tablet PC, were compared…

  5. Language Learning Careers as an Object of Narrative Research in TESOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Phil

    2011-01-01

    One of the strengths of narrative research in TESOL is its potential to provide insight into long-term language learning experiences that cannot be investigated in real time. Reliance on retrospection, however, brings two problems that are addressed in this article through the concept of "language learning careers". The first problem is…

  6. Physical Learning Environment and its Suitability to the Objectives of Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobik, Mart

    2013-01-01

    The present article focuses on Technology Education teachers' opinions on the physical learning environment of Technology Education. The study compares and analyses the changes in the physical learning environment of Technology Education. Two questionnaire surveys (Study I and Study II) were carried out among teachers of Technology Education…

  7. Weighting of vowel cues explains patterns of word-object associative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtin, S.; Fennell, C.; Escudero, P.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that infants under 17 months have difficulty learning novel words in the laboratory when the words differ by only one consonant sound, irrespective of the magnitude of that difference. The current study explored whether 15-month-old infants can learn novel words

  8. Weighting of Vowel Cues Explains Patterns of Word-Object Associative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Suzanne; Fennell, Christopher; Escudero, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that infants under 17 months have difficulty learning novel words in the laboratory when the words differ by only one consonant sound, irrespective of the magnitude of that difference. The current study explored whether 15-month-old infants can learn novel words that differ in only one vowel sound. The rich…

  9. A Naive Bayes Approach for Converging Learning Objects with Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitha, A. Sai; Mehrotra, Deepti; Bansal, Abhay; Sharma, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are digitised material freely available to the students and self learners. Many institutions had initiated in incorporating these OERs in their higher educational system, to improve the quality of teaching and learning. These resources promote individualised study, collaborative learning. If they are coupled with…

  10. Weighting of vowel cues explains patterns of word-object associative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtin, S.; Fennell, C.; Escudero, P.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that infants under 17 months have difficulty learning novel words in the laboratory when the words differ by only one consonant sound, irrespective of the magnitude of that difference. The current study explored whether 15-month-old infants can learn novel words th

  11. Effect of Varied Elaborated Hypertext Strategies in Facilitating Students' Achievement of Different Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Fan; Dwyer, Francis

    2006-01-01

    Hypertext learning materials have been employed as major components for designing and implementing educational and training learning environments. However, the design and development of hypertext materials are still heavily based on technical issues or simply designed by intuition. To overcome these deficiencies in hypermedia research, one of the…

  12. Unsupervised invariance learning of transformation sequences in a model of object recognition yields selectivity for non-accidental properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSerre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-accidental properties (NAPs correspond to image properties that are invariant to changes in viewpoint (e.g., straight vs. curved contours and are distinguished from metric properties (MPs that can change continuously with in-depth object rotation (e.g., aspect ratio, degree of curvature, etc. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies of shape processing have demonstrated greater sensitivity to differences in NAPs than in MPs. However, previous work has shown that such sensitivity is lacking in multiple-views models of object recognition such as textsc{Hmax}. These models typically assume that object processing is based on populations of view-tuned neurons with distributed symmetrical bell-shaped tuning that are modulated at least as much by differences in MPs as in NAPs.Here, we test the hypothesis that unsupervised learning of invariances to object transformations may increase the sensitivity to differences in NAPs vs. MPs in textsc{Hmax}. We collected a database of video sequences with objects slowly rotating in-depth in an attempt to mimic sequences viewed during object manipulation by young children during early developmental stages. We show that unsupervised learning yields shape-tuning in higher stages with greater sensitivity to differences in NAPs vs. MPs in agreement with monkey IT data. Together, these results suggest that greater NAP sensitivity may arise from experiencing different in-depth rotations of objects.

  13. Education and Professional Outreach for Scientists: Producing and Leveraging EPO Objects for Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.

    2007-12-01

    Most Education and Professional Outreach (EPO) by scientists reaches relatively small audiences. Most scientists also see their contributions to K-12 teaching rather limited due to their lack of experience in primary and secondary school education. These limitations remain a major barrier in bridging the gap between science and education, and in optimizing the effectiveness of EPO by scientists. As part of the Enduring Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE) project, we have started to use web- templates in our EPO creation (http://earthref.org/ERESE). These templates are now being developed into web- based tools and services that will be served from the ERESE website and archived by the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). At EarthRef.org these EPO objects can be linked to teaching materials in the ERDA digital archive that can be displayed in a fashion allowing selection based on expert level and file type, in what we dubbed the "resource matrix" view. This is a powerful search mechanism for learners of all levels in which they can pre-screen materials to their own level, while allowing them to venture up to higher expert levels or to explore more simple cases at lower levels. This stimulates inquiry- based learning by permitting as much roaming freedom as possible in a "science-data- based" online environment. The current EarthRef.org and ERESE collections include websites for scientific projects, for classes taught and for expeditions, as well as a wide range of materials including press releases, video footage, science illustrations, interviews, data and diagrams, student reports and lesson plans. This collection is representative for EPO in any STEM discipline and provides much interesting materials that are useful for education. Our main goal is to provide scientists with tools so they can obtain an easy-to-use and highly leveraged outlet for their EPO efforts, where they can reach substantial numbers of learners and educators, and where their

