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Sample records for preparticipation athletic examination

  1. National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement: Preparticipation physical examinations and disqualifying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Kevin M; Bolin, Delmas J; Carek, Peter J; Konin, Jeff G; Neal, Timothy L; Violette, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    To present athletic trainers with recommendations for the content and administration of the preparticipation physical examination (PPE) as well as considerations for determining safe participation in sports and identifying disqualifying conditions. Preparticipation physical examinations have been used routinely for nearly 40 years. However, considerable debate exists as to their efficacy due to the lack of standardization in the process and the lack of conformity in the information that is gathered. With the continuing rise in sports participation at all levels and the growing number of reported cases of sudden death in organized athletics, the sports medicine community should consider adopting a standardized process for conducting the PPE to protect all parties. Recommendations are provided to equip the sports medicine community with the tools necessary to conduct the PPE as effectively and efficiently as possible using available scientific evidence and best practices. In addition, the recommendations will help clinicians identify those conditions that may threaten the health and safety of participants in organized sports, may require further evaluation and intervention, or may result in potential disqualification.

  2. Usefulness of echocardiography in preparticipation screening of competitive athletes.

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    Grazioli, Gonzalo; Merino, Beatriz; Montserrat, Silvia; Vidal, Bàrbara; Azqueta, Manel; Pare, Carles; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Yangüas, Xavier; Pi, Ramon; Til, Lluis; Escoda, Jaume; Brugada, Josep; Sitges, Marta

    2014-09-01

    Despite the established diagnostic value of the electrocardiogram in preparticipation screening of athletes, some cardiac structural changes can be missed, particularly in early disease stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiac structural changes via the systematic use of echocardiography in preparticipation screening of competitive athletes. Professional athletes or participants in a competitive athletic program underwent a screening that included family and personal medical history, physical examination, electrocardiography, exercise testing, and Doppler echocardiography. A total of 2688 athletes (67% men; mean age [standard deviation], 21 [10] years) were included. Most of the echocardiographic evaluations (92.5%) were normal and only 203 (7.5%) showed changes; the most frequent change was left ventricular hypertrophy, seen in 50 athletes (1.8%). Cessation of athletic activity was indicated in 4 athletes (0.14%): 2 for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (electrocardiography had shown changes that did not meet diagnostic criteria), 1 pectus excavatum with compression of the right ventricle, and 1 significant pulmonary valve stenosis; the rest of the changes did not entail cessation of athletic activity and only indicated periodic monitoring. Although rare, some cardiac structural changes can be missed on physical examination and electrocardiography; in contrast, they are easily recognized with echocardiography. These findings suggest the use of echocardiography in at least the first preparticipation screening of competitive athletes to improve the effectiveness of programs aimed at preventing sudden death in athletes. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Transtelephonic Electrocardiographic Transmission in the Preparticipation Screening of Athletes

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    Theodoros Samaras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transtelephonic electrocardiographic transmission (TET is the most widespread form of telecardiology since it enables clinicians to assess patients at a distance. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of TET either by fixed telephone line (POTS or by mobile phone in the preparticipation screening of young athletes. A total of 506 players, aged 20.5 ± 6.2 years, from 23 soccer clubs in the prefecture of Thessaloniki, Greece, were physically examined in their playfields by a general practitioner (GP and had their ECG recorded. In 142 cases, and on the judgment of the GP, the ECG was transmitted via POTS and/or global system for mobile communications (GSM to a specialised medical centre where it was evaluated by a cardiologist. The mean total time for recording, storing, and transmitting the ECG was four minutes per subject. It was found that the success rate for transmission at first attempt was similar for both fixed and mobile networks, that is, 93% and 91%, respectively. The failure rate in the GSM network was correlated to the reception level at the site of transmission. Only in about half ( = 74 of the transmitted ECGs did the cardiologist confirm “abnormal” findings, although in 16, they were considered to be clinically insignificant. Consequently, 58 athletes were referred for further medical examination. Our results indicate that TET (either by fixed telephone line or by mobile phone can ensure valid, reliable, and objective measurements, and significantly contribute to the application of medical screening in a great number of athletes. Therefore, it is recommended as an alternative diagnostic tool for the preparticipation screening of athletes living in remote areas.

  4. Application of pre-participation cardiovascular screening guidelines to novice older runners and endurance athletes

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    Justin R Abbatemarco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Despite robust growth in participation in marathons and endurance sports among older individuals, guidance regarding pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation of these athletes is lacking. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of currently available pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation guidelines as applied to a cohort of older novice endurance athletes. Methods: We applied data from 1457 novice runners and endurance athletes aged 35 years and older to two pre-participation screening tools, the American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire and the 2001 Working Group recommendations for pre-participation screening of masters athletes (2001 Masters. Results: Application of the American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire identified 42.1% for which pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation was indicated. Of those who met criteria, 51.5% reported completion of a healthcare evaluation. Application of the 2001 Masters guidelines identified 75.2% who qualified for pre-participation electrocardiogram and 34.0% for pre-participation stress testing. Of those who met 2001 Masters criteria for pre-participation testing, 43.7% and 24.6% underwent recommended electrocardiogram and stress testing, respectively. While there was modest concordance with recommendations for pre-participation evaluations based on both American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire and 2001 Masters, only athlete age was independently associated with completion of a pre-participation healthcare evaluation and only athlete age and athlete’s participation in marathons were independently associated with pre-participation stress testing. Conclusion: Among older novice endurance athletes, application of the American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire

  5. Application of pre-participation cardiovascular screening guidelines to novice older runners and endurance athletes

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    Abbatemarco, Justin R; Bennett, Courtney; Bell, Adrian J; Dunne, Laura; Matsumura, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite robust growth in participation in marathons and endurance sports among older individuals, guidance regarding pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation of these athletes is lacking. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of currently available pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation guidelines as applied to a cohort of older novice endurance athletes. Methods: We applied data from 1457 novice runners and endurance athletes aged 35 years and older to two pre-participation screening tools, the American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire and the 2001 Working Group recommendations for pre-participation screening of masters athletes (2001 Masters). Results: Application of the American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire identified 42.1% for which pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation was indicated. Of those who met criteria, 51.5% reported completion of a healthcare evaluation. Application of the 2001 Masters guidelines identified 75.2% who qualified for pre-participation electrocardiogram and 34.0% for pre-participation stress testing. Of those who met 2001 Masters criteria for pre-participation testing, 43.7% and 24.6% underwent recommended electrocardiogram and stress testing, respectively. While there was modest concordance with recommendations for pre-participation evaluations based on both American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire and 2001 Masters, only athlete age was independently associated with completion of a pre-participation healthcare evaluation and only athlete age and athlete’s participation in marathons were independently associated with pre-participation stress testing. Conclusion: Among older novice endurance athletes, application of the American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine Pre-Participation Questionnaire and 2001 Masters

  6. Cost-effectiveness of pre-participation screening of athletes with ECG in Europe and Algeria.

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    Assanelli, Deodato; Levaggi, Rosella; Carré, François; Sharma, Sanjay; Deligiannis, Asterios; Mellwig, Klaus Peter; Tahmi, Mohamed; Vinetti, Giovanni; Aliverti, Paola

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ECG in combination with family and personal history and physical examination in order to detect cardiovascular diseases that might cause sudden death in athletes. The study was conducted on a cohort of 6,634, mainly young professional and recreational athletes, 1,071 from Algeria and 5,563 from Europe (France, Germany and Greece). Each athlete underwent medical history, physical examination, and resting 12-lead ECG. 293 athletes (4.4 %), 149 in Europe (2.7 %) and 144 in Algeria (13.4 %) required further tests, and 56 were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease and thus disqualified. The cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) was calculated as the ratio between the cost of screening and the number of statistical life-years saved by the intervention. The estimated reduced risk of death deriving from treatment or disqualification resulted in the saving of 79.1 statistical life-years in Europe and 136.3 in Algeria. CER of screening was 4,071 purchasing-power-parity-adjusted US dollars ($PPP) in Europe and 582 $PPP in Algeria. The results of this study strongly support the utilisation of 12-lead ECG in the pre-participation screening of young athletes, especially in countries where secondary preventive care is not highly developed.

  7. Concussion-Related Protocols and Preparticipation Assessments Used for Incoming Student-Athletes in National Collegiate Athletic Association Member Institutions

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    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Snook, Erin M.; Lynall, Robert C.; Dompier, Thomas P.; Sales, Latrice; Parsons, John T.; Hainline, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Context  National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) legislation requires that member institutions have policies to guide the recognition and management of sport-related concussions. Identifying the nature of these policies and the mechanisms of their implementation can help identify areas of needed improvement. Objective  To estimate the characteristics and prevalence of concussion-related protocols and preparticipation assessments used for incoming NCAA student-athletes. Design  Cross-sectional study. Setting  Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants  Head athletic trainers from all 1113 NCAA member institutions were contacted; 327 (29.4%) completed the survey. Intervention(s)  Participants received an e-mail link to the Web-based survey. Weekly reminders were sent during the 4-week window. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Respondents described concussion-related protocols and preparticipation assessments (eg, concussion history, neurocognitive testing, balance testing, symptom checklists). Descriptive statistics were compared by division and football program status. Results  Most universities provided concussion education to student-athletes (95.4%), had return-to-play policies (96.6%), and obtained the number of previous concussions sustained by incoming student-athletes (97.9%). Fewer had return-to-learn policies (63.3%). Other concussion-history–related information (eg, symptoms, hospitalization) was more often collected by Division I universities. Common preparticipation neurocognitive and balance tests were the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT; 77.1%) and Balance Error Scoring System (46.5%). In total, 43.7% complied with recommendations for preparticipation assessments that included concussion history, neurocognitive testing, balance testing, and symptom checklists. This was due to moderate use of balance testing (56.6%); larger proportions used concussion history (99.7%), neurocognitive testing (83

  8. Comparison of U.S. and Italian experiences with sudden cardiac deaths in young competitive athletes and implications for preparticipation screening strategies.

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    Maron, Barry J; Haas, Tammy S; Doerer, Joseph J; Thompson, Paul D; Hodges, James S

    2009-07-15

    Controversy has evolved over the most practical and effective strategy for preparticipation cardiovascular screening of competitive athletes to detect unsuspected cardiovascular disease and prevent sudden death on the athletic field. Athlete screening in the Veneto region of Italy is part of a national program (with 12-lead electrocardiography) that has reported the detection of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a decrease in the cardiovascular death rate in young athletes. In this study, over time periods of similar length, cardiovascular-related mortality rates in Veneto athletes were compared with those of a demographically similar region of the United States (Minnesota) in which screening is limited to history and physical examination. There were 55 sudden cardiovascular deaths reported in Veneto over 26 years (2.1/year), compared with 22 deaths in 23 years (0.96/year) in Minnesota. Over the recent and comparable 11-year period, 1993 to 2004, 12 deaths were reported in Veneto and 11 in Minnesota. When analyzed as deaths per 100,000 person-years, Veneto exceeded Minnesota for all years combined (1.87 for 1979 to 2004 vs 1.06 for 1985 to 2007, respectively, p = 0.006), although the 2 regions did not differ significantly for 1993 to 2004 (0.87 vs 0.93, respectively, p = 0.88) or most recently for 2001 to 2004 (0.43 vs 0.90, respectively, p = 0.38). In conclusion, sudden cardiovascular deaths in young competitive athletes occurred at a low rate in both Veneto and Minnesota. Despite different preparticipation screening strategies, athlete sudden death rates in these demographically similar regions of the United States and Italy have not differed significantly in recent years. These data do not support a lower mortality rate associated with preparticipation screening programs involving routine electrocardiography and examinations by specially trained personnel.

  9. Risk of sports: do we need a pre-participation screening for competitive and leisure athletes?

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    Corrado, Domenico; Schmied, Christian; Basso, Cristina; Borjesson, Mats; Schiavon, Maurizio; Pelliccia, Antonio; Vanhees, Luc; Thiene, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is most often the first clinical manifestation of an underlying cardiovascular disease and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. The risk benefit ratio of physical exercise differs between young competitive athletes and middle-age/senior individuals engaged in leisure-time sports activity. Competitive sports are associated with an increase in the risk of sudden cardiovascular death (SCD) in susceptible adolescents and young adults with underlying cardiovascular disorders. In middle-age/older individuals, physical activity can be regarded as a 'two-edged sword': vigorous exertion increases the incidence of acute coronary events in those who did not exercise regularly, whereas habitual physical activity reduces the overall risk of myocardial infarction and SCD. Although cardiovascular pre-participation evaluation offers the potential to identify athletes with life-threatening cardiovascular abnormalities before onset of symptoms and may reduce their risk of SCD, there is a significant debate among cardiologists about efficacy, impact of false-positive results and cost-effectiveness of routine screening. This review presents an appraisal of the available data and criticisms concerning screening programmes aimed to prevent SCD of either young competitive athletes or older individuals engaged in leisure-time sports activity.

  10. Competitive sports for children and adolescents: should an electrocardiogram be required in the pre-participation physical examination?

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    Baptista, Cláudio Aparício Silva; Foronda, Antonio; Baptista, Luciana de Pádua Silva

    2009-08-01

    The growing number of children and adolescents, aged 7 to 17 years, that participate in competitive sports requires preventive medical care. The pre-participation physical examination (PPE) requires appropriate medical knowledge to insure safe medical clearance. Recent sudden death events related to sports practice have raised doubts concerning the need for a medical evaluation based on medical tests, which due to the delay in its implementation may result in demotivation and abandonment of the sports practice. This is a review study, including data collected during a period of 30 years at the Olympic Training and Research Center (COTP) of the Municipal Secretary of Sports of São Paulo, where future athletes are identified, socially included and trained; and the objective of the study was to evaluate the need for the involvement of medical organizations in the preparation of a EPP protocol for the cardiovascular assessment of this population, according to the Brazilian reality. We had no normative standard, and so we relied on data collected from protocols that were established by other countries, but we defined which conduct to be taken with each of our individuals.

  11. Setting, Structure, and Timing of the Preparticipation Examination: The Wilderness Adventure Consultation.

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    Green, Gary A

    2015-12-01

    Patients pursue wilderness experiences throughout the entire life cycle, and while outdoor pursuits are relatively safe, injuries do occur. Many of these adverse events can be anticipated, identified, and prevented through a wilderness preparticipation examination (PPE). To accomplish this, it is incumbent on the physician to assess the extrinsic and intrinsic factors faced by the patient and attempt to correct them to ensure an enjoyable experience in the outdoors. This article outlines the goals of the PPE along with identification of various risk factors that can influence a trip. Most injuries and rescues occur from underestimating the risks from extrinsic, environmental factors, and/or overestimating one's intrinsic skills. By matching the patient's fitness and skill level to the environment, the physician can help reduce the risk of serious injury.

  12. Counseling for the Wilderness Athlete and Adventurer During a Preparticipation Evaluation for Preparation, Safety, and Injury Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Justin Mark J; Campbell, Aaron D; Raastad, Kate K

    2015-12-01

    Wilderness sports and adventures continue to increase in popularity. Counseling is an essential element of the preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for athletes in traditional sports. This approach can be applied to and augmented for the wilderness athlete and adventurer. The authors reviewed the literature on counseling during PPEs and gathered expert opinion from medical professionals who perform such PPEs for wilderness sports enthusiasts. The objective was to present findings of this review and make recommendations on the counseling component of a wilderness sports/adventure PPE. The counseling component of a PPE for wilderness sports/adventures should take place after a basic medical evaluation, and include a discussion on sport or activity-specific injury prevention, personal health, travel recommendations, and emergency event planning. Counseling should be individualized and thorough, and involve shared decision making. This should take place early enough to allow ample time for the athlete or adventurer to further prepare as needed based on the recommendations. Resources may be recommended for individuals desiring more information on selected topics.

  13. Challenges of Pre-participation Cardiovascular Screening in Athletes%运动员潜在心血管疾病筛查面临的挑战

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童文娟(综述); 周建中(审校)

    2016-01-01

    研究表明,与非运动员相比,同样心脏基础的运动员发生心脏性猝死的风险更高,因此关注运动员的心脏病筛查非常有必要;但运动员心脏与心脏疾病存在众多重叠之处,且针对黑人运动员的研究甚少,黑人运动员异常心电图发生率更高,更为运动员心血管病筛查增加了难度。详细回顾运动员心脏性猝死的常见病因,并深刻剖析运动员心血管筛查面临的挑战及困境。%Studies have shown that the incidence of sudden cardiac death( SCD) is greater in athletes compared with their nonathletic counterparts,therefore close attention to SCD in athletes is great necessity.However,physiological adaptation to exercise,known as“athlete's heart” and Cardionmyopathic falls into a‘grey zone’ .Even though blcak athletes have shown a higher prevalence of ECG abnormalites,stud-ies associated with black athletes are very limited and black athletes have shown a higher prevalence of ECG abnormalities.All of these in-crease the difficulty of pre-participation cardiovascular screening in athletes.This paper provides a detailed review regarding the etiology of SCD and provides insight into the challenges and dilemmas faced concerning pre-participation cardiovascular screening in athletes.

  14. Use of the Preparticipation Physical Exam in Screening for the Female Athlete Triad among High School Athletes

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    De La Torre, Dena M.; Snell, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    The female athlete triad comprises 3 individual but interrelated conditions associated with athletic training: disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Each condition is of medical concern, but when found within the triad, they can have serious medical consequences. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  15. Preparticipation physical evaluation: getting to the heart of the matter.

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    Cantwell, J D

    1998-10-01

    The cardiovascular evaluation is an important component of the preparticipation physical examination of the athlete. The history should be standardized to include questions ranging from those about chest pain and palpitations to ones about syncope. The physical examination should not be a perfunctory one, but rather a careful search for findings that might include a low grade heart murmur that accentuates with Valsalva'a maneuver (suggestive of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the leading cause of sudden death in a competitive athlete). The cardiovascular risks to the athlete are known. Fortunately, only a small percentage of athletes who are screened have such abnormalities. The validity of such screening remains to be proven. Recommendations are provided to make the present approach more time efficient and perhaps more cost effective.

  16. Preparticipation Exams: How to Detect a Teenage Crisis.

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    Donahue, Parnell

    1990-01-01

    Sport-specific preparticipation examinations do not address social problems (drug abuse, suicide, murder, accidents, and sex) epidemic among teenagers, but they are often the only contact these youth have with a physician. This article discusses these risk factors and presents methods for assessing them during preparticipation exams. (SM)

  17. Methods of Echocardiographic Examination of Athletes

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    Aleksandr S. Sharykin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of echocardiography in in-depth medical examinations helps conduct screening for inborn or acquired heart anomalies, which, however, can oftentimes be not enough for assessing their significance. In athletes who train 5-6 times per week 2-3 times or more per day, the heart gets under physical stress more often than in non-athletes – therefore, examining them at rest cannot provide a full-scale picture of the heart’s operation. The article describes a methodology of echocardiography with graduated training load, which helps explore the condition of hemodynamics in athletes when they are engaged in doing habitual work.

  18. Preparticipation Evaluation for Climbing Sports.

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    Campbell, Aaron D; Davis, Christopher; Paterson, Ryan; Cushing, Tracy A; Ng, Pearlly; Peterson, Charles S; Sedgwick, Peter E; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-12-01

    Climbing is a popular wilderness sport among a wide variety of professional athletes and amateur enthusiasts, and many styles are performed across many environments. Potential risks confront climbers, including personal health or exacerbation of a chronic condition, in addition to climbing-specific risks or injuries. Although it is not common to perform a preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for climbing, a climber or a guide agency may request such an evaluation before participation. Formats from traditional sports PPEs can be drawn upon, but often do not directly apply. The purpose of this article was to incorporate findings from expert opinion from professional societies in wilderness medicine and in sports medicine, with findings from the literature of both climbing epidemiology and traditional sports PPEs, into a general PPE that would be sufficient for the broad sport of climbing. The emphasis is on low altitude climbing, and an overview of different climbing styles is included. Knowledge of climbing morbidity and mortality, and a standardized approach to the PPE that involves adequate history taking and counseling have the potential for achieving risk reduction and will facilitate further study on the evaluation of the efficacy of PPEs.

  19. Drugs and the adolescent athlete.

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    Dyment, P G

    1984-08-01

    The pediatrician performing a preparticipation physical examination on an adolescent athlete should discuss the use of ergogenic aids. This could be with all of the athletes present in the case of the mass screening examination, or in private during the preferred office-based physical examination, whether preparticipation or health maintenance. Knowing which sport the youth is active in can lead to the drugs most likely being misused being emphasized by the physician; ie, androgens in the case of weightlifting and football, and amphetamines in competitive events like swimming, football, and track. Not only should the risks be discussed (an unsuccessful way to influence adolescents' behavior), but the drugs' degree of ineffectiveness should be stressed. Finally, and possibly at least as importantly, the moral question of a competitor attempting to gain an "illegal edge" should be addressed.

  20. Results of voluntary cardiovascular examination of elite athletes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tischer, S G; Mattsson, N; Storgaard, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the cardiovascular status of elite athletes in Denmark, the extent of abnormal cardiac findings--both training related and pathologic--and how participating in cardiac examination was perceived by the athletes. A standardized protocol of questionnaires, physical examination, resting...... a cardiac diagnosis; one athlete (0.2%) diagnosed with long QT syndrome was advised against competition level sports. In total, 60 athletes (11.6%) were referred for additional testing. The athletes presented a very low level of psychological stress before and a slight decrease immediately after...

  1. Pre-Participation Physical Examinations

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    ... significantly contributes to longevity. Even a person with risk factors like high blood pressure, diabetes or even a smoking habit can gain real benefits from incorporating regular physical activity into their daily life. As many dieters have found, exercise can help you stay on a diet and ...

  2. Examining multidimensional sport-confidence in athletes and non-athlete sport performers.

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    Machida, Moe; Otten, Mark; Magyar, T Michelle; Vealey, Robin S; Ward, Rose Marie

    2017-03-01

    Sport-confidence is considered a critical success factor for sport performers at all levels. Researchers have suggested that sport-confidence is a multidimensional rather than a unidimensional construct, and the sport-confidence model identified three types of sport-confidence (i.e., physical skills and training, cognitive efficiency, and resilience) that are important for success in sport. However, such multidimensionality of sport-confidence and its measurement have not been fully examined. On a large sample of sport performers with varied skill levels and characteristics, the purpose of the present study was to examine the three-factor model of sport-confidence. We tested the measurement invariance of the Sport-Confidence Inventory across 512 athletes and 1170 non-athlete sport performers. Results from the multiple group model analysis showed that the three-factor model of sport-confidence fit better for the athlete sample than for the non-athlete sample. The results implicate that the three-factor model of sport-confidence model is suitable to athletes, though sport-confidence may appear more unidimensional for non-athletes. The use of the Sport-Confidence Inventory for non-athlete sport performers demands further consideration; however, the findings implicate that it could be a useful tool to assess sport-confidence of sport performers at any levels.

  3. An Examination of College and University Athletic Directors' Perception of Management Models Utilized to Operate Intercollegiate Athletic Arenas

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    Palmero, Mauro R.

    2010-01-01

    Demands for enhanced accountability and effectiveness in higher education have also affected athletic departments, requiring a more cost-efficient managerial approach to the administration of athletic facilities, especially arenas. The purpose of this study was to examine athletic directors' perceptions towards the arena management models they…

  4. Something Old, Something New: Using Family History and Genetic Testing to Diagnose and Manage Athletes with Inherited Cardiovascular Disease.

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    Thomas, Matthew J; Battle, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    A primary objective of the preparticipation physical examination is to identify athletes at increased risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Review of an athlete's family history may identify those at risk for SCA. Genetic testing for inherited cardiovascular disease has emerged as a valuable addition to the repertoire of cardiologists facing the decision of clearing athletes with concerning clinical signs and/or family histories. Genetic testing may lead to various outcomes for an athlete including: reassurance, diagnosis in those with borderline clinical features, finding disease predisposition prior to the onset of clinical signs (ie, genotype-positive/phenotype-negative), or continued uncertainty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Examination on the Aggression Levels of Turkish National Skiing Athletes

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    Atalay GACAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leading the aggression in some athletes ensures productivity; however, misleading does not give the same result. The aggression may reach dangerous extents. Nevertheless, aggressive behavior can be regarded as a relaxation. One of the important reasons of violence and aggression seen in sports is the belief that it increases the performance or success. Based upon these arguments, we aim to examine the aggression levels of Turkey national skiing athletes. The study has been conducted on 9 female and 11 male national skiing athletes who participated in International Alpine Skiing Cup held in Sarıkamış in 2012. An assessment instrument that comprises 2 parts was used to acquire data. At the first part, demographic data of the participants were gathered; at the second part, a 30-item Aggression Scale of which reliability has been developed by İpek İlter was used to analyze the participants’ aggression and factors influencing aggression. Consequently, the aggression levels were observed below the average pursuant to the gender, age and year of sports. Furthermore, assertiveness level was observed as high while disruptive and passive dimensions of aggression were found low. It is believed the athletes’ being national athletes at the elite level has importance in both team success and individual success.

  6. Examination of parental involvement in Greek female athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Giannitsopoulou, Evgenia; Kosmidou, Evdoxia; Zisi, Vasiliki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived and desired parental involvement in female sports in Greece. The parental involvement in sport questionnaire was administrated to 383 female former and current athletes (mean age 20.33 years, competitive experience 7.10 years) from different sports (rhythmic gymnastics, artistic gymnastics, swimming, basketball, volleyball, track and field). The questionnaire assessed athletes’ perception about their parental involvement (directive behavior, ...

  7. Examination of parental involvement in Greek female athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Giannitsopoulou, Evgenia; Kosmidou, Evdoxia; Zisi, Vasiliki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived and desired parental involvement in female sports in Greece. The parental involvement in sport questionnaire was administrated to 383 female former and current athletes (mean age 20.33 years, competitive experience 7.10 years) from different sports (rhythmic gymnastics, artistic gymnastics, swimming, basketball, volleyball, track and field). The questionnaire assessed athletes’ perception about their parental involvement (directive behavior, ...

  8. Moving Elite Athletes Forward: Examining the Status of Secondary School Elite Athlete Programmes and Available Post-School Options

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    Brown, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study focused specifically on examining the status of and the promotion of two elite athlete programmes (EAPs), the students/elite athlete selection process and available post-school options. The research was guided by Michel Foucault's work in understanding the relationship between power and knowledge. Participants,…

  9. Moving Elite Athletes Forward: Examining the Status of Secondary School Elite Athlete Programmes and Available Post-School Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study focused specifically on examining the status of and the promotion of two elite athlete programmes (EAPs), the students/elite athlete selection process and available post-school options. The research was guided by Michel Foucault's work in understanding the relationship between power and knowledge. Participants,…

  10. High Prevalence of Hypertension Among Collegiate Football Athletes

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    Karpinos, Ashley Rowatt; Roumie, Christianne L.; Nian, Hui; Diamond, Alex B.; Rothman, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of hypertension among collegiate football athletes is not well described. Methods and Results A retrospective cohort of all male athletes who participated in varsity athletics at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university between 1999–2012 was examined through chart review. Mandatory annual preparticipation physical examinations included blood pressure, body mass index, medication use, and supplement use. Prevalence of hypertension was compared between football and non-football athletes. A mixed-effects linear regression model examined change in blood pressure over time. 636 collegiate athletes, including 323 football players, were identified. In the initial year of athletic participation, 19.2% of football athletes had hypertension and 61.9% had prehypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was higher among football athletes than non-football athletes in their initial (19.2% vs. 7.0%, Pfootball athletes in the initial year (AOR 2.28, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.30) but not the final year (AOR 1.25, 95% CI 0.69 to 2.28). Over the course of their collegiate career, football athletes had an annual decrease in systolic blood pressure (−0.82 mmHg, P=0.002), while non-football athletes did not (0.18 mmHg, P=0.58). Conclusions Hypertension and prehypertension were common among collegiate football athletes, and football athletes were more likely to have hypertension than male non-football athletes. This presents a potential cardiovascular risk in a young population of athletes. Strategies for increasing awareness, prevention and treatment are needed. PMID:24221829

  11. Mastering the Physical Examination of the Athlete's Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofa, David P; Mayeux, Sophie E; Parisien, Robert L; Ahmad, Christopher S; Lynch, T Sean

    In this review, we describe precise methods for evaluating the athlete's hip or groin with an emphasis on recognizing the most common extra-articular and intra-articular pathologies, including adductor strains, athletic pubalgia, osteitis pubis, and femoroacetabular impingement with labral tears.

  12. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach.

  13. Examining the Mentoring Relationships of Women Working in Intercollegiate Athletic Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Glenna G.; Hums, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mentoring relationships of women working within intercollegiate athletic administration. More specifically, the mentor characteristics and the career and psychosocial benefits of having a mentor in intercollegiate athletic administration were the focus of the study. The population for this study was all…

  14. Clinical examination and physical assessment of hip joint-related pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Evidence-based clinical examination and assessment of the athlete with hip joint related pain is complex. It requires a systematic approach to properly differentially diagnose competing potential causes of athletic pain generation. An approach with an initial broad focus (and hence use...

  15. Predicting elite Scottish athletes' attitudes towards doping: examining the contribution of achievement goals and motivational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Justine; Taylor, John; Dimeo, Paul; Dixon, Sarah; Robinson, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Understanding athletes' attitudes to doping continues to be of interest for its potential to contribute to an international anti-doping system. However, little is known about the relationship between elite athletes' attitudes to drug use and potential explanatory factors, including achievement goals and the motivational climate. In addition, despite specific World Anti-Doping Agency Code relating to team sport athletes, little is known about whether sport type (team or individual) is a risk or protective factor in relation to doping. Elite athletes from Scotland (N = 177) completed a survey examining attitudes to performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, achievement goal orientations and perceived motivational climate. Athletes were generally against doping for performance enhancement. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that task and ego goals and mastery motivational climate were predictors of attitudes to PED use (F (4, 171) = 15.81, P doping in sport.

  16. Motivational cluster profiles of adolescent athletes: an examination of differences in physical-self perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cağlar, Emine; Aşçı, F Hülya

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to identify motivational profiles of adolescent athletes using cluster analysis in non-Western culture. A second purpose was to examine relationships between physical self-perception differences of adolescent athletes and motivational profiles. One hundred and thirty six male (Mage = 17.46, SD = 1.25 years) and 80 female adolescent athletes (Mage = 17.61, SD = 1.19 years) from a variety of team sports including basketball, soccer, volleyball, and handball volunteered to participate in this study. The Sport Motivation Scale (SMS) and Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) were administered to all participants. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed a four-cluster solution for this sample: amotivated, low motivated, moderate motivated, and highly motivated. A 4 x 5 (Cluster x PSPP Subscales) MANOVA revealed no significant main effect of motivational clusters on physical self-perception levels (p > 0.05). As a result, findings of the present study showed that motivational types of the adolescent athletes constituted four different motivational clusters. Highly and moderate motivated athletes consistently scored higher than amotivated athletes on the perceived sport competence, physical condition, and physical self-worth subscales of PSPP. This study identified motivational profiles of competitive youth-sport participants. Key pointsHighly motivated athletes have a tendency to perceive themselves competent in psychomotor domains as compared to the amotivated athletesAs the athletes feel more competent in psychomotor domain, they are more intrinsically motivated.The information about motivational profiles of adolescent athletes could be used for developing strategies and interventions designed to improve the strength and quality of sport participants' motivation.

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors encountered during medical examination in athletic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cis Spoturno, Adela C; Paz-Sauquillo, María T; López-Zea, Matilde; Fernández-Rostello, Eduardo A

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors can predispose to cardiovascular disease in adults or lead to cardiovascular events while practicing sports. The objectives of this study were: 1) to estimate the distribution of individual cardiovascular risk factors; 2) to establish a relationship between cardiovascular risk factors in parents or grandparents and the children's clinical condition. This was a retrospective study to assess overweight, obesity and hypertension in 1021 child athletes. The family history of obesity, type 2 diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and stroke was studied. Out of the studied children, 22.1% (n= 226) were obese and 2.1% (n= 21) had hypertension. Obesity was the most common family risk factor (30%).

  18. Performance Comparison of Student-Athletes and General College Students on the Functional Movement Screen and the Y Balance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engquist, Katherine D; Smith, Craig A; Chimera, Nicole J; Warren, Meghan

    2015-08-01

    Although various studies have assessed performance of athletes on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Y Balance Test (YBT), no study to date has directly evaluated a comparison of performance between athletes and members of the general population. Thus, to better understand the application of the FMS and the YBT to general college students, this study examined whether or not general college students performed similarly to student-athletes on the FMS (composite and movement pattern scores) and the YBT (composite and reach directions). This study evaluated 167 Division I student-athletes and 103 general college students from the same university on the FMS and the YBT. No difference was found in FMS composite scores between student-athletes and general college students. For FMS movement patterns, female student-athletes scored higher than general college students in the deep squat. No difference was found for men in any FMS movement pattern. Female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in YBT composite scores; no difference was found for men in YBT composite scores. In analysis of YBT reach directions, female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in all reach directions, whereas no difference was found in men. Existing research on the FMS composite score in athletic populations may apply to a general college population for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc. Existing research on the YBT in male athletic populations is expected to apply equally to general college males for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc.

  19. Early Single-Sport Specialization: A Survey of 3090 High School, Collegiate, and Professional Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick S; Bishop, Meghan; Kane, Patrick; Ciccotti, Michael C; Selverian, Stephen; Exume, Dominique; Emper, William; Freedman, Kevin B; Hammoud, Sommer; Cohen, Steven B; Ciccotti, Michael G

    2017-07-01

    Youth participation in organized sports in the United States is rising, with many athletes focusing on a single sport at an increasingly younger age. To retrospectively compare single-sport specialization in current high school (HS), collegiate, and professional athletes with regard to the rate and age of specialization, the number of months per year of single-sport training, and the athlete's perception of injury related to specialization. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A survey was distributed to HS, collegiate, and professional athletes prior to their yearly preparticipation physical examination. Athletes were asked whether they had chosen to specialize in only 1 sport, and data were then collected pertaining to this decision. A total of 3090 athletes completed the survey (503 HS, 856 collegiate, and 1731 professional athletes). A significantly greater percentage of current collegiate athletes specialized to play a single sport during their childhood/adolescence (45.2% of HS athletes, 67.7% of collegiate athletes, and 46.0% of professional athletes; P sport specialization differed between groups and occurred at a mean age of 12.7 ± 2.4 (HS), 14.8 ± 2.5 (collegiate), and 14.1 ± 2.8 years (professional) (P sport-related injury than current professional athletes (25.4%) (P child to specialize to play only 1 sport during childhood/adolescence. This study provides a foundation for understanding current trends in single-sport specialization in all athletic levels. Current HS athletes specialized, on average, 2 years earlier than current collegiate and professional athletes surveyed. These data challenge the notion that success at an elite level requires athletes to specialize in 1 sport at a very young age.

  20. The Glass Ceiling: Examining the Advancement of Women in the Domain of Athletic Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galloway, Brittany J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The “glass ceiling” is a metaphor for examining gender disparities between men and women within the workplace. Such disparities are particularly visible in athletic administration. This literature review evaluates specific leadership characteristics and their relationship to gender stereotyping in Sport Management. Because athletic administration is a male dominated domain, there appears to be discrimination against women, creating a gender gap that prevents the advancement of women into top-level managerial positions.

  1. Examining the effects of rational emotive behavior therapy on performance outcomes in elite paralympic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A G; Barker, J B; Turner, M J; Sheffield, D

    2017-06-05

    Traditionally a psychotherapeutic intervention, rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) is receiving increasing attention within the extant literature as an intervention to enhance the athletic performance and psychological well-being of competitive athletes. Whilst the benefits of REBT on psychological health are established, less is understood about the effects on athletic performance. This study aimed to examine the immediate and maintained effects of REBT on physiological, psychological, and performance outcomes with elite Paralympic athletes. Using a single-case research design, eight athletes recruited from the same Paralympic sport (M=40.12, SD=12.99) received five, one-to-one REBT sessions. Measures of irrational beliefs were collected weekly, whereas the remaining psychological and physiological measures were collected at a pre-, post-, and at a 9-month follow-up time point. Visual and statistical analyzes of the data indicates reductions in irrational beliefs were coupled with reductions in systolic blood pressure indicative of an adaptive physiological response, improved athletic performance during competition simulations, and reductions in avoidance goals. Furthermore, social validation data indicated greater self-awareness, emotional control, and enhanced focus during competition as a result of the REBT intervention. This study contributes to growing literature supporting the efficacy of REBT as an intervention that not only facilitates psychological health but also enhances athletic performance. Results are discussed with reference to theory, limitations, and future recommendations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Examining the validity of the Athlete Engagement Questionnaire (AEQ in a Portuguese sport setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Martins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sport psychology literature suggests that understanding engagement levels is pivotal to promote positive sporting experiences among athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Athlete Engagement Questionnaire among Portuguese sport athletes. Two distinct samples of Portuguese athletes from different competitive levels were collected, and the results of a confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated a good fit of the model to the data. A review of the psychometric properties indicated that all factors showed good composite reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. In addition, a multi-groups analysis showed the invariance of the model in two independent samples providing evidence of cross validity. Implications of these results for scholars and coaches are discussed and guidelines for future studies are suggested.

  3. Early Single-Sport Specialization: A Survey of 3090 High School, Collegiate, and Professional Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick S.; Bishop, Meghan; Kane, Patrick; Ciccotti, Michael C.; Selverian, Stephen; Exume, Dominique; Emper, William; Freedman, Kevin B.; Hammoud, Sommer; Cohen, Steven B.; Ciccotti, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Youth participation in organized sports in the United States is rising, with many athletes focusing on a single sport at an increasingly younger age. Purpose: To retrospectively compare single-sport specialization in current high school (HS), collegiate, and professional athletes with regard to the rate and age of specialization, the number of months per year of single-sport training, and the athlete’s perception of injury related to specialization. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A survey was distributed to HS, collegiate, and professional athletes prior to their yearly preparticipation physical examination. Athletes were asked whether they had chosen to specialize in only 1 sport, and data were then collected pertaining to this decision. Results: A total of 3090 athletes completed the survey (503 HS, 856 collegiate, and 1731 professional athletes). A significantly greater percentage of current collegiate athletes specialized to play a single sport during their childhood/adolescence (45.2% of HS athletes, 67.7% of collegiate athletes, and 46.0% of professional athletes; P sport specialization differed between groups and occurred at a mean age of 12.7 ± 2.4 (HS), 14.8 ± 2.5 (collegiate), and 14.1 ± 2.8 years (professional) (P sport-related injury than current professional athletes (25.4%) (P sport during childhood/adolescence. Conclusion: This study provides a foundation for understanding current trends in single-sport specialization in all athletic levels. Current HS athletes specialized, on average, 2 years earlier than current collegiate and professional athletes surveyed. These data challenge the notion that success at an elite level requires athletes to specialize in 1 sport at a very young age. PMID:28812031

  4. MOTIVATIONAL CLUSTER PROFILES OF ADOLESCENT ATHLETES: AN EXAMINATION OF DIFFERENCES IN PHYSICAL-SELF PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Çağlar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of the present study was to identify motivational profiles of adolescent athletes using cluster analysis in non-Western culture. A second purpose was to examine relationships between physical self-perception differences of adolescent athletes and motivational profiles. One hundred and thirty six male (Mage = 17.46, SD = 1.25 years and 80 female adolescent athletes (Mage = 17.61, SD = 1.19 years from a variety of team sports including basketball, soccer, volleyball, and handball volunteered to participate in this study. The Sport Motivation Scale (SMS and Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP were administered to all participants. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed a four-cluster solution for this sample: amotivated, low motivated, moderate motivated, and highly motivated. A 4 x 5 (Cluster x PSPP Subscales MANOVA revealed no significant main effect of motivational clusters on physical self-perception levels (p > 0.05. As a result, findings of the present study showed that motivational types of the adolescent athletes constituted four different motivational clusters. Highly and moderate motivated athletes consistently scored higher than amotivated athletes on the perceived sport competence, physical condition, and physical self-worth subscales of PSPP. This study identified motivational profiles of competitive youth-sport participants

  5. An examination of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale using collegiate wheelchair basketball student athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, Mark; Dodder, Richard A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose was to examine the construct validity of the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES). The construct validity of the scale was examined by applying it to collegiate wheelchair basketball student athletes at an NCAA sanctioned wheelchair basketball tournament at a mid-sized university in the south central United States (N=68). In accordance with previous research on the scale, Cronbach alpha was .86; confirmatory factor analysis supported a one-factor structure. The scale is useful for measuring global self-esteem in collegiate wheelchair basketball student athletes.

  6. THE EXAMINATION OF ATTITUDES TOWARD JUDO IN GREEK ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaggelidis G.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate opinions about judo athletes’ personality. For this purpose forty eight (48 judo athletes, 12 women and 36 men, 30+9.1 years old (mean+SD, with none to five dan, participated in the research. All the subjects answered to a 35-item questionnaire describing the image they have towards those people who are doing judo, in regard to five factors such as social nature, volition nature, active nature, physicalnature and emotional nature. For the statistical analysis the statistic packet SPSS/PC version 12.0 for windows wasused. Men’s and women’s rating about judo athletes’ image was almost the same on all items ranging from the average, to somewhat strong and, also, to strong. However, there was a definitely significant difference in the comparison of the two groups, among men and women, with men rating significantly higher in the item of “beingcautious” of active nature (t=3.518, p<0.01, in the item of “not being unfair in things” of emotional nature (t=2.533, p<0.05, and in the item of “being mild” of emotional nature, too (t=2.718, p<0.01. However, women were rating significantly higher in the item of “having an independent nature” of volition nature (t=-2.350,p<0.05. Age didn’t correlate with any item. Moreover, chi square test showed that dan number affects the item of “having leadership” of social nature (x2=31.335, p<0.05. The results lead to the conclusions that the high rating in the image of all thirty-five items, of all the five senses, social nature, volition nature, active nature, physical nature and emotional nature in both men and women regarding judo is high and is thought to be an expression of attitudesprovided in judo lessons and matches, as well as during judo practice time.

  7. A qualitative examination of professional role commitment among athletic trainers working in the secondary school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitney, William A

    2010-01-01

    Work-related demands can challenge an athletic trainer's professional role commitment for an extended period throughout one's career. To explore how athletic trainers perceive the phenomenon of professional commitment and maintain this commitment while working in a professionally challenging environment. Basic, interpretive qualitative study. Secondary school. A criterion sample was used. Each participant had a minimum of 10 years of experience as an athletic trainer and self-identified as having maintained his or her professional commitment. Seventeen individuals (14 men, 3 women) with a mean age of 44.3 +/- 6.8 years and 19.0 +/- 6.7 years of experience in the secondary school setting participated in the study. Seventeen total interviews were conducted. Interviews were transcribed and an inductive analysis was performed. A peer debriefing and member checks with 7 participants were completed to enhance the trustworthiness of the findings. Four themes emerged from the findings: 1) professional responsibility, 2) rewards, 3) respect, and 4) rejuvenation. Participants explained that a strong sense of responsibility to their patients was a prominent feature of maintaining their commitment. Their professional commitment was influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards and respect from others. The last emergent theme, rejuvenation, explained the necessity of having appropriate time away from the athletic training role to interact with peers and address personal needs. A strong sense of professional responsibility to both patients and the athletic training discipline is a central feature of professional commitment. Organizations, such as high school athletic programs, can play an influential role in helping an athletic trainer to maintain professional commitment by examining the intrinsic and extrinsic reward systems, assessing the work structure to ensure time to address personal needs, fostering effective communication, and addressing continuing education needs

  8. EPHEDRA USE IN A SELECT GROUP OF ADOLESCENT ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Schaefer

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Ephedra-containing dietary supplements are consumed to improve sports performace, but may carry risks of cardiac and neurological adverse events. Little is known of their use by young athletes. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and patterns of ephedra use among high school athletes. An anonymous survey was performed in Rochester, Minnesota on high school athletes who participated in fall sports during 2003-04. Parental consent was obtained for athletes under age 18 years. Surveys were distributed at preparticipation examinations and in- school survey stations. The response rate to the survey was 68.2%, or 311 respondents out of a possible 456 with consent (or 26% of all 1197 athletes eligible prior to the consent process. Seven of 311 (2.3% respondents used dietary supplements containing ephedra. Only one of seven users (14.3% knew that the supplements they used contained ephedra. Ephedra use was more common in boys (five than girls (two. Ephedra use was only found in 17 and 18-year-olds. The most common sports among ephedra users were football, track and field, and weightlifting. This study suggests that Ephedra use was infrequent among the young athletes in this population. However, ephedra users were generally unaware that the dietary supplements they consumed contained ephedra. Users were more likely to participate in football, track and field, and weightlifting. Ephedra users were likely to obtain supplements from their peers, and were largely uninformed of the content of their supplements

  9. Between-Seasons Test-Retest Reliability of Clinically Measured Reaction Time in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Reaction time is typically impaired after concussion. A clinical test of reaction time (RTclin) that does not require a computer to administer may be a valuable tool to assist in concussion diagnosis and management. Objective: To determine the test-retest reliability of RTclin measured over successive seasons in competitive collegiate athletes and to compare these results with a computerized measure of reaction time (RTcomp). Design: Case series with repeated measures. Setting: Preparticipation physical examinations for the football, women's soccer, and wrestling teams at a single university. Patients or Other Participants: 102 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes. Interventions : The RTclin was measured using a measuring stick embedded in a weighted rubber disk that was released and caught as quickly as possible. The RTcomp was measured using the simple reaction time component of CogState Sport. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data were collected at 2 time points, 1 season apart, during preparticipation physical examinations. Outcomes were mean simple RTclin and RTcomp. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient estimates from season 1 to season 2 were 0.645 for RTclin (n = 102, entire sample) and 0.512 for RTcomp (n = 62 athletes who had 2 consecutive valid baseline CogState Sport test sessions). Conclusions: The test-retest reliability of RTclin over consecutive seasons compared favorably with that of a concurrently tested computerized measure of reaction time and with literature-based estimates of computerized reaction time measures. This finding supports the potential use of RTclin as part of a multifaceted concussion assessment battery. Further prospective study is warranted. PMID:21944073

  10. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic st

  11. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic

  12. An Examination of Psychosocial Correlates of Eating Disorders among Female Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Trent A.; Greenleaf, Christy; Reel, Justine J.; Carter, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    With female collegiate athletes, we examined the relationship of eating pathology to body image concerns, weight pressures, sociocultural internalization, and mood state. Multivariate analyses revealed that the symptomatic and eating disorder groups were similar on seven of eight weight pressures, three of four mood states, on internalization, and…

  13. Examining Athletes' Attitudes toward Using Anabolic Steroids and Their Knowledge of the Possible Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark H.; Russell, Kenneth G.

    1997-01-01

    Examined the relationships between athletes' (N=291) knowledge about the long-term effects of anabolic steroids and their attitudes toward this type of drug. Results show low correlation between greater knowledge and attitudes about the use of steroids in sports, suggesting that drug education programs regarding steroids may have limited value.…

  14. An Examination of Concussion Injury Rates in Various Models of Football Helmets in NCAA Football Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan Moran; Tracey Covassin

    2015-01-01

    While newer, advanced helmet models have been designed with the intentions of decreasing concussions, very little research exists on injury rates in various football helmets at the collegiate level. The aim of this study was to examine concussion injury rates in various models of football helmets in collegiate football athletes. In addition, to compare injury rates of newer, advanced football helmets to older, traditional helmets among collegiate football athletes, a total of 209 concussions and 563,701 AEs (athlete-exposures) among 2,107 collegiate football athletes in seven helmet models were included in the analyses. Concussion injury rates revealed that the Riddell Revolution~ had the highest rate of 0.41 concussions per 1,000 AEs. The Schutt ION 4DTM helmet had the lowest rate of 0.25 concussions per 1,000 AEs. These newer helmet models did not significantly differ from one another (P = 0.74), however, all models significantly differed from the older, traditional helmet model (P 〈 0.001). The findings of this study suggest that concussion rates do not differ between newer and more advanced helmet models. More importantly, there are currently no helmets available to prevent concussions from occurring in football athletes.

  15. An examination of the relationship between athlete leadership and cohesion using social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Todd M; Fransen, Katrien; Van Puyenbroeck, Stef; Hoffmann, Matt D; De Cuyper, Bert; Vanbeselaere, Norbert; Boen, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Two studies investigated the structure of different athlete leadership networks and its relationship to cohesion using social network analysis. In Study 1, we examined the relationship between a general leadership quality network and task and social cohesion as measured by the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ). In Study 2, we investigated the leadership networks for four different athlete leadership roles (task, motivational, social and external) and their association with task and social cohesion networks. In Study 1, the results demonstrated that the general leadership quality network was positively related to task and social cohesion. The results from Study 2 indicated positive correlations between the four leadership networks and task and social cohesion networks. Further, the motivational leadership network emerged as the strongest predictor of the task cohesion network, while the social leadership network was the strongest predictor of the social cohesion network. The results complement a growing body of research indicating that athlete leadership has a positive association with cohesion.

