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Sample records for preparing synthetic freshwaters

  1. Screening of freshwater fungi for decolorizing multiple synthetic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Panpan; Shi, Wenxiao; Wang, Hongkai; Liu, Hongmei

    The biodegradation of synthetic dyes by fungi is emerging as an effective and promising approach. In the present study, freshwater fungal strains isolated from submerged woods were screened for the decolorization of 7 synthetic dyes. Subsequently, 13 isolates with high decolorization capability were assessed in a liquid system; they belonged to 9 different fungal species. Several strains exhibited a highly effective decolorization of multiple types of dyes. New absorbance peaks appeared after the treatment with 3 fungal strains, which suggests that a biotransformation process occurred through fungal biodegradation. These results showed the unexploited and valuable capability of freshwater fungi for the treatment of dye-containing effluents. The ability of certain fungi to decolorize dyes is reported here for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation

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    Owen, Christopher L.; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  3. Stability of single dispersed silver nanoparticles in natural and synthetic freshwaters: Effects of dissolved oxygen.

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    Zou, Xiaoyan; Li, Penghui; Lou, Jie; Fu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwu

    2017-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly used in various commercial products. This increased use raises ecological concerns because of the large release of AgNPs into the environment. Once released, the local water chemistry has the potential to influence the environmental fates and behaviors of AgNPs. The impacts of dissolved oxygen and natural organic matter (NOM) on the dissolution and stability of AgNPs were investigated in synthetic and natural freshwaters for 7 days. In synthetic freshwater, the aggregation of AgNPs occurred due to the compression of the electric double layer, accompanied by the dissolution of AgNPs. However, once oxygen was removed, the highest dissolved Ag (Agdis) concentration decreased from 356.5 μg/L to 272.1 μg/L, the pH of the AgNP suspensions increased from less than 7.6 to more than 8.4, and AgNPs were regenerated by the reduction of released Ag(+) by citrate. The addition of NOM mitigated aggregation, inhibited oxidative dissolution and induced the transformation of AgNPs into Ag2S due to the formation of NOM-adsorbed layers, the reduction of Ag(+) by NOM, and the high affinity of sulfur-enriched species in NOM for Ag. Likewise, in oxygen-depleted natural freshwaters, the inhibition of oxidative dissolution was obtained in comparison with oxygenated freshwaters, showing a decrease in the maximum Agdis concentration from 137.6 and 57.0 μg/L to 83.3 and 42.4 μg/L from two natural freshwater sites. Our results suggested that aggregation and dissolution of AgNPs in aquatic environments depend on the chemical composition, where oxygen-depleted freshwaters more significantly increase the colloidal stability. In comparison with oxic conditions, anoxic conditions were more favorable to the regeneration of AgNPs by reducing species (e.g., citrate and NOM) and enhanced the stability of nanoparticles. This indicates that some AgNPs will be more stable for long periods in oxygen-deprived freshwaters, and pose more serious

  4. [Preparation technique of Cremastra appendiculata synthetic seed].

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    Zhang, Mingsheng; Peng, Siwen; Yang, Xiaorui; Xu, Li

    2009-08-01

    The protocorm-suspension-system of Cremastra appendiculata was founded by liquid-suspension culture. The factors to effect germination rate and seedling conversion rate of C. appendiculata synthetic seeds, such as synthetic coating materials, synthetic endosperm components, storing conditions and germination materials, etc. were studied. The result showed that the germination rate and seedling conversion rate of synthetic seeds were the highest on the MS solid-medium while using 4% sodium alginate + 2% CaCl2 + 2% chitosan as synthetic coating materials, with 1/2 MS liquid-medium + 0.2 mg x L(-1) NAA + 0.1 mg x L(-1) GA3 + 0.5 mg L(-1) BA + 0.4 mg x L(-1) penicillin + 10.0 mg x L(-1) endophyte extract +0.3% carbendazim powder + 0.2% sodium benzoate + 1.0% sucrose as synthetic endosperm. And the germination rate and seedling conversion rate of synthetic seeds could attain to 68% and 65% after 20 days storing at 4 degrees C. The germination rate and seedling conversion rate of synthetic seeds decreased to a great extent with increasing the storing temperature and prolonging storing time.

  5. Colloidal stability of carbonate-coated silver nanoparticles in synthetic and natural freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccapietra, Flavio; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata

    2012-01-17

    To gain important information on fate, mobility, and bioavailability of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in aquatic systems, the influence of pH, ionic strength, and humic substances on the stability of carbonate-coated AgNP (average diameter 29 nm) was systematically investigated in 10 mM carbonate and 10 mM MOPS buffer, and in filtered natural freshwater. Changes in the physicochemical properties of AgNP were measured using nanoparticle tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. According to the pH-dependent carbonate speciation, below pH 4 the negatively charged surface of AgNP became positive and increased agglomeration was observed. Electrolyte concentrations above 2 mM Ca(2+) and 100 mM Na(+) enhanced AgNP agglomeration in the synthetic media. In the considered concentration range of humic substances, no relevant changes in the AgNP agglomeration state were measured. Agglomeration of AgNP exposed in filtered natural freshwater was observed to be primarily controlled by the electrolyte type and concentration. Moreover, agglomerated AgNP were still detected after 7 days of exposure. Consequently, slow sedimentation and high mobility of agglomerated AgNP could be expected under the considered natural conditions. A critical evaluation of the different methods used is presented as well.

  6. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  7. Biotin-specific synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey; Karim, Kal; Terpetschnig, Ewald; Turner, Anthony

    2004-02-16

    The composition of new molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) specific for biotin was optimised using molecular modelling software. Three functional monomers: methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylic acid (TFAA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA), which demonstrated the highest binding scores with biotin, were tested on their ability to generate specific binding sites. The imprinted polymers were photografted to the surface of polystyrene microspheres in water. The affinity of the synthetic 'receptor' sites was evaluated in binding experiments using horseradish peroxidase-labelled biotin. Good correlation was found between the modelling results and the performance of the materials in the template re-binding study. The dissociation constants for all MIPs were 1.4-16.8 nM, which is sufficient for most analytical applications where biotin is used as a label.

  8. Synthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally materials have been associated with a series of physical properties that can be used as inputs to production and manufacturing. Recently we witnessed an interest in materials considered not only as ‘true matter’, but also as new breeds where geometry, texture, tooling and finish are able to provoke new sensations when they are applied to a substance. These artificial materials can be described as synthetic because they are the outcome of various qualities that are not necessarily true to the original matter, but they are the combination of two or more parts, whether by design or by natural processes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of architectural surfaces to produce effects through the invention of new breeds of artificial matter, using micro-scale details derived from Nature as an inspiration.

  9. Preparation of a zeolite-modified polymer monolith for identification of synthetic colorants in lipsticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiqi; Li, Zheng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Niu, Qian [Jilin Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Changchun 130062 (China); Ma, Jiutong [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Jia, Qiong, E-mail: jiaqiong@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Poly(methacrylic acid-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column embedded with zeolites was prepared and employed for the polymer monolith microextraction of colorants combined with HPLC. - Highlights: • Zeolite, as a kind of mesoporous material, was firstly combined with PMME. • Zeolite@poly(MAA-EDMA) monolith columns were prepared for the enrichment of colorants. • Zeolite@poly(MAA-EDMA) monolith columns demonstrated relatively high extraction capacity. - Abstract: A novel zeolite-modified poly(methacrylic acid-ethylenedimethacrylate) (zeolite@poly(MAA-EDMA)) monolithic column was prepared with the in situ polymerization method and employed in polymer monolith microextraction for the separation and preconcentration of synthetic colorants combined with high performance liquid chromatography. The polymer was characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, we obtained acceptable linearities, low limits of detection, and good intra-day/inter-day relative standard deviations. The method was applied to the determination of synthetic colorants in lipsticks with recoveries ranged from 70.7% to 109.7%. Compared with conventional methacrylic acid-based monoliths, the developed monolith exhibited high enrichment capacity because of the introduction of zeolites into the preparation process. The extraction efficiency followed the order: zeolite@poly(MAA-EDMA) > poly(MAA-EDMA) > direct HPLC analysis.

  10. Synthetic analogues of the microtubule-stabilizing agent (+)-discodermolide: preparation and biological activity.

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    Gunasekera, Sarath P; Mickel, Stuart J; Daeffler, Robert; Niederer, Daniel; Wright, Amy E; Linley, Patricia; Pitts, Tara

    2004-05-01

    A series of seven synthetic discodermolide analogues 2-8, which are minor side products generated during the final stages in the synthesis of (+)-discodermolide (1), have been purified and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against A549, P388, MFC-7, NCI/ADR, PANC-1, and VERO cell lines. These synthetic analogues showed a significant variation of cytotoxicity and confirmed the importance of the C-7 hydroxy through C-17 hydroxy molecular fragment for potency. Specifically, these analogues suggested the relevance of the C-11 hydroxyl group, the C-13 double bond, and the C-16 (S) stereochemistry for the potency of (+)-discodermolide. The preparation, purification, structure elucidation, and biological activity of these new analogues are described.

  11. Extending the toxicity-testing paradigm for freshwater mussels: Assessing chronic reproductive effects of the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol on the unionid mussel Elliptio complanata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jeremy A; Cope, W Gregory; Hammer, Edward J; Barnhart, M Christopher; Bringolf, Robert B

    2017-01-01

    Surface water concentrations of the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) as low as 1ng/L can cause adverse reproductive effects in fish under acute and chronic exposure conditions, whereas higher concentrations (> 5ng/L) in acute studies are necessary to elicit adverse effects in freshwater mussels. Prolonged chronic exposures of freshwater mussels to EE2 remain un-evaluated. An extended duration testing paradigm was used to examine reproductive and biochemical (carbohydrate, lipid, protein) effects of EE2 on the unionid mussel, Elliptio complanata, throughout its reproductive cycle. Mussels were exposed to a control and EE2 concentrations (5 and 50ng/L) in six discrete and sequential 28 d tests, and in one discrete and simultaneous 180 d test, from February through August. Foot protrusion and siphoning behavior were recorded daily, along with conglutinate releases and larval (glochidia) mortality. Gonad, hemolymph, and gonad fluid samples were taken for biochemical and vitellogenin-like protein (Vtg) analysis post-exposure. Female mussels released eggs and conglutinates during the months of April to June, indicating sexual maturation during this time. Conglutinates released in the 5ng/L treatment in 28 d exposures contained fewer glochidia and more eggs, and increased concentrations of Vtg in hemolymph were observed from April to August in the 5ng/L treatment during the 180 d exposure. Results indicate that the 180 d test approach, concurrent with the sequence of 28 d tests, enabled a more robust evaluation of mussel behavior and physiology than would have been possible with a single short-term (28 d) test.

  12. Biophysical inhibition of synthetic vs. naturally-derived pulmonary surfactant preparations by polymeric nanoparticles.

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    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Reasonable suspicion has accumulated that inhaled nano-scale particulate matter influences the biophysical function of the pulmonary surfactant system. Hence, it is evident to provide novel insights into the extent and mechanisms of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in order to facilitate the fabrication of safe nanomedicines suitable for pulmonary applications. Negatively- and positively-charged poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameters of ~100nm) served as model carriers. Nanoparticles were incubated with several synthetic and naturally-derived pulmonary surfactants to characterize the sensitivity of each preparation to biophysical inactivation. Changes in surface properties (i.e. adsorption and dynamic surface tension behavior) were monitored in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Both nanoparticle formulations revealed a dose-dependent influence on the biophysical behavior of all investigated pulmonary surfactants. However, the surfactant sensitivity towards inhibition depended on both the carrier type, where negatively-charged nanoparticles showed increased inactivation potency compared to their positively-charged counterparts, and surfactant composition. Among the surfactants tested, synthetic mixtures (i.e. phospholipids, phospholipids supplemented with surfactant protein B, and Venticute®) were more susceptible to surface-activity inhibition as the more complex naturally-derived preparations (i.e. Alveofact® and large surfactant aggregates isolated from rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Overall, nanoparticle characteristics and surfactant constitution both influence the extent of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactants.

  13. Characterization and classification of freshwater marshy wetland using synthetic aperture radar polarimetry: a case study from Loktak wetland, Northeast India

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    Padalia, Hitendra; Musthafa, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Loktak is the largest natural wetland of Northeast India, the last home of endangered brow-antlered deer, and a site of global significance recognized under Ramsar convention. Ecological and human-meditated spatial patterns of Loktak wetland were characterized and classified using a Radarsat-2 C band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data. Radarsat-2 quad-pol scene of dry season was preprocessed and classified using PolSARpro software. Eigen vector-eigen value decomposition of coherency matrix (T3) was performed to characterize the scattering properties of wetland targets based on entropy (H)/anisotropy (A)/alpha angle (α) segmentation. Results illustrate that RGB color display of H/A/α images is a useful indicator of wetland structure and composition, and provide clear visual discrimination of open water, floating phumdi, permanent phumdi cover, and associated man-made features. Six classes, namely, floating phumdi, permanent phumdi, scrub/shrub, fallow land, built-up, and open water were mapped using Wishart classification of H/A/α images. Scattering mechanisms of natural and man-made targets synthesized from PolSAR data, and their classification using Wishart algorithm have been validated through a visually classified map and field reference points. The land cover generated would be useful for conservation and management of Loktak wetland and brow-antlered deer population.

  14. Preparation, characterization, and microbial degradation of specifically radiolabeled [C]lignocelluloses from marine and freshwater macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, R; Maccubbin, A E; Hodson, R E

    1984-02-01

    Specifically radiolabeled [C-lignin]lignocelluloses were prepared from the aquatic macrophytes Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemerianus, Rhizophora mangle, and Carex walteriana by using [C]phenylalanine, [C]tyrosine, and [C]cinnamic acid as precursors. Specifically radiolabeled [C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared by using [C]glucose as precursor. The rates of microbial degradation varied among [C-lignin]lignocelluloses labeled with different lignin precursors within the same plant species. To determine the causes of these differential rates, [C-lignin]lignocelluloses were thoroughly characterized for the distribution of radioactivity in nonlignin contaminants and within the lignin macromolecule. In herbaceous plants, significant amounts (8 to 24%) of radioactivity from [C]phenylalanine and [C]tyrosine were found associated with protein, although very little (3%) radioactivity from [C]cinnamic acid was associated with protein. Microbial degradation of radiolabeled protein resulted in overestimation of lignin degradation rates in lignocelluloses derived from herbaceous aquatic plants. Other differences in degradation rates among [C-lignin]lignocelluloses from the same plant species were attributable to differences in the amount of label being associated with ester-linked subunits of peripheral lignin. After acid hydrolysis of [C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses, radioactivity was detected in several sugars, although most of the radioactivity was distributed between glucose and xylose. After 576 h of incubation with salt marsh sediments, 38% of the polysaccharide component and between 6 and 16% of the lignin component (depending on the precursor) of J. roemerianus lignocellulose was mineralized to CO(2); during the same incubation period, 30% of the polysaccharide component and between 12 and 18% of the lignin component of S. alterniflora lignocellulose was mineralized.

  15. Preparation of anti-ciguatoxin monoclonal antibodies using synthetic haptens: sandwich ELISA detection of ciguatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Hirama, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a form of food poisoning caused by the consumption of fish that have accumulated a type of sodium channel activator toxin called ciguatoxins (CTXs), which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus through the food chain. CFP affects more than 50000 people each year. The extremely low level of CTXs in tainted fish has hampered the development of antibodies for the detection of these toxins. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific against major congeners of CTX3C, 51-hydroxyCTX3C, CTX1B, and 54-deoxyCTX1B were prepared by immunization of mice with protein conjugates of rationally designed synthetic haptens in place of the natural toxins. We found that haptenic groups possessing a surface area larger than 400 angstroms2 were required to produce mAbs that can bind strongly to CTXs. Direct sandwich ELISA utilizing two different monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to one of the two wings of a CTX were established to detect CTXs. No cross-reactivity was observed against the other marine toxins tested, including brevetoxin A, brevetoxin B, okadaic acid, and maitotoxin.

  16. Preparation of Synthetic Earthquake Catalogue and Tsunami Hazard Curves in Marmara Sea using Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Başak; Özer Sözdinler, Ceren; Necmioǧlu, Öcal; Meral Özel, Nurcan

    2017-04-01

    The Marmara Sea and its surrounding is one of the most populated areas in Turkey. Many densely populated cities, such as megacity Istanbul with a population of more than 14 million, a great number of industrial facilities in largest capacity and potential, refineries, ports and harbors are located along the coasts of Marmara Sea. The region is highly seismically active. There has been a wide range of studies in this region regarding the fault mechanisms, seismic activities, earthquakes and triggered tsunamis in the Sea of Marmara. The historical documents reveal that the region has been experienced many earthquakes and tsunamis in the past. According to Altinok et al. (2011), 35 tsunami events happened in Marmara Sea between BC 330 and 1999. As earthquakes are expected in Marmara Sea with the break of segments of North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in the future, the region should be investigated in terms of the possibility of tsunamis by the occurrence of earthquakes in specific return periods. This study aims to make probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis in Marmara Sea. For this purpose, the possible sources of tsunami scenarios are specified by compiling the earthquake catalogues, historical records and scientific studies conducted in the region. After compiling all this data, a synthetic earthquake and tsunami catalogue are prepared using Monte Carlo simulations. For specific return periods, the possible epicenters, rupture lengths, widths and displacements are determined with Monte Carlo simulations assuming the angles of fault segments as deterministic. For each earthquake of synthetic catalogue, the tsunami wave heights will be calculated at specific locations along Marmara Sea. As a further objective, this study will determine the tsunami hazard curves for specific locations in Marmara Sea including the tsunami wave heights and their probability of exceedance. This work is supported by SATREPS-MarDim Project (Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in the

  17. Preparation of Silver Nanoparticles from Synthetic and Natural Sources: Remediation Model for PAHs

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    Abbasi, Maryam; Saeed, Fatima; Rafique, Uzaira

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of nanoscience and technology is gaining popularity with an increasing demand for metal nanoparticles applicability in various areas such as electronics, catalysis, chemistry, energy and medicine. Metallic nanoparticles are traditionally synthesized by wet chemical techniques, where the chemicals used are quite often toxic and flammable. In this work, an attempt is made to compare the efficiency of two different synthesis methods and application of each for the remediation of poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this regard, silver nanoparticles are prepared by green and wet chemical method using plant extract of garlic (Allium sativum). The extract is known to reduce the metal during synthesis and acts as stabilizing ligand. These synthesized silver nanoparticles (Agp) and (AgW) were applied as adsorbents in synthetic batch mode experiments at varying parameters of pH and temperature. A concentration of 0.01mg/L of Phenanthrene, Anthracene, and Pyrene were induced at fixed dosage of 1mg/Kg of adsorbent. Residual concentration of each PAH was analyzed on UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The results indicated that both adsorbents follow the sequence of Phenanthrene>Pyrene>Anthracene with optimal removal of higher than 85% in each case. A distinguishing privilege is attained by Agp adsorbent showing 3, 3 and 11 orders of magnitude higher efficiency than Agw. It may be attributed to more functional groups in the plant extract participating in binding of PAH to the surface. Each synthesized adsorbents was characterized by FTIR, SEM and EDX. The average particle size was determined to be of the order of 13-26 nm. The study concludes the use of alternate economical and green adsorbents for control of poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  18. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

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    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Preparation of Dis-Azo Dyes Derived from p-Aminophenol and Their Fastness Properties for Synthetic Polymer-Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otutu, J. O.; Okoro, D.; Ossai, E. K.

    The preparation and properties of a series of dis-azo dyes derived from p-aminophenol is described. The influence on colour, dyeing fastness properties of the dyes on synthetic polymer-fibres is reported. Most of the dyes synthesized afford better light fastness and better wet (wash, perspiration) fastness on PET than on nylon 6 fabric. The structure of each compound was confirmed by using infrared, UV-VIS and elemental analysis.

  20. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  1. Comparative efficacy of supplementation of phytoconcentrate herbal preparation and synthetic amino acid on broiler performance

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    A. B. Kanduri

    Full Text Available In view to study the role of herbal sources of essential amino acids in improving growth & performance, an experiment was conducted on seventy five day Vencob broiler chicks. Chicks were randomly divided into three groups (n=25, one negative control (T0 and two treatments (T1 & T2. Control group (T0 was offered basal diet deficient in natural or synthetic source of amino acids (choline, methionine, lysine & biotin. Treatment group T1 was fed with basal diet supplemented with polyherbal formulation comprising natural sources (herbs that mimic the activity of amino acids (choline, methionine, lysine & biotin @ 2Kg/tonne of feed while treatment group T2 was fed with basal diet supplemented with combination of synthetic choline chloride (600gm/tonne, synthetic methionine (1kg/tonne, synthetic lysine (1kg/tonne and biotin (150mg/tonne. Growth & performance parameters were recorded at weekly intervals and a metabolic trial for nutrient retention studies was conducted at the end of study. A significant increase in mean body weight gain, mean final body weight, feed efficiency & nutrient retention was observed in both the treated groups as compared to untreated control. The results of group T1 supplemented with herbal sources of amino acids were in confirmation with T2 supplemented with combination of synthetic amino acids suggesting that the polyherbal formula can successfully replace synthetic additives in feed. [Vet. World 2011; 4(9.000: 413-416

  2. Lipid mixtures prepared with well-defined synthetic ceramides closely mimic the unique stratum corneum lipid phase behavior.

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    de Jager, Miranda W; Gooris, Gert S; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2005-12-01

    Lipid lamellae present in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, form the main barrier for the diffusion of molecules through the skin. The presence of a unique 13 nm lamellar phase and its high crystallinity are characteristic for the stratum corneum lipid phase behavior. In the present study, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to examine the organization in lipid mixtures prepared with a unique set of well-defined synthetic ceramides, varying from each other in head group architecture and acyl chain length. The results show that equimolar mixtures of cholesterol, free fatty acids, and synthetic ceramides (resembling the composition of pig ceramides) closely resemble the lamellar and lateral stratum corneum lipid organization, both at room and higher temperatures. Exclusion of several ceramide classes from the mixture does not affect the lipid organization. However, complete substitution of ceramide 1 (acylceramide with a sphingosine base) with ceramide 9 (acylceramide with a phytosphingosine base) reduces the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase. This indicates that the head group architecture of acylceramides affects the lipid organization. In conclusion, lipid mixtures prepared with well-defined synthetic ceramides offer an attractive tool with which to unravel the importance of the molecular structure of individual ceramides for proper lipid organization.

  3. Modern synthetic tools toward the preparation of sophisticated phthalocyanine-based photoactive systems.

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    Ragoussi, Maria-Eleni; Torres, Tomás

    2014-10-01

    Phthalocyanines are ideal components in a variety of electronic applications due to their extraordinary photophysical characteristics combined with their synthetic versatility and robustness. They have attracted substantial attention in recent decades and are now established building blocks of sophisticated molecular materials. Synthetically, a great deal of this progress is attributed to the use of modern synthetic tools, which gave rise to phthalocyanine-based systems that could not have been envisaged in the past. In particular, Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, together with other transition-metal-catalyzed procedures, "click" chemistry, and ruthenium metathesis have been employed extensively en route to an abundant range of elaborate phthalocyanine mono- and multicomponent photoactive architectures. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a selection of key examples that are representative in certain optoelectronic applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effects of Synthetic Serum Supplementation in Sperm Preparation Media on Sperm Capacitation and Function Test Results

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    Ying-Fu Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Albumin supplementation of culture media induces sperm capacitation in assisted reproduction technique cycles. Synthetic serum supplementation is clinically used to replace albumin for preventing transmission of infectious agents. However, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation have rarely been investigated. Spermatozoa from 30 men with normal basic semen analysis results were collected, divided into five aliquots, and cultured in capacitating conditions in four combinations of two synthetic serum supplements, serum substitute supplement (SSS and serum protein substitute (SPS, and two fertilization media, Quinns Advantage™ Fertilization (QF and human tubular fluid (HTF media. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in spermatozoa were measured through chemiluminescence. Furthermore, acrosome reaction and western blotting for tyrosine phosphorylation were used to evaluate sperm capacitation. HTF+SSS had significantly higher ROS levels than QF+SPS did (11,725 ± 1,172 versus 6,278 ± 864 relative light units. In addition, the spermatozoa cultured in QF+SPS had lower motility, acrosome reaction rates, and tyrosine phosphorylation levels compared with those cultured in HTF+SSS. In conclusion, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation varied according to the combination of media. These differences may lead to variations in spermatozoon ROS levels, thus affecting sperm function test results.

  5. Preparation and Low Temperature Short-term Storage for Synthetic Seeds of Caladium bicolor

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    Mehpara MAQSOOD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An efficient somatic embryo encapsulation and in vitro plant regeneration technique were established with Caladium bicolor, an important ornamental plant.Tuber derived embryogenic callus (95.50% was obtained on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium amended with 0.5 mg L-1 α-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA + 0.5 mg L-1 6-Benzyladenine (BA. The embryogenic callus later differentiated into somatic embryos in the same plant growth regulators (PGRs added medium (NAA and BA. The induced embryos matured and developed into plantlets in NAA and BA added media; maximum plantlets development was observed at 1.0 mg L-1 NAA + 1.0 mg L-1 BA supplemented medium. Synthetic seeds were produced by encapsulating embryos in gel containing 3.0% sucrose + 3.0% sodium alginate and 100 mM of calcium chloride.The highest synthetic seed germination (97.6% was observed on medium supplemented with 1.0 mg L-1 NAA + 1.0 mg L-1 BA. The synthetic seeds were kept at low temperatures for storage; the encapsulated beads were viable and demonstrated good germination even after 12 weeks of storage at 4 °C. The plantlet recovery frequency was however declined with time. The synthetic seed derived plantlets were morphologically similar to the mother plant.