  14. The Analysis of Learning Objectives in Iranian Junior High School English Text books based on Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Rahpeyma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the Iranian junior high school English text books according to learning objectives of Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy (2001 to find which learning levels of Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy were more common in these text books. The primary data in this study came from the newly published English text book, English for Schools series consisting of two three-volume series named Prospect 1, 2 and English book grade three named Right Path to English. Therefore, the data sources were junior high school English text books contents. This study is important as these course books are the first English text books that have been prescribed for Iranian junior high school students to study from 2014. To fulfill the purpose of this study, the contents of junior high school English text books were codified by a coding scheme of BRT. The data were then analyzed; at the first step the frequency and percentage of occurrence of different learning objectives from each book was separately considered and then the average of the whole books were calculated. Results from the codification of 439 tasks and exercises indicated that in three grades, the first three low levels in BRT were the most prevalent than higher learning levels in Iranian junior high school English text books. In addition an important difference was found among the text books in their inclusion of different levels of learning objectives of two dimensions of BRT (knowledge and cognitive. This study can provide useful information for text book development, curriculum writers, and syllabus designers to boost English learning in the EFL setting of Iran. Keywords: Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, Junior high school English text books, Text book

  15. State-of-the-art Machine Learning in event reconstruction and object identification

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in deep learning have seen great success in the realms of computer vision, natural language processing, and broadly in data science. However, these new ideas are only just beginning to be applied to the analysis of High Energy Physics data. In this talk, I will discuss developments in the application of computer vision and deep learning techniques for event reconstruction and particle identification for the LHC .

  16. The Role of Objectives in Guiding the Organization of Information Learned from Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Ellen D.; Britton, Bruce K.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to examine how objectives influence organization of information recalled from text. Objectives were hypothesized to affect sequence of attention, rehearsal during a review period, and to serve as retrieval cues. Results indicated that organization by objectives occurs during rehearsal but not encoding or retrieval…

  17. Articulating Learning Objectives for an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Program: Merging Teaching Practicum, Leadership Seminar, and Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 2009, the Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Program (in the Department of Focused Inquiry at Virginia Commonwealth University) has evolved and expanded into an amalgamation of three distinct but overlapping elements: (i) teaching practicum, (ii) leadership seminar, and (iii) service learning experience. But only recently have…

  18. Prerequisites for Successful Strategic Partnerships for Sustainable Building Renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Thuesen, Christian

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the prerequisites for establishing successful strategic partnerships in relation to renovating buildings sustainably. Establishing strategic partnerships is in the paper seen as a potential way to make building renovation more sustainable in Denmark...... particularly in terms of reducing energy consumption and use of resources and increase productivity. However, until now we have only had a limited number of such partnerships implemented and the few examples that do exist, mostly concern the construction of new buildings. The paper is based on an investigation...... industry and analyses of two exemplary cases the paper suggests prerequisites for establishing successful strategic partnerships for sustainable building renovation. The results show that strategic partnerships are collaborations set up between two or more organizations that remain independent...

  19. A Knowledge-Based Educational Module for Object-Oriented Programming & The Efficacy of Web Based e-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S. Mashhour

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to explore the effectiveness of using computer-aided learning methods in teaching compared to traditional instructions. Moreover, the research proposed an intelligent-based educational module for teaching object oriented languages. The results provide teachers positive outcomes of using computers technology in teaching. Sample of more than one hundred undergraduate students from two universities located in the Middle East participated in this empirical study. The findings of this study indicated that students using e-learning style perform more efficient in terms of understandability than traditional face-to-face learning approach. The research also indicated that female students’ performance is equally likely to male students.

  20. Interactive Sensory Objects Developed for and by People with Learning Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a project that aims to help improve the accessibility of museums and heritage\\ud sites by creating a series of interactive, multisensory objects. The objects will be developed\\ud collaboratively by artists, technologists, people with an interest in heritage sites, and people with\\ud disabilities and their carers in a series of sensory art and electronics workshops. The workshops\\ud and the sensory objects will explore aspects of physicality and how to appeal to the entire...