  16. A multimethod examination of the relationship between coaching behavior and athletes' inherent self-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zourbanos, Nikos; Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis; Tsiakaras, Nikos; Chroni, Stiliani; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the relationship between coaching behavior and athletes' inherent self-talk (ST). Three studies were conducted. The first study tested the construct validity of the Coaching Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ) in the Greek language, and provided support for its original factor structure. The second study examined the relationships between coaching behavior and athletes' ST in field, with two different samples. The results showed that supportive coaching behavior was positively related to positive ST (in one sample) and negatively related to negative ST (in both samples), whereas negative coaching behavior was negatively related to positive ST (in one sample) and positively related to negative ST (in both samples). Finally, the third study examined the relationships experimentally, to produce evidence regarding the direction of causality. The results showed that variations in coaching behavior affected participants' ST. Overall, the results of the present investigation provided considerable evidence regarding the links between coaching behavior and athletes' ST and suggested that coaches may have an impact on athletes' thoughts.

  17. An Examination of the Dual Model of Perfectionism and Adolescent Athlete Burnout: A Short-Term Longitudinal Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung Hung; Kee, Ying Hwa; Tsai, Ying-Mei

    2009-01-01

    The dual model of perfectionism (Slade and Owens, Behav Modificat 22(3):372-390, 1998) is adopted to examine the influence of adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism on adolescent athlete burnout in Taiwan. Participants were 188 high school adolescent student-athletes (M = 16.48, SD = 0.59). They were administered the Multidimensional Inventory of…

  18. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach

    OpenAIRE

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete’s behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample ...

  19. 2016 update on eating disorders in athletes: A comprehensive narrative review with a focus on clinical assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Elizabeth; Kussman, Andrea; Nattiv, Aurelia

    2016-02-01

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, can have devastating effects on both the health and performance of athletes. Compared to non-athletes, both female and male athletes are at higher risk of developing an eating disorder. This is especially true for athletes participating in sports where low body weight or leanness confers a competitive advantage. Screening for disordered eating behaviours, eating disorders and for related health consequences should be a standard component of preparticipation examinations, and team physicians should be knowledgeable of the updated diagnostic criteria for eating disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-V. Athletes with eating disorders should undergo thorough evaluation and treatment by an experienced multidisciplinary team. Team physicians play a critical role in decision-making on clearance for participation and return to play. Using evidence-based guidelines for clearance and return to play encourages transparency and accountability between the sports medicine care team and the athlete. Efforts to prevent eating disorders should be aimed at athletes, coaches, parents and athletic administrators, and focused on expanding knowledge of healthy nutrition in support of sport performance and health.

  20. Vision Examination Protocol for Archery Athletes Along With an Introduction to Sports Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Visual skills are one of the main pillars of intangible faculties of athletes that can influence their performance. Great number of vision tests used to assess the visual skills and it will be irrational to perform all vision tests for every sport. Objectives The purpose of this protocol article is to present a relatively comprehensive battery of tests and assessments on static and dynamic aspects of sight which seems relevant to sports vision and introduce the most useful ones for archery. Materials and Methods Through extensive review of the literature, visual skills and respective tests were listed; such as ‘visual acuity, ‘contrast sensitivity’, ‘stereo-acuity’, ‘ocular alignment’, and ‘eye dominance’. Athletes were defined as “elite” and “non-elite” category based on their past performance. Dominance was considered for eye and hand; binocular or monocular aiming was planned to be recorded. Illumination condition was defined as to simulate the real archery condition to the extent possible. The full cycle of examinations and their order for each athlete was sketched (and estimated to take 40 minutes. Protocol was piloted in an eye hospital. Female and male archers aged 18 - 38 years who practiced compound and recurve archery with a history of more than 6 months were included. Conclusions We managed to select and design a customized examination protocol for archery (a sight-intensive and aiming type of sports, serving skill assessment and research purposes. Our definition for elite and non-elite athletes can help to define sports talent and devise skill development methods as we compare the performance of these two groups. In our pilot, we identified 8 “archery figures” (by hand dominance, eye dominance and binocularity and highlighted the concept “congruence” (dominant hand and eye in the same side in archery performance.

  1. Vision Examination Protocol for Archery Athletes Along With an Introduction to Sports Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyed Farzad; Aghazade Amiri, Mohammad; Naderifar, Homa; Rakhshi, Elham; Vakilian, Banafsheh; Ashrafi, Elham; Behesht-Nejad, Amir-Houshang

    2016-03-01

    Visual skills are one of the main pillars of intangible faculties of athletes that can influence their performance. Great number of vision tests used to assess the visual skills and it will be irrational to perform all vision tests for every sport. The purpose of this protocol article is to present a relatively comprehensive battery of tests and assessments on static and dynamic aspects of sight which seems relevant to sports vision and introduce the most useful ones for archery. Through extensive review of the literature, visual skills and respective tests were listed; such as 'visual acuity, 'contrast sensitivity', 'stereo-acuity', 'ocular alignment', and 'eye dominance'. Athletes were defined as "elite" and "non-elite" category based on their past performance. Dominance was considered for eye and hand; binocular or monocular aiming was planned to be recorded. Illumination condition was defined as to simulate the real archery condition to the extent possible. The full cycle of examinations and their order for each athlete was sketched (and estimated to take 40 minutes). Protocol was piloted in an eye hospital. Female and male archers aged 18 - 38 years who practiced compound and recurve archery with a history of more than 6 months were included. We managed to select and design a customized examination protocol for archery (a sight-intensive and aiming type of sports), serving skill assessment and research purposes. Our definition for elite and non-elite athletes can help to define sports talent and devise skill development methods as we compare the performance of these two groups. In our pilot, we identified 8 "archery figures" (by hand dominance, eye dominance and binocularity) and highlighted the concept "congruence" (dominant hand and eye in the same side) in archery performance.

  2. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

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    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes.

  3. Ephedra use in a select group of adolescent athletes.

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    P Schaefer, Michael; Smith, Jay; L Dahm, Diane; C Sorenson, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Ephedra-containing dietary supplements are consumed to improve sports performace, but may carry risks of cardiac and neurological adverse events. Little is known of their use by young athletes. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and patterns of ephedra use among high school athletes. An anonymous survey was performed in Rochester, Minnesota on high school athletes who participated in fall sports during 2003-04. Parental consent was obtained for athletes under age 18 years. Surveys were distributed at preparticipation examinations and in- school survey stations. The response rate to the survey was 68.2%, or 311 respondents out of a possible 456 with consent (or 26% of all 1197 athletes eligible prior to the consent process). Seven of 311 (2.3%) respondents used dietary supplements containing ephedra. Only one of seven users (14.3%) knew that the supplements they used contained ephedra. Ephedra use was more common in boys (five) than girls (two). Ephedra use was only found in 17 and 18-year-olds. The most common sports among ephedra users were football, track and field, and weightlifting. This study suggests that Ephedra use was infrequent among the young athletes in this population. However, ephedra users were generally unaware that the dietary supplements they consumed contained ephedra. Users were more likely to participate in football, track and field, and weightlifting. Ephedra users were likely to obtain supplements from their peers, and were largely uninformed of the content of their supplements. Key PointsEphedra is an herbal stimulant used as an ergogenic aide.Adolescent ephedra users most commonly obtain it from their friends.Adolescent athletes are likely to take ephedra unknowningly.

  4. Diamonds in the Rough: Examining a Case of Successful Black Male Student Athletes in College Sport

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    Bimper, Albert Y., Jr.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Clark, Langston

    2013-01-01

    Ailing academic performances of Black male student athletes have been an impetus for a search of recourse by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Amid the volume of these academic underperformances, particularly in revenue-generating sports, there are Black male student athletes who achieve a level of success in the classroom that rivals…

  5. A suggested model for physical examination and conservative treatment of athletic pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Eric J; Stern, Ben; Reiman, Michael P; Tarara, Dan; Wright, Alexis A

    2013-02-01

    Athletic pubalgia (AP) is a chronic debilitating syndrome that affects many athletes. As a syndrome, AP is difficult to diagnose both with clinical examination and imaging. AP is also a challenge for conservative intervention with randomized controlled trials showing mixed success rates. In other syndromes where clinical diagnosis and conservative treatment have been less than clear, a paradigm has been suggested as a framework for clinical decision making. To propose a new clinical diagnostic and treatment paradigm for the conservative management of AP. Relevant studies were viewed with regard to diagnosis and intervention and where a gap in evidence existed, clinical expertise was used to fill that gap and duly noted. A new paradigm is proposed to assist with clinical diagnosis and non-surgical intervention in patients suffering with AP. The level of evidence supporting this paradigm, according to the SORT taxonomy, is primarily level 2B. Further testing is warranted but following the suggested paradigm should lead to a clearer diagnosis of AP and allow more meaningful research into homogeneous patient populations within the AP diagnostic cluster. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): 2B. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Esporte competitivo na criança e no adolescente - exame pré-participação: eletrocardiograma obrigatório? Deporte competitivo en el niño y el adolescente - examen pre participación: ¿debería ser obligatorio el uso de electrocardiograma? Competitive sports for children and adolescents: should an electrocardiogram be required in the pre-participation physical examination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Aparício Silva Baptista

    2009-08-01

    Secretaría Municipal de Deportes de São Paulo -local de detección, inclusión social y formación de futuros atletas-, objetiva la necesidad de la implicación de entidades médicas en la elaboración de un protocolo de EPP, insertado en la realidad brasileña, para la evaluación cardiovascular de esa población. Por no disponer de una normativa, nos basamos en protocolos establecidos por otros países para respaldarnos con informaciones, a pesar de habernos definido individualmente la conducta a tomar.The growing number of children and adolescents, aged 7 to 17 years, that participate in competitive sports requires preventive medical care. The pre-participation physical examination (PPE requires appropriate medical knowledge to insure safe medical clearance. Recent sudden death events related to sports practice have raised doubts concerning the need for a medical evaluation based on medical tests, which due to the delay in its implementation may result in demotivation and abandonment of the sports practice. This is a review study, including data collected during a period of 30 years at the Olympic Training and Research Center (COTP of the Municipal Secretary of Sports of São Paulo, where future athletes are identified, socially included and trained; and the objective of the study was to evaluate the need for the involvement of medical organizations in the preparation of a EPP protocol for the cardiovascular assessment of this population, according to the Brazilian reality. We had no normative standard, and so we relied on data collected from protocols that were established by other countries, but we defined which conduct to be taken with each of our individuals.

  7. A gender-based analysis of high school athletes using computerized electrocardiogram measurements.

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    Nikhil Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The addition of the ECG to the preparticipation examination (PPE of high school athletes has been a topic for debate. Defining the difference between the high school male and female ECG is crucial to help initiate its implementation in the High School PPE. Establishing the different parameters set for the male and female ECG would help to reduce false positives. We examined the effect of gender on the high school athlete ECG by obtaining and analyzing ECG measurements of high school athletes from Henry M. Gunn High School. METHODS: In 2011 and 2012, computerized Electrocardiograms were recorded and analyzed on 181 athletes (52.5% male; mean age 16.1 ± 1.1 years who participated in 17 different sports. ECG statistics included intervals and durations in all 3 axes (X, Y, Z to calculate 12 lead voltage sums, QRS Amplitude, QT interval, QRS Duration, and the sum of the R wave in V5 and the S Wave in V2 (RS Sum. RESULTS: By computer analysis, we demonstrated that male athletes had significantly greater QRS duration, Q-wave duration, and T wave amplitude. (P<0.05. By contrast, female athletes had a significantly greater QTc interval. (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The differences in ECG measurements in high school athletes are strongly associated with gender. However, body size does not correlate with the aforementioned ECG measurements. Our tables of the gender-specific parameters can help facilitate the development of a more large scale and in-depth ECG analysis for screening high school athletes in the future.

  8. Examining Factors That Influence Donor Motivation among Former Student-Athletes and NCAA DI Classification

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    Burchette, Brett M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify motivational factors that contribute to the philanthropic decision making of the former NCAA Division I student-athlete. A 47-item survey instrument was modified from a prior study and distributed electronically to 8,461 male and female former student-athletes at three participating NCAA Division I…

  9. Examining Factors That Influence Donor Motivation among Former Student-Athletes and NCAA DI Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchette, Brett M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify motivational factors that contribute to the philanthropic decision making of the former NCAA Division I student-athlete. A 47-item survey instrument was modified from a prior study and distributed electronically to 8,461 male and female former student-athletes at three participating NCAA Division I…

  10. The impact of witnessing athletic injury: a qualitative examination of vicarious trauma in artistic gymnastics.

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    Day, Melissa C; Schubert, Nina

    2012-01-01

    We explored how athletes respond and cope after witnessing athletic injury in others participating in the same sport. Participants were eight competitive female artistic gymnasts aged 21-25 years. In the previous 3 years, participants had witnessed a serious athletic injury of another gymnast that had required hospital treatment. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews in which they were asked to discuss their experiences of witnessing injury, including descriptions of the injury's occurrence. Data were analysed using hierarchical content analysis. Following acute reactions to witnessing injury, participants reported experiencing intrusive cognitions and engaged in avoidance coping strategies. Participants reported gradually engaging in more approach coping strategies which served to lower their perceptions of vulnerability to injury. Despite the complex nature of trauma, suggestions may be made to assist applied sport psychologists working with athletes who have witnessed athletic injury.

  11. Sudden cardiac death in young athletes

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    Östman-Smith I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ingegerd Östman-SmithDivision of Paediatric Cardiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, SwedenAbstract: Athletic activity is associated with an increased risk of sudden death for individuals with some congenital or acquired heart disorders. This review considers in particular the causes of death affecting athletes below 35 years of age. In this age group the largest proportion of deaths are caused by diseases with autosomal dominant inheritance such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, long QT-syndrome, and Marfan’s syndrome. A policy of early cascade-screening of all first-degree relatives of patients with these disorders will therefore detect a substantial number of individuals at risk. A strictly regulated system with preparticipation screening of all athletes following a protocol pioneered in Italy, including school-age children, can also detect cases caused by sporadic new mutations and has been shown to reduce excess mortality among athletes substantially. Recommendations for screening procedure are reviewed. It is concluded that ECG screening ought to be part of preparticipation screening, but using criteria that do not cause too many false positives among athletes. One such suggested protocol will show positive in approximately 5% of screened individuals, among whom many will be screened for these diseases. On this point further research is needed to define what kind of false-positive and false-negative rate these new criteria result in. A less formal system based on cascade-screening of relatives, education of coaches about suspicious symptoms, and preparticipation questionnaires used by athletic clubs, has been associated over time with a sizeable reduction in sudden cardiac deaths among Swedish athletes, and thus appears to be worth implementing even for junior athletes not recommended for formal preparticipation screening. It is strongly argued

  12. Factor structure of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) in male and female college athletes.

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    Darcy, Alison M; Hardy, Kristina K; Crosby, Ross D; Lock, James; Peebles, Rebecka

    2013-06-01

    The study explored the psychometric properties of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) among 1637 university students. Participants were divided into male (n=432) and female (n=544) competitive athletes, and male (n=229) and female (n=429) comparison groups comprised of individuals who had not engaged in competitive sports for at least one year. All groups were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test the fit of the published factor structure in this population, and then exploratory FA (EFA). A three-factor solution was the best fit for three out of four groups, with a two-factor solution providing best fit for the male comparison group. The first factor for all groups resembled a combined Shape and Weight Concern subscale. The factor structure among male and female competitive athletes was remarkably similar; however, non-competitive athletic/low activity males appear qualitatively different from other groups.

  13. Examination of Turkish extreme athletes' personality traits in terms of gender and some demographic factors

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    Merve Ceylan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted for the purpose of examining the personality traits of extreme athletes. In line with this purpose a total of 227 extreme athletes, as 86 female and 141 male athletes selected through judgment sampling, that either actively compete or trains to compete in any of the branches of snowboarding, snowkiting, kitesurfing, windsurfing, river kayaking, mountain biking, free diving, paragliding and rafting were included within the sample group of the study. Questionnaire applications were carried out in extreme sports facilities throughout the country. Within the scope of the study, an 85-item short form of the Five Factor Personality Scale developed by Somer, Korkmaz and Tatar was used as the data collection tool. Data analysis was carried out by means of the SPSS 16.0 software and the percentages frequencies, mean, standard deviation and to find the differences between the sexes "independent t" test were calculated. Examining the obtained results showed that the male athletes have higher extravertion level from female athletes (p <0.05. This finding obtained in our study suggest that, in an essentially male-dominant society, the higher level of pressure women are subjected to in social, economic, cultural and psychological terms and the difficulties and pressure they experience in the working life are significant factors for women to be more introvert.     Özet Bu araştırma, ekstrem sporcuların kişilik özelliklerinin incelemesi amacıyla yapılmıştır. Bu amaç doğrultusunda araştırmaya, yargısal örnekleme yöntemiyle seçilmiş, snowboard, snowkite, uçurtma sörfü, rüzgar sörfü, akarsu ve nehir kanosu, dağ bisikleti, serbest dalış, yamaç paraşütü, kaya tırmanışı ve rafting branşlarında yarışmacı olan ya da bir yarışmaya katılmak için hazırlık yapan, 86’sı kadın, 141’i erkek olmak üzere 227 ekstrem sporcu katılmıştır.  Anket uygulamaları, ülke genelinde bulunan

  14. The hearts of competitive athletes: an up-to-date overview of exercise-induced cardiac adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, Hélder; Freitas, António; Malhotra, Aneil; Mendes, Miguel; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Intense and regular physical exercise is responsible for various cardiac changes (electrical, structural and functional) that represent physiological adaptation to exercise training. This remodeling, commonly referred to as 'athlete's heart', can overlap with several pathological entities, in which sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. Although pre-competitive screening can identify athletes with life-threatening cardiovascular abnormalities, there are no widely used standardized pre-participation programs and those currently implemented are controversial. Data from personal and family history, features of physical examination and changes in the 12-lead electrocardiogram can raise the suspicion of cardiac disease and lead to early detection of entities such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, interpreting the electrocardiogram is often challenging, because some changes are considered physiological in athletes. Thus, clinical decision-making in such cases can prove difficult: missing a condition associated with an increased risk of life-threatening events, or conversely, mislabeling an athlete with a disease that leads to unnecessary disqualification, are both situations to avoid. This paper provides an up-to-date review of the physiological cardiac effects of exercise training and highlights key points that should be taken into consideration in the assessment of young competitive athletes. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Who Dropped the Ball: Examining the Relationship between Race, Memorable Messages about Academic and Athletic Achievement, and Graduation Rates for Football Student-Athletes

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    Colon, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored memorable messages that former football student-athletes recalled regarding academics and athletics. Respondents were asked via interviews and a survey questionnaire to recall memorable messages and to describe the source, context, and importance of the message. Student-athletes were asked what memorable messages were evoked…

  16. Who Dropped the Ball: Examining the Relationship between Race, Memorable Messages about Academic and Athletic Achievement, and Graduation Rates for Football Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored memorable messages that former football student-athletes recalled regarding academics and athletics. Respondents were asked via interviews and a survey questionnaire to recall memorable messages and to describe the source, context, and importance of the message. Student-athletes were asked what memorable messages were evoked…

  17. Advising a cardiac disease gene positive yet phenotype negative or borderline abnormal athlete: is sporting disqualification really necessary?

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    Richard, Pascale; Denjoy, Isabelle; Fressart, Véronique; Wilson, Mathew G; Carré, François; Charron, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    The sudden cardiac death (SCD) of an athlete is a rare and tragic event, often caused by a number of inherited heart muscle disorders, namely the cardiomyopathies and primary arrhythmia syndromes (also known as cardiac ion channelopathies). Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics of these heritable cardiovascular diseases present new challenges for clinicians who manage athletes with these types of heart muscle conditions. Unfortunately, the clinical heterogeneity of many of these SCD diseases are also matched by the genotypic heterogeneity associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. A particularly challenging situation arises when the sports physician and attending cardiologist are presented with an athlete who demonstrates a familial context of inherited cardiac disease or presents mild cardiac abnormalities suggestive of inherited cardiac disease. Alongside the complete cardiac evaluation, genetic testing may be proposed as an additional diagnostic tool in this clinical conundrum. However, debate still remains on how extensive the screening should be, in particular the use and interpretation of genetic testing in that setting. The aim of this review is to examine the role of genetic testing within the diagnostic algorithm of preparticipation screening of athletes. This will be achieved by providing the sports medicine physician with simple current cardiac genetic knowledge for the main inherited cardiac conditions known to cause SCD. Furthermore, it will examine current knowledge for the role of genetic testing upon the prediction of SCD, concluding with its impact on the sport eligibility and disqualification conundrum using case examples from our genetic testing laboratory.

  18. Female athlete triad and stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, David; Hame, Sharon L

    2006-10-01

    Stress fractures are a common occurrence in athletes, and the incidence of stress fractures in female Division 1 collegiate athletes is double that of men. Hormonal influences on bone and bone morphology may influence the risk for fracture. A high level of suspicion and special imaging procedures allow for accurate diagnosis of these fractures. In stress fractures that are associated with the female athlete triad, addressing the three aspects of the triad--eating disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis--are critical for successful treatment. Preparticipation screening for the presence of signs of the female athlete triad by monitoring weight, energy level, menstrual cycles, and bone mineral density may help to prevent the occurrence of stress fractures in this population.

  19. EXAMINATION OF COMPREHENSIBILITY OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT SCALES FOR SPORT BY 8 - 14 YEARS OLD CHILDREN AND YOUTH ATHLETES

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    Koray KILIÇ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate Turkish form of “Positive Youth Development Measurement Framework for Sport” (PYD; Vierimaa et al., 2012 in terms of comprehensibility and content for young athletes. Cognitive interviews were conducted with 12 athletes with different ages ((8 – 14 years; 5 girls, 7 boys in competitive sport context. The measurement framework is composed of five instruments that measure youths’ a competence (Sport Competence Inventory, b confidence (Sport Confidence Inventory, c connection (Coach–Athlete Relationship Questionnaire and Peer Connection Inventory, and d character (Athlete Behavior Scale. In order to help participants define their own cognitive processes during the application of the instruments, think-aloud technique was used. To further examine the extent that the participants understood the items of the instruments, verbal probing technique was used. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcribed text was analyzed by using Thematic Analysis (Sparkes & Smith, 2014. The findings indicated that considerable amount of participants had difficulty in understanding the items of the instruments as well as distinguishing some of them from one another. Especially, younger participants under 12 years of age were found not to be able to understand the terms “pressure”, “sacrifice”, “feedback”, and “closeness”. According to Piaget’s (1970 theory of cognitive development, individuals progress through from the stage of concrete operations to the stage of formal operations between 11 and 12 years of age. From this perspective, it is suggested that the concepts used in the instruments examined may be abstract for younger participants. In the light of the findings, it may be more appropriate that the PYD measurement framework be used starting from 12 years of age.

  20. Effect of concussion on clinically measured reaction time in nine NCAA Division I collegiate athletes: a preliminary study

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    Eckner, James T.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, James K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of concussion on clinically-measured reaction time (RTclin) with comparison to a computerized reaction time measure (RTcomp). Design Prospective, repeated measures observational study. Setting Athletic training clinic at an NCAA Division I university. Participants Data are reported for 9 collegiate athletes with acute concussion who were part of a larger cohort of 209 athletes recruited from the university’s football, women’s soccer, and wrestling teams prior to the start of their respective athletic seasons. Methods Baseline RTclin and RTcomp were measured during pre-participation physical examinations. RTclin measured the time required to catch a suspended vertical shaft by hand closure after its release by the examiner. RTcomp was derived from the simple reaction time component of the CogState-Sport computerized neurocognitive test battery. Athletes who subsequently sustained a physician-diagnosed concussion underwent repeat RTclin and RTcomp testing within 72 hours of injury. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare baseline and after-injury reaction times. Main Outcome Measurements After-injury changes in RTclin and RTcomp calculated with respect to each athlete’s own pre-season baseline value. Results After-injury RTclin was prolonged in 8 of the 9 concussed athletes, while RTcomp was prolonged in 5 of the 9 concussed athletes. Mean RTclin increased from 193 ± 21 ms to 219 ± 31 ms (p = 0.050), and mean RTcomp increased from 247 ± 75 to 462 ± 120 ms (p = 0.214). Conclusions We conclude that RTclin appears to be sensitive to the known prolongation of reaction time following concussion, and compares favorably to an accepted computerized reaction time measure. This study supports the potential utility of RTclin as part of a multi-faceted concussion assessment battery. PMID:21402367

  1. Female athlete triad syndrome in the high school athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M; Carr, Kathleen E

    2011-08-01

    Female sports participation at the high school level has significantly increased since the 1970s. Physical activity in females has numerous positive benefits, including improved body image and overall health. Unfortunately, a select population of exercising females may experience symptoms related to the "female athlete triad," which refers to the interrelationships among energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral density. Clinically, these conditions can manifest as disordered eating behaviors, menstrual irregularity, and stress fractures. Athletes with conditions related to the triad are distributed along a spectrum between optimal health and disease and may not experience all conditions simultaneously. Previous research related to the triad has primarily focused on collegiate and elite athletes. However, mounting evidence demonstrates that the triad is present in the high school population. High school athletes should be assessed for triad components at preparticipation physicals. In addition, parents, coaches, and health care professionals should be educated and informed about the female athlete triad syndrome. In the presence of triad symptoms, further evaluation and treatment by a multidisciplinary team is strongly recommended for the athlete.

  2. Simple reaction time and decision making performance after different physical workloads: an examination with elite athletes

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    Recep Ali Özdemir

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate effects of both local and general physical fatigue on visual simple and visual choice reaction time of elite level athletes. 15 male and 3 female national Muay-Thai athletes (Mage = 21.55, SD= 3.47 who participated at least 5 training sessions per week volunteered to participate present study. Subjects were asked to perform Wingate anaerobic test on a mechanically braked cycle ergometer (834 E, Monark to induce general fatigue. Hand grip dynamometer was used for resistance exercises to induce local fatigue. Simple, two-choice and three-choice visual reaction times were measured at resting, after local and general physical fatigue conditions both on right and left hands, respectively. The results of repeated measure ANOVAs yielded that compared to resting conditions simple reaction time significantly increased after inducing the local and general physical fatigue on both hands. On the other hand, although two-choice and three-choice reaction time mean scores increased from resting to both general and local physical fatigue conditions, these increments were not statistically different among measurements. It was concluded that both dynamic and resistance exercise induced fatigue may seems to lengthen only simple reaction time and did not affect decision making processes of elite level Muay-Thai athletes.

  3. Re-examination of the contribution of substrates to energy expenditure during high-intensity intermittent exercise in endurance athletes

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    Zübeyde Aslankeser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background It has been believed that the contribution of fat oxidation to total energy expenditure is becoming negligible at higher exercise intensities (about 85% VO2max. The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in substrate oxidation during high-intensity interval exercise in young adult men. Methods A total of 18 healthy well-trained (aged 19.60 ± 0.54 years, BMI = 22.19 ± 0.64 kg/m2, n = 10 and untrained (aged 20.25 ± 0.41 years, BMI = 22.78 ± 0.38 kg/m2, n = 8 young men volunteered to participate in this study. After an overnight fast, subjects were tested on a cycle ergometer and completed six 4-min bouts of cycling (at ∼80% VO2max with 2 min of rests between intervals. Energy expenditure and the substrate oxidation rate were measured during the experiment by using indirect calorimetry. The blood lactate concentration was collected immediately after each interval workout. Results The fat oxidation rate during each workout was significantly different between the untrained and the athlete groups (p  0.05. Moreover, lactate concentration significantly increased in the untrained group (p  0.05. Fat contribution to energy expenditure was significantly higher in the athlete group (∼25% than in the untrained group (∼2%. Conclusions The present study indicates that 17 times more fat oxidation was measured in the athlete group compared to the untrained group. However, the athletes had the same CHO oxidation rate as the recreationally active subjects during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Higher fat oxidation rate despite the same CHO oxidation rate may be related to higher performance in the trained group.

  4. Comparison of the Frequency of Sudden Cardiovascular Deaths in Young Competitive Athletes Versus Nonathletes: Should We Really Screen Only Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Barry J; Haas, Tammy S; Duncanson, Emily R; Garberich, Ross F; Baker, Andrew M; Mackey-Bojack, Shannon

    2016-04-15

    The issue of sudden death in young athletes and consideration for the most practical and optimal strategy to identify those genetic and/or congenital heart diseases responsible for these tragic events continues to be debated. However, proponents of broad-based and mandatory national preparticipation screening, including with 12-lead electrocardiograms have confined the focus to a relatively small segment of the youthful population who choose to engage in competitive athletic programs at the high school, college, and elite-professional level. Therefore, lost in this discussion of preparticipation screening of athletes is that the larger population of young people not involved in competitive sports (and, therefore, a priori are excluded from systematic screening) who nevertheless may die suddenly of the same cardiovascular diseases as athletes. To substantiate this hypothesis, we accessed the forensic Hennepin County, Minnesota registry in which cardiovascular sudden deaths were 8-fold more common in nonathletes (n = 24) than athletes (n = 3) and threefold more frequent in terms of incidence. The most common diseases responsible for sudden death were hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 6) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 4). These data raise ethical considerations inherent in limiting systematic screening for unsuspected genetic and/or congenital heart disease to competitive athletes.

  5. An examination of current practices and gender differences in strength and conditioning in a sample of varsity high school athletic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Monica L; Ransdell, Lynda B; Lucas, Shelley M; Petlichkoff, Linda M; Gao, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Currently, little is known about strength and conditioning programs at the high school level. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to explore current practices in strength and conditioning for varsity high school athletes in selected sports. The following were specifically examined: who administers programs for these athletes, what kinds of training activities are done, and whether the responsible party or emphasis changes depending on the gender of the athletes. Coaches of varsity soccer, basketball, softball, and baseball in 3 large Idaho school districts were asked to complete an online survey. Sixty-seven percent (32/48) of the questionnaires were completed and used for the study. The majority of coaches (84%) provided strength and conditioning opportunities for their athletes, although only 37% required participation. Strength training programs were designed and implemented primarily by either physical education teachers or head coaches. Compared with coaches of male athletes, coaches of female athletes were less likely to know the credentials of their strength coaches, and they were less likely to use certified coaches to plan and implement their strength and conditioning programs. Most programs included dynamic warm-ups and cool-downs, plyometrics, agility training, speed training, and conditioning, and most programs were conducted 3 d·wk(-1) (76%) for sessions lasting between 30 and 59 minutes (63%). Compared with their female counterparts, male athletes were more likely to have required training, participate in strength training year round, and train using more sessions per week. This study provides additional information related to the practice of strength and conditioning in a sample of high school athletic teams.

  6. CORRELATION OF MRI GRADING OF BONE STRESS INJURIES WITH CLINICAL RISK FACTORS AND RETURN TO PLAY: A 5-YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY IN COLLEGIATE TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattiv, Aurelia; Kennedy, Gannon; Barrack, Michelle T.; Abdelkerim, Ashraf; Goolsby, Marci A.; Arends, Julie C.; Seeger, Leanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone stress injuries are common in track and field athletes. Knowledge of risk factors and correlation of these to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading could be helpful in determining recovery time. Purpose To examine the relationships between MRI grading of bone stress injury with clinical risk factors and time to return to sport in collegiate track and field athletes. Study Design Prospective cohort over 5 years. Methods Two hundred and eleven male and female collegiate track and field and cross-country athletes were followed prospectively through their competitive seasons. All athletes had a pre-participation history, physical exam, and anthropometric measurements obtained annually. An additional questionnaire was completed regarding nutritional behaviors, menstrual patterns and prior injuries, as well as a 3-day diet record. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was obtained at baseline and each year of participation in the study. Athletes with clinical evidence of bone stress injuries had plain radiographs. If radiographs were negative, MRI was obtained. Bone stress injuries were evaluated by two independent radiologists utilizing an MRI grading system. MRI grading and risk factors were evaluated to identify predictors of time to return to sport. Results Thirty-four (12 males, 22 females) of the 211 collegiate athletes sustained 61 bone stress injuries during the 5-year study period. The average prospective assessment for participants was 2.1 years. MRI grade and total body bone mineral density (BMD) emerged as significant and independent predictors of time to return to sport in the multiple regression model. Specifically, the higher the MRI grade, the longer the recovery time (psport. Conclusions Higher MRI grade, lower BMD, and skeletal sites of predominant trabecular bone structure were independently associated with delayed recovery of bone stress injuries in track and field athletes. Knowledge of these risk factors, as well as nutritional and

  7. Systematic review of clinical studies examining biomarkers of brain injury in athletes after sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Linda; Ramia, Michelle M; Edwards, Damyan; Johnson, Brian D; Slobounov, Semyon M

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to systematically review clinical studies examining biofluid biomarkers of brain injury for concussion in athletes. Data sources included PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database from 1966 to October 2013. Studies were included if they recruited athletes participating in organized sports who experienced concussion or head injury during a sports-related activity and had brain injury biomarkers measured. Acceptable research designs included experimental, observational, and case-control studies. Review articles, opinion papers, and editorials were excluded. After title and abstract screening of potential articles, full texts were independently reviewed to identify articles that met inclusion criteria. A composite evidentiary table was then constructed and documented the study title, design, population, methods, sample size, outcome measures, and results. The search identified 52 publications, of which 13 were selected and critically reviewed. All of the included studies were prospective and were published either in or after the year 2000. Sports included boxing (six studies), soccer (five studies), running/jogging (two studies), hockey (one study), basketball (one study), cycling (one study), and swimming (one study). The majority of studies (92%) had fewer than 100 patients. Three studies (23%) evaluated biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), one in both serum and CSF, and 10 (77%) in serum exclusively. There were 11 different biomarkers assessed, including S100β, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, tau, neurofilament light protein, amyloid beta, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, creatine kinase and heart-type fatty acid binding protein, prolactin, cortisol, and albumin. A handful of biomarkers showed a correlation with number of hits to the head (soccer), acceleration/deceleration forces (jumps, collisions, and falls), postconcussive symptoms, trauma to the body versus the head, and dynamics of different sports

  8. Preventive echocardiographic examination in athletes and workers – Quadricuspid aortic valve and atrial septal aneurysm in a young basketball player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Wierzbowska-Drabik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring safety of young athletes and employees who perform hard physical work within the scope of their professional duties, with a special focus on prevention of a sudden cardiac death at sports fields or during hard physical work is one of the most important tasks, which demands joint effort of cardiologists and sport physicians or occupational physicians, who qualify patients for a job or a sport discipline. Apart from hypertrophic and arhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, coronary anomalies and aortic dissection belong to the most frequent causes of dramatic complications during competitive exercise or work with an increased energy expenditure. Although a detailed medical history and a physical examination combined with 12-lead ECG assessment may significantly improve the safety in competitive sports, adding echocardiography examination gives a detailed and noninvasive insight into the heart morphology and function. Therefore, in our opinion, it should constitute a standard part of the evaluation of candidates for competitive sports. The practice indicates that beyond subjects with severe heart diseases and those classified as normal, there is a group of individuals with abnormalities which should be more closely monitored, but are not contraindications against professional sports or work with an increased energy expenditure. We describe the case of a young female with a diagnosis of rare congenital aortic valve disease, quadricuspid valve, with mild regurgitation and atrial septal aneurysm which was established during transthoracic echocardiography and confirmed and expanded during TEE examination.

  9. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    .... We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork...

  10. An exploratory examination of the association between altered lumbar motor control, joint mobility and low back pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkery, Marie B; O'Rourke, Brittany; Viola, Samantha; Yen, Sheng-Che; Rigby, Joseph; Singer, Kevin; Thomas, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common cause of lost playing time and can be a challenging clinical condition in competitive athletes. LBP in athletes may be associated with joint and ligamentous hypermobility and impairments in activation and coordination of the trunk musculature, however there is limited research in this area. To determine if there is an association between altered lumbar motor control, joint mobility and low back pain (LBP) in a sample of athletes. Fifteen athletes with LBP were matched by age, gender and body mass index (BMI) with controls without LBP. Athletes completed a questionnaire with questions pertaining to demographics, activity level, medical history, need to self-manipulate their spine, pain intensity and location. Flexibility and lumbar motor control were assessed using: active and passive straight leg raise, lumbar range of motion (ROM), hip internal rotation ROM (HIR), Beighton ligamentous laxity scale, prone instability test (PIT), observation of lumbar aberrant movements, double leg lowering and Trendelenburg tests. Descriptive statistics were compiled and the chi square test was used to analyze results. Descriptive statistics showed that 40% of athletes with LBP exhibited aberrant movements (AM), compared to 6% without LBP. 66% of athletes with LBP reported frequently self-manipulating their spine compared to 40% without LBP. No significant differences in motor control tests were found between groups. Athletes with LBP tended to have less lumbar flexion (63 ± 11°) compared to those without LBP (66 ± 13°). Chi-Square tests revealed that the AM were more likely to be present in athletes with LBP than those without (X2 = 4.66, P = 0.03). The presence of aberrant movement patterns is a significant clinical finding and associated with LBP in athletes.

  11. CARDIOVASCULAR SCREENING OF YOUNG ATHLETES: A REVIEW OF ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkens, Sophie; Van Brabandt, Hans; Desomer, Anja; Leonard, Christian; Neyt, Mattias

    2017-01-01

    Some experts have promoted preparticipative cardiovascular screening programs for young athletes and have claimed that such programs were cost-effective without performing a critical analysis of studies supporting this statement. In this systematic review, a critical assessment of economic evaluations on these programs is performed to determine if they really provide value for money. A systematic review of economic evaluations was performed on December 24, 2014. Web sites of health technology assessment agencies, the Cochrane database of systematic review, the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database of the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline, Psychinfo, and EconLit were searched to retrieve (reviews of) economic evaluations. No language or time restrictions were imposed and predefined selection criteria were used. Selected studies were critically assessed applying a structured data extraction sheet. Five relevant economic evaluations were critically assessed. Results of these studies were mixed. However, those in favor of screening made (methodological) incorrect choices, of which the most important one was not taking into account a no-screening alternative as comparator. Compared with no screening, other strategies (history and physical examination or history and physical examination plus electrocardiogram) were not considered cost-effective. Results of primary economic evaluations should not be blindly copied without critical assessment. Economic evaluations in this field lack the support of robust evidence. Negative consequences of screening (false positive findings, overtreatment) should also be taken into account and may cause more harm than good. A mass screening of young athletes for cardiovascular diseases does not provide value for money and should be discouraged.

  12. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in the young and in athletes: dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiene, Gaetano; Carturan, Elisa; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases account for 40% of all deaths in the Western countries, and nearly two thirds of them occur suddenly. Young people (counseling and/or therapy. In vivo detection of cardiomyopathies is nowadays feasible by electrocardiogram and/or echocardiography, which resulted in a sharp decline of SD in the athletes in Italy, thanks to obligatory preparticipation screening for sport activity. Genetic screening could play a pivotal role in early detection of asymptomatic mutation carriers of cardiovascular diseases at risk of SD.

  13. Pilot Evaluation of a Novel Clinical Test of Reaction Time in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Evidence suggests that concussion prolongs reaction time (RT). We have developed a simple, reliable clinical tool for measuring reaction time that may be of value in the assessment of concussion in athletes. Objective: To compare baseline values of clinical RT (RTclin) obtained using the new clinical reaction time apparatus with computerized RT (RTcomp) obtained using a validated computerized neuropsychological test battery. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Data were collected during a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football team's preparticipation physical examination session. Patients or Other Participants: Ninety-four Division I collegiate football players. Main Outcome Measure(s): The RTclin was measured using a 1.3-m measuring stick embedded in a weighted rubber disk that was released and caught as quickly as possible. The RTcomp was measured using the simple RT component of CogState Sport. Results: For the 68 athletes whose CogState Sport tests passed the program's integrity check, RTclin and RTcomp were correlated (r  =  0.445, P < .001). Overall, mean RTclin was shorter and less variable than mean RTcomp (203 ± 20 milliseconds versus 268 ± 44 milliseconds; P < .001). When RTclin and RTcomp were compared between those athletes with (n  =  68) and those without (n  =  26) valid CogState Sport test sessions, mean RTclin was similar (202 ± 19 milliseconds versus 207 ± 23 milliseconds; P  =  .390), but mean RTcomp was different (258 ± 35 milliseconds versus 290 ± 55 milliseconds; P  =  .009). Conclusions: The RTclin was positively correlated with RTcomp and yielded more consistent reaction time values during baseline testing. Given that RTclin is easy to measure using simple, inexpensive equipment, further prospective study is warranted to determine its clinical utility in the assessment of concussion in athletes. PMID:20617905

  14. Interassociation Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Care of College Student-Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Brian; Drezner, Jonathan; Baggish, Aaron; Harmon, Kimberly G; Emery, Michael S; Myerburg, Robert J; Sanchez, Eduardo; Molossi, Silvana; Parsons, John T; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular evaluation and care of college student-athletes is gaining increasing attention from both the public and medical communities. Emerging strategies include screening of the general athlete population, recommendations of permissible levels of participation by athletes with identified cardiovascular conditions, and preparation for responding to unanticipated cardiac events in athletic venues. The primary focus has been sudden cardiac death and the utility of screening with or without advanced cardiac screening. The National Collegiate Athletic Association convened a multidisciplinary task force to address cardiovascular concerns in collegiate student-athletes and to develop consensus for an interassociation statement. This document summarizes the task force deliberations and follow-up discussions, and includes available evidence on cardiovascular risk, pre-participation evaluation, and the recognition of and response to cardiac arrest. Future recommendations for cardiac research initiatives, education, and collaboration are also provided. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2016;doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.03.527.)

  15. Interassociation Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Care of College Student-Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Brian; Drezner, Jonathan A; Baggish, Aaron; Harmon, Kimberly G; Emery, Michael S; Myerburg, Robert J; Sanchez, Eduardo; Molossi, Silvana; Parsons, John T; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-06-28

    Cardiovascular evaluation and care of college student-athletes is gaining increasing attention from both the public and medical communities. Emerging strategies include screening of the general athlete population, recommendations of permissible levels of participation by athletes with identified cardiovascular conditions, and preparation for responding to unanticipated cardiac events in athletic venues. The primary focus has been sudden cardiac death and the utility of screening with or without advanced cardiac screening. The National Collegiate Athletic Association convened a multidisciplinary task force to address cardiovascular concerns in collegiate student-athletes and to develop consensus for an interassociation statement. This document summarizes the task force deliberations and follow-up discussions, and includes available evidence on cardiovascular risk, pre-participation evaluation, and the recognition of and response to cardiac arrest. Future recommendations for cardiac research initiatives, education, and collaboration are also provided.

  16. EXAMINATION OF COMPREHENSIBILITY OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT SCALES FOR SPORT BY 8 - 14 YEARS OLD CHILDREN AND YOUTH ATHLETES

    OpenAIRE

    Koray KILIÇ; İNCE, Mustafa Levent

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Turkish form of “Positive Youth Development Measurement Framework for Sport” (PYD; Vierimaa et al., 2012) in terms of comprehensibility and content for young athletes. Cognitive interviews were conducted with 12 athletes with different ages ((8 – 14 years; 5 girls, 7 boys) in competitive sport context. The measurement framework is composed of five instruments that measure youths’ a) competence (Sport Competence Inventory), b) confidence (Sport Conf...

  17. The examination of the relationship between family-coach-club support and success motivation in elite taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Can

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the survey, achievement motivation of athletes supported by detection of the relationship between viewing and elite Taekwondo athletes support to detect the level of motivation and success in the years, in sports, sex, marital status, education level and income groups in terms of significant differences is not available to investigate. Research to date in April 2009 in Turkey (Kayseri the 300 athletes participating in the Taekwondo Championships 138 athletes selected from the random method has participated as volunteers. Achievement motivation and support Araştırmada scale is used to detect scale. Moreover, survey research took place in the form of 6 individual questions. Research data in computer environment was evaluated, and personal information ort he frequency and percentage distribution table, success, motivation and support to detect the relationship between the direction of the determination to Pearson correlation analysis, athlete support to detect and achievement motivation level demographic findings of significant differences available to the middle to put the bilateral groups Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal Wallis test analysis of the two groups than are used. According to research results, success, motivation and support for athletes to detect a relationship between the 0.05 level was found in the positive way.

  18. A neuroscientific approach to the examination of concussions in student-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcham, Caroline J; Hall, Eric; Bixby, Walter R; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Folger, Stephen E; Kostek, Matthew C; Miller, Paul C; Barnes, Kenneth P; Patel, Kirtida

    2014-12-08

    Concussions are occurring at alarming rates in the United States and have become a serious public health concern. The CDC estimates that 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur in sports and recreational activities annually. Concussion as defined by the 2013 Concussion Consensus Statement "may be caused either by a direct blow to the head, face, neck or elsewhere on the body with an 'impulsive' force transmitted to the head." Concussions leave the individual with both short- and long-term effects. The short-term effects of sport related concussions may include changes in playing ability, confusion, memory disturbance, the loss of consciousness, slowing of reaction time, loss of coordination, headaches, dizziness, vomiting, changes in sleep patterns and mood changes. These symptoms typically resolve in a matter of days. However, while some individuals recover from a single concussion rather quickly, many experience lingering effects that can last for weeks or months. The factors related to concussion susceptibility and the subsequent recovery times are not well known or understood at this time. Several factors have been suggested and they include the individual's concussion history, the severity of the initial injury, history of migraines, history of learning disabilities, history of psychiatric comorbidities, and possibly, genetic factors. Many studies have individually investigated certain factors both the short-term and long-term effects of concussions, recovery time course, susceptibility and recovery. What has not been clearly established is an effective multifaceted approach to concussion evaluation that would yield valuable information related to the etiology, functional changes, and recovery. The purpose of this manuscript is to show one such multifaceted approached which examines concussions using computerized neurocognitive testing, event related potentials, somatosensory perceptual responses, balance assessment, gait assessment and genetic testing.

  19. Prevention of eating disorders in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira; Gomes, Ainá Innocencio da Silva; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves; Soares, Eliane de Abreu

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are serious mental diseases that frequently appear in female athletes. They are abnormal eating behaviors that can be diagnosed only by strict criteria. Disordered eating, although also characterized as abnormal eating behavior, does not include all the criteria for diagnosing eating disorders and is therefore a way to recognize the problem in its early stages. It is important to identify factors to avoid clinical progression in this high-risk population. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss critical information for the prevention of eating disorders in female athletes. This review discusses the major correlates for the development of an eating disorder. We also discuss which athletes are possibly at highest risk for eating disorders, including those from lean sports and female adolescent athletes. There is an urgent need for the demystification of myths surrounding body weight and performance in sports. This review includes studies that tested different prevention programs' effectiveness, and the majority showed positive results. Educational programs are the best method for primary prevention of eating disorders. For secondary prevention, early identification is essential and should be performed by preparticipation exams, the recognition of dietary markers, and the use of validated self-report questionnaires or clinical interviews. In addition, more randomized clinical trials are needed with athletes from multiple sports in order for the most reliable recommendations to be made and for some sporting regulations to be changed.

  20. The examination of the relationship between family-coach-club support and success motivation in elite taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Can

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the survey, achievement motivation of athletes supported by detection of the relationship between viewing and elite Taekwondo athletes support to detect the level of motivation and success in the years, in sports, sex, marital status, education level and income groups in terms of significant differences is not available to investigate. Research to date in April 2009 in Turkey (Kayseri the 300 athletes participating in the Taekwondo Championships 138 athletes selected from the random method has participated as volunteers. Achievement motivation and support Araştırmada scale is used to detect scale. Moreover, survey research took place in the form of 6 individual questions. Research data in computer environment was evaluated, and personal information ort he frequency and percentage distribution table, success, motivation and support to detect the relationship between the direction of the determination to Pearson correlation analysis, athlete support to detect and achievement motivation level demographic findings of significant differences available to the middle to put the bilateral groups Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal Wallis test analysis of the two groups than are used. According to research results, success, motivation and support for athletes to detect a relationship between the 0.05 level was found in the positive way.