  6. An Efficient Synthetic Strategy for the Preparation of Nucleic Acid-Encoded Peptide and Protein Libraries for In Vitro Evolution Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Lohse

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe an improved synthetic strategy for the preparation of nucleic acid encoded peptide and protein libraries. A solid-phase format was used to prepare and purify a novel type of mRNA-template for in vitro mRNA-protein fusion synthesis. The present protocol simplifies and accelerates the preparation of fusion libraries and should prove most useful for in vitro protein evolution procedures which involve repetitive cycles of fusion library preparation and selection.

  7. A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Lanfang; Feng, Dawei; Liu, Tian-Fu; Chen, Ying-Pin; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Kecheng; Wang, Xuan; Fordham, Stephen; Zhou, Hong-Cai [TAM

    2016-02-01

    Exploitation of new titanium metal–organic frameworks (Ti-MOFs) with high crystallinity has been attracting great attention due to their vast application potential in photocatalysis. Herein a versatile synthetic strategy, namely, High Valence Metathesis and Oxidation (HVMO), is developed to synthesize a series of Ti-MOFs with predesigned topologies and structures. The crystallinity of these Ti-MOFs was well maintained throughout, as confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption measurements. Significantly, there were only a few examples of Ti-MOFs, not to mention a general synthetic strategy for various kinds of Ti-MOFs in the literature. This contribution also illustrates the intriguing potential of Ti-MOF platforms in photocatalysis.

  8. Assessment of natural and synthetic wollastonite as source for bioceramics preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrodeguas, R G; De Aza, A H; De Aza, P N; Baudín, C; Jiménez, J; López-Bravo, A; Pena, P; De Aza, S

    2007-11-01

    Pseudowollastonite ceramics (beta-CaSiO3) from synthetic and natural sources were assessed with regard to their properties relevant to biomedical applications. Synthetic and natural CaSiO3 powders, with average particle size of 1.6 and 13.2 microm, respectively, were first employed. Powders were pressed and sintered at 1400 degrees C for 2 h. Pseudowollastonite was the only crystalline phase in sintered materials. Glassy phase, eight times more abundant in sintered natural wollastonite (SNW) than in the synthetic one (SSW), was observed in grain boundaries and in triple points. Larger grains and bigger and more abundant pores were present in SNW, resulting in lower diametral tensile strength (26 MPa), than in SSW (42 MPa). However, by milling the natural wollastonite starting powder to a particle size of 2.0 microm and sintering (SNW-M), the microstructure became finer and less porous, and diametral tensile strength increased (48 MPa). Weibull modulus of SNW and SNW-M samples was twice that of the SSW. All the samples released Si and Ca ions, and removed phosphate ions from simulated body fluid in similar amounts and were completely coated by apatite-like spherules after soaking in simulated body fluid for 3 wk. The aqueous extracts from all samples studied were not cytotoxic in a culture of human fibroblastic cells. No differences in fibroblast-like human cells adhesion and proliferation were observed between samples. According to the obtained results, properly processed pseudowollastonite bioceramics, obtained from the natural source, exhibit the same in vitro behavior and better performance in terms of strength and reliability than do the more expensive synthetic materials. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Rapid Synthetic Method for the Preparation of Two Tris-Cobalt(III) Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Donald C.; Rillema, D. Paul

    1989-01-01

    Reports a method of preparation for tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine)cobalt(III) that will shorten the preparation time by approximately 3 hours. Notes the time for synthesis and isolation of compound one was 1 hour (yield 38 percent) while compound two took 50 minutes (yield 71%). (MVL)

  10. Synthetic process for preparation of high surface area electroactive compounds for battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard

    2013-07-23

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of electroactive cathode compounds useful in lithium-ion batteries, comprising exothermic mixing of low-cost precursors and calcination under appropriate conditions. The exothermic step may be a spontaneous flameless combustion reaction. The disclosed process can be used to prepare any lithium metal phosphate or lithium mixed metal phosphate as a high surface area single phase compound.

  11. Synthetic Applications of Chiral Unsaturated Epoxy Alcohols Prepared by Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Moreno

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the synthesis and applications of chiral 2,3-epoxy alcohols containing unsaturated chains is presented. One of the fundamental synthetic routes to these compounds is Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation, which is reliable, highly chemoselective and enables easy prediction of the product enantioselectivity. Thus, unsaturated epoxy alcohols are readily obtained by selective oxidation of the allylic double bond in the presence of other carbon-carbon double or triple bonds. The wide availability of epoxy alcohols with unsaturated chains, the versatility of the epoxy alcohol functionality (e.g. regio- and stereo-selective ring opening; oxidation; and reduction, and the arsenal of established alkene chemistries, make unsaturated epoxy alcohols powerful starting materials for the synthesis of complex targets such as biologically active molecules. The popularization of ring-closing metathesis has further increased their value, making them excellent precursors to cyclic compounds.

  12. Evaluation of error sources in a gravimetric technique for preparation of a reference gas mixture (carbon dioxide in synthetic air).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Shimosaka, Takuya; Watanabe, Takuro; Kato, Kenji

    2008-07-01

    One method of preparing a primary reference gas mixture is the gravimetric blending method. Uncertainty of a few mg in mass measurements is unavoidable when preparing reference gas mixtures under current laboratory conditions with our facilities, equipment, and materials. There are many sources of errors when using this method. In this study, several sources of errors were re-evaluated for our process for preparation of carbon dioxide in synthetic air. As a consequence of the re-evaluation, it was found that some sources of errors had significant effects on gravimetric concentrations of the gas mixtures. These sources are: (1) different masses of the reference cylinder and sample cylinder (an error in the readings of the electronic mass comparator), (2) leakage of the inner gas from valves of the cylinders, and (3) cooling of the gas cylinder caused by filling with high-pressure liquefied carbon dioxide gas. When the mass measurements were performed under uncontrolled conditions, the errors due to sources (1), (2), and (3) were as high as 20 mg, 24 mg, and 13 mg, respectively. In this paper, the detailed results from re-evaluation of these sources of errors are discussed.

  13. Preparation, Characterization, and Microbial Degradation of Specifically Radiolabeled [14C]Lignocelluloses from Marine and Freshwater Macrophytes †

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses were prepared from the aquatic macrophytes Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemerianus, Rhizophora mangle, and Carex walteriana by using [14C]phenylalanine, [14C]tyrosine, and [14C]cinnamic acid as precursors. Specifically radiolabeled [14C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared by using [14C]glucose as precursor. The rates of microbial degradation varied among [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses labeled with different lignin precursors within...

  14. Preparation and characterization of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments for toxicity tests: toward more environmentally realistic nickel partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, William G.; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; May, Thomas W.; Ivey, Chris D.; Schlekat, Christian E.; Garman, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    Two spiking methods were compared and nickel (Ni) partitioning was evaluated during a series of toxicity tests with 8 different freshwater sediments having a range of physicochemical characteristics. A 2-step spiking approach with immediate pH adjustment by addition of NaOH at a 2:1 molar ratio to the spiked Ni was effective in producing consistent pH and other chemical characteristics across a range of Ni spiking levels. When Ni was spiked into sediment having a high acid-volatile sulfide and organic matter content, a total equilibration period of at least 10 wk was needed to stabilize Ni partitioning. However, highest spiking levels evidently exceeded sediment binding capacities; therefore, a 7-d equilibration in toxicity test chambers and 8 volume-additions/d of aerobic overlying water were used to avoid unrealistic Ni partitioning during toxicity testing. The 7-d pretest equilibration allowed excess spiked Ni and other ions from pH adjustment to diffuse from sediment porewater and promoted development of an environmentally relevant, 0.5- to 1-cm oxic/suboxic sediment layer in the test chambers. Among the 8 different spiked sediments, the logarithm of sediment/porewater distribution coefficient values (log Kd) for Ni during the toxicity tests ranged from 3.5 to 4.5. These Kd values closely match the range of values reported for various field Ni-contaminated sediments, indicating that testing conditions with our spiked sediments were environmentally realistic.

  15. Assessments of Fuels for Military Use Preparation and Distribution of Synthetic Fuel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Kerosene (SPK), Hydrotreated Renewable Jet Fuel, JP-8 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME...Cylinder Lubricity Evaluator cSt Centistokes DCN Derived Cetane Number HFRR High Frequency Reciprocating Test Rig HRJ Hydrotreated Renewable Jet...3.3 HEFA-SPK (HRJ) BLENDS TFLRF prepared several 50/50 % blends of hydrotreated renewable jet fuel (HRJ) and JP-8. Both HRJ-8 and HRJ-5 were

  16. Synthetic Methods for the Preparation of a Functional Analogue of Ru360, a Potent Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Sarah R; Pino, Nicholas W; Arduino, Daniela M; Perocchi, Fabiana; MacMillan, Samantha N; Wilson, Justin J

    2017-03-20

    The mixed-valent oxo-bridged ruthenium complex [(HCO2)(NH3)4Ru(μ-O)Ru(NH3)4(O2CH)](3+), known as Ru360, is a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial calcium uptake. Although this compound is useful for studying the role of mitochondrial calcium in biological processes, its widespread availability is limited because of challenges in purification and characterization. Here, we describe our investigations of three different synthetic methods for the preparation of a functional analogue of this valuable compound. We demonstrate that this analogue, isolated from our procedures, exhibits potent mitochondrial calcium uptake inhibitory properties in permeabilized HeLa cells and in isolated mitochondria.

  17. Efficacy evaluation of activated carbon prepared from date stones in cyanide adsorption from synthetic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Ramavandi

    2013-02-01

    Results: The maximum adsorption capacity of 50.21 mg/g corresponded with Langmuir model. Kinetic evaluation indicated that the adsorption of cyanide ions by the adsorbent clearly followed the pseudo-second order rate reaction. The absorption was pH dependent and the maximum adsorption was done by solutions having pH 9. At an optimum pH 9, over 97% removal of 100 mg/L cyanide was attained for an adsorbent dose of 1.25 g/L during a 40 min contact time. Conclusion: Activated carbon prepared from date stones is an efficient and low-cost adsorbent for removing of different concentrations of cyanide from water and wastewater.

  18. A Facile and Green Synthetic Route for Preparation of Heterostructure Fe3O4@Au Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Liping

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles offer many exciting opportunities in biology and biomedicine, such as magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic hyperthermia therapy, biomedical diagnosis. The synthesis of multifunctional magnetic nanocomposites that possess water-solubility, magnetic properties and optical stability by a green method at room temperature in aqueous phase is still an unmet need. Here, we developed a simple and green method for preparing Fe3O4@Au integrated the super-paramagnetic and optical properties by seed-mediated growth at mild condition in aqueous phase. The amphiphilic, non-ionic and nontoxic polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone (PVP was used as a coupling agent for synthesis of Fe3O4@Au nanocomposites, which avoided the direct connection of Au and Fe3O4, and improved the saturation magnetization values of Fe3O4@Au to 40 emu/g at room temperature. We anticipate that the multifunctional Fe3O4@Au nanocomposites with high magnetic and good optical properties will provide a platform for potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications.

  19. A fast and facile synthetic route toward the preparation of nanoparticles of polythiophene and its derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozukova, Dimitriya, E-mail: d_bozukova@abv.bg; Jerome, Robert, E-mail: rjerome@ulg.ac.be; Jerome, Christine, E-mail: c.jerome@ulg.ac.be [Center for Education and Research on Macromolecules (CERM), University of Liege (Belgium)

    2013-04-15

    A novel photochemical water-based approach for the preparation of nanoparticles of polymerized thiophene (Th), thiophene methanol (ThM), or their mixtures (Th-co/or-ThM) was developed. The influence of 3-[(2-acryloyloxy)methyl] thiophene (ATh) as cross-link agent on the stability of the nanoparticles and on their performances was investigated. The occurrence of a polymerization process was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV and fluorescence emission spectroscopies. Nanoparticles with very narrow size distribution (0.0092-0.105 ATh cross-linked, 0.0635-0.272 uncross-linked) and ideal spherical shape (radius 35-47 nm ATh cross-linked, 49-109 nm uncross-linked) were obtained whatever the reaction composition. The size of the particles was found to depend strongly on the level of ATh-stabilization and to diminish upon increase of the ATh content. In contrast, in the same order, their thermal stability shifted toward higher temperatures. Thermal decomposition of the nanoparticles led to formation of carbon-nanoobjects, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR, and RAMAN spectroscopies. The re-dispersibility of the dry Th-co/or-ThM nanoparticles in some conventional monomers and solvents has been estimated.Graphical Abstract.

  20. New synthetic pathways to the preparation of near-blue emitting heteroleptic Ir(III) N-6 coordinated compounds with microsecond lifetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soman, Suraj; Manton, Jennifer C.; Inglis, Jane L.; Halpin, Yvonne; Twamley, Brendan; Otten, Edwin; Browne, Wesley R.; De Cola, Luisa; Vos, Johannes G.; Pryce, Mary T.

    2014-01-01

    A high yield synthetic route for the preparation of N-6 coordinated heteroleptic Ir(III) complexes using bidentate polypyridyl type ligands is described. The complexes are near-blue emitters and showmicrosecond emission lifetimes, high emission quantum yields and have two quasi-reversible reduction

  1. In situ growth of carbon nanotubes on Ni/MgO: a facile preparation of efficient catalysts for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M T; Lin, J D; Zhang, H B; Liao, D W

    2015-11-07

    Ni/MgO-CNTs catalysts are prepared by in situ chemical vapor deposition growth of CNTs on Ni/MgO. These catalysts exhibit an improved performance for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas, which is attributed to the formation of highly catalytic active interfaces among Ni, CNTs and MgO.

  2. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  3. L-( sup 3 H) glutamate binding to a membrane preparation from the optic lobe of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratumtan, P.; Govitrapong, P.; Withyachumnarnkul, B.; Poolsanguan, B. (Mahidol Univ., Bangkok (Thailand) Mahidol Univ., Nakorn Pathom (Thailand))

    1991-01-01

    Membrane preparation from the optic lobe of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man, was examined for the presence of specific L-({sup 3}H) glutamate binding. The optic lobes were isolated from live animals. The tissue was homogenized and the membrane fraction isolated by differential centrifugation. The membrane suspension was incubated with 10-1,000 nM of L-({sup 3}H) glutamate at 37{degree}C for 60 min. Nonspecific binding was determined by incubating the mixture with 100 {mu}M L-glutamate. L-({sup 3}H) glutamate specifically bound to the membrane fraction with a dissociation equilibrium constant (Kd) of 205 nM and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 2.04 n mol/mg protein. By using LIGAND computerized program, the saturation isotherm binding pattern indicates a single type of binding. To determine the type of glutamate receptors, competitive inhibition and IC{sub 50} of several glutamate agonists and antagonists were determined. The study reveals a metabotropic type of binding site.

  4. Freshwater Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  5. Direct Preparation of 2-Benzothiazolylzinc Bromide and its Applications: A Facile Synthetic Route to the Preparation of 2-Substituted Benzothiazole Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sooyoul [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyuhyuk; Kim, Seunghoi [Dankook Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We have developed a novel approach for the direct preparation of 2-benzothiazolylzinc bromide and its application in organic synthesis. This protocol is a new tool for the convenient synthesis of 2-substituted benzothiazole derivatives. The resulting products obtained from this work can be utilized for further applications in the synthesis of many biologically active compounds. The benzothiazole moiety has been found in a variety of natural products and pharmaceuticals and demonstrates efficient biological activities. Specifically, 2-substituted benzothiazole derivatives have attracted considerable attention in a wide spectrum of chemical applications due to their unique structural properties. Therefore, the diversity of synthetic protocols has been an extensively discussed topic among scientists involved in organic synthesis for the past decades. In general, to build up the 2-substituted benzothiazole complexes, the strategic tools can be categorized as shown in Scheme 1: cross-coupling of benzothiazolylmetallic complexes (method A), coupling reaction of benzothiazole via direct oxidative C-H activation, cross-coupling of organometallic with halobenzothiazole, and ring-construction of N and S-containing compounds with the appropriate substrates.

  6. Preparation and characterization of polysulfone affinity membranes bearing a synthetic peptide ligand for the separation of murine immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana; Algeri, Cristian; Sarti, Giulio C

    2008-01-01

    Affinity membranes have been prepared by immobilizing D-PAM, a synthetic ligand that exhibits affinity for the Fc portion of antibodies, onto poliethersulfone microporous membranes. The ligand density has been measured and the ligand utilization was evaluated and compared with literature data available for chromatographic beads. The resulting new affinity membranes have been experimentally characterized and tested by using pure murine IgG solutions and mouse serum. Equilibrium and kinetic parameters have been obtained in batch experiments using pure protein solutions. The highest binding capacity measured for murine IgG was 45 microg/cm(2) obtained at 1.2 mg/mL protein concentration at equilibrium, while the maximum static binding capacity calculated with the Langmuir model was 81 microg/cm(2). The adsorption of murine IgG on the affinity membranes was described using different isotherms: Freundlich and Temkin models have been considered and critically compared with the Langmuir adsorption model. A dynamic binding capacity of 21 microg/cm(2) was obtained by feeding a solution of 0.3 mg/mL of murine IgG, confirming the results obtained in batch experiments at the same concentration. The affinity membranes considered are endowed with good binding capacity for murine IgG and good selectivity for immunoglobulins and can be considered for the capturing step of an antibody production process.

  7. Preparation and Characteristics of Polyaluminium Chloride by Utilizing Fluorine-Containing Waste Acidic Mother Liquid from Clay-Brine Synthetic Cryolite Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clay-brine process employing activated clay, NaCl, HCl, and HF as raw materials is the primarily advanced technology to synthesize cryolite in the present industrial grade. However, plenty of byproducts of fluorine-containing waste HCl at the concentration of about 10%~12% could not be utilized comprehensively and are even hazardous to the environment. This work proposed a new two-step technology to prepare inorganic polymer flocculants polyaluminium chloride (PAC from synthetic cryolite mother liquor. Many specific factors such as the variety of aluminide source, reaction temperature and time, reagent ratio, and manner of alkaline addition were taken into consideration and their influences on the performances of produced PAC were discussed. It was found that synthetic cryolite mother liquor could react with bauxite and calcium aluminate directly to prepare cheap PAC, with plenty amount of water insoluble CaF2 and CaSiF6 produced as well. However, once HCl was introduced into synthetic cryolite mother liquor as well as by utilizing bauxite as aluminide source and sodium aluminate as adjusting basicity agent, the resultant PAC would dissolve out higher amount of aluminum while producing little amount of water insoluble materials. The coagulation behavior of the specially produced PAC could even match the industrial grade PAC conforming to national standard.

  8. Synthetic surfactant- and cross-linker-free preparation of highly stable lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles as potential oral delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taoran; Xue, Jingyi; Hu, Qiaobin; Zhou, Mingyong; Chang, Chao; Luo, Yangchao

    2017-06-05

    The toxicity associated with concentrated synthetic surfactants and the poor stability at gastrointestinal condition are two major constraints for practical applications of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as oral delivery vehicles. In this study, a synthetic surfactant-free and cross-linker-free method was developed to fabricate effective, safe, and ultra-stable lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPN). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and dextran varying in molecular weights were first conjugated through Maillard reaction and the conjugates were exploited to emulsify solid lipid by a solvent diffusion and sonication method. The multilayer structure was formed by self-assembly of BSA-dextran micelles to envelope solid lipid via a pH- and heating-induced facile process with simultaneous surface deposition of pectin. The efficiency of different BSA-dextran conjugates was systematically studied to prepare LPN with the smallest size, the most homogeneous distribution and the greatest stability. The molecular interactions were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both nano spray drying and freeze-drying methods were tested to produce spherical and uniform pectin-coated LPN powders that were able to re-assemble nanoscale structure when redispersed in water. The results demonstrated the promise of a synthetic surfactant- and cross-linker-free technique to prepare highly stable pectin-coated LPN from all natural biomaterials as potential oral delivery vehicles.

  9. Preparation and Properties of Moisture- permeable Micro - fiber Synthetic Leather%透湿超纤合成革的制备及其性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺璇; 王贺玲; 孙向浩; 刘建生; 王克亮

    2011-01-01

    A kind of micro - fiber synthetic leather with good moisture - permeable properties was prepared. The influence of several factors ( including polyurethane resin, coating weight, polyether silicone oil and micro - fiber base) on moisture - permea- ble properties of micro - fiber synthetic leather was also studied. Under the condition of no surface resin' s water swelling and the better hydrophilicity of surface resin and the less coating weight, the water vapour permeability is greater and water vapour coeffi- cient of permeability and absorption is also increased. However, adhesive resin' s hydrophilicity does not have a great influence on water vapour moisture - permeable properties of micro - fiber synthetic leather. With addition of 2% polyether silicone oil, micro - fiber synthetic leather' s permeability of water vapour and its water vapour synthetic coefficient of permeability and absorption increases. If micro - fiber base' s hydrophilicity is improved suitably, micro - fiber synthetic leather' s water vapour coefficient of permeability and absorption is also enhanced.%制备了一种具有良好透湿性能的超纤合成革,并考察了聚氨酯树脂、涂覆量、聚醚硅油和超纤基布对超纤合成革透湿性能的影响。研究表明:在面层树脂不发生膨润变形的情况下,当面层树脂的亲水性增强、面层和粘结层涂覆量减小时,超纤合成革的水蒸气渗透量、水蒸气渗透和吸收系数增大,但粘结层树脂的亲水性对透湿性能影响不明显;加入2%聚醚硅油,超纤合成革水蒸气渗透量、水蒸气渗透和吸收系数均有所提高;适当增加基布的亲水性,超纤合成革水蒸气渗透和吸收系数增大。

  10. Freshwater systems; Frisch gezapft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.P.

    2008-06-09

    Increasingly, providers of solar systems are also offering freshwater systems, although these are more costly than combined storage systems. The contribution discusses the pros and cons of these systems as well as the freshwater quality. (orig.)

  11. An efficient and highly versatile synthetic route to prepare iron oxide nanoparticles/nanocomposites with tunable morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagoz, Bunyamin; Yeow, Jonathan; Esser, Lars; Prakash, Shyam M; Kuchel, Rhiannon P; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille

    2014-09-02

    We report a versatile synthetic method for the in situ self-assembly of magnetic-nanoparticle-functionalized polymeric nanomorphologies, including spherical micelles and rod-like and worm-like micelles and vesicles. Poly(oligoethylene glycol methacrylate)-block-(methacrylic acid)-block-poly(styrene) (POEGMA-b-PMAA-b-PST) triblock copolymer chains were simultaneously propagated and self-assembled via a polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) approach. Subsequently, the carboxylic acid groups in the copolymers were used to complex an iron ion (Fe(II)/Fe(III)) mixture. Iron oxide nanoparticles were then formed in the central block, within the polymeric nanoparticles, via alkaline coprecipitation of the iron(II) and (III) salts. Nanoparticle morphologies, particle sizes, molecular weights, and chemical structures were then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and (1)H NMR measurements. TEM micrographs showed that the average size of the magnetic nanoparticles was ∼7 nm at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nexus contained within the nanoparticles. In addition, XRD was used to confirm the formation of iron oxide nanoparticles. Importantly, the polymeric nanoparticle morphologies were not affected by the coprecipitation of the magnetic nanoparticles. The hybrid nanoparticles were then evaluated as negative MRI contrast agents, displaying remarkably high transverse relaxivities (r2, greater than 550 mM(-1) s(-1) at 9.4 T); a result, that we hypothesize, ensues from iron oxide nanoparticle clustering at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface. This simple synthetic procedure is highly versatile and produces nanocarriers of tunable size and shape with high efficacy as MRI contrast agents and potential utility as theranostic delivery vectors.

  12. Synthetic aspects and characterization of polypropylene–silica nanocomposites prepared via solid-state modification and sol–gel reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Sachin; Goossens, Han; Picchioni, Francesco; Magusin, Pieter; Mezari, Brahim; Duin, Martin van

    2005-01-01

    A new route is developed by combining solid-state modification (SSM) by grafting vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES) with a sol–gel method to prepare PP/silica nanocomposites with varying degree of adhesion between filler and matrix. VTES was grafted via SSM in porous PP particles. Bulk polymerization unde

  13. Synthetic aspects and characterization of polypropylene-silica nanocomposites prepared via solid-state modification and sol-gel reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S; Goossens, H; Picchioni, F; Magusin, P; Mezari, B

    2005-01-01

    A new route is developed by combining solid-state modification (SSM) by grafting vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES) with a sol-gel method to prepare PP/silica nanocomposites with varying degree of adhesion between filler and matrix. VTES was grafted via SSM in porous PP particles. Bulk polymerization unde

  14. Preparation and evaluation of a novel anticancer drug delivery carrier for 5-Fluorouracil using synthetic bola-amphiphile based on lysine as polar heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Beibei; Yuan, Yue; Yan, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoping; Li, Yue; Kan, Qiming; Li, Sanming

    2017-06-01

    A novel bolaamphiphile surfactant N,N'-(dodecane-1, 12-diyl) bis (2,6-diaminohexanamide) (DADL) was designed and synthesized using l-lysine and 1,12-diaminododecane as the hydrophilic and hydrophobic part, respectively. After separation and purification, the structure of the synthetic bolaamphiphile surfactant was verified by FTIR, MS and (1)H NMR. The synthetic bolaamphiphile was able to self-assemble to form vesicles. After formulation screening, vesicles loaded with 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) were prepared with Tween 60 and DADL by sonication and were examined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Micro-FTIR was applied to investigate the conformation of the bola molecules within the vesicle membrane. The release profile of the vesicles showed a pH-sensitive and sustained release. No significant toxicity was observed in an in vitro cell viability assay. The antitumor efficacy of the 5-Fu-loaded vesicles on H22 tumor-bearing mice was remarkably high due to the EPR effects. These results show that our novel bolaamphiphile derived from lysine has excellent potential as a pH-sensitive drug carrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparation of polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for dispersive solid-phase extraction of water-soluble synthetic colorants in beverage samples with HPLC analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Weibo; Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    A facile and sensitive dispersive solid-phase extraction (D-SPE) method for the extraction and enrichment of four representative synthetic colorants prior to high performance liquid chromatography analysis was introduced. As highly efficient adsorbents, polydopamine-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4@PDA NPs) were prepared by a simple and green procedure. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency, mainly including the polymerization time of dopamine, pH of the sample solution, the amount of adsorbent, extraction time and the desorption conditions, were systematically studied. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factors for the four colorants were both higher than 176. The limits of detection (LODs) for the established d-SPE-HPLC method were found to be 0.20-0.25μgL(-1), which were lower than most chromatographic methods previously reported for synthetic colorant analysis. When used for quantitative analysis, wide linearity ranges (1-500μgL(-1) for amaranth and Ponceau 4R, and 0.80-500μgL(-1) for sunset yellow and allure red) were achieved with good correlation (R(2)≥0.9995). The developed method was also successfully applied to the analysis of colorants in beverage samples with satisfactory results, demonstrating its reliability and feasibility in real sample analysis.