  1. Enhanced student experience: an analysis of subjective evaluation and objective learning success after the transformation of a pharmaceutical physiology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Martina; Eckert, Gunter P

    2010-03-01

    In the present article, the reorientation of a fourth-semester physiology course for pharmacy students is described. The motivation for the introduction of changes was to prepare the students to not only assimilate facts but to learn and understand how to integrate and apply them. The article considers how this reorganization was received by the students in both subjective and objective terms. Specifically, we investigate whether our changes resulted in both an enhanced learning experience and improved learning success. The following changes were introduced to the course: first, we integrated either experimental, computer-based teaching modules or case studies in five of the eight course units to give the students the opportunity to gain more hands-on experience; second, we organized regular meetings to enhance communication among the course tutors; and finally, we increased the pass mark for the entrance exam to the course from 50% to 60%. Student opinion was evaluated by means of a questionnaire that was distributed at the end of each course semester throughout the three-semester evaluation period (summer 2008, winter 2008/2009, and summer 2009). The students gave convincing positive feedback concerning the efficacy of the changes in both quantitative and qualitative terms. Moreover, their learning success improved significantly in objective terms as evidenced by enhanced final and State exam performance.

  2. Challenges in Physical Characterization of Dim Space Objects: What Can We Learn from NEOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J.; Thirouin, A.; Rivera-Valentin, E.; Ryan, W.; Ryan, E.; Mokovitz, N.; Tegler, S.

    2016-09-01

    Physical characterization of dim space objects in cis-lunar space can be a challenging task. Of particular interest to both natural and artificial space object behavior scientists are the properties beyond orbital parameters that can uniquely identify them. These properties include rotational state, size, shape, density and composition. A wide range of observational and non-observational factors affect our ability to characterize dim objects in cis-lunar space. For example, phase angle (angle between Sun-Target-Observer), temperature, rotational variations, temperature, and particle size (for natural dim objects). Over the last two decades, space object behavior scientists studying natural dim objects have attempted to quantify and correct for a majority of these factors to enhance our situational awareness. These efforts have been primarily focused on developing laboratory spectral calibrations in a space-like environment. Calibrations developed correcting spectral observations of natural dim objects could be applied to characterizing artificial objects, as the underlying physics is the same. The paper will summarize our current understanding of these observational and non-observational factors and present a case study showcasing the state of the art in characterization of natural dim objects.

  3. Graphical Geometric and Learning/Optimization-Based Methods in Statistical Signal and Image Processing Object Recognition and Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    models is computationally intractable). Applications ranging from hyperspectral data analysis to multimodal fusion for object classification will... CLASSIFICATION I18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT OR REPORT ON THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED...from complex signals in an unsupervised learning context. The principle we have adopted in this and in our other work in this area is that of maximizing

  4. Fingerprints of Learned Object Recognition Seen in the fMRI Activation Patterns of Lateral Occipital Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Zvi N; Zohary, Ehud

    2015-09-01

    One feature of visual processing in the ventral stream is that cortical responses gradually depart from the physical aspects of the visual stimulus and become correlated with perceptual experience. Thus, unlike early retinotopic areas, the responses in the object-related lateral occipital complex (LOC) are typically immune to parameter changes (e.g., contrast, location, etc.) when these do not affect recognition. Here, we use a complementary approach to highlight changes in brain activity following a shift in the perceptual state (in the absence of any alteration in the physical image). Specifically, we focus on LOC and early visual cortex (EVC) and compare their functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to degraded object images, before and after fast perceptual learning that renders initially unrecognized objects identifiable. Using 3 complementary analyses, we find that, in LOC, unlike EVC, learned recognition is associated with a change in the multivoxel response pattern to degraded object images, such that the response becomes significantly more correlated with that evoked by the intact version of the same image. This provides further evidence that the coding in LOC reflects the recognition of visual objects.

  5. Conditional Random Field (CRF-Boosting: Constructing a Robust Online Hybrid Boosting Multiple Object Tracker Facilitated by CRF Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehwa Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the reasonably acceptable performance of state-of-the-art object detectors, tracking-by-detection is a standard strategy for visual multi-object tracking (MOT. In particular, online MOT is more demanding due to its diverse applications in time-critical situations. A main issue of realizing online MOT is how to associate noisy object detection results on a new frame with previously being tracked objects. In this work, we propose a multi-object tracker method called CRF-boosting which utilizes a hybrid data association method based on online hybrid boosting facilitated by a conditional random field (CRF for establishing online MOT. For data association, learned CRF is used to generate reliable low-level tracklets and then these are used as the input of the hybrid boosting. To do so, while existing data association methods based on boosting algorithms have the necessity of training data having ground truth information to improve robustness, CRF-boosting ensures sufficient robustness without such information due to the synergetic cascaded learning procedure. Further, a hierarchical feature association framework is adopted to further improve MOT accuracy. From experimental results on public datasets, we could conclude that the benefit of proposed hybrid approach compared to the other competitive MOT systems is noticeable.