  1. Correlation of MRI grading of bone stress injuries with clinical risk factors and return to play: a 5-year prospective study in collegiate track and field athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattiv, Aurelia; Kennedy, Gannon; Barrack, Michelle T; Abdelkerim, Ashraf; Goolsby, Marci A; Arends, Julie C; Seeger, Leanne L

    2013-08-01

    Bone stress injuries are common in track and field athletes. Knowledge of risk factors and correlation of these to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading could be helpful in determining recovery time. To examine the relationships between MRI grading of bone stress injuries with clinical risk factors and time to return to sport in collegiate track and field athletes. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. A total of 211 male and female collegiate track and field and cross-country athletes were followed prospectively through their competitive seasons. All athletes had preparticipation history, physical examination, and anthropometric measurements obtained annually. An additional questionnaire was completed regarding nutritional behaviors, menstrual patterns, and prior injuries, as well as a 3-day diet record. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at baseline and each year of participation in the study. Athletes with clinical evidence of bone stress injuries had plain radiographs. If radiograph findings were negative, MRI was performed. Bone stress injuries were evaluated by 2 independent radiologists utilizing an MRI grading system. The MRI grading and risk factors were evaluated to identify predictors of time to return to sport. Thirty-four of the athletes (12 men, 22 women) sustained 61 bone stress injuries during the 5-year study period. The mean prospective assessment for participants was 2.7 years. In the multiple regression model, MRI grade and total-body bone mineral density (BMD) emerged as significant and independent predictors of time to return to sport. Specifically, the higher the MRI grade (P = .004) and lower the BMD (P = .030), the longer the recovery time. Location of the bone injury at predominantly trabecular sites of the femoral neck, pubic bone, and sacrum was also associated with a prolonged time to return to sport. Female athletes with oligomenorrhea and amenorrhea had bone stress injuries of higher MRI grades compared with

  2. Self-confidence level in professional athletes; an examination of exposure to violence, branch and socio-demographic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karagün

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether or not the self-confidence levels of the athletes working as professionals show a significant difference by the variables  such as age, gender, number of years spent doing sports, duration of professional working life, exposure to violence, sports branch worked, economic situation and education level. To this end, 607 athletes in total, 265 (43,7% of whom were female and 342 (56,3% of whom were male working professionally in 9 branches including wrestling, arm wrestling, football, judo, basketball, volleyball, handball, athletics and weightlifting in 11 provinces of Turkey in total including İstanbul, Kocaeli, Ankara, Sakarya, Aydın, Bilecik, Samsun, Kayseri, Kütahya, Hatay and Eskişehir were included in the scope of the study. The study was conducted for two years in 2012 and 2013. Self-Confidence Scale developed by Tokinan (2008 as well as Socio-Demographic Characteristics Scale, was applied on the athletes. as the data obtained were analyzed in SPSS 13.0 package program, self-confidence was significant by the variables of gender, exposure to violence, sports branch, the years spent working professionally and doing sports in total whereas the results were found to be insignificant by the variables of marital status, regular participation in non-sports activities, age, educational status and level of income.

  3. Athletic identity foreclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Britton W; Petitpas, Albert J

    2017-08-01

    Athletic identity foreclosure refers to commitment to the athlete role in the absence of exploration of occupational or ideological alternatives. This article traces the theoretical underpinnings of the construct, examines the role of sport participation in identity development, and provides an overview of the course, correlates, and consequences of athletic identity foreclosure. Implications for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining mortality risk and rate of ageing among Polish Olympic athletes: a survival follow-up from 1924 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhui; Gajewski, Antoni; Poznańska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Population-based studies have shown that an active lifestyle reduces mortality risk. Therefore, it has been a longstanding belief that individuals who engage in frequent exercise will experience a slower rate of ageing. It is uncertain whether this widely-accepted assumption holds for intense wear-and-tear. Here, using the 88 years survival follow-up data of Polish Olympic athletes, we report for the first time on whether frequent exercise alters the rate of ageing. Design Longitudinal survival data of male elite Polish athletes who participated in the Olympic Games from year 1924 to 2010 were used. Deaths occurring before the end of World War II were excluded for reliable estimates. Setting and participants Recruited male elite athletes N=1273 were preassigned to two categorical birth cohorts—Cohort I 1890–1919; Cohort II 1920–1959—and a parametric frailty survival analysis was conducted. An event-history analysis was also conducted to adjust for medical improvements from year 1920 onwards: Cohort II. Results Our findings suggest (1) in Cohort I, for every threefold reduction in mortality risk, the rate of ageing decelerates by 1%; (2) socioeconomic transitions and interventions contribute to a reduction in mortality risk of 29% for the general population and 50% for Olympic athletes; (3) an optimum benefit gained for reducing the rate of ageing from competitive sports (Cohort I 0.086 (95% CI 0.047 to 0.157) and Cohort II 0.085 (95% CI 0.050 to 0.144)). Conclusions This study further suggests that intensive physical training during youth should be considered as a factor to improve ageing and mortality risk parameters. PMID:27091824

  5. Screening examination and treatment of Trichophyton tonsurans infection in judo athletes affiliated with the University Judo Federation of Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Suganami, Morio; Ogawa, Yumi Shiraki; Hiruma, Masataro; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2011-07-01

    In Japan, Trichophyton tonsurans infection has become an increasing problem among combat sports participants. We investigated the prevalence of T. tonsurans infection in athletes affiliated to judo clubs in the 21 First Division universities that were registered with the University Judo Federation of Tokyo in 2008. Study procedures performed by the subjects included (i) completion of a questionnaire concerning lifestyle, risk factors for tinea corporis and medical history; (ii) scrubbing the scalp with a circular hairbrush to obtain samples for fungal culture; (iii) anti-fungal treatment as recommended by a dermatologist, based on the number of fungal colonies isolated from the hairbrush; and (iv) repeat testing using the hairbrush method 3 months after treatment recommendations were received. Of 902 study subjects, 102 (11.3%) yielded positive hairbrush culture results. Of these, 14 individuals (13.7%) had tinea corporis; the remainder were asymptomatic. Conversion to negative fungal culture was observed in 85 of 96 culture-positive individuals who performed the second hairbrush culture test following treatment. Control of T. tonsurans infection among judo athletes could be achieved by educating athletes, trainers and coaches in judo clubs concerning detection, prevention, and treatment of T. tonsurans infection.

  6. Incidence and etiology of sports-related sudden cardiac death in Denmark--implications for preparticipation screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Theilade, Juliane;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on incidences of sports-related sudden cardiac death (SrSCD) are few and data are needed for the discussion of preparticipation screening for cardiac disease. OBJECTIVE: We sought to chart the incidence and etiology of SrSCD in the young in Denmark (population 5.4 million...

  7. Athletic Director's Survival Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Mike; Giebel, Nancy

    This book examines the duties assigned to athletic directors, offering successful strategies for achieving them and materials to make their jobs easier (e.g., sample memos, letters, forms, and charts for interacting successfully with coaches, students, administrators, and parents). Section 1 discusses the director's work with student athletes and…

  8. Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

  9. Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

  10. Examining physical training versus physical and mental training programmes in Swimrun semi-professional athletes: A randomised, controlled, trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chirico

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of two psychological interventions, named ‘Mental imagery’ and ‘Motivational self-talk’ training used in combination, on perceived excertion and flow state in a sample of Swimrun semi-professional athletes. Methods: Thirty male semi-professional athletes, enrolled for a Swimrun competition, were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP and a control group (CON. The modified Borg Scale of Perceived Exertion (RPE and the Flow State Scale (FSS were the dependent variables. Before a Swimrun competition, the EXP Group performed both physical and mental training programs, while the CON group only performed a physical training program. Immediately after the race, we measured the dependent variables in both groups. Results: The results of unpaired-t test showed that levels of perceived exertion were less in EXP group than CON group, (t(28 = 12.87, P < .001, while levels of flow state were higher in EXP group than CON group (t(28 = 5.96, P < .001, immediately after the end of the endurance competition. The use of both mental imagery and self-talk training in order to reduce perceived exertion and improve flow state was supported (P < .001. Discussion and Conclusion: The findings of this study support the psychobiological model of endurance performance. Our research is the first to demonstrate that mental imagery used in combination with motivational self-talk can reduce the perceived exertion and improve the flow state in Swimrun athletes during their endurance performance.

  11. Project on Elite Athlete Commitment (PEAK): III. An examination of the external validity across gender, and the expansion and clarification of the Sport Commitment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Tara K; Russell, David G; Magyar, T Michelle; Scanlan, Larry A

    2009-12-01

    The Sport Commitment Model was further tested using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method to examine its generalizability to New Zealand's elite female amateur netball team, the Silver Ferns. Results supported or clarified Sport Commitment Model predictions, revealed avenues for model expansion, and elucidated the functions of perceived competence and enjoyment in the commitment process. A comparison and contrast of the in-depth interview data from the Silver Ferns with previous interview data from a comparable elite team of amateur male athletes allowed assessment of model external validity, tested the generalizability of the underlying mechanisms, and separated gender differences from discrepancies that simply reflected team or idiosyncratic differences.

  12. An examination of athletes' self-efficacy and strength training effort during an entire off-season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Todd A; Cisco Reyes, G F; Curnock, Lindsey E

    2012-02-01

    Over the past 30-plus years in which self-efficacy (or confidence at a task) has been researched, findings have shown that in almost every domain of human functioning, self-efficacy positively relates to effort, persistence, and other adaptive behaviors. However, in the past decade, new research postulating that too much self-efficacy can lead to complacency and a subsequent downturn in behavior or performance has also experienced resurgence in the literature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test these opposing viewpoints regarding self-efficacy and effort for Division I athletes in a strength and conditioning domain over off-season training, a procedure yet to be undertaken. Subjects (N = 99), from 4 different sports (M(ag)e = 20.0 years, SD = 1.2 years), completed self-efficacy and effort measures at 4 distinct time points during off-season training. In addition, strength and conditioning coaches also rated each subject's effort--at each time point--so that a more valid measure of this construct could be attained. Results were analyzed using a multilevel approach and revealed that self-efficacy was positively, and significantly, related to the current effort that athletes exerted in strength training sessions. Consequently, practitioners are advised to structure strength and conditioning training sessions and the overall environment in ways that will positively impact the 4 proven sources of self-efficacy.

  13. Prevention of eating disorders in female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho GMO

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira Coelho,1 Ainá Innocencio da Silva Gomes,2 Beatriz Gonçalves Ribeiro,2 Eliane de Abreu Soares11Nutrition Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University, Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Macaé Campus, Granja dos Cavaleiros, Macaé, BrazilAbstract: Eating disorders are serious mental diseases that frequently appear in female athletes. They are abnormal eating behaviors that can be diagnosed only by strict criteria. Disordered eating, although also characterized as abnormal eating behavior, does not include all the criteria for diagnosing eating disorders and is therefore a way to recognize the problem in its early stages. It is important to identify factors to avoid clinical progression in this high-risk population. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss critical information for the prevention of eating disorders in female athletes. This review discusses the major correlates for the development of an eating disorder. We also discuss which athletes are possibly at highest risk for eating disorders, including those from lean sports and female adolescent athletes. There is an urgent need for the demystification of myths surrounding body weight and performance in sports. This review includes studies that tested different prevention programs' effectiveness, and the majority showed positive results. Educational programs are the best method for primary prevention of eating disorders. For secondary prevention, early identification is essential and should be performed by preparticipation exams, the recognition of dietary markers, and the use of validated self-report questionnaires or clinical interviews. In addition, more randomized clinical trials are needed with athletes from multiple sports in order for the most reliable recommendations to be made and for some sporting regulations to be changed.Keywords: nutrition, disordered eating, sport, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa

  14. Comparing Greek-Affiliated Students and Student Athletes: An Examination of the Behavior-Intention Link, Reasons for Drinking, and Alcohol-Related Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchting, Karie K.; Lac, Andrew; Hummer, Justin F.; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    While affiliation with Greek fraternities/sororities and intercollegiate athletic teams is associated with heavier drinking (Meilman et al., 1999), few studies have compared reasons for drinking among these groups. A sample of 1,541 students, identifying as either Greeks or athletes, completed an online survey. Athletes were significantly higher…

  15. Ethical, Legal, and Administrative Considerations for Preparticipation Evaluation for Wilderness Sports and Adventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Craig C; Campbell, Aaron D; Lemery, Jay; Young, David S

    2015-12-01

    Preparticipation evaluations (PPEs) are common in team, organized, or traditional sports but not common in wilderness sports or adventures. Regarding ethical, legal, and administrative considerations, the same principles can be used as in traditional sports. Clinicians should be trained to perform such a PPE to avoid missing essential components and to maximize the quality of the PPE. In general, participants' privacy should be observed; office-based settings may be best for professional and billing purposes, and adequate documentation of a complete evaluation, including clearance issues, should be essential components. Additional environmental and personal health issues relative to the wilderness activity should be documented, and referral for further screening should be made as deemed necessary, if unable to be performed by the primary clinician. Travel medicine principles should be incorporated, and recommendations for travel or adventure insurance should be made.

  16. A preliminary examination of neurocognitive performance and symptoms following a bout of soccer heading in athletes wearing protective soccer headbands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbin, R J; Beatty, Amanda; Covassin, Tracey; Schatz, Philip; Hydeman, Ana; Kontos, Anthony P

    2015-01-01

    This study compared changes in neurocognitive performance and symptom reports following an acute bout of soccer heading among athletes with and without protective soccer headgear. A total of 25 participants headed a soccer ball 15 times over a 15-minute period, using a proper linear heading technique. Participants in the experimental group completed the heading exercise while wearing a protective soccer headband and controls performed the heading exercise without wearing the soccer headband. Neurocognitive performance and symptom reports were assessed before and after the acute bout of heading. Participants wearing the headband showed significant decreases on verbal memory (p = 0.02) compared with the no headband group, while the no headband group demonstrated significantly faster reaction time (p = 0.03) than the headband group following the heading exercise. These findings suggest that protective soccer headgear likely does not mitigate the subtle neurocognitive effects of acute soccer heading.

  17. Update: Causes and symptoms of sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Irfan M; Yim, Eugene S; Hoffman, Jacob M; Froelicher, Vic

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death during exercise. While initial reports suggested that the most common cause of SCD in young athletes was due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a critical review of investigations in several populations (athletes, non-athletes, military, national, and international) supports that the most common finding at autopsy of young individuals with SCD is actually a structurally normal heart (SNH). This information is vital for sports medicine clinicians, especially with regard to the pre-participation evaluation (PPE) since cardiac death associated with a SNH is likely attributed to disorders such as arrhythmia or ion channel diseases. This comprehensive review explores the causes of SCD, along with the symptoms preceding death, which ultimately may help refine the PPE and maximize the ability to detect potentially lethal disease prior to competition.

  18. Archetypal Athletes

    CERN Document Server

    Eugster, Manuel J A

    2011-01-01

    Discussions on outstanding---positively and/or negatively---athletes are common practice. The rapidly grown amount of collected sports data now allow to support such discussions with state of the art statistical methodology. Given a (multivariate) data set with collected data of athletes within a specific sport, outstanding athletes are values on the data set boundary. In the present paper we propose archetypal analysis to compute these extreme values. The so-called archetypes, i.e., archetypal athletes, approximate the observations as convex combinations. We interpret the archetypal athletes and their characteristics, and, furthermore, the composition of all athletes based on the archetypal athletes. The application of archetypal analysis is demonstrated on basketball statistics and soccer skill ratings.

  19. Cardiovascular pre-participation screening of young competitive athletes for prevention of sudden death: proposal for a common European protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corrado, D.; Pellicia, A.; Bjørnstad, H.; Vanhees, L.E.M.J.; Biffi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Consensus Statement of the Study Group of Sport Cardiology of the Working Group of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology and the Working Group of Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Archetypal Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Eugster, Manuel J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Discussions on outstanding---positively and/or negatively---athletes are common practice. The rapidly grown amount of collected sports data now allow to support such discussions with state of the art statistical methodology. Given a (multivariate) data set with collected data of athletes within a specific sport, outstanding athletes are values on the data set boundary. In the present paper we propose archetypal analysis to compute these extreme values. The so-called arche...

  1. The Evidence Against Cardiac Screening Using Electrocardiogram in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Chad A; O'Connor, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young athletes is publicly remarkable and tragic because of the loss of a seemingly healthy young person. Because many of the potential etiologies may be identified with a preparticipation electrocardiogram (ECG), the possible use of an ECG as a screening tool has received much attention. A good screening test should be cost-effective and should influence a disease or health outcome that has a significant impact on public health. The reality is that the prevalence of SCD is low and no outcome-based data exist to determine whether early detection saves lives. Further, there is insufficient screening infrastructure, and the risk of screening and follow-up may be higher than that of the actual disease. Until outcomes data demonstrate a benefit with regard to SCD, universal screening cannot be recommended.

  2. Cardiovascular screening in adolescents and young adults: a prospective study comparing the Pre-participation Physical Evaluation Monograph 4th Edition and ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudge, Jessie; Harmon, Kimberly G; Owens, David S; Prutkin, Jordan M; Salerno, Jack C; Asif, Irfan M; Haruta, Alison; Pelto, Hank; Rao, Ashwin L; Toresdahl, Brett G; Drezner, Jonathan A

    2014-08-01

    This study compares the accuracy of cardiovascular screening in active adolescents and young adults using a standardised history, physical examination and resting 12-lead ECG. Participants were prospectively screened using a standardised questionnaire based on the Pre-participation Physical Evaluation Monograph 4th Edition (PPE-4), physical examination and ECG interpreted using modern standards. Participants with abnormal findings had focused echocardiography and further evaluation. Primary outcomes included disorders associated with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). From September 2010 to July 2011, 1339 participants underwent screening: age 13-24 (mean 16) years, 49% male, 68% Caucasian, 17% African-American and 1071 (80%) participating in organised sports. Abnormal history responses were reported on 916 (68%) questionnaires. After physician review, 495/916 (54%) participants with positive questionnaires were thought to have non-cardiac symptoms and/or a benign family history and did not warrant additional evaluation. Physical examination was abnormal in 124 (9.3%) participants, and 72 (5.4%) had ECG abnormalities. Echocardiograms were performed in 586 (44%) participants for abnormal history (31%), physical examination (8%) or ECG (5%). Five participants (0.4%) were identified with a disorder associated with SCA, all with ECG-detected Wolff-Parkinson-White. The false-positive rates for history, physical examination and ECG were 31.3%, 9.3% and 5%, respectively. A standardised history and physical examination using the PPE-4 yields a high false-positive rate in a young active population with limited sensitivity to identify those at risk for SCA. ECG screening has a low false-positive rate using modern interpretation standards and improves detection of primary electrical disease at risk of SCA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Athletes broad dimensions of dispositional perfectionism: examining changes in life satisfaction and the mediating role of sport-related motivation and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Antl, Sheilah

    2008-06-01

    This study examined the associations of dispositional perfectionism, contextual motivation, sport-related coping, goal attainment, and changes in life satisfaction during a sport competition. A sample of 186 athletes completed measures of dispositional perfectionism, contextual motivation, and life satisfaction at Time 1 (before a competition) as well as measures of coping, goal attainment, and life satisfaction at Time 2 (after a competition). Results of structural equation modeling supported a model in which self-determined and non-self-determined motivation partially mediated the relationships between different dimensions of perfectionism and coping. It was also shown that disengagement-oriented coping mediated the negative relationship between evaluative concerns perfectionism and change in life satisfaction. In a similar way, goal attainment mediated the relationships of both task- and disengagement-oriented coping with change in life satisfaction. For the most part, these results are consistent with the motivational properties of evaluative concerns and personal standards perfectionism and with literature regarding coping and self-determination theory.

  4. A systematic review of studies comparing body image concerns among female college athletes and non-athletes, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnes, Julia R; Stellefson, Michael L; Janelle, Christopher M; Dorman, Steven M; Dodd, Virginia; Miller, M David

    2013-09-01

    Research prior to 2001 indicated that athletes experienced better body image than non-athletes, with no differences among sport types. Since then, female athletes have become increasingly sexually objectified in the media, and the sociocultural beauty ideal has shifted to emphasize appearing both athletic and thin. Part I of this paper explores the literature describing these changes. Part II presents a systematic and comprehensive literature review of 10 recent studies comparing body image concerns (BIC) among collegiate female athletes and non-athletes to identify the current status of BIC in female athletes. Findings indicate that involvement in collegiate athletics provides some protection from BIC; however, this protection appears attenuated for athletes in more feminine sports (e.g., gymnastics), and higher level athletes (Division I). Researchers should examine how sociocultural pressures unrelated to competition predict female athletes' BIC using measures that focus on objectification, positive body image, body functionality, and thin- and athletic-ideal internalization.

  5. Chem I Supplement: Nutrition (Diet) and Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, David R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various aspects related to nutrition and athletics. Examines nutritional requirements, energy use, carbohydrate loading, and myths and fallacies regarding food and athletic performance. Indicates that scientific evidence does not validate the use of any special diet by an athlete. (JN)

  6. Team management of the female athlete triad: part 1: what to look for, what to ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, E; Clark, N; Ireland, M L; Martire, J; Nattiv, A; Varechok, S

    1997-03-01

    The female athlete triad of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis affects many active women and girls, especially those in sports that emphasize appearance or leanness. Because of the athlete's psychological defense mechanisms and the stigma surrounding disordered eating, physicians may need to ask targeted questions about nutrition habits when assessing a patient who has a stress fracture or amenorrhea, or during preparticipation exams. Carefully worded questions can help. Physical signs and symptoms include unexplained recurrent or stress fracture, dry hair, low body temperature, lanugo, and fatigue. Targeted lab tests to assess nutritional and hormonal status are essential in making a diagnosis that will steer treatment, as are optimal radiologic tests like dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for assessing bone density.

  7. The Effect of Athletic Identity and Locus of Control on the Stress Perceptions of Community College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 72,000 student-athletes compete annually in athletic programs at the community college level. However, research addressing the effect of athletic participation on the psychological well-being of the community college student-athlete is sparse. This study represents an attempt to address this gap by examining the relationship among perceived…

  8. The Effect of Athletic Identity and Locus of Control on the Stress Perceptions of Community College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 72,000 student-athletes compete annually in athletic programs at the community college level. However, research addressing the effect of athletic participation on the psychological well-being of the community college student-athlete is sparse. This study represents an attempt to address this gap by examining the relationship among perceived…

  9. Athletic identity and well-being among young talented athletes who live at a Dutch elite sport center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Hove, van P.; Dik, G.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in athletic identity and well-being were examined between athletes living in a Dutch elite sport center (CTO) and athletes not living in such a center (age range: 16–30). Measures included the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS; Brewer & Cornelius, 20014. Brewer , B. W. and Co

  10. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  11. Drug abuse in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon CL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. Keywords: doping, athletes, steroids, drug abuse, mental illness

  12. Strategic Planning in Higher Education: An Examination of Variation in Strategic Planning Practices and Their Effect on Success in NCAA Division I Athletic Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starsia, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Higher education and intercollegiate athletics are operating in an era of heightened competition and diminishing resources. As these organizations increase in complexity, the need for highly professional staff and management strategies becomes critical. The theoretical framework guiding this research was generated from the literature in…

  13. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  14. Strategic Planning in Higher Education: An Examination of Variation in Strategic Planning Practices and Their Effect on Success in NCAA Division I Athletic Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starsia, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Higher education and intercollegiate athletics are operating in an era of heightened competition and diminishing resources. As these organizations increase in complexity, the need for highly professional staff and management strategies becomes critical. The theoretical framework guiding this research was generated from the literature in…

  15. Disorders of the female athlete triad among collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Katherine A; Manore, Melinda M

    2002-09-01

    This study examined the prevalence of and relationship between the disorders of the female athlete triad in collegiate athletes participating in aesthetic, endurance, or team/anaerobic sports. Participants were 425 female collegiate athletes from 7 universities across the United States. Disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and musculoskeletal injuries were assessed by a health/medical, dieting and menstrual history questionnaire, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), and the Eating Disorder Inventory Body Dissatisfaction Subscale (EDI-BD). The percentage of athletes reporting a clinical diagnosis of anorexia and bulimia nervosa was 3.3% and 2.3%, respectively; mean ( SD) EAT and EDI-BD scores were 10.6 9.6 and 9.8 7.6, respectively. The percentage of athletes with scores indicating "at-risk" behavior for an eating disorder were 15.2% using the EAT-26 and 32.4% using the EDI-BD. A similar percentage of athletes in aesthetic, endurance, and team/anaerobic sports reported a clinical diagnosis of anorexia or bulimia. However, athletes in aesthetic sports scored higher on the EAT-26 (13.5 10.9) than athletes in endurance (10.0 9.3) or team/anaerobic sports (9.9 9.0, p athletes in aesthetic versus endurance or team/anaerobic sports scored above the EAT-26 cut-off score of 20 (p athletes not using oral contraceptives, and there were no group differences in the prevalence of self-reported menstrual irregularity. Muscle and bone injuries sustained during the collegiate career were reported by 65.9% and 34.3% of athletes, respectively, and more athletes in aesthetic versus endurance and team/anaerobic sports reported muscle (p =.005) and/or bone injuries (p Athletes "at risk" for eating disorders more frequently reported menstrual irregularity (p =.004) and sustained more bone injuries (p =.003) during their collegiate career. These data indicate that while the prevalence of clinical eating disorders is low in female collegiate athletes, many are "at risk" for an eating

  16. Liability, Athletic Equipment, and the Athletic Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard

    Standards of conduct, roles, and responsibilities expected of athletic trainers should be developed and disseminated. These guidelines could be used in court to show that the athletic trainer was following basic standards if he should be charged with liability. A review of liability cases involving athletic injuries received while athletes were…

  17. The experiences of female athletic trainers in the role of the head athletic trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Burton, Laura; Cotrufo, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Very few women have leadership positions in athletic training (ie, head athletic training positions) in intercollegiate athletics. Research exists on the barriers to attaining the role; however, our understanding about the experiences of those currently engaged in the role is limited. To examine the experiences of female head athletic trainers as they worked toward and attained the position of head athletic trainer. Qualitative study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. Eight female athletic trainers serving in the role of head athletic trainer participated in our study. The mean age of the participants was 45 ± 12 years, with 5 ± 1.5 years of experience in the role of head athletic trainer and 21 ± 10 years of experience as athletic trainers. We conducted phone interviews with the 8 participants following a semistructured format. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed following a general inductive approach as described by Thomas. To establish credibility, we used a peer reviewer, member checks, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Six major themes emerged from our analysis regarding the experiences of female head athletic trainers. Opportunities to become a head athletic trainer, leadership qualities, and unique personal characteristics were discussed as factors leading to the assumption of the role of the head athletic trainer. Where women hold back, family challenges, and organizational barriers speak to the potential obstacles to assuming the role of head athletic trainer. Female head athletic trainers did not seek the role, but through persistence and encouragement, they find themselves assuming the role. Leadership skills were discussed as important for success in the role of head athletic trainer. Life balancing and parenting were identified as barriers to women seeking the role of head athletic trainer.

  18. Examining the Relationship Between the Functional Movement Screen and the Landing Error Scoring System in an Active, Male Collegiate Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Eoin M; Harrison, Andrew J; Lyons, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Everard, EM, Harrison, AJ, and Lyons, M. Examining the relationship between the functional movement screen and the landing error scoring system in an active, male collegiate population. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1265-1272, 2017-In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on movement screening as the principal aspect of preparticipation testing. Two of the most common movement screening tools are the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Several studies have examined the reliability and validity of these tools, but so far, there have been no studies comparing the results of these 2 screening tools against each other. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between FMS scores and LESS scores. Ninety-eight male college athletes actively competing in sport (Gaelic games, soccer, athletics, boxing/mixed martial arts, Olympic weightlifting) participated in the study and performed the FMS and LESS screens. Both the 21-point and 100-point scoring systems were used to score the FMS. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between the 2 screening scores. The results showed a significant moderate correlation between FMS and LESS scores (rho 100 and 21 point = -0.528; -0.487; p < 0.001). In addition, r values of 0.26 and 0.23 indicate a poor shared variance between the 2 screens. The results indicate that performing well in one of the screens does not necessarily equate to performing well in the other. This has practical implications as it highlights that both screens may assess different movement patterns and should not be used as a substitute for each other.

  19. Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy: implications for sporting participation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, Deirdre F

    2012-11-01

    Long-term high-intensity physical activity is associated with morphological changes, termed as the \\'athlete\\'s heart\\'. The differentiation of physiological cardiac adaptive changes in response to high-level exercise from pathological changes consistent with an inherited cardiomyopathy is imperative. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging allows definition of abnormal processes occurring at the tissue level, including, importantly, myocardial fibrosis. It is therefore vital in accurately making this differentiation. In this review, we will review the role of CMR imaging of fibrosis, and detail CMR characterisation of myocardial fibrosis in various cardiomyopathies, and the implications of fibrosis. Additionally, we will outline advances in imaging fibrosis, in particular T1 mapping. Finally we will address the role of CMR in pre-participation screening.

  20. The Anemias of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  1. Role ambiguity and athlete satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eys, Mark A; Carron, Albert V; Bray, Steven R; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between athletes' perceptions of role ambiguity and satisfaction. The relationship between these multidimensional constructs was investigated at the beginning and at the end of the season, as well as from early season to end of season. Consistent with the a prioi hypothesis, concurrent analyses revealed lower perceived role ambiguity was associated with higher athlete satisfaction. Specifically, role ambiguity, as represented by the dimension Scope of Responsibilities on offence, was significantly related to the leadership facets of athlete satisfaction (i.e. ability utilization, strategy, and training/instruction) both at the beginning and at the end of the season. However, contrary to expectations, role ambiguity at the beginning of the season was not predictive of athlete satisfaction at the end of the season. The implications of the results are discussed and future research is suggested.

  2. Primary prevention of sudden cardiac death of the young athlete: the controversy about the screening electrocardiogram and its innovative artificial intelligence solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anthony C

    2012-03-01

    The preparticipation screening for athlete participation in sports typically entails a comprehensive medical and family history and a complete physical examination. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) can increase the likelihood of detecting cardiac diagnoses such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but this diagnostic test as part of the screening process has engendered considerable controversy. The pro position is supported by argument that international screening protocols support its use, positive diagnosis has multiple benefits, history and physical examination are inadequate, primary prevention is essential, and the cost effectiveness is justified. Although the aforementioned myriad of justifications for routine ECG screening of young athletes can be persuasive, several valid contentions oppose supporting such a policy, namely, that the sudden death incidence is very (too) low, the ECG screening will be too costly, the false-positive rate is too high, resources will be allocated away from other diseases, and manpower is insufficient for its execution. Clinicians, including pediatric cardiologists, have an understandable proclivity for avoiding this prodigious national endeavor. The controversy, however, should not be focused on whether an inexpensive, noninvasive test such as an ECG should be mandated but should instead be directed at just how these tests for young athletes can be performed in the clinical imbroglio of these disease states (with variable genetic penetrance and phenotypic expression) with concomitant fiscal accountability and logistical expediency in this era of economic restraint. This monumental endeavor in any city or region requires two crucial elements well known to business scholars: implementation and execution. The eventual solution for the screening ECG dilemma requires a truly innovative and systematic approach that will liberate us from inadequate conventional solutions. Artificial intelligence, specifically the process termed "machine

  3. Comparing Division IA Scholarship and Non-Scholarship Student-Athletes: A Discriminant Analysis of Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lisa Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Many research studies have examined the academic performance and graduation rates of college student-athletes. The limited focus on scholarship student-athletes has overlooked the majority of NCAA student-athletes, those participating in collegiate athletic programs without athletic scholarships. Therefore, this study contributes to a gap in the…

  4. Understanding the Female Athlete Triad: Eating Disorders, Amenorrhea, and Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Katherine A.; Brey, Rebecca A.; Gonyou, Julianna B.

    1999-01-01

    Examines three disorders that can affect female athletes who focus on succeeding athletically and achieving a prescribed body weight: disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. The paper presents prevention and treatment suggestions for athletes with eating disorders, focusing on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Recommends that…

  5. Moral Atmosphere and Athletic Aggressive Tendencies in Young Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivernau, Marta; Duda, Joan L.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the moral atmosphere of athletic teams to athletes' self-described likelihood to be aggressive (SLA). Reports athletes indicated they would be more aggressive if they thought their coach supported such behavior. Argues the findings show that the influence of others can shape the moral atmosphere operating on youth sports teams. (CAJ)

  6. Leadership Development of Team Captains in Collegiate Varsity Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandzol, Christian; Perlis, Susan; Draina, Lois

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the leadership development of team captains and student-athletes engaged in NCAA Division III intercollegiate athletics at 6 private institutions of higher education. Student-athletes in the sports of men's and women's soccer, women's field hockey, men's and women's cross country, and women's tennis completed the 2nd edition of…

  7. Olympism as Education: Analysing the Learning Experiences of Elite Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D.; Barker-Ruchti, N.; Rynne, S. B.; Lee, J.

    2012-01-01

    Olympic athletes are potentially the most visible exponents of Olympic values. How athletes learn values, however, has not captured the attention of those responsible for Olympic documentation or pedagogues. This paper examines how aspects of Olympism became relevant for three former Olympians during their athletic careers. Interview material…

  8. Athletic Apparel Industry Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE; TAN; NAFISUL; ISLAM; MILAN; MITRASINOVIC

    2015-01-01

    Industry Overview The athletic apparel industry is the fastest growing segment of global clothing industry differentiated by offering high quality athletic apparel made of technically advanced fabrics.The athletic apparel is made for a variety of sports and physical activities for children,men and women and enhances comfort and performance of athletes.The industry consists of companies that design and market

  9. Joint-position sense is altered by football pre-participation warm-up exercise and match induced fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Fernando; Oliveira, José

    2015-06-01

    The demands to which football players are exposed during the match may augment the risk of injury by decreasing the sense of joint position. This study aimed to assess the effect of pre-participation warm-up and fatigue induced by an official football match on the knee-joint-position sense of football players. Fourteen semi-professional male football players (mean age: 25.9±4.6 years old) volunteered in this study. The main outcome measures were rate of perceived exertion and knee-joint-position sense assessed at rest, immediately after a standard warm-up (duration 25 min), and immediately after a competitive football match (90 minutes duration). Perceived exertion increased significantly from rest to the other assessments (rest: 8.6±2.0; after warm-up: 12.1±2.1; after football match: 18.5±1.3; pfootball match compared to both rest (pfootball match-induced fatigue. Warm-up exercises could contribute to knee injury prevention, whereas the deleterious effect of match-induced fatigue on the sensorimotor system could ultimately contribute to knee instability and injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. YOUNG ATHLETES' MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Moreno Murcia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between motivational characteristics and dispositional flow. In order to accomplish this goal, motivational profiles emerging from key constructs within Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory were related to the dispositional flow measures. A sample of 413 young athletes (Age range 12 to 16 years completed the PMCSQ-2, POSQ, SMS and DFS measures. Cluster analysis results revealed three profiles: a "self-determined profile" characterised by higher scores on the task-involving climate perception and on the task orientation; a "non-self-determined profile", characterised by higher scores on ego-involving climate perception and ego orientation; and a "low self-determined and low non-self-determined profile" which had the lowest dispositional flow. No meaningful differences were found between the "self-determined profile" and the "non-self-determined profile" in dispositional flow. The "self-determined profile" was more commonly associated with females, athletes practising individual sports and those training more than three days a week. The "non-self-determined profile" was more customary of males and athletes practising team sports as well as those training just two or three days a week

  11. Incidence and etiology of sports-related sudden cardiac death in Denmark - Implications for preparticipation screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Theilade, Juliane;

    2010-01-01

    SCD were found, 8 of which had antecedent symptoms. The incidence rate was 1.21 (95% confidence inrterval (CI): 0.68 to 2.00) per 100,000 athlete person-years. The most common autopsy findings were arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 4), sudden unexplained death (n = 4) and coronary artery...... disease (n = 2). The incidence of SCD in the general population age 12- to 35 was 3.76 (95% CI: 3.42 to 4.14) per 100,000 person-years. Conclusion In Denmark, SrSCD is a rare occurrence and the incidence rate is lower than that of SCD in the general population. This may imply a low value...... this to the incidence of sudden cardiac death SCD in the background population. Methods Al 5,662 death certificates for decedents in the perio 2000 to 2006 in the age group 12 to 35 years in Denmark were read independently by 2 physicians to identify cases of SCD. Information from autopsy reports, selected hospital...

  12. Upper gastrointestinal issues in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Jason J; Kapur, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complaints are common among athletes with rates in the range of 30% to 70%. Both the intensity of sport and the type of sporting activity have been shown to be contributing factors in the development of GI symptoms. Three important factors have been postulated as contributing to the pathophysiology of GI complaints in athletes: mechanical forces, altered GI blood flow, and neuroendocrine changes. As a result of those factors, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), nausea, vomiting, gastritis, peptic ulcers, GI bleeding, or exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) may develop. GERD may be treated with changes in eating habits, lifestyle modifications, and training modifications. Nausea and vomiting may respond to simple training modifications, including no solid food 3 hours prior to an athletic event. Mechanical trauma, decreased splanchnic blood flow during exercise, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) contribute to gastritis, GI bleeding, and ulcer formation in athletes. Acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors may be useful in athletes with persistence of any of the above symptoms. ETAP is a common, poorly-understood, self-limited acute abdominal pain which is difficult to treat. ETAP incidence increases in athletes beginning a new exercise program or increasing the intensity of their current exercise program. ETAP may respond to changes in breathing patterns or may resolve simply with continued training. Evaluation of the athlete with upper GI symptoms requires a thorough history, a detailed training log, a focused physical examination aimed at ruling out potentially serious causes of symptoms, and follow-up laboratory testing based on concerning physical examination findings.

  13. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. The female athlete triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattiv, Aurelia; Loucks, Anne B; Manore, Melinda M; Sanborn, Charlotte F; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Warren, Michelle P

    2007-10-01

    The female athlete triad (Triad) refers to the interrelationships among energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral density, which may have clinical manifestations including eating disorders, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. With proper nutrition, these same relationships promote robust health. Athletes are distributed along a spectrum between health and disease, and those at the pathological end may not exhibit all these clinical conditions simultaneously. Energy availability is defined as dietary energy intake minus exercise energy expenditure. Low energy availability appears to be the factor that impairs reproductive and skeletal health in the Triad, and it may be inadvertent, intentional, or psychopathological. Most effects appear to occur below an energy availability of 30 kcal.kg(-1) of fat-free mass per day. Restrictive eating behaviors practiced by girls and women in sports or physical activities that emphasize leanness are of special concern. For prevention and early intervention, education of athletes, parents, coaches, trainers, judges, and administrators is a priority. Athletes should be assessed for the Triad at the preparticipation physical and/or annual health screening exam, and whenever an athlete presents with any of the Triad's clinical conditions. Sport administrators should also consider rule changes to discourage unhealthy weight loss practices. A multidisciplinary treatment team should include a physician or other health-care professional, a registered dietitian, and, for athletes with eating disorders, a mental health practitioner. Additional valuable team members may include a certified athletic trainer, an exercise physiologist, and the athlete's coach, parents and other family members. The first aim of treatment for any Triad component is to increase energy availability by increasing energy intake and/or reducing exercise energy expenditure. Nutrition counseling and monitoring are sufficient

  14. Alternating myocardial sympathetic neural function of athlete's heart in professional cycle racers examined with iodine-123-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Keiko; Inoue, Tomio; Hasegawa, Akira; Oriuchi, Noboru; Okamoto, Eiichi; Tomaru, Yumi; Endo, Keigo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-08-01

    Myocardial sympathetic neural function in professional athletes who had the long-term tremendous cardiac load has not been fully investigated by myocardial iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in comparison with power spectral analysis (PSA) in electrocardiography. Eleven male professional cycle racers and age-matched 11 male healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The low frequency components in the power spectral density (LF), the high frequency components in the power spectral density (HF), the LF/HF ratio and mean R-R interval were derived from PSA and time-domain analysis of heart rate variability in electrocardiography. The mean heart-to-mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M ratio) of the MIBG uptake, in professional cycle racers was significantly lower than that in healthy volunteers (p<0.01) and HF power in professional cycle racers was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). In the group of professional cycle racers, the H/M ratio showed a significant correlation with the R-R interval, as indices of parasympathetic nerve activity (r=0.80, p<0.01), but not with the LF/HF ratio as an index of sympathetic nerve activity. These results may indicate that parasympathetic nerve activity has an effect on MIBG uptake in a cyclist's heart. (author)

  15. Game Changers: The Role Athletic Identity and Racial Identity Play on Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimper, Albert Y., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which athletic and racial identity predict the academic outcomes of Black student athletes participating in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division 1 Football Bowl Series football. The academic outcomes of Black student athletes are a growing concern to both scholars and…

  16. Athletic Engagement and Athletic Identity in Top Croatian Sprint Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Vesna; Sarac, Jelena; Missoni, Sasa; Sindik, Josko

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to determine construct validity and reliability for two questionnaires (Athlete Engagement Questionnaire-AEQ and Athletic Identity Measurement Scale-AIMS), applied on elite Croatian athletes-sprinters, as well as the correlations among the dimensions in these measuring instruments. Then, we have determined the differences in the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity, according to gender, education level and winning medals on international competitions. A total of 71 elite athletes-sprinters (former and still active) are examined, from which 27 (38%) females and 44 (62%) males. The results of factor analyses revealed the existence of dimensions very similar as in the original instruments, which showed moderate to-high reliabilities. A small number of statistically significant correlations have been found between the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity, mainly in male sprinter runners. Small number of statistically significant differences in the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity have been found according to the gender, education level and winning medals on the international competitions. The most reasonable explanation of these differences could be given in terms of very similar characteristics of elite athletes on the same level of sport excellence.

  17. The career planning, athletic identity, and student role identity of intercollegiate student athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Patricia S; Kerr, Gretchen A

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career planning of university student athletes and relationships between their career planning and athletic and student role identities. Two retrospective in-depth interviews were held with four male and four female university student athletes. Participants entered university with vague or nonexistent career objectives and invested heavily in their athletic roles. In the latter years of their college career, the participants discarded their sport career ambitions and allowed the student role to become more prominent in their identity hierarchies. The current findings support Brown and Hartley's (1998) suggestion that student athletes may invest in both the athlete and student role identities simultaneously and that investing in the latter may permit the exploration of nonsport career options.

  18. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  19. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  20. Left ventricular mass in male adolescent athletes and non-athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling David Kaunang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Systematic exercise leads to increased left ventricular mass, which may be misleading in a differential diagnosis of heart disease in athletes (physiologic hypertrophy versus pathologic hypertrophy. The cause of left ventricular hypertrophy is an important risk factor in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases. Objective To compare left ventricular mass and left ventricular hypertrophy in male adolescent athletes and non-athletes. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, analytic study, from September to December 2012 in male adolescents aged 15-18 years. The case group included athletes from the Bina Taruna Football Club Manado, while the control group included non-athlete adolescents. All subjects underwent history-taking, physical examinations and further supporting examinations. Left ventricular mass was measured by cardiovascular echocardio-graphy (Esaote Mylab 4.0 and calculated based on a formula. Left ventricular hypertrophy was defined as left ventricular mass of > 134 g/m2 body surface area. Results Subjects’ mean left ventricular masses were 359.69 (SD 188.4; 95%CI 283.58 to 435.81 grams in the athlete group and 173.04 (SD 50.69; 95%CI 152.56 to 103.51 grams in the non-athlete group, a statistically significant difference (P=0.0001. Ventricular hypertrophy was found 76.9% compared to 11.5% in the non-athlete group (P=0.0001. Conclusion Left ventricular mass in athletes is bigger than in non-athletes. In addition, left ventricular hypertrophy is more common in male adolescent athletes than in non-athletes. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:305-8.].

  1. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  2. Issues in Athletic Administration: A Content Analysis of Syllabi from Intercollegiate Athletics Graduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie; Brown, Alan; Sieben, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined courses focused on intercollegiate athletics in sport-related graduate programs (e.g., Sport Leadership, Sport Management, and Athletic/Sport Administration). A content analysis of course syllabi was used to determine the alignment of course scope and content. Analysis included course type (i.e., required or elective),…

  3. Male and Female: Career Development of African American College Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jamie Dowdy

    2015-01-01

    Tendency to foreclose on careers, vocational exploration, and career commitment were examined in relationship to racial-ethnic socialization, parental responsiveness, and career-related verbal encouragement and emotional support among 228 African American male and female college athletes and non-athletes. A number of tests were conducted to test…

  4. Risk Factors for the Female Athlete Triad among Female Collegiate and Noncollegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; Gabriel, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    The female athlete triad, defined by eating disorders, menstrual dysfunction, and osteoporosis, has been increasing among female athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine eating disorders, performance-related injuries, menstrual dysfunction, exercise time, calcium intake, and orientation to exercise among undergraduate female collegiate…

  5. Coaches, Athletes, and Dominance Profiles in Sport: Addressing the Learning Styles of Athletes to Improve Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Debbie; Cadorette, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the background and purpose of using dominance profiles to assist coaches in determining learning preferences for themselves and their athletes. Dominance profiles can provide information that will help coaches understand the differences in how athletes think, act, and learn. Dominance profiles can help…

  6. Servant Leadership in Intercollegiate Athletics: Follower Perceptions of NCAA Division II Athletic Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Harlan L.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership in the intercollegiate athletic setting has come under pressure in recent years due to problem of unethical behavior and falling short of the expectation of serving students in higher education. While servant leadership has been examined in many different contexts, the literature is limited within the intercollegiate athletic setting.…

  7. Alcohol Consumption among Athletes and Non-Athletes in Christian Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, William S.; Allen, Bert; Drinnon, Joy

    2010-01-01

    This research was designed to be a pilot study that examined the differences in heavy episodic drinking and perceptions of drinking between athletes and non-athletes. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first of alcohol consumption between these groups at Christian-affiliated colleges. A random sample of participants comprised…

  8. Issues in Athletic Administration: A Content Analysis of Syllabi from Intercollegiate Athletics Graduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie; Brown, Alan; Sieben, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined courses focused on intercollegiate athletics in sport-related graduate programs (e.g., Sport Leadership, Sport Management, and Athletic/Sport Administration). A content analysis of course syllabi was used to determine the alignment of course scope and content. Analysis included course type (i.e., required or elective),…

  9. Underreporting of Concussions and Concussion-Like Symptoms in Female High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tracy; Burghart, Mark A; Nazir, Niaman

    2016-01-01

    Underreporting of concussions and concussion-like symptoms in athletes continues to be a serious medical concern and research focus. Despite mounting worry, little evidence exists examining incidence of underreporting and documenting characteristics of head injury in female athletes participating in high school sports. This study examined the self-reporting behaviors of female high school athletes. Seventy-seven athletes participated, representing 14 high school sports. Nearly half of the athletes (31 participants) reported a suspected concussion, with 10 of the 31 athletes refraining from reporting symptoms to training staff after injury. Only 66% reported receiving concussion education. Concussion education appeared to have no relationship with diagnosed concussion rates in athletes, removing athletes from play, or follow-up medical care after injury. In conclusion, female high school athletes underreport signs and symptoms of concussions. Concussion education should occur at higher rates among female athletes to influence reporting behaviors.

  10. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Iranian Female Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Baradaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190, volleyball (103, running (42, fencing (45 and rock climbing (38. The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 % soccer players, 21/103(20.38 % volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 % runners, 6/45(13.33 % fencers and 10/38 (26.31% rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners.

  11. Sport Opportunities for Athletes with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This series outlines sport opportunities for athletes with disabilities. Included are articles discussing sports for athletes with cerebral palsy, deaf athletes, blind athletes, wheelchair bound athletes, amputee athletes, as well as a discussion of the Special Olympics. (JMK)

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more by reviewing the NATA Media Kit. NATA Marketing Opportunities Join or Renew Joining NATA offers athletic ... looking for more information about athletic training, youth sports safety or specific health issues, we encourage you ...

  13. Nutrition and athletic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002458.htm Nutrition and athletic performance To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nutrition can help enhance athletic performance. An active lifestyle ...

  14. Athletic Identity, Vocational Identity, and Occupational Engagement in College Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Lacole L.

    2012-01-01

    Athletic departments in National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision universities provide academic support services to their student-athletes. Even though student-athletes receive help including career assistance from academic counselors, some studies have found that student-athletes are behind non-athletes in career…

  15. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  16. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  17. Perfectionism and athlete burnout in junior elite athletes: the mediating role of coping tendencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew P; Hall, Howard K; Appleton, Paul R

    2010-07-01

    Recent research indicates that some dimensions of perfectionism are positively related to athlete burnout, whereas others are negatively related to athlete burnout. The divergent relationship between these dimensions of perfectionism and athlete burnout may be explained by different coping tendencies. The present investigation examined whether different coping tendencies mediate the relationship between self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism and burnout. Two-hundred and six junior elite athletes (M age=15.15 years, SD=1.88 years, range=11-22 years) completed measures of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism, coping tendencies, and athlete burnout. Structural equation modeling indicated that the relationship between dimensions of perfectionism and athlete burnout was mediated by different coping tendencies. Higher levels of socially prescribed perfectionism was related to higher levels of avoidant coping which, in turn, was related to higher levels of athlete burnout. In contrast, higher levels of self-oriented perfectionism was related to higher levels of problem-focused coping and lower levels of avoidant coping which, in turn, was related to lower levels of athlete burnout. The findings suggest that different coping tendencies may underpin the divergent relationship between self-oriented and socially prescribed dimensions of perfectionism and athlete burnout.