  16. Preparation and ectopic osteogenesis in vivo of scaffold based on mineralized recombinant human-like collagen loaded with synthetic BMP-2-derived peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Bin; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Wu Yongchao [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Wang Yu; Cui Fuzai [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: gxdwh@yahoo.com.cn

    2008-12-15

    The ideal bone graft material must be biocompatible, biodegradable, osteoconductive and osteoinductive. In this study, a new biomimetic scaffold based on mineralized recombinant collagen, nano-hydroxyapatite/recombinant human-like collagen/poly(lactic acid) (nHA/RHLC/PLA), was prepared and the synthetic P24 peptide derived from BMP-2 was introduced into the porous nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold to improve its osteoinductive property. The nHA/RHLC/PLA implants loaded with 3 mg, 2 mg, 1 mg and 0 mg P24 peptide were implanted subcutaneously into rats. At the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks after implantation, the rats were sacrificed in batch and the samples were harvested. Their osteogenic capability was detected by CT scan and histological observation. The results indicated that the osteogenic capability of 3 mg, 2 mg and 1 mg of the P24 peptide was superior to the implants without the P24 peptide. There was no significant difference between implants with 3 mg and 2 mg P24 peptide, but the osteogenic capability of the two dosage groups was significantly better than that of the 1 mg group. It was concluded that BMP-2-derived peptide can increase the osteoinduction of nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold and the P24 peptide induced new bone formation in a dose-dependent manner. The nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold loaded with the synthetic BMP-2-derived peptide is a kind of ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Preparation of a N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel(II) Complex: Synthetic Experiments in Current Organic and Organometallic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritleng, Vincent; Brenner, Eric; Chetcuti, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    A four-part experiment that leads to the synthesis of a cyclopentadienyl chloro-nickel(II) complex bearing a N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand is presented. In the first part, the preparation of 1,3-bis-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazolium chloride (IMes[middle dot]HCl) in a one-pot procedure by reaction of 2,4,6-trimethylaniline with…

  18. Colfosceril palmitate. A pharmacoeconomic evaluation of a synthetic surfactant preparation (Exosurf Neonatal) in infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, H M; Whittington, R

    1994-12-01

    Comprehensive clinical data provide strong evidence of the efficacy of the synthetic lung surfactant colfosceril palmitate (Exosurf Neonatal) administered as prophylaxis or rescue therapy in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The use of rescue therapy with colfosceril palmitate is further supported by cost-effectiveness analyses which report a 9 to 48% reduction in the cost per survivor compared with placebo or historical controls, despite divergent study methodology and location. Importantly, the savings were evident in both larger (> or = 1250g) and smaller (700 to 1350g) infants. All studies considered costs or charges accrued during initial hospitalisation through to 1 year; measurement of long term resource use data and all resulting costs are required for a more complete pharmacoeconomic evaluation. The optimal timing of surfactant administration is likely to be an important economic issue given that efficacy data from a large international trial support earlier administration of colfosceril palmitate versus delayed therapy in high risk patients. Further economic benefits may be realised by the sequential use of antenatal corticosteroids and surfactant therapy, although this has yet to be prospectively investigated. In conclusion, clinical and pharmacoeconomic data strongly support the use of rescue therapy with colfosceril palmitate. Additionally, recent clinical data indicating that even better results may be achieved with earlier administration and/or combined use with antenatal corticosteroids should be assessed from an economic standpoint to determine the optimal prescribing strategy for this agent.

  19. 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose: biocatalytic and chemical synthetic methods for the preparation, transformation and derivatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundt, Inge; Yu, Shukun

    2010-01-01

    1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose (1,5AnFru) is a monoketosaccharide that can be prepared enzymatically from starch by a-1,4-glucan lyase or chemically from D-glucose or D-fructose in a few steps with high yields. The formed 1,5AnFru can be derivatized both enzymatically and chemically to interesting new...... carbohydrate derivatives, some with biological activities. For example dehydratases, isomerases and reductases can convert 1,5AnFru to enolones (as Ascopyrone P) and sugar alcohols with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, while chemical modifications can give similar compounds as well as natural products...

  20. Pulse combustion reactor as a fast and scalable synthetic method for preparation of Li-ion cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križan, Gregor; Križan, Janez; Dominko, Robert; Gaberšček, Miran

    2017-09-01

    In this work a novel pulse combustion reactor method for preparation of Li-ion cathode materials is introduced. Its advantages and potential challenges are demonstrated on two widely studied cathode materials, LiFePO4/C and Li-rich NMC. By exploiting the nature of efficiency of pulse combustion we have successfully established a slightly reductive or oxidative environment necessary for synthesis. As a whole, the proposed method is fast, environmentally friendly and easy to scale. An important advantage of the proposed method is that it preferentially yields small-sized powders (in the nanometric range) at a fast production rate of 2 s. A potential disadvantage is the relatively high degree of disorder of synthesized active material which however can be removed using a post-annealing step. This additional step allows a further tuning of materials morphology as shown and commented in some detail.

  1. Action of a semi-synthetic human insulin preparation (30/70 NPH insulin Organon): comparison with another 30/70 NPH (Actraphane Novo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, H; Nivet, A M; Morlat, P; Aubertin, J

    1989-01-01

    The action of a new semi-synthetic insulin preparation (30% soluble, 70% NPH insulin from Organon Laboratories Eragny sur Epte France) was studied in 6 healthy male volunteers using the euglycemic clamp technique (Biostator GCIIS) and compared with another 30/70 NPH (Actraphane Novo). Insulin levels, inhibition of C peptide secretion and glucose consumption were determined. There was a time lag between the maximum glucose need (167 +/- 18 mg/Kg/15 min at the 195th minute after the injection) and the peak plasma insulin level (98.3 +/- 8.5 uu/ml at the 105th minute following the injection). The maximum glucose need was followed by a slow fall in insulin levels with a duration of action of 17 hours. The total glucose need was the same as for Actraphane, although Actraphane had a slower action with a lower peak glucose need (144 +/- 18 mg/Kg/15 min at the 280th minute after injection). The two preparations had the same duration of action.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of biodegradable microspheres containing a new potent osteogenic compound and new synthetic polymers for sustained release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Nobuo; Sato, Takayuki; Harada, Masahiro; Takeda, Junko; Saito, Shuji; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2010-06-15

    In order to achieve the sustained release of 3-ethyl-4-(4-methylisoxazol-5-yl)-5-(methylthio) thiophene-2-carboxamide (BFB0261), a new potent osteogenic compound for the treatment of bone disorders, we prepared microspheres containing BFB0261 and newly synthesized three poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA), four poly (D, L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and eight poly (D, L-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) biodegradable polymers or copolymers, and evaluated the release pattern of BFB0261 from the microspheres in vitro and in vivo. The mean particle size of the microspheres, except for the microspheres constructed from PLA-PEG with a greater than 20% PEG component, was in the range of approximately 10-50 microm, and the preparations showed a spherical shape with a smooth surface. In an in vitro release study, the release of BFB0261 from PLA-1 (Mw: 36 kDa), PLAPEG9604H (PLA/PEG ratio: 96:4, Mw: 181 kDa), or PLAPEG8317 (PLA/PEG ratio: 83:17, Mw: 106 kDa) microspheres occurred in a zero-order manner with a slow release, and more than 50% of BFB0261 remained in each type of microsphere at 12 weeks after incubation. When the BFB0261 microspheres constructed from various polymers were intramuscularly administered to the rat femur, the microspheres constructed from PLA-1 or PLAPEG9604H were able to achieve a sustained release of BFB0261 at the injection site for 6 weeks. The present information indicates that microspheres constructed from PLA-1 or PLAPEG9604H may be feasible for bone engineering. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. (68) Ga-Ca-phytate particles: A potential lung perfusion agent of synthetic origin prepared in a cold kit format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, William; Ali, Masood; Praehofer, Renee; Tsopelas, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the radiosynthesis of (68) Ga-Ca-phytate particles and then characterize the formulation for radiochemical purity, radioactive particle size distribution, and biodistribution in normal rats. This radiotracer was prepared using a commercial phytate cold kit after reconstitution with saline, (68) Ga-chloride generator eluent, calcium chloride, and air, then heating at 100°C for 30 minutes to achieve 99% radiochemical purity of (68) Ga-particles that were 21% 3-5 μm, 8% 5-15 μm, and 71% >15 μm in diameter. This optimal formulation was stable for 2 hours at room temperature. Intravenous administration of (68) Ga-particles in rats resulted in an uptake of 93% in the lungs, 4% in the liver plus spleen, and 3% in the carcass after 20 minutes. Two-thirds of the carcass activity was radioactive blood, likely to be (68) Ga-transferrin. The positron emission tomography image was superior than the (99m) Tc-MAA image because it displayed high lung uptake against a low background. Low uptake by the liver, spleen did not interfere with the diagnostic quality, and faint activity in the submandibular (salivary) glands was due to (68) Ga-transferrin. The preclinical data so far indicate that (68) Ga-Ca-phytate particles have good potential as a lung perfusion imaging agent.

  4. Preparation and characterization of paper based nano cellulose PU synthetic leather%纸基纳米纤维素PU合成革的制备与研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜明; 宋冰; 石勇; 王伟; 周小凡

    2016-01-01

    with plant fiber paper as raw material, ZnCl2 solution was used as the solvent of cellulose, ifber substrate was prepared by sol-gel method, it was studied that effects of dissolution time of paper ifber in ZnCl2 solution at 80℃, aging time, plasticizing agent and drying on substrate performance and on the physical and mechanical properties of synthetic leather. The results showed that the physical properties of the substrate is the best when the dissolution time is 8s in ZnCl2 solution at 80℃, aging time in air 2h, 30% amino silicone oil emulsion as a plasticizer, and by freeze drying. The moisture permeability, tensile strength, break elongation of the synthetic leather made with the leather substrate was close to natural leather. The substrate base, paper and the synthetic leather were characterized by scanning electron microscopy.%以植物纤维纸张为原料,ZnCl2溶液为纤维素溶剂,通过溶胶-凝胶法制备凝胶纤维基材,研究了Z n C l2溶液在80℃对纤维纸张的溶解时间、老化时间、增塑剂的选择和干燥方式对基材性能的影响以及合成革物理机械性能的影响。结果表明:Z n C l2溶液在80℃对纤维纸张的溶解8s、空气中老化2h,选择30%的氨基硅油乳液作为增塑剂、干燥方式为冷冻干燥时,基材的物理性能最佳。此基材制备的合成革的透湿性能,抗张强度,断裂伸长率都较接近天然皮革。通过扫描电镜对基材、原纸和合成革进行表征。

  5. Simple preparation of new [(18) F]F-labeled synthetic amino acid derivatives with two click reactions in one-pot and SPE purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Cheol-Min; Lee, Sang Ju; Oh, Seung Jun; Ha, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Jong Jin

    2015-06-30

    New [(18) F]fluorinated 1,2,3-triazolyl amino acid derivatives were efficiently prepared from Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, well known as click reaction. We developed two simultaneous click reactions in one-pot with a simple solid-phase extraction (SPE) purification method. [(18) F]fluoro-1-propyne was obtained at a 45% non-decay corrected radiochemical yield based on the [(18) F]fluoride ion. The one-pot and simultaneous two click reactions were performed with unprotected azido-alkyl amino acid, [(18) F]fluoro-1-propyne, and lipophilic additive alkyne to produce three synthetic amino acid derivatives, AMC-101 ([(18) F]-6a), AMC-102 ([(18) F]-6b), and AMC-103 ([(18) F]-6c) with 29%, 28%, and 24% of non-decay corrected radiochemical yields, respectively. All radiotracers indicated that radiochemical purities were >95% without any residual organic solvent. Our new method involving two click reactions in one-pot showed high radiochemical and chemical purity by easy removal of the residual precursor from the simultaneous two click reactions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  7. Freshwater sponges of Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezcurra de Drago, Inés

    1975-01-01

    This paper is the first contribution to the knowledge of the freshwater sponges of Suriname. Four species have been identified up till now: Metania spinata (Carter, 1881), Trochospongilla paulula (Bowerbank, 1863), Radiospongilla crateriformis (Potts, 1882), and Drulia uruguayensis Bonetto & Ezcurra

  8. Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is seeking regular and early career applications proposing innovative research on the prediction, prevention, control and mitigation of freshwater HABs as well as the drivers, life cycle patterns, and fate of and effects from from less-common, less

  9. A Convenient Synthetic Method of Metal Dendritic Porphyrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Bin CUI; Jie ZHOU; Lei CHEN; Xiao Bin DENG; Chun GUO

    2006-01-01

    A convenient synthetic method of metal dendritic porphyrins through the convergent synthetic strategy is described. The porphyrin core were linked with the synthetic fragments by forming ether or ester bonds to give five target compounds were prepared.

  10. Studies on the relationship between cyanide-resistant respi-ration and expression of alternative oxidase in mung bean using antibodies prepared by synthetic polypeptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Chijun; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Liang, Z., Liang, H. G., The respiratory metabolism of plants, in Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology (eds. Yu, S. W., Tang, Z. C.) (in Chinese), 2nd ed., Beijing: Science Press, 1998, 344-365.[2]Lü, C. S., Liang, H. G., Induced respiration in melon fruits, Scientia Sinica, 1963, 12(4): 616.[3]Liang, H. G., Lü, C. S., A comparative study of CN-resistant respiration in different cultures of tobacco callus, Plant Physiol., 1984, 75: 876.[4]Elthon, T. E., McIntosh, L., Identification of the alternative terminal oxidase of higher plant mitochondria, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1987, 84: 8399.[5]Elthon, T. E., Nickels, R. L., McIntosh, L., Monoclonal antibodies to the alternative oxidase of higher plant mitochondria, Plant Physiol., 1989, 89: 1311.[6]Liang, W. S., Liang, H. G., Progress of the alternative oxidase, Chinese Bulletin of Botany (in Chinese), 1997, 14(2): 9.[7]Liang, W. S., Liang, H. G., Induction of alternative oxidase expression by endogenous ethylene in aging potato slices, Acta Phytophysiol. Sin. (in Chinese), 1999, 25(2): 205.[8]He, J. X., Wei, Z. Q., Liang, H. G., Effects of water stress on development, and operation and gene expression of cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway in wheat, Science in China, Ser. C, 1999, 42(3): 300.[9]McIntosh, L., Molecular biology of the alternative oxidase, Plant Physiol., 1994, 105: 781.[10] Wang, J., Zhang, L. X., Liu, Z. L. et al., A possible calcium binding site in D1 protein: A fluorescence and FTIR study of the interaction between lanthanides and a synthetic peptide, Photosynthesis Research, 1995, 44: 297.[11] Li, X. P., Du, L. F., Liang, H. G. et al., Preparation and identification of antidodecapeptide of polypeptide D1 or photosys-tem II reaction center, Prog. Biochem. Biophys. (in Chinese), 1997, 24(3): 283.[12] Wen, J. Q., Liang, H. G., Studies on energy status and mitochondria respiration during growth and senescence of mung bean cotyledons, Physiol

  11. Freshwater and fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxen, R. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Severe radioactive contamination of the freshwater environment could have serious consequences for both drinking water and fish. Most of the Nordic countries have an abundance of freshwater lakes and rivers. Finland alone has about 56,000 lakes, each with a surface area of 1 hectare or more. Nearly 10% of Finland`s surface is covered with lakes and rivers. In Sweden, about 9% of the surface area is freshwater, in Norway about 5%, and in Denmark only about 2%. Freshwater plays a minor role in Iceland, but even there numerous rivers discharge from the volcanic soils to the Ocean. Cs-137 and {sup 90}Sr are likely to be the most important radionuclides with respect to long term radioactive contamination of freshwater. If radioactive deposition occurs in the absence of snow and ice radionuclides will contaminate the surface water directly and may rapidly enter the aquatic food chain. Fish which eat contaminated plankton become contaminated almost immediately. Deposition during summer increases the transfer for radionuclides to fish since fish metabolism is faster during the warm season. During the cold period, fish metabolism is slow and thus uptake and excretion of radiocaesium are also slow. (EG). 18 refs.

  12. Preparation and evaluation of unimolecular pentavalent and hexavalent antigenic constructs targeting prostate and breast cancer: a synthetic route to anticancer vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragupathi, Govind; Koide, Fusataka; Livingston, Philip O; Cho, Young Shin; Endo, Atsushi; Wan, Qian; Spassova, Maria K; Keding, Stacy J; Allen, Jennifer; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Wilson, Rebecca M; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2006-03-01

    Several novel, fully synthetic, carbohydrate-based antitumor vaccines have been assembled. Each construct consists of multiple cancer-related antigens displayed on a single polypeptide backbone. Recent advances in synthetic methodology have allowed for the incorporation of a complex oligosaccharide terminating in a sialic acid residue (i.e., GM2) as one of the carbohydrate antigens. Details of the vaccine synthesis as well as the results of preliminary immunological investigations are described herein.

  13. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-01

    Freshwater ecosystems and associated habitats harbor incrediblebiodiversity. They offer various ecosystem services andsustain human livelihoods. However, due to increasing developmentalpressure and rising water demand, these systemsare under huge threat. As a result, many aquatic species arefeared to become extinct in near future. Quantifying the patternsof aquatic species diversity and composition of river systemsis urgently required. With this interest, we studied fourriver systems in the Western Ghats region, documenting thepattern of fish diversity and identifying the factors that influencefish species richness. Maintaining undisturbed streamsand river basins, especially headwater regions is crucial forsustaining freshwater biodiversity in the tropical river ecosystems.

  14. Freshwater Marsh. Habitat Pac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, three lesson plans and student data sheets, and a poster. The overview describes how the freshwater marsh is an important natural resource for plant, animal, and human populations and how the destruction of marshes causes…

  15. Metabolites of 5F-AKB-48, a synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist, identified in human urine and liver microsomal preparations using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Pedersen, Anders Just; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe

    2015-01-01

    New types of synthetic cannabinoid designer drugs are constantly introduced to the illicit drug market to circumvent legislation. Recently, N-​(1-Adamant​yl)-​1-​(5-​fluoropentyl)-​1H-​indazole-​3-​carboxamide (5F-AKB-48), also known as 5F-APINACA, was identified as an adulterant in herbal products...

  16. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  17. Synthetic foldamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Gilles; Huc, Ivan

    2011-06-07

    Foldamers are artificial folded molecular architectures inspired by the structures and functions of biopolymers. This highlight focuses on important developments concerning foldamers produced by chemical synthesis and on the perspectives that these new self-organized molecular scaffolds offer. Progress in the field has led to synthetic objects that resemble small proteins in terms of size and complexity yet that may not contain any α-amino acids. Foldamers have introduced new tools and concepts to develop biologically active substances, synthetic receptors and novel materials.

  18. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  19. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  20. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  1. A new synthetic methodology for the preparation of biocompatible and organo-soluble barbituric- and thiobarbituric acid based chitosan derivatives for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahzad, Sohail [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Shahzadi, Lubna [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, Nasir [Department of Allied Health Sciences and Chemical Pathology, Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rauf, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Manzoor, Faisal; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rehman, Ihtesham ur [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Kroto Research Institute, The University of Sheffield, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Yar, Muhammad, E-mail: drmyar@ciitlahore.edu.pk [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2016-09-01

    Chitosan's poor solubility especially in organic solvents limits its use with other organo-soluble polymers; however such combinations are highly required to tailor their properties for specific biomedical applications. This paper describes the development of a new synthetic methodology for the synthesis of organo-soluble chitosan derivatives. These derivatives were synthesized from chitosan (CS), triethyl orthoformate and barbituric or thiobarbituric acid in the presence of 2-butannol. The chemical interactions and new functional motifs in the synthesized CS derivatives were evaluated by FTIR, DSC/TGA, UV/VIS, XRD and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity investigation for these materials was performed by cell culture method using VERO cell line and all the synthesized derivatives were found to be non-toxic. The solubility analysis showed that these derivatives were readily soluble in organic solvents including DMSO and DMF. Their potential to use with organo-soluble commercially available polymers was exploited by electrospinning; the synthesized derivatives in combination with polycaprolactone delivered nanofibrous membranes. - Highlights: • Development of a new synthetic methodology • Synthesis of organo-soluble chitosan (CS) derivatives • VERO cells proliferation • Nanofibrous membranes from the synthesized chitosan derivatives and polycaprolactone.

  2. Range size patterns in European freshwater trematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David; Hof, Christian; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe

    2011-01-01

    Aim We investigated the relationship between host and parasite diversity as well as latitudinal gradients in parasite diversity on a continental scale in European freshwater trematodes. Location European freshwaters. Methods We extracted distributional data for 564 freshwater trematodes across 25...

  3. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  4. Characteristics of glass ionomer cements composed of glass powders in CaO-SrO-ZnO-SiO₂ system prepared by two different synthetic routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Coughlan, Aisling; Placek, Lana; Wren, Anthony W; Towler, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are composed of an acid degradable glass, polyacrylic acid and water. Sol-gel processing to prepare the glass phase has certain advantages, such as the ability to employ lower synthesis temperatures than melt quenching and glasses that are reported to have higher purity. A previous study reported the effects of glass synthesis route on GIC fabrication. However, in that study, the sol-gel derived glass exhibited a reduced concentration of cations. This study investigates increasing the cation content of a sol-gel derived glass, 12CaO.4SrO.36ZnO.48SiO2 (molar ratio) by heating before aging to reduce dissolution of cations. This glass was prepared by both sol-gel and melt-quenched routes. GICs were subsequently prepared using both glasses. The resultant cement based on the sol-gel derived glass had a shorter working time than the cement based on the melt-quenched one. Contrary to this, setting time was considerably longer for the cement based on the sol-gel derived glass than for the cement based on the melt-quenched one. The cements based on the sol-gel derived glass were stronger in both compression and biaxial flexure than the cements prepared from the melt-quenched glass. The differences in setting and mechanical properties were associated with both cation content in the glass phase and the different surface area of the resultant cements.

  5. Conservation status of imperiled North American freshwater and diadromous fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard L. Jelks; Stephen J. Walsh; Noel M. Burkhead; Salvador Contreras-Balderas; Edmundo Diaz-Pardo; Dean A. Hendrickson; John Lyons; Nicholas E. Mandrak; Frank McCormick; Joseph S. Nelson; Steven P. Plantania; Brady A. Porter; Claude B. Renaud; Juan Jacobo Schmitter-Soto; Eric B. Taylor; Melvin L. Jr. Warren

    2008-01-01

    This is the third compilation of imperiled (i.e., endangered, threatened, vulnerable) plus extinct freshwater and diadromous fishes of North America prepared by the American Fisheries Society?s Endangered Species Committee. Since the last revision in 1989, imperilment of inland fishes has increased substantially. This list includes 700 extant taxa representing 133...

  6. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  7. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  8. Lake spray aerosol generation: a method for producing representative particles from freshwater wave breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Nathaniel W.; Axson, Jessica L.; Watson, Alexa; Pratt, Kerri A.; Ault, Andrew P.

    2016-09-01

    Wave-breaking action in bodies of freshwater produces atmospheric aerosols via a similar mechanism to sea spray aerosol (SSA) from seawater. The term lake spray aerosol (LSA) is proposed to describe particles formed by this mechanism, which have been observed over the Laurentian Great Lakes. Though LSA has been identified from size distribution measurements during a single measurement campaign, no measurements of LSA composition or relationship to bubble-bursting dynamics have been conducted. An LSA generator utilizing a plunging jet, similar to many SSA generators, was constructed for the generation of aerosol from freshwater samples and model salt solutions. To evaluate this new generator, bubble and aerosol number size distributions were measured for salt solutions representative of freshwater (CaCO3) and seawater (NaCl) at concentrations ranging from that of freshwater to seawater (0.05-35 g kg-1), synthetic seawater (inorganic), synthetic freshwater (inorganic), and a freshwater sample from Lake Michigan. Following validation of the bubble and aerosol size distributions using synthetic seawater, a range of salt concentrations were investigated. The systematic studies of the model salts, synthetic freshwater, and Lake Michigan sample indicate that LSA is characterized by a larger number size distribution mode diameter of 300 nm (lognormal), compared to seawater at 110 nm. Decreasing salt concentrations from seawater to freshwater led to greater bubble coalescence and formation of larger bubbles, which generated larger particles and lower aerosol number concentrations. This resulted in a bimodal number size distribution with a primary mode (180 ± 20 nm) larger than that of SSA, as well as a secondary mode (46 ± 6 nm) smaller than that of SSA. This new method for studying LSA under isolated conditions is needed as models, at present, utilize SSA parameterizations for freshwater systems, which do not accurately predict the different size distributions observed

  9. A Controllable Synthetic Route for Preparing Graphene-Cu and Graphene-Cu2O Nanocomposites Using Graphene Oxide-CuO as a Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li; ZHU Junwu; BI Huiping; MENG Xiaoqian; YAO Pengcheng; HAN Qiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    The development of convenient method to obtain graphene-based nanocomposites is a key issue for their application. Herein, we described a facile route for synthesizing graphene-Cu and graphene-Cu2O nanocomposites using graphene oxide-CuO as a precursor. Remarkably, the different nanocomposites could be formed just by varying the reaction temperature and time. This work provides a feasible route for the preparation of graphene-based nanocomposites with various constituents.