  6. Simple Learned Weighted Sums of Inferior Temporal Neuronal Firing Rates Accurately Predict Human Core Object Recognition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaj, Najib J; Hong, Ha; Solomon, Ethan A; DiCarlo, James J

    2015-09-30

    To go beyond qualitative models of the biological substrate of object recognition, we ask: can a single ventral stream neuronal linking hypothesis quantitatively account for core object recognition performance over a broad range of tasks? We measured human performance in 64 object recognition tests using thousands of challenging images that explore shape similarity and identity preserving object variation. We then used multielectrode arrays to measure neuronal population responses to those same images in visual areas V4 and inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and simulated V1 population responses. We tested leading candidate linking hypotheses and control hypotheses, each postulating how ventral stream neuronal responses underlie object recognition behavior. Specifically, for each hypothesis, we computed the predicted performance on the 64 tests and compared it with the measured pattern of human performance. All tested hypotheses based on low- and mid-level visually evoked activity (pixels, V1, and V4) were very poor predictors of the human behavioral pattern. However, simple learned weighted sums of distributed average IT firing rates exactly predicted the behavioral pattern. More elaborate linking hypotheses relying on IT trial-by-trial correlational structure, finer IT temporal codes, or ones that strictly respect the known spatial substructures of IT ("face patches") did not improve predictive power. Although these results do not reject those more elaborate hypotheses, they suggest a simple, sufficient quantitative model: each object recognition task is learned from the spatially distributed mean firing rates (100 ms) of ∼60,000 IT neurons and is executed as a simple weighted sum of those firing rates. Significance statement: We sought to go beyond qualitative models of visual object recognition and determine whether a single neuronal linking hypothesis can quantitatively account for core object recognition behavior. To achieve this, we designed a

  7. Learning to Grasp Unknown Objects Based on 3D Edge Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodenhagen, Leon; Kraft, Dirk; Popovic, Mila

    2010-01-01

    an offline or an online learning scheme. Both methods are implemented using a hybrid artificial neural network containing standard nodes with a sigmoid activation function and nodes with a radial basis function. We show that a significant performance improvement can be achieved....

  8. Developing an Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Work-Integrated Learning in Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Fiona; Moore, Keri; Mildon, Sally; Jones, Philip

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a valid method to assess the key competencies of the exercise physiology profession acquired through work-integrated learning (WIL). In order to develop a competency-based assessment, the key professional tasks needed to be identified and the test designed so students' competency in different tasks and settings could be…

  9. Reusable Learning Objects for Medical Education: Evolving a Multi-institutional Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Leeder; T. Davies; A. Hall

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn early 2002 a number of UK HE institutions founded a collaborative project to produce a bank of high quality e-learning resources to support and enhance teaching in the traditionally difficult area of statistics, epidemiology and research skills. Creation of these resources is very cos

  10. An Object-Oriented Course Framework for Developing Adaptive Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Su, Jun-Ming; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Hwang, Gwo-Haur; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Tsai, Chang-Jiun

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of web-based learning systems has encouraged researchers to pay attention to several new issues. One of the most important issues is the development of new techniques to provide personalized teaching materials. Although several frameworks or methods have been proposed, it remains a challenging issue to design an easy-to-realize…

  11. Abstraction ability as an indicator of success for learning object-oriented programming?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens Benned; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2006-01-01

    Computer science educators generally agree that abstract thinking is a crucial component for learning computer science in general and programming in particular. We report on a study to confirm the hypothesis that general abstraction ability has a positive impact on programming ability. Abstraction...

  12. Using Student e-Portfolios to Facilitate Learning Objective Achievements in an Outcome-Based University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Abdallah; Lansari, Azzedine

    2013-01-01

    Several researchers define e-portfolios as a digital collection of students' work accomplished throughout their time of studies in an academic program (Buzzetto-More, 2006; Love, McKean and Gathercoal, 2004; Paulson, Paulson, & Meyer, 1991; Siemens, 2004). E-portfolios can be a rich resource for students and faculty. Students learn to identify…

  13. Effects of Podcasts in Higher Education on the Achievement of Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Waughen, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    Technology resources such as podcasts allow users to connect to the World Wide Web to download audio files to listen to anytime and anywhere and are slowly being introduced in classrooms as an educational tool and as a resource in the e-learning environment. Past studies have examined the relationship between the use of technology as a teaching…

  14. English- and Mandarin-Learning Infants' Discrimination of Actions and Objects in Dynamic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Tardif, Twila; Pulverman, Rachel; Casasola, Marianella; Zhu, Liqi; Zheng, Xiaobei; Meng, Xiangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The present studies examined the role of linguistic experience in directing English and Mandarin learners' attention to aspects of a visual scene. Specifically, they asked whether young language learners in these 2 cultures attend to differential aspects of a word-learning situation. Two groups of English and Mandarin learners, 6-8-month-olds (n =…

  15. Expanding the Media Mix in Statistics Education through Platform-Independent and Interactive Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittag, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of mobile devices demands the exploitation of their potentials in distance and face-to-face teaching, as well for complementing textbooks in printed or electronic format. There is a strong need to develop innovative resources that open up new dimensions of learning and teaching through interactive and platform-independent content.…

  16. The Effects of Focus of Attention and Task Objective Consistency on Learning a Balancing Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian H.; Holmes, Amanda M.