  18. Nutritional considerations for vegetarian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan I; Rideout, Candice A

    2004-01-01

    With the growing interest in the potential health benefits of plant-based diets, it is relevant to consider whether vegetarian dietary practices could influence athletic performance. Accordingly, this review examines whether nutrients that may differ between vegetarian and omnivorous diets could affect physical performance. We also describe recent studies that attempt to assess the effects of a vegetarian diet on performance and comment on other nutritional aspects of vegetarianism of relevance to athletes. Although well-controlled long-term studies assessing the effects of vegetarian diets on athletes have not been conducted, the following observations can be made: 1) well-planned, appropriately supplemented vegetarian diets appear to effectively support athletic performance; 2) provided protein intakes are adequate to meet needs for total nitrogen and the essential amino acids, plant and animal protein sources appear to provide equivalent support to athletic training and performance; 3) vegetarians (particularly women) are at increased risk for non-anemic iron deficiency, which may limit endurance performance; and 4) as a group, vegetarians have lower mean muscle creatine concentrations than do omnivores, and this may affect supramaximal exercise performance. Because their initial muscle creatine concentrations are lower, vegetarians are likely to experience greater performance increments after creatine loading in activities that rely on the adenosine triphosphate/phosphocreatine system. 5) Coaches and trainers should be aware that some athletes may adopt a vegetarian diet as a strategy for weight control. Accordingly, the possibility of a disordered eating pattern should be investigated if a vegetarian diet is accompanied by unwarranted weight loss.

  19. Controlling Coaching Behaviors and Athlete Burnout: Investigating the Mediating Roles of Perfectionism and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcza-Renner, Kelly; Eklund, Robert C; Morin, Alexandre J; Habeeb, Christine M

    2016-02-01

    This investigation sought to replicate and extend earlier studies of athlete burnout by examining athlete-perceived controlling coaching behaviors and athlete perfectionism variables as, respectively, environmental and dispositional antecedents of athlete motivation and burnout. Data obtained from NCAA Division I swimmers (n = 487) within 3 weeks of conference championship meets were analyzed for this report. Significant indirect effects were observed between controlling coaching behaviors and burnout through athlete perfectionism (i.e., socially prescribed, self-oriented) and motivation (i.e., autonomous, amotivation). Controlling coaching behaviors predicted athlete perfectionism. In turn, self-oriented perfectionism was positively associated with autonomous motivation and negatively associated with amotivation, while socially prescribed perfectionism was negatively associated with autonomous motivation and positively associated with controlled motivation and amotivation. Autonomous motivation and amotivation, in turn, predicted athlete burnout in expected directions. These findings implicate controlling coaching behaviors as potentially contributing to athlete perfectionism, shaping athlete motivational regulations, and possibly increasing athlete burnout.

  20. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  1. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  2. Asthma in elite athletes: how do we manage asthma-like symptoms and asthma in elite athletes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas Kromann

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and the high prevalence of asthma might be associated with specific types of sport. It has been suggested that chronic endurance training might increase the number of neutrophils in the airways, and this may reflect airway injury. The use of anti......-asthmatic medication in elite athletes is also currently under scrutiny in order to reduce the risk of under-treatment or over treatment. OBJECTIVES: Determine the use of anti-asthmatic medication and the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma in Danish elite athletes. Further, to determine whether elite...... survey of elite athletes (N = 418); and (iii) a clinical study of elite athletes. A total of 54 elite athletes (19 with physician-diagnosed asthma) participated together with two control groups: (i) 22 non-athletes with physician-diagnosed asthma (steroid naïve for 4 weeks before the examination) and (ii...

  3. Sport-related achievement motivation and alcohol outcomes: an athlete-specific risk factor among intercollegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Cameron C; Martens, Matthew P; Cadigan, Jennifer M; Takamatsu, Stephanie K; Treloar, Hayley R; Pedersen, Eric R

    2013-12-01

    Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college students in general, research has begun to examine risk factors that are unique to collegiate athletes. For example, research has found that off-season status, the leadership role, and athlete-specific drinking motives are associated with increased alcohol use. Given these findings, it is possible that other athlete-specific variables influence alcohol misuse. One such variable may be sport achievement orientation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between sport achievement orientation and alcohol outcomes. Given previous research regarding seasonal status and gender, these variables were examined as moderators. Varsity athletes (n=263) completed the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, which assesses sport-related achievement orientation on three scales (Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation). In addition, participants completed measures of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Results indicated that Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation were all significantly associated with alcohol use, but not alcohol-related problems. Moreover, these relationships were moderated by seasonal status and gender. These interactions, clinical implications, and limitations are discussed.

  4. SLAP lesions in the overhead athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokito, Steven E; Myers, Kevin R; Ryu, Richard K N

    2014-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of SLAP lesions in the overhead athlete remains a challenge for the sports medicine specialist due to variable anatomy, changes with aging, concomitant pathology, lack of dependable physical findings on examination, and lack of sensitivity and specificity with imaging studies. This article presents a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, relevant anatomy, proposed pathogenesis, diagnostic approach, and outcomes of nonoperative and operative management of SLAP lesions in the overhead athlete.

  5. Organization of the Greek athletic Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COSTAS MOUNTAKIS, VASSILIKI AVGERINOU, GEORGE KYPRAIOS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the school year 1988-99 the first ‘’Classes of Athletic Facilitation’’ were established in Greece. These Classes were for young prospective athletes and were established in certain schools in addition to ordinary studies. The purpose of these Classes was to contribute to the development of the elite athlete in order for Greece to achieve the best possible performance in the Olympic Games of 1996 which it was then thought would be staged by Greece. The aim of this study was to examine whether the Classes of Athletic Facilitation actually achieved their aim. This study was carried out with the case study methodology. From our findings it may be concluded that these Classes failed to meet the expectations of their proponents, since only 9% of the Greek Olympic team participated in them. The main reasons of that are: a the unwillingness of the most talented athletes to attend these Classes because of their low academic standards, b the lack of official connection between these Classes and athletic clubs and athletic federations, and c the serious problems concerning the appointment of the teacher – coaches.

  6. Psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS): measurement invariance between athletes and non-athletes and construct validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Hsiang; Lu, Frank Jing-Horng; Lin, Ju-Han; Nien, Chiao-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Liu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, Cohen, Kamarack & Mermelstein, 1983) has been validated and widely used in many domains, there is still no validation in sports by comparing athletes and non-athletes and examining related psychometric indices. The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement invariance of PSS between athletes and non-athletes, and examine construct validity and reliability in the sports contexts. Study 1 sampled 359 college student-athletes (males = 233; females = 126) and 242 non-athletes (males = 124; females = 118) and examined factorial structure, measurement invariance and internal consistency. Study 2 sampled 196 student-athletes (males = 139, females = 57, Mage = 19.88 yrs, SD = 1.35) and examined discriminant validity and convergent validity of PSS. Study 3 sampled 37 student-athletes to assess test-retest reliability of PSS. Results found that 2-factor PSS-10 fitted the model the best and had appropriate reliability. Also, there was a measurement invariance between athletes and non-athletes; and PSS positively correlated with athletic burnout and life stress but negatively correlated with coping efficacy provided evidence of discriminant validity and convergent validity. Further, the test-retest reliability for PSS subscales was significant (r = .66 and r = .50). It is suggested that 2-factor PSS-10 can be a useful tool in assessing perceived stress either in sports or non-sports settings. We suggest future study may use 2-factor PSS-10 in examining the effects of stress on the athletic injury, burnout, and psychiatry disorders.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS: measurement invariance between athletes and non-athletes and construct validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsiang Chiu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Although Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, Cohen, Kamarack & Mermelstein, 1983 has been validated and widely used in many domains, there is still no validation in sports by comparing athletes and non-athletes and examining related psychometric indices. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement invariance of PSS between athletes and non-athletes, and examine construct validity and reliability in the sports contexts. Methods Study 1 sampled 359 college student-athletes (males = 233; females = 126 and 242 non-athletes (males = 124; females = 118 and examined factorial structure, measurement invariance and internal consistency. Study 2 sampled 196 student-athletes (males = 139, females = 57, Mage = 19.88 yrs, SD = 1.35 and examined discriminant validity and convergent validity of PSS. Study 3 sampled 37 student-athletes to assess test-retest reliability of PSS. Results Results found that 2-factor PSS-10 fitted the model the best and had appropriate reliability. Also, there was a measurement invariance between athletes and non-athletes; and PSS positively correlated with athletic burnout and life stress but negatively correlated with coping efficacy provided evidence of discriminant validity and convergent validity. Further, the test-retest reliability for PSS subscales was significant (r = .66 and r = .50. Discussion It is suggested that 2-factor PSS-10 can be a useful tool in assessing perceived stress either in sports or non-sports settings. We suggest future study may use 2-factor PSS-10 in examining the effects of stress on the athletic injury, burnout, and psychiatry disorders.

  8. Navigating the thin-ideal in an athletic world: influence of coach communication on female athletes' body image and health choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckner, Brittany N; Record, Rachael A

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate how interpersonal communication between coaches and female athletes influences the female athletes' perceptions of body image and health choices. Much of the current literature has focused on the fact that female athletes are at risk for disordered eating and a distorted body image due to susceptibility to the feminine "thin-ideal" while maintaining the fitness levels necessary to compete in their sport. However, very little research has examined how interpersonal interaction plays a role in female athletes' body image perceptions and health behaviors. Utilizing the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI) as a lens to examine communication between female athletes and their coaches, the researchers analyzed transcripts from in-depth interviews with 28 female athletes and identified themes within the personal, relational, enacted, and communal layers of identity. Coach communication with their female athletes was found to be influential to the athletes' body images and health choices.

  9. Modern Sexism and Preference for a Coach among Select National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Female Athletes: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, Nancy Jo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this explanatory mixed methods research study was to examine the relationship of modern sexism to a female athlete's preference for a coach based on the sex of the coach. Female athletes (N = 155) from one National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I institution in the Northeastern United States participated in the…

  10. The Influence of Climate on the Academic and Athletic Success of Student-Athletes: Results from a Multi-Institutional National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Susan; Merson, Dan; Garvey, Jason C.; Sorgen, Carl H.; Menon, India; Loya, Karla; Oseguera, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the campus climate can affect their success and outcomes. Student-athletes' experiences with campus life are unique. The Student-Athletes Climate Study (SACS) is a national study of over 8,000 student athletes from all NCAA sports and divisions. The purpose of the study was to examine the influence of individual and…

  11. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athlet...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic ß2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  12. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athlet...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic β2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  13. The athlete's foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, S S; Lewis, L A; Cohen, B H

    1977-09-01

    In general, painful feet can affect the performance of an athlete in any sport. To prevent skin diseases of the feet, the "Athlete's Foot" should be kept clean and dry with toenails trimmed. Properly fitting athletic shoes should be worn to avoid the formation of blisters. Wearing of sandals in locker and shower rooms, which prevents intimate contact with infecting organisms, can alleviate many of the problems that affect the feet.

  14. Iron and the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedekum, Natalie A; Dimeff, Robert J

    2005-08-01

    Iron is an important mineral necessary for many biologic pathways. Different levels of deficiency can occur in the athlete, resulting in symptoms that range from none to severe fatigue. Iron deficiency without anemia may adversely affect athletic performance. Causes of iron deficiency include poor intake, menstrual losses, gastrointestinal and genitourinary losses due to exercise-induced ischemia or organ movement, foot strike hemolysis, thermohemolysis, and sweat losses. A higher incidence of deficiency occurs in female athletes compared with males.

  15. Vegetarian athletes: Special requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Ongan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetarian diets have been mentioned on having long and short term beneficial effects while they are important parts of the Western countries. Vegetarians are not homogeneous groups and subjects are motivated to be on a vegetarian diet because of culturel and regional reasons, ethical concerns including animal rights, health parameters and environmental situations. And these reasons differ from vegetarian and omnivour athletes. Athletes, especially endurance ones (sprinters, cyclists, triathlon athletes, …, eat vegetarian diets in order to meet increasing requirements of carbohydrate and manage their weight status. A healthily well planned vegetarian diet positively affect some parameters related with performance of the athlete. However in a diet based on vegetable, herbs and high fiber, inadequate energy intake should be avoided. Although many vegetarian athletes are warned about consuming high amounts of protein, athletes take less protein than omnivour ones. Therefore, vegetarians should increase dietary protein quality by mixing different foods such as legumes and cereals. Vegetarian athletes who avoid eating animal based foods are at risk of having inadequate energy, fat (essential fatty acids, vitamins B12, B2, D and calcium, iron and zinc. In this review, contribution of vegetarian diets on purpose of healthy eating and optimal athletic performance and nutritional strategies for vegetarian athletes were discussed.

  16. Auscultation of the Chest and Abdomen by Athletic Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McChesney, John A.; McChesney, John W.

    2001-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a practical overview of the methods and techniques of auscultation of the chest and abdomen for use during the physical examination of athletes. Our intent is to provide information on this clinical technique to assist athletic trainers in recognizing and referring athletes presenting with potentially serious internal organ conditions. BACKGROUND: Use of the stethoscope is a clinical skill increasingly necessary for athletic trainers. Given the expanding breadth of both the assessment techniques used by athletic trainers and the populations they care for and the fact that clinical instruction guidelines have changed in the newly adopted National Athletic Trainers' Association Educational Competencies, our goal is to provide a framework upon which future instruction can be based. DESCRIPTION: This review covers the use of a stethoscope for auscultation of the chest and abdomen. Auscultation of the heart is covered first, followed by techniques for auscultating the breath sounds. Lastly, auscultation of the abdomen describes techniques for listening for bowel sounds and arterial bruits. CLINICAL ADVANTAGES: During the assessment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes, knowledge of auscultatory techniques is valuable and of increasing importance to athletic trainers. Athletic trainers who do not know how to perform auscultation may fail to recognize, and therefore fail to refer for further evaluation, athletes with potentially serious pathologic conditions.

  17. Gambling as an addictive disorder among athletes: clinical issues in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T W; Adams, J M; Kraus, R F; Clayton, R; Miller, J M; Anderson, J; Ogilvie, B

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the role of gambling as an addictive disorder experienced by athletes, both college and professional. Gambling may often be seen as a comorbid factor with other addictions and with depression among athletes. The focus on addictions among athletes has gained considerable attention among sports medicine clinicians. Diagnostic indicators, risk and protective factors, and a stage model of addiction among athletes are addressed. An algorithm and pathway of care for athletes with an addictive disorder is offered as are recommendations that sports physicians, sports medicine specialists, coaches and counsellors need to address athletes who have an addictive disorder.

  18. Game On: Past Year Gambling, Gambling-Related Problems, and Fantasy Sports Gambling Among College Athletes and Non-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ryan J; Nelson, Sarah E; Gallucci, Andrew R

    2016-06-01

    College students experience higher rates of gambling-related problems than most other population segments, including the general population. Although Division I (D1) athletes often have more at stake than the average student if and when they gamble (e.g., the potential to lose their athletic eligibility), relatively few studies have assessed the gambling behavior of this population and none have specifically assessed fantasy sports gambling. We conducted a study to examine gambling behavior (past-year gambling, gambling-related problems, and fantasy sport gambling) among a sample (N = 692) of college students at a private religiously affiliated university in the Southwest US. The sample for our study was unique in that approximately 30 % of the participants were D1 athletes. We compared the gambling behavior among three groups based on the athlete status: D1 athletes, club/intramural/recreational (CIR) athletes, and non-athletes (NAs). Compared to females in our sample, males observed higher rates of past year gambling, fantasy sports participation, fantasy sports gambling, and gambling-related problems. Among males, we found that CIR athletes observed the highest rates of past year gambling and fantasy sports participation and D1 athletes observed higher rates than NAs. We did not find differences in fantasy sport gambling and past year gambling-related problems based on athlete status in males or females.

  19. Sex Objects, Athletes, and Sexy Athletes: How Media Representations of Women Athletes Can Impact Adolescent Girls and College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the large body of research examining the negative effects of idealized media images on girls' and women's body image, little research has investigated whether media images can positively impact body concept among females. Using a between-participants experimental design, this study examined how images of performance athletes,…

  20. Sex Objects, Athletes, and Sexy Athletes: How Media Representations of Women Athletes Can Impact Adolescent Girls and College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the large body of research examining the negative effects of idealized media images on girls' and women's body image, little research has investigated whether media images can positively impact body concept among females. Using a between-participants experimental design, this study examined how images of performance athletes,…

  1. Panhellenic athletics at Olympia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Heine

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses Olympia as a panhellenic venue for athletics and the city-state interaction which took place at the sanctuary......The paper discusses Olympia as a panhellenic venue for athletics and the city-state interaction which took place at the sanctuary...

  2. Finances and College Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Frank; Tanlu, Lloyd

    2009-01-01

    In 2008-2009, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) generated television and marketing revenues of approximately $591 million, college sports apparel sales topped $4 billion, and several schools signed multimedia-rights deals for more than $100 million (Berkowitz, 2009; National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2009). At the Division…

  3. Salt, Water, and Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan J.

    Good nutrition for athletes demands plenty of water, since water is essential to such vital functions as muscle reactions. Dehydration can result from jet travel as well as from exercise and heat, making it a danger to traveling athletic teams. To avoid dehydration, water needs should be monitored by frequent weighing, and a clean water supply…

  4. The Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Roberta Trattner; Thompson, Ron A.

    2004-01-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a syndrome of the interrelated components of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Sometimes inadvertently, but more often by willful dietary restriction, many female athletes do not ingest sufficient calories to adequately fuel their physical or sport activities, which can disrupt menstrual functioning,…

  5. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  6. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Hillman, Susan K.; Montain, Scott J.; Reiff, Ralph V.; Rich, Brent S. E.; Roberts, William O.; Stone, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers Association for optimizing the fluid replacement practices of athletes, explaining that dehydration can compromise athletic performance and increase the risk of exertional heat injury. Athletes must be educated about the risks of dehydration and overhydration. They must learn fluid…

  7. Female athlete triad update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Katherine A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2007-01-01

    The passage of Title IX legislation in 1972 provided enormous opportunities for women to reap the benefits of sports participation. For most female athletes, sports participation is a positive experience, providing improved physical fitness, enhanced self-esteem, and better physical and mental health. Nonetheless, for a few female athletes, the desire for athletic success combined with the pressure to achieve a prescribed body weight may lead to the development of a triad of medical disorders including disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density (BMD)--known collectively as the female athlete triad. Alone or in combination, the disorders of the triad can have a negative impact on health and impair athletic performance.

  8. The FTO A/T polymorphism and elite athletic performance: a study involving three groups of European athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Eynon

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The FTO A/T polymorphism (rs9939609 is a strong candidate to influence obesity-related traits. Elite athletes from many different sporting disciplines are characterized by low body fat. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess whether athletic status is associated with the FTO A/T polymorphism. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A large cohort of European Caucasians from Poland, Russia and Spain were tested to examine the association between FTO A/T polymorphism (rs9939609 and athletic status. A total of 551 athletes were divided by type of sport (endurance athletes, n = 266 vs. sprint/power athletes, n = 285 as well as by level of competition (elite-level vs. national-level. The control group consisted of 1,416 ethnically-matched, non-athletic participants, all Europeans. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between FTO A/T genotypes and athletic status/competition level. RESULTS: There were no significantly greater/lesser odds of harbouring any type of genotype when comparing across athletic status (endurance athletes, sprint/power athletes or control participants. These effects were observed after controlling for sex and nationality. Furthermore, no significantly greater/lesser odds ratios were observed for any of the genotypes in respect to the level of competition (elite-level vs. national-level. CONCLUSION: The FTO A/T polymorphism is not associated with elite athletic status in the largest group of elite athletes studied to date. Large collaborations and data sharing between researchers, as presented here, are strongly recommended to enhance the research in the field of exercise genomics.

  9. The FTO A/T Polymorphism and Elite Athletic Performance: A Study Involving Three Groups of European Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynon, Nir; Nasibulina, Emiliya S.; Banting, Lauren K.; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Bondareva, Elvira A.; Shagimardanova, Roza R.; Raz, Maytal; Sharon, Yael; Williams, Alun G.; Ahmetov, Ildus I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The FTO A/T polymorphism (rs9939609) is a strong candidate to influence obesity-related traits. Elite athletes from many different sporting disciplines are characterized by low body fat. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess whether athletic status is associated with the FTO A/T polymorphism. Subjects and Methods A large cohort of European Caucasians from Poland, Russia and Spain were tested to examine the association between FTO A/T polymorphism (rs9939609) and athletic status. A total of 551 athletes were divided by type of sport (endurance athletes, n = 266 vs. sprint/power athletes, n = 285) as well as by level of competition (elite-level vs. national-level). The control group consisted of 1,416 ethnically-matched, non-athletic participants, all Europeans. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between FTO A/T genotypes and athletic status/competition level. Results There were no significantly greater/lesser odds of harbouring any type of genotype when comparing across athletic status (endurance athletes, sprint/power athletes or control participants). These effects were observed after controlling for sex and nationality. Furthermore, no significantly greater/lesser odds ratios were observed for any of the genotypes in respect to the level of competition (elite-level vs. national-level). Conclusion The FTO A/T polymorphism is not associated with elite athletic status in the largest group of elite athletes studied to date. Large collaborations and data sharing between researchers, as presented here, are strongly recommended to enhance the research in the field of exercise genomics. PMID:23573268

  10. Are asthma-like symptoms in elite athletes associated with classical features of asthma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T.K.; Pedersen, L.; Anderson, S.D.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and clinical studies in athletes have found increased airway inflammation. Objective: To investigate asthma-like symptoms, airway inflammation, airway reactivity (AR) to mannitol and use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. Methods......: The study group consisted of 54 elite athletes (19 with doctor-diagnosed asthma), 22 non-athletes with doctor-diagnosed asthma (steroid naive for 4 weeks before the examination) and 35 non-athletes without asthma; all aged 18-35 years. Examinations (1 day): questionnaires, exhaled nitric oxide (e......NO) in parts per billion, spirometry, skin prick test, AR to mannitol and blood samples. Induced sputum was done in subjects with asthma. Results: No significant difference was found in values for eNO, AR and atopy between 42 elite athletes with and 12 without asthma-like symptoms. Elite athletes with doctor...

  11. Gender Preference? National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Student-Athletes and Strength and Conditioning Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Kristin M; Appleby, Karen M

    2016-10-01

    Shuman, KM and Appleby, KM. Gender Preference? National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Student-Athletes and Strength and Conditioning Coaches. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2924-2933, 2016-The purpose of this study was to examine the preferences and attitudes of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I (DI) junior and senior class student-athletes toward the gender of their strength and conditioning coach (SCC). This study contributes to the empirical body of literature regarding student-athlete and strength and conditioning coach interaction specific to gender-related information and extends the efforts to increase student-athlete success. A qualitative framework was used for this study. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 NCAA DI junior or senior class student-athletes who had been exposed to and coached by both a male and a female SCC. The results of this study concluded that, in general, participants did not have a specific gender preference for their SCC. However, participants indicated a preference for a coaching leadership style, which conveyed (a) leadership ability, (b) professionalism,

  12. The relation between athletic sports and prevalence of amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea in Iranian female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadgostar Haleh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1992, the concept of female athlete triad was introduced to describe the interrelated problems of amenorrhea, eating disorders and osteoporosis seen in female athletes. To gain a clearer picture of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea in Iran, one of the main components of the female athlete triad, we therefore established this study on the prevalence of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea in elite Iranian female athletes, also evaluating the risk factors of these disorders in the same population. Methods This study performed as a cross-sectional study. All elite Iranian female athletes of 34 sports federation, including female athletes in national teams and medalists of Tehran were invited to participate. A total of 788 (95% response rate returned the questionnaires and were examined. Younger athletes under the age of menarche were excluded. Each athlete completed a self-administered questionnaire, which covered the following questions about participant's demographic information, athletic history, history of injuries and menstrual pattern. In order to diagnose the causes of amenorrhea/Oligomenorrhea including polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS, participants with amenorrhea/Oligomenorrhea underwent further investigation. They were evaluated by following Para clinic investigation, and an ultrasonographic study of ovary. Results The age ranged from 13–37 (mean = 21.1, SD = 4.5. Seventy one (9.0% individuals had amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea, among those, 11 (15.5% had PCOS. There was also a positive association between amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea and the following: age under 20 OR; 2.67, 95%CI(1.47 – 4.85, weight class sports OR; 2.09, 95%CI(1.15 – 3.82, endurance sports OR; 2.89, 95%CI(1.22 – 6.84, late onset of menarche OR; 3.32 95%CI(1.04–10.51, and use of oral contraceptive pills OR; 6.17, 95%CI(3.00 – 12.69. Intensity of training sport or BMI were not risk factors. Conclusion These findings support the previous findings in the literature

  13. College Student-Athlete Wellness: An Integrative Outreach Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, James

    2014-01-01

    College student-athletes face unique stressors that can contribute to compromised well-being. Additionally, there are a variety of barriers that prevent student-athletes from accessing mental health supports. This study used self-report questionnaires and qualitative interviews to examine the impact of an integrative outreach model that…

  14. Supporting the Basic Psychological Needs of Athletes with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangraw, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    A subtheory of self-determination theory, basic needs theory (BNT), examines the ways in which social-environmental factors interact with athletes' physical and psychological wellness. When the three psychological needs (autonomy, competence and relatedness) identified in BNT are met in a sport setting, athletes' perceptions of well-being and…

  15. Critical-Thinking Skills of First-Year Athletic Training Students Enrolled in Professional Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Dana K.; Sikkema, Jill A.; Nynas, Suzette M.; Culp, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    Context: The Examination of Professional Degree Level document presented to the National Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Directors states that research in athletic training education has not investigated differences in the critical-thinking skills of professional athletic training students. Objective: Investigate the differences in…

  16. A Comparison of Female College Athletes and Nonathletes: Eating Disorder Symptomatology and Psychological Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Patricia Marten; Shaffer, Carey

    2002-01-01

    Examined eating attitudes, body satisfaction, reasons for exercise, and psychological wellbeing among female nonathletes and college athletes. Data from participant surveys revealed less eating disorder symptomatology and more healthy psychological functioning among athletes, suggesting that female athletic involvement could be associated with…

  17. Identity Development and Life Plan Maturity: A Comparison of Women Athletes and Nonathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer; Bursik, Krisanne

    2000-01-01

    Using a sample of 59 college women (26 athletes and 33 non-athletes), examined whether women higher in identity achievement would describe more mature life plans, ones with greater complexity and stronger commitment to life goals. For athletes, identity achievement was positively associated with life plan commitment, while identity achievement and…

  18. Low-energy density and high fiber intake are dietary concerns in female endurance athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Anna Katarina; Tornberg, Å B; Skouby, Sven O.

    2016-01-01

    of athletes with LEA and/or FHA. Endurance athletes (n = 45) were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocols included gynecological examination, body composition, eating disorder evaluation, and 7-day dietary intake and EA assessment. Athletes with disordered eating behavior/eating...

  19. Radiographic Evidence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Athletes With Athletic Pubalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two of the most common causes of groin pain in athletes are femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and athletic pubalgia. An association between the 2 is apparent, but the prevalence of radiographic signs of FAI in patients undergoing athletic pubalgia surgery remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of radiologic signs of FAI in patients with athletic pubalgia. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that patients with athletic pubalgia would have a high prevale...

  20. Sonographic evaluation of athletic pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Nicholas; Grant, Thomas; Blount, Kevin; Omar, Imran

    2016-05-01

    Athletic pubalgia, or "sports hernia", represents a constellation of pathologic conditions occurring at and around the pubic symphysis. These injuries are primarily seen in athletes or those involved in athletic activity. In this article, we review the sonographic appearance of the relevant complex anatomy, scanning technique for ultrasound evaluation of athletic pubalgia, and the sonographic appearances of associated pathologic conditions.

  1. Intercollegiate Athlete as Student Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Anthony; Simet, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The chapter explores student-athlete campus engagement and challenges faced by athletes that may impede leadership development. The roles of athletic academic advisors, team coaches, and teammates in leadership development are outlined. Current campus initiatives directly related to intercollegiate athlete leadership development are also shared.

  2. The Sport Experience of Athletes with Intellectual Disabilities: A National Survey of Special Olympics Athletes and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Coreen M.; Siperstein, Gary N.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the sport experience for athletes with intellectual disabilities (ID) who participate in Special Olympics (SO). This study included a nationally representative sample of 1,307 families and 579 athletes in the U.S., focusing on sport involvement over the lifespan and motives for participating and for leaving…

  3. ATHLETES ENGAGEMENT MODEL: A GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Martins

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation from a diversity of theoretical perspectives displays that one of the best predictors of children’s continuing involvement in sports is the development of positive feelings for sport involvement (e.g. Martins, Rosado, Ferreira & Biscaia, 2014. In sport, the concept of engagement reflects the energy in action, the connection between the person and the activity, and it is considered as a form of active involvement between the individual and the task (Russell, Ainley, & Frydenberg, 2005. In sport, the concept of athletes’ engagement reflects a relatively stable and long lasting experience that is generically characterized through positive emotions and cognitions when engaged in the act of practicing the given activity (Lonsdale, Hodge, & Raedeke, 2007. Therefore, the analysis of experiences related to engagement is important in order to understand sport participation, and how its different levels can condition the social involvement. In addition, these studies failed to examine potentially important gender differences in engagement among athletes. Therefore, the study of athletes by evaluating their engagement levels comparing genders, can contribute towards shedding light on decisive aspects pertaining to its social involvement within ethical dimensions as well as personal and social responsibility, on which research is still lacking. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of gender on engagement in a sport scenario among youth athletes.

  4. Structure of personality and motivation of extreme sports athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Mahnič

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research was to define the eventual differences between personal and motivational structure among extreme sports athletes and non-athletes. Beside personal and motivational structure of both mentioned groups, we also examined state and trait anxiety as significant factors of success. We used a medium lengthy version of FPI inventory, Costell's questionnaire of achievement motivation and Spielberg's questionnaire STAI – X1 and STAI – X2. The pattern included 66 extreme sports athletes. We concluded that extreme sports athletes are significantly less suppressed and sincere, whereas they are more extrovert and masculine in comparison with the group of non-athletes. A trend that individuals, who reach for extreme sports, are more sociable, and less neurotic is pointed out, but it is not of significant importance. We found out that there is also a tendency that extreme sports athletes express more positive achievement motivation than non-athletes, who on the other hand express significantly higher negative achievement motivation. The analysis of anxiety differences on the other hand showed that extreme sports athletes have significantly lower state of anxiety and the anxiety itself as atrait is far less visible, but the difference did not appear as significant. The results however did not confirme previous studies' findings. Nevertheless they serve as a contribution to some earlier findings and suggest that extreme sports athletes are a special group, which differs from non-athlete population in both personal and motivational structure and relatively well suits to the profile of a top athlete. At the same time, the present research offers a possibility of shaping an extreme sports athlete's profile.

  5. The coaching preferences of elite athletes competing at Universiade '83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, P C

    1984-12-01

    The study investigated the coaching preferences of 95 male and 65 female elite athletes competing at Universiade '83 (Edmonton, Canada). Preferred coaching behaviour (PCB) was measured using a version of the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). Preference scores were analyzed on the basis of sex, age, nationality, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that males prefer significantly more Autocratic behaviour than females (p = .039). Also, athletes in team sports prefer significantly more Training behaviour (p = .001), Autocratic behaviour (p less than .001), and Rewarding behaviour (p = .017), and significantly less Democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and Social Support behaviour (p = .002) than athletes in individual sports. No significant differences in PCB attributable to the age or nationally of the athlete were found. In addition, data collected in a previous study (Terry and Howe, 1984), which examined the PCB of 'club' athletes, was included to facilitate a comparison of club v elite athletes. A MANOVA showed that elite athletes prefer significantly more Democratic behaviour (p = .01) and Social Support behaviour (p = .001), and significantly less Rewarding behaviour (p = .01) than athletes at a 'club' level. Although differences between subject groups were found, it can be concluded that athletes generally tend to favour coaches who "often" display Training behaviour and Rewarding behaviour, "occasionally" display Democratic behaviour and Social Support behaviour, and "seldom" display Autocratic behaviour.

  6. Physical Exam Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Injury in High School Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, James A; Everhart, Joshua S; Clifton, Daniel R; Best, Thomas M; Borchers, James R; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2016-11-01

    A stated goal of the preparticipation physical evaluation (PPE) is to reduce musculoskeletal injury, yet the musculoskeletal portion of the PPE is reportedly of questionable use in assessing lower extremity injury risk in high school-aged athletes. The objectives of this study are: (1) identify clinical assessment tools demonstrated to effectively determine lower extremity injury risk in a prospective setting, and (2) critically assess the methodological quality of prospective lower extremity risk assessment studies that use these tools. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, UptoDate, Google Scholar, Cochrane Reviews, and SportDiscus. Inclusion criteria were prospective injury risk assessment studies involving athletes primarily ages 13 to 19 that used screening methods that did not require highly specialized equipment. Methodological quality was evaluated with a modified physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scale. Nine studies were included. The mean modified PEDro score was 6.0/10 (SD, 1.5). Multidirectional balance (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; CI, 1.5-6.1; P < 0.05) and physical maturation status (P < 0.05) were predictive of overall injury risk, knee hyperextension was predictive of anterior cruciate ligament injury (OR, 5.0; CI, 1.2-18.4; P < 0.05), hip external:internal rotator strength ratio of patellofemoral pain syndrome (P = 0.02), and foot posture index of ankle sprain (r = -0.339, P = 0.008). Minimal prospective evidence supports or refutes the use of the functional musculoskeletal exam portion of the current PPE to assess lower extremity injury risk in high school athletes. Limited evidence does support inclusion of multidirectional balance assessment and physical maturation status in a musculoskeletal exam as both are generalizable risk factors for lower extremity injury.

  7. Physical Exam Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Injury in High School Athletes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, James A.; Everhart, Joshua S.; Clifton, Daniel R.; Best, Thomas M.; Borchers, James R.; Chaudhari, Ajit M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A stated goal of the preparticipation physical evaluation (PPE) is to reduce musculoskeletal injury, yet the musculoskeletal portion of the PPE is reportedly of questionable use in assessing lower extremity injury risk in high school-aged athletes. The objectives of this study are: (1) identify clinical assessment tools demonstrated to effectively determine lower extremity injury risk in a prospective setting, and (2) critically assess the methodological quality of prospective lower extremity risk assessment studies that use these tools. Data Sources A systematic search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, UptoDate, Google Scholar, Cochrane Reviews, and SportDiscus. Inclusion criteria were prospective injury risk assessment studies involving athletes primarily ages 13 to 19 that used screening methods that did not require highly specialized equipment. Methodological quality was evaluated with a modified physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scale. Main Results Nine studies were included. The mean modified PEDro score was 6.0/10 (SD, 1.5). Multidirectional balance (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; CI, 1.5–6.1; P anterior cruciate ligament injury (OR, 5.0; CI, 1.2–18.4; P < 0.05), hip external: internal rotator strength ratio of patellofemoral pain syndrome (P = 0.02), and foot posture index of ankle sprain (r = −0.339, P = 0.008). Conclusions Minimal prospective evidence supports or refutes the use of the functional musculoskeletal exam portion of the current PPE to assess lower extremity injury risk in high school athletes. Limited evidence does support inclusion of multidirectional balance assessment and physical maturation status in a musculoskeletal exam as both are generalizable risk factors for lower extremity injury. PMID:26978166

  8. Energy availability in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure. The review closes by summarizing the implications of this research for managing the diets of athletes.

  9. The deaf athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Trish; Weber, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing athletes have few documented related medical problems. Hearing loss has multiple causes. A portion of those with a hearing loss consider themselves part of the Deaf community, a community with a unique language and culture. Athletes may have assistive devices to enhance their ability to perceive auditory cues, whereas in deaf sport competitions, common auditory cues may be made visible. There are athletic organizations whose missions are to provide a sport and social venue specific to the deaf population. Having a better understanding and appreciation of the Deaf community will help sports medicine physicians to work more effectively with this population.

  10. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome.

  11. Photobiomodulation in athletic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Cui, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Lu, Jian; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been mainly used in athlete trauma care. In this paper, the possible applications of PBM in athlete medical care to maintain pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and in athlete trauma care to treat osteoarthritis and delayed onset of muscular soreness (DOMS) have been discussed. In order to maintain pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis, PBM might be used in an intravascular way, in an endonasal way or in a directly irradiated way. DOMS was supposed to have three phases, z-line disruption, proteolysis of damaged proteins and protein synthesis for myofibril remodeling, each of which might have its own optimum dose of PBM.

  12. Elevated hair cortisol concentrations in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoluda, Nadine; Dettenborn, Lucia; Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    Engaging in intensive aerobic exercise, specifically endurance sports, is associated with HPA axis activation indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Whether the repeated short-term elevations in cortisol levels result in higher long-term cortisol exposure of endurance athletes has been difficult to examine since traditional methods of cortisol assessments (saliva, blood, urine) reflect only relatively short time periods. Hair segment analysis provides a new method to assess cumulative cortisol secretion over prolonged time periods in a retrospective fashion. The aim of this study was to investigate cumulative cortisol secretion over several months reflecting intensive training and competitive races by examining hair cortisol levels of endurance athletes. Hair samples were obtained from 304 amateur endurance athletes (long-distance runners, triathletes, cyclists) and 70 controls. Cortisol concentrations were determined in the first to third 3-cm hair segments most proximal to the scalp. In addition, self-report measures of training volume were obtained. Endurance athletes exhibited higher cortisol levels in all three hair segments compared to controls (pathletes is associated with elevated cortisol exposure over prolonged periods of time. These findings may have important implications with regard to somatic and mental health of athletes which should be investigated in future research.

  13. Striving for success or addiction? Exercise dependence among elite Australian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Justin; McCabe, Marita P

    2012-01-01

    Exercise dependence is a condition that involves a preoccupation and involvement with training and exercise, and has serious health and performance consequences for athletes. We examined the validity of a biopsychosocial model to explain the development and maintenance of exercise dependence among elite Australian athletes. Participants were 234 elite Australian athletes recruited from institutes and academies of sport. Thirty-four percent of elite athletes were classified as having exercise dependence based on high scores on the measure of exercise dependence. These athletes had a higher body mass index, and more extreme and maladaptive exercise beliefs compared to non-dependent athletes. They also reported higher pressure from coaches and teammates, and lower social support, compared to athletes who were not exercise dependent. These results support the utility of a biopsychosocial model of exercise dependence in understanding the aetiology of exercise dependence among elite athletes. Limitations of the study and future research directions are highlighted.

  14. Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term, female athlete triad may lead to reduced physical performance, stress fractures, and other injuries. Over the long term, it can cause bone weakness, long-term effects on the reproductive system, and heart problems. A ...

  15. Female athletes and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malara Marzena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that regular physical activity has a beneficial effect on human health by affecting the metabolic processes that are of fundamental importance in the body’s functions, such as insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal, as well as lipid and lipoprotein turnover. On the other hand, there is a wealth of studies which indicate that strenuous, regular physical activity, such as that performed by high performance athletes, may be detrimental for the athletes’ health especially in women. This review focuses on the factors that contribute to health problems in female athletes, named the female athlete triad, which includes excessive dieting, menstrual dysfunctions (anovulatory menstrual cycles, oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea and a low bone mineral density (BMD. As a result of these factors, women who participate in sports, especially those focused on leanness, need special attention and education from health professionals, coaches and the athletes themselves to prevent the detrimental effects of an inadequate energy supply against high energy demands.

  16. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  17. NUTRIONAL NEEDS OF ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Pandey

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim – is to provide a comprehensive information regarding the nutritional needs of athletes, followed by female athletes who have a higher necessity for Iron. Sports and nutrition are directly related to each other. Taking into consideration the fact that sports person need more energy to carry out their sporting activity effectively, it becomes of prime importance to take care for sports performance. Athletes must supposedly eat the perfect ratio of Protein, carbohydrate and fat at each meal and snack to control the hormonal systems and thus reach their maximum performance and ideal weight .The carbohydrate/protein/fat ratio of the 40-30-30 diet allegedly maintains the proper balance between the hormones insulin and glucagon. The present review focuses on the intake for a wholesome nutrient and well balanced diet for better performance among male as well as female athletes.

  18. Vegetarian athletes: Special requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Dilek Ongan; Gülgün Ersoy

    2012-01-01

    Vegetarian diets have been mentioned on having long and short term beneficial effects while they are important parts of the Western countries. Vegetarians are not homogeneous groups and subjects are motivated to be on a vegetarian diet because of culturel and regional reasons, ethical concerns including animal rights, health parameters and environmental situations. And these reasons differ from vegetarian and omnivour athletes. Athletes, especially endurance ones (sprinters, cyclists, triathl...

  19. female collegiate athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Ayers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Olympic weightlifting movements and their variations are believed to be among the most effective ways to improve power, strength, and speed in athletes. This study investigated the effects of two Olympic weightlifting variations (hang cleans and hang snatches, on power (vertical jump height, strength (1RM back squat, and speed (40-yard sprint in female collegiate athletes. 23 NCAA Division I female athletes were randomly assigned to either a hang clean group or hang snatch group. Athletes participated in two workout sessions a week for six weeks, performing either hang cleans or hang snatches for five sets of three repetitions with a load of 80-85% 1RM, concurrent with their existing, season-specific, resistance training program. Vertical jump height, 1RM back squat, and 40-yard sprint all had a significant, positive improvement from pre-training to post-training in both groups (p≤0.01. However, when comparing the gain scores between groups, there was no significant difference between the hang clean and hang snatch groups for any of the three dependent variables (i.e., vertical jump height, p=0.46; 1RM back squat, p=0.20; and 40-yard sprint, p=0.46. Short-term training emphasizing hang cleans or hang snatches produced similar improvements in power, strength, and speed in female collegiate athletes. This provides strength and conditioning professionals with two viable programmatic options in athletic-based exercises to improve power, strength, and speed.

  20. The Underlying Processes of Athletic Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, Larry M.

    1983-01-01

    Athletic administration is a diverse subject area requiring competence in many skills. The process of administration refers to the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling that takes place to accomplish objectives. This paper examines these four elements and suggests how using these principles will result in more efficient athletic…

  1. The Underlying Processes of Athletic Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, Larry M.

    1983-01-01

    Athletic administration is a diverse subject area requiring competence in many skills. The process of administration refers to the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling that takes place to accomplish objectives. This paper examines these four elements and suggests how using these principles will result in more efficient athletic…

  2. Assessing Intentions to Eat a Healthful Diet Among National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinski, Christine A; Milliner, Kellianne

    2016-01-01

    Many athletes fail to obtain the optimal levels of energy and nutrients to support health and performance. The constructs underlying the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) may help identify barriers to healthful eating that can be addressed in nutrition-education programs. To use the TPB to examine factors regarding collegiate male and female student-athletes' intentions of eating a healthful diet. Cross-sectional study. Online survey tool. The survey was taken by 244 male and female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II athletes, and data from 201 were analyzed. Mean age of the athletes was 20 ± 1.31 years (range, 18-24 years); most were white (86.1%) and female (78.6%). We assessed predictive strength of attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control on behavioral intentions. Regression analysis evaluated how the variables of TPB were valued and how they predict behavioral intentions. The combination of attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral controls accounted for 73.4% (R 2) of the variance in behavioral intention (F = 180.82, P behavioral intentions (β = .534, P < .001). Understanding both the intentions of collegiate athletes to eat healthfully and how highly they value nutrition is crucial for the development of effective nutrition education and counseling programs.

  3. Psychological and social correlates of doping attitudes among Italian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, Giulia; Candela, Filippo; Villosio, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to identify the main psychological and social correlates of doping attitudes among Italian athletes. It is well recognized that athlete disposition and attitude towards doping is one of the factors responsible for doping behavior. Less is known, however, about the factors that sustain the level of athletes' attitudes towards doping. The main psychological (i.e., perfectionism, sport motivation, self-confidence and life satisfaction) and social correlates (i.e., social network and contact with people who use sports drugs) of attitudes towards doping among Italian athletes are examined in this paper. Differences are hypothesized regarding the type of sport (resistance sport vs. non-resistance sport) and athlete participation in competitive sport (i.e., agonistics) or in non-competitive sport (i.e., amateurs) on the level of attitude towards doping. The research hypothesis is that each of these constructs affects the level of athletes' attitudes toward doping. Data were collected from a sample of athletes (N=109), aged from 15 to 45 (M=31.5; SD=13.78) recruited in a Sports Medicine Center. Socio-demographic information, attitude towards doping, psychological and social variables were assessed through self-report questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression showed that both psychological (i.e., extrinsic motivation, perfectionism) and social variables (i.e., athletes' contact with doping users) were associated with athletes' attitudes towards doping. The results highlighted that athletes with excessive perfectionism, extrinsically motivated and who have contact with doping users have a positive attitude toward doping. Athletes who exhibit these characteristics should be considered at risk and monitored to prevent possible future sports drug use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical activity participation and constraints among athletic training students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Justin; Rogers, Katherine; Anderson, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have examined the physical activity (PA) habits of certified athletic trainers; however, none have looked specifically at athletic training students. To assess PA participation and constraints to participation among athletic training students. Cross-sectional study. Entry-level athletic training education programs (undergraduate and graduate) across the United States. Participants were 1125 entry-level athletic training students. Self-reported PA participation, including a calculated PA index based on a typical week. Leisure constraints and demographic data were also collected. Only 22.8% (252/1105) of athletic training students were meeting the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for PA through moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise. Although 52.3% (580/1105) were meeting the recommendations through vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, 60.5% (681/1125) were meeting the recommendations based on the combined total of moderate or vigorous cardiorespiratory exercise. In addition, 57.2% (643/1125) of respondents met the recommendations for resistance exercise. Exercise habits of athletic training students appear to be better than the national average and similar to those of practicing athletic trainers. Students reported structural constraints such as lack of time due to work or studies as the most significant barrier to exercise participation. Athletic training students experienced similar constraints to PA participation as practicing athletic trainers, and these constraints appeared to influence their exercise participation during their entry-level education. Athletic training students may benefit from a greater emphasis on work-life balance during their entry-level education to promote better health and fitness habits.

  5. Effects of Resistance Training in Youth Athletes on Muscular Fitness and Athletic Performance: A Conceptual Model for Long-Term Athlete Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eGranacher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the stages of long-term athlete development (LTAD, resistance training (RT is an important means for (i stimulating athletic development, (ii tolerating the demands of long-term training and competition, and (iii inducing long-term health promoting effects that are robust over time and track into adulthood. However, there is a gap in the literature with regards to optimal RT methods during LTAD and how RT is linked to biological age.Thus, the aims of this scoping review were (i to describe and discuss the effects of RT on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes, (ii to introduce a conceptual model on how to appropriately implement different types of RT within LTAD stages, and (iii to identify research gaps from the existing literature by deducing implications for future research.In general, RT produced small-to-moderate effects on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes with muscular strength showing the largest improvement. Free weight, complex, and plyometric training appear to be well-suited to improve muscular fitness and athletic performance. In addition, balance training appears to be an important preparatory (facilitating training program during all stages of LTAD but particularly during the early stages. As youth athletes become more mature, specificity and intensity of RT methods increase. This scoping review identified research gaps that are summarized in the following and that should be addressed in future studies: (i to elucidate the influence of gender and biological age on the adaptive potential following RT in youth athletes (especially in females, (ii to describe RT protocols in more detail (i.e., always report stress and strain-based parameters, and (iii to examine neuromuscular and tendomuscular adaptations following RT in youth athletes.

  6. Effects of Resistance Training in Youth Athletes on Muscular Fitness and Athletic Performance: A Conceptual Model for Long-Term Athlete Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Lesinski, Melanie; Büsch, Dirk; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Prieske, Olaf; Puta, Christian; Gollhofer, Albert; Behm, David G.

    2016-01-01

    During the stages of long-term athlete development (LTAD), resistance training (RT) is an important means for (i) stimulating athletic development, (ii) tolerating the demands of long-term training and competition, and (iii) inducing long-term health promoting effects that are robust over time and track into adulthood. However, there is a gap in the literature with regards to optimal RT methods during LTAD and how RT is linked to biological age. Thus, the aims of this scoping review were (i) to describe and discuss the effects of RT on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes, (ii) to introduce a conceptual model on how to appropriately implement different types of RT within LTAD stages, and (iii) to identify research gaps from the existing literature by deducing implications for future research. In general, RT produced small-to-moderate effects on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes with muscular strength showing the largest improvement. Free weight, complex, and plyometric training appear to be well-suited to improve muscular fitness and athletic performance. In addition, balance training appears to be an important preparatory (facilitating) training program during all stages of LTAD but particularly during the early stages. As youth athletes become more mature, specificity, and intensity of RT methods increase. This scoping review identified research gaps that are summarized in the following and that should be addressed in future studies: (i) to elucidate the influence of gender and biological age on the adaptive potential following RT in youth athletes (especially in females), (ii) to describe RT protocols in more detail (i.e., always report stress and strain-based parameters), and (iii) to examine neuromuscular and tendomuscular adaptations following RT in youth athletes. PMID:27242538

  7. Perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in junior athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Daniel J.; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggest that perfectionism is a personal factor contributing to athletes’ vulnerability to doping (using banned substances/drugs to enhance sporting performance). So far, however, no study has examined what aspects of perfectionism suggest a vulnerability in junior athletes. Employing a cross-sectional design, this study examined perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in 129 male junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) differentiating four aspects of perfectionism...