  10. Iron-based adsorbent prepared from Litchi peel biomass via pyrolysis process for the removal of pharmaceutical pollutant from synthetic aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletto, Vitória Segabinazzi; Ferreira, Ananda Bulegon; da Cruz Severo, Eric; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho; Foletto, Edson Luiz; Dotto, Guilherme Luiz

    2017-03-10

    A porous iron-based adsorbent obtained from litchi peel via pyrolysis process was prepared in this work, in order to evaluate its adsorptive potential for the removal of a pharmaceutical dye (amaranth) from aqueous solution. The material was characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, and scanning electron microscopy. Several isotherm and kinetic models were tested aiming to represent the amaranth dye adsorption. The prepared sample presented magnetic property, and a mesoporous texture constituted of graphite and three iron-based phases. The adsorption kinetics of amaranth on the adsorbent followed the pseudo-second-order model, whereas the equilibrium data were in good agreement with the BET isotherm, being represented by a sigmoid-shaped adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for the amaranth dye was found to be 44.87 mg g(-1), demonstrating that the material prepared in this work showed to be a promising adsorbent for the removal of amaranth from aqueous solution.

  11. Synthetic Brainbows

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists.

  12. [Efficacy and safety of acute bronchitis treatment in adults--a comparison of Bronchosol® syrup and synthetic preparations with ambroxol. Results of observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fal, Andrzej M; Schönknecht, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), including acute bronchitis, are the frequent health problems and the most common reason for acute cough in adults. Even though the infections are caused mainly by viruses, and their course is usually not complicated, febrifuges, i.a. mucokinetics, or antitussives are used in the treatment of URTI in order to improve the quality of life and safety of patients. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Bronchosol® herbal syrup in comparison to ambroxol preparations in the treatment of acute bronchitis in adult patients. The Bronchosol®/2013 study was a non-interventional, prospective, open-label, observational study. Data from adult patients treated with Bronchosol® syrup for acute bronchitis were collected and compared with data from patients treated for the same condition with ambroxol preparations. The severity of bronchitis symptoms was evaluated with the BSS (Bronchitis Severity Score) scale, and patients'quality of life wasassessed with the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) scale. Between visits patients conducted self-observations and filled out observation diaries. Moreover, the data on adverse events were collected. In 87.68% of patients the infections were cured. Most of patients considered the studied drugs to be the agent decreasing the duration of infection and its intensity. The percentage of patients who declared that they had a less intense cough than during earlier infections was higher in the group of patients treated with Bronchosol® syrup in comparison to ambroxol treated patients (60.22% vs. 45.03%). 91.94% of patients treated with Bronchosol® considered this syrup to be very safe; in the ambroxol group such a declaration was made by 76.61% of patients. Bronchosol® syrup is an efficient, well-tolerated, and safe drug. Its efficacy in the treatment of acute bronchitis symptoms in adult patients is similar to the efficacy of ambroxol preparations.

  13. A General Synthetic Procedure for 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinone Derivatives and Their Utilization in the Preparation of Novel Anticancer Agents with 4-Anilinoquinazoline Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lan Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In our ongoing research on novel anticancer agents with 4-anilinoquinazoline scaffolds, a series of novel 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinones were needed as key intermediates. An improved one-step synthesis of 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinones utilizing o-anthranilic acids as starting materials was described. Based on it, 2-hydroxy-methyl-4(3H-quinazolinones were conveniently prepared in one pot. Moreover, two novel 4-anilinoquinazoline derivatives substituted with chloromethyl groups at the 2-position were synthesized and showed promising anticancer activity in vitro.

  14. New synthetic way to prepare 2-aryl-8-(piperidin-4-yl)-5, 7-dimethoxy-4H-chromen-4-one as key intermediate for CDK inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ling Li; Hao Fang; Wen Fang Xu; Bing He Wang

    2008-01-01

    As an important intermediate to study cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, 2-aryl-8-(piperidin-4-yl)-5,7-dimethoxy-4H-chromen-4-one derivatives were prepared using β-diketone route with low yield. In our study, chalcone route has been investigatedand the result suggested that the benzaldehydes substituted with electron-donating group give much better yield than β-diketoneroute. This new method will be an efficient way to start further research on new anticancer flavonoids.2008 Hao Fang. PuNished by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility, located at SANGB, has direct year-round access to water from Lake St. Clair and has a State of Michigan approved National...

  16. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2017-01-01

    "Are we alone?" is one of the primary questions of astrobiology, and whose answer defines our significance in the universe. Unfortunately, this quest is hindered by the fact that we have only one confirmed example of life, that of earth. While this is enormously helpful in helping to define the minimum envelope for life, it strains credulity to imagine that life, if it arose multiple times, has not taken other routes. To help fill this gap, our lab has begun using synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - as an enabling technology. One theme, the "Hell Cell" project, focuses on creating artificial extremophiles in order to push the limits for Earth life, and to understand how difficult it is for life to evolve into extreme niches. In another project, we are re-evolving biotic functions using only the most thermodynamically stable amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids.

  17. Hardness corrections for copper are inappropriate for protecting sensitive freshwater biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markich, S J; Batley, G E; Stauber, J L; Rogers, N J; Apte, S C; Hyne, R V; Bowles, K C; Wilde, K L; Creighton, N M

    2005-06-01

    Toxicity testing using a freshwater alga (Chlorella sp.), a bacterium (Erwinnia sp.) and a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia) exposed to copper in synthetic and natural freshwaters of varying hardness (44-375 mg CaCO3/l), with constant alkalinity, pH and dissolved organic carbon concentration, demonstrated negligible hardness effects in the pH range 6.1-7.8. Therefore, the use of a generic hardness-correction algorithm, developed as part of national water quality guidelines for protecting freshwater biota, is not recommended for assessing the toxicity of copper to these, and other, sensitive freshwater species. Use of the algorithm for these sensitive species will be underprotective because the calculated concentrations of copper in water that cause a toxic effect will be higher.

  18. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-25

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  19. Kinetic study of isothermal crystallization process of Gd2Ti2O7 precursor's powder prepared through the Pechini synthetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Bojan; Marinović-Cincović, Milena; Dramićanin, Miroslav

    2015-10-01

    Crystallization process of Gd2Ti2O7 precursor's powder prepared by Pechini-type polymerized complex route has been studied under isothermal experimental conditions in an air atmosphere. It was found that the crystallization proceeds through two-parameter Šesták-Berggren (SB) autocatalytic model, in the operating temperature range of 550 °C≤T≤750 °C. Based on the behavior of SB parameters (M, N), it was found that in the lower operating temperature range, the crystallites with relatively low compactness exist, which probably disclosed low dimensionality of crystal growth from numerous nucleation sites, where the amorphous solid is produced. In the higher operating temperature region (above 750 °C), it was established that a morphological well-defined and high-dimensional particles of the formed pyrochlore phase can be expected. It was found that at T=850 °C, there is a change in the rate-determining reaction step, from autocatalytic into the contracting volume mechanism.

  20. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies of synthetic dye removal using pomegranate peel activated carbon prepared by microwave-induced KOH activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Azmier Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate peel was converted into activated carbon using microwave induced and KOH activation techniques. The prepared activated carbon (PPAC was characterized using FTIR, TGA, SEM, and nitrogen-adsorption surface area (BET. BET measurements gave remarkable increase in both the surface area (941.02 m2/g and total pore volume (0.470 cm3/g. Various operational parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and solution temperature in batch systems were investigated on the use of PPAC in the adsorption of remazol brilliant blue reactive (RBBR dye. At pH 2, the optimum dye removal was 94.36%. The amount of dye removed was dependent on initial dye concentration and solution temperature. Adsorption kinetics was found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Experimental data were analyzed using eight model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin–Radushkevich, Radke Prausnite, Sips, Viet–Sladek and Brouers – Sotolongo isotherms and it was found that the Freundlich isotherm model fitted the adsorption data most with the highest correlation (R2≥0.99 and lowest normalized standard deviation, ∆qe. Both intra-particle and film diffusion governed the adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters, such as standard Gibbs free energy (∆G0, standard enthalpy (∆H0, standard entropy (∆S0, and the activation energy (Ea were calculated. The adsorption of RBBR dye onto PPAC was found to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. This study shows that the adsorption follows physisorption mechanism.

  1. Preparation of oleic diethanolamide borate and its application in synthetic cutting fluid%油酸二乙醇酰胺硼酸酯的制备及在全合成切削液中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 宋扬扬

    2015-01-01

    Oleic diethanolamide was prepared by using oleic acid reacted with diethanolamine in the presence of methylbenzene as water carrying agent, by testing the amine value of reactants at different temperature, appro-priate reaction temperature is 150℃.Oleic diethanolamide borate was prepared by using oleic diethanolamide re-acted with boric acid and n-butyl alcohol at 180℃, which as the main anti-rust agent applied in synthetic cutting fluid. With laminated antirust test for examining the basis, main composition ratio of cutting fluid are optimized by the orthogonal test, products meet the GB/T 6144-2010.%本文以油酸、二乙醇胺反应,甲苯为带水剂制备油酸二乙醇酰胺,通过在不同反应温度下测定反应物胺值,得出适宜的反应温度为150℃.将制备的油酸二乙醇酰胺与硼酸、正丁醇在180℃下反应制备油酸二乙醇酰胺硼酸酯.将其做为主要防锈剂应用于全合成切削液中,以叠片防锈试验为考察依据,通过正交试验优化切削液主要成分配比,产品符合GB/T6144-2010.

  2. Synthetic peptides of actin-tropomyosin binding region of troponin I and heat shock protein 20 modulate the relaxation process of skinned preparations of taenia caeci from guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yasumasa; Sakurai, Wataru; Morimoto, Sachio; Watanabe, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    To explore the possible role of the thin filament-linked regulation of cross-bridge cycling in living smooth muscle contraction, we studied the effects of TnIp and HSP20p, a synthetic peptide originating from an actin tropomyosin binding region of rabbit cardiac troponin I (residues 136-147; GKFKRPTLRRVR), and that of human heat shock protein 20 (residues 110-121; GFVAREFHRRYR) on the relaxation of skinned (cell membrane ilized) preparations from guinea pig taenia caeci. An active stress of the skinned preparations, resulting from actin-myosin interaction, rapidly decayed following Ca(2+) removal (relaxation). TnIp accelerated the initial rapid phase and slowed the following slow phase of the relaxation. On the other hand, HSP20p only slowed the whole process of the relaxation. The relaxation time courses were well fitted in a double exponential manner, and the double exponential decay of the stress could be explained as a portion of fast-detaching cross bridges not to dissociate rapidly by Ca(2+) removal, but to transfer to latch bridges dissociating very slowly. Our present results suggested that (i) TnIp and HSP20p accelerated transferring from fast-detaching cross bridges to slow-detaching (latch) bridges, and (ii) TnIp accelerated dissociation of the fast-detaching cross bridges and the latch bridges, while HSP20p slowed dissociation the fast-detaching cross bridges. Since TnIp and HSP20p are thought to bind to actin and tropomyosin, but not to myosin, we concluded that through thin-filament-dependent mechanisms these peptides regulated the formation and/or deformation of latch bridges in smooth muscle. The thin-filament-dependent regulation might physiologically control the stress maintenance and relaxation in smooth muscle cells.

  3. Progress and challenges in freshwater conservation planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, JL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater ecosystems and their associated biota are among the most endangered in the world. This, combined with escalating human pressure on water resources, demands that urgent measures be taken to conserve freshwater ecosystems and the services...

  4. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  5. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Freshwater Biological Traits Database. This report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biological traits. The database combines several existing traits databases into an online format. The database is also...

  6. Freshwater snail consumption and angiostrongyliasis in Malaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liat, L B; Fong, Y L; Krishnansamy, M; Ramachandran, P; Mansor, S

    1978-06-01

    A survey of the freshwater snails, Pila scutata and Bellamyia ingallsiana, as food consumed by the local population was carried out in Peninsular Malaysia. Of these two species the first is preferred; the sizes favoured are between 25--40 mm. Pila snails were found to be consumed by the three communities, viz. Malay, Chinese and Indian, in different ways. The various methods of preparing the snails for consumption are described. P. scutata is an intermediate host of the rat-lung worm, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis. As this worm presumably is the causative agent of human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis, the eating habits of the three races in consuming the snail in relation to the epidemiology of the disease was also discussed.

  7. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  8. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haine, T.W.N.; Curry, B.; Gerdes, R.; Hansen, E.; Karcher, M.; Lee, C.; Rudels, B.; Spreen, G.; de Steur, L.; Stewart, K.D.; Woodgate, R.

    2015-01-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980–2000, with an extra ˜ 5000 km3 — about 25% — being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runo

  9. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  10. Nearctic freshwater tardigrades: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana G. HINTON

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and ecology of limno-terrestrial Tardigrada in the Nearctic realm remain poorly known. This is especially true of freshwater tardigrades (i.e., species found in permanently submerged habitats, which have received much less attention than terrestrial species. We reviewed the literature on Nearctic freshwater tardigrades. Of 204 Nearctic limno-terrestrial tardigrade species, 44 have been collected from sediments and aquatic vegetation of streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, groundwater and cryoconite holes. Of these, 17 are hydrophilous species found exclusively or primarily in aquatic environments. Most of the remainder are probably washed in accidentally from terrestrial substrates. Among the hydrophilous species, five are endemic to the Nearctic realm and three cosmopolitan. Hypsibius dujardini is the most widely-distributed hydrophilous species. There are no regional collections of Nearctic freshwater tardigrades comparable to those for terrestrial species. Aquatic tardigrades are benthic, and are found in sediments and on aquatic vegetation. Hypsibius dujardini and other widespread species are found in both substrates, and there is thus no evidence of substrate specificity. Numerically, tardigrades usually comprise a minor component of benthic invertebrate communities. Nothing is known of their trophic relationships or dispersal in these habitats. The density of Nearctic freshwater tardigrade species peaks in the spring and/or fall. Future research should increase the spatial and temporal scale of study, and employ adequate replication.

  11. Methane emission from freshwater marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nat, Frans-Jaco Willy Anthony van der

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a four-year study into the CH4 cycle of freshwater marshes dominated by reed and bulrush. This research was conducted in the framework of the research theme carbon and nutrient dynamics in vegetated littoral systems of the department of Littoral Vegetation of t

  12. Caribbean brackish and freshwater Cyanophyceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Joséphine Th.

    1960-01-01

    Among the extensive collections of algae made by Dr P. Wagenaar Hummelinck (Utrecht) in the Antilles and adjacent regions during the years 1930, 1936, 1937, 1948—1949, 1955, a number of chiefly brackish, but also freshwater, Cyanophyceae were incorporated. This collection was kindly committed for st

  13. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage.

  14. Synthetic rubbers prepared by lanthanide coordination catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China is rich in rare earth resources. Rare earth elements, also named lanthanides, are number 58 to number 81 elements in the elemental periodic table. They have unique electronic structures and may form various coordination compounds. In the early 1960s, researchers at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CIAC) found the catalytic activities of lanthanide compounds in stereospecific polymerization of conjugated dienes, and published the first paper on this topic in 1964. On the basis of this finding, CIAC launched extensive research activities on lanthanide compounds as diene polymerization catalysts, from a series of fundamental research to the efforts of industrializing the rare earth catalyzed cis-1,4-polybutatine rubber and cis-1,4-polyisoprene rubber. This review aims to summarize the progress in this field in the past half century.

  15. Synthetic rubbers prepared by lanthanide coordination catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN WenQi; WANG FoSong

    2009-01-01

    China is rich in rare earth resources. Rare earth elements, also named Ianthanides, are number 58 to number 81 elements in the elemental periodic table. They have unique electronic structures and may form various coordination compounds. In the early 1960s, researchers at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CIAC) found the catalytic activities of lanthanide compounds in stereospecific polymerization of conjugated dienes, and published the first paper on this topic in 1964. On the basis of this finding, CIAC launched extensive research activities on lanthanide compounds as diene polymerization catalysts, from a series of fundamental research to the efforts of industrializing the rare earth catalyzed cis~(-1),4-polybutatine rubber and cis~(-1),4-polyisoprene rubber. This review aims to summarize the progress in this field in the past half century.

  16. Dissolved Organic Matter in Freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, E. M.; Ritchie, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    Organic matter in freshwaters exists as dissolved molecules, colloids, and particles. It is appropriate to regard these distinctions as dynamic, however, because organic matter can be interconverted readily between these forms by dissolution and precipitation, sorption and desorption, aggregation and disaggregation, etc. Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the subject of this chapter, is defined operationally as the fraction of organic matter in a water sample that passes through a 0.45 μm filter. In the authors' opinion, the scientific literature on organic matter in freshwaters will be better reflected in this review, if data are considered without regard to the manner in which water samples may have been filtered. This more general approach is warranted because: * many submicron colloids and some microorganisms can pass through 0.45 μm filters; * the effective pore size of a 0.45 μm filter is usually unknown, because it is decreased by partial clogging during the filtration of a water sample; * some important studies have been conducted on unfiltered samples or on samples that were filtered through other types of filters; and * some important studies have been conducted on samples that were concentrated with ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF), or reverse osmosis (RO) membranes.As methods for fractionation and isolation of organic matter in freshwaters have evolved, and as the intensity of research has waxed and waned in various academic disciplines, a rich and potentially confusing nomenclature has evolved for organic matter in freshwaters. Some of the more commonly encountered descriptors and their associated acronyms, if any, are yellow organic acids (YOAs), aquatic humus, DOM, and natural organic matter (NOM). Regardless of the terminology used in the original literature, the organic matter in freshwaters is referred to as DOM in this review, except when it is necessary to be more specific.

  17. Synthetic biology, inspired by synthetic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, V; Nallani, M; Meier, W P; Sinner, E K

    2012-07-16

    The topic synthetic biology appears still as an 'empty basket to be filled'. However, there is already plenty of claims and visions, as well as convincing research strategies about the theme of synthetic biology. First of all, synthetic biology seems to be about the engineering of biology - about bottom-up and top-down approaches, compromising complexity versus stability of artificial architectures, relevant in biology. Synthetic biology accounts for heterogeneous approaches towards minimal and even artificial life, the engineering of biochemical pathways on the organismic level, the modelling of molecular processes and finally, the combination of synthetic with nature-derived materials and architectural concepts, such as a cellular membrane. Still, synthetic biology is a discipline, which embraces interdisciplinary attempts in order to have a profound, scientific base to enable the re-design of nature and to compose architectures and processes with man-made matter. We like to give an overview about the developments in the field of synthetic biology, regarding polymer-based analogs of cellular membranes and what questions can be answered by applying synthetic polymer science towards the smallest unit in life, namely a cell.

  18. Plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants.

  19. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A recent study found that 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a common synthetic cathinone, affects the brain in ... but is at least 10 times more powerful. MDPV is the most common synthetic cathinone found in ...

  20. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dried plant materials. Chemical tests show that their active ingredients are man-made cannabinoid compounds. Synthetic cannabinoid users report some effects similar to those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception symptoms of psychosis Synthetic cannabinoids can ...

  1. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...

  2. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  3. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the fre...

  4. The Freshwater Information Platform - an online network supporting freshwater biodiversity research and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kloiber, Astrid; De Wever, Aaike; Bremerich, Vanessa; Strackbein, Jörg; Hering, Daniel; Jähnig, Sonja; Kiesel, Jens; Martens, Koen; Tockner, Klement

    2017-04-01

    Species distribution data is crucial for improving our understanding of biodiversity and its threats. This is especially the case for freshwater environments, which are heavily affected by the global biodiversity crisis. Currently, a huge body of freshwater biodiversity data is often difficult to access, because systematic data publishing practices have not yet been adopted by the freshwater research community. The Freshwater Information Platform (FIP; www.freshwaterplatform.eu) - initiated through the BioFresh project - aims at pooling freshwater related research information from a variety of projects and initiatives to make it easily accessible for scientists, water managers and conservationists as well as the interested public. It consists of several major components, three of which we want to specifically address: (1) The Freshwater Biodiversity Data Portal aims at mobilising freshwater biodiversity data, making them online available Datasets in the portal are described and documented in the (2) Freshwater Metadatabase and published as open access articles in the Freshwater Metadata Journal. The use of collected datasets for large-scale analyses and models is demonstrated in the (3) Global Freshwater Biodiversity Atlas that publishes interactive online maps featuring research results on freshwater biodiversity, resources, threats and conservation priorities. Here we present the main components of the FIP as tools to streamline open access freshwater data publication arguing this will improve the capacity to protect and manage freshwater biodiversity in the face of global change.

  5. Optimization of preparation of soybean protein isolate film by fuzzy synthetic discrimination%模糊综合评判用于大豆分离蛋白膜制备工艺的优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyze influentia factors of mechanical property of soybean protein isolate ( SPI ) film and select the optimal process parameters, single factor experiment and orthogonal experiment were conducted with mass concentration of SPI solution, dosage of glycerol(based on the mass of SPI), film forming temperature and liquid film pH as experimental factors. The main factor and process parameters affecting mechanical property were preliminarily determined by variance analysis and visual analysis, and the tensile strength ( TS) and elongation at break ( EAB) were comprehensively evaluated by fuzzy syn-thetic discrimination to optimize each influentia factor. The results showed that dosage of glycerol had the greatest effect on mechanical property of SPI film. When the weight vector of TS to EAB was 0. 5:0. 5, the optimal process parameters were obtained as follows:mass concentration of SPI solution 4%, dosage of glycerol 20%, film forming temperature 65℃ and liquid film pH 10. Under these conditions, TS and EAB of SPI film reached 5. 41 MPa and 186. 36%, respectively. The fuzzy synthetic discrimination could play a guiding role in the optimization of preparation of SPI film.%为分析大豆分离蛋白(SPI)膜机械性能的影响因素及最优参数的选择,以SPI溶液质量分数、甘油添加量(占SPI质量)、成膜温度和膜液pH为实验因素,进行了单因素实验和正交实验.采用方差分析和直观分析初步确定了影响膜机械性能的主要因素及工艺参数;采用模糊综合评判方法对抗拉强度(TS)和断裂伸长率(EAB)进行综合评判,进而优化各影响因素.结果表明:甘油添加量对膜的机械性能影响最大;在TS和EAB这两个评判指标的权重向量为0.5:0.5时,最优工艺参数为SPI溶液质量分数4%、甘油添加量20%、成膜温度65℃、膜液pH 10,此时大豆分离蛋白膜的TS和EAB可达5.41 MPa和186.36%.模糊综合评判在优化大豆分离蛋白膜制备工艺方面能起到一定的指导作用.

  6. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability.

  7. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    of magnitude and degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants, and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 14C years can occur within one river. The freshwater reservoir effect has also implications...... for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany. The surprisingly old ages of the earliest pottery most probably are caused by a freshwater reservoir effect. In a sediment core from the Limfjord, northern Denmark, the impact of the freshwater reservoir...... effect on radiocarbon dating in an estuarine environment is examined. Here, freshwater influence causes reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 14C years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. The examples in this study show clearly that the freshwater reservoir effect can seriously corrupt radiocarbon...

  8. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  9. Ecosystem Services : In Nordic Freshwater Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Kristin; Hasler, Berit; Zandersen, Marianne

    framework in freshwater management, particularly water management according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD). There are several examples of how ecosystem services have been used in WFD related studies in all the Nordic countries. Most of them involve listing, describing and categorizing freshwater...... ecosystem services, while there are few comprehensive Cost Benefit Analyses and analyses of disproportionate costs that apply this framework. More knowledge about ecosystem services and the value of ecosystem services for freshwater systems is needed....

  10. Davis Pond Freshwater Prediversion Biomonitoring Study: Freshwater Fisheries and Eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  11. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [The forensic chemical study of synthetic detergents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartushnyĭ, A F; Sergeeva, E E; Kvasov, E B

    1994-01-01

    Six color reactions were developed and thin-layer chromatography conditions defined for identification of components of some synthetic detergents in preparations and cadaveric material. Sensitivity of toxic components identification in biologic objects is 0.1 mg for alkylbenzolsulfonate and 0.25 mg of sodium silicate per 100 g of the object.

  13. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  14. Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokumsen, Alfred; Svendsen, Lars Moeslund

    Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark......Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark...

  15. Mesozooplankton affinities in a recovering freshwater estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambord, S.; Maris, T.; Colas, F.; van Engeland, T.; Sossou, A.-C.; Azémar, F.; Le Coz, M.; Cox, T.; Buisson, L.; Souissi, S.; Meire, P.; Tackx, M.

    2016-01-01

    Water quality of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands) has considerably improved in recent years, especially in the upstream, freshwater reaches. Within the zooplankton community, the copepod Eurytemora affinis, typically abundant in brackish water and quasi-absent from freshwater

  16. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to…

  18. Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokumsen, Alfred; Svendsen, Lars Moeslund

    Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark......Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark...

  19. Physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaehnig, F. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biologie, Tuebingen (Germany, F.R.)); Obladen, M. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Kinderklinik)

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant to treat the respiratory distress syndrome are discussed. Requirements for the lipid composition and preparation of the synthetic surfactant are detailed, leading to the conclusion that a suspension of large unilamellar vesicles consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and a small amount of unsaturated lipid is a promising choice.

  20. DNA meets synthetic polymers—highly versatile hybrid materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemdaroglu, Fikri E.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The combination of synthetic polymers and DNA has provided biologists, chemists and materials scientists with a fascinating new hybrid material. The challenges in preparing these molecular chimeras were overcome by different synthetic strategies that rely on coupling the nucleic acid moiety and the

  1. Designing synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology.

  2. Determination of Synthetic Food Colors, Caffeine, Sodium Benzoate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reductions in the number of permitted food colors but because of their low ... Germany). Deionised water was prepared by a .... Fig 2: Resolution of chromatograms of synthetic dyes. .... natural variations in colors; to enhance colors that occur ...