    2011-01-01

    In motor learning, a popular area of research has been to examine the importance of where individuals focus their attention during the acquisition of motor skills. Researchers in this area have proposed that, when teaching a motor skill, the instructions used to direct the learner's attention can affect the immediate and long-term retention of…

  17. Does Learning Spanish Grammatical Gender Change English-Speaking Adults' Categorization of Inanimate Objects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurinski, Elena; Sera, Maria D.

    2011-01-01

    Second language acquisition studies can contribute to the body of research on the influence of language on thought by examining cognitive change as a result of second language learning. We conducted a longitudinal study that examined how the acquisition of Spanish grammatical gender influences categorization in native English-speaking adults. We…

  18. Reusable Learning Objects for Medical Education: Evolving a Multi-institutional Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Leeder; T. Davies; A. Hall

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn early 2002 a number of UK HE institutions founded a collaborative project to produce a bank of high quality e-learning resources to support and enhance teaching in the traditionally difficult area of statistics, epidemiology and research skills. Creation of these resources is very

  19. Assessing Enquiry-Based Learning: Developing Objective Criteria from Personal Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article takes as its starting point the idea that policies of "personalising learning" and promoting "creativity" raise issues for assessment which the present framework for assessment and testing in schools in England and Wales does little to address. It explores the notion, also touched on elsewhere in this issue, of a…

  20. Service-Learning in Crisis Communication Education: Revisiting Coombs' Objectives for the Crisis Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresh-Fuehrer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit Coombs' suggestions for teaching the crisis communication course using service-learning as a framework. The author sought to assess the effectiveness of using this method in terms of the benefits to both students and the partnering organization and students' perceptions of whether they met the learning…

  1. Using Action Verbs as Learning Outcomes: Applying Bloom's Taxonomy in Measuring Instructional Objectives in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevid, Jeffrey S.; McClelland, Nate

    2013-01-01

    We used a set of action verbs based on Bloom's taxonomy to assess learning outcomes in two college-level introductory psychology courses. The action verbs represented an acronym, IDEA, comprising skills relating to identifying, defining or describing, evaluating or explaining, and applying psychological knowledge. Exam performance demonstrated…

  2. A multi-objective improved teaching-learning based optimization algorithm for unconstrained and constrained optimization problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Venkata Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes a multi-objective improved teaching-learning based optimization (MO-ITLBO algorithm for unconstrained and constrained multi-objective function optimization. The MO-ITLBO algorithm is the improved version of basic teaching-learning based optimization (TLBO algorithm adapted for multi-objective problems. The basic TLBO algorithm is improved to enhance its exploration and exploitation capacities by introducing the concept of number of teachers, adaptive teaching factor, tutorial training and self-motivated learning. The MO-ITLBO algorithm uses a grid-based approach to adaptively assess the non-dominated solutions (i.e. Pareto front maintained in an external archive. The performance of the MO-ITLBO algorithm is assessed by implementing it on unconstrained and constrained test problems proposed for the Congress on Evolutionary Computation 2009 (CEC 2009 competition. The performance assessment is done by using the inverted generational distance (IGD measure. The IGD measures obtained by using the MO-ITLBO algorithm are compared with the IGD measures of the other state-of-the-art algorithms available in the literature. Finally, Lexicographic ordering is used to assess the overall performance of competitive algorithms. Results have shown that the proposed MO-ITLBO algorithm has obtained the 1st rank in the optimization of unconstrained test functions and the 3rd rank in the optimization of constrained test functions.

  3. Technical Objects between Categorisation and Learning: An Exploratory Case Study in French Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impedovo, M. A.; Andreucci, C.; Delserieys-Pedregosa, A.; Coiffard, C.; Ginestié, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present exploratory research carried out in order to understand how students (from 12 to 14 years old) relate to technical objects. It uses technical objects that are part of everyday life and mediated reality. A questionnaire was administered to 57 students in French classes. The questionnaire was composed of three parts: 1)…

  4. The Perceived Impacts of Supervisor Reinforcement and Learning Objectives Importance on Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Pucel, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This study, conducted within a Managerial Leadership Program in an oil refinery and chemical company in Korea, investigates the relationships between: perceived importance of training objectives and perceived transfer of training relative to those objectives, and types of supervisor reinforcement which trainees perceive to be most motivating and…

  5. BlueJ Visual Debugger for Learning the Execution of Object-Oriented Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Schulte, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment undertaken in order to evaluate the effect of a program visualization tool for helping students to better understand the dynamics of object-oriented programs. The concrete tool used was BlueJ's debugger and object inspector. The study was done as a control-group experiment in an introductory programming…

  6. BlueJ Visual Debugger for Learning the Execution of Object-Oriented Programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens B.; Schulte, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment undertaken in order to evaluate the effect of a program visualization tool for helping students to better understand the dynamics of object-orientedprograms. The concrete tool used was BlueJ?s debugger and object inspector. The study was done as a control...