  8. Collapse in the Endurance Athlete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Sallis

    2005-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Most cases of collapse are benign in nature and occur after an athlete crosses the finish line or stops exercising. Athletes who collapse before finishing are more likely to have a serious condition.

  9. Australian athletes' health behaviours and perceptions of role modelling and marketing of unhealthy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunseit, Anne C; MacNiven, Rona; Orr, Rhonda; Grassmayr, Matt; Kelly, Bridget; Davies, Daniel; Colagiuri, Stephen; Bauman, Adrian E

    2012-04-01

    This study examined Australian athletes' support for athletes' role in promoting physical activity and obesity prevention, the acceptability of unhealthy products promotion in sport, and their own health behaviours. Surveys were conducted with (n = 1990) elite and sub-elite athletes recruited from 22 sports across Australia. Athletes' perceptions and behaviours were analysed across demographic and sport-related factors (e.g. individual vs team sport) and correlations calculated between perceptions and health behaviours. Most respondents supported a role for athletes in promoting physical activity and obesity prevention, and disagreed that athletes should promote unhealthy foods and alcohol (73.9%). Athletes reported low smoking rates, but high rates of binge drinking. Female, younger, individual and amateur athletes had more health-positive perceptions and healthier behaviours than older, male, team and professional athletes. More sympathy towards junk food and alcohol advertising in sport and less support for athletes as role models were associated with more unhealthy behaviours. Elite athletes are receptive to supporting health promotion through sport and many are not in agreement with the promotion of unhealthy products in sport or by sports people. Improving elite athletes' health behaviours would benefit not only the individual but also health promotion within elite sport.

  10. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  11. Diet Quality of Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Kelly; Stoess, Amanda Ireland; Forsythe, Hazel; Kurzynske, Janet; Vaught, Joy Ann; Adams, Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Collegiate athletes generally appear healthy according to weight for height and body fat standards. Despite the fact that there are well known connections between athletic performance and nutrition, little is known about the diets of collegiate athletes. The objective of this study was to determine the diet quality of 138…

  12. Energy availability in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets...... of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure...

  13. The Cultural Cover-Up of College Athletics: How Organizational Culture Perpetuates an Unrealistic and Idealized Balancing Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Uma M.; Comeaux, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Using a combined grounded theory and case study methodology, Jayakumar and Comeaux examined the role of organizational culture in shaping the lives of college athletes, particularly related to negotiating dual roles as both student and athlete. Data collection involved 20 interviews with athletes and stakeholders in the affairs of intercollegiate…

  14. Fueling the vegetarian (vegan) athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Joel; Ferreri, Deana M

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarian diets are associated with several health benefits, but whether a vegetarian or vegan diet is beneficial for athletic performance has not yet been defined. Based on the evidence in the literature that diets high in unrefined plant foods are associated with beneficial effects on overall health, lifespan, immune function, and cardiovascular health, such diets likely would promote improved athletic performance as well. In this article, we review the state of the literature on vegetarian diets and athletic performance, discuss prevention of potential micronutrient deficiencies that may occur in the vegan athlete, and provide strategies on meeting the enhanced caloric and protein needs of an athlete with a plant-based diet.

  15. Challenging the “Ontology of Aging” in Athletic Career Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkainen, Noora; Ryba, Tatiana

    career and its developmental stage models. A commonly used definition of an athletic career as a pursuit aimed at achieving the person’s peak in athletic performance carries a prescriptive assumption of career discontinuation when the athlete no longer has ‘objective’ possibilities of development. Sport......In this paper, we critically examine the existing theorization of athletic career and how the existing models construct aging and reaching the limits of physical development. We argue that the ‘ontology of aging’ as proposed by Wainwright and Turner (2003) underpins the definition of athletic...... review). Therefore, instead of reproducing dominant relations of power in sports, a more nuanced view is needed in order for career theories to reflect the lived experiences of athletes and to endow athletes with new trajectories in their career development. References Ronkainen, N., Ryba, T.V. & Nesti...

  16. Athlete burnout: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Henrik; DeFreese, J D; Madigan, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Over the last two decades, growing concerns regarding the negative implications of athlete burnout have spurred empirical research on the topic. In their citation network analysis of the burnout literature, Gustafsson et al. (2014), cited well over 100 publications on the syndrome. Despite considerable investigation into athlete burnout, there remain a number of unresolved questions and issues. Four main aims guide the current review. First, we highlight various models of athlete burnout. Second, we discuss the measurement of athlete burnout. Third, we describe the symptoms, antecedents, and consequences of athlete burnout with a focus on social perceptions and perfectionism. Finally, we provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of athlete burnout via an illustration of links between theory and practice. It is our hope that this review can stimulate future research in order to help athletes avoid burnout and other severe forms of training maladaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  18. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  19. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  20. WHITE BLOOD CELLS IN POLISH ATHLETES OF VARIOUS SPORTS DISCIPLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Orysiak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the diversity of white blood cell (WBC counts and their subsets (neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes among competitive athletes of different sports disciplines. The blood samples were collected from 608 healthy, medically examined athletes (181 females and 427 males aged 20.1 ± 5.1 years, who represented five sport disciplines: canoeing, judo, rowing, swimming and volleyball. All blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein in the morning, after overnight fasting, in a seated position. Haematological analyses were conducted using a haematology analyser (ADVIA 120, Siemens. Neutropenia (defined as neutrophil count <2.0 · 10[sup]9[/sup]·L[sup]-1[/sup] was found in athletes of both sexes in each discipline. There was no incident of lymphopenia (defined as a lymphocyte count <1.0 · 10[sup]9[/sup]·L[sup]-1[/sup]. Monocytopenia (defined as a monocyte count <0.2 · 10[sup]9[/sup]·L[sup]-1[/sup] was seen only in male athletes, except judo athletes. Differences in WBC and their subset counts were related to sport disciplines: in volleyball players WBC counts were significantly higher than in athletes of canoeing and rowing (in females; neutrophil counts were the lowest in swimming athletes; lymphocyte counts were lower in athletes of canoeing than in volleyball and swimming, but only in females; monocyte counts were lower in athletes of canoeing than swimming (in females and judo (in males. In women, counts of neutrophils were greater and counts of monocytes were smaller than in men. It seems that prevalence of neutropenia and monocytopenia and differences in WBC counts and their subsets among disciplines could be related to the adaptive response to physical exercise.

  1. Athlete Leadership in Sport Teams: Current Understanding and Future Directions.

    OpenAIRE

    Cotterill, Stewart; Fransen, Katrien

    2016-01-01

    Leadership is a fundamental aspect of sports performance, particularly within team sport environments. Over the past 25 years there has been significant research exploring the role of the coach/manager in this regard. However, this only represents one aspect of leadership within the sporting domain. Equally important, although far less examined is the concept of athlete leadership.\\ud The role of athlete leaders, both formal (e.g., the captain) and informal (such as motivators and cultural ar...

  2. The role of athlete narcissism in moderating the relationship between coaches' transformational leader behaviors and athlete motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Calum Alexander; Woodman, Tim; Ong, Chin Wei; Hardy, Lew; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2011-02-01

    Leadership research that examines follower characteristics as a potential moderator of leadership effectiveness is lacking. Within Bass's (1985) transformational leadership framework, we examined follower narcissism as a moderator of the coach behavior-coach effectiveness relationship. Youth athletes (male = 103, female = 106) from the Singapore Sports Academy (mean age = 14.28, SD = 1.40 years) completed the Differentiated Transformational Leadership Inventory (Callow, Smith, Hardy, Arthur, & Hardy, 2009), the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (Raskin & Terry, 1988), and indices of follower effort. Multilevel analyses revealed that athlete narcissism moderated the relationship between fostering acceptance of group goals and athlete effort and between high performance expectations and athlete effort. All the other transformational leader behaviors demonstrated main effects on follower effort, except for inspirational motivation.

  3. Personal attributes of female basketball athletes in training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Folle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study, based on the Bioecological Theory of Human Development, was aimed at examining the personal attributes of athletes belonging to a prominent club in the field of developing female basketball athletes. Participants were 31 athletes and two coaches who participate in youth sports divisions. Data were collected through semi structured interviews, guided by the following main themes: personal characteristics, motivation for sports, best moments of the sporting career (athletes, sports talent identification process (coaches. Participants’ interviews were analyzed using the content analysis technique, through the categorical type. The information found highlighted the presence of the three dimensions emphasized in the Bioecological Theory of Human Development. Height is presented as an important measure for the detection of athletes (positive demand. Interpersonal relationships stood out as motivating factors for entry in basketball practice, while psychological skills reinforced engagement and maintaining the sports career (generating provisions. Passive features, as well as incompatibilities between mesosystem of athletes’ participation and negative affective interpersonal relationships stood out in terms of favoring disruptive provisions of the temporary withdrawal or feelings of sport abandonment. Finally, positive moments (active resources exceeded negative moments (passive resources when it comes to important moments in sports history. The results found suggest that personal attributes of athletes, in addition to the training process occurred in the sporting environment, have enabled the experience of competence results in the process of development of female basketball athletes.

  4. The relationship between coaching behaviours and sport anxiety in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J; Côté, J; Hawes, R

    2000-06-01

    Previous research has identified the relationship between athlete sport anxiety and various sport outcomes (e.g., performance and dropout). For the majority of athletes involved in sport, the coach is an influential element of the competitive experience. Two hundred and twenty-eight athletes from 15 sports, completed the Sport Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S). The predictive ability of athletes' perceived frequency of seven coaching behaviours (physical training, mental preparation, goal setting, technical skills, competition strategies, personal rapport and negative personal rapport) on four forms of sport anxiety (total anxiety, somatic anxiety, concentration disruption and worry) was examined. Results indicate that negative personal rapport was a significant predictor of all measured forms of sport anxiety while competition strategies was a significant predictor for total anxiety, concentration disruption, and worry. Other behaviours were not significant. The findings suggest that negative rapport between coach and athlete is an important contributor to athlete anxiety. In addition, behaviours that the coach demonstrates relative to competition can be influential in reducing athlete anxiety.

  5. Posterior labral injury in contact athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, S D; Zarzour, R H; Speer, K P

    1998-01-01

    Nine athletes (seven football offensive linemen, one defensive lineman, and one lacrosse player) were found at arthroscopy to have posterior labral detachment from the glenoid. In our series, this lesion is specific to contact athletes who engage their opponents with arms in front of the body. All patients had pain with bench pressing and while participating in their sport, diminishing their ability to play effectively. Conservative measures were ineffective in relieving their symptoms. Examination under anesthesia revealed symmetric glenohumeral translation bilaterally, without evidence of posterior instability. Treatment consisted of glenoid rim abradement and posterior labral repair with a bioabsorbable tack. All patients returned to complete at least one full season of contact sports and weightlifting without pain (minimum follow-up, > or = 2 years). Although many injuries leading to subluxation of the glenohumeral joint occur when an unanticipated force is applied, contact athletes ready their shoulder muscles in anticipation of impact with opponents. This leads to a compressive force at the glenohumeral joint. We hypothesize that, in combination with a posteriorly directed force at impact, the resultant vector is a shearing force to the posterior labrum and articular surface. Repeated exposure leads to posterior labral detachment without capsular injury. Posterior labral reattachment provides consistently good results, allowing the athlete to return to competition.

  6. Dehydration and endurance performance in competitive athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Eric D B

    2012-11-01

    The field of research examining the link between dehydration and endurance performance is at the dawn of a new era. This article reviews the latest findings describing the relationship between exercise-induced dehydration and endurance performance and provides the knowledge necessary for competitive, endurance-trained athletes to develop a winning hydration strategy. Acute, pre-exercise body weight loss at or above 3% may decrease subsequent endurance performance. Therefore, endurance athletes should strive to start exercise well hydrated, which can be achieved by keeping thirst sensation low and urine color pale and drinking approximately 5-10 mL/kg body weight of water 2 h before exercise. During exercise lasting 1 h or less, dehydration does not decrease endurance performance, but athletes are encouraged to mouth-rinse with sports drinks. During exercise lasting longer than 1 h, in which fluid is readily available, drinking according to the dictates of thirst maximizes endurance performance. In athletes whose thirst sensation is untrustworthy or when external factors such as psychological stress or repeated food intake may blunt thirst sensation, it is recommended to program fluid intake to maintain exercise-induced body weight loss around 2% to 3%.

  7. Low Back Pain in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, G D

    1987-01-01

    In brief: Low back pain in seasoned athletes is not common, but when present it can limit participation. While direct blows or hyperlor-dotic positions can cause low back pain in certain sports, the most common cause is overuse and resultant strains or sprains of the paravertebral muscles and ligaments. Such injuries cause acute pain and spasm, which sometimes do not appear for 24 hours or longer. Diagnosis is based on history, ruling out of systemic maladies, physical examination, and, if necessary, supplemental tests such as x-rays, myelograms, and bone scans. Treatment of low back pain due to overuse is, sequentially, bed rest and ice for 24 to 36 hours, heat and massage, analgesics as needed, and a lumbosacral support until flexion and strengthening exercises have returned the damaged part to normal.

  8. Energy availability and the female athlete triad in elite endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, A; Tornberg, Å B; Skouby, S; Møller, S S; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Faber, J; Sidelmann, J J; Aziz, M; Sjödin, A

    2015-10-01

    The female athlete triad (Triad), links low energy availability (EA), with menstrual dysfunction (MD), and impaired bone health. The aims of this study were to examine associations between EA/MD and energy metabolism and the prevalence of Triad-associated conditions in endurance athletes. Forty women [26.2 ± 5.5 years, body mass index (BMI) 20.6 ± 2.0 kg/m(2), body fat 20.0 ± 3.0%], exercising 11.4 ± 4.5 h/week, were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocol included gynecological examination; assessment of bone health; indirect respiratory calorimetry; diet and exercise measured 7 days to assess EA; eating disorder (ED) examination; blood analysis. Subjects with low/reduced EA (Triad conditions. 53% had low RMR, 25% hypercholesterolemia, and 38% hypoglycemia. Conclusively, athletes with low/reduced EA and/or MD had lowered RMR. Triad-associated conditions were common in this group of athletes, despite a normal BMI range. The high prevalence of ED, MD, and impaired bone health emphasizes the importance of prevention, early detection, and treatment of energy deficiency.

  9. The Athletic Foot and Its Import to Performance during Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Richard

    In this paper, problems and conditions of the foot, including flat feet, achilles tendon problems, heel spur syndrome, digital problems, shin splints, and leg stress fractures, are examined. Ways to examine the athlete's foot and leg are described, including the one-foot test and the off weight-bearing examination. (CJ)

  10. Nutrition for the pediatric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Viswanath B; Goulopoulou, Styliani

    2004-08-01

    A paucity of literature exists with regard to research on nutrition for the pediatric athlete. This lack of research makes the development of specific nutritional recommendations for young athletes problematic. This issue is made difficult by the macro- and micronutrient intake required for growth and development in conjunction with that required for sports. Exogenous carbohydrate drinks could be considered for the young athlete engaged in both endurance exercise and high-intensity exercise. Monitoring of the energy intake during resistance training in the pediatric athlete needs to be considered, as there is evidence to suggest that energy deficits may occur. If decrements in exercise performance are noted, then serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations should be monitored, as nonanemic iron deficiency is prevalent in the pediatric athlete. The pediatric athlete exercising in the heat is susceptible to voluntary dehydration and evidence exists to suggest that a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink will abolish this phenomenon.

  11. WWC Quick Review of the Article "Outcomes of a Prospective Trial of Student-Athlete Drug Testing: The Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification ('SATURN') Study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether the Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification ("SATURN") program affects illicit drug and alcohol use among student athletes. The study experienced high rates of sample attrition. Seven of the 18 study schools (39%) left the study and were not included in the analysis. Some students at the remaining…

  12. An ancient greek pain remedy for athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else M.; Swaddling, Judith; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2006-01-01

    and swellings, which was reserved for use by the winners of Olympic events, the so-called "Fuscum Olympionico inscriptum"-(ointment) entitled "dark Olympic victor's". In a time when the Olympic games have recently returned to their homeland, we examine the potential efficacy of this ancient remedy in terms...... of pain relief, the novelty of transdermal pain management, and the ability of ancient physicians to attend to the sports-related needs of highly tuned athletes....

  13. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  14. [Athletic pubalgia and hip impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaudin, A; Schindler, M; Ziltener, J-L; Menetrey, J

    2014-07-16

    Athletic pubalgia is a painful and complex syndrom encountered by athletes involved in pivoting and cutting sports such as hockey and soccer. To date, there is no real consensus on the criteria for a reliable diagnostic, the different investigations, and the appropriate therapy. Current literature underlines intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributing to athletic pubalgia. This review article reports upon two novelties related to the issue: the importance and efficience of prevention program and the association of femoro-acetabular impingement with the pubalgia.

  15. Morphological optimization of female combat sports athletes as seen by the anthropologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukiewicz Anna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Body build and proportions are key determinants of athletic success. The effects of the athlete selection process and discipline-specific training are differentiated body dimensions. The aim of the study was to examine the physical characteristics of female combat athletes. The results of anthropometric measurements of 154 females aged 21.2±1.79 years competing in judo, jiu-jitsu, karate, taekwondo, and fencing for 7.5±3.43 years.

  16. Sports Nutrition Knowledge among Mid-Major Division I University Student-Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley Andrews; Wojcik, Janet R; Boyd, Joni M.; Bowers, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Competitive athletes have goals to optimize performance and to maintain healthy body composition. Sports nutrition is a component of training programs often overlooked by student-athletes and their coaches. The purpose of this study was to examine student-athletes’ sports nutrition knowledge across sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Participants included 123 mid-major Division I university student-athletes (47 females and 76 males) from baseball, softball, m...

  17. The young female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Michal; Weiss, Ram

    2009-12-01

    Participation of adolescents and young women in strenuous sports activity may lead to various metabolic and psychological derangements of clinical relevance to the endocrinologist. The most common manifestations encountered in practice are primary and secondary amenorrhea, reduced bone mineral density and eating disorders. The occurrence of all three together has been named "the athletic triad". The underlying hormonal drivers that lead to some of these manifestations are the reduced leptin level as well as the persistent low grade stress response commonly observed in such females. "Exercise-related female reproductive dysfunction" (ERFRD), can possibly include short-term (infertility) and long-term (osteoporosis) consequences. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, a manifestation of ERFRD in adolescence, is an integrated response to the combination of excessive physical and emotional stress, exercise, and/or reduced food intake characterized by decreased endogenous GNRH secretion. The primary aim of treating these athletes should be the prevention of the development of any component of the triad as well as the whole complex by educating athletes, trainers, parents and health care professionals about proper nutrition and safe training. The long term prognosis is good. However, significant long term morbidity may affect these young women later in life.

  18. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality.

  19. Elite athletes and pubertal delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczuk, Karina

    2017-10-01

    Intensive physical training and participation in competitive sports during childhood and early adolescence may affect athletes' pubertal development. On the other hand, pubertal timing, early or late, may impact on an athlete selection for a particular sport. Genetic predisposition, training load, nutritional status and psychological stress determine athletes' pubertal timing. Athletes that practice esthetic sports, especially gymnasts, are predisposed to a delay in pubertal development. The growing evidence indicates that energy deficiency, not a systemic training per se, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of functional hypothalamic hypogonadism in female athletes. Metabolic and psychologic stress activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and suppress hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Female athletes who do not begin secondary sexual development by the age of 14 or menstruation by the age of 16 warrant a comprehensive evaluation and a targeted treatment. Somatic growth and sexual maturation of elite female athletes are largely sport-specific since each sport favors a particular somatotype and requires a specific training. Chronic negative energy balance resulting from a systemic physical training and inadequate energy intake may delay pubertal development in elite athletes. Youth athletes, especially those engaged in competitive sports that emphasize prepubertal or lean appearance, are at risk of developing relative energy deficiency in sport associated with disordered eating or eating disorders. Management strategies should address the complex conditions underlying functional hypothalamic hypogonadism.

  20. Athlete burnout in elite sport: a self-determination perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Chris; Hodge, Ken; Rose, Elaine

    2009-06-01

    Using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) as the theoretical framework, we examined potential antecedents of athlete burnout in 201 elite Canadian athletes (121 females, 80 males; mean age 22.9 years). Employing a cross-sectional design, our primary aims were to investigate the relationships between behavioural regulations and athlete burnout and to examine whether self-determined motivation mediated relationships between basic needs satisfaction and athlete burnout. Our self-determination theory-derived hypotheses were largely supported. Relationships among athlete burnout and behavioural regulations mostly varied according to their rank on the self-determination continuum, with less self-determined motives showing positive associations and more self-determined motives showing negative correlations with burnout. The basic needs of competence and autonomy, plus self-determined motivation, accounted for significant amounts of variance in athlete burnout symptoms (exhaustion, R(2) = 0.31; devaluation, R(2) = 0.49; reduced accomplishment, R(2) = 0.61; global burnout, R(2) = 0.74). Self-determined motivation fully mediated the relationships that competence and autonomy had with exhaustion. Analyses showed indirect relationships between these two needs and devaluation, through their associations with self-determined motivation. Motivation partially mediated the needs-reduced sense of accomplishment relationships, but the direct effects were more prominent than the indirect effects.

  1. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Vahid; Lotfian, Sara; Amini, Homayoun; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali; Memari, Amir-Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Objective Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents’ behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70), karateka (n=66), swimmers (n=59), and non athletes (n=96). One stage cluster sampling method was used to select judoka, karateka, and swimmers from sport clubs in Tehran. Students of governmental schools at the same area were chosen as the non-athletes group. The “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” questionnaire was utilized to assess the anger rate. Findings The mean age of participants was 12.90(±2.06) years. The total anger rates were 45.40 (±5.61) in judoka, 41.53(±5.63) in karateka, 41.19(±5.33) in swimmers, and 45.44 (±8.58) in non athletes. In total anger scale karateka and swimmers had a significantly lower score compared to judoka and non athletes. In instrumental anger subscale the difference was significant just between karateka and non athletes. In reactive anger subscale judoka showed higher scores than swimmers. In anger control subscale the difference was significant between judoka and swimmers and also judoka and karateka. The difference of anger control between karateka and non athletes was significant. Conclusion The findings of this study propose a difference in the anger rate between judoka and karateka. In contrary to the results of previous studies, judo training may have no influence on anger control, while karate training could be beneficial. PMID:23056853

  2. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Vahid; Lotfian, Sara; Amini, Homayoun; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali; Memari, Amir-Hossein

    2012-03-01

    Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents' behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70), karateka (n=66), swimmers (n=59), and non athletes (n=96). One stage cluster sampling method was used to select judoka, karateka, and swimmers from sport clubs in Tehran. Students of governmental schools at the same area were chosen as the non-athletes group. The "Adolescent Anger Rating Scale" questionnaire was utilized to assess the anger rate. The mean age of participants was 12.90(±2.06) years. The total anger rates were 45.40 (±5.61) in judoka, 41.53(±5.63) in karateka, 41.19(±5.33) in swimmers, and 45.44 (±8.58) in non athletes. In total anger scale karateka and swimmers had a significantly lower score compared to judoka and non athletes. In instrumental anger subscale the difference was significant just between karateka and non athletes. In reactive anger subscale judoka showed higher scores than swimmers. In anger control subscale the difference was significant between judoka and swimmers and also judoka and karateka. The difference of anger control between karateka and non athletes was significant. The findings of this study propose a difference in the anger rate between judoka and karateka. In contrary to the results of previous studies, judo training may have no influence on anger control, while karate training could be beneficial.

  3. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison Among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Mansournia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents’ behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70, karateka (n=66, swimmers (n=59, and non athletes (n=96. One stage cluster sampling method was used to select judoka, karateka, and swimmers from sport clubs in Tehran. Students of governmental schools at the same area were chosen as the non-athletes group. The “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” questionnaire was utilized to assess the anger rate.Findings: The mean age of participants was 12.90(±2.06 years. The total anger rates were 45.40 (±5.61 in judoka, 41.53(±5.63 in karateka, 41.19(±5.33 in swimmers, and 45.44 (±8.58 in non athletes. In total anger scale karateka and swimmers had a significantly lower score compared to judoka and non athletes. In instrumental anger subscale the difference was significant just between karateka and non athletes. In reactive anger subscale judoka showed higher scores than swimmers. In anger control subscale the difference was significant between judoka and swimmers and also judoka and karateka. The difference of anger control between karateka and non athletes was significant.Conclusion: The findings of this study propose a difference in the anger rate between judoka and karateka. In contrary to the results of previous studies, judo training may have no influence on anger control, while karate training could be beneficial.

  4. Exercise Addiction in Athletes and Leisure Exercisers: The Moderating Role of Passion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Ricardo; Parastatidou, Irini S; Ruíz-Barquín, Roberto; Szabo, Attila

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Recently, empirical research has linked obsessive passion to the etiology of exercise addiction, and the conceptual reason behind the fact that the latter is more prevalent in athletes than leisure exercisers has been challenged. The aim of this study was to determine the link between exercise addiction and harmonious passion, obsessive passion, and dedication to sports, in the context of athletic levels. Method A sample comprised of low- and high-level competitive athletes and non-competitive leisure exercisers (n = 313) was examined, in a cross-sectional design, in which participants completed the Spanish validated versions of the Exercise Addiction Inventory (Sicilia, Alías-García, Ferriz, & Moreno-Murcia, 2013) and Passion Scale (Chamarro et al., 2015). Results Obsessive passion and dedication to sports emerged as strong predictors of exercise addiction. Competitive athletes scored higher than leisure exercisers on all measures. Athletes competing at low and high levels only differed in dedication to their sports from each other. Team-sports athletes reported greater harmonious and obsessive passions, and dedication to sports, but not different exercise addictions, than people taking part in individual sports. Conclusions The concept of exercise addiction is not a plain and independent construct and may not reflect a psychological dysfunction in the athletic population. Athletes could interpret exercise addiction screening-items differently from non-athletes. Athletes in team sports report greater passion and dedication than those practicing individual sports.

  5. Sports Nutrition Knowledge among Mid-Major Division I University Student-Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Andrews

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive athletes have goals to optimize performance and to maintain healthy body composition. Sports nutrition is a component of training programs often overlooked by student-athletes and their coaches. The purpose of this study was to examine student-athletes’ sports nutrition knowledge across sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Participants included 123 mid-major Division I university student-athletes (47 females and 76 males from baseball, softball, men’s soccer, track and field, and tennis. The student-athletes completed a survey questionnaire to determine adequate sports nutrition knowledge (mean ≥ 75%. The overall mean sports nutrition knowledge score for the student-athletes was 56.9% which was considered inadequate sports nutrition knowledge (mean < 75%. Only 12 student-athletes achieved adequate sports nutrition knowledge score of 75% or higher. There were no differences by sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Student-athletes’ inadequate sports nutrition knowledge may place them at nutrition risk, lead to impaired performance, and affect their lean body mass and energy levels. Athletics personnel should not assume student-athletes have adequate sports nutrition knowledge. Athletic departments may make available a board certified Sports Dietitian or Registered Dietitian and offer classroom or online courses facilitating student-athletes to optimize nutrition knowledge and behaviors.

  6. The influence of athletic status on maximal and rapid isometric torque characteristics and postural balance performance in Division I female soccer athletes and non-athlete controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ty B; Hawkey, Matt J; Thiele, Ryan M; Conchola, Eric C; Adams, Bailey M; Akehi, Kazuma; Smith, Doug B; Thompson, Brennan J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of maximal and rapid isometric torque characteristics of the hip extensor muscles and postural balance performance to discriminate between female collegiate soccer athletes and non-athlete controls. Ten athletes (mean ± SE: age = 19·20 ± 0·36 year; mass = 62·23 ± 3·12 kg; height = 162·43 ± 1·70 cm) and 10 non-athletes (age = 20·30 ± 0·40 year; mass = 69·64 ± 3·20 kg; height = 163·22 ± 2·10 cm) performed two isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the hip extensor muscles. Peak torque (PT) and absolute and relative rate of torque development (RTD) at early (0-50 ms) and late (100-200 ms) phases of muscle contraction were examined during each MVC. Postural balance was assessed using a commercially designed balance testing device, which provides a measurement of static stability based on sway index (SI). Results indicated that absolute and relative RTD at 0-50 ms (RTD50 and RTD50norm) were greater (P = 0·007 and 0·026), and postural SI was lower (P = 0·022) in the athletes compared with the non-athletes. However, no differences (P = 0·375-0·709) were observed for PT nor absolute and relative RTD at 100-200 ms (RTD100-200 and RTD100-200norm). Significant relationships were also observed between RTD50 and RTD50norm and SI (r = -0·559 and -0·521; P = 0·010 and 0·019). These findings suggest that early rapid torque characteristics of the hip extensor muscles and postural balance performance may be sensitive and effective measures for discriminating between college-aged athletes and non-athletes. Coaches and practitioners may use these findings as performance evaluation tools to help in identifying athletes with both superior early rapid torque and balance performance abilities, which may possibly be an indicator of overall athletic potential.

  7. Parallels with the Female Athlete Triad in Male Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Barrack, Michelle T; Nattiv, Aurelia; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Participation in sports offers many health benefits to athletes of both sexes. However, subsets of both female and male athletes are at increased risk of impaired bone health and bone stress injuries. The Female Athlete Triad (Triad) is defined as the interrelationship of low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. The Triad may result in health consequences, including bone stress injuries. Our review presents evidence that an analogous process may occur in male athletes. Our review of the available literature indicates that a subset of male athletes may experience adverse health issues that parallel those associated with the Triad, including low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and low bone mineral density. Consequently, male athletes may be predisposed to developing bone stress injuries, and these injuries can be the first presenting feature of associated Triad conditions. We discuss the evidence for impaired nutrition, hormonal dysfunction, and low bone mineral density in a subset of male athletes, and how these health issues may parallel those of the Triad. With further research into the mechanisms and outcomes of these health concerns in active and athletic men, evidence-based guidelines can be developed that result in best practice.

  8. Vascular adaptation in athletes: is there an 'athlete's artery'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Spence, A.; Rowley, N.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Naylor, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst the existence of a specific phenotype characterized as 'athlete's heart' is generally acknowledged, the question of whether athletes exhibit characteristic vascular adaptations has not been specifically addressed. To do so in this symposium, studies which have assessed the size, wall thicknes

  9. Spatial Ability Differences in Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cynthia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive processes, specifically spatial abilities, are responsible for integration of daily activities. Many factors contribute to the plasticity of the brain which, furthermore, alter the spatial ability. Physical activity, which can be further grouped into sport and exercise, is a modifiable factor that enhances the cognitive processes through a divergent mechanism. This study aimed to gain further understanding on whether sport differs from exercise in altering spatial ability in athletes and non-athletes. Methods: This observational study compared the spatial ability score of athletes of Indonesia National Sport Comitte (Komite Olahraga Nasional Indonesia, KONI in West Java (n= 21 and non-athletes (n= 21. Sampling were performed using stratified random technique and data were collected between August and October 2015 which included spatial scores and demographic of subjects. Results: The difference in spatial scores between athletes and non-athletes were not significant (p=0.432. Conclusions: This study suggests an insignificant difference in spatial ability in athletes performing sport and non-athletes performing exercise. Hence, the cognitive component skills in sport experience do not alter the spatial ability.

  10. A qualitative examination of wheelchair configuration for optimal mobility performance in wheelchair sports : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Barry S.; Porcellato, Lorna; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    Objective: To examine wheelchair athletes' perceptions of wheelchair configuration in relation to aspects of mobility performance. Methods: Nine elite wheelchair athletes from wheelchair basketball, wheelchair rugby and wheelchair tennis were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Interview

  11. A qualitative examination of wheelchair configuration for optimal mobility performance in wheelchair sports : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Barry S.; Porcellato, Lorna; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine wheelchair athletes' perceptions of wheelchair configuration in relation to aspects of mobility performance. Methods: Nine elite wheelchair athletes from wheelchair basketball, wheelchair rugby and wheelchair tennis were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Interview tra

  12. A qualitative examination of wheelchair configuration for optimal mobility performance in wheelchair sports : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Barry S.; Porcellato, Lorna; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine wheelchair athletes' perceptions of wheelchair configuration in relation to aspects of mobility performance. Methods: Nine elite wheelchair athletes from wheelchair basketball, wheelchair rugby and wheelchair tennis were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Interview tra

  13. Psychosocial aspects of athletic injuries as perceived by athletic trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Damien; Granquist, Megan D; Arvinen-Barrow, Monna M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the Psychosocial Strategies and Referral content area, athletic trainers (ATs) generally lack confidence in their ability to use this information. The current study's primary purpose was to determine (a) perceived psychological responses and coping behaviors athletes may present to ATs, (b) psychosocial strategies ATs currently use with their athletes, (c) psychosocial strategies ATs deem important to learn more about, and (d) ATs' current practices in referring athletes to counseling or sport psychology services. Mixed-methods study. Online survey containing both quantitative and qualitative items. A total of 215 ATs (86 male, 129 female), representing a response rate of 22.50%. The Athletic Training and Sport Psychology Questionnaire. Stress/anxiety (4.24 ± 0.82), anger (3.70 ± 0.96), and treatment adherence problems (3.62 ± 0.94) were rated as the primary psychological responses athletes may present upon injury. Adherence and having a positive attitude were identified as key determinants in defining athletes' successful coping with their injuries. The top 3 selected psychosocial strategies were keeping the athlete involved with the team (4.57 ± 0.73), using short-term goals (4.45 ± 0.67), and creating variety in rehabilitation exercises (4.32 ± 0.75). The top 3 rated psychosocial strategies ATs deem important to learn more about were understanding motivation (4.29 ± 0.89), using effective communication (4.24 ± 0.91), and setting realistic goals (4.22 ± 0.97). Of the sample, only 59 (27.44%) ATs reported referring an athlete for counseling services, and 37 (84.09%) of those who had access to a sport psychologist (n = 44) reported referring for sport psychology services. These results not only highlight ATs' current use of psychosocial strategies but also their desires to increase their current knowledge and understanding of these strategies while caring for injured athletes.

  14. Comparison of brachial artery vasoreactivity in elite power athletes and age-matched controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Welsch

    Full Text Available Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes.To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls.Eight elite power athletes (age = 23 ± 2 years and ten controls (age = 22 ± 1 yrs were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD and a cold pressor test (CPT. Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test.Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39 ± 1.51 vs.3.73 ± 0.71 mm, p0.05 and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88 ± 21 vs.98 ± 26 bpm, p>0.05 following the step test.Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an 'athlete's artery' as previously shown for elite endurance athletes to elite power athletes, and presents a hypothetical explanation for the functional significance of the 'power athlete's artery'.

  15. Comparison of brachial artery vasoreactivity in elite power athletes and age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Michael A; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P; Parish, Tracie R

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Eight elite power athletes (age = 23 ± 2 years) and ten controls (age = 22 ± 1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39 ± 1.51 vs. 3.73 ± 0.71 mm, p0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88 ± 21 vs. 98 ± 26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an 'athlete's artery' as previously shown for elite endurance athletes to elite power athletes, and presents a hypothetical explanation for the functional significance of the 'power athlete's artery'.

  16. Self-reported concussion symptoms and training routines in mixed martial arts athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher J; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact, fighting sport that has risen in popularity over recent years, resulting in an increase in both training facilities and sport participants. To date, little research has examined the complications and vulnerability to head trauma, or concussive symptomatology, in MMA athletes. In this study, we assessed relationships between training routines and concussive symptoms, as well as medical care, in MMA athletes. A sample (N = 119) of MMA athletes reported concussive symptoms, training routines, and medical histories through an online survey. Nearly 15% of the MMA athletes reported history of a knockout, and nearly one-third reported a technical knockout. Subjective ratings of concussive symptoms were high for these athletes, with many of them waiting only a brief time after such incidents to return to competition. These findings have important implications for informing the medical treatment and safety decision for returning to participation for these athletes.

  17. Core Muscle Injury/Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia, and Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James R; Stone, Rebecca M; Larson, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Core muscle injury/sports hernia/athletic pubalgia is an increasingly recognized source of pain, disability, and time lost from athletics. Groin pain among athletes, however, may be secondary to various etiologies. A thorough history and comprehensive physical examination, coupled with appropriate diagnostic imaging, may improve the diagnostic accuracy for patients who present with core muscular injuries. Outcomes of nonoperative management have not been well delineated, and multiple operative procedures have been discussed with varying return-to-athletic activity rates. In this review, we outline the clinical entity and treatment of core muscle injury and athletic pubalgia. In addition, we describe the relationship between athletic pubalgia and femoroacetabular impingement along with recent studies that have investigated the treatment of these related disorders.

  18. The World Anti-Doping Code: can you have asthma and still be an elite athlete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Fitch

    2016-06-01

    The World Anti-Doping Code (the Code has not prevented asthmatic individuals from becoming elite athletes. This review examines those sections of the Code that are relevant to respiratory physicians who manage elite and sub-elite athletes with asthma. The restrictions that the Code places or may place on the prescription of drugs to prevent and treat asthma in athletes are discussed. In addition, the means by which respiratory physicians are able to treat their elite asthmatic athlete patients with drugs that are prohibited in sport are outlined, along with some of the pitfalls in such management and how best to prevent or minimise them.

  19. Imaging of athletic pubalgia and core muscle injuries: clinical and therapeutic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisch, Andrew; Zoga, Adam C; Meyers, William C

    2013-07-01

    Athletes frequently injure their hips and core muscles. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of groin pain in the athlete can be tricky, frequently posing vexing problem for trainers and physicians. Clinical presentations of the various hip problems overlap with respect to history and physical examination. This article reviews clinical presentations and magnetic resonance imaging findings specific to the various causes of groin pain in the athlete. The focus is on the core muscle injuries (athletic pubalgia or "sports hernia"). The goal is to raise awareness about the variety of injuries that occur and therapeutic options.

  20. Gender attitudes and sexual behaviors: comparing center and marginal athletes and nonathletes in a collegiate setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Elizabeth Ann

    2008-09-01

    This research examines the impact of participating in different sports on male athletes' gender attitudes, hegemonic masculinity, sexual behavior, and sexual aggression. Expanding on past research that compares athletes with nonathletes, this research finds differences between collegiate athletes and men who do not participate in collegiate sports, as well as between men who play different collegiate sports. Athletes in center sports (such as football) scored significantly higher on hyper-masculinity scales, had lower attitudes toward women, and displayed more sexual aggression and more sexual activity than men who competed in marginal sports (e.g., track and field) or not at all.

  1. An ancient Greek pain remedy for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Else M; Swaddling, Judith; Harrison, Adrian P

    2006-09-01

    While Hippocratic writings make no reference to the actual Olympics, there is frequent mention of diet, exercise, and the treatment of injuries sustained by the athletic participants. Indeed, Galen in his Composition of Medicines gives details of a remedy prescribed for the relief of pains and swellings, which was reserved for use by the winners of Olympic events, the so-called "Fuscum Olympionico inscriptum"--(ointment) entitled "dark Olympic victor's." In a time when the Olympic games have recently returned to their homeland, we examine the potential efficacy of this ancient remedy in terms of pain relief, the novelty of transdermal pain management, and the ability of ancient physicians to attend to the sports-related needs of highly tuned athletes.

  2. [Epidemiology of maxillofacial injuries in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Marcin; Mazur-Psonka, Lidia; Drugacz, Jan; Krajewski-Siuda, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The general enthusiasm connected with sports activities causes that we often forget about threat connected with careless sports activities. The aim of this paper was the evaluation of causes and frequencies of maxillofacial injuries in hospitalized athletes in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery in Katowice. Period between 1992-2002 was analyzed. Material consisted of 59 patients in whom injury required hospitalization. In studied material the frequency and causes of maxillofacial injuries in athletes in eleven-year period was examined. Male and female patients were divided in two groups: I--team sports and II--individual sports. In analyzed material injuries of upper part of facial skull were not affirmed. Injuries of upper facial massif overweighed its bottom massif injuries.

  3. Injuries to the Young Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandusky, Jane C.

    A review of literature on the incidence and nature of injuries to young athletes is presented on the topics of: (1) physiological characteristics of preadolescents, adolescents, and young adults; (2) musculo-skeletal changes in the growing athlete; (3) epiphyseal injuries and their potential for resulting in temporary or permanent impairment; (4)…

  4. Avoid Overtraining in Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rearick, Matt; Creasy, John; Buriak, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Each year many young athletes suffer injuries from overtraining. According to the existing literature, strategies do exist to help control this growing problem. This article explores the basic nature of training and overtraining, with a particular emphasis on endurance athletes. Several psychological factors are highlighted as the first clear…

  5. SUPPLEMENT USE BY YOUNG ATHLETES

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    Jill Anne McDowall

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews studies of supplement use among child and adolescent athletes, focusing on prevalence and type of supplement use, as well as gender comparisons. Supplement use among adult athletes has been well documented however there are a limited number of studies investigating supplement use by child and adolescent athletes. A trend in the current literature revealed that the most frequently used supplements are in the form of vitamin and minerals. While health and illness prevention are the main reasons for taking supplements, enhanced athletic performance was also reported as a strong motivating factor. Generally, females are found to use supplements more frequently and are associated with reasons of health, recovery, and replacing an inadequate diet. Males are more likely to report taking supplements for enhanced performance. Both genders equally rated increased energy as another reason for engaging in supplement use. Many dietary supplements are highly accessible to young athletes and they are particularly vulnerable to pressures from the media and the prospect of playing sport at increasingly elite levels. Future research should provide more direct evidence regarding any physiological side effects of taking supplements, as well as the exact vitamin and mineral requirements for child and adolescent athletes. Increased education for young athletes regarding supplement use, parents and coaches should to be targeted to help the athletes make the appropriate choices

  6. Prevalence of Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm by laboratory exercise challenge among Ragunan Sport School athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatio Rika

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB is a common condition among adolescent athletes. There has been no study examining the prevalence of EIB among adolescent athletes in Indonesia. This study aimed to get the prevalence of EIB among Ragunan Sport School athletes by laboratory exercise challenge. Subjects performed static cycle ergometer exercise (Monark, Sweden to reach minimal workload of 90% maximal heart rate. Force expiratory ventilation (FEV₁ was examined by spirometry (Minato AS-PAL, Japan at minute 0, 5, 10 and 20 post exercise. The EIB was defined as a decline of FEV₁ as much as 10% or more from baseline value. Room temperature and humidity were 28°C-31°C and 74%-82% respectively. There were 168 athletes from 12 sport types who participated in this study. Among them, 23 athletes (13.7% were EIB positive. The highest percentage of EIB was in taekwondo (54.5%. Sixteen athletes with EIB (70% were from less asthmogenic sports. Athletes with EIB consisted of 17 (17.5% females and 6 (8.4% males. In conclusion, the prevalence of EIB among adolescent athletes was moderately high, and was more prevalent in female. More over, laboratory exercise challenge could elicit EIB in less asthmogenic sport. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 33-6Keywords: adolescent athlete, asthmogenic sports

  7. Iron and the endurance athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2014-09-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that is highly significant to endurance athletes. Iron is critical to optimal athletic performance because of its role in energy metabolism, oxygen transport, and acid-base balance. Endurance athletes are at increased risk for suboptimal iron status, with potential negative consequences on performance, because of the combination of increased iron needs and inadequate dietary intake. This review paper summarizes the role of iron in maximal and submaximal exercise and describes the effects of iron deficiency on exercise performance. Mechanisms that explain the increased risk of iron deficiency in endurance athletes, including exercise-associated inflammation and hepcidin release on iron sequestration, are described. Information on screening athletes for iron deficiency is presented, and suggestions to increase iron intake through diet modification or supplemental iron are provided.

  8. Type 1 Diabetes and Sports Participation: Strategies for Training and Competing Safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draznin, Martin B.

    2000-01-01

    Athletes with type 1 diabetes require frequent blood glucose checks throughout the day and intensive diabetes management to balance insulin, carbohydrate intake, and the effects of exercise. Effective care begins with a targeted preparticipation examination. Decreasing insulin dosage may be necessary for heavier exercise programs. Analysis of…

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Hip Girdle Pain in the Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Cheng, Abby

    2016-03-01

    Evaluation of an athlete's report of "hip pain" is challenging. Many conditions involving the pelvic girdle can present with overlapping pain distributions, and athletes often may have coexisting disorders. Appropriate evaluation requires thorough, systematic consideration of intra-articular hip disease, extra-articular local causes of hip pain, and referred pain from other musculoskeletal or even visceral sources. Although our understanding of intra-articular hip disorders has been greatly enhanced in recent decades through advances in hip arthroscopy, gaps still exist in our understanding of appropriate treatment, including effective nonsurgical protocols and when to consider surgical intervention. For instance, we have a better understanding of hip dysfunction related to structural changes that occur prior to the onset of arthritis, but we are also learning that correction of the structural changes does not always guarantee a correction of dysfunction and pain. Furthermore, athletes need instruction and guidance in retraining appropriate movement patterns after a surgical intervention. Risk stratification regarding which athletes need surgical intervention and what their needs are after specific surgical procedures remain undefined. In this review we will describe the differential diagnosis of hip and pelvic girdle pain in the athlete and then discuss how to use a history, physical examination, and appropriate imaging and diagnostic injections to arrive at a proper diagnosis. Lastly, a brief discussion is included of key concepts and controversies involved in treating some of the most common hip disorders experienced by athletes.

  10. Orthorexia nervosa: a frequent eating disordered behavior in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-García, C; Papaianni, M C; Caglioti, F; Procopio, L; Nisticò, C G; Bombardiere, L; Ammendolia, A; Rizza, P; De Fazio, P; Capranica, L

    2012-12-01

    Striving for enhancing athletic performance, many sportsmen undergo rigid dietary habits, which could lead to eating disorders (EDs) or Orthorexia Nervosa (ON), a psychopathological condition characterized by the obsession for high quality food. The aim of the study was to examine the occurrence of ON in athletes and to verify the relationship between ON and EDs. Five-hundred-seventy-seven athletes and 217 matched controls were administered the following tests: ORTO-15, Eating Attitude Test 26 (EAT-26), Body Uneasiness Test (BUT) and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale (YBC-EDS). High positivity to ORTO-15 (28%) and EAT-26 (14%) emerged in athletes, whereas a high rate of BUT positivity was evident among controls (21%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that independent predictors of ON are previous dieting, age, positivity to YBC-EDS, positivity to EAT-26, competition level, and number of YBC-EDS preoccupations and rituals. Sharing many features with both EDs and Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, ON represents a crossroad between these pathologic conditions and might compromise the health state of an athlete. Therefore, coaches should consider important to detect symptoms of EDs and ON in their athletes.