  3. Nano-biocomposites based on synthetic aliphatic polyesters and nanoclay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojijo, Vincent O

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the recent developments in the preparation, characterisation, properties, crystallisation behaviour, and melt rheology of clay-containing composites of biodegradable synthetic aliphatic polyesters such as poly...

  4. Panbiogeographical analysis of Costa Rican freshwater fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Herrera-Vásquez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Track analysis and Parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE were performed to analyze the distribution pattern of Costa Rican freshwater fishes. A basic matrix (presence/absence was prepared using the distribution of 77 freshwater fish. The data were analyzed with CLIQUE software in order to find generalized tracks (cliques. Data also were analyzed with the software NONA and Winclada version 1.00.08 in order to perform the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE. Fourteen equally probable cliques were found with 31 species in each and the intersection of the amount was selected as a generalized track dividing the country in two main zones: Atlantic slope from Matina to Lake Nicaragua and Pacific slope from the Coto River to the basin of the Tempisque River connected with some branches oriented to the central part of the country. PAE analysis found ten cladogram areas (72 steps, CI=0.45, RI=0.64, using the "strict consensus option" two grouping zones were identified: Atlantic slope and Pacific slope. Both PAE and Track Analysis show the division of the two slopes and the orientation of the generalized track suggests new biogeographical evidence on the influence of both old and new southern elements to explain the migrations of freshwater fish into Central America during two different geological events. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 165-170. Epub 2008 March 31.Con el objetivo de analizar el patrón de distribución de peces de agua dulce de Costa Rica se aplicó un análisis de trazos y de parsimonía de endemismos (PAE. Se construyó una matriz básica utilizando la distribución de 77 especies. Se utilizó el programa CLIQUE con la intención de encontrar los trazos generalizados y NONA y Winclada, versión 1.00.08, con el fin de llevar a cabo el PAE. Se encontró un total de 14 cliques igualmente probables con 31 especies. De esta cantidad se construyó un trazo generalizado que constituye la intersección del total, dividiendo el país en dos zonas: Atl

  5. Trivalent Gd-DOTA reagents for modification of proteins† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic details for known compounds; materials and methods for bioconjugation reactions; copies of spectra of new compounds and compounds prepared according to new procedures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ra20359g Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Martin J.; Williamson, Daniel J.; Burslem, George M.; Plante, Jeffrey P.; Manfield, Iain W.; Tiede, Christian; Ault, James R.; Stockley, Peter G.; Plein, Sven; Maqbool, Azhar; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Foster, Richard; Warriner, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel protein-targeted MRI contrast agents crucially depends on the ability to derivatise suitable targeting moieties with a high payload of relaxation enhancer (e.g., gadolinium(iii) complexes such as Gd-DOTA), without losing affinity for the target proteins. Here, we report robust synthetic procedures for the preparation of trivalent Gd-DOTA reagents with various chemical handles for site-specific modification of biomolecules. The reagents were shown to successfully label proteins through isothiocyanate ligation or through site-specific thiol–maleimide ligation and strain-promoted azide–alkyne cycloaddition. PMID:27019702

  6. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  7. Novel Synechococcus Genomes Reconstructed from Freshwater Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Cabello-Yeves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater picocyanobacteria including Synechococcus remain poorly studied at the genomic level, compared to their marine representatives. Here, using a metagenomic assembly approach we discovered two novel Synechococcus sp. genomes from two freshwater reservoirs Tous and Lake Lanier, both sharing 96% average nucleotide identity and displaying high abundance levels in these two lakes located at similar altitudes and temperate latitudes. These new genomes have the smallest estimated size (2.2 Mb and average intergenic spacer length (20 bp of any previously sequenced freshwater Synechococcus, which may contribute to their success in oligotrophic freshwater systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed that Synechococcus sp. Tous comprises small cells (0.987 ± 0.139 μm length, 0.723 ± 0.119 μm width that amount to 90% of the picocyanobacteria in Tous. They appear together in a phylogenomic tree with Synechococcus sp. RCC307 strain, the main representative of sub-cluster 5.3 that has itself one of the smallest marine Synechococcus genomes. We detected a type II phycobilisome (PBS gene cluster in both genomes, which suggests that they belong to a phycoerythrin-rich pink low-light ecotype. The decrease of acidic proteins and the higher content of basic transporters and membrane proteins in the novel Synechococcus genomes, compared to marine representatives, support their freshwater specialization. A sulfate Cys transporter which is absent in marine but has been identified in many freshwater cyanobacteria was also detected in Synechococcus sp. Tous. The RuBisCo subunits from this microbe are phylogenetically close to the freshwater amoeba Paulinella chromatophora symbiont, hinting to a freshwater origin of the carboxysome operon of this protist. The novel genomes enlarge the known diversity of freshwater Synechococcus and improve the overall knowledge of the relationships among members of this genus at large.

  8. Synthetic cathinone abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capriola M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Capriola Thomasville Medical Center, Thomasville, NC, USA Abstract: The abuse of synthetic cathinones, widely known as bath salts, has been increasing since the mid-2000s. These substances are derivatives of the naturally occurring compound cathinone, which is the primary psychoactive component of khat. The toxicity of synthetic cathinones includes significant sympathomimetic effects, as well as psychosis, agitation, aggression, and sometimes violent and bizarre behavior. Mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone are currently the predominantly abused synthetic cathinones. Keywords: designer drugs/chemistry, street drugs/pharmacology, substance-related disorders/epidemiology, alkaloids/poisoning

  9. Synthetic Base Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M.; Fotheringham, J. D.; Hoyes, T. J.; Mortier, R. M.; Orszulik, S. T.; Randles, S. J.; Stroud, P. M.

    The chemical nature and technology of the main synthetic lubricant base fluids is described, covering polyalphaolefins, alkylated aromatics, gas-to-liquid (GTL) base fluids, polybutenes, aliphatic diesters, polyolesters, polyalkylene glycols or PAGs and phosphate esters.Other synthetic lubricant base oils such as the silicones, borate esters, perfluoroethers and polyphenylene ethers are considered to have restricted applications due to either high cost or performance limitations and are not considered here.Each of the main synthetic base fluids is described for their chemical and physical properties, manufacture and production, their chemistry, key properties, applications and their implications when used in the environment.

  10. Contamination of the freshwater ecosystem by pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Oliver B.

    1966-01-01

    A large part of our disquieting present-day pesticide problem is intimately tied to the freshwater ecosystem. Economic poisons are used in so many types of terrain to control so many kinds of organisms that almost all lakes and streams are likely to be contaminated. In addition to accidental contamination many pesticides are deliberately applied directly to fresh waters for suppression of aquatic animals or plants. The problem is intensified because of the extreme susceptibility of freshwater organisms. The complexity of freshwater environments and their variety makes it difficult to comprehend the total effect of pesticides.

  11. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    case studies will show the degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 years can occur within one river. In the Limfjord, freshwater influence...... caused reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. Finally, I will discuss the implications of the freshwater reservoir effect for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany....

  12. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  13. Analysis of Synthetic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviews techniques for the characterization and analysis of synthetic polymers, copolymers, and blends. Includes techniques for structure determination, separation, and quantitation of additives and residual monomers; determination of molecular weight; and the study of thermal properties including degradation mechanisms. (MVL)

  14. Hybrid Block Copolymers Constituted by Peptides and Synthetic Polymers: An Overview of Synthetic Approaches, Supramolecular Behavior and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Puiggalí

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid block copolymers based on peptides and synthetic polymers, displaying different types of topologies, offer new possibilities to integrate the properties and functions of biomacromolecules and synthetic polymers in a single hybrid material. This review provides a current status report of the field concerning peptide-synthetic polymer hybrids. The first section is focused on the different synthetic approaches that have been used within the last three years for the preparation of peptide-polymer hybrids having different topologies. In the last two sections, the attractive properties, displayed in solution or in the solid state, together with the potential applications of this type of macromolecules or supramolecular systems are highlighted.

  15. 无纺布--纳米纤维素PU合成革的制备与研究%Preparation and characterization of PU synthetic leather with non-woven fabric/cellulose nano ifbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜明; 宋冰; 石勇; 马金霞; 周小凡

    2016-01-01

    with non-woven fabric as base material was researched the effect of amount of Naoh solution under the temperature of 80℃ on the fabric processing time, alcohol soluble polyurethane coating, nano cellulose ifber on the moisture permeability of fabric and the inlfuence of waterborne polyurethane iflm quantitatively, the amount of glycerol on physical and mechanical properties of synthetic leather. The research results indicate that the best performance of permeability of base cloth is treated by 8%Naoh under the temperature of 80℃ for 1h, the amount of nano cellulose ifber is 3%, alcohol soluble polyurethane coating weight 130g/m2; when waterborne polyurethane iflm coating weight is 100g/m2, the concentration of glycerol is 15% of the synthetic leather, the breathable performance gets best, with synthetic leather surface density, tensile strength, elongation at break and cracking strength close to natural leather. The morphology and surface pattern of the synthetic leather and the base cloth were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and the properties of synthetic leather including moisture permeability were tested.%以无纺布为基材,研究了NaOH溶液在80℃对基布的处理时间、醇性聚氨酯涂布量、纳米纤维素纤维的用量对基布透湿性的影响以及水性聚氨酯膜定量、甘油用量对合成革物理、机械性能的影响。结果表明NaOH溶液在80℃下处理基布1h、纳米纤维素纤维的用量为3%、醇性聚氨酯涂布量为130g/m2时基布的透湿性能最好;当水性聚氨酯膜涂布量为100g/m2、甘油用量为15%时合成革的透湿性能最佳,此时合成革的表观密度、抗张强度、断裂伸长率、崩裂强度较接近天然皮革。通过扫描电镜对基材和合成革表面皮纹的形貌进行表征并对合成革的透湿性能等性能进行检测。

  16. The vulnerability of Amazon freshwater ecosystems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castello, Leandro; McGrath, David G; Hess, Laura L; Coe, Michael T; Lefebvre, Paul A; Petry, Paulo; Macedo, Marcia N; Renó, Vivian F; Arantes, Caroline C

    2013-01-01

    ... at local and distant locations. Amazon freshwater ecosystems are suffering escalating impacts caused by expansions in deforestation, pollution, construction of dams and waterways, and overharvesting of animal and plant species...

  17. Exotic freshwater planarians currently known from Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, R.; Kawakatsu, M.; Yamamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    Biogeographical and taxonomic information on the four non-indigenous freshwater planarians of Japan is reviewed, viz. Dugesia austroasiatica Kawakatsu, 1985, Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850), G. dorotocephala (Woodworth, 1897), and Rhodax evelinae? Marcus, 1947. The occurrence of Girardia dorotocepha

  18. Chesapeake Bay Low Freshwater Inflow Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    quinquecirrha sea nettle Mnemiopsis leidyi comb jelly, ctenophore Streblospio benedicti polychaete worm Mulinia lateralis coot clam Mercenaria...Mnemiopous leidyi - comb jelly, ctenophore ment freshwater inflows during all Streblospio benedicti - polychaete worm seasons of the year thereby providing

  19. Characterization of a Freshwater Crab Sudanonautes aubryi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... J. Appl. Biosci. 2014. Characterization of fresh water crab ( Sudanonautes aubryi) of ... great diversity (Dobson, 2004), their role in the ecology of freshwaters is ... Apart from fish, other groups of animals subject to exploitation ...

  20. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  1. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  2. Moessbauer study of synthetic jarosites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, K., E-mail: kkriszti@bolyai.elte.hu [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Kuzmann, E. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center (Hungary); Homonnay, Z.; Vertes, A. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Gunneriusson, L. [Lulea University of Technology, Division of Chemistry (Sweden); Sandstroem, A. [Lulea University of Technology, Division of Process Metallurgy (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and PXRD were used to study artificially prepared jarosites with the compositions of KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6-x}F{sub x}x 0 - 1.6 PXRD measurements revealed single phase jarosite samples. All Moessbauer spectra taken at room temperature exhibit a quadrupole doublet corresponding to mineral jarosite. However, at low temperature where the mineral jarosite has a well resolved sextet, the synthetic jarosite even with x = 0 F{sup -} content shows a relaxation transition. The spectra indicate that with increasing F{sup -} concentration, the paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic transition temperature is decreasing. The results can be used in the analysis of artificial jarosites or those formed during biomineralization processes.

  3. The Synthetic Cannabinoids Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Laurent; Benyamina, Amine; Blecha, Lisa; Cottencin, Olivier; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    « Spice » is generally used to describe the diverse types of herbal blends that encompass synthetic cannabinoids on the market. The emergence of smokable herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids, which mimic the effects of cannabis, appears to become increasingly popular, in the new psychoactive substances landscape. In 2014, the existence of 134 different types of synthetic cannabinoids were reported by the European Union Early Warning System. These drugs are mainly sold online as an alternative to controlled and regulated psychoactive substances. They appear to have a life cycle of about 1-2 years before being replaced by a next wave of products. Legislation controlling these designer drugs has been introduced in many countries with the objective to limit the spread of existing drugs and control potential new analogs. The majority of the synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists at the CB1 receptor and do not contain tobacco or cannabis. They are becoming increasingly popular in adolescents, students and clubbers as an abused substance. Relatively high incidence of adverse effects associated with synthetic cannabinoids use has been documented in the literature. Numerous fatalities linked with their use and abuse have been reported. In this paper, we will review the available data regarding the use and effects of synthetic cannabinoids in humans in order to highlight their impact on public health. To reach this objective, a literature search was performed on two representative databases (Pubmed, Google Scholar), the Erowid Center website (a US non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals), and various governmental websites. The terms used for the database search were: "synthetic cannabinoids", "spice", "new psychoactive substances", and/or "substance use disorder", and/or "adverse effects", and/or "fatalities". The search was limited to years 2005 to 2016 due to emerging scientific literature at

  4. Development of a passive sampler based on a polymer inclusion membrane for total ammonia monitoring in freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M Inês G S; Silva, Adélia M L; Coleman, Rhys A; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Cattrall, Robert W; Kolev, Spas D

    2016-05-01

    A passive sampler for determining the time-weighted average total ammonia (i.e. molecular ammonia and the ammonium cation) concentration (C TWA) in freshwaters, which incorporated a polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) as a semi-permeable barrier separating the aqueous source solution from the receiving solution (i.e. 0.8 mol L(-1) HCl), was developed for the first time. The PIM was composed of dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNS) as a carrier, poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) as a base polymer and 1-tetradecanol as a modifier. Its optimal composition was found to be 35 wt% commercial DNNS, 55 wt% PVC and 10 wt% 1-tetradecanol. The effect of environmental variables such as the water matrix, pH and temperature were also studied using synthetic freshwaters. The passive sampler was calibrated under laboratory conditions using synthetic freshwaters and exhibited a linear response within the concentration range 0.59-2.8 mg L(-1) NH4(+) (0.46-2.1 mg N L(-1)) at 20 °C. The performance of the sampler was further investigated under field conditions over 7 days. A strong correlation between spot sampling and passive sampling was achieved, thus providing a proof-of-concept for the passive sampler for reliably measuring the C(TWA) of total ammonia in freshwaters, which can be used as an indicator in tracking sources of faecal contamination in stormwater drains.

  5. Davis Pond freshwater prediversion biomonitoring study: freshwater fisheries and eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  6. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  7. An Improved Synthetic Method of Saquinavir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An improved synthetic method of saquinavir, an HIV protease inhibitor, is described. In comparison with the methods in the reported works, the improved procedures had several advantages, such as less expensive agents, shorter reaction time, and a smaller amount of the solvent needed. To measure the optical purities of the products, the intermediates were determined by means of chiral HPLC. Some of the intermediates can also be used for the preparation of new protease inhibitors.

  8. Production Pathways and Separation Procedures for High-Diagnostic-Value Activation Species, Fission Products, and Actinides Required for Preparation of Realistic Synthetic Post-Detonation Nuclear Debris: Status Report and FY16 Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, S. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaughnessy, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The objective of this project is to provide a comprehensive study on the production routes and chemical separation requirements for activation products, fission products, and actinides required for the creation of realistic post-detonation surrogate debris. Isotopes that have been prioritized by debris diagnosticians will be examined for their ability to be produced at existing irradiation sources, production rates, and availability of target materials, and chemical separation procedures required to rapidly remove the products from the bulk target matrix for subsequent addition into synthetic debris samples. The characteristics and implications of the irradiation facilities on the isotopes of interest will be addressed in addition to a summary of the isotopes that are already regularly produced. This is a planning document only.

  9. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  10. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  11. Synthetic growth reference charts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanussen, Michael; Stec, Karol; Aßmann, Christian; Meigen, Christof; Van Buuren, Stef

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To reanalyze the between-population variance in height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), and to provide a globally applicable technique for generating synthetic growth reference charts. Methods: Using a baseline set of 196 female and 197 male growth studies published since 1831, common

  12. Synthetic studies towards bottromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ackermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Thio-Ugi reactions are described as an excellent synthetic tool for the synthesis of sterically highly hindered endothiopeptides. S-Methylation and subsequent amidine formation can be carried out in an inter- as well as in an intramolecular fashion. The intramolecular approach allows the synthesis of the bottromycin ring system in a straightforward manner.

  13. Synthetic Plant Defense Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eBektas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of the some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  14. Synthetic River Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D

  15. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and fish catch according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1997 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased for 836 ha or 8.40%. The total fish amount was bigger for 477 tons, or 10,52%. The feeding coefficient is 2.6 kg decreased 35% for in comparison to the bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used is bigger for 37.30%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 6.50% of the total fish pond surfaces, the young carp ponds 22.04/0, and the ponds with consumption fish 70.31%. The total amount in the carp ponds was 446 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 160.8 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 79.32%, followed by the trout with 11.50%, the herbivorous fish with 4.25%, while all the other fish species make up 4.93% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 69,23%, followed by the big head carp with 29.74% and the silver carp with 1.03%. Compared to the previous year the production of the carp, grass carp and tench is increased. Fish catch in open waters has decreased by 5.53% in comparison to the previous year. In the production and catch of the total freshwater fish, carp made up 75.34%, herbivorous fish made up 3.89%, trout 10.66%, sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2.70% and all other fish species 7.41%. As far as the distribution of production and catch of fish is concerned, 52,80% were sold on the market, 37.94% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms, mortality was 1.43%, and for personal use (sports fishing 7.83%. The number of fisheries workers has decreased for 8.17%, and the production per worker is bigger for 22.25%, compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 7.17% tons of fish.

  16. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1996.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and fish catch according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1996 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased by 1357 ha or 11.99%. The total fish amount has decreased by 1,921.00 tons or 29.76%. The feeding coefficient is 4 kg (33.33% bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used has decreased by 18.79%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 5.99% of the total fish pond surfaces, the young carp ponds 21.13%, and the ponds with consumption fish 71.53%. The total fish amount in the carp ponds was 376 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 146.6 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 82.21 %, followed by the trout with 8.57%, the herbivorous fish with 4.78%, while all the other fish species make up 4.44% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 64,28%, followed by the big head carp with 26.02% and the silver carp with 9.70%. Compared to the previous year the production of the trout and tench has somewhat increased, while the production of all the other species of fish has decreased. Fish catch in open waters has increased by 19.23% in comparison to the previous year. In the production and catch of the total freshwater fish, carp made up 77.46%, the herbivorous fish made up 4.32%, trout 4.32%, sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2.99% and all other fish species 7.36%. As far as the distribution of production and catch is concerned, 46.91% were sold on the market, 39.19% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms, mortalities were 6.23%, and for personal use (sports fishing 7.67% was used. The number of fisheries workers has decreased by 17.75%, and the production per worker has also decreased by 26.62%, compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 5.87 tons of fish.

  17. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-12-31

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 {mu}M. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 {mu}M h{sup -1} while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 {mu}M h{sup -1}, respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination

  18. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at a freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    The freshwater-seawater interface was studied in a ~9-m thick anaerobic aquifer located in marine sand and gravel with thin peat lenses. Very limited amounts of iron-oxides are present. Consequently, the dominating redox processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, and the groundwater...... is enriched in dissolved sulfide, methane and bicarbonate. Under normal conditions the seawater-freshwater interface is found at a depth of 4 m at the coastline and reaches the bottom of the aquifer 40 m inland. However, occasional flooding of the area occurs, introducing sulfate to the aquifer. Groundwater...... chemistry was studied in a 120 m transect perpendicular to the coast. Cores were taken for radiotracer rate measurements of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. In the saline part of the aquifer 35 m inland, sulfate reduction was the dominant process with rates of 0.1-10 mM/year. In the freshwater part 100...

  19. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at a freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    The freshwater-seawater interface was studied in a ~9-m thick anaerobic aquifer located in marine sand and gravel with thin peat lenses. Very limited amounts of iron-oxides are present. Consequently, the dominating redox processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, and the groundwater...... is enriched in dissolved sulfide, methane and bicarbonate. Under normal conditions the seawater-freshwater interface is found at a depth of 4 m at the coastline and reaches the bottom of the aquifer 40 m inland. However, occasional flooding of the area occurs, introducing sulfate to the aquifer. Groundwater...... chemistry was studied in a 120 m transect perpendicular to the coast. Cores were taken for radiotracer rate measurements of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. In the saline part of the aquifer 35 m inland, sulfate reduction was the dominant process with rates of 0.1-10 mM/year. In the freshwater part 100...

  20. Freshwater reservoir effect variability in Northern Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, B.; Heinemeier, J.

    2013-01-01

    The freshwater reservoir effect is a potential problem when radiocarbon dating fish bones, shells, human bones, or food crusts on pottery from sites near rivers or lakes. The reservoir age in hardwater rivers can be up to several thousand years and may be highly variable. Accurate 14C dating...... of freshwater-based samples requires knowing the order of magnitude of the reservoir effect and its degree of variability. Measurements on modern riverine materials may not give a single reservoir age correction that can be applied to archaeological samples, but they show the order of magnitude and variability...

  1. Freshwater reservoir effect variability in Northern Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente; Heinemeier, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The freshwater reservoir effect is a potential problem when radiocarbon dating fishbones, shells, human bones or food crusts on pottery from sites next to rivers or lakes. The reservoir age in rivers containing considerable amounts of dissolved 14C-free carbonates can be up to several thousand...... years and may be highly variable. For accurate radiocarbon dating of freshwater-based samples, the order of magnitude of the reservoir effect as well as the degree of variability has to be known. The initial problem in this case was the accurate dating of food crusts on pottery from the Mesolithic sites...

  2. Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa: Milestones to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... evolved into a widely accepted framework for identifying and ... a brief overview of historical freshwater conservation plans .... National strategic priority areas for conserving freshwater ecosystems and associated biodiversity ...

  3. Threatened and Endangered Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all US listed Threatened and Endangered freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region....

  4. A new synthetic protocol for coumarin amino acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyi Xu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydrochloride of the racemic amino acid (2-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylethylglycine, which can serve as a fluorescent probe in proteins, and two halogen derivatives of it, were synthesized by using a new synthetic protocol in five steps. It is less costly and relatively easy to prepare this kind of fluorescent amino acid with the new synthetic method. Furthermore, it can be applied to synthesize other derivatives of the coumarin amino acid with some specific properties.

  5. Production of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from freshwater catfish (Clarias batrachus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniman, Maizatul Sarah Md; Yusop, Salma Mohamad; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2014-09-01

    Fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) was prepared from freshwater catfish (Clarias batrachus) by using Alcalase® 2.4L and Papain. The effect of hydrolysis time (30, 60, 120, 180 min) with enzyme concentration of 1% (v/w substrate); pH = 8.0, 7.0 was studied to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH), peptide content, proximate composition and amino acid profile. Results showed that the highest DH of Alcalase and Papain FPH were 58.79% and 53.48% after 180 min at 55°C incubation respectively. The peptide content of both FPH increased as hydrolysis time increases. FPH showed higher crude protein content and lower fat, moisture and ash content compared to raw catfish. The major amino acids of both hydrolysates were Glu, Lys and Asp. Content of essential amino acids of Alcalase and Papain hydrolysates were 44.05% and 43.31% respectively.

  6. Prospects for monitoring freshwater ecosystems towards the 2010 targets

    OpenAIRE

    Revenga, C.; Campbell, I; Abell, R; VILLIERS, P.; Bryer, M

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have severely affected the condition of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Physical alteration, habitat loss, water withdrawal, pollution, overexploitation and the introduction of non-native species all contribute to the decline in freshwater species. Today, freshwater species are, in general, at higher risk of extinction than those in forests, grasslands and coastal ecosystems. For North America alone, the projected extinction rate for freshwater fauna is five times greater th...

  7. A synthetic zero air standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    A Synthetic Zero Air Standard R. E. Hill-Pearce, K. V. Resner, D. R. Worton, P. J. Brewer The National Physical Laboratory Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW UK We present work towards providing traceability for measurements of high impact greenhouse gases identified by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) as critical for global monitoring. Standards for these components are required with challengingly low uncertainties to improve the quality assurance and control processes used for the global networks to better assess climate trends. Currently the WMO compatibility goals require reference standards with uncertainties of < 100 nmolmol-1 for CO2 (northern hemisphere) and < 2 nmolmol-1 for CH4 and CO. High purity zero gas is required for both the balance gas in the preparation of reference standards and for baseline calibrations of instrumentation. Quantification of the amount fraction of the target components in the zero gas is a significant contributor to the uncertainty and is challenging due to limited availability of reference standard at the amount fraction of the measurand and limited analytical techniques with sufficient detection limits. A novel dilutor was used to blend NPL Primary Reference Gas Mixtures containing CO2, CH4 and CO at atmospheric amount fractions with a zero gas under test. Several mixtures were generated with nominal dilution ratios ranging from 2000:1 to 350:1. The baseline of two cavity ring down spectrometers was calibrated using the zero gas under test after purification by oxidative removal of CO and hydrocarbons to < 1 nmolmol-1 (SAES PS15-GC50) followed by the removal of CO2 and water vapour to < 100 pmolmol-1 (SAES MC190). Using the standard addition method.[1] we have quantified the amount fraction of CO, CO2, and CH4 in scrubbed whole air (Scott Marrin) and NPL synthetic zero air. This is the first synthetic zero air standard with a matrix of N2, O2 and Ar closely matching ambient composition with gravimetrically assigned

  8. These Synthetic Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIT GILLET

    2008-01-01

    @@ Already slated to be one of the most important cultural events in the buildup to this summer's Olympic games, Synthetic Times-Media Art China 2008 will feature the works of more than 30 artists from around the world. Upwards of 40 media art installations will be exhibited in the National Art Museum of China alone, along with performances, workshops, presentations, and discussion panels focusing on the art works and the growth of media art as a discipline.