  7. Learning illumination- and orientation-invariant representations of objects through temporal association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Guy; Backus, Benjamin T; Langer, Michael; Huebner, Gesche; Bülthoff, Heinrich

    2009-07-10

    As the orientation or illumination of an object changes so does its appearance. This paper considers how observers are nonetheless able to recognize objects that have undergone such changes. In particular the paper tests the hypothesis that observers rely on temporal correlations between different object views to decide whether they are views of the same object or not. In a series of experiments subjects were shown a sequence of views representing a slowly transforming object. Testing revealed that subjects had formed object representations which were directly influenced by the temporal characteristics of the training views. In particular, introducing spurious correlations between views of different people's heads caused subjects to regard those views as being of a single person. This rapid and robust overriding of basic generalization processes supports the view that our recognition system tracks the correlated appearance of views of objects across time. Such view associations appear to allow the visual system to solve the view invariance problem without recourse to complex illumination models for extracting 3D form, or the use of the image plane transformations required to make appearance-based comparisons.

  8. Mobile Virtual Learning Object for the Assessment of Acute Pain as a Learning Tool to Assess Acute Pain in Nursing: An Analysis of the Mental Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ana Graziela; Sasso, Grace; Iyengar, Sriram

    2015-11-06

    The inclusion of new technologies in education has motivated the development of studies on mental workload. These technologies are now being used in the teaching and learning process. The analysis enables identification of factors intervening in this workload as well as planning of overload prevention for educational activities using these technologies. To analyze the mental workload of an educational intervention with the Mobile Virtual Learning Object for the Assessment of Acute Pain in adults and newborns, according to the NASA Task Load Index criteria. A methodological study with data collected from 5 nurses and 75 students, from November of 2013 to February of 2014. The highest students' and specialists' means were in the dimensions of "Mental demand" (57.20 ± 22.27; 51 ± 29.45) and "Performance" (58.47 ± 24.19; 73 ± 28.85). The specialists' mental workload index was higher (50.20 ± 7.28) when compared with students' (47.87 ± 16.85) on a scale from 0 to 100 (P=.557). The instrument allowed for the assessment of mental workload after an online educational intervention with a mobile learning virtual object. An excessive overload was not identified among participants. Assessing mental workload from the use of educational technologies at the end of a task is a key to their applicability, with the aim of providing a more effective, stimulating, and long-lasting experience of the learning process.

  9. THE USE OF LEARNING OBJECTS IN PHYSICS CLASSES: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INCLUSION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This work corresponds to a Master research that has as a research field a classroom of 1st year of high school a public school in the state schools in the city of Presidente Prudente/São Paulo, Brazil. The main objective is to investigate the contribution of the use of Educational Objects (OE) in physics classes to the inclusion process, using as tool the Banco Internacional de Objetos Educacionais. For this, we seek to achieve the following objectives: to analyze how the OE can be inserted i...

  10. The Evolution of a Professional Practice Forum: Balancing Peer-to-Peer Learning With Course Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anna; Robinson, Tracy; Shaw, Tim

    2014-10-31

    The Opioid Treatment Accreditation Course (OTAC) is a mandatory accreditation requirement in New South Wales, Australia, and aims to prepare medical practitioners for the provision of safe and effective Opioid Substitution Treatment to people with opioid dependence. The course has a strong focus on safe prescribing practices and the course design includes a Professional Practice Forum that is engaging for participants and effective at imparting complex ideas and concepts that do not place additional time constraints on already time-poor health professionals. The study aimed to use participatory action research methods to develop and evaluate an online Professional Practice Forum that is a key component of the OTAC teaching and learning experience. Three evaluation cycles were implemented with three cohorts of participants (N=40) to inform the design and review of the updated OTAC course. Overall, the study relied on participatory action research methods to enhance a sense of online community and to revise the Professional Practice Forum component of the course. Findings from survey feedback and an examination of Web metrics were used to monitor participant learning and were subsequently subject to thematic analysis in order to identify key themes. The use of participatory action techniques in the redesign of the OTAC course was a successful means of engaging with participants and resulted in four revisions based on feedback from facilitators and participants. The Professional Practice Forum was rated highly and received positive feedback from both moderators and participants. The use of interactive forums in online learning in an educational module for adult learners can prove extremely valuable as a means for participants to share their expertise and improve their learning outcomes. In particular, the use of sticky and welcome threads were significant features that enhanced interactions between participants and facilitators and resulted in increased quantity and