  11. The power athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J C; Stebbins, C L

    1997-08-01

    A number of normal daily and athletic activities require isometric or static exercise. Sports such as weight lifting and other high-resistance activities are used by power athletes to gain strength and skeletal muscle bulk. Static exercise, the predominant activity used in power training, significantly increases blood pressure, heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. These changes occur in response to central neural irradiation, called central command, as well as a reflex originating from statically contracting muscle. Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure appears to be the regulated variable, presumably because the increased pressure provides blood flow into muscles whose arterial inflow is reduced as a result of increases in intramuscular pressure created by contraction. Thus, static exercise is characterized by a pressure load on the heart and can be differentiated from the hemodynamic response to dynamic (isotonic) exercise, which involves a volume load to the heart. Physical training with static exercise (i.e., power training) leads to concentric cardiac (particularly left ventricular) hypertrophy, whereas training with dynamic exercise leads to eccentric hypertrophy. The magnitude of cardiac hypertrophy is much less in athletes training with static than dynamic exercise. Neither systolic nor diastolic function is altered by the hypertrophic process associated with static exercise training. Many of the energy requirements for static exercise, particularly during more severe levels of exercise, are met by anaerobic glycolysis because the contracting muscle becomes comes deprived of blood flow. Power athletes, training with repetitive static exercise, derive little benefit from an increase in oxygen transport capacity, so that maximal oxygen consumption is increased only minimally or not at all. Peripheral cardiovascular adaptations also can occur in response to training with static exercise. Although the studies are controversial

  12. Epidemiology of Overuse and Acute Injuries Among Competitive Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Tibbetts, Abigail S.; Covassin, Tracey; Cheng, Gang; Nayar, Saloni; Heiden, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although overuse injuries are gaining attention, epidemiologic studies on overuse injuries in male and female collegiate athletes are lacking. (70.7%) acute injuries were reported. The overall injury rate was Objective: To report the epidemiology of overuse injuries sustained by collegiate athletes and to compare the rates of overuse and acute injuries. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting: A National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1317 reported injuries sustained by 573 male and female athletes in 16 collegiate sports teams during the 2005–2008 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): The injury and athlete-exposure (AE) data were obtained from the Sports Injury Monitoring System. An injury was coded as either overuse or acute based on the nature of injury. Injury rate was calculated as the total number of overuse (or acute) injuries during the study period divided by the total number of AEs during the same period. Results: A total of 386 (29.3%) overuse injuries and 931 63.1 per 10000 AEs. The rate ratio (RR) of acute versus overuse injuries was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.05, 2.67). Football had the highest RR (RR = 8.35, 95% CI = 5.38, 12.97), and women's rowing had the lowest (RR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.51, 1.10). Men had a higher acute injury rate than women (49.8 versus 38.6 per 10000 AEs). Female athletes had a higher rate of overuse injury than male athletes (24.6 versus 13.2 per 10000 AEs). More than half of the overuse injuries (50.8%) resulted in no time loss from sport. Conclusions: Additional studies are needed to examine why female athletes are at greater risk for overuse injuries and identify the best practices for prevention and rehabilitation of overuse injuries. PMID:22488286

  13. EXERCISE-INDUCED ARTERIAL ADAPTATIONS IN ELITE JUDO ATHLETES

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    Panagiotis Karagounis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine exercise-induced arterial adaptations in elite Judo male and female athletes. 27 male Judo athletes (age 24.06 ± 2 years, 11 female Judoka (age 24.27 ± 1 years, 27 sedentary healthy men (age 24.01 ± 2 years and 11 women (age 24.21 ± 1 years participated in the current study. The examined vessels included brachial, radial, ulnar, popliteal, anterior and posterior tibial arteries. The experimental parameters were recorded with the use of Duplex ultrasound at rest. Diastolic diameter and blood mean flow velocity of the examined arteries in Judo athletes were found to be both significantly increased (p < 0.05 compared to the findings of the control groups. In male Judo athletes the brachial (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and anterior tibial artery (p < 0.001 presented the highest difference on the diastolic diameter, compared with the control male group. In female Judo athletes, ulnar (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and brachial (p < 0.001 arteries illustrated the highest diastolic diameter. The highest blood mean flow velocity was recorded in ulnar (p < 0.001 and popliteal arteries (p < 0.001 of the Judo athletes groups. Recording differences between the two genders, male participants presented larger arteries than females. Conclusively, Judo has been found to be a highly demanding physical sport, involving upper and lower limbs leading to significant arterial adaptations. Obtaining vascular parameters provide a useful tool to the medical team, not only in the direction of enhancement of the efficacy of physical training, but in unknown so far parameters that may influence athletic performance of both male and female elite Judokas

  14. Athlete endorsements in food marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Marie A; Yanamadala, Swati; Roberto, Christina A; Harris, Jennifer L; Brownell, Kelly D

    2013-11-01

    This study quantified professional athletes' endorsement of food and beverages, evaluated the nutritional quality of endorsed products, and determined the number of television commercial exposures of athlete-endorsement commercials for children, adolescents, and adults. One hundred professional athletes were selected on the basis of Bloomberg Businessweek's 2010 Power 100 rankings, which ranks athletes according to their endorsement value and prominence in their sport. Endorsement information was gathered from the Power 100 list and the advertisement database AdScope. Endorsements were sorted into 11 endorsement categories (eg, food/beverages, sports apparel). The nutritional quality of the foods featured in athlete-endorsement advertisements was assessed by using a Nutrient Profiling Index, whereas beverages were evaluated on the basis of the percentage of calories from added sugar. Marketing data were collected from AdScope and Nielsen. Of 512 brands endorsed by 100 different athletes, sporting goods/apparel represented the largest category (28.3%), followed by food/beverages (23.8%) and consumer goods (10.9%). Professional athletes in this sample were associated with 44 different food or beverage brands during 2010. Seventy-nine percent of the 62 food products in athlete-endorsed advertisements were energy-dense and nutrient-poor, and 93.4% of the 46 advertised beverages had 100% of calories from added sugar. Peyton Manning (professional American football player) and LeBron James (professional basketball player) had the most endorsements for energy-dense, nutrient-poor products. Adolescents saw the most television commercials that featured athlete endorsements of food. Youth are exposed to professional athlete endorsements of food products that are energy-dense and nutrient-poor.

  15. Social physique anxiety and eating attitudes in female athletic and non-athletic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A M; Prapavessis, H

    2001-12-01

    One purpose of the present study was to compare Social Physique Anxiety (SPA) scores among four different female groups (physique-salient (PS) athletes-aerobics competitors and divers, n = 63; weight-restricted athletes-rowers, n = 60; non-physique-salient (NPS) athletes--soccer, n = 75; and non-athlete students, n = 53). A second purpose of the study was to examine relations between SPA and disturbed eating attitudes among these four groups. Participants completed the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS; Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989) and the Eating Attitude Test (EAT; Garner & Garfinkel, 1979). With respect to purpose one, an analysis of variance (ANOVA) with SPA (i.e., 9-item single factor model of the SPAS) as the dependent measure, failed to reach significance (F (3,184) = 1.61, p> .05). With respect to purpose two, significant relations were found between SPA and EAT scores for all four groups. Inferential comparison of the bivariate correlations (Fisher's Z transformations), however, showed no significant differences between groups. In addition, a moderated regression analysis was computed using EAT scores as the dependent measure. The variables were entered in the following order: SPA, followed by dummy vectors for each sport-type category, and then the interaction term between SPA and the dummy vectors. Results showed that there was no significant interaction effect. Thus, these analyses, taken together. suggest that the type of sport activity does not serve to moderate relations between SPA and disordered eating. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  16. Athletic Participation and Wellness: Implications for Counseling College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    This study used a holistic wellness paradigm to explore the adjustment of student-athletes and non-athletes at a Division I institution. Results were that non-athletes reported higher levels of wellness than did student-athletes. The authors discuss the ways in which wellness may affect student-athletes' physical and mental health at different…

  17. Developmental and Contextual Risks of Social Physique Anxiety among Female Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Jennifer L.; Monsma, Eva V.; Torres-McGehee, Toni M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we examined developmental and contextual factors that may increase the odds of reporting higher social physique anxiety (SPA) among 404 adolescent athletes 11 to 16 years old. Findings showed older, later maturing athletes past peak height velocity and with greater body mass index (BMI) reported higher SPA. Individual…

  18. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

  19. Perceived Effects of Emotion Intensity on Athletic Performance: A Contingency-Based Individualized Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura; Hanin, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    This study, based on the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning model, examined the perceived effect of idiosyncratic emotions and bodily symptoms on athletic performance along the entire emotion-intensity range. The participants were 35 elite Italian athletes, 16 women and 19 men, competing in either figure skating or gymnastics. Idiosyncratic…

  20. Purposeful Engagement of First-Year Division I Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie; Speer, Laura; Taustine, Maria; Harrison, C. Keith

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which transitioning, first-year student-athletes engage in educationally sound activities in college. The sample included 147 revenue and nonrevenue first-year student-athletes who were surveyed at four large Division 1-A universities. Findings revealed that revenue and nonrevenue first-year student athletes…

  1. Neuromuscular adaptations to 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Meyland, Jacob; Raffalt, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes on jumping performance and underlying changes in biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations. Nine well-trained athletes at high national competition level within sprinting and jumping disciplines...

  2. A Qualitative Content Analysis of Sexual Abuse Prevention and Awareness Programming in Texas Private School Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naterman, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine to what extent private school athletic administrators have implemented programming specifically aimed at combatting the problem of childhood sexual abuse in sport. The study examined published policies and procedures overseen by private school athletic administrators to determine to what extent their…

  3. Myocardial response to a triathlon in male athletes evaluated by Doppler tissue imaging and biochemical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, T H; Dam, A; Glintborg, D

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine cardiac dysfunction following ultra-endurance exercise in male athletes. Fourteen athletes (mean+/-SD, age 39+/-8 years) were evaluated before and after the European Championship in Triathlon 2003 using echocardiogram (ECG), cardiac markers [cardiac troponin T...

  4. Alcohol-Related Consequences among Intercollegiate Student Athletes: The Role of Drinking Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined drinking motives as predictors of alcohol-related consequences among student athletes and nonathletes. Results indicated that the highest level of alcohol-related consequences was reported by student athletes with high levels of both coping and conformity motives. (Contains 2 tables and 2 figures.)

  5. Promoting the Academic Engagement and Success of Black Male Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul C.; Hines, Erik M.; Kelly, Darren D.; Williams, Derick J.; Bagley, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a qualitative look at the factors associated with the academic engagement and success of Black male student-athletes in high school. The research team employed a thematic analysis to examine semi-structured interviews conducted with two successful Black male student-athletes, along with their principal,…

  6. The Sport Commitment Model: An Investigation of Structural Relationships with Thai Youth Athlete Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosakul, Chairat; Vongjaturapat, Naruepon; Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Grounded in the conceptual framework of the Sport Commitment Model and previous empirical studies conducted in Western countries, this study was designed to (a) test and validate a Thai version of the Athlete Opinion Survey to assess components of the Sport Commitment Model in Thai youth athletes and (b) examine structural relationships among…

  7. Perceived Effects of Emotion Intensity on Athletic Performance: A Contingency-Based Individualized Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura; Hanin, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    This study, based on the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning model, examined the perceived effect of idiosyncratic emotions and bodily symptoms on athletic performance along the entire emotion-intensity range. The participants were 35 elite Italian athletes, 16 women and 19 men, competing in either figure skating or gymnastics. Idiosyncratic…

  8. Sexy versus Strong: What Girls and Women Think of Female Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Little research has investigated girls' and college women's reactions to non-objectified media images of women, including those that depict women in instrumental activities like playing a sport. This study examined open-ended responses to images of performance athletes, sexualized athletes, and sexualized models. Participants were 258 adolescent…

  9. Negotiation and Capital: Athletes' Use of Power in an Elite Men's Rowing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Laura; Jones, Robyn; Cassidy, Tania

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine how power is given, acquired and used by athletes in the elite sporting context. It focuses on a top-level athlete's reactions to the behaviors of his coaches and how such actions contribute to the creation of a coaching climate, which both influences and "houses" coaching. The paper centers on Sean (a…

  10. Vitamin D and the Athlete: Risks, Recommendations, and Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ogan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is well known for its role in calcium regulation and bone health, but emerging literature tells of vitamin D’s central role in other vital body processes, such as: signaling gene response, protein synthesis, hormone synthesis, immune response, plus, cell turnover and regeneration. The discovery of the vitamin D receptor within the muscle suggested a significant role for vitamin D in muscle tissue function. This discovery led researchers to question the impact that vitamin D deficiency could have on athletic performance and injury. With over 77% of the general population considered vitamin D insufficient, it’s likely that many athletes fall into the same category. Research has suggested vitamin D to have a significant effect on muscle weakness, pain, balance, and fractures in the aging population; still, the athletic population is yet to be fully examined. There are few studies to date that have examined the relationship between vitamin D status and performance, therefore, this review will focus on the bodily roles of vitamin D, recommended 25(OHD levels, vitamin D intake guidelines and risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency in athletes. In addition, the preliminary findings regarding vitamin D’s impact on athletic performance will be examined.

  11. Early death in active professional athletes: Trends and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemez, S; Wattie, N; Baker, J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to examine mortality trends and causes of death among professional athletes from the four major sports in North America who died during their playing careers. 205 deceased athletes who were registered as active when they died from the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), National Hockey League (NHL), and Major League Baseball (MLB) were examined. Results were compared with the Canadian and U.S. general population. The leading causes of death in players reflected the leading causes of death in the Canadian and U.S. general population (i.e., car accidents). Descriptively, NFL and NBA players had a higher likelihood of dying in a car accident (OR 1.75, 95% CI: 0.91-3.36) compared with NHL and MLB players. In addition, NFL and NBA players had a significantly higher likelihood of dying from a cardiac-related illness (OR 4.44, 95% CI: 1.59-12.43). Mortality trends were disproportionate to team size. Overall, death in active athletes is low. Out of 53 400 athletes who have historically played in the four leagues, only 205 died while active (0.38%). Future examinations into the trends and causes of mortality in elite athlete populations will create a better understanding of health-related risks in elite sport. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Personality Preferences of College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Michael D.; Liput, Taylor; Nirmal, Rashmeen

    2007-01-01

    College student-athletes face many unique role strains during their academic and athletic career, which may impact the way in which they understand themselves. This study was designed to explore whether college student-athletes have a different perceived personality preference than their non-athlete counterpart. Ninety-one college students took…

  13. Hypermobility in Adolescent Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Heidi; Pedersen, Trine Lykke; Junge, Tina

    2017-01-01

    athletes, and to study the association of GJH with pain, function, HRQoL, and musculoskeletal injuries. Methods A total of 132 elite-level adolescent athletes (36 adolescent boys, 96 adolescent girls; mean ± SD age, 14.0 ± 0.9 years), including ballet dancers (n = 22), TeamGym gymnasts (n = 57), and team......-reported questionnaires, and part of physical performance was assessed by 4 postural-sway tests and 2 single-legged hop-for-distance tests. Results Overall prevalence rates for GJH4, GJH5, and GJH6 were 27.3%, 15.9%, and 6.8%, respectively, with a higher prevalence of GJH4 in ballet dancers (68.2%) and TeamGym gymnasts...... significantly larger center-of-pressure path length across sway tests. Conclusion For ballet dancers and TeamGym gymnasts, the prevalence of GJH4 was higher than that of team handball players. For ballet dancers, the prevalence of GJH5 and GJH6 was higher than that of team handball players and the general...

  14. Choosing a career in athletic training: exploring the perceptions of potential recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, James; Mitchell, Murray

    2008-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. Therefore, understanding potential recruits' perceptions of athletic training is important. To (1) gain insight regarding undergraduate students' decisions to enter or not enter an athletic training education program (ATEP), and (2) examine potential athletic training recruits' perceptions of the roles and responsibilities of certified athletic trainers. We used a descriptive study employing a grounded theory approach to explore perceptions of the athletic training profession by college students with various levels of interest in athletic training. Athletic training education program from a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I research-intensive university. Forty-six undergraduate students (23 interested in applying to an ATEP and 23 who were aware of but not interested in applying to an ATEP). Data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer-debriefing techniques were used to ensure trustworthiness of the study. Three contributing factors appeared to influence the recruitment of students to a career in athletic training: (1) a strong affiliation to a sports/team model, (2) initial exposure at the high school level, and (3) an incomplete understanding of athletic training. Awareness of how students are recruited into ATEPs is important information for our profession. Educators and administrators must create a comprehensive recruitment strategy using factors that influence potential recruits' decisions to enter the athletic training profession, specifically their association with sports and their experiences during high school.

  15. Division I athletes' attitudes toward and preferences for male and female strength and conditioning coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusen, Marshall J; Rhea, Deborah J

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether male and female Division I team sport athletes prefer same-sex or opposite-sex strength and conditioning coaches. Participants included 476 (male = 275, female = 201) National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football, soccer, and volleyball athletes; the men were from football programs and the women were from soccer and volleyball programs. The Attitudes of Athletes toward Male versus Female Coaches Questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes and feelings of male and female athletes toward the gender of their strength coach (29). The results of a 2 x 2 multivariate analysis of variance (athlete gender x coach gender) revealed that the male athletes (all football players) were less comfortable with a female strength coach in all regards and preferred to have a male strength coach (p preference, nor did they have any negative attitudes toward a strength coach. The women would be productive training with any qualified strength coach, whereas the men would prefer working with a male strength coach no matter how qualified the female coach might be. As a result of this study, one suggestion is for male athletes to be exposed to female strength coaches much earlier in their sport experience. This might help reduce gender bias later in their athletic careers.

  16. The validity and reliability of the functional rating index for evaluating low back pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, S; Ansari, N Nakhostin; Yazdanpanah, M; Feise, R J; Fakhari, Z

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Functional Rating Index (FRI) for athletes with low back pain (LBP). In this cross-sectional and prospective cohort study, the validated Persian FRI (PFRI) was tested in 100 athletes with LBP and 50 healthy athletes. From the athletes with LBP, data were recollected among 50 athletes with a 7-day interval to examine test-retest reliability. The content validity was excellent, and the athletes with LBP responded to all items with no floor or ceiling effects. The discriminative validity was supported by a statistically significant difference in PFRI total scores between the athletes with LBP and healthy athletes. The concurrent criterion validity was good (rho = 0.72). The construct, convergent validity was good (r = 0.83). The internal consistency reliability estimate was high (Cronbach's α = 0.90). Factor analysis demonstrated a single-factor structure with an explained variance of 52.22%. The test-retest reliability was excellent, indicated by an ICC(agreement) of 0.97, and the agreement observed in the Bland and Altman plot demonstrated no systematic bias. It is concluded that the PFRI has excellent psychometric properties for assessing athletes with LBP.

  17. Understanding Athletic Pubalgia: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brian; Kleinhenz, Dominic; Schiller, Jonathan; Tabaddor, Ramin

    2016-10-04

    Athletic Pubalgia, more commonly known as sports hernia, is defined as chronic lower abdominal and groin pain without the presence of a true hernia. It is increasingly recognized in athletes as a source of groin pain and is often associated with other pathology. A comprehensive approach to the physical exam and a strong understanding of hip and pelvic anatomy are critical in making the appropriate diagnosis. Various management options are available. We review the basic anatomy, patholophysiology, diagnostic approach and treatment of athletic pubalgia as well as discuss associated conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-10.asp].

  18. Bone health and the female athlete triad in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Kathryn E; Misra, Madhusmita

    2011-02-01

    Peak bone mass (PBM) is a negative predictor of osteoporosis and lifelong fracture risk. Because osteoporosis is such a prevalent disease with life-threatening consequences, it is important to try to maximize PBM. Adolescence is a critical period for bone acquisition. This article discusses some of the differences in male and female skeletal development and modifiable factors that enhance bone accrual in this age group, particularly in athletes. Hormonal influences, effects of physical activity, and nutritional contributions are included, with a focus on the adolescent athlete. Emphasis is placed on the importance of appropriate energy availability in this age group. We also review prevention and treatment strategies for the female athlete triad (ie, the inter-relationship of decreased energy availability, menstrual irregularity, and low bone density) in adolescents and athletic women. Recommendations for maximizing bone density in both male and female adolescents are discussed.

  19. The isometric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J C; Stebbins, C L

    1992-05-01

    A number of normal daily and athletic activities require isometric or static exercise. Such sports as weight lifting and other high-resistance activities are used by athletes to gain strength and skeletal muscle bulk. However, static exercise also causes significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. These changes occur in response to central neural irradiation, called central command, as well as a reflex originating from statically contracting muscle. Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure appears to be the regulated variable, presumably because the increased pressure provides blood flow into muscles that have compressed their arterial inflow as a result of increases in intramuscular pressure created by contraction. Thus, static exercise is characterized by a pressure load to the heart and can be differentiated from dynamic (isotonic) exercise, which involves a volume load to the heart. Physical training with static exercise leads to concentric cardiac, particularly left ventricular, hypertrophy, whereas training with dynamic exercise leads to eccentric hypertrophy. Furthermore, the magnitude of cardiac hypertrophy is much less in athletes training with static than dynamic exercise. Neither systolic nor diastolic function is altered by the hypertrophic process associated with static exercise training. Many of the energy requirements for static exercise, particularly during more severe levels of exercise, are met by anaerobic glycolysis because the contracting muscle becomes deprived of blood flow. Training with repetitive static exercise therefore causes little increase in oxygen transport capacity, so that maximal oxygen consumption is either not or only minimally increased. Peripheral cardiovascular adaptations also can occur in response to static exercise training. Although controversial, these adaptations include modest decreases in resting blood pressure, smaller increases in blood pressure during a

  20. Interpersonal Emotion Regulation Among Adolescent Athletes: A Bayesian Multilevel Model Predicting Sport Enjoyment and Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Katherine A; Gaudreau, Patrick; McEwen, Carolyn E; Crocker, Peter R E

    2016-12-01

    Efforts to regulate emotions can influence others, and interpersonal emotion regulation within teams may affect athletes' own affective and motivational outcomes. We examined adolescent athletes' (N = 451, N teams = 38) self- and interpersonal emotion regulation, as well as associations with peer climate, sport enjoyment, and sport commitment within a multilevel model of emotion regulation in teams. Results of multilevel Bayesian structural equation modeling showed that athletes' self-worsening emotion regulation strategies were negatively associated with enjoyment while other-improving emotion regulation strategies were positively associated enjoyment and commitment. The team-level interpersonal emotion regulation climate and peer motivational climates were also associated with enjoyment and commitment. Team-level factors moderated some of the relationships between athletes' emotion regulation with enjoyment and commitment. These findings extend previous research by examining interpersonal emotion regulation within teams using a multilevel approach, and they demonstrate the importance of person- and team-level factors for athletes' enjoyment and commitment.

  1. [Female athlete triad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portmann, Luc; Giusti, Vittorio

    2009-08-05

    The practitioner, as well as specialist such as gynecologist and endocrinologist, may face in their office women with eating disorders, abnormalities of menstrual cycles and low bone mass, which may be the first hints of the female athlete triad. In these situations, the practitioner may search other findings of these triad by looking at some particular physical findings and by using appropriate questionnaire. In some advanced forms of this triad specific abnormalities of eating disorders (anorexia and boulimia) may be present as well as amenorrhea and osteoporosis, which may disturb the well-being and cause health damages of women practising sport either as amateur or in a elite setting. An appropriate handling of such disorders has to be proposed to these women.

  2. Magnesium and the Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral and the second most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body. It is a required mineral that is involved in more than 300 metabolic reactions in the body. Magnesium helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function, heart rhythm (cardiac excitability), vasomotor tone, blood pressure, immune system, bone integrity, and blood glucose levels and promotes calcium absorption. Because of magnesium's role in energy production and storage, normal muscle function, and maintenance of blood glucose levels, it has been studied as an ergogenic aid for athletes. This article will cover the general roles of magnesium, magnesium requirements, and assessment of magnesium status as well as the dietary intake of magnesium and its effects on exercise performance. The research articles cited were limited from those published in 2003 through 2014.

  3. Special Medical Problems of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Joan M.

    1987-01-01

    This article addresses the situations in which athletes with special needs and considerations participate in sports. The health problems discussed are diabetes mellitus, exercise-induced asthma, exercise-induced anaphylaxis, and epilepsy. (MT)

  4. Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Christopher J.

    Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

  5. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various s...

  6. Factors of persistence among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Previous researchers have indicated that athletic training education programs (ATEPs) appear to retain students who are motivated and well integrated into their education programs. However, no researchers have examined the factors leading to successful persistence to graduation of recent graduates from ATEPs. To determine the factors that led students enrolled in a postprofessional education program accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) to persist to graduation from accredited undergraduate ATEPs. Qualitative study. Postprofessional education program accredited by the NATA. Fourteen graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited undergraduate entry-level ATEPs who were enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program volunteered to participate. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data through a grounded theory approach. We used open, axial, and selective coding procedures. To ensure trustworthiness, 2 independent coders analyzed the data. The researchers then negotiated over the coding categories until they reached 100% agreement. We also performed member checks and peer debriefing. Four themes emerged from the data. Decisions to persist to graduation from ATEPs appeared to be influenced by students' positive interactions with faculty, clinical instructors, and peers. The environment of the ATEPs also affected their persistence. Participants thought they learned much in both the clinic and the classroom, and this learning motivated them to persist. Finally, participants could see themselves practicing athletic training as a career, and this greatly influenced their eventual persistence. Our study gives athletic training educators insight into the reasons students persist to graduation from ATEPs. Specifically, athletic training programs should strive to develop close-knit learning communities that stress positive interactions between students and instructors. Athletic training educators also must work to

  7. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Norwegian female biathlon athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Håvard Østerås,1 Kirsti Krohn Garnæs,2 Liv Berit Augestad3 1Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Abstract: The purpose was to examine musculoskeletal disorders in Norwegian female biathlon athletes (age ≥ 16, both juniors and seniors. The design was a retrospective cross-sectional study. In all, 148 athletes (79.1% responded; of these, 118 athletes were 16–21 years (juniors (77.6%, and 30 athletes were 22 years or older (seniors (20.3%, and mean age was 19.1. A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 57.8%. The most affected parts were the knee (23.0% of the total injuries, calf (12.2%, ankle/foot (10.8%, lower back (10.8%, and thigh (10.1%. The disorders resulted in training/competition cessation for 73.5% of athletes, in alternative training for 87.8%. Fifty percent of the athletes had one or several musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the problems occurred preseason, and the duration of symptoms was often prolonged. Few differences between the juniors and seniors were found. This study showed the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems among female biathlon athletes. The results indicate that prevention of lower limb problems must be prioritized, especially during the preseason. Keywords: injuries, cross-country skiing, skating

  8. Depression in athletes: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Andrew; Gross, Michael; Hong, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Depression affects an estimated 6.7% of today's adult population in a 12-month period. The prevalence rates for certain age groups, such as young adults and older adults, are higher. There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association student athletes competing each year and 5 to 7 million high school student athletes involved in competitive interscholastic sports. Given such a high prevalence rate in certain age groups and a large denominator pool of athletes, past notions that athletes are devoid of mental health issues have come under scrutiny by sports medicine providers. Initial data suggest that athletes are far from immune to depression. The purpose of this article was to review the current research on athletes and depression; particularly this article will provide an overview of studies, which have investigated the rate of depression among athletes, and discuss relevant risk factors, which may contribute to depression among athletes.

  9. Early indicators of enduring symptoms in high school athletes with multiple previous concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Philip; Moser, Rosemarie Scolaro; Covassin, Tracey; Karpf, Robin

    2011-06-01

    Despite recent findings of cognitive, emotional, physical, and behavioral symptomatology in retired professional athletes with a history of multiple concussions, there is little systematic research examining these symptoms in high school athletes with a history of concussion. To identify cognitive, emotional, and physical symptoms at baseline in nonconcussed high school athletes based on concussion history. A multicenter sample of 616 high school athletes who completed baseline evaluations were assigned to groups based on history of concussion (none, 1, 2, or more previous concussions). The Post-Concussion Symptom Scale was administered as part of a computerized neuropsychological test battery during athletes' preseason baseline evaluations. Cross-sectional analyses were used to examine symptoms reported at the time of baseline neuropsychological testing. High school athletes with a history of 2 or more concussions showed significantly higher ratings of concussion-related symptoms (cognitive, physical, sleep difficulties) than athletes with a history of one or no previous concussions. It appears that youth athletes who sustain multiple concussions experience a variety of subtle effects, which may be possible precursors of the future onset of concussion-related difficulties. Copyright © 2011 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  10. Fear of Reinjury in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Meierbachtol, Adam; George, Steven Z; Chmielewski, Terese L

    A sports injury has both physical and psychological consequences for the athlete. A common postinjury psychological response is elevated fear of reinjury. To provide an overview of the implications of fear of reinjury on the rehabilitation of athletes, including clinical methods to measure fear of reinjury; the impact of fear of reinjury on rehabilitation outcomes, including physical impairments, function, and return to sports rate; and potential interventions to address fear of reinjury during rehabilitation. PubMed was searched for articles published in the past 16 years (1990-2016) relating to fear of reinjury in athletes. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were searched for additionally relevant articles. Clinical review. Level 3. Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can negatively affect the recovery of physical impairments, reduce self-report function, and prevent a successful return to sport. Athletes with high fear of reinjury might benefit from a psychologically informed practice approach to improve rehabilitation outcomes. The application of psychologically informed practice would be to measure fear of reinjury in the injured athletes and provide interventions to reduce fear of reinjury to optimize rehabilitation outcomes. Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can lead to poor rehabilitation outcomes. Incorporating principles of psychologically informed practice into sports injury rehabilitation could improve rehabilitation outcomes for athletes with high fear of reinjury.

  11. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  12. Intense Loyalty in Organizations: A Case Study of College Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Peter; Adler, Patricia A.

    1988-01-01

    Using data gathered during a five-year participant-observation study of a major college basketball program, this paper examines the intense form of organizational loyalty associated with college athletics. Finds five essential ingredients for developing intense organizational loyalty: documentation, identification, commitment, integration, and…

  13. Nutrition and the Athlete. New Horizons in Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Justine; Grogan, Jane, Ed.

    This instructional handbook is one of a series of ten packets designed to form a comprehensive course in nutrition for secondary students. This booklet examines some of the more common myths associated with sport nutrition and provides basic guidelines for sound dietary habits for both athletes and nonathletes. It contains a page of teaching…

  14. Nutrition and the Athlete. New Horizons in Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Justine; Grogan, Jane, Ed.

    This instructional handbook is one of a series of ten packets designed to form a comprehensive course in nutrition for secondary students. This booklet examines some of the more common myths associated with sport nutrition and provides basic guidelines for sound dietary habits for both athletes and nonathletes. It contains a page of teaching…

  15. Young Athletes' Perceptions of Parental Support and Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S.; Hoyle, Rick H.

    1995-01-01

    Individual participation in athletics was examined as an achievement-oriented activity in which perceived parental support or pressure influence adolescents' perceptions of themselves and their performance. Results with 97 male and 57 female tennis players provide evidence of an association between perceptions of parental involvement and activity…

  16. Knowledge Retention of Exercise Physiology Content between Athletes and Nonathletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Webster, Collin; Druger, Marvin

    2006-01-01

    Based on the idea that learning is linked to personal relevance, this study examined knowledge retention of exercise physiology content between college athletes and nonathletes. No differences were observed between the groups. These findings have implications on understanding the relationship between personal relevance and memory. (Contains 1…

  17. Athletics and Students with Disabilities: What Principals Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losinski, Mickey; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Yell, Mitchell L.

    2014-01-01

    Public concern over the general health of children in the United States has risen during recent years due to dramatic decreases in physical activity levels and increases in obesity and other health-related issues. This article examines the participation of students with disabilities in extracurricular activities, particularly athletic activities,…

  18. Long term consequences of the female athlete triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill

    2013-06-01

    In the past 40 years, female sports participation, particularly at the high school level, has significantly increased. Physical activity in females has numerous positive benefits, including improved body image and overall health. Unfortunately, a select population of exercising females may experience symptoms related to the female athlete triad, which refers to the interrelatedness of energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral density. Clinically, these conditions can manifest as disordered eating behaviors, menstrual irregularity, and stress fractures. Triad symptoms are distributed along a spectrum between optimal health and disease; all of the components of the triad may not be affected simultaneously. The female athlete triad was first identified in 1992. Since that time, a vast amount of research related to the identification, management and prevention of this condition has been published. More recently, research related to the long term effects of triad components has come into light. Women who were diagnosed with female athlete triad syndrome as adolescents and young adults in the 1990s are now in their 30s and 40s; negative long term effects of the female athlete triad, such as low bone mineral density, are now starting to manifest. Women of all ages should be assessed for triad components during routine annual physical examinations; appropriate measures to treat any current triad components should be implemented. In addition, women in their 30s, 40s and early 50s should be screened for a history of the female athlete triad. Multidisciplinary management of these conditions is strongly recommended.

  19. A rise in peak performance age in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenshawy, Ahmed R; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-06-01

    It was reported in 1980s that ages at which peak performance was observed had remained remarkably stable in the past century, although absolute levels of athletic performance increased dramatically for the same time span. The emergence of older (masters) athletes in the past few decades has changed the demographics and age-spectrum of Olympic athletes. The primary aim of the present study was to determine whether the ages at which peak performance was observed had increased in the recent decades. The data spanning 114 years from the first Olympics (1898) to the most recent Olympics (2014) were collected using the publically available data. In the present study, ages at which Olympic medals (gold, silver, and bronze) were won were used as the indicators of peak performance age. Track and field, swimming, rowing, and ice skating events were analyzed. In men, peak performance age did not change significantly in most of the sporting events (except in 100 m sprint running). In contrast, peak performance ages in women have increased significantly since 1980s and consistently in all the athletic events examined. Interestingly, as women's peak performance age increased, they became similar to men's peak ages in many events. In the last 20-30 years, ages at which peak athletic performance is observed have increased in women but not in men.

  20. Probiotics supplementation for athletes - clinical and physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; West, Nicholas P; Cox, Amanda J; Cripps, Allan W

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation has traditionally focused on gut health. However, in recent years, the clinical applications of probiotics have broadened to allergic, metabolic, inflammatory, gastrointestinal and respiratory conditions. Gastrointestinal health is important for regulating adaptation to exercise and physical activity. Symptoms such as nausea, bloating, cramping, pain, diarrhoea and bleeding occur in some athletes, particularly during prolonged exhaustive events. Several studies conducted since 2006 examining probiotic supplementation in athletes or highly active individuals indicate modest clinical benefits in terms of reduced frequency, severity and/or duration of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness. The likely mechanisms of action for probiotics include direct interaction with the gut microbiota, interaction with the mucosal immune system and immune signalling to a variety of organs and systems. Practical issues to consider include medical and dietary screening of athletes, sourcing of recommended probiotics and formulations, dose-response requirements for different probiotic strains, storage, handling and transport of supplements and timing of supplementation in relation to travel and competition.

  1. Relationship between athletes' emotional intelligence and precompetitive anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Frank J-H; Li, Gladys Shuk-fong; Hsu, Eva Ya-wen; Williams, Lavon

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between athletes' Emotional Intelligence (EI) and precompetitive anxiety. Taiwanese intercollegiate track and field athletes (N = 111; 64 men, 47 women) completed the Bar-On EQ-i 1 mo. before a1 national intercollegiate athletic meet, and the Competition State Anxiety Inventory-2R 1 hr. before the competition. Analyses indicated that participants with the lowest EI scores reported greater intensity of precompetitive cognitive anxiety than those with the highest EI scores. No other statistically significant differences were found among the groups. Further, correlational analyses and multiple stepwise regression analyses revealed that EI components such as stress management, intrapersonal EI, and interpersonal EI were associated with precompetitive anxiety. Current EI measures provide limited understanding of precompetitive anxiety. A sport-specific EI measure is needed for future research.

  2. Coaching communication issues with elite female athletes: two Norwegian case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, E; Tomten, S E; Hanstad, D V; Roberts, G C

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the careers of two successful female elite athletes who later stagnated, and to identify possible factors that might have led to their demotivation. Individual interviews and a focus group interview were conducted. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the stories of April and Hazel raised several issues related to coaching, coach education, and the development of female athletes. Their individual profiles revealed that their perception of the lack of long-term development was caused by coach miscommunication, having to cope with sudden fame, and injuries provoked by overtraining. The coach-athlete relationship was discussed with a focus on the inexperience of some coaches, the number of coaches the athletes had to deal with, sociolinguistic issues, and the differing criteria of success communicated. Finally, the importance of their national governing bodies to focus on knowledge transfer, the supervision of coaches, and the infrastructure to monitor athletes were discussed.

  3. Athlete leadership: a review of the theoretical, measurement, and empirical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Todd M

    2017-08-01

    Athlete leadership is defined as an athlete who occupies a formal or informal leadership role within a team and influences team members to achieve a common objective. The area of athlete leadership has been shaped by theories and measurement tools from organizational and sport coaching literatures. The present article describes the conceptual developments within athlete leadership by providing an operational definition of this construct, followed by the theories and measurement tools used to examine athlete leadership. Finally, the present paper describes both qualitative and quantitative research that has emerged over the last decade. The results suggest the importance of this source of leadership within sport teams. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep-hygiene Education Improves Sleep Indices in Elite Female Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Shannon; Driller, Matthew W.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of sleep in providing psychophysiological recovery in elite athletes is often overlooked. In other populations (eg shift workers and adolescent students), sleep hygiene education may serve to acutely improve sleep indices. However, this is yet to be examined in an elite athlete...... setting. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of a sleep hygiene education session on sleep indices in elite athletes. The study involved 26 elite female netball athletes performing one week of baseline sleep monitoring (PRE), followed by a sleep hygiene education session...... and a further week of sleep monitoring (POST) in a single group, pre- post design. The sleep hygiene education session focused on providing information on the importance of sleep for athletes and practical tips to improve sleep quality and quantity. Sleep monitoring was performed using wrist actigraphy...

  5. Patellofemoral pain in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen W

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wolf Petersen,1 Ingo Rembitzki,2 Christian Liebau3 1Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Martin Luther Hospital, Grunewald, Berlin; 2German Sport University Cologne, 3Asklepios Clinic, Bad Harzburg, Germany Abstract: Patellofemoral pain (PFP is a frequent cause of anterior knee pain in athletes, which affects patients with and without structural patellofemoral joint (PFJ damage. Most younger patients do not have any structural changes to the PFJ, such as an increased Q angle and a cartilage damage. This clinical entity is known as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. Older patients usually present with signs of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA. A key factor in PFPS development is dynamic valgus of the lower extremity, which leads to lateral patellar maltracking. Causes of dynamic valgus include weak hip muscles and rearfoot eversion with pes pronatus valgus. These factors can also be observed in patients with PFOA. The available evidence suggests that patients with PFP are best managed with a tailored, multimodal, nonoperative treatment program that includes short-term pain relief with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, passive correction of patellar maltracking with medially directed tape or braces, correction of the dynamic valgus with exercise programs that target the muscles of the lower extremity, hip, and trunk, and the use of foot orthoses in patients with additional foot abnormalities. Keywords: anterior knee pain, dynamic valgus, hip strength, rearfoot eversion, single leg squat, hip strength 

  6. Functional torque ratios and torque curve analysis of shoulder rotations in overhead athletes with and without impingement symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Gisele G; Oliveira, Ana B; Saccol, Michele F; Ejnisman, Benno; Mattiello-Rosa, Stela M

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the peak torque, functional torque ratios, and torque curve profile of the shoulder rotators in overhead athletes with impingement symptoms so as to examine possible alterations in response to sports training and shoulder pain. Twenty-one overhead athletes with impingement symptoms were compared with 25 overhead athletes and 21 non-athletes, none of whom were symptomatic for impingement. The participants performed five maximal isokinetic concentric and eccentric contractions of medial and lateral shoulder rotations at 1.57 rad · s(-1) and 3.14 rad · s(-1). Isokinetic peak torque was used to calculate the eccentric lateral rotation-to-concentric medial rotation and the eccentric medial rotation-to-concentric lateral rotation ratios. An analysis of the torque curve profiles was also carried out. The eccentric lateral rotation-to-concentric medial rotation torque ratio of asymptomatic athletes was lower than that of non-athletes at both test velocities. The concentric medial rotation isokinetic peak torque of the asymptomatic athletes, at 3.14 rad · s(-1), was greater than that of the non-athletes, and the peak appeared to occur earlier in the movement for athletes than non-athletes. These findings suggest that there may be adaptations to shoulder function in response to throwing practice. The eccentric medial rotation-to-concentric lateral rotation torque ratio was altered neither by the practice of university-level overhead sports nor impingement symptoms.

  7. Differences in Socialization between Visually Impaired Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Mojtahedi, Hossein; Farazyani, Fateh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in measure of socialization between visually impaired student-athletes and non-athletes. We compared the social skills of Iranian visually impaired student-athletes (n = 51) and visually impaired student non-athletes (n = 56) with ages ranging from 13 to…

  8. How Stereotypes Affect Current Collegiate Female Athletes' Athletic Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Stereotype discrimination affects female athletes' athletic experiences. Studies have been conducted of former collegiate female athletes' perceptions of the lesbian stereotype found that they were discriminated against because of their sport participation. These limit the recalling of thoughts and experience from the female athletes' playing…

  9. Is athletic background associated with a future lower prevalence of risk factors for chronic disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano H.X. Batista

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study examined whether the prevalence of behavioral and biological risk factors of former elite athletes (both men and women, differed from nonelite athletes and nonathletes. A total of 491 individuals (225 former elite athletes, 168 former nonelite athletes, and 98 nonathletes participated in this study. Major behavioral and biological risk factors identified in the 2002 World Health Report were assessed. Apart from alcohol consumption, former elite athletes had at least 70% lower likelihood than nonathletes for the other behavioral risk factors. Regarding biological factors, being overweight/obesity seems to be the one where minor differences exist, with a significant odds ratio only among female former elite athletes (0.09, p < 0.001 when compared to nonathletes. In general, the results showed healthy outcomes among former elite athletes. Albeit the results extend to both sexes, women appear to have slightly healthier outcomes. Being a former athlete, especially at an elite level, seems to be associated with decreased risk factors for major chronic diseases.

  10. Effective nutrition support programs for college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, D M

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Husky Sport Nutrition Program at the University of Washington. This program is a component of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Total Student-Athlete Program, an NCAA-sponsored CHAMPS/Life Skills Program that provides life skills assistance to student-athletes. Successful integration of a sport nutrition program requires an understanding of the athletic culture, physiological milestones, and life stressors faced by college athletes. The sport nutritionist functions as an educator, counselor, and administrator. Team presentations and individual nutrition counseling provide athletes with accurate information on healthy eating behaviors for optimal performance. For women's sports, a multidisciplinary team including the sport nutritionist, team physician, clinical psychologist, and athletic trainer work to prevent and treat eating disorders. Case studies are presented illustrating the breadth of nutrition-related issues faced by a sport nutritionist working with college athletes.

  11. Secondary Amenorrhea among Female Athletes. Current Understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasiene, Gwen Hagenbuch

    1983-01-01

    Research pertaining to female athletes' problems with secondary amenorrhea is reviewed. Studies point to stress, weight loss, anorexia nervosa, obesity, arduous athletic training, and age of onset of training as factors which may contribute to this disorder. (PP)

  12. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  13. Performance-Enhancing Drugs and Teen Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Tween and teen health Performance-enhancing drugs can be tempting for teen athletes. Understand the warning signs and what you can do to keep your teen from using shortcuts to improve athletic performance. By Mayo ...

  14. Does Cupping = Success for Olympic Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160301.html Does 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes? Telltale red circles of ancient Chinese practice ... Eyebrows raised in Rio over the weekend when Olympic athletes like swimmer Michael Phelps started showing up ...

  15. Helping Athletes Avoid Hazardous Weight Control Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    This article addresses dangerous dieting techniques used by athletes and provides coaches and teachers specific strategies to aid in preventing eating-related disorders among athletes. Symptoms of anorexia and of bulimia are described. (JL)

  16. Nutrition, Diet, and Weight Control for Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Kathy

    1980-01-01

    Athletes can achieve their full potential and develop good eating habits for the future through proper diet and weight control. The basics of nutrition are as important as the basic skills of the sports in which athletes participate. (CJ)

  17. Perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in junior athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Daniel J; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggest that perfectionism is a personal factor contributing to athletes' vulnerability to doping (using banned substances/drugs to enhance sporting performance). So far, however, no study has examined what aspects of perfectionism suggest a vulnerability in junior athletes. Employing a cross-sectional design, this study examined perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in 129 male junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) differentiating four aspects of perfectionism: perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, parental pressure to be perfect, and coach pressure to be perfect. In the bivariate correlations, only parental pressure showed a positive relationship with positive doping attitudes. In a multiple regression analysis controlling for the overlap between the four aspects, perfectionistic strivings additionally showed a negative relationship. Moreover, a structural equation model examining the relationships between all variables suggested that coach pressure had a negative indirect effect on attitudes towards doping via perfectionistic strivings. The findings indicate that perceived parental pressure to be perfect may be a factor contributing to junior athletes' vulnerability to doping, whereas perfectionistic strivings may be a protective factor.

  18. SOCIAL SECURITY OF TURKISH ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış ÖZTUNA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Law No. 5510 realized within the social security reform aims providing a structure which presents equal scope and quality of social security service other all citizens. According to Labor Law No 4857, unionization of sportsmen in Turkish legal environment is possible, sport clubs and sportsmen are continuing to live without so many rights and obligations but they didn’t. Aim of this study; to prove sportsmen of location of the labour law and to mark off. The purpose of the study is explained according to Law No. 4857 and Law No. 5510 Turkish athletes. Profesional athletes deemed to be insurance holders for the purposes of implementing short and long term insurance branches of No 5510 Law. But amateur athletes don't seem to be insurance holders for the purposes of implementing short and long term insurance branches of No 5510 Law. According to the law 5774 regarding to be called as an g overnment athlete, within the adults category of the sports that are accepted as olympic, paralympic and deaflympic; pension is paid to the amateur athletes who became first, second or third at Olymic games, World or European Champions as an individual or team sports and to the national team coaches and assistant coaches of the athletes’ who became Olympic or World Champion as a team.

  19. Comparison of Athletes' Proneness to Depressive Symptoms in Individual and Team Sports: Research on Psychological Mediators in Junior Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Insa; Frank, Raphael; Beckmann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Depression among elite athletes is a topic of increasing interest and public awareness. Currently, empirical data on elite athletes' depressive symptoms are rare. Recent results indicate sport-related mechanisms and effects on depression prevalence in elite athlete samples; specific factors associated with depression include overtraining, injury, and failure in competition. One such effect is that athletes competing in individual sports were found to be more prone to depressive symptoms than athletes competing in team sports. The present study examined this effect by testing three possible, psychological mediators based on theoretical and empirical assumptions: namely, cohesion in team or training groups; perception of perfectionistic expectations from others; and negative attribution after failure. In a cross-sectional study, 199 German junior elite athletes (M age = 14.96; SD = 1.56) participated and completed questionnaires on perfectionism, cohesion, attribution after failure, and depressive symptoms. Mediation analysis using path analysis with bootstrapping was used for data analysis. As expected, athletes in individual sports showed higher scores in depression than athletes in team sports [t(197) = 2.05; p < 0.05; d = 0.30]. Furthermore, negative attribution after failure was associated with individual sports (β = 0.27; p < 0.001), as well as with the dependent variable depression (β = 0.26; p < 0.01). Mediation hypothesis was supported by a significant indirect effect (β = 0.07; p < 0.05). Negative attribution after failure mediated the relationship between individual sports and depression scores. Neither cohesion nor perfectionism met essential criteria to serve as mediators: cohesion was not elevated in either team or individual sports, and perfectionism was positively related to team sports. The results support the assumption of previous findings on sport-specific mechanisms (here the effect between individual and team sports) contributing to

  20. Sudden cardiac death in the elite athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio-santiago, Valentín; Santiago Trinidad, Ricardo; Vicenty Rivera, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a long -recognized disease that occurs rarely in trained athletes. Most affected athletes have no symptoms before death. Many attempts have been made to detect those at risk for SCD before athletic participation. However, its overall clinical advantages remain questionable in medical literature. This article will review cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic causes of SCD as well as discuss how this entity affects those athletes older than 35 years.

  1. Steroids in Athletics: One University's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mike

    1990-01-01

    Presents an account of one university's experience in conducting an investigation into possible steroid use by student athletes and the development of a program to deal with the problem. Discusses why athletes use steroids and how steroids are taken. Concludes it is likely many steroid-related deaths of athletes go undetected. (Author/ABL)

  2. NCAA Takes Heat over Commercialization of Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Libby

    2008-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is no stranger to criticism. This article reports that during a meeting of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, some higher-education officials questioned the NCAA's handling of a CBS fantasy football league, announced over the summer, that would use college athletes' names. Many…

  3. Personality and motivation of top athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kajtna

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The research investigated the differences in personality structure and the motivational structure of top athletes and athletes and male and female athletes, and we also looked for the interactive effect of sport success and gender. We also investigated anxiety in the mentioned groups. We gathered the results from 385 athletes, divided into two groups according to their success. World class athletes and international class athletes, as categorized according to the Slovenian Olympic committee, were assigned to "top athletes" group, whereas those with the perspective, national and youth class were assigned to the group of "athletes". We found no effect of sport success in the personality structure and anxiety, while we found that successful athletes are more competitive, have stronger win orientation, stronger need for power and stronger need for success and are more self – motivated. Differences between male and female athletes have demonstrated themselves to be significant in all three investigated areas – female athletes are more failure avoidant in the motivational scope of our investigation, express a higher level of state and trait anxiety than male athletes, and are less emotionally stable and are more agreeable as far as personality is concerned. We found no interactive effect of sport success and sex in any of the investigated areas.

  4. Transportation Practices in Community College Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVetter, David; Kim, Hyun Duck

    2010-01-01

    Over 45,000 U.S. community college athletes were transported to events during 2005-2006. Transporting college athletes has been an overlooked risk management issue facing administrators. Team travel accidents have caused death, injury, liability claims, property loss, and grief. National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) member…

  5. Intercollegiate Athletics Subsidies: A Regressive Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhart, Matthew; Vedder, Richard

    2010-01-01

    For most colleges and universities in the United States, intercollegiate athletics is a losing financial proposition. The vast majority ICA departments do not break even and require subsidization from the institution as a whole. When schools are forced to heavily subsidize athletics, ICA serves to impose an "athletics tax" on other dimensions of…

  6. Smokeless Tobacco Education for College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia J.

    2001-01-01

    Chewing tobacco and taking snuff are common practices among college athletes. This article describes one college's smokeless tobacco education program for students athletes in the health, physical education, and recreation department. Research on the multiple-strategy intervention indicated decreases in student athletes' smokeless tobacco use and…

  7. A Proposed Athletic Training Curriculum Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Sue

    An athletic training curriculum for the training of high school coaches and physical education teachers in Virginia includes courses on: (1) athletic injuries--a basic study of human physiology and anatomy relevant to different athletic injuries; (2) the art and science of sports medicine--prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of…

  8. Female College Athlete Leadership and Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicinao, Brianne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study contributes to the research on athlete leadership and team effectiveness in college sports. Athletic departments and sports coaches could benefit from a study about athlete leadership and team effectiveness in order to assist their student-leaders with leadership development and explore additional means to help improve team…

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Eugene Brent; Adams, Brian B

    2008-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections have become an increasingly common condition among athletes. Physical contact, shared facilities and equipment, and hygienic practices of athletes all contribute to methicillin-resistant S. aureus transmission among sports participants. This review elucidates the risk factors predisposing to methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in athletes and provides guidance for treatment and prevention.