  9. Field and model investigations of freshwater lenses in coastal aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    A major problem of sustaining freshwater supply from freshwater lens is the invasion of saline groundwater into a fresh groundwater body. In many coastal areas saltwater intrusion has led to well closure and reduced freshwater supply. Furthermore, in the future saltwater intrusion is expected to inc

  10. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements for Protecting and Restoring Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body...

  11. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The data on the production and catch of fish according to sorts, pond ackerage, fishing means as well as the distribution of production and catch in 1995 have been stated in the paper. Ackerages used for the fish production have been increased by 1710 acres or 6.51%; total fish prinos* is less for 1,252 tons or 17.05%. The highest production of fish was reched by the fish farm Donji Miholjac with 859 kg/ha. A nutritive coefficient is 3.0 kg and it is less by 3.22% compared with the previous year. The nutritive coefficient is less than 2.0 kg in three fish-farms but it is greater than 4.0 kg in five large fish farms. Mostly corn but also wheat dominate in fish nutrition. The fertilizers consumption has been reduced by 14.53%. Of total pond ackerage, growing fish farms occupy 1.25%, new fish farms occupy 17.90% and consumptive fish farms occupy 79.64%. Total fish production in carp ponds is 507 kg/ha and 136.1 ton/ha in trout ponds. With 84.33%, carp is the mostly produced fish sorts, herbivore fish follow it with 3.89% and the production of all other fish makes 11.78% of the total. With 83.97%, grass carp takes the first place in the structure of herbivore fish. It is followed by the big head carp with 9.28% and silver carp with 6.75%. The trout production has been slightly increased by 6. 3%. Pike has appeared again and all other fish sorts has been reduced. Fish catch in open water has been increased by 7.06% compared with the previous year. When we sum up total production and catch of fresh-water fish, we can conclude that carp contributes with 81.08%; herbivore fish with 3.67%; trouts with 5.53%; sheat-fish, pike-perch and pike with 2.74% and all other fish sorts with 6.98%. As to the distribution of production and catch, there has been 49.02% sold on markets, 38.02% has been spent on farm reproduction (set back in ponds, the percentage of mortalities is 7.90%. Sport fishers have spent 5.06% of fish. The number of employees has been reduced

  12. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and catch of fish according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the product and catch in 1994 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased by 274 ha or 2,51%. The total amount of fish has decreased by 1.263 tons or 14,78%. The highest production of fish was reached by the fish farm Donji Miholjac with 1.231 kg/ha. The feeding coefficient is 3,10 kg. Only on one fish farm was the feeding coefficient less than 2.0 kg (1,40 and on two large farms this coefficient was greater than 5,00 kg. The main fish food is still wheat followed by corn. The amount of fertilizer used was decreased by 14,40%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 0,92% of the surface area of the entire fish farm, the young carp ponds 21,77% and the culturing ponds for consumption fish 76,55%. The total amount of fish in the carp ponds was 660 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 123.4 tons/ha. The carp is the highest produced fish with 80, 35%, then the herbivorous fish with 5,65 and all other fish make up 14% of the total production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 54, 70%, followed by the big head carp with 25,54% and the silver carp with 19,76%. In comparison with the previous year the production of "all other fish- has significantly increased (287%, and sheat fish 18,90%, while the production of trench has decreased (71%. Fish catch in open waters has increased by 20,57% in comparison to the previous year. Carp made up 78,07% of the total production and catch of freshwater fish, the herbivorous fish made up 5,40%, trout 4,38%, the sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2,86% and all other fish species 9,28%. As far as the distribution of production and catch, 51,60% were sold on the market, 37,54% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms , mortalities were 6,35% and for personal use (sports fishing 4,50% was used. The number

  13. Synthetic gases production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaud, J.P.

    1996-06-01

    The natural gas or naphtha are the main constituents used for the production of synthetic gases. Several production ways of synthetic gases are industrially used as for example the natural gas or naphtha catalytic reforming, the selective oxidation of natural gas or heavy fuels and the coal oxy-vapo-gasification. The aim of this work is to study the different steps of production and treatment of the synthetic gases by the way of catalytic reforming. The first step is the desulfurization of the hydrocarbons feedstocks. The process used in industry is described. Then is realized the catalytic hydrocarbons reforming process. After having recalled some historical data on the catalytic reforming, the author gives the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. The possible reforming catalysts, industrial equipments and furnaces designs are then exposed. The carbon dioxide is a compound easily obtained during the reforming reactions. It is a wasteful and harmful component which has to be extracted of the gaseous stream. The last step is then the gases de-carbonation. Two examples of natural gas or naphtha reforming reactions are at last given: the carbon monoxide conversion by steam and the carbon oxides reactions with hydrogen (methanization). (O.M.). 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Synthetic biology in plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Lars B; Bock, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) harbor a small gene-dense genome that is amenable to genetic manipulation by transformation. During 1 billion years of evolution from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont to present-day chloroplasts, the plastid genome has undergone a dramatic size reduction, mainly as a result of gene losses and the large-scale transfer of genes to the nuclear genome. Thus the plastid genome can be regarded as a naturally evolved miniature genome, the gradual size reduction and compaction of which has provided a blueprint for the design of minimum genomes. Furthermore, because of the largely prokaryotic genome structure and gene expression machinery, the high transgene expression levels attainable in transgenic chloroplasts and the very low production costs in plant systems, the chloroplast lends itself to synthetic biology applications that are directed towards the efficient synthesis of green chemicals, biopharmaceuticals and other metabolites of commercial interest. This review describes recent progress with the engineering of plastid genomes with large constructs of foreign or synthetic DNA, and highlights the potential of the chloroplast as a model system in bottom-up and top-down synthetic biology approaches.

  15. Methane emission from tidal freshwater marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Nat, F.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    In two tidal freshwater marshes, methane emission, production and accumulation in the pore-water have been studied. The two sites differ in their dominant vegetation, i.e., reed and bulrush, and in their heights above sea level. The reed site was elevated in relation to the bulrush site and had

  16. Methane emission from tidal freshwater marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Nat, F.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    In two tidal freshwater marshes, methane emission, production and accumulation in the pore-water have been studied. The two sites differ in their dominant vegetation, i.e., reed and bulrush, and in their heights above sea level. The reed site was elevated in relation to the bulrush site and had high

  17. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  18. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Persistent organochlorine pesticide residues in freshwater systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    determined in water and sediment samples of freshwater systems in the Eastern Cape ... its effect on wildlife (USEPA, 1975) triggered its determination in ... petroleum, acetone and distilled water were of analytical grade. ..... (European Community, 1980). .... Water Quality guidelines to protect aquatic ecosystems are aldrin.

  20. New freshwater triclads from Tasmania (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ball, Ian R.; Vinh-Hao, Tran Thi

    1979-01-01

    Three new freshwater triclads are described from Tasmanian lakes. Two of these represent the first records of the genus Spathula in Tasmania and the third belongs to the endemic genus Romankenkius. The taxonomic affinities of the species are discussed and keys to all the Tasmanian genera and species

  1. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to freshwater organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    with freshwater filter feeder Daphnia magna, sediment feeder Lumbriculus variegatus and green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The results made it possible to identify major scientific and methodological challenges in the testing of nanoparticles compared to ‘conventional’ chemicals. It has been highlighted...

  3. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  4. Mathematical Explorations: Freshwater Scarcity: A Proportional Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Middle school students' mathematical understanding benefits from connecting mathematics to other content areas in the curriculum. This month's activity explores the issue of the scarcity of freshwater, a natural resource (activity sheets are included). This activity concentrates on the critical areas mentioned in the Common Core State…

  5. Biological effects and toxicity of diluted bitumen and its constituents in freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, William A; Hontela, Alice; Rood, Stewart B; Pyle, Greg G

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 50 billion cubic meters of bitumen resides within the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada. To facilitate the transport of bitumen from where it is extracted to where it is processed, the bitumen is diluted with natural gas condensate ('dilbit'), synthetic crude from hydrocracking bitumen ('synbit'), or a mixture of both ('dilsynbit'). A primary consideration for the effects of diluted bitumen products on freshwater organisms and ecosystems is whether it will float on the water surface or sink and interact with the stream or lake sediments. Evidence from a spill near Kalamazoo, MI, in 2010 and laboratory testing demonstrate that the nature of the spill and weathering of the dilbit, synbit or dilsynbit prior to and during contact with water will dictate whether the product floats or sinks. Subsequent toxicological data on the effects of dilbit and other diluted bitumen products on freshwater organisms and ecosystems are scarce. However, the current literature indicates that dilbit or bitumen can have significant effects on a wide variety of toxicological endpoints. This review synthesizes the currently available literature concerning the fate and effects of dilbit and synbit spilled into freshwater, and the effects of bitumen and bitumen products on aquatic organisms and ecosystems. Dilbit is likely to provide ecological impacts that are similar to and extend from those that follow from exposure to lighter crude oil, but the prospect of bitumen settling after binding to suspended sediments elevates the risk for benthic impacts in streams and lakes.

  6. Synthetic Polypeptide Mimics of Marine Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu; Deming

    1998-07-28

    Water soluble copolypeptides containing l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and l-lysine were prepared by ring-opening polymerization of alpha-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers. We have prepared a range of different copolymers to probe the effects of functional group composition on adhesive and cross-linking behavior. Aqueous solutions of these copolymers, when mixed with a suitable oxidizing agent (e.g., O2, mushroom tyrosinase, Fe3+, H2O2, or IO4-), formed cross-linked networks that were found to form moisture-resistant adhesive bonds to a variety of substrates (e.g., aluminum, steel, glass, and plastics). It was found that successful adhesive formation was dependent on oxidation conditions, with chemical oxidants giving the best results. Optimized systems were found to form adhesive bonds that rival in strength those formed by natural marine adhesive proteins. Our synthetic systems are readily prepared in large quantities and require no enzymes or other biological components.

  7. Opportunities in plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Charis; Martin, Lisa; Bastow, Ruth

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging field uniting scientists from all disciplines with the aim of designing or re-designing biological processes. Initially, synthetic biology breakthroughs came from microbiology, chemistry, physics, computer science, materials science, mathematics, and engineering disciplines. A transition to multicellular systems is the next logical step for synthetic biologists and plants will provide an ideal platform for this new phase of research. This meeting report highlights some of the exciting plant synthetic biology projects, and tools and resources, presented and discussed at the 2013 GARNet workshop on plant synthetic biology.

  8. Synthetic cannabis and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinwala, Felecia N; Gupta, Mayank

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, synthetic cannabis use has been increasing in appeal among adolescents, and its use is now at a 30 year peak among high school seniors. The constituents of synthetic cannabis are difficult to monitor, given the drug's easy accessibility. Currently, 40 U.S. states have banned the distribution and use of some known synthetic cannabinoids, and have included these drugs in the Schedule I category. The depressive respiratory effect in humans caused by synthetic cannabis inhalation has not been thoroughly investigated in the medical literature. We are the first to report, to our knowledge, two cases of self-reported synthetic cannabis use leading to respiratory depression and necessary intubation.

  9. Freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Mernild

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial inputs of freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland, were estimated, indicating ice discharge to be the dominant source of freshwater. A freshwater flux of 40.4 ± 4.9×109 m3 y−1 was found (1999–2008, with an 85% contribution originated from ice discharge (65% alone from Helheim Glacier, 11% from terrestrial surface runoff (from melt water and rain, 3% from precipitation at the fjord surface area, and 1% from subglacial geothermal and frictional melting due to basal ice motion. The results demonstrate the dominance of ice discharge as a primary mechanism for delivering freshwater to Sermilik Fjord. Time series of ice discharge for Helheim Glacier, Midgård Glacier, and Fenris Glacier were calculated from satellite-derived average surface velocity, glacier width, and estimated ice thickness, and fluctuations in terrestrial surface freshwater runoff were simulated based on observed meteorological data. These simulations were compared and bias corrected against independent glacier catchment runoff observations. Modeled runoff to Sermilik Fjord was variable, ranging from 2.9 ± 0.4×109 m3 y−1 in 1999 to 5.9 ± 0.9×109 m3 y−1 in 2005. The sub-catchment runoff of the Helheim Glacier region accounted for 25% of the total runoff to Sermilik Fjord. The runoff distribution from the different sub-catchments suggested a strong influence from the spatial variation in glacier coverage, indicating high runoff volumes, where glacier cover was present at low elevations.

  10. Molluscicidal activity of chlorophyll extraction against the freshwater snails

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mona Said Mahmoud; Peter Richter; Hatem Abdel Mawgoud Shalaby; Omnia Mohamed Kandil; Donat-Peter Hder

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the molluscicidal activity of chlorophyll extract as a photodynamic substance against the snails Lymnaea stagnalis, Biomphalaria spp. and Physa marmorata.Methods:Chlorophyllin was extracted from deep-frozen spinach. Snails were incubated in chlorophyllin containing water with 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 15.0 µg/mL. All samples were kept in darkness overnight for incubation. After incubation, three samples were irradiated with simulated solar radiation for 3 h. After irradiation, the vitality of the organisms was determined. Results: The photodynamically active chlorophyllin, at low concentrations, was able to kill snails within a few hours under exposure of solar radiation. Besides, it had a killing effect by about 70%and 100% on the snails’ eggs and the newly hatched snails, respectively, after 3 h exposure to solar radiation.Conclusion:The derivates of chlorophyll was a very interesting substance for photodynamic freshwater snail control. Hence, it might be a promising and cheap new strategy which probably had the potential to replace the synthetic molluscicides for snail control.

  11. Molluscicidal activity of chlorophyll extraction against the freshwater snails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Said Mahmoud

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the molluscicidal activity of chlorophyll extract as a photodynamic substance against the snails Lymnaea stagnalis, Biomphalaria spp. and Physa marmorata. Methods: Chlorophyllin was extracted from deep-frozen spinach. Snails were incubated in chlorophyllin containing water with 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 15.0 µg/mL. All samples were kept in darkness overnight for incubation. After incubation, three samples were irradiated with simulated solar radiation for 3 h. After irradiation, the vitality of the organisms was determined. Results: The photodynamically active chlorophyllin, at low concentrations, was able to kill snails within a few hours under exposure of solar radiation. Besides, it had a killing effect by about 70% and 100% on the snails’ eggs and the newly hatched snails, respectively, after 3 h exposure to solar radiation. Conclusion: The derivates of chlorophyll was a very interesting substance for photodynamic freshwater snail control. Hence, it might be a promising and cheap new strategy which probably had the potential to replace the synthetic molluscicides for snail control.

  12. [Herbal medicines alternative to synthetical medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A M; Schilcher, H; Loew, D

    2013-12-16

    Herbal pharmaceuticals in medical practice are similarly used as chemically well defined drugs. Like other synthetical drugs, they are subject to pharmaceutical legislature (AMG) and EU directives. It is to differentiate between phytopharmaceuticals with effectiveness of proven indications and traditional registered herbal medicine. Through the Health Reform Act January 2004 and the policy of the Common Federal Committee (G-BA)on the contractual medical care from March 2009--with four exceptions--Non-prescription Phytopharmaka of the legal Health insurance is no longer (SHI) refundable and must be paid by the patients. The result is that more and more well-established preparations disappear from the market. This article gives an overview of practical relevant indications for herbal medicines, which according to its licensing status, the scientific assessment by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) and evidence-based Medicine (EBM)/ meta-analyzes as an alternative to synthetics can be used.

  13. Biopolymers Versus Synthetic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Adriana Cziple

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper present an overview of important synthetic and natural polymers with emphasis on polymer structure, the chemistry of polymer formation. an introduction to polymer characterization. The biodegradation process can take place aerobically and anaerobically with or without the presence of light. These factors allow for biodegradation even in landfill conditions which are normally inconducive to any degradation. The sheeting used to make these packages differs significantly from other “degradable plastics” in the market as it does not attempt to replace the current popular materials but instead enhances them by rendering them biodegradable.

  14. CASH vs. SYNTHETIC CDOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Eduard Dinca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, in the recent post-crisis aftermath, global asset managers are constantly searching new ways to optimize their investment portfolios while financial and banking institutions around the world are exploring new alternatives to better secure their financing and refinancing demands altogether with the enhancement of their risk management capabilities. We will exhibit herewith a comparison between the true-sale and synthetic CDO securitizations as financial markets-based funding, investment and risks mitigation techniques, highlighting certain key structuring and implementation specifics on each of them.

  15. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERY IN 2001 and 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jahutka

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available For each segment of freshwater fisheries — freshwater aquaculture, commercial and sport and recreational fisheries — there is a legal obligation for data submission to the Ministry of agriculture and forestry, Directorate of fisheries. Within the segments of commercial and sport and recreational fisheries the data submission obligation refers to the period beginning with the year 2003, while in the segment of aquaculture that obligation includes also the year 2002. Data collected for freshwater aquaculture contain the information on production of freshwater fish, total production areas, food, fertilizers and subsidies for freshwater fish farming. Data collected for commercial and sport and recreational fisheries contain the information on catch quantities and number of commercial and sport and recreational fishermen. Freshwater fish production in the year 2001 was 5,549. 50 tons, while the total fresh water fish production in the year 2002 decreased for 1.00% compared to the previous year, amounting to 5,501.07 tons. Although total fresh water fish production constantly decreases comparing to previous years, trout production has increased and the maximum production was noted in the year 2002. Total area of the freshwater fish farms in the year 2001 increased compared to the year 2000 for 2.14% amounting to 11,880.41 ha. Actual production area slightly increased in comparison to the previous year as well and amounted to 9,214.11 ha. In the year 2002 total area of freshwater fish farms was 11,491.29 ha, and 72.13% of that figure was the actual production area, that is 8,288.27 ha. Production per unit area in the year 2001 was 485.31 kg/ha for warm–water species and 280.44 t/ha for cold–water species. In the year 2002 production per unit area for warm–water species was 462.95 kg/ha, and for cold–water species 315.26 t/ha. During the year 2001, in total, 10,575.82 t of food was spent and 1,891 tons of fertilizers and lime, while in the

  16. Formation and dissolution kinetics of Al(OH)3 (s) in synthetic freshwater solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, E.; Salbu, B.; PolèO, A. B. S.; Muniz, I. P.

    1991-03-01

    The precipitation of Al in aqueous solutions can be described as a two-step process. When acidic inorganic Al solutions (pH 4.5) were titrated with NaOH to pH levels between 5.5 and 6.0, an amorphous Al(OH)3 (s) phase was formed instantaneously. During the first 5 min, the apparent half time for the reduction in dissolved Al species (t1/2) was 0.162 ± 0.07 hours (n = 4). The decrease of dissolved Al species continued during the following 24 hours, but at a far slower rate (t1/2 = 55.6 ± 25 hours (n = 4)). The highest precipitation rates were found in the solution of highest pH, and at approximately identical pH, the highest rate was found in the solution of highest temperature. The dissolution of amorphous Al(OH)3 (s) can also be described as a two-step process. When the amorphous Al solutions (pH between 5.5 and 6.0) were acidified to pH about 4.5 (HCl), the initial dissolution was relatively fast, but not as instantaneous as in the first step of precipitation. The apparent t1/2 after 5 min was estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.12 hours (n = 4). During the first 2.67 hours (160 min) the dissolution step could be described by the equation C(t) = C0e-0.45t, i.e., t1/2 = 1.53 ± 0.60 hours (n = 20) according to which the solid Al phase should dissolve totally (97%) during 7.65 hours. However, after 24 hours of storage 40 to 50% of the original Al(OH)3 (s) remained in the solid phase. This is explained by the presence of a far lower dissolution rate in a second step, i.e., the remaining Al(OH)3 (s) was less soluble. The average dissolution rate for the rest of the 24-hour period (21.33 hours) could be described by the exponential function C(t) = C0e-0.0095t, i.e., t1/2 = 73.2 ± 23.4 hours (n = 4). This implies that a total dissolution of Al (97%) will occur after 15.3 ± 4.9 days. The implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the current geochemical models pretending to simulate and predict aluminum chemistry in soils and surface runoff.

  17. Construction of synthetic dermis and skin based on a self-assembled peptide hydrogel scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Bunsho; Kadomatsu, Koichi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki

    2009-09-01

    Using biocompatible peptide hydrogel as a scaffold, we prepared three-dimensional synthetic skin that does not contain animal-derived materials or pathogens. The present study investigated preparation methods, proliferation, and functional expression of fibroblasts in the synthetic dermis and differentiation of keratinocytes in the epidermis. Synthetic dermis was prepared by mixing fibroblasts with peptide hydrogel, and synthetic skin was prepared by forming an epidermal layer using keratinocytes on the synthetic dermis. A fibroblast-rich foamy layer consisting of homogeneous peptide hydrogel subsequently formed in the synthetic dermis, with fibroblasts aggregating in clusters within the septum. The epidermis consisted of three to five keratinocyte layers. Immunohistochemical staining showed human type I collagen, indicating functional expression around fibroblasts in the synthetic dermis, keratinocyte differentiation in the epidermis, and expression of basement membrane proteins. The number of fibroblasts tended to increase until the second week and was maintained until the fourth week, but rapidly decreased in the fifth week. In the synthetic dermis medium, the human type I collagen concentration increased after the second week to the fifth week. These findings suggest that peptide hydrogel acts as a synthetic skin scaffold that offers a platform for the proliferation and functional expression of fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

  18. Mesozooplankton affinities in a recovering freshwater estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambord, Sophie; Maris, Tom; Colas, Fanny; Van Engeland, Tom; Sossou, Akoko-C.; Azémar, Frédéric; Le Coz, Maïwen; Cox, Tom; Buisson, Laetitia; Souissi, Sami; Meire, Patrick; Tackx, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Water quality of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands) has considerably improved in recent years, especially in the upstream, freshwater reaches. Within the zooplankton community, the copepod Eurytemora affinis, typically abundant in brackish water and quasi-absent from freshwater before 2007, has since substantially developed in the latter, where it now represents 90% of the crustacean mesozooplankton community. Simultaneously, cyclopoid copepod abundance has greatly decreased, while cladoceran abundance did not change. The study aim was: 1) to verify if the zooplankton community described for the period 2007-2009 by Mialet et al. (2011) has stabilized until present, and 2) to look for the environmental conditions favouring E. affinis development and causing changes in the upstream freshwater zooplankton community. The 2002-2012 temporal evolution of the zooplankton distribution at three stations in the upstream freshwater Scheldt estuary was analyzed. Water quality remained better after 2007 than before, and some factors revealed continuous improvement in annual mean concentrations (e.g. increase in O2, decrease in BOD5 and NH4sbnd N concentration). The increase in oxygen and the decrease in NH4sbnd N concentration, together with low discharge during summer were the main environmental factors explaining the development and timing of E. affinis in the upstream freshwater reach. In this reach, E. affinis maximal abundance is shifted to higher temperatures (summer) compared to its typical maximum spring abundance peak in the brackish zone of the Scheldt estuary and in most temperate estuaries. The changes in zooplankton community followed a temporal and spatial gradient induced by the spatio-temporal evolution of water quality improvement. The most downstream station (3) allowed E. affinis development (oxygen concentration > 4 mg L-1; NH4sbnd N concentration high predation pressure, NH3sbnd N toxicity, sensitivity to oxygen, etc.), there is no clear cause

  19. Synthetic collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Conde-Pueyo, Núria; Carbonell-Ballestero, Max; Montañez, Raúl

    2016-10-01

    Intelligent systems have emerged in our biosphere in different contexts and achieving different levels of complexity. The requirement of communication in a social context has been in all cases a determinant. The human brain, probably co-evolving with language, is an exceedingly successful example. Similarly, social insects complex collective decisions emerge from information exchanges between many agents. The difference is that such processing is obtained out of a limited individual cognitive power. Computational models and embodied versions using non-living systems, particularly involving robot swarms, have been used to explore the potentiality of collective intelligence. Here we suggest a novel approach to the problem grounded in the genetic engineering of unicellular systems, which can be modified in order to interact, store memories or adapt to external stimuli in collective ways. What we label as Synthetic Swarm Intelligence defines a parallel approach to the evolution of computation and swarm intelligence and allows to explore potential embodied scenarios for decision making at the microscale. Here, we consider several relevant examples of collective intelligence and their synthetic organism counterparts.

  20. Catalytic Behaviour of CuO-CeO2 Systems Prepared by Different Synthetic Methodologies in the CO-PROX Reaction under CO2-H2O Feed Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Cecilia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available CuO-CeO2 catalysts, with 6 wt % of Cu, have been synthesised by different preparation methods (calcination of nitrate precursors, thermal urea-nitrate combustion, freeze-drying method, using polymethyl metacrylate PMMA microspheres as template and precipitation using NaOH or the decomposition of urea as precipitating agents. The obtained materials have been characterised by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption at −196 °C, H2 thermoprogrammed reduction (H2-TPR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The catalysts displayed high dispersion of copper oxide, obtaining CO conversion values of 90–100% at 115 °C in the CO preferential oxidation in excess of hydrogen (CO-PROX and maintaining this activity even after 48 h of time on stream. The incorporation of CO2 and H2O in the feed stream (simulating a PROX unit caused a decrease in the CO conversion, except for the catalyst synthesised using PMMA microspheres as a template which maintained a CO conversion of 95% at 115 °C. This catalyst exhibits an excellent catalytic performance, also under real operating conditions, thanks to many and concomitant factors, such as the very small CeO2 particle size (5.6 nm, the surface being rich in copper (atomic ratio Cu/Ce = 0.35 that is easily reducible, and the peculiar morphology and porosity of the material.