  11. Toward a neurobiology of auditory object perception: What can we learn from the songbird forebrain?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai LU; David S. VICARIO

    2011-01-01

    In the acoustic world,no sounds occur entirely in isolation; they always reach the ears in combination with other sounds.How any given sound is discriminated and perceived as an independent auditory object is a challenging question in neuroscience.Although our knowledge of neural processing in the auditory pathway has expanded over the years,no good theory exists to explain how perception of auditory objects is achieved.A growing body of evidence suggests that the selectivity of neurons in the auditory forebrain is under dynamic modulation,and this plasticity may contribute to auditory object perception.We propose that stimulus-specific adaptation in the auditory forebrain of the songbird (and perhaps in other systems) may play an important role in modulating sensitivity in a way that aids discrimination,and thus can potentially contribute to auditory object perception [Current Zoology 57 (6):671-683,2011].

  12. A Semiotic Framework for the Semantics of Digital Multimedia Learning Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The relevance of semiotics for extending multimedia description schemes will be shown relative to existing strategies for indexing and retrieval. The semiotic framework presented is intended to support a compositional semantics of flexible digital multimedia objects. Besides semiotics insights from...

  13. Why Inquiry? Primary Teachers' Objectives in Choosing Inquiry- and Context-Based Instructional Strategies to Stimulate Students' Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walan, Susanne; Nilsson, Pernilla; Ewen, Birgitta Mc

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown that there is a need for pedagogical content knowledge among science teachers. This study investigates two primary teachers and their objectives in choosing inquiry- and context-based instructional strategies as well as the relation between the choice of instructional strategies and the teachers' knowledge about of students' understanding and intended learning outcomes. Content representations created by the teachers and students' experiences of the enacted teaching served as foundations for the teachers' reflections during interviews. Data from the interviews were analyzed in terms of the intended, enacted, and experienced purposes of the teaching and, finally, as the relation between intended, enacted, and experienced purposes. Students' experiences of the teaching were captured through a questionnaire, which was analyzed inductively, using content analysis. The results show that the teachers' intended teaching objectives were that students would learn about water. During the enacted teaching, it seemed as if the inquiry process was in focus and this was also how many of the students experienced the objectives of the activities. There was a gap between the intended and experienced objectives. Hardly any relation was found between the teachers' choice of instructional strategies and their knowledge about students' understanding, with the exception that the teacher who also added drama wanted to support her students' understanding of the states of water.

  14. Why Inquiry? Primary Teachers' Objectives in Choosing Inquiry- and Context-Based Instructional Strategies to Stimulate Students' Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walan, Susanne; Nilsson, Pernilla; Ewen, Birgitta Mc

    2017-10-01

    Studies have shown that there is a need for pedagogical content knowledge among science teachers. This study investigates two primary teachers and their objectives in choosing inquiry- and context-based instructional strategies as well as the relation between the choice of instructional strategies and the teachers' knowledge about of students' understanding and intended learning outcomes. Content representations created by the teachers and students' experiences of the enacted teaching served as foundations for the teachers' reflections during interviews. Data from the interviews were analyzed in terms of the intended, enacted, and experienced purposes of the teaching and, finally, as the relation between intended, enacted, and experienced purposes. Students' experiences of the teaching were captured through a questionnaire, which was analyzed inductively, using content analysis. The results show that the teachers' intended teaching objectives were that students would learn about water. During the enacted teaching, it seemed as if the inquiry process was in focus and this was also how many of the students experienced the objectives of the activities. There was a gap between the intended and experienced objectives. Hardly any relation was found between the teachers' choice of instructional strategies and their knowledge about students' understanding, with the exception that the teacher who also added drama wanted to support her students' understanding of the states of water.

  15. PREREQUISITE PROGRAMMES IN OWN CHECKS IN STATUTORY AND VOLUNTARY LEGISLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guidi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prerequisite Programmes approach is a requirement for implementing a correct own check plan. This new approach, born according to the European Legislation, is completely recognized by third Nation Authorities and private Inspection and Accreditation Bodies. This method is the basis to verify if an own check system is under control and to verify if corrective actions are built up to warrant hygienic production standards. The present work demonstrate that a correct own check plan is built up only by a Pre Requisites Program approach. The new UNI EN ISO 22000:2005 standard describe this concept specifying the difference between PRP and CCP.