  10. in athletes with spinal cord injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RC Pritchett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sweat production is crucial for thermoregulation. However, sweating can be problematic for individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI, as they display a blunting of sudomotor and vasomotor responses below the level of the injury. Sweat gland density and eccrine gland metabolism in SCI are not well understood. Consequently, this study examined sweat lactate (S-LA (reflective of sweat gland metabolism, active sweat gland density (SGD, and sweat output per gland (S/G in 7 SCI athletes and 8 able-bodied (AB controls matched for arm ergometry VO2peak. A sweat collection device was positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf of each subject just prior to the beginning of the trial, with iodine sweat gland density patches positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf. Participants were tested on a ramp protocol (7 min per stage, 20 W increase per stage in a common exercise environment (21±1°C, 45-65% relative humidity. An independent t-test revealed lower (p<0.05 SGD (upper scapular for SCI (22.3 ±14.8 glands · cm-2 vs. AB. (41.0 ± 8.1 glands · cm-2. However, there was no significant difference for S/G between groups. S-LA was significantly greater (p<0.05 during the second exercise stage for SCI (11.5±10.9 mmol · l-1 vs. AB (26.8±11.07 mmol · l-1. These findings suggest that SCI athletes had less active sweat glands compared to the AB group, but the sweat response was similar (SLA, S/G between AB and SCI athletes. The results suggest similar interglandular metabolic activity irrespective of overall sweat rate.

  11. Vegan diets: practical advice for athletes and exercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, David

    2017-01-01

    With the growth of social media as a platform to share information, veganism is becoming more visible, and could be becoming more accepted in sports and in the health and fitness industry. However, to date, there appears to be a lack of literature that discusses how to manage vegan diets for athletic purposes. This article attempted to review literature in order to provide recommendations for how to construct a vegan diet for athletes and exercisers. While little data could be found in the sports nutrition literature specifically, it was revealed elsewhere that veganism creates challenges that need to be accounted for when designing a nutritious diet. This included the sufficiency of energy and protein; the adequacy of vitamin B12, iron, zinc, calcium, iodine and vitamin D; and the lack of the long-chain n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA in most plant-based sources. However, via the strategic management of food and appropriate supplementation, it is the contention of this article that a nutritive vegan diet can be designed to achieve the dietary needs of most athletes satisfactorily. Further, it was suggested here that creatine and β-alanine supplementation might be of particular use to vegan athletes, owing to vegetarian diets promoting lower muscle creatine and lower muscle carnosine levels in consumers. Empirical research is needed to examine the effects of vegan diets in athletic populations however, especially if this movement grows in popularity, to ensure that the health and performance of athletic vegans is optimised in accordance with developments in sports nutrition knowledge.

  12. Athletes' perception of the causes of injury in gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Edvard; Pavletič, Mitija S; Smrdu, Maja; Atiković, Almir

    2017-05-01

    Gymnastics requires a high level of flexibility, conditioning and complete body recruitment that is infrequently matched by other sports. Artistic gymnastics has a relatively high incidence of injuries, which are generally of minor or medium severity. With all its complexity, it poses a unique diagnostic and treatment challenge to medical practitioners. The present study examined athletes' perception of the causes of injury and of the possible ways to reduce their incidence. The research involved 63 quality athletes, of whom 20 were in men's artistic gymnastics, 21 in women's artistic gymnastics, and 22 in rhythmic gymnastics. We used the self-assessment method. Factors inducing injury were grouped into three different categories: training, the athlete himself, and the environment. We used the χ2 test to test the association between a risk factor and injuries. The association between injuries and risk factors was also tested using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Overall, an incidence of 184 injuries was found, of which 67 (36.4%) were acute and 117 (63.5%) were chronic injuries. According to binary logistic regression analyses, psychological factors significantly associated with the prevalence of acute and chronic injury in both sexes for all disciplines were: a poor technique, improper methods of teaching, and an inadequate load. In our study, higher rates of acute and chronic injury were observed among male gymnasts, who reported their occurrence during training by overload, and among female gymnasts, who reported a poor technique, improper methods of teaching, and an inadequate load as main causes of their occurrence. Improving the communication between athletes and coaches, taking the opinion of an athlete into account, and the athlete's active involvement in preparation of the program include the most crucial points for reducing the incidence of injuries.

  13. Aspects of treatment for posterior heel pain in young athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elengard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Elengard1, Jón Karlsson1, Karin Grävare Silbernagel21Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USAAbstract: Posterior heel pain occurs in young athletes involved in running and jumping. Due to the pain, the child often limits his/her physical activity level, with a possible negative effect on health and well-being. Although numerous research studies have examined the cause and treatment of heel and Achilles tendon pain in adults, there are no randomized clinical trials on treatment in children and adolescents. Therefore, there is limited evidence for how to treat young athletes with this type of complaint. The purpose of this review was to analyze critically and summarize the literature in regards to the cause and treatment of posterior heel pain in young athletes. The various diagnoses and clinical presentations relating to posterior heel and Achilles tendon pain are discussed. The theory and mechanism behind various recommended treatment strategies are also reviewed in the context of use in the young athlete. In summary, it is important to perform a thorough evaluation of each young athlete with heel pain to determine the appropriate diagnosis and to treat the deficits found and allow for a gradual progression to training. However, the recommendations at this time are based on clinical experience and a few retrospective studies, so further well designed prospective studies with validated outcome measures are urgently needed for the young athlete.Keywords: Sever's disease, apophysitis, tendinitis, tendinopathy, child, adolescent

  14. COMPOSITION OF THE ATHLETES DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Salaj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available  Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with many of research papers published annually. However, designing the most suitable sports diet is very difficult. It must be given to the type of training, its duration and intensity, the age and sex of the athlete and also for overall health. The aim of this article is to summarize knowledges about sports nutrition, especially intake of carbohydrates, proteins, fats and dietary supplements and their influence on the performance and recovery of the athlete.doi:10.5219/126 

  15. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolinson, P Gunnar; Kozar, Albert J; Cibor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a common source of low back pain in the general population. Because it is the link between the lower extremities and the spine, it sustains even higher loads during athletic activity, predisposing athletes to a greater probability of joint dysfunction and pain. The diagnosis and treatment of SI joint dysfunction remains controversial, due to complex anatomy and biomechanics, and a lack of universally accepted nomenclature and terminology, consistently reliable clinical tests and imaging studies, and consistently effective treatments. This article clarifies these issues by presenting a model of SI joint anatomy and function, a systematic approach to the diagnosis of dysfunction, and a comprehensive treatment plan.

  16. The relationship between perfectionism, eating disorders and athletes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, S; Lock, J

    2006-12-01

    Perfectionism is a potentially maladaptive personality trait implicated in a number of psychopathologies. As our understanding of the construct perfectionism has shifted from more unidimensionally focused conceptualizations to multidimensional ones, our ability to assess its bearing on various disorders has grown. One particular area in which perfectionism appears to play an important role is among eating disorder patients. The personalities of both those with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are thought to be intrinsically perfectionistic, which suggests a need to understand the role perfectionism plays in the development, course and outcome of these disorders. There is also an increased focus on perfectionism among athletes and its relationship to the higher prevalence of eating disorders in this group. With the institution of Title IX in the United States (which prohibited sex discrimination in higher educational settings) the participation of women in various sports has increased exponentially and with it concerns about their well-being in a milieu where a risk for menstrual irregularities, osteoporosis and eating disorders (the female athlete triad) are common. However, conflicting data suggests that athletics may be a protective factor in the development of eating disorders on the one hand, or it may be a risk factor on the other. Thus, it has become important to examine other variables, such as perfectionism, that may influence the outcome, one way or another. This review examines the current evidence about the relations between perfectionism, athletics and eating disorders.

  17. Differences in self-regulatory skills among talented athletes : The significance of competitive level and type of sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Laura; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that talented athletes outscore their mainstream peers on the basis of self-regulation. Although valuable, this does not tell us more about the distinction between good athletes and the best, which is a prerequisite in talent development. Therefore, we examined the self-regulatory

  18. Racial and Athletic Identity of African American Football Players at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Reed, Courtney; Steinfeldt, M. Clint

    2010-01-01

    This study examined racial and athletic identity among African American football players at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Negotiating the dualism of racial and athletic identities can be problematic because both roles are subject to prejudice and discrimination, particularly for…

  19. Evaluation of the Career Planning of Athletes, Who Succeeded in Olympics, in the Light of Different Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Cemal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, career planning of Turkish athletes, who won medals in olympics for the periods they played and left sport, are investigated; however, differentiation of career planning dimensions of athletes in terms of demographic and sportive variables is examined as well. This study, which aimed at determining the effectiveness of career…

  20. Racial and Athletic Identity of African American Football Players at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Reed, Courtney; Steinfeldt, M. Clint

    2010-01-01

    This study examined racial and athletic identity among African American football players at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Negotiating the dualism of racial and athletic identities can be problematic because both roles are subject to prejudice and discrimination, particularly for…

  1. The Impact of Baseball Participation on the Educational Experiences of Black Student-Athletes at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrysiak, Edward Joseph; Cooper, Joseph N.; Hawkins, Billy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of baseball participation on the educational experiences of black student-athletes at two Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the southeastern United States (US). HBCUs were selected for this study because of the limited amount of research on student-athletes at these…

  2. Leadership Ability and Achieving Styles among Student-Athletes at a NCAA-II University in the Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Mary Theresa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined student-athletes' self-reported leadership ability and achieving styles. It analyzed leadership ability and achieving style preferences as they related to gender, class status, ethnicity, and sport classification: individual-sport vs. team-sport athletes. A paper and pencil survey consisting of a composite variable of six…

  3. Differences in self-regulatory skills among talented athletes : The significance of competitive level and type of sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Laura; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that talented athletes outscore their mainstream peers on the basis of self-regulation. Although valuable, this does not tell us more about the distinction between good athletes and the best, which is a prerequisite in talent development. Therefore, we examined the self-regulatory

  4. "Law v. National Collegiate Athletic Association": A Guide To How Courts Will Treat Future Antitrust Challenges to NCAA Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Marc R.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the application of antitrust law to National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules and regulations through an analysis of the Tenth Circuit's decision in "Law v. National Collegiate Athletic Association." Suggests that the "Law" decision provides a useful framework for the analysis of future antitrust challenges to NCAA rules and…

  5. Validity and reliability of eating disorder assessments used with athletes:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zachary Pope; Yong Gao; Nicole Bolter; Mary Pritchard

    2015-01-01

    Background:Prevalence of eating disorders (EDs) among college-aged athletes has risen in recent years. Although measures exist for assessing EDs, these measures have not been thoroughly reviewed in athletes. This study reviewed the validity and reliability evidence of the commonly used measures for assessing EDs in athlete populations aged 18-26 years. Methods:Databases were searched for studies of regarding ED on male and/or female athletes. Inclusion criteria stated the study (a) assessed EDs in an athlete population 18-26 years of age and (b) investigated EDs using a psychometric measure found valid and/or reliable in a non-athlete population and/or athlete population. Results:Fifty studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven and 22 articles, respectively, studied EDs behaviors in male and female athletes whereas 21 articles studied EDs in combined-gender samples. The five most commonly used measures were the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), Bulimia Test-Revised (BULIT-R), Questionnaire for Eating Disorder Diagnosis (QEDD), and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Conclusion:Only seven studies calculated validity coefficients within the study whereas 47 cited the validity coefficient. Twenty-six calculated a reliability coefficient whereas 47 cited the reliability of the ED measures. Four studies found validity evidence for the EAT, EDI, BULIT-R, QEDD, and EDE-Q in an athlete population. Few studies reviewed calculated validity and reliability coefficients of ED measures. Cross-validation of these measures in athlete populations is clearly needed.

  6. Many non-elite multisport endurance athletes do not meet sports nutrition recommendations for carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Geneviève; Lamarche, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    Little is known regarding the dietary intake of non-elite athletes involved in multisport endurance events. The primary objective of this observational study was to characterize the dietary intake of non-elite athletes participating in winter triathlon (snowshoeing, skating, and cross-country skiing), winter pentathlon (winter triathlon sports + cycling and running), Ironman (IM: swimming, cycling, running), and half-distance Ironman (IM 70.3) in relation with current sports nutrition recommendations. A total of 116 non-elite athletes (32 women and 84 men) who had participated in one of those events in 2014 were included in the analyses. Usual dietary intake was assessed using a validated online food frequency questionnaire. Participants (22-66 years old) trained 14.8 ± 5.3 h/week, on average (±SD). Only 45.7% [95% confidence interval, 36.4%-55.2%] of all athletes reported consuming the recommended intake for carbohydrates, with the highest proportion (66.7%) seen in IM athletes. On the other hand, 87.1% [79.6%-92.6%] of all athletes reported consuming at least 1.2 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1), while 66.4% [57.0%-74.9%] reported consuming more than 1.6 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1). The proportion of athletes consuming the recommended amount of protein was highest (84.6%) among IM athletes. There was no difference in the proportion of athletes achieving the recommended carbohydrate and protein intakes between men and women. These findings suggest that many non-elite multisport endurance athletes do not meet the current recommendations for carbohydrates, emphasizing the need for targeted nutritional education. Further research is needed to examine how underreporting of food intake may have affected these estimates.

  7. Exhaustion Experiences in Junior Athletes: The Importance of Motivation and Self-Control Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordalen, Gro; Lemyre, Pierre-Nicolas; Durand-Bush, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Quality of motivation, self-control competencies, as well as past performance experience influence sport participation outcomes in developing athletes. Studies have shown that junior athletes high in self-determined motivation are less prone to experience burnout, while self-control competencies help developing athletes to be conscious and deliberate in their self-regulatory efforts toward elite sport performances and avoid negative sport participation outcomes. Combining the self-determination theory framework and psychosocial theories of self-regulation, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine how various types of motivation and self-control competencies together are associated with the development of burnout symptoms in junior athletes. High-level Norwegian winter-sport athletes from elite sport academies (N = 199; female n = 72; 16-20 years of age) consented to participate. Associations between six types of motivational regulation, self-control, and indices of exhaustion were investigated. We hypothesized that athletes' self-control competencies are important to operate successfully, and influenced by different types of motivation, they are expected to help athletes avoid negative sport participation outcomes such as emotional and physical exhaustion. Structural equation modeling analyses were conducted to analyze these relationships, and results revealed some multifaceted associations. When identifying antecedents of sport participation exhaustion and burnout, there is a need to go beyond the unique framework of motivation theories, and explore what cognitive competencies ensure fulfillment of motivation desires. In the current study, differences in junior athletes' quality of motivation influenced self-control competencies when predicting exhaustion. Interestingly, young athletes driven by self-determined (intrinsic, integrated, and identified), and controlled (introjected and amotivation) regulations in association with self-control offered the

  8. Adipocytokine responses to acute exercise in athletes with different body fat content and sedentary controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Sumarac Dumanovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent research in the biology of adipose tissue indicates that it is far more than a simply an energy storage organ, and it is in fact an active endocrine organ secreting numerous bioactive mediators, called adipokines, including leptin, adiponectin and visfatin (Galic, 2010. To date, less attention has been focused on the kinetics of adipokines levels during and after high intensity exercise. Several reports pointed at the metabolic role of adipokines during exercise in elite athletes, but the data are currently equivocal (Bouassida et al., 2010; Jürimäe et al., 2011. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate adipocytokine responses to a single bout acute exercise in elite athletes with low percentage of body fat, elite athletes with a high percentage of body fat and sedentary controls. Methods: Sixteen athletes with low percentage of body fat (volleyball players, low fat athletes group, LFAG, fifteen athletes with high percentage of body fat (water polo players, high fat athletes group, HFAG and fifteen sedentary subjects participated in this study (age [years] 20±2; 20±2; 20±1, respectively. All subjects were exposed to: anthropometric measurements; exercise test on treadmill in order to examine acute changes of adipocytokines; blood samples were obtained at baseline levels, immediately after the exercise test and 30 minutes after recovery. Separated serum or plasma were used for hormone (leptin, adiponectin and visfatin ELISA analysis. Results: In athletes in LFAG, baseline leptin concentration was significantly lower, but adiponectin and visfatin concentrations were significantly higher, compared to sedentary controls and athletes in HFAG (p0.05. Conclusions: Our findings show leptin and visfatin levels, but not adiponectin respond to acute exercise. Acute exercise elicited an inverse visfatin response in athletes in HFAG and controls. Also, these results suggest that leptin is altered after acute exercise

  9. Electrocardiography and echocardiography in athletic heart imagining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Biały

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was evaluation of electrocardiographic and echocardiographic parameters in athletes. „Athletic heart” characteristics were compared with fit persons’ heart. 96 athletes participated in the study. Sportsmen were divided into: static (S, dynamic (D and composite (SD exercise groups and Polish (I, European (II, World (III champions. 30 students from Sport Academy formed the control group (K. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examination were performed in everyone. As regards the type of exercise, the end-systolic left ventricular (LV dimension was smaller in S in comparison with D and SD (28.9 vs 32.2 and 32.68 mm; P<0.05. LV mass was bigger in D in comparison with K (273.2 vs 218.6 g; P<0.05. Medium Pulmonary Artery Pressure (MPAP in S and SD was lower in respect to D and K (11.75; 11.08 vs 15.52; 17.43 mm Hg; P<0.05. We observed lower heart rate in D, SD in comparison with K (58.64; 60.54 vs 68.8; P<0.05, bigger R wave amplitude in V5 (RV5 (21.65; 23.5 vs 15.03 mm; P<0.05 and V6 (RV6 (23.5 vs 15.3 mm; P<0.05 in group S in respect to K. LV mass was bigger in III than in K (261.3 vs 218.6 g; P<0.05. MPAP was lower in I and II in comparison with K (11.42; 13.13 vs 17.43 mmHg; P<0.05. HR was lower in categories I, II than in K (61.32; 60.13 vs 68.8; P<0.05, RV5 was bigger in I in comparison with K (19.5 vs 15.03 mm; P<0.05. The electrocardiography and echocardiography proves to find some significant differences between athletic and fit persons’ heart especially as concerns MPAP, RV5, RV6 values.

  10. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed.

  11. The special olympics healthy athletes experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Special Olympics is the largest sports organization in the world serving athletes with intellectual disabilities. Because of their unique needs, Special Olympics has designed a multitude of programs specifically for athletes with intellectual disabilities, including the world's largest public health screening program for people with intellectual disabilities, known as the Special Olympics Healthy Athletes Program. This article describes the Healthy Athletes program and some of the results of the program within the context of impacting health care professional education with respect to athletes with intellectual disabilities.

  12. Perceptions of Athletic Trainers as a Source of Nutritional Information among Collegiate Athletes: A Mixed-methods Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Schlaff

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Athletes obtain nutrition information from a number of sources, with some being more accurate than others.  Little is known about athletes’ perceptions of utilizing Certified Athletic Trainers (ATs as a primary source of information. Objective: We sought to 1 examine the primary sources of nutrition information among a group of United States collegiate athletes and 2 understand athletes’ perceptions regarding utilization of their ATs as primary sources of nutrition information. Methods: Participants (Division II university athletes completed an online questionnaire (n=155;n=58 males, n=97 females assessing demographic information and ranked primary sources of nutrition information, and participated in focus groups (n=26;n=18 women, n=8 men to better understand barriers/perceptions for using their ATs for nutrition information. Mean+SD ranking were calculated for all sources. Mann Whitney-U analyses were used to identify differences in rank order nutrition sources between genders and years of collegiate experience. Semi-structured focus groups were transcribed, coded, and themes were identified regarding barriers to utilizing ATs for nutrition-related information. Results: Parents (3.54±2.38 and the internet (3.69±2.29 had the highest mean ranks.  ATs were least often ranked as the number one nutrition source (7.5%, among all sources provided.  Barriers to utilizing ATs for nutritional information included discomfort, nutrition information not being within the scope of practice, lack of knowledge, the athletic trainer not caring, and lack of time. Conclusions: Participants reported utilizing ATs less than previous research indicates. Continuing education may be needed to improve the efficacy of ATs in addressing nutritional issues and being seen as a credible and accessible source. Keywords: Diet, Athlete perceptions, Barriers

  13. Impacts of talent development environments on athlete burnout: a self-determination perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiao; Wang, Chee Keng John; Pyun, Do Young

    2017-09-01

    Guided by Deci and Ryan's (2000) self-determination theory, this survey study aimed to examine the effects of the talent development environmental factors on athlete burnout. Talented adolescent athletes (n = 691) filled out a survey form measuring the talent development environmental factors, needs satisfaction and burnout. The findings showed that three talent environmental factors (i.e., long-term development focus, holistic quality preparation and communication) were negative predictors of burnout via needs satisfaction. It was concluded that the three talent development environmental factors may be important for facilitating athletes' needs satisfaction and preventing burnout.

  14. Anthropometric characteristics, passive hip flexion, and spinal mobility in relation to back pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swärd, L; Eriksson, B; Peterson, L

    1990-05-01

    Anthropometric characteristics, passive hip flexion, and spinal mobility were examined and back pain was registered in 116 top Swedish male athletes representing four different sports (wrestling, gymnastics, soccer, tennis). Differences in stature, body weight, passive hip flexion, mobility of the spine in forward flexion, and asymmetry of the back were found when each group of athletes was compared with the rest of the athletes. These differences could be explained by a natural selection of individuals with the physical constitution required for the sport concerned, but they may also be a long-term effect of training. A small sacral inclination, defined as the sacrohorizontal angle, correlated significantly with back pain.

  15. Minimum reporting standards for clinical research on groin pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Thorborg, Kristian; Khan, Karim M

    2015-01-01

    are provided in relation to: (1) study methodology, (2) study participants and injury history, (3) clinical examination, (4) clinical assessment and (5) radiology. Adherence to these minimum reporting standards will strengthen the quality and transparency of research conducted on groin pain in athletes...... to generalise findings to the target patient population. Minimum reporting standards for research on groin pain in athletes are overdue. We propose a set of minimum reporting standards based on best available evidence to be utilised in future research on groin pain in athletes. Minimum reporting standards...

  16. The Role of Athlete Narcissism in Moderating the Relationship Between Coaches’ Transformational Leader Behaviors and Athlete Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, Calum Alexander; Woodman, Tim; Ong, Chin Wei; Hardy, Lew; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Leadership research that examines follower characteristics as a potential moderator of leadership effectiveness is lacking. Within Bass’s (1985) transformational lead­ership framework, we examined follower narcissism as a moderator of the coach behavior–coach effectiveness relationship. Youth athletes (male = 103, female = 106) from the Singapore Sports Academy (mean age = 14.28, SD = 1.40 years) completed the Differentiated Transformational Leadership Inventory (Callow, Smith, Hardy, Arthur,...

  17. CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Montfort-Steiger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes

  18. Strategies for the prevention of sudden cardiac death during sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Domenico; Drezner, Jonathan; Basso, Cristina; Pelliccia, Antonio; Thiene, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death of a young athlete is the most tragic event in sports and devastates the family, the sports medicine team, and the local community. Such a fatality represents the first manifestation of cardiac disease in up to 80% of young athletes who remain asymptomatic before sudden cardiac arrest occurs; this explains the limited power of screening modalities based solely on history and physical examination. The long-running Italian experience showed that electrocardiogram (ECG) screening definitively improves the sensitivity of pre-participation evaluation for heart diseases and substantially reduces the risk of death in the athletic field (primary prevention). However, some cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery diseases, present no abnormalities on 12-lead ECG. Moreover, cardiac arrest due to non-penetrating chest injury (commotio cordis) cannot be prevented by screening. This justifies the efforts for implementing programmes of early external defibrillation of unpredictable arrhythmic cardiac arrest. This article reviews the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest in the athlete in terms of incidence, sport-related risk, underlying causes, and the currently available prevention programmes such as pre-participation screening and early external defibrillation by using automated external defibrillators. The best strategy is to combine synergistically primary prevention of sudden cardiac death by pre-participation identification of athletes affected by at-risk cardiomyopathies and secondary prevention with back-up defibrillation of unpredictable sudden cardiac arrest on the athletic field.

  19. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing

  20. Female Athlete Triad: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Curry, Emily J; Whitlock, Kaitlyn

    2015-07-01

    After the passage of Title IX in 1972, female sports participation skyrocketed. In 1992, the female athlete triad was first defined; diagnosis required the presence of an eating disorder, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. However, many athletes remained undiagnosed because they did not meet all three of these criteria. In 2007, the definition was modified to a spectrum disorder involving low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. With the new definition, all three components need not be present for a diagnosis of female athlete triad. Studies using the 1992 definition of the disorder demonstrated a prevalence of 1% to 4% in athletes. However, in certain sports, many female athletes may meet at least one of these criteria. The actual prevalence of athletes who fall under the "umbrella" diagnosis of the female athlete triad remains unknown.

  1. Nutrition assessment of horse-racing athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Snider, O Sue; Windish, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Athletes involved in horse racing face weight restrictions like wrestlers and dancers; however, the literature is sparse pertaining to nutritional habits of jockeys. The practice of "making weight" causes these athletes to engage in potentially unhealthy practices. A gap in nutritionally sound practices and methods used by jockeys was identified and a desire for nutrition education was expressed to Cooperative Extension of Delaware by representatives of the riders at Delaware Park Race Track. Nutrition assessment was done using the Nutrition Care Process. Twenty jockeys were interviewed using an assessment form developed to target areas of disordered eating. Body mass index (BMI), mean weight loss on race day, methods of weight loss and ease of weight maintenance were examined. The jockeys were also asked for areas they wished to receive nutrition education on in the future. The BMI of the 20 jockeys ranged from 17.0 to 21.4 during racing season, with only one jockey in the "underweight" category. This range increased to 19.1-24.0 when the riders were not riding. The most common method of weight loss was the use of steam rooms, to lose an average 2.5 lb in 1 day. Eight of 20, the most common response, reported it very easy to maintain their racing weight. The jockeys reported interest in future education sessions on meal planning and healthy food ideas. The assessment was used as the basis to develop nutrition education materials and presentations for the riders at the race track.

  2. Differentiating Concussion From Intracranial Pathology in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps, Andrea; Livingston, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Scenario: A cerebral concussion is a traumatically induced transient disturbance of brain function characterized by a complex pathophysiologic process and is classified as a subset of mild traumatic brain injury. The occurrence of intracranial lesions after sport-related head injury is relatively uncommon, but the possibility of serious intracranial injury (ICI) should be included in the differential diagnosis. ICIs are potentially life threatening and necessitate urgent medical management; therefore, prompt recognition and evaluation are critical to proper medical management. One of the primary objectives of the initial evaluation is to determine if the concussed athlete has an acute traumatic ICI. Athletic trainers must be able promptly recognize clinical signs and symptoms that will enable them to accurately differentiate between a concussion (ie, a closed head injury not associated with significant ICI) and an ICI. The identification of predictors of intracranial lesions is, however, relatively broad. Focused Clinical Question: Which clinical examination findings (ie, clinical signs and symptoms) indicate possible intracranial pathology in individuals with acute closed head injuries?

  3. Athletic Excellence and National Glory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The Athens Olympic Games marked a watershed in Chinesesporting history. China's remarkable achievements, second only tothose of America, placed indelibly it on the list of powerful sportingnations. More important, China's most celebrated athlete, 110-meterhurdle gold medallist Liu Xiang, banished forever the myth that Asianathletes do not measure up to those of Europe or the USA.

  4. Common problems in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, David D; Navazio, Franco

    2007-07-15

    Endurance athletes alternate periods of intensive physical training with periods of rest and recovery to improve performance. An imbalance caused by overly intensive training and inadequate recovery leads to a breakdown in tissue reparative mechanisms and eventually to overuse injuries. Tendon overuse injury is degenerative rather than inflammatory. Tendinopathy is often slow to resolve and responds inconsistently to anti-inflammatory agents. Common overuse injuries in runners and other endurance athletes include patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band friction syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, and lower extremity stress fractures. These injuries are treated with relative rest, usually accompanied by a rehabilitative exercise program. Cyclists may benefit from evaluation on their bicycles and subsequent adjustment of seat height, cycling position, or pedal system. Endurance athletes also are susceptible to exercise-associated medical conditions, including exercise-induced asthma, exercise-associated collapse, and overtraining syndrome. These conditions are treatable or preventable with appropriate medical intervention. Dilutional hyponatremia is increasingly encountered in athletes participating in marathons and triathlons. This condition is related to overhydration with hypotonic fluids and may be preventable with guidance on appropriate fluid intake during competition.

  5. Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Colin P.

    A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

  6. Nutrient Needs of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Barbara; Hemmelgarn, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Explains the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents, and the physiological roles of the major nutrients. Details the nutrient needs of young athletes, including pre- and postgame meals and fluid replacement. Discusses eating disorders and obesity. Advocates a diet rich in complex carbohydrates. (BC)

  7. A Corporate Pitch for Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The challenge of funding new athletic programs with no additional tax revenue forced a Colorado Springs school district to supplement existing funding arrangements (participation fees, gate admissions, and team fundraising) with a new income source--a lucrative Coca-Cola contract. This article explains how to negotiate (and justify) favorable…

  8. Nutrition recommendations for masters athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Christine A; Dunaway, Ann

    2007-01-01

    "More than 3000 masters athletes from 62 countries compete in Linz, Austria, in March of 2006." In 2005, 9000 "silver-haired Americans go for the gold." The National Senior Games Association announced a "major change in the NSGA rules affecting the game of basketball; a new age division of 80+ has been added for 2007."

  9. Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Colin P.

    A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

  10. Treatment strategies for the female athlete triad in the adolescent athlete: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thein-Nissenbaum J

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jill Thein-Nissenbaum,1 Erin Hammer2 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Since the passage of Title IX in 1972, female sports participation has dramatically increased. The benefits of physical activity, including decreased risk for heart disease and diabetes as well as improved body image and self-esteem, far outweigh the risks. However, a select population of adolescent and young adult females may experience symptoms related to the female athlete triad (Triad, which refers to the interrelatedness of energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral density (BMD. These conditions often manifest clinically as disordered eating behaviors, menstrual irregularity, and stress fractures; an individual may suffer from 1 or all of the Triad components simultaneously. Because of the complex nature of the Triad, treatment is challenging and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Team members often include a physician, psychologist or psychiatrist, nutritionist or dietitian, physical therapist, athletic trainer, coach, family members, and most importantly, the patient. A thorough physical examination by a primary care physician is essential to identify all organs/systems that may be impacted by Triad-related conditions. Laboratory tests, assessment of bone density, nutritional assessment, and behavior health evaluation guide the management of the female athlete with Triad-related conditions. Treatment of the Triad includes adequate caloric consumption to restore a positive energy balance; this is often the first step in successful management of the Triad. In addition, determining the cause of menstrual dysfunction (MD and resumption of menses is very important. Nonpharmacologic interventions are the first choice; pharmacologic treatment for MD is reserved only for those patients with symptoms of

  11. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Ali Mansournia; Homayoun Amini; Sara Lotfian; Vahid Ziaee; Amir-Hossein Memari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents’ behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70), karateka (n=66), swimmers (n=59), and non athletes (n=96). One stage cluster s...

  12. Competitive athletic participation, thigh muscle strength, and bone density in elite senior athletes and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Jean L; Salacinski, Amanda J; Hunt Sellhorst, Sarah E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between participation in highly competitive exercise, thigh muscle strength, and regional and total body bone mineral density (BMD) in elite senior athletes and healthy elderly controls was investigated. One hundred and four elite senior athletes (age: 72.6 ± 6.4 years, height: 168.7 ± 8.6 cm, mass: 72.6 ± 13.5 kg, 57 male:47 female) and 79 healthy controls (age: 75.4 ± 5.6 years, height: 170.8 ± 25.5 cm, mass: 79.5 ± 11.7 kg, 46 male:33 female) participated in this cross-sectional study. Vitamin D and calcium intake were assessed via a recall survey. Isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque were measured via a custom strength measurement device. Total body and regional BMD of the hip, radius, and spine were assessed with a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometer. For each BMD site assessed, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed in 4 steps (α = 0.10) to examine the contribution of (a) age, sex, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake; (b) group (elite senior athlete, control); (c) knee extension peak torque; and (d) knee flexion peak torque on BMD. Sex, age, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake explained a significant amount of variance in BMD in each site. Group was not significant. Knee extension peak torque explained an additional 3.8% of the variance in hip BMD (p = 0.06). Knee flexion peak torque was not correlated to BMD at any of the sites assessed. In conclusion, participation in highly competitive athletics was not related to total body or regional BMD. Age, sex, bodyweight, and vitamin D and calcium intake were significantly related to BMD at all the sites assessed. Quadriceps strength contributed slightly to hip BMD. Our results imply that participation in highly competitive senior athletics does not have a protective effect on BMD, perhaps because of a lower bodyweight or other confounding factors.

  13. Psychological skills training of an elite wheelchair water-skiing athlete: a single-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bressy de Guast, Virginie; Golby, Jim; Van Wersch, Anna; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2013-10-01

    This study presents a complete psychological skills training (PST) program with a wheelchair athlete and examines the program effectiveness using a mixed-method approach. After initial testing, the athlete followed a two-month program of self-confidence building, motivational, visualization/relaxation, and injury management techniques. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine the impacts on performance and psychological abilities. The triangulated results suggest that the PST program was perceived as effective by the athlete in terms of his sporting performances and mental skills. The characteristics and implications of a PST program with this wheelchair athlete are discussed, as well as the study limitations and the perspectives for future research.

  14. Using recovery modalities between training sessions in elite athletes: does it help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Achieving an appropriate balance between training and competition stresses and recovery is important in maximising the performance of athletes. A wide range of recovery modalities are now used as integral parts of the training programmes of elite athletes to help attain this balance. This review examined the evidence available as to the efficacy of these recovery modalities in enhancing between-training session recovery in elite athletes. Recovery modalities have largely been investigated with regard to their ability to enhance the rate of blood lactate removal following high-intensity exercise or to reduce the severity and duration of exercise-induced muscle injury and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Neither of these reflects the circumstances of between-training session recovery in elite athletes. After high-intensity exercise, rest alone will return blood lactate to baseline levels well within the normal time period between the training sessions of athletes. The majority of studies examining exercise-induced muscle injury and DOMS have used untrained subjects undertaking large amounts of unfamiliar eccentric exercise. This model is unlikely to closely reflect the circumstances of elite athletes. Even without considering the above limitations, there is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of the recovery modalities reviewed to enhance the between-training session recovery of elite athletes. Modalities reviewed were massage, active recovery, cryotherapy, contrast temperature water immersion therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, compression garments, stretching, electromyostimulation and combination modalities. Experimental models designed to reflect the circumstances of elite athletes are needed to further investigate the efficacy of various recovery modalities for elite athletes. Other potentially important factors associated with recovery, such as the rate of post-exercise glycogen synthesis and the role

  15. John Amaechi: changing the way sport reporters examine gay athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kian, Edward Ted M; Anderson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, John Amaechi became the first former National Basketball Association (NBA) player to publicly announce he was gay. Former NBA star Tim Hardaway made a series of homophobic remarks a week later. A textual analysis was used to analyze narratives on Amaechi's revelation and/or Hardaway's comments published in 50 international newspapers. Four dominant themes emerged from the data. While most of these themes supported narratives that gay males remain unwelcome in men's team sports, all were challenged consistently, thus, showing the fluidity of hegemonic masculinity and the increasing societal acceptance of gays and gay lifestyles. Moreover, print media writers exhibited little homophobia and frequently called for more acceptance of gays, particularly within sport.

  16. Overuse injuries in pediatric athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen A; Gross, Richard H

    2003-07-01

    Children can be seemingly invincible, with inexhaustible energy. Even the elite young athlete, however, may lack the experience to realize when his or her level of activity is increasing the risk of sustaining injuries related to overuse. Coaches, trainers, parents, and physicians need to monitor the activities of young athletes, modify factors that may place them at increased risk of injury, and enforce periods of "relative rest" when necessary. Factors that can increase the risk of overuse injuries can be identified and modified if possible. Environmental factors include the use of sport-specific equipment (ie, running shoes instead of cleats for running activities) and properly sized equipment. Children of the same age will be of different sizes; "one size fits all" is not a good enough policy in this diverse population. Training factors include magnitude, frequency, and intensity. Children should be asked if they are participating in more than one team or sport simultaneously. Also, because the child's interest may exceed his or her skill level, young athletes optimally should be taught sport-specific skills to prevent injuries related to improper biomechanics. Finally, anatomic factors should be assessed, including alignment, laxity, flexibility, and muscle balance. These factors cannot always be changed, but coaches can modify training regimens and suggest strength and flexibility training to counteract specific weaknesses. Young athletes have a long future of activity ahead of them. Even if they never reach the Olympics or compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA), the injuries that occur in young athletes can have significant repercussions long after they leave the competitive arena.

  17. The Chronotype of Elite Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lastella Michele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to compare the chronotype distribution of elite athletes to a young adult population and (ii to determine if there was a tendency for athletes to select and/or participate in sports which suited their chronotype. A total of 114 elite athletes from five sports (cricket, cycling, hockey, soccer and triathlon participated in this study. The participants’ chronotype, sleepiness, sleep satisfaction and sleep quality were determined using the Horne and Östberg Morningness and Eveningness questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and questions concerning their sleep satisfaction and quality. All questionnaires were administered during a typical training phase that was not in the lead up to competition and/or post competition. No differences between chronotype group for sleepiness, sleep satisfaction or sleep quality were found. There was a significantly higher proportion of triathletes that were morning and intermediate types compared to the control group χ2 (2 = 7.5, p = 0.02. A significant relationship between sport and chronotype group (χ2(4=15.9, p = 0.04 was observed, with a higher frequency of morning types involved in sports that required morning training. There was a clear indication that athletes tended to select and pursue sports that suited their chronotype. This was evident by the amount of morning types involved in morning sports. Given that athletes are more likely to pursue and excel in sports which suit their chronotype, it is recommended that coaches consider the athlete’s chronotype during selection processes or if possible design and implement changes to training schedules to either suit the athletes’ chronotype or the timing of an upcoming competition.

  18. Athletes as PR Spokespeople: the NFL’s “A Crucial Catch” PR Campaign Explored

    OpenAIRE

    Chyna Teresa Trible

    2015-01-01

    The results of the present study were presented at the 2015 International Conference on Communication and Management and examined the National Football League’s (NFL) “A Crucial Catch” breast cancer awareness campaign in the United States. Variables included identification with NFL athletes, exposure to the campaign, NFL fanship, and intention to schedule a breast cancer screening (the action promoted by NFL athletes in this PR campaign). Social media outlets and an e-mail listserv of the Sch...

  19. INFLUENCE OF STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM ON ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN YOUNG ATHLETES

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Radovanovic; Aleksandar Ignjatovic; Ratko Stankovic

    2007-01-01

    Strength training, or resistance training, is a form of physical conditioning used to increase the ability to resist force. Since muscular strength is required for success in many sports, it is logical to assume that stronger and more powerful young athletes will achieve better results. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of strength training on young athletes. An eight-week strength training program for developing muscle strength was performed in this study. Training protocol was...

  20. Physical constitution matters for athletic performance and salary of NBA players

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkenbüll, Linn-Brit

    2017-01-01

    Basketball is one of the most practised sports in the world, especially in America. America has the most famous professional basketball league, the National Basketball Association (NBA). This study examines whether there is a relationship between the physical constitution of professional basketball players and their athletic performance in the 2015/16 NBA season. Regression results show that the relative wingspan influences the athletic performance in a significantly positive way whereas the ...

  1. To lead or not to lead? Identifying athlete leadership roles in sport teams

    OpenAIRE

    Fransen, Katrien; Vanbeselaere, Norbert; Vande Broek, Gert; De Cuyper, Bert; Boen, Filip

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research in sport leadership has mainly focused on the leadership of the coach. However, players within the team can also occupy leadership roles and become crucial for an optimal team functioning. The few studies that did examine the different roles of athlete leaders have distinguished between three leadership roles; task leader, social leader, and external leader (Loughead, Hardy, & Eys, 2006). However, these athlete leadership roles and their characteristics have not yet b...

  2. Doha agreement meeting on terminology and definitions in groin pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weir, Adam; Brukner, Peter; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    . All members participated in a Delphi questionnaire prior to the meeting. RESULTS: Unanimous agreement was reached on the following terminology. The classification system has three major subheadings of groin pain in athletes: 1. Defined clinical entities for groin pain: Adductor-related, iliopsoas...... taxonomy using three major categories. These definitions and terminology are based on history and physical examination to categorise athletes, making it simple and suitable for both clinical practice and research....

  3. Interrelationships between lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant status in sedentary controls and unprofessional athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimi, Gregorio; Canino, Baldassare; Lo Presti, Rosalia

    2010-01-01

    We examined the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) as an index of lipid peroxidation, and the total antioxidant status (TAS) in 81 unprofessional athletes subdivided into three subgroups. The first group included 28 subjects who practised endurance sports, the second included 30 subjects who practised mixed sports, the third included 23 subjects who practised power sports. We enrolled also a group of 61 sedentary controls (SC). TBARS were increased and TAS was decreased in the whole group of athletes in comparison with SC; an almost similar behaviour was present also subdividing athletes according to the practised sport. A significant negative correlation between these two parameters emerged in SC but not in the whole group of athletes. Unless for the athletes that practised endurance sports a similar trend was found in athletes that practised mixed and power sports. In conclusion, at rest the symmetrical behaviour between the lipid peroxidation increase and the TAS decrease, observed in sedentary controls, was not evident in unprofessional athletes who practised different sports.

  4. Athletic Pubalgia and "Sports Hernia" Optimal MR Imaging Technique and Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nGroin injuries are common in athletes who participate in sports that require twisting at the waist, sudden and sharp changes in direction, and side-to-side ambulation. Such injuries frequently lead to debilitating pain and lost playing time, and they may be difficult to diagnose. Diagnostic confusion often arises from the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the public symphysis region, the large number of potential sources of groin pain, and the similarity of symptoms in athletes with different types or sites of injury. Many athletes with a diagnosis of "sports hernia" or "athletic pubalgia" have a spectrum of related pathologic conditions resulting from musculotendinous injuries and subsequent instability of the public symphysis without any finding of inguinal hernia at physical examination. The actual causal mechanisms of athletic pubalgia are poorly understood, and imaging studies have been deemed inadequate or unhelpful for clarification. However, a large-field-of-view magnetic resonance (MR imaging survey of the pelvis, combined with high-resolution MR imaging of the public symphysis, is an excellent means of assessing various causes of athletic pubalgia, providing information about the location of injury, and delineating the severity of the disease. Familiarity with the pubis anatomy and with MR imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and other confounding causes of groin pain allows accurate imaging-based diagnoses and helps in planning the treatment that targets specific pathologic conditions.  

  5. Athletic pubalgia and "sports hernia": optimal MR imaging technique and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Imran M; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Koulouris, George; Bergin, Diane; Gopez, Angela G; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2008-01-01

    Groin injuries are common in athletes who participate in sports that require twisting at the waist, sudden and sharp changes in direction, and side-to-side ambulation. Such injuries frequently lead to debilitating pain and lost playing time, and they may be difficult to diagnose. Diagnostic confusion often arises from the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the pubic symphysis region, the large number of potential sources of groin pain, and the similarity of symptoms in athletes with different types or sites of injury. Many athletes with a diagnosis of "sports hernia" or "athletic pubalgia" have a spectrum of related pathologic conditions resulting from musculotendinous injuries and subsequent instability of the pubic symphysis without any finding of inguinal hernia at physical examination. The actual causal mechanisms of athletic pubalgia are poorly understood, and imaging studies have been deemed inadequate or unhelpful for clarification. However, a large-field-of-view magnetic resonance (MR) imaging survey of the pelvis, combined with high-resolution MR imaging of the pubic symphysis, is an excellent means of assessing various causes of athletic pubalgia, providing information about the location of injury, and delineating the severity of disease. Familiarity with the pubic anatomy and with MR imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and in other confounding causes of groin pain allows accurate imaging-based diagnoses and helps in planning treatment that targets specific pathologic conditions.

  6. Motivational climate, behaviour regulation and perceived effort in soccer athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Monteiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the integration of two motivational theoretical models (self-determination theory and the achievement goal theory to analyze the impact of motivational climate in the regulation of motivation and athletes´ effort perception. Participated in the study 460 athletes (male football players at both regional and national level, on the categories of beginners, youth, juniors and seniors, with 17.42 ± 4.37 years-old. The quality of the structural equation model was examined by the Chi-square value and some complementary model fit indices. The results support the model fit (S-Bχ²= 288.84, df= 147, p< 0.001, S-Bχ²/df= 1.96, SRMR= 0.049, NNFI= 0.912, CFI= 0.924, RMSEA= 0.046, 90%IC RMSEA= 0.038−0.054, suggesting that a motivational task-oriented climate has a significant positive effect on autonomous motivation, which in turn has a significant positive effect on athletes' effort perception. On the other hand, an ego-oriented environment had a positive effect on the controlled motivation, which in turn had a negative effect on athletes' effort perception, although not significant.

  7. The organisational stressors encountered by athletes with a disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Rachel; Wagstaff, Christopher R D; Steadman, Lauren; Pratt, Yasmin

    2017-06-01

    Organisational stressors have been found to be prevalent and problematic for sport performers, with research identifying demographic differences in the stressors encountered. Nevertheless, extant sport psychology research on the topic of stress has generally focused on able-bodied athletes; whilst that which has been conducted on performers with a disability has typically recruited relatively small samples to explore a narrow selection of organisational stressors, or examined other components of the stress process. The purpose of the present study was to explore the various organisational stressors that athletes with a disability encounter. The sample comprised 18 elite athletes with a disability (10 male, 8 female) who had a classified disability and experience of competing at a major championships in their sport (e.g., Paralympic Games, World Championships). Participants took part in a semi-structured interview which was analysed by drawing from grounded theory procedures. A total of 316 organisational stressors were identified, which were abstracted into 31 concepts and four, previously conceptualised, exploratory schemes: leadership and personnel issues, cultural and team issues, logistical and environmental issues, and performance and personal issues. This study not only provides the first illustration of the prevalence of organisational stressors for athletes with a disability, but also significantly points to salient similarities and distinct differences between the stress experiences of performers with and without a disability.

  8. Extensor hallucis longus tendon injury in taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Tai; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Young Koo; Lee, Jeong Pil; Young, Ki Won; Park, Shin Yi

    2009-08-01

    Extensor hallucis longus (EHL) tendon injuries can occur in taekwondo athletes when performing hyperplantarflexed barefoot kicking exercises. A state of full excursion of the extensor tendon is used to strike opponents in which the metatarsal bone and the proximal phalanx area is in contact with the opponent. The purpose of this study is to examine the incidence of extensor hallucis longus tendon injury in taekwondo athletes. Case-control study. 50 Athletes from the Korean taekwondo national team and a control group of 50 healthy subjects. History of sports participation, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and ultrasound imaging of the EHL. Difference in the AOFAS scores were noted with the control group at 92.95+/-9.18, and the experimental group score at 88.45+/-10.93 (ptaekwondo group displayed changes in 16 tendons (20%). EHL thickness of the experimental group (1.52+/-0.16 mm) was greater and the control group (1.46+/-0.11 mm) (pTaekwondo athletes have a higher incidence of changes on sonographic imaging of the EHL compared to non-taekwando participating healthy subjects.