  1. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Debra J. H. Mathews

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with...

  2. ACL Revision in Synthetic ACL graft failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Zordán, J.; Escobar, G.; Collazo, C.; Palanconi, M.; Autorino, C.; Salinas, E. Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic grafts as an alternative to biological grafts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament dates from 1980. The interest is awakened due to the potential advantages of: The absence of morbidity associated with donor site, and early return to sport. However, this surgical technique has had multiple complications associated with graft: mechanical failures (synthetic graft failure, loss of fixation), synovial foreign body reaction, recurrent stroke, recurrent instability and ultimately, early osteoarthritis. Objectives: We describe the synthetic graft failure LCA, intraoperative findings and details of surgical technique. Methods: Patient 35 years old, with a history of ACL reconstruction four years of evolution in another health center, consultation with the Service knee arthroscopy for acute knee pain left knee during secondary sporting event to a rotation mechanism with fixed foot. On physical examination, presents and positive Lachman maneuver Pivot. Radiografia in a widening of the tibial tunnel is observed. NMR shows a discontinuity of fibers of synthetic graft. Results: First time arthroscopic revision where synthetic plastic LCA identifies with Disruption fiber pattern. Intraoperatively, hypertrophic chronic synovitis localized predominantly in intercóndilo is observed. debridement thereof is performed, and proceeds to the extraction of the synthetic ligament. Then he was made prior cruentado and revival of the edges of the tunnel, filling them with non-irradiated structural bone allograft. At four months as planned and after confirmation by studies incorporating bone graft was performed the second time with the new plastic ACL. It was planned like a primary graft surgery with autologous hamstring prepared in fourfold form, and fixation with modified transtibial technique Biotransfix system proximal and distal screw Biocomposite (arthrex®). A quadruple graft 9 mm was obtained, making good positioning of tunnels and stable

  3. Toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates-Spiking methodology, species sensitivity, and nickel bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kemble, Nile E.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Rudel, David

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes data from studies of the toxicity and bioavailability of nickel in nickel-spiked freshwater sediments. The goal of these studies was to generate toxicity and chemistry data to support development of broadly applicable sediment quality guidelines for nickel. The studies were conducted as three tasks, which are presented here as three chapters: Task 1, Development of methods for preparation and toxicity testing of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; Task 2, Sensitivity of benthic invertebrates to toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; and Task 3, Effect of sediment characteristics on nickel bioavailability. Appendices with additional methodological details and raw chemistry and toxicity data for the three tasks are available online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5225/downloads/.

  4. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eIijima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria.

  5. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW) medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW) were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria. PMID:25954257

  6. Freshwater fishes of Tsitsikamma National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Fish assemblages in six river systems were sampled in 2001, with a total of 323 fish from eight species recorded. Indigenous fish collected included four freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Pseudobarbus tenuis, Sandelia capensis, Anguilla mossambica, three estuarine species (Monodactylus falciformis, Caffrogobius gilchristi, Myxus capensis, and one alien (Micropterus salmoides. One additional indigenous species (Galaxias zebratus and two aliens (Salmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss could potentially occur within the park. The topography and locality of the park presents a unique opportunity to meaningfully conserve the endangered P. tenuis as well as other fish characteristic of the eastern reaches of the Cape Floristic Region. Management action is required to minimise opportunities for further establishment and spread of alien fish species and to conserve indigenous fish assemblages within the park.

  7. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay.

  8. Freshwater fish of the Wilderness National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fish in the Wilderness National Park. Fish assemblages in the Touw and Duiwe rivers were sampled in 1997 and 1998, with a total of 327 fish from nine species recorded. Indigenous species included two freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Sandelia capensis, two catadromous species (Anguilla mossambicus, Myxus capensis, and two estuarine species (Monodactylusfalciformis, Caffrogobius multifasciatus. Three of the nine recorded species were alien (Micropterus dolomieu, Micropterus salmoides, Gambusia affinis, with the Micropterus spp., in particular, likely to have a substantial negative influence on indigenous species. A further one indigenous species, two translocated indigenous species, and five estuarine species could potentially be recorded in these rivers. River catchment management actions to restore perennial flow to the Duiwe River, to prevent the attenuation of floods, and to prevent further establishment and spread of alien and translocated biota are required to conserve indigenous fish assemblages.

  9. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  10. Assessing the freshwater distribution of yellow eel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasne É.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the global context of the decline in wild species, modeling the distribution of populations is a crucial aspect of ecological management. This can be a major challenge, especially for species, such as the European eel, that have complex life cycles, exhibit cryptic behavior, or migrate over long distances. A review of the literature suggests that eel size data could be used to assess and analyze freshwater distribution of eel. We argue that analyses based on small yellow eels (≤ 300 mm along the longitudinal course of rivers could provide a valuable tool for population monitoring. We propose a standardized catchment recruitment index and a colonization index based on the probability of occurrence (presence/absence data using logistic models for different size classes. The model developed here provides a convenient guide for assessing yellow eel stages in freshwater areas, and should have concrete applications for management of the species.

  11. Freshwater fishes of Bontebok National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Fish assemblages were sampled at six sites in the Breede River in the Bontebok National Park during 1999 and 2000. A total of 380 fish from 12 species was recorded. Indigenous fish collected included one freshwater species (Barbus andrewi, two catodromous species (Anguilla mossambica, Myxus capensis. and three estuarine species (Gilchris- tella aestuaria, Monodactylusfalciformis, Mugil cephalus. Four of the species recorded were aliens (Tinea tinea, Lepomis macrochirus, Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus dolomieu and two species translocated from other South African rivers (Tilapia sparrmanii, Clarias gariepinus. A further two indigenous species (Sandelia capensis, Pseudobarbus biirchelli could potentially occur within the park, though the high abundance of alien predators means that there is little chance for recolonisation from tributaries higher in the Breede River system. There is little opportunity to meaningfully conserve most indigenous freshwater fish in Bontebok National Park.

  12. Superhydrophobic resistance to dynamic freshwater biofouling inception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, K Ghokulla; Malm, Peter; Loth, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophobic nanotextured surfaces have gained increased usage in various applications due to their non-wetting and self-cleaning abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate nanotextured surfaces with respect to their resistance to the inception of freshwater biofouling at transitional flow conditions. Several coatings were tested including industry standard polyurethane (PUR), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), capstone mixed polyurethane (PUR + CAP) and nanocomposite infused polyurethane (PUR + NC). Each surface was exposed to freshwater conditions in a lake at 4 m s(-1) for a duration of 45 min. The polyurethane exhibited the greatest fouling elements, in terms of both height and number of elements, with the superhydrophobic nanocomposite based polyurethane (PUR + NC) showing very little to no fouling. A correlation between the surface characteristics and the degree of fouling inception was observed.

  13. Monitoring endangered freshwater biodiversity using environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Kielgast, Jos; Iversen, Lars Lønsmann

    2012-01-01

    , ponds and streams. We successfully validate our findings in a controlled mesocosm experiment and show that DNA becomes undetectable within 2 weeks after removal of animals, indicating that DNA traces are near contemporary with presence of the species. We further demonstrate that entire faunas......Freshwater ecosystems are among the most endangered habitats on Earth, with thousands of animal species known to be threatened or already extinct. Reliable monitoring of threatened organisms is crucial for data-driven conservation actions but remains a challenge owing to nonstandardized methods...... that depend on practical and taxonomic expertise, which is rapidly declining. Here, we show that a diversity of rare and threatened freshwater animals-representing amphibians, fish, mammals, insects and crustaceans-can be detected and quantified based on DNA obtained directly from small water samples of lakes...

  14. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB...... harmonic techniques have been made, but none of these methods have so far been applicable for in-vivo imaging. The basis of this project is a synthetic aperture technique known as synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB). The technique utilizes a two step beamforming approach to drastically reduce...

  15. Synthetic biology and genetic causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftedal, Gry; Parkkinen, Veli-Pekka

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic biology research is often described in terms of programming cells through the introduction of synthetic genes. Genetic material is seemingly attributed with a high level of causal responsibility. We discuss genetic causation in synthetic biology and distinguish three gene concepts differing in their assumptions of genetic control. We argue that synthetic biology generally employs a difference-making approach to establishing genetic causes, and that this approach does not commit to a specific notion of genetic program or genetic control. Still, we suggest that a strong program concept of genetic material can be used as a successful heuristic in certain areas of synthetic biology. Its application requires control of causal context, and may stand in need of a modular decomposition of the target system. We relate different modularity concepts to the discussion of genetic causation and point to possible advantages of and important limitations to seeking modularity in synthetic biology systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arctic Freshwater Ice and Its Climatic Role

    OpenAIRE

    Prowse, Terry; Alfredsen, Knut; Beltaos, Spyros; Bonsal, Barrie; Duguay, Claude; Korhola, Atte; McNamara, Jim; Vincent, Warwick F.; Vuglinsky, Valery; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater ice dominates the Arctic terrestrial environment and significantly impacts bio-physical and socio-economic systems. Unlike other major cryospheric components that either blanket large expanses (e.g., snow, permafrost, sea ice) or are concentrated in specific locations, lake and river ice are interwoven into the terrestrial landscape through major flow and storage networks. For instance, the headwaters of large ice-covered rivers extend well beyond the Arctic while many northern lak...

  17. Space Synthetic Biology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David; Roman, Monsi; Mansell, James (Matt)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an effort to make genetic engineering more useful by standardizing sections of genetic code. By standardizing genetic components, biological engineering will become much more similar to traditional fields of engineering, in which well-defined components and subsystems are readily available in markets. Specifications of the behavior of those components and subsystems can be used to model a system which incorporates them. Then, the behavior of the novel system can be simulated and optimized. Finally, the components and subsystems can be purchased and assembled to create the optimized system, which most often will exhibit behavior similar to that indicated by the model. The Space Synthetic Biology project began in 2012 as a multi-Center effort. The purpose of this project was to harness Synthetic Biology principals to enable NASA's missions. A central target for application was to Environmental Control & Life Support (ECLS). Engineers from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) ECLS Systems Development Branch (ES62) were brought into the project to contribute expertise in operational ECLS systems. Project lead scientists chose to pursue the development of bioelectrochemical technologies to spacecraft life support. Therefore, the ECLS element of the project became essentially an effort to develop a bioelectrochemical ECLS subsystem. Bioelectrochemical systems exploit the ability of many microorganisms to drive their metabolisms by direct or indirect utilization of electrical potential gradients. Whereas many microorganisms are capable of deriving the energy required for the processes of interest (such as carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation) from sunlight, it is believed that subsystems utilizing electrotrophs will exhibit smaller mass, volume, and power requirements than those that derive their energy from sunlight. In the first 2 years of the project, MSFC personnel conducted modeling, simulation, and conceptual design efforts to assist the

  18. Why are freshwater fish so threatened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closs, Gerard P.; Angermeier, Paul; Darwall, William R.T.; Balcombe, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The huge diversity of freshwater fishes is concentrated into an area of habitat that covers only about 1% of the Earth's surface, and much of this limited area has already been extensively impacted and intensively managed to meet human needs (Dudgeon et al., 2006). As outlined in Chapter 1, the number and proportions of threatened species tend to rise wherever fish diversity coincides with dense human populations, intensive resource use and development pressure. Of particular concern is the substantial proportion of the global diversity of freshwater fishes concentrated within the Mekong and Amazon Basins and west-central Africa (Berra, 2001; Abell et al., 2008; Dudgeon, 2011; Chapter 1) with extensive exploitation of water resources planned to accelerate in future years (Dudgeon, 2011; Chapter 1). If current trends continue, and the social, political and economic models that have been used to develop industrialised regions of the world over the past two centuries prevail, then the future of a significant proportion of global diversity of freshwater fish species is clearly uncertain.

  19. Pesticides in Brazilian freshwaters: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, A F; Ribeiro, J S; Kummrow, F; Nogueira, A J A; Montagner, C C; Umbuzeiro, G A

    2016-07-13

    The widespread use of pesticides in agriculture can lead to water contamination and cause adverse effects on non-target organisms. Brazil has been the world's top pesticide market consumer since 2008, with 381 approved pesticides for crop use. This study provides a comprehensive literature review on the occurrence of pesticide residues in Brazilian freshwaters. We searched for information in official agency records and peer-reviewed scientific literature. Risk quotients were calculated to assess the potential risk posed to aquatic life by the individual pesticides based on their levels of water contamination. Studies about the occurrence of pesticides in freshwaters in Brazil are scarce and concentrated in few sampling sites in 5 of the 27 states. Herbicides (21) accounted for the majority of the substances investigated, followed by fungicides (11), insecticides (10) and plant growth regulators (1). Insecticides are the class of major concern. Brazil would benefit from the implementation of a nationwide pesticide freshwater monitoring program to support preventive, remediation and enforcement actions.

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF FRESHWATER FISHING IN ELAZIĞ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki BOYRAZ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing world population has more demand for healthy food day after day. Our research draws attention to increasing freshwater fishery in Elazığ that increased its importance depending on the fishery activities in inland water in recent years. Our reasearch area, Elazığ, is situated in the Upper Fırat part, in the southwest of Eastern Anatolia Region. The main factor that allows freshwater fishery develop in the research field is the existence of fresh water. The most important river within the city borders is Fırat and its tributaries. Hazar Lake has a 86 km2 surface area and it is 30 km far from the city center. Also the Keban Dam, 675 km2 and Karakaya Dam, 268 km2 make up the city borders. Other important dams like Kralkızı, 57 km2 and Özlüce 26 km2 are situated in near distances. In this study we will focus on the potential and development of the freshwater fishery in Elazığ.

  1. Monitoring Global Freshwater Resources with GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matt; Famiglietti, Jay; Velicogna, Isabella; Swenson, Sean; Chambers, Don

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater resources include surface waters, groundwater, and seasonal snowpack. Given adequate ground based measurements, all of these can be monitored effectively, however, outside of the developed world such measurements often are not systematic and the data not centralized, and as a result reports of freshwater availability may be largely anecdotal. Even in the developed world it can be difficult to quantify changes in groundwater storage over large scales. Owing to its global coverage, satellite remote sensing has become a valuable tool for freshwater resources assessment. In particular, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated an unequaled ability to monitor total terrestrial water storage including groundwater at regional to continental scales. In this presentation we will identify apparent trends in terrestrial water storage observed by GRACE over the past nine years and attempt to explain their origins and predict whether they are likely to continue. Trends in certain regions where groundwater extraction has significantly depleted aquifers, including northern India and California, will be discussed in detail.

  2. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  3. Synthetic biology and occupational risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Murashov, Vladimir; Schulte, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging interdisciplinary field of biotechnology that involves applying the principles of engineering and chemical design to biological systems. Biosafety professionals have done an excellent job in addressing research laboratory safety as synthetic biology and gene editing have emerged from the larger field of biotechnology. Despite these efforts, risks posed by synthetic biology are of increasing concern as research procedures scale up to industrial processes in the larger bioeconomy. A greater number and variety of workers will be exposed to commercial synthetic biology risks in the future, including risks to a variety of workers from the use of lentiviral vectors as gene transfer devices. There is a need to review and enhance current protection measures in the field of synthetic biology, whether in experimental laboratories where new advances are being researched, in health care settings where treatments using viral vectors as gene delivery systems are increasingly being used, or in the industrial bioeconomy. Enhanced worker protection measures should include increased injury and illness surveillance of the synthetic biology workforce; proactive risk assessment and management of synthetic biology products; research on the relative effectiveness of extrinsic and intrinsic biocontainment methods; specific safety guidance for synthetic biology industrial processes; determination of appropriate medical mitigation measures for lentiviral vector exposure incidents; and greater awareness and involvement in synthetic biology safety by the general occupational safety and health community as well as by government occupational safety and health research and regulatory agencies.

  4. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  5. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring...... a sufficient amount of data for high precision flow estimation. These constrictions can be lifted by employing SA imaging. Here data is acquired simultaneously from all directions over a number of emissions, and the full image can be reconstructed from this data. The talk will demonstrate the many benefits...... of SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...

  6. Computational synthetic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bokowski, Jürgen

    1989-01-01

    Computational synthetic geometry deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. This research monograph considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It turns out that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain new mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatorics of Grassmann varieties. Finally algebraic varieties characterizing matroids and oriented matroids are introduced providing a new basis for applying computer algebra methods in this field. The necessary background knowledge is reviewed briefly. The text is accessible to stud...

  7. Transionospheric synthetic aperture imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Mikhail; Tsynkov, Semyon

    2017-01-01

    This landmark monograph presents the most recent mathematical developments in the analysis of ionospheric distortions of SAR images and offers innovative new strategies for their mitigation. As a prerequisite to addressing these topics, the book also discusses the radar ambiguity theory as it applies to synthetic aperture imaging and the propagation of radio waves through the ionospheric plasma, including the anisotropic and turbulent cases. In addition, it covers a host of related subjects, such as the mathematical modeling of extended radar targets (as opposed to point-wise targets) and the scattering of radio waves off those targets, as well as the theoretical analysis of the start-stop approximation, which is used routinely in SAR signal processing but often without proper justification. The mathematics in this volume is clean and rigorous – no assumptions are hidden or ambiguously stated. The resulting work is truly interdisciplinary, providing both a comprehensive and thorough exposition of the field,...

  8. Variation and Synthetic Speech

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, C; Massey, N; Miller, Corey; Karaali, Orhan; Massey, Noel

    1997-01-01

    We describe the approach to linguistic variation taken by the Motorola speech synthesizer. A pan-dialectal pronunciation dictionary is described, which serves as the training data for a neural network based letter-to-sound converter. Subsequent to dictionary retrieval or letter-to-sound generation, pronunciations are submitted a neural network based postlexical module. The postlexical module has been trained on aligned dictionary pronunciations and hand-labeled narrow phonetic transcriptions. This architecture permits the learning of individual postlexical variation, and can be retrained for each speaker whose voice is being modeled for synthesis. Learning variation in this way can result in greater naturalness for the synthetic speech that is produced by the system.

  9. Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk

    Medical ultrasound imaging is used for many purposes, e.g. for localizing and classifying cysts, lesions, and other processes. Almost any mass is first observed using B-mode imaging and later classified using e.g. color flow, strain, or attenuation imaging. It is therefore important that the B....... The method is investigated using simulations and through measurements using both phased array and convex array transducers. The images all show an improved contrast compared to images without compounding, and by construction, imaging using an improved frame rate is possible. Using a phased array transducer...... and the limiting factor is the amount of memory IO resources available. An equally high demand for memory throughput is found in the computer gaming industry, where a large part of the processing takes place on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Using the GPU, a framework for synthetic aperture imaging...

  10. Characteristics of Color Produced by Awa Natural Indigo and Synthetic Indigo

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoko Kawahito; Ryoko Yasukawa

    2009-01-01

    Color of cloth dyed with Awa natural indigo is quantitatively compared with color of the cloth dyed with synthetic indigo. Results showed that: 1) color produced by Awa natural indigo is bluer and brighter than color produced by synthetic indigo; 2) a single Gaussian function fits the profile of the running of color produced by Awa natural indigo and the running of color produced by synthetic indigo prepared with sodium hydrosulfite approximates a linear sum of two Gaussian functions; 3) befo...

  11. New Synthetic Method for Industrial Manufacture of Glutaric Dialdehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianli; Wang Luyao; Bai Yinjuan; Li Zheng; Shi Zhen

    2006-01-01

    A new synthetic method for the manufacture of glutaric dialdehyde is investigated.Glutaric dialdehyde was prepared by the addition-hydrolysis reaction of benzimidazolium salt with saturated dihalide as the di-Grignard reagent.The yield of glutaric dialdehyde by this method can reach 73%.Both infrared spectra and melting point of the compound were consistent with those reported earlier.

  12. A concise synthetic route to the conduritols from pentoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keinicke, Lise Edelmann; Madsen, Robert

    2005-01-01

    A short synthetic strategy for preparation of the conduritols is described. The key step employs a zinc-mediated fragmentation of protected methyl 5-deoxy-5-iodo-D-pentofuranosides followed by an allylation of the intermediate aldehyde in the same pot. The allylation is performed with 3-bromoprop...

  13. COMMERCIAL FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN REPUBLIC OF CROATIA IN 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Josip Suić; Mirjana Šarić; Zlatko Homen; Irena Jahutka; Ante Mišura

    2008-01-01

    Commercial freshwater fisheries in Republic of Croatia is regulated according to the Freshwater Fisheries Act (2001) and special sub–acts regarding commercial freshwater fisheries, as well as other sub–laws which deal with fish sizes, no–fishing periods and estimation of damages on fish stocks. Subjects of regulations are the areas for commercial fisheries, commercial fishermen exams, fishing permits, fishing tools and gear, yearly allowed catch quotas and catch data delivery. All the sub–act...

  14. Restricted-Range Fishes and the Conservation of Brazilian Freshwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Nogueira; Paulo A. Buckup; Menezes, Naercio A.; Osvaldo T. Oyakawa; Thais P Kasecker; Ramos Neto, Mario B.; da Silva, José Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms) and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geograph...

  15. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  16. Engineering Ecosystems and Synthetic Ecologies#

    OpenAIRE

    Mee, Michael T.; Wang, Harris H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecosystems play an important role in nature. Engineering these systems for industrial, medical, or biotechnological purposes are important pursuits for synthetic biologists and biological engineers moving forward. Here, we provide a review of recent progress in engineering natural and synthetic microbial ecosystems. We highlight important forward engineering design principles, theoretical and quantitative models, new experimental and manipulation tools, and possible applications of ...

  17. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-11-16

    Metabolic engineering emerged 20 years ago as the discipline occupied with the directed modification of metabolic pathways for the microbial synthesis of various products. As such, it deals with the engineering (design, construction, and optimization) of native as well as non-natural routes of product synthesis, aided in this task by the availability of synthetic DNA, the core enabling technology of synthetic biology. The two fields, however, only partially overlap in their interest in pathway engineering. While fabrication of biobricks, synthetic cells, genetic circuits, and nonlinear cell dynamics, along with pathway engineering, have occupied researchers in the field of synthetic biology, the sum total of these areas does not constitute a coherent definition of synthetic biology with a distinct intellectual foundation and well-defined areas of application. This paper reviews the origins of the two fields and advances two distinct paradigms for each of them: that of unit operations for metabolic engineering and electronic circuits for synthetic biology. In this context, metabolic engineering is about engineering cell factories for the biological manufacturing of chemical and pharmaceutical products, whereas the main focus of synthetic biology is fundamental biological research facilitated by the use of synthetic DNA and genetic circuits.

  18. Holographically Correcting Synthetic Aperture Aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Malacara (20:105-148). The synthetic aperture was aligned in accordance with the synthetic-aperture alignment technique of Gill (8:61-64). The...1987. 20. Malacara , Daniel, ed. Optical Shop Testing. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1978. 21. Marciniak, Capt Michael. Tutorial Presentation of mV

  19. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  20. Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route towards robust metal-organic frameworks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Dawei; Wang, Kecheng; Wei, Zhangwen; Chen, Ying-Pin; Simon, Cory M; Arvapally, Ravi K; Martin, Richard L; Bosch, Mathieu; Liu, Tian-Fu; Fordham, Stephen; Yuan, Daqiang; Omary, Mohammad A; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we present a kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation synthetic route for the preparation of highly crystalline and extremely robust metal-organic frameworks with a preserved metal cluster core...

  1. A New and Efficient Synthetic Method and Antibacterial Activities of Oxazolidinone Analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Sheng YU; Liang HUANG; Hui LIANG; Ping GONG

    2005-01-01

    A series of novel oxazolidinone analogues were prepared by a new and efficient synthetic method and their antibacterial activities were determined. These compounds were characterized by LC-MS and 1H NMR.

  2. Ecotoxicology of synthetic pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, S J; Campbell, P J; Giddings, J M; Hamer, M J; Henry, K; Pilling, E D; Warinton, J S; Wheeler, J R

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we review the ecotoxicology of the synthetic pyrethroids (SPs). SPs are potent, broad-spectrum insecticides. Their effects on a wide range of nontarget species have been broadly studied, and there is an extensive database available to evaluate their effects. SPs are highly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates in the laboratory, but effects in the field are mitigated by rapid dissipation and degradation. Due to their highly lipophilic nature, SPs partition extensively into sediments. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in sediment can be predicted on the basis of equilibrium partitioning, and whilst other factors can influence this, organic carbon content is a key determining variable. At present for SPs, there is no clear evidence for adverse population-relevant effects with an underlying endocrine mode of action. SPs have been studied intensively in aquatic field studies, and their effects under field conditions are mitigated from those measured in the laboratory by their rapid dissipation and degradation. Studies with a range of test systems have shown consistent aquatic field endpoints across a variety of geographies and trophic states. SPs are also highly toxic to bees and other nontarget arthropods in the laboratory. These effects are mitigated in the field through repellency and dissipation of residues, and recovery from any adverse effects tends to be rapid.

  3. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Z H Wong

    Full Text Available L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20 on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days, and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  4. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel Z H; Ching, Biyun; Chng, You R; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2013-01-01

    L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo) catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20) on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days), and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day) of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  5. Synthetic biology: lessons from the history of synthetic organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Brian J; Lim, Wendell A

    2007-09-01

    The mid-nineteenth century saw the development of a radical new direction in chemistry: instead of simply analyzing existing molecules, chemists began to synthesize them--including molecules that did not exist in nature. The combination of this new synthetic approach with more traditional analytical approaches revolutionized chemistry, leading to a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of chemical structure and reactivity and to the emergence of the modern pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The history of synthetic chemistry offers a possible roadmap for the development and impact of synthetic biology, a nascent field in which the goal is to build novel biological systems.