  16. Main Objectives for this I.A.U. Special Session on Innovation in Teaching/ Learning Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Ros, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    In the IAU resolution on the Value of Astronomy Education, passed by the IAU's General Assembly in 2003, it was recommended: to include astronomy in school curricula, to assist schoolteachers in their training and backup, and to inform teachers about available resources. The aim of this Special Session 2 on "Innovation in Teaching/Learning Astronomy" is to contribute to the implementation of these recommendations, introducing innovative points of view regarding methods of teaching and learning. Astronomers from all countries—developed or developing—will be equally interested. New methods of dissemination of information are making big changes in the opportunity of spreading astronomical knowledge. The World Wide Web continues to expand its reach, and the Astronomy Picture of the Day reaches the homepage of millions. The new phenomenon of podcasts is spreading rapidly. Astronomy attracts many young people to education in important fields in science and technology. But in many countries, astronomy is not part of the standard curriculum, and teachers do not receive adequate education and support. Still, many scientific and educational societies and government agencies have produced materials and educational resources in astronomy for all educational levels. Technology is used in astronomy both for obtaining observations and for teaching. In any case, it is useful to take their special opportunity to learn about the situation in different countries, to exchange opinions, and to collect information in order to continue, over at least the next triennium, the activities related to promoting astronomy throughout the world. In particular, we would like to invite all participants to explain their positive original experiences so they can be adapted for other regions. Everyone is invited to exchange their initiatives and to try to involve other countries in common projects. All of us are in the same boat. http://www.communicatingastronomy.org/innovation2006/

  17. Facilitating peer based learning through summative assessment - An adaptation of the Objective Structured Clinical Assessment tool for the blended learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikander, Lolita; Bouchoucha, Stéphane L

    2017-09-18

    Adapting a course from face to face to blended delivery necessitates that assessments are modified accordingly. In Australia the Objective Structured Clinical Assessment tool, as a derivative from the Objective Structured Clinical Examination, has been used in the face-to-face delivery mode as a formative or summative assessment tool in medicine and nursing since 1990. The Objective Structured Clinical Assessment has been used at Charles Darwin University to assess nursing students' simulated clinical skills prior to the commencement of their clinical placements since 2008. Although the majority of the course is delivered online, students attend a one-week intensive clinical simulation block yearly, prior to attending clinical placements. Initially, the Objective Structured Clinical Assessment was introduced as a lecturer assessed summative assessment, over time it was adapted to better suit the blended learning environment. The modification of the tool from an academic to peer assessed assessment tool, was based on the empirical literature, student feedback and a cross-sectional, qualitative study exploring academics' perceptions of the Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (Bouchoucha et al., 2013a, b). This paper presents an overview of the process leading to the successful adaptation of the Objective Structured Clinical Assessment to suit the requirements of a preregistration nursing course delivered through blended learning. This is significant as many universities are moving their curriculum to fully online or blended delivery, yet little attention has been paid to adapting the assessment of simulated clinical skills. The aim is to identify the benefits and drawbacks of using the peer assessed Objective Structured Clinical Assessment and share recommendations for successful implementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Semantic Learning Object (SLOWeb-Editor based on Web Ontology Language (OWL using a New OWL2XSLO Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhair Rimale

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, we see a strong demand for real-time information, with a rapid growth of m-learning. We also see that there are many educational resources on the Internet. Learning objects (LOs are designed as a means of reusing these resources. Most of these LOs are built for e-learning systems based on desktop computers, which prevents their use on mobile devices. A LO is an area that is open to research and has a lot of potential in the creation, adaptation and production of learning content. There are standards that describe LOs in general as IEEE LOM, SCORM. Semantic web and its associated technologies are increasingly used in electronic document editing while separating the content from the presentation. Creating a LO with the semantic web is complex and raises difficulties because of the editing tools that require general knowledge of XML syntax and related technologies. In this paper, the authors propose a new OWL2XSLO approach based on ontologies (OWL allowing the generation of XML-Schemas LOs. They then derive a semantic LO web editor based on OWL2XSLO approach for the generation of a content type enabling the editing of interactive LOs with XML technology and which can then be integrated into LMS and adapted to the mobile display.

  19. The Spiral-in Method for Designing and Connecting Learning Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios

    2012-01-01

    . The starting point for this conquest to knowledge is estimated through the decomposition of a subject matter, combined with a series of questions that (1) set the goals and the preferences of the learners and (2) extract information about their prior knowledge on the subject matter. According to the answers...... given, LOs are created and connected in a linear structure, like a spiral. The LOs are grouped together into lessons attempting to satisfy short-term learning outcomes. The spiral has to be fully wrapped for the possession of the subject matter....

  20. Bullying and social objectives : A study of prerequisites for success in Swedish schools

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlström, Björn

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines the relationship between organizations structure, culture and leadership. The specific organization that has been studied is Swedish secondary schools. The Swedish schools have a divided task, first to develop the students academic skills and secondly to develop the students socially and civically. This thesis has its interest on the schools social environment with special interest focused on questions regarding bullying and insulting behaviour. The data that has been use...