  9. Nutritional status and dietary pattern of male athletes in Ibadan, South Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladunni, M O; Sanusi, R A

    2013-12-20

    Several factors, including nutritional status and dietary pattern are paramount to optimum performance among athletes. Notwithstanding, risky behaviours that limit or impair athletic performance are widely prevalent among athletes; these include excessive weight reduction and inappropriate dietary practices. This study was conducted to provide information on the nutritional status and dietary pattern of athletes in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. This was a cross sectional descriptive study, involving 207 athletes aged 17 to 40 years in Ibadan. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric indices: Body Mass Index (BMI) and percentage body fat (%BF). BMI was calculated from weight and height measurements and %BF was estimated from the sum of skin-fold thickness at 4 sites (triceps, biceps, sub-scapular and supra-iliac skin-folds). Dietary pattern was assessed by food habits and food frequency questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were conducted to describe and examine relationships between variables. Mean (SD) for variables were: age; 26.09(±4.77) years, weight; 72.13(±0.45) kg, height; 1.74(±0.06)m, and BMI; 23.89(±3.34)kg/m2. Only 4(1.93%) of the participants were underweight, 39(18.84%) were overweight and 8(3.86%) obese. Mean (SD) of %BF among overweight athletes was 14.25(±3.12) and maximum %BF among overweight athletes was 21.2. A strong and positive correlation was observed between BMI and %BF and %BF increased with age among overweight athletes. About 72% of the athletes skipped meals, 77% drank water or sports drinks during sporting activities, about 11% spent less than #40.00 for each meal. About 49% ate before sports. Foods most frequently consumed by athletes in this study were meat, fish, roots/tubers, cereals, vegetables and fruits. Milk and legumes were less frequently consumed by these athletes. Most of these athletes had nutritional status adequate for their sport activity. With regards to food habits, most of these athletes

  10. Perceptions of Sport Retirement by Current Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Brandy Sue

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the problem of college student-athletes retiring from their sports unprepared for life outside of sanctioned athletics. The purpose was to identify if a current student-athlete believes he/she is prepared for a career life after competitive college athletics and who the student-athlete feels should provide guidance into the…

  11. Postactivation potentiation enhances upper- and lower-body athletic performance in collegiate male and female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evetovich, Tammy K; Conley, Donovan S; McCawley, Paul F

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of postactivation potentiation (PAP)-inducing activities in 4 separate studies examining vertical (VJP) and horizontal (HJP) jump performance, shot put performance (SPP), and sprint performance (SP), in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II athletes. Study 1: 12 male (mean ± SD; age = 20.2 ± 2.0 years; height = 178.1 ± 6.2 cm; weight = 73.3 ± 6.43 kg) and 8 female (age = 20.1 ± 1.0 years; height = 169.6 ± 5.5 cm; weight = 59.8 ± 7.6 kg) track athletes participated in HJP and VJP testing before and after performing a parallel back squat (PBS) at 85% 1 repetition maximum (RM). Study 2: 10 (6 men and 4 women) shot put throwers (age = 20.6 ± 0.7 years; height = 182.1 ± 9.8 cm; weight = 102.8 ± 23.6 kg) participated in SPP testing for control (C), 3RM bench press, and 3RM PBS protocols. Study 3: 7 football players (age = 20.4 ± 1.6 years; weight = 87.8 ± 8.3 kg; height = 184.3 ± 7.2 cm) participated in SP testing before (PBS1) and after (PBS2) performing a 3RM PBS. Study 4: 11 football players (age = 20.3 ± 1.8 years; height = 180.6 ± 7.5 cm; weight = 86.1 ± 12.8 kg) participated in VJP testing for C and 3RM PBS protocols. Results of study 1: There was a significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in VJP (PRE = 61.9 ± 12.3 cm; POST = 63.6 ± 11.6 cm) and HJP (PRE = 93.7 ± 11.0 cm; POST = 95.9 ± 11.5 cm). Study 2: SPP after PBS (11.67 ± 1.92 m) was not different vs. C (11.77 ± 1.81), but bench press (11.91 ± 1.81 m) was significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) than both PBS and C. Study 3: SP time was significantly lower for PBS2 (4.6014 ± 0.17995 seconds) vs. PB1 (4.6557 ± 0.19603 seconds). Study 4: There was no difference in VJP for C (68.35 ± 2.16 cm) vs. PBS (68.12 ± 2.51 cm). Our data show that a 3RM PBS resulted in significant improvements in VJP, HJP, SPP, and SP in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II male and female athletes. Strength and conditioning practitioners

  12. Attention and Reaction Time in Shotokan Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António VencesBrito

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the attention capacity and the reaction time in Portuguese karate Shotokan athletes. Participated 96 Shotokan athletes from the Portuguese Karate Association. We physically characterized the sample (weight, height, body mass index, and body fat mass percentage and evaluated Simple Reaction Time (TRS, Choice Reaction Time (TRE, Decision Time (TD and the Distributed Attention (AD. Data was analyzed according to athletes’ group age (15 to 19 yr, 20 to 35 yr and more than 35 yr, level of graduation (9th to 4th kyu, 3rd to 1st kyu, DAN and by gender (male and female. Male athletes present significant differences from female athletes in height, weight, years of practice and body fat mass. In relation to TRS all groups tend to a value near to 300 ms without significant differences among them, but the TRE and the TD are significantly higher in the Dan athletes and in the +35 yrs athletes than in the other groups. On the other hand the Dan and +35 yrs athletes tend to do less mistakes. Gender does not influence significantly the reaction time in the Shotokan karate athletes, but it seems that women tend to have smaller reaction times than men. Athletes with more years of practice and more graduation need more time to reply to the stimulus than the other athletes, but they tend to do fewer mistakes on their choices than other subjects. As for distributed attention, no significant differences were found in function of the athlete graduation, nor in function of gender. However, for distributed attention, we found statistical significant differences in function of the age, with the oldest athletes presenting lower levels of distributed attention. Our results seem to show that is necessary to do some modifications in the training process of Portuguese Shotokan karate athletes.

  13. Student retention in athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r = 0.515, P students. Understanding student retention in athletic training is important for our profession. Results from this study suggest 3 key factors associated with student persistence in athletic training education programs: (1) student motivation, (2) clinical and academic integration, and (3) the presence of a peer-support system. Educators and program

  14. Is the risk of atrial fibrillation higher in athletes than in the general population? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Nielsen, Jens Rokkedal

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine by a systematic literature review and meta-analysis whether the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) is higher in athletes compared with not athletes. METHODS AND RESULTS: A comprehensive systematic search was conducted for case-control studies that examined...

  15. Common cutaneous disorders in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, R J

    1990-02-01

    Athletic activity may cause or aggravate skin disorders, which in turn may diminish athletic performance. Since many sporting activities necessitate prolonged exposure to the sun, athletes must avoid painful sunburn which will adversely affect their performance. Drugs and chemicals also may cause photoallergic and/or phototoxic reactions, including polymorphous light eruption and athletes should thus avoid photosensitising drugs and chemicals. The effects of chronic ultraviolet exposure include ageing, pigmentation and skin cancers. The most effective protection against excessive exposure to sunlight is the use of sunscreens, although inadequate application and poor protection in the UVA spectrum may diminish their effectiveness and contact allergies may create other problems. Viral, bacterial and fungal infections are common in athletes due to heat, friction and contact with others. Herpes simplex may be treated with any drying agents (e.g. alcohol) as they are as effective as more expensive topical agents such as acyclovir. Molluscum contagiosum may be spread by close contact or water contact and is treated by superficial incision, cryotherapy or standard wart varnishes. Plantar wart infection is transmitted by swimming pool decks, changing rooms and hand-to-hand from weights in gymnasiums. Plantar warts presenting with pain may be aggressively treated, by blunt dissection, but painless ones are best treated conservatively. Impetigo and folliculitis often develop after trauma. Antibiotics are effective against mild infections while abrasions and lacerations should be cleansed and dressed with occlusive dressings. Diphtheroid bacteria in moist footwear may produce pitted keratolysis and erythrasma. Tinea pedis is common in athletes and probably originates in swimming pools, gymnasium floors and locker rooms. Interdigital, dry-moccasin and pustular-midsole forms can be distinguished. The latter two forms respond to topical antifungal agents, while the interdigital

  16. Motivations Associated With Nondisclosure of Self-Reported Concussions in Former Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Kroshus, Emily; Baugh, Christine M; Marshall, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies examining nondisclosure among athletes in various settings have found substantial proportions of athletes with undisclosed concussions. Substantial gaps exist in our understanding of the factors influencing athletes' disclosure of sports-related concussions. To examine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, nondisclosure of recalled concussions in former collegiate athletes. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Former collegiate athletes (N = 797) completed an online questionnaire. Respondents recalled self-identified sports-related concussions (SISRCs) that they sustained while playing sports in high school, college, or professionally, and whether they disclosed these SISRCs to others. Respondents also recalled motivations for nondisclosure. The prevalence of nondisclosure was calculated among those who recalled SISRCs. Multivariate binomial regression estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% CIs, controlling for sex, level of contact in sports, and year the athletes began playing collegiate sports. A total of 214 respondents (26.9%) reported sustaining at least 1 SISRC. Of these, 71 (33.2%) reported not disclosing at least 1 SISRC. Former football athletes were most likely to report nondisclosure (68.3% of those recalling SISRCs); female athletes who participated in low/noncontact sports were the least likely to report nondisclosure (11.1% of those recalling SISRC). The prevalence of nondisclosure was higher among men than women in the univariate analysis (PR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.62-5.14), multivariate analysis (PR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.13-3.96), and multivariate analysis excluding former football athletes (PR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.12-3.94). The most commonly reported motivations were as follows: did not want to leave the game/practice (78.9%), did not want to let the team down (71.8%), did not know it was a concussion (70.4%), and did not think it was serious enough (70.4%). Consistent with previous studies, a substantial

  17. Medical considerations for the master athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlis-Mayor, Stephanie

    2012-09-01

    As the American population ages, older adults are likely to continue their active lifestyles including participation in high-level competitive sports. Physicians caring for the older athlete will need to guide activity and return-to-play to optimize the athlete's performance, as well as safely support their physical and mental health. Many medical concerns of the older athlete have the same etiology and treatment as those of their younger counterpart However, there are medical considerations of the mature athlete that are unique to this population. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the medical considerations that may arise in the care of the older athlete. For the purpose of this review, the mature athlete is de!ned as an individual over the age of 40, who participates in sport at a competitive level.

  18. Sudden cardiac death in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camilo Pellegrino dos Santos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The most accepted definition of sudden cardiac death nowadays is an unexplained death occurred suddenly within one hour of symptom onset. If it was not witnessed, individuals need to had been observed for at least 24 hours before the event and should be discarded the possibility of non cardiac causes of sudden death, pulmonary embolism or extensive malignancy. The term athlete refers to individuals of any age who participate in collective or individual regular physical activity, as well as physical training program for regular competitions. The sudden death of a young athlete, whether amateur or professional, especially during competitions, is always dramatic, with strong negative social impact and in the media. The fact that sports are recommended as a formula for longevity and quality of life makes these events a cause for concern in sports and society in general.

  19. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a traditional, abdominal hernia, it is a different injury. A sports hernia is a strain or tear of any ... to you about your symptoms and how the injury occurred. If you have a sports hernia, when your doctor does a physical examination, ...

  20. Organizing the Nutrition of Athletes During the 2014 Sochi Olympics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya N. Khokhlova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the organization of the nutrition of athletes during the course of major sports events. The article addresses major issues in the optimization of athletes’ nutrition. The author examines the issue of organizing nutrition through the example of the way it was done at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The article notes the importance of getting full information on food in real time, which is crucial to preserving the athlete’s shape and achieving better results.

  1. Injury Rate and Patterns Among CrossFit Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Weisenthal, Benjamin M.; Beck, Christopher A.; Maloney, Michael D.; DeHaven, Kenneth E.; Giordano, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: CrossFit is a type of competitive exercise program that has gained widespread recognition. To date, there have been no studies that have formally examined injury rates among CrossFit participants or factors that may contribute to injury rates. Purpose: To establish an injury rate among CrossFit participants and to identify trends and associations between injury rates and demographic categories, gym characteristics, and athletic abilities among CrossFit participants. Study Design: ...

  2. Eating disorders among university student-athletes | Van Zyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disorders among university student-athletes. ... the student-athletes felt that they did not receive any pressure from their coaches to lose weight. Healthy relationships between student-athletes and coaches, family, friends and teammates ...

  3. Sport-specific influences on respiratory patterns in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Durmic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To examine differences in lung function among sports that are of a similar nature and to determine which anthropometric/demographic characteristics correlate with lung volumes and flows. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving elite male athletes (N = 150; mean age, 21 4 years engaging in one of four different sports, classified according to the type and intensity of exercise involved. All athletes underwent full anthropometric assessment and pulmonary function testing (spirometry. RESULTS: Across all age groups and sport types, the elite athletes showed spirometric values that were significantly higher than the reference values. We found that the values for FVC, FEV1, vital capacity, and maximal voluntary ventilation were higher in water polo players than in players of the other sports evaluated (p < 0.001. In addition, PEF was significantly higher in basketball players than in handball players (p < 0.001. Most anthropometric/demographic parameters correlated significantly with the spirometric parameters evaluated. We found that BMI correlated positively with all of the spirometric parameters evaluated (p < 0.001, the strongest of those correlations being between BMI and maximal voluntary ventilation (r = 0.46; p < 0.001. Conversely, the percentage of body fat correlated negatively with all of the spirometric parameters evaluated, correlating most significantly with FEV1 (r = −0.386; p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the type of sport played has a significant impact on the physiological adaptation of the respiratory system. That knowledge is particularly important when athletes present with respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea, cough, and wheezing. Because sports medicine physicians use predicted (reference values for spirometric parameters, the risk that the severity of restrictive disease or airway obstruction will be underestimated might be greater for athletes.

  4. Recognition and Management of Athletic Pubalgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul R. Geisler; Ed.D; ATC

    2011-01-01

    Whether termed “sports hernias”,“hockey groin”,or “athletic pubalgia”,insidious onset and vague groin and hip maladies seem to be on the rise in the last few years,creating much confusion as to the best way to diagnosis and treat the multifaceted and complex conditions.Because of the vague nature of their clinical presentation,sports hernias and athletic pubalgia are complicated and multifaceted problems for clinicians and athletes to manage.

  5. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart

    OpenAIRE

    Popović Dejana; Brkić Predrag; Nešić Dejan; Stojiljković Stanimir; Šćepanović Ljiljana; Ostojić Miodrag Č.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The athletic heart syndrome is characterized by morphological, functional and electrophysiological alterations as an adaptive response to vigorous physical activity. Athletes heart is predominantly associated with a programmed, intensive training. But as there are different kinds of physical activities, the degree of these changes is highly variable. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart. The response of the body to vigorous physical activity is a multiorga...

  6. Management of allergic Olympic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, K D

    1984-05-01

    Twenty percent of the recent Australian Olympic athletes have had an allergic disorder. Because of the ban on all sympathomimetic drugs except some beta 2-agonists. Olympic team physicians have a major responsibility to ensure that no competitor is disqualified for infringing on the antidoping rules of the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee. Inadvertent contravention of these regulations may occur because numerous banned sympathomimetics are available to athletes and their coaches without medical prescription and are frequently contained in combination preparations. The unbroken 24 yr in which asthmatics have won Olympic medals have been both before and after the introduction of drug tests. Currently a comprehensive range of preventive and therapeutic medications are available for asthmatics to compete with minimal respiratory disadvantage. It was, however, during a period of unnecessary restriction that an American swimmer forfeited his gold medal because of prerace ingestion of a banned sympathomimetic agent. Should adverse air quality be encountered during the Los Angeles Olympics, allergic competitors will be among the most inconvenienced . Athletes with allergic rhinitis and sinusitis will be the most disadvantaged because sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors remain banned. It is strongly recommended that the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee meet with an appropriate body of experts (i.e., the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology) to review this ban on vasoconstrictor agents.

  7. Misperceptions of the Prevalence of Marijuana Use Among College Students: Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; Roland, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of marijuana use and perceptions of the prevalence of marijuana use was assessed in a sample of intercollegiate athletes and a separate sample of primarily first-year non-athlete students at a northwestern public university. Marijuana use prevalence in the non-athlete sample was higher than the prevalence found in nationwide surveys…

  8. Academic and Athletic Motivation as Predictors of Academic Performance of Division I College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christina Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Division I intercollegiate student-athletes represent a unique population of college students on college campuses today because they face competing demands between the student and athlete roles. Without the proper environment and motivation for academic performance, some Division I student-athletes are unable to obtain a college degree and leave…

  9. The Effects of Athletic Competition on Character Development in College Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Sharon Kay

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that there are inherent problems in athletic competition relating to character development in college student athletes. A review of the research supports the claim that athletic competitions do not build character. The author proposes ways to address this problem and provides personal observations and published research to…

  10. An Interpersonal Psychotherapy Approach to Counseling Student Athletes: Clinical Implications of Athletic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heird, Emily Benton; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that disruptive circumstances in an athlete's career (temporary injury, permanent injury, retirement) can pose significant difficulties, especially if the athlete has developed a salient athletic identity at the expense of a multidimensional self-concept. The authors present an interpersonal psychotherapy approach to case…

  11. Exploring relations of wellness and athletic coping skills of collegiate athletes: implications for sport performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Guenthner, Shannon; Hammermeister, Jon

    2007-12-01

    In exploring the relationship between wellness and athletic performance, this study assessed the link between wellness, as defined by a high score on five wellness dimensions of emotional, social, spiritual, intellectual, and physical well-being, with psychological variables thought to be related to athletic performance as measured by athletes' self-report of specific athletic coping skills. 142 collegiate athletes completed a survey composed of the Optimal Living Profile to measure wellness dimensions and the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory to measure specific psychological variables. Analysis indicated that athletes scoring higher on the dimensions of wellness also scored significantly higher on athletic coping skills. Specifically, male athletes who scored higher on wellness also reported higher scores on coachability, concentration, goal setting/mental preparation, and peaking under pressure, and female athletes who scored higher on wellness also reported higher scores in coping with adversity, coachability, concentration, goal setting/mental preparation, and freedom from worry. Various dimensions of wellness seem related to better performance by involving the athletic coping skills of intercollegiate athletes. Implications for coaches and sport psychologists are also discussed.

  12. Evaluation of congruence among dietary supplement use and motivation for supplementation in young, Canadian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Jill A; Wiens, Kristin; Erdman, Kelly Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dietary supplement use is endemic in young athletes; however, it is unclear if their choices are congruent with their motivation for supplementation and the established benefits of the dietary supplements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between dietary supplement use and self-reported rationale in young athletes. Canadian athletes (n = 567; 11-25 years; 76% club or provincial level, 24% national or higher) completed a questionnaire designed to assess supplementation patterns and motivation for supplementation. Chi square tests examined associations between dietary supplements and self-reported rationale for use. Vitamin and mineral supplements, including vitamin-enriched water, were associated with several health- and performance- related reasons (p sport bars, sport gels, etc.). Plant extracts and fatty acids were primarily associated with health reasons, particularly immune support (p motivators for supplementation. Educational interventions are essential to ensure young athletes are using dietary supplements safely and effectively.

  13. Spotlight on Athletes With a Disability: Malaysian Newspaper Coverage of the 2012 London Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Khoo, Selina; Razman, Rizal

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed newspaper coverage of the 2012 London Paralympic Games by 8 Malaysian newspapers. Articles and photographs from 4 English-language and 4 Malay-language newspapers were examined from August 28 (1 day before the Games) to September 10, 2012 (1 day after the Games closing). Tables, graphs, letters, fact boxes, and lists of events were excluded from analysis. A total of 132 articles and 131 photographs were analyzed. Content analysis of the newspaper articles revealed that most (62.8%) of the articles contained positive reference to the athletes with a disability. There were equal numbers (39.1%) of action and static shots of athletes. More articles and photographs of Malaysian (58%) than non-Malaysian (42%) athletes with a disability were identified. Only 14.9% of the articles and photographs were related to female athletes with a disability.

  14. [Endurance and Fatigue Caused by Local Muscular Performance in Skilled Athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, T V; Koryukalov, Y I; Kourova, O G

    2015-01-01

    It was the objective of this research to study the functional parameters of endurance and performance and the brain electrobiological activity during local antebrachial muscle work performance among skilled athletes and unfit people aged 18-23. We examined performance and the brain bioelectrical activity changes at local muscle work by means of an ergograph until fatigue. Our results suggested that local performance increased the spectral power of slow alpha- and theta waves as the fatigue set in, but these changes developed slower and were manifested later in the athletes than in the unfit people. Besides, tired athletes' EEGs showed alpha waves synchronization and only demonstrated a decrease in low- and high frequency beta waves indexes. Athletes show higher performance and lower fatigability if compared to unfit people during local performance, also proved by the EEG bioelectrical changes.

  15. Motivation Mediates the Perfectionism-Burnout Relationship: A Three-Wave Longitudinal Study With Junior Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Daniel J; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-08-01

    Perfectionism in sports has been shown to predict longitudinal changes in athlete burnout. What mediates these changes over time, however, is still unclear. Adopting a self-determination theory perspective and using a three-wave longitudinal design, the current study examined perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, autonomous motivation, controlled motivation, and athlete burnout in 141 junior athletes (mean age = 17.3 years) over 6 months of active training. When multilevel structural equation modeling was employed to test a mediational model, a differential pattern of between- and within-person relationships emerged. Whereas autonomous motivation mediated the negative relationship that perfectionistic strivings had with burnout at the between- and within-person level, controlled motivation mediated the positive relationship that perfectionistic concerns had with burnout at the between-persons level only. The present findings suggest that differences in autonomous and controlled motivation explain why perfectionism predicts changes in athlete burnout over time.

  16. Athletic identity, sport participation, and psychological adjustment in people with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasiemski, Tomasz; Brewer, Britton W

    2011-07-01

    This study examined interrelationships among athletic identity, sport participation, and psychological adjustment in a sample of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Participants (N = 1,034) completed measures of athletic identity, life satisfaction, anxiety, depression, and demographic and sport participation variables. Current amount of weekly sport participation was positively related to athletic identity when statistically controlling for age, gender, and pre-SCI amount of weekly sport participation. Being able to practice one's favorite sport after SCI was associated with higher levels of athletic identity and better psychological adjustment. Team sport participants reported experiencing better psychological adjustment than individual sport participants did. The findings suggest that social factors are important in the link between sport participation and psychological adjustment in people with SCI.

  17. T he Relationship between Perfectionism and Burnout in Junior - Elite Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi AGHDASI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and athlete burnout. The target population of research consisted of 168 elite handball players who participate in National Junior Championships. 123 athletes were selected randomly as the sample. We used a multi - section inventory to collect data, contained measures of multidimensional perfectionism, dispositional achievem ent goals, athlete burnout, perceived satisfaction with goal attainment and perceived coach satisfaction with goal attainment. In this study was used Pierson correlation and Hierarchical regression for the analysis of collected data. Regression analyses re vealed that socially prescribed perfectionism demonstrated a significant positive association, and self - oriented perfectionism a significant negative association with burnout dimensions. In conclusion, in this study were not supported the hypotheses of the moderating influence of Perceived satisfaction with goal attainment and achievement goal orientations on the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and athlete burnout .

  18. Nutrition for Women Athletes. Commonly Asked Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, N. Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Information on the nutritional needs of female athletes is presented. Among the topics discussed are proper eating habits, carbohydrate loading, amenorrhea, osteoporosis, anemia, vitamins, and minerals. (MT)

  19. Organic food consumption by athletes in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Marius; Stukas, Rimantas; Tubelis, Linas; Žagminas, Kęstutis; Šurkienė, Genė; Dobrovolskij, Valerij; Jakubauskienė, Marija; Giedraitis, Vincentas Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    With environmental pollution increasing, interest in organic farming and organic foodstuffs has been growing all over the world. Data on organic food consumption by Lithuanian athletes is not yet available. This lack of data determined the aim of this study: to identify the particulars of organic foodstuff consumption among athletes. In September-November 2012, we polled 158 of the best-performing athletes of the Olympic sports team through direct interviews. An approved questionnaire was used to identify the specifics of organic foodstuff consumption among athletes. The survey results showed that 97% of athletes consume organic foodstuffs, and 80% of athletes highlighted the positive impact of organic food on health. Nevertheless, a slim majority of athletes (51.7%) consume organic foodstuffs seldomly, 2-3 times per week. The range of organic foodstuffs consumed depends on the gender of athletes, and the consumption of some products depends on monthly incomes. Survey results confirm the need for the production and expansion of the variety of organic foodstuffs. In the course of the development of the organic food market, it should be beneficial for manufacturers to target high-performance athletes and physically active people.

  20. Psychological profile of high risk sports athlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kajtna

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The research attempted to compose a psycjhological profile of high risk sports athletes, based on personality, values and sensation seeking. 38 high risk sports athletes participated in the research (alpinists, sky divers, parachute gliders, white water kayakers, downhill mountain bikers, motocross riders, downhill skiers and Nordic jumpers, the non risk sports athletes consisted of 38 swimmers, track athletes, sailers, still water kayakers, rowers, Nordic skiers, sports climbers and karate players, whereas non athletes were equalled with both groups in age and education and included 76 non athletes. We used the self descriptive scale Big five observer, Musek's Value scale and Zuckerman' Sensation seeking scale IV. The dimensions, obtained from the discrimination analysis, were named personality maturity and sensation seeking in a social environment. Our results show that high risk sports athletes are more mature personalities than non risk sports athletes and non athletes and that they do not attempt to find stimulation in social environments. We also suggest some possibilities for further research.

  1. Athlete presentations and sports injury frequencies by sport branches at a university sports medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirbegolli, Bernard; Dinçer, Şensu; Gözübüyük, Ömer B; Değirmenci, Ufuk; Yildiz, Safinaz; Vehid, Suphi

    2017-02-22

    We aimed to investigate the profile of athletes by determining the branch of sports, type, and area of sustained sports injury, and the frequencies through athletes' presentations to the largest university clinic in one of the most crowded and athletepopulated cities of Turkey, Istanbul. THE study population comprised 1302 athletes who presented to the sports medicine clinic between the dates of July 1st, 2014, and June 30th, 2015. This record-based study examined all athlete presentations using the physical examination cards. Eight hundred sixty-five of the athletes were male. The median age of applicants was 21 years (interquartile range 16-30 years), the median body mass index was 22.23 kg/m2 (range, 20.01-24.67 kg/m2), and the median years of sports activity was 5 years (range, 0-10 years). Presentations to the clinic were significantly higher in April (p=0.003). The most commonly injured body part was the knee and soccer was the leading sport among the patients; anterior cruciate ligament injury was the most common pathology among soccer players. Athletes who presented to our clinic most commonly sustained a lower extremity injury. It was notable that ligament injuries were seen as commonly as muscle injuries.

  2. Elite adolescent athletes' use of dietary supplements: characteristics, opinions, and sources of supply and information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Katharina; Thiel, Ansgar; Zipfel, Stephan; Mayer, Jochen; Schnell, Alexia; Schneider, Sven

    2012-06-01

    The authors' aim was to examine the prevalence of (daily) dietary-supplement (DS) use among elite adolescent athletes and to differentiate use by different types of DS according to their function. Data were analyzed for associations between users of these DS types, sociodemographic, sport-specific characteristics, and opinion on the need for DS. In addition, sources of supply and information were examined. In the framework of the GOAL Study, 1,138 German elite adolescent athletes (14-18 yr) answered questions about DS. The data were analyzed to identify groups at risk for using DS after a classification by supplemental function. Of the young athletes, 91.1% reported DS use during the previous month. (Daily) DS use was significantly associated with sex, kind of sport, and the weekly duration of sporting activity. Furthermore, some athletes were required to use DS by their sporting organization. DS use was more likely in these athletes than in those whose sporting organizations had no such requirement. Overall, DS with short- and long-term supplemental function were mostly associated with the use of magnesium. However, DS with medium-term muscle-building function played an important role among daily users. The main source of information about DS was coaches; main source of supply was parents. Professional education is urgently needed, as 9 out of 10 athletes used DS, and strong positive opinions toward the use of DS were present, particularly in the DS users.

  3. A preliminary investigation into the relationship between functional movement screen scores and athletic physical performance in female team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Rg; Schultz, Ab; Callaghan, Sj; Jordan, Ca; Luczo, Tm; Jeffriess, Md

    2015-03-01

    There is little research investigating relationships between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and athletic performance in female athletes. This study analyzed the relationships between FMS (deep squat; hurdle step [HS]; in-line lunge [ILL]; shoulder mobility; active straight-leg raise [ASLR]; trunk stability push-up; rotary stability) scores, and performance tests (bilateral and unilateral sit-and-reach [flexibility]; 20-m sprint [linear speed]; 505 with turns from each leg; modified T-test with movement to left and right [change-of-direction speed]; bilateral and unilateral vertical and standing broad jumps; lateral jumps [leg power]). Nine healthy female recreational team sport athletes (age = 22.67 ± 5.12 years; height = 1.66 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 64.22 ± 4.44 kilograms) were screened in the FMS and completed the afore-mentioned tests. Percentage between-leg differences in unilateral sit-and-reach, 505 turns and the jumps, and difference between the T-test conditions, were also calculated. Spearman's correlations (p ≤ 0.05) examined relationships between the FMS and performance tests. Stepwise multiple regressions (p ≤ 0.05) were conducted for the performance tests to determine FMS predictors. Unilateral sit-and-reach positive correlated with the left-leg ASLR (r = 0.704-0.725). However, higher-scoring HS, ILL, and ASLR related to poorer 505 and T-test performance (r = 0.722-0.829). A higher-scored left-leg ASLR related to a poorer unilateral vertical and standing broad jump, which were the only significant relationships for jump performance. Predictive data tended to confirm the correlations. The results suggest limitations in using the FMS to identify movement deficiencies that could negatively impact athletic performance in female team sport athletes.

  4. A preliminary investigation into the relationship between functional movement screen scores and athletic physical performance in female team sport athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Lockie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is little research investigating relationships between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS and athletic performance in female athletes. This study analyzed the relationships between FMS (deep squat; hurdle step [HS]; in-line lunge [ILL]; shoulder mobility; active straight-leg raise [ASLR]; trunk stability push-up; rotary stability scores, and performance tests (bilateral and unilateral sit-and-reach [flexibility]; 20-m sprint [linear speed]; 505 with turns from each leg; modified T-test with movement to left and right [change-of-direction speed]; bilateral and unilateral vertical and standing broad jumps; lateral jumps [leg power]. Nine healthy female recreational team sport athletes (age = 22.67 ± 5.12 years; height = 1.66 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 64.22 ± 4.44 kilograms were screened in the FMS and completed the afore-mentioned tests. Percentage between-leg differences in unilateral sit-and-reach, 505 turns and the jumps, and difference between the T-test conditions, were also calculated. Spearman’s correlations (p ≤ 0.05 examined relationships between the FMS and performance tests. Stepwise multiple regressions (p ≤ 0.05 were conducted for the performance tests to determine FMS predictors. Unilateral sit-and-reach positive correlated with the left-leg ASLR (r = 0.704-0.725. However, higher-scoring HS, ILL, and ASLR related to poorer 505 and T-test performance (r = 0.722-0.829. A higher-scored left-leg ASLR related to a poorer unilateral vertical and standing broad jump, which were the only significant relationships for jump performance. Predictive data tended to confirm the correlations. The results suggest limitations in using the FMS to identify movement deficiencies that could negatively impact athletic performance in female team sport athletes.

  5. Nutritional supplementation habits and perceptions of elite athletes within a state-based sporting institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascombe, B J; Karunaratna, M; Cartoon, J; Fergie, B; Goodman, C

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the nutritional supplement intake of athletes from a state-based sports institute. Athletes (n=72) from seven sports (kayaking, field hockey, rowing, waterpolo, swimming, athletics and netball) completed a questionnaire detailing their daily usage and rationale therefore. The large majority (63/72; 87.5+/-12.5%) of surveyed athletes reported using nutritional supplements, with no difference between female (31/36; 86.1+/-13.9%) and male (32/36; 88.9+/-11.1%) athletes. Kayakers (6.0+/-2.9) consumed a higher number of nutritional supplements than swimmers (4+/-2.2), field hockey (1.5+/-1.0), rowing (2.4+/-1.4), waterpolo (2.3+/-2.4), athletics (2.5+/-1.9) and netball (1.7+/-1.0) athletes. The athletes believed that nutritional supplements are related to performance enhancements (47/72; 65.3%), positive doping results (45/72; 62.5%), and that heavy training increases supplement requirements (47/72; 65.3%). The cohort was equivocal as to their health risks (40/72; 55.6%) or their need with a balanced diet (38/72; 52.8%). The most popular supplements were minerals (33/72; 45.8%), vitamins (31/72; 43.1%), other (23/72; 31.9%), iron (22/72; 30.6%), caffeine (16/72; 22.2%), protein (12/72; 16.7%), protein-carbohydrate mix (10/72; 13.9%), creatine (9/72; 12.5%) and glucosamine (3/72; 4.2%). The majority of supplementing athletes (n=63) did not know their supplements active ingredient (39/63; 61.9%), side effects (36/63; 57.1%) or mechanism of action (34/63; 54.0%) and admitted to wanting additional information (36/63; 57.0%). Only half of the athletes knew the recommended supplement dosages (33/63; 52.4%). The performance enhancing perception may explain the large proportion of athletes that reported using nutritional supplements, despite over half of the athletes believing that supplements are not required with a balanced diet and can cause positive doping violations.

  6. Primary Motor Cortex Excitability in Karate Athletes: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Monda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The mechanisms involved in the coordination of muscle activity are not completely known: to investigate adaptive changes in human motor cortex Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was often used. The sport models are frequently used to study how the training may affect the corticospinal system excitability: Karate represents a valuable sport model for this kind of investigations for its high levels of coordination required to athletes. This study was aimed at examining possible changes in the resting motor threshold (rMT and in the corticospinal response in karate athletes, and at determining whether athletes are characterized by a specific value of rMT.Methods: We recruited 25 right-handed young karate athletes and 25 matched non-athletes. TMS was applied to primary motor cortex (M1. Motor evoked potential (MEP were recorded by two electrodes placed above the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle. We considered MEP latencies and amplitudes at rMT, 110% of rMT, and 120% of rMT.Results: The two groups were similar for age (p > 0.05, height (p > 0.05 and body mass (p > 0.05. The TMS had a 70-mm figure-of-eight coil and a maximum output of 2.2 T, placed over the left motor cortex. During the stimulation, a mechanical arm kept the coil tangential to the scalp, with the handle at 45° respect to the midline. The SofTaxic navigator system (E.M.S. Italy, www.emsmedical.net was used in order to correctly identifying and repeating the stimulation for every subject. Compared to non-athletes, athletes showed a lower resting motor threshold (p < 0.001. Furthermore, athletes had a lower MEP latency (p < 0.001 and a higher MEP amplitude (p < 0.001 compared to non-athletes. Moreover, a ROC curve for rMT was found significant (area: 0.907; sensitivity 84%, specificity 76%.Conclusions: As the main finding, the present study showed significant differences in cortical excitability between athletes and non-athletes. The training can improve cortical

  7. Perceptions of Organizational Justice, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment in Intercollegiate Athletics: A Study of NCAA Men's Sport Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship among organizational justice components, overall job satisfaction, and organizational commitment within the intercollegiate athletics setting. Perceptions of three organizational justice components (procedural, distributive, and interactional), overall job satisfaction, and…

  8. Athletes' perceptions of anti-doping sanctions: the ban from sport versus social, financial and self-imposed sanctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overbye, Marie Birch; Elbe, Anne-Marie; Knudsen, Mette Lykke

    2015-01-01

    athletes from 40 sports (N = 645; response rate, 43%). Results showed that 78% of athletes regarded the ban as a deterrent. Older male athletes, however, did so to a lesser degree. Seventy-seven per cent, regardless of gender, age, sport type and previous experience of doping testing, viewed social......Today the main doping deterrence strategy is to ban athletes from sport if caught. This study examines whether Danish elite athletes perceive the ban as a deterrent and how they evaluate social, self-imposed and financial sanctions compared with the ban. Questionnaires were emailed to elite...... sanctions as a greater deterrent than the ban. Many also considered self-imposed sanctions (54%) and financial consequences (47%) a greater deterrent. Four per cent considered neither the ban nor the presented alternatives a deterrent. The findings indicate that the ban from sport deters doping...

  9. The effects of Ramadan intermittent fasting on athletic performance: recommendations for the maintenance of physical fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Leiper, John B; Chtourou, Hamdi; Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Chamari, Karim

    2012-01-01

    The behavioural modifications that accompany Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) are usually associated with some alterations in the metabolic, physiological, and psychological responses of athletes that may affect sport performance. Muslim athletes who are required to train and/or compete during the month-long, diurnal fast must adopt coping strategies that allow them to maintain physical fitness and motivation if they are to perform at the highest level. This updated review aims to present the current state of knowledge of the effects of RIF on training and performance, focusing on key-factors that contribute to the effects of Ramadan on exercise performance: energy restriction, sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm perturbation, dehydration, and alterations in the training load. The available literature contain few studies that have examined the effects of RIF on physical performance in athletes and, to date, the results are inconclusive, so the effects of RIF on competition outcomes are not at present wholly understood. The diverse findings probably indicate individual differences in the adaptability and self-generated coping strategies of athletes during fasting and training. However, the results of the small number of well-controlled studies that have examined the effects of Ramadan on athletic performance suggest that few aspects of physical fitness are negatively affected, and where decrements are observed these are usually modest. Subjective feelings of fatigue and other mood indicators are often cited as implying additional stress on the athlete throughout Ramadan, but most studies show that these factors may not result in decreases in performance and that perceived exercise intensity is unlikely to increase to any significant degree. Current evidence from good, well-controlled research supports the conclusion that athletes who maintain their total energy and macronutrient intake, training load, body composition, and sleep length and quality are unlikely to

  10. Prevalence and Impact of Glenoid Augmentation in American Football Athletes Participating in the National Football League Scouting Combine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Derrick M; Gillespie, Robert J; Salata, Michael J; Voos, James E

    2017-08-01

    Bony augmentation of the anterior glenoid is used in athletes with recurrent shoulder instability and bone loss; however, the prevalence and impact of repair in elite American football athletes are unknown. To evaluate the prevalence and impact of glenoid augmentation in athletes invited to the National Football League (NFL) Scouting Combine from 2012 to 2015. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 1311 athletes invited to the NFL Combine from 2012 to 2015 were evaluated for history of either Bristow or Latarjet surgery for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Athlete demographics, surgical history, imaging, and physical examination results were recorded using the NFL Combine database. Prospective participation data with regard to draft status, games played, games started, and status after the athletes' first season in the NFL were gathered using publicly available databases. Surgical repair was performed on 10 shoulders in 10 athletes (0.76%), with the highest prevalence in defensive backs (30%; n = 3). Deficits in shoulder motion were exhibited in 70% (n = 7) of athletes, while 40% (n = 4) had evidence of mild glenohumeral arthritis and 80% demonstrated imaging findings consistent with a prior instability episode (8 labral tears, 2 Hill-Sachs lesions). Prospectively, 40% (n = 4) of athletes were drafted into the NFL. In the first season after the combine, athletes with a history of glenoid augmentation were not found to be at significant risk for diminished participation with regard to games played or started when compared with athletes with no history of glenoid augmentation or athletes undergoing isolated shoulder soft tissue repair. After the conclusion of the first NFL season, 60% (n = 6 athletes) were on an active NFL roster. Despite being drafted at a lower rate than their peers, there were no significant limitations in NFL participation for athletes with a history of glenoid augmentation when compared with athletes without a history of shoulder

  11. Sport-Related Achievement Motivation and Alcohol Outcomes: An Athlete-Specific Risk Factor among Intercollegiate Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Cameron C.; Martens, Matthew P.; Cadigan, Jennifer M.; Takamatsu, Stephanie K.; Treloar, Hayley R.; Pedersen, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college stud...

  12. Identification of the role of the sports pharmacist with a model for the prediction of athletes' actions to cope with sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takumi; Horio, Ikuo; Aoki, Ryouta; Yamashita, Noboru; Tanaka, Mamoru; Izushi, Fumio; Miyauchi, Yoshirou; Araki, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA) established Sports Pharmacist-a system for certified pharmacists. There are many over-the-counter drugs that contain prohibited substances in Japan, and they are easily available. In Japan, most doping violations are committed when athletes unintentionally take prohibited substances. Therefore, the Sports Pharmacist has a vital role in promoting the prevention of doping. In the present study, surveys involving a total of 350 athletes, (including 260 representatives of Ehime Prefecture in the National Athletic Meets and 90 college students who participated in the intercollegiate athletics Shikoku area meets), on awareness regarding doping and medical drugs were conducted. Using correspondence and logistic regression analyses, the results were examined to develop a model for the prediction of athletes' actions to cope with sickness based on changes in their awareness of anti-doping, and the relationship between them was also analyzed. The survey results suggested that attitudes towards doping were strongly influenced by gender, rather than the athletic ability and whether or not a doping test is scheduled. Their behavior and criteria for the selection of drugs to address sickness were strongly correlated with awareness of anti-doping. Therefore, athletes with an increased awareness of anti-doping are expected to consult a pharmacist prior to using medicine. The Sports Pharmacist should further promote environmental development, such as activities to improve awareness of doping among young athletes and the establishment of medical drug consultation services for athletes (female athletes in particular).

  13. Athletic background is related to superior trunk proprioceptive ability, postural control, and neuromuscular responses to sudden perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glofcheskie, Grace O; Brown, Stephen H M

    2017-01-28

    Trunk motor control is essential for athletic performance, and inadequate trunk motor control has been linked to an increased risk of developing low back and lower limb injury in athletes. Research is limited in comparing relationships between trunk neuromuscular control, postural control, and trunk proprioception in athletes from different sporting backgrounds. To test for these relationships, collegiate level long distance runners and golfers, along with non-athletic controls were recruited. Trunk postural control was investigated using a seated balance task. Neuromuscular control in response to sudden trunk loading perturbations was measured using electromyography and kinematics. Proprioceptive ability was examined using active trunk repositioning tasks. Both athlete groups demonstrated greater trunk postural control (less centre of pressure movement) during the seated task compared to controls. Athletes further demonstrated faster trunk muscle activation onsets, higher muscle activation amplitudes, and less lumbar spine angular displacement in response to sudden trunk loading perturbations when compared to controls. Golfers demonstrated less absolute error and variable error in trunk repositioning tasks compared to both runners and controls, suggestive of greater proprioceptive ability. This suggests an interactive relationship between neuromuscular control, postural control, and proprioception in athletes, and that differences exist between athletes of various training backgrounds.

  14. Single-Task and Dual-Task Gait Among Collegiate Athletes of Different Sport Classifications: Implications for Concussion Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David R; Oldham, Jessie R; DiFabio, Melissa; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Hall, Eric E; Ketcham, Caroline J; Meehan, William P; Buckley, Thomas A

    2017-02-01

    Gait impairments have been documented following sport-related concussion. Whether preexisting gait pattern differences exist among athletes who participate in different sport classifications, however, remains unclear. Dual-task gait examinations probe the simultaneous performance of everyday tasks (ie, walking and thinking), and can quantify gait performance using inertial sensors. The purpose of this study was to compare the single-task and dual-task gait performance of collision/contact and noncontact athletes. A group of collegiate athletes (n = 265) were tested before their season at 3 institutions (mean age= 19.1 ± 1.1 years). All participants stood still (single-task standing) and walked while simultaneously completing a cognitive test (dual-task gait), and completed walking trials without the cognitive test (single-task gait). Spatial-temporal gait parameters were compared between collision/contact and noncontact athletes using MANCOVAs; cognitive task performance was compared using ANCOVAs. No significant single-task or dual-task gait differences were found between collision/contact and noncontact athletes. Noncontact athletes demonstrated higher cognitive task accuracy during single-task standing (P = .001) and dual-task gait conditions (P = .02) than collision/contact athletes. These data demonstrate the utility of a dual-task gait assessment outside of a laboratory and suggest that preinjury cognitive task performance during dual-tasks may differ between athletes of different sport classifications.

  15. Use of prescription drugs in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaranta, Antti; Alaranta, Hannu; Helenius, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    Although athletes are young and generally healthy, they use a variety of non-doping classified medicines to treat injuries, cure illnesses and obtain a competitive edge. Athletes and sports medicine physicians try to optimize the treatment of symptoms related to extreme training during an elite athlete's active career. According to several studies, the use of antiasthmatic medication is more frequent among elite athletes than in the general population. The type of training and the kind of sport influence the prevalence of asthma. Asthma is most common among those competing in endurance events, such as cycling, swimming, cross-country skiing and long-distance running. Recent studies show that athletes use also NSAIDs and oral antibacterials more commonly than age-matched controls, especially athletes competing in speed and power sports. Inappropriately high doses and concomitant use of several different NSAIDs has been observed. All medicines have adverse effects that may have deleterious effects on elite athletes' performance. Thus, any unnecessary medication use should be minimized in elite athletes. Inhaled beta(2)-agonists may cause tachycardia and muscle tremor, which are especially harmful in events requiring accuracy and a steady hand. In experimental animal models of acute injury, especially selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors have been shown to be detrimental to tissue-level repair. They have been shown to impair mechanical strength return following acute injury to bone, ligament and tendon. This may have clinical implications for future injury susceptibility. However, it should be noted that the current animal studies have limited translation to the clinical setting. Adverse effects related to the CNS and gastrointestinal adverse reactions are commonly reported in connection with NSAID use also in elite athletes. In addition to the potential for adverse effects, recent studies have shown that NSAID use may negatively regulate muscle growth by inhibiting

  16. Isokinetic dynamometry of knee flexors and extensors: comparative study among non-athletes, jumper athletes and runner athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Cássio Marinho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation in intensive sports activities leads to muscular specializations that may generate alterations in involved articular forces and cause static (posture and dynamic changes (alterations of articular stability, coordination, etc.. Prevention of injury requires specific functional muscular evaluation in all athletes and for any kind of sport. OBJECTIVE: To dynamically evaluate, through isokinetic tests, the peak torque, total work, and average power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of jumper and runner athletes and compare them to those of a non-athletic population, evaluating dominance and balance between agonistic and antagonistic muscle groups. RESULTS: In the non-athlete group, we noted a higher asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant members. The jumpers had the highest values of the evaluated parameters of all groups, whereas parameters for the runners were intermediate between non-athletes and jumpers.

  17. Assessment of psychological pain management techniques: a comparative study between athletes and non-athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Daniel Câmara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Athletes usually deal with injuries and pain. They seem to have similar pain threshold when compared to non-athletes, although they have higher pain tolerance and the exact cause for that is unknown. High levels for pain tolerance and control can improve performance and time for injury recovery. The literature shows that use of coping strategies can increase pain control; possible differences on coping with pain between athletes and non-athletes are poorly described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate frequency of coping strategies used by athletes and non-athletes of both genders and look for possible association between preferred coping style and pain intensity. The sample included 160 subjects with actual pain experience, 80 athletes (52 male, 28 female and 80 non-athletes (50 male and 30 female. All subjects were evaluated for pain intensity, frequency and duration and for coping strategies using a questionnaire (SBS-V. The results show that athletes and non-athletes, despite of gender, use with the same frequency coping strategies. The less common coping strategies for all groups were those poor-adaptative (p < 0.001; the most commonly strategy used was self-statement and regulation of body tension (p < 0.001. Female athletes use more frequently poor-adaptative strategies when pain intensity increases (p < 0.05.

  18. Sports chiropractic management of concussions using the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 symptom scoring, serial examinations, and graded return to play protocol: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Eric R; Pierce, Kevin M; Gonzalez, Jannet K; Campbell, Nathan J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this case series is to report how the symptom section of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2) was used to manage athletes with concussions in a high school training room setting and to address the need for SCAT2 baseline measurements. During a 4-month period, 3 doctors of chiropractic with certification from the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians managed 15 high school athletes with concussions in a multidisciplinary setting. Fourteen athletes were male American football players, and one was a female volleyball player. Of the 15 athletes, 3 athletes had baseline SCAT2 documentation. Athletes were evaluated and returned to play with a graded return to play protocol using the SCAT2 symptoms and serial physical examinations. Once participants were asymptomatic, they began a graded return to play process. A total of 47 SCAT2 tests were performed on the 15 athletes, averaging 3.13 SCAT2 evaluations per patient. Of the 15 athletes evaluated, 6 were managed and cleared for return to play; 2 of the athletes sustained concussions in the last week of the season, thus ending their season; and 3 athletes were cleared by medical doctors. None of the athletes under care reported an adverse event. The utilization of the SCAT2 with serial physical examinations provided objective measures for athlete's injuries, allowing the practitioners to evaluate concussions. More efforts are needed to collect baseline SCAT2 to compare these scores with subsequent SCAT2 scores following athletic injuries.

  19. Analysis of injury types for mixed martial arts athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, MinJoon

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the types of injuries associated with mixed martial arts and their location in order to provide substantial information to help reduce the risk of these injuries during mixed martial arts. [Subjects and Methods] Data were collected from 455 mixed martial arts athletes who practiced mixed martial arts or who participated in mixed martial arts competitions in the Seoul Metropolitan City and Gyeongnam Province of Korea between June 3, 2015, and November 6, 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect the data. The convenience sampling method was used, based on the non-probability sampling extraction method. [Results] The arm, neck, and head were the most frequent locations of the injuries; and lacerations, concussions, and contusions were the most frequently diagnosed types of injuries in the mixed martial arts athletes in this study. [Conclusion] Reducing the risk of injury by establishing an alert system and preventing critical injuries by incorporating safety measures are important.

  20. Acute hyperhydration reduces athlete biological passport OFF-hr score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder Rasmussen, Jacob; Hoffmann, M F; Ashenden, M

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that athletes hyperhydrate to mask prohibited substances in urine and potentially counteract suspicious fluctuations in blood parameters in the athlete biological passport (ABP). It is examined if acute hyperhydration changes parameters included in the ABP. Twenty...... subjects received recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) for 3 weeks. After 10 days of rhEPO washout, 10 subjects ingested normal amount of water (∼ 270 mL), whereas the remaining 10 ingested a 1000 mL bolus of water. Blood variables were measured 20, 40, 60, and 80 min after ingestion. Three days later...... with atypical blood profiles (99% specificity level) before drinking 1000 mL of water, whereas 11% (n = 18), 10% and 11% (n = 18) were identified 40, 60, and 80 min, respectively, after ingestion. This was different (P