  6. Freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Mernild

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in terrestrial surface freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland, were simulated and analyzed. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution, snow and ice melt, and runoff modeling system, was used to simulate the temporal and spatial terrestrial runoff distribution to the fjord based on observed meteorological data (1999–2008 from stations located on and around the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS. Simulated runoff was compared and verified against independent glacier catchment runoff observations (1999–2005. Modeled runoff to Sermilik Fjord was highly variable, ranging from 2.9×109 m3 y−1 in 1999 to 5.9×109 m3 y−1 in 2005. The uneven spatial runoff distribution produced an areally-averaged annual maximum runoff at the Helheim glacier terminus of more than 3.8 m w.eq. The sub-catchment runoff of the Helheim glacier region accounted for 25% of the total runoff to Sermilik Fjord. The runoff distribution from the different sub-catchments suggested a strong influence from the spatial variation in glacier coverage. To assess the Sermilik Fjord freshwater flux, simulated terrestrial runoff and net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation and sublimation for the fjord area were combined with satellite-derived ice discharge and subglacial geothermal and frictional melting due to basal ice motion. A terrestrial freshwater flux of ~40.4×109 m3 y−1 was found for Sermilik Fjord, with an 11% contribution originated from surface runoff. For the Helheim glacier sub-catchment only 4% of the flux originated from terrestrial surface runoff.

  7. Opisthorchis viverrini metacercaria in Thai freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikagul, J

    1998-06-01

    Examination for metacercaria in freshwater fish, the common intermediate hosts of Opisthorchis viverrini was carried out during 1992-1996. The 4-year survey of fish from markets in 14 provinces revealed that metacercariae of O. viverrini were found in fish from Udon Thani, Sa Kaeo and Prachin Buri Provinces; fish from Aranyaprathet district had the highest positive rates (25-28%). Fish from 12 provinces were found to be positive with heterophyid metacercariae, namely: Haplorchis pumilio, H. taichui, H. yokogawai, Stellantchasmus falcatus, Centrocestus formosanus and Haplorchoides cahirinus. It was also observed that the prevalence of O. viverrini metacercaria in fish decreased markedly during the last 10 years.

  8. 76 FR 17962 - Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Geological Survey Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater... titled ``Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States''. The report reviews key issues related to freshwater resource data and...

  9. Prospects for monitoring freshwater ecosystems towards the 2010 targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenga, C; Campbell, I; Abell, R; de Villiers, P; Bryer, M

    2005-02-28

    Human activities have severely affected the condition of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Physical alteration, habitat loss, water withdrawal, pollution, overexploitation and the introduction of non-native species all contribute to the decline in freshwater species. Today, freshwater species are, in general, at higher risk of extinction than those in forests, grasslands and coastal ecosystems. For North America alone, the projected extinction rate for freshwater fauna is five times greater than that for terrestrial fauna--a rate comparable to the species loss in tropical rainforest. Because many of these extinctions go unseen, the level of assessment and knowledge of the status and trends of freshwater species are still very poor, with species going extinct before they are even taxonomically classified. Increasing human population growth and achieving the sustainable development targets set forth in 2002 will place even higher demands on the already stressed freshwater ecosystems, unless an integrated approach to managing water for people and ecosystems is implemented by a broad constituency. To inform and implement policies that support an integrated approach to water management, as well as to measure progress in halting the rapid decline in freshwater species, basin-level indicators describing the condition and threats to freshwater ecosystems and species are required. This paper discusses the extent and quality of data available on the number and size of populations of freshwater species, as well as the change in the extent and condition of natural freshwater habitats. The paper presents indicators that can be applied at multiple scales, highlighting the usefulness of using remote sensing and geographical information systems technologies to fill some of the existing information gaps. Finally, the paper includes an analysis of major data gaps and information needs with respect to freshwater species to measure progress towards the 2010 biodiversity targets.

  10. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  11. Synthetic biology and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K K

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology, application of synthetic chemistry to biology, is a broad term that covers the engineering of biological systems with structures and functions not found in nature to process information, manipulate chemicals, produce energy, maintain cell environment and enhance human health. Synthetic biology devices contribute not only to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms, but also provide novel diagnostic tools. Methods based on synthetic biology enable the design of novel strategies for the treatment of cancer, immune diseases metabolic disorders and infectious diseases as well as the production of cheap drugs. The potential of synthetic genome, using an expanded genetic code that is designed for specific drug synthesis as well as delivery and activation of the drug in vivo by a pathological signal, was already pointed out during a lecture delivered at Kuwait University in 2005. Of two approaches to synthetic biology, top-down and bottom-up, the latter is more relevant to the development of personalized medicines as it provides more flexibility in constructing a partially synthetic cell from basic building blocks for a desired task. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Freshwater rotifers from Hordaland, western Norway, with a survey of freshwater rotifers previously found in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brit Godske Bjørklund

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Bjørklund BG. 2009. Freshwater rotifers from Hordaland western Norway with a u survey of freshwater rotifers previously found in Norway. Fauna Norvegica29: 11-54. A total of 156 species (or subspecies o rotifers, mostly non-planktonic, have been identified from freshwater or slightly brackish-water localities in the county of Hordaland; 83 are new to Norway and 24 others are new to the county. One hundred of the species were collected from the two valleys of Eksingedalen and Teigdalen in spring and summer 1967. Samples were taken on the shallow shores of lake-like parts of the rivers, and in pools, tarns and small lakes. Forty more or less euryhaline fresh­water rotifers were also collected during studies of slightly brackish-water localities around Bergen in 1963-1969. A number of freshwater rotifers were collected at several localities in and around Bergen in 1968-1970, and on the western part of Hardangervidda. Of those so far identified ,23 are new to Norway and 8 more are new to the county. They are therefore included in the species list. A few additional ones are referred to in the taxonomical notes. All the species are listed with localities and habitat categories, or, in the case of the last-mentioned ones, just the district where they were collected. The paper includes notes, measurements and ,in most cases, figures regarding 44 little known, variable or taxonomically problematical species, especially in the genera Cephalodella and Trichocerca. Comments are given on the distribution , abundance and diversity of the species. The paper presents asurvey of previous investigations on rotifers in Norway, listing 200 previously recorded freshwater (a few euryhaline rotifers, giving other names, the authors who recorded the finds and, in most cases, the counties where the species were collected. 

  13. Synthetic biology: advancing biological frontiers by building synthetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology are contributing to diverse research areas, from basic biology to biomanufacturing and disease therapy. We discuss the theoretical foundation, applications, and potential of this emerging field. PMID:22348749

  14. Synthetic biology: advancing biological frontiers by building synthetic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonne Yu-Hsuan; Galloway, Kate E; Smolke, Christina D.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology are contributing to diverse research areas, from basic biology to biomanufacturing and disease therapy. We discuss the theoretical foundation, applications, and potential of this emerging field.

  15. The toxicity of molybdate to freshwater and marine organisms. II. Effects assessment of molybdate in the aquatic environment under REACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijerick, D G; Regoli, L; Carey, S

    2012-10-01

    The REACH Molybdenum Consortium initiated an extensive research program in order to generate robust PNECs, based on the SSD approach, for both the freshwater and marine environments. This activity was part of the REACH dossier preparation and to form the basis for scientific dialogues with other national and international regulatory authorities. Chronic ecotoxicity data sets for the freshwater and marine environments served as starting point for the derivation of PNECs for both compartments, in accordance with the recommended derivation procedures established by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). The HC(5,50%)s that were derived from the generated Species Sensitivity Distributions were 38.2 mg Mo/L and 5.75 mg Mo/L for the freshwater and marine water compartment, respectively. Uncertainty analysis on both data sets and available data on bioaccumulation at high exposure levels justified an assessment factor of 3 on both HC(5,50%) leading to a PNEC(freshwater) of 12.7 mg Mo/L and a PNEC(marine) of 1.92 mg Mo/L. As there are currently insufficient ecotoxicological data available for the derivation of PNECs in the sediment compartment, the equilibrium partitioning method was applied; typical K(D)-values for both the freshwater and marine compartments were identified and combined with the respective PNEC, leading to a PNEC(sediment) of 22,600 mg/kg dry weight and 1980 mg/kg dry weight for freshwater and marine sediments, respectively. The chronic data sets were also used for the derivation of final chronic values using the procedures that are outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency for deriving such water benchmarks. Comparing PNECs with FCVs showed that both methodologies result in comparable protective concentration levels for molybdenum in the environment.

  16. The Ethics of Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    The dissertation analyses and discusses a number of ethical issues that have been raised in connection with the development of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology is a set of new techniques for DNA-level design and construction of living beings with useful properties. The dissertation especially......) popular responsesto them succeed, and whether the objections are ultimately persuasive.2. Given that synthetic biology is a new technology, there is a certain degree of uncertainty about its ultimate effects, and many perceive the technology as risky. I discuss two common approaches in risk regulation...

  17. Synthetic biology for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abil, Zhanar; Xiong, Xiong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-02-02

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug discovery and production, as well as vaccine development and treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders.

  18. The Ethics of Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    The dissertation analyses and discusses a number of ethical issues that have been raised in connection with the development of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology is a set of new techniques for DNA-level design and construction of living beings with useful properties. The dissertation especially......) popular responsesto them succeed, and whether the objections are ultimately persuasive.2. Given that synthetic biology is a new technology, there is a certain degree of uncertainty about its ultimate effects, and many perceive the technology as risky. I discuss two common approaches in risk regulation...

  19. Biodiversity in South East Asia: an overview of freshwater sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae: Spongillina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Manconi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that South East (SE Asia is considered as a biodiversity hotspot, knowledge of sessile invertebrates such as freshwater sponges (Porifera: Haplosclerida: Spongillina in this region is poor and scarcely reported. For this synopsis, diversity and distribution of SE Asian inland water sponges is reported on the basis of available literature and a recent biodiversity assessment of the Lower Mekong basin. A diagnostic key of families/genera from SE Asia is provided together with Light Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy protocols to prepare the basic spicular complement for taxonomic identification. So far, SE Asian freshwater sponges consist of widespread and/or endemic species belonging to the families Metaniidae, Potamolepidae, and Spongillidae. The highest diversity is recorded from Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, and Myanmar, respectively. Data from the other countries are necessary for our understanding of their diversity and distribution. Biodiversity in SE Asia is strongly underestimated, as indicated by recent new records and the discovery of new species of freshwater sponges in Thailand. Further investigations should reveal higher values of taxonomic richness, highlighting biogeographic patterns at the family/genus/species levels. A cooperative network involving Thai, Laotian and Italian researchers, was set up to contribute and fulfil knowledge on taxonomy, ecology and biotechnological potentialities of these neglected filter feeders, playing a key role in water purification and biomass production in both lentic and lotic ecosystems in the tropics.

  20. SYNTHETIC STRATEGY FOR THE PREPARATION OF BIOACTIVE GALACTOGLYCEROLIPIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Manzo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current communication represents an extended abstract of the presentation delivered on the joint Moldo-Italian seminar “New frontiers in natural product chemistry”, held in the Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of Moldova on 30 September. A simple and efficient strategy for the synthesis of galactoglycerolipids is provided.

  1. Synthetic methodology for the preparation of nucleic acid containing peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heden-van Noort, Gerbrand Jan van der

    2012-01-01

    Dit proefschrift beschrijft de ontwikkeling van nieuwe methoden voor de synthese van hybride biomoleculen die samengesteld zijn uit een peptide- en een nucleïnezuurfragment. Zulke hybride moleculen komen in de natuur voor en hebben belangrijke functies. In dit proefschrift wordt aandacht besteed aan

  2. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  3. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  4. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa.

  5. Management and the conservation of freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Mark S.; Richardson, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Riparian areas are the terrestrial environment adjacent to water that both influences and is influenced by the aquatic feature (Gregory et al., 1991; Naiman et al., 2010). Riparian areas along streams provide shade, sources of wood and organic matter, contribute to bank stability, filter sediments, take up excess nutrients from groundwater inputs, and other key processes that protect freshwaters (e.g. Naiman et al., 2010; Richardson & Danehy, 2007; Figure 9.1). Riparian areas also increase biodiversity through habitat complexity and close juxtaposition of aquatic and terrestrial environments (Quinn et al., 2004; Naiman et al., 2010). Alterations to riparian areas, despite their small area relative to the landscape, have disproportionate effects on habitats and fish communities (Naiman et al., 2010; Wipfli & Baxter, 2010). Key habitat losses and alterations are derived from modification of riparian areas by reducing instream habitat complexity (Bilby & Ward, 1989; Fausch & Northcote, 1992; Naiman et al., 2010), diminishing the productive basis of freshwater food webs (Belsky et al., 1999; Quinn et al., 2004), increasing nutrient, contaminant and sediment intrusion (Muscutt et al., 1993; Daniels & Gilliam, 1996; Nguyen et al., 1998; Waters, 1999).

  6. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H. W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%. PMID:21149727

  7. Recent changes in the freshwater composition east of Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Steur, L.; Pickart, R.S.; Torres, D.J.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2015-01-01

    Results from three hydrographic surveys across the East Greenland Current between 2011 and 2013 are presented with focus on the freshwater sources. End-member analysis using salinity, d18O, and nutrient data shows that while meteoric water dominated the freshwater content, a significant amount of Pa

  8. Tracking salinity intrusions in a coastal forested freshwater wetland system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand D. Jayakaran; Thomas M. Williams; William H. Conner

    2016-01-01

    Coastal forested freshwater wetlands are sentinel sites for salinity intrusions associated with large, tidally influenced, storm-driven or drought-induced incursions of estuarine waters into freshwater ecosystems. These incursions may also be exacerbated by rising sea levels associated with climate change.

  9. Sodium turnover rate determines sensitivity to acute copper and silver exposure in freshwater animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosell, Martin Hautopp; Nielsen, Claus; Bianchini, A.

    2002-01-01

    Copper, Silver, Freshwater, Fish, Crustaceans, Sodium transport, Ammonia excretion, Predicting mortality......Copper, Silver, Freshwater, Fish, Crustaceans, Sodium transport, Ammonia excretion, Predicting mortality...

  10. An overview of the synthetic routes to the best selling drugs containing 6-membered heterocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Baumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review which is the second in this series summarises the most common synthetic routes as applied to the preparation of many modern pharmaceutical compounds categorised as containing a six-membered heterocyclic ring. The reported examples are based on the top retailing drug molecules combining synthetic information from both scientific journals and the wider patent literature. It is hoped that this compilation, in combination with the previously published review on five-membered rings, will form a comprehensive foundation and reference source for individuals interested in medicinal, synthetic and preparative chemistry.

  11. Culture of Freshwater Prawns (Macrobrachium Rosenbergii) Using Geothermal Waste Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.

    1978-01-01

    The farming of freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) in geothermal-heated water has been demonstrated to be feasible in a non-tropical climate. The husbandry of prawns is being done in two outdoor raceway ponds, 9.1 m by 2.5 m and 29 m by 3.5 m that are 1.2 m deep. The ponds are not shielded from the ambient climate which during the winter months has recorded air temperatures as low as -20oC. A selected brood stock is held in a small spawning building where larvae are hatched in artificial saltwater and reared to the post-larvae stage which makes the facility self-supporting. This project is providing a model for potential investors to utilize the low-temperature geothermal resources in the western United States for warm water aquaculture. Zooplankton, macroscopic crusteans, from a local euthrophic lake are being fed to the post-larvae and adult prawns in addition to prepared commercial dry pelleted foods to keep operational costs at a minimum. Initial measurements of growth and weight gains indicate the production of two crops of prawns per year at seven to the pond is possible. No work on intensive culture has been done. Plans to enlarge the facility and do work on developing intensive culture are being considered.

  12. Synthetic biology: ethical ramifications 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinow, Paul; Bennett, Gaymon

    2009-12-01

    During 2007 and 2008 synthetic biology moved from the manifesto stage to research programs. As of 2009, synthetic biology is ramifying; to ramify means to produce differentiated trajectories from previous determinations. From its inception, most of the players in synthetic biology agreed on the need for (a) rationalized design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems as well as (b) the re-design of natural biological systems for specified purposes, and that (c) the versatility of designed biological systems makes them suitable to address such challenges as renewable energy, the production of inexpensive drugs, and environmental remediation, as well as providing a catalyst for further growth of biotechnology. What is understood by these goals, however, is diverse. Those assorted understandings are currently contributing to different ramifications of synthetic biology. The Berkeley Human Practices Lab, led by Paul Rabinow, is currently devoting its efforts to documenting and analyzing these ramifications as they emerge.

  13. Programming languages for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, P; Naveen, F; Rao, Chanchala Uma Maheswara; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2010-12-01

    In the backdrop of accelerated efforts for creating synthetic organisms, the nature and scope of an ideal programming language for scripting synthetic organism in-silico has been receiving increasing attention. A few programming languages for synthetic biology capable of defining, constructing, networking, editing and delivering genome scale models of cellular processes have been recently attempted. All these represent important points in a spectrum of possibilities. This paper introduces Kera, a state of the art programming language for synthetic biology which is arguably ahead of similar languages or tools such as GEC, Antimony and GenoCAD. Kera is a full-fledged object oriented programming language which is tempered by biopart rule library named Samhita which captures the knowledge regarding the interaction of genome components and catalytic molecules. Prominent feature of the language are demonstrated through a toy example and the road map for the future development of Kera is also presented.

  14. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  15. Synthetic Biology for Specialty Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kelly A; Alper, Hal S

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we address recent advances in the field of synthetic biology and describe how those tools have been applied to produce a wide variety of chemicals in microorganisms. Here we classify the expansion of the synthetic biology toolbox into three different categories based on their primary function in strain engineering-for design, for construction, and for optimization. Next, focusing on recent years, we look at how chemicals have been produced using these new synthetic biology tools. Advances in producing fuels are briefly described, followed by a more thorough treatment of commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. Throughout this review, an emphasis is placed on how synthetic biology tools are applied to strain engineering. Finally, we discuss organism and host strain diversity and provide a future outlook in the field.

  16. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall

  17. Identifying Canadian freshwater fishes through DNA barcodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Hubert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcoding aims to provide an efficient method for species-level identifications using an array of species specific molecular tags derived from the 5' region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene. The efficiency of the method hinges on the degree of sequence divergence among species and species-level identifications are relatively straightforward when the average genetic distance among individuals within a species does not exceed the average genetic distance between sister species. Fishes constitute a highly diverse group of vertebrates that exhibit deep phenotypic changes during development. In this context, the identification of fish species is challenging and DNA barcoding provide new perspectives in ecology and systematics of fishes. Here we examined the degree to which DNA barcoding discriminate freshwater fish species from the well-known Canadian fauna, which currently encompasses nearly 200 species, some which are of high economic value like salmons and sturgeons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We bi-directionally sequenced the standard 652 bp "barcode" region of COI for 1360 individuals belonging to 190 of the 203 Canadian freshwater fish species (95%. Most species were represented by multiple individuals (7.6 on average, the majority of which were retained as voucher specimens. The average genetic distance was 27 fold higher between species than within species, as K2P distance estimates averaged 8.3% among congeners and only 0.3% among concpecifics. However, shared polymorphism between sister-species was detected in 15 species (8% of the cases. The distribution of K2P distance between individuals and species overlapped and identifications were only possible to species group using DNA barcodes in these cases. Conversely, deep hidden genetic divergence was revealed within two species, suggesting the presence of cryptic species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study evidenced that freshwater fish

  18. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D; Mathews, Debra J H

    2015-08-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) PROJECT is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 PROJECT: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Mathews, Debra J. H.

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 Project: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. PMID:26272997

  20. Synthetic Biomarker Design by Using Analyte-Responsive Acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Inoue, Joe; Tabata, Sho; Murakami, Shinnosuke; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Saito, Natsumi; Fukuda, Shinji; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2017-05-18

    The use of synthetic biomarkers is an emerging technique to improve disease diagnosis. Here, we report a novel design strategy that uses analyte-responsive acetaminophen (APAP) to expand the catalogue of analytes available for synthetic biomarker development. As proof-of-concept, we designed hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-responsive APAP (HR-APAP) and succeeded in H2 O2 detection with cellular and animal experiments. In fact, for blood samples following HR-APAP injection, we demonstrated that the plasma concentration ratio [APAP+APAP conjugates]/[HR-APAP] accurately reflects in vivo differences in H2 O2 levels. We anticipate that our practical methodology will be broadly useful for the preparation of various synthetic biomarkers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  2. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1979-06-01

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs.

  3. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rauschenberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors (“synthetic lectins” constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA, β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  4. Terrestrial and freshwater Tardigrada of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Harry A

    2013-12-16

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of the freshwater and terrestrial tardigrade fauna reported from the Americas (North America, South America, Central America and the West Indies), their distribution in the Americas, and the substrates from which they have been reported. Data were obtained from 316 published references. Authors' identifications were accepted at face value unless subsequently amended. Taxa were assigned to sub-national units (states, provinces, etc.). Many areas, in particular large portions of Central America and the West Indies, have no reported tardigrade fauna.        The presence of 54 genera and 380 species has been reported for the Americas; 245 species have been collected in the Nearctic ecozone and 251 in the Neotropical ecozone. Among the tardigrade species found in the Americas, 52 are currently considered cosmopolitan, while 153 species have known distributions restricted to the Americas. Based on recent taxonomic revision of the genus Milnesium, the vast majority of records of M. tardigradum in the Americas should now be reassigned to Milnesium tardigradum sensu lato, either because the provided description differs from M. tardigradum sensu stricto or because insufficient description is provided to make a determination; the remainder should be considered Milnesium cf. tardigradum.        Most terrestrial tardigrade sampling in the Americas has focused on cryptogams (mosses, lichens and liverworts); 90% of the species have been collected in such substrates. The proportion of species collected in other habitats is lower: 14% in leaf litter, 20% in soil, and 24% in aquatic samples (in other terrestrial substrates the proportion never exceeds 5%). Most freshwater tardigrades have been collected from aquatic vegetation and sediment. For nine species in the Americas no substrates have been reported. 

  5. Secondary structure of fluorescence labelled synthetic peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A S

    2000-01-01

    A series of eight synthetic oligopeptides has been prepared and their secondary structures investigated using various techniques. The project represents a continuation of an investigation into thermally induced changes in secondary structure. Following the previously reported results, the change in structure was initially thought to represent a change from an alpha-helix at low temperature to 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix at high temperature. However, the results reported herein suggest the peptides retain an alpha-helical configuration at all temperatures studied, but that this helix can adopt at least two related forms. The difference in the structures relates to the nature of the H-bonds which may or may not involve an additional interaction from water molecules or side-chains. The peptides were encouraged to adopt a helical configuration by the inclusion of alpha- aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Also, modified forms of glutamic acid were included in the sequences. These had pendant donor (4-methoxy naphthalen...

  6. Spectroscopy of a Synthetic Trapped Ion Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucul, David; Christensen, Justin E.; Hudson, Eric R.; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2017-09-01

    133Ba+ has been identified as an attractive ion for quantum information processing due to the unique combination of its spin-1 /2 nucleus and visible wavelength electronic transitions. Using a microgram source of radioactive material, we trap and laser cool the synthetic A =133 radioisotope of barium II in a radio-frequency ion trap. Using the same, single trapped atom, we measure the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the 62P1 /2↔62S1 /2 and 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transitions that are needed for laser cooling, state preparation, and state detection of the clock-state hyperfine and optical qubits. We also report the 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transition isotope shift for the rare A =130 and 132 barium nuclides, completing the spectroscopic characterization necessary for laser cooling all long-lived barium II isotopes.

  7. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  8. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  9. Large-scale degradation of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, L.; Macedo, M.

    2016-12-01

    The integrity of freshwater ecosystems depends on their hydrological connectivity with land, water, and climate systems. Hydrological connectivity regulates the structure and function of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems and the provisioning of services that sustain local populations. However, the hydrological connectivity of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems is increasingly disrupted by construction of dams, mining, land-cover changes, and global climate change. This review analyzes these drivers of degradation; evaluates their impacts on hydrological connectivity; and identifies policy deficiencies that hinder freshwater ecosystem protection. There are 155 large hydroelectric dams in operation, 21 dams under construction, and there will be only three free-flowing tributaries if all 277 planned dams for the Basin are built. Land-cover changes driven by mining, dam and road construction, and agriculture and cattle ranching have already affected 20% of the Basin and up to 50% of riparian forests in some regions. Global climate change will likely exacerbate these impacts by creating warmer and dryer conditions, with less predictable rainfall and more extreme events (e.g. droughts and floods). The resulting hydrological alterations are rapidly degrading freshwater ecosystems both independently and via complex feedbacks and synergistic interactions. The ecosystem impacts include biodiversity loss, warmer stream temperatures, stronger and more frequent floodplain fires, and changes to biogeochemical cycles, transport of organic and inorganic materials, and freshwater community structure and function. The impacts also include reductions in water quality, fish yields, and availability of water for navigation, power generation, and human use. This degradation of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems cannot be curbed presently because existing policies are inconsistent across the Basin, ignore cumulative effects, and do not consider the hydrological connectivity of freshwater

  10. Control theory meets synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Dy, Aaron J; Qian, Yili

    2016-07-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology.

  11. Control theory meets synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology. PMID:27440256

  12. A plea for the use of copepods in freshwater ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkarni, Devdutt; Gergs, André; Hommen, Udo

    2013-01-01

    . However, very little is known about the ecotoxicology of freshwater copepods. To enable a more realistic risk higher tier environmental risk assessment, we recommend considering freshwater copepods as part of the hazard assessment process. This could include the establishment of laboratory experiments...... consequences concerning the vulnerability of such species to exposure with contaminants. We aimed to highlight the importance of copepods in ecology and to underline the need to include freshwater copepods in ecotoxicology. We carried out a literature search on copepods and Daphnia in ecology and ecotoxicology...

  13. Synthetic strategies for the generation of molecularly imprinted organic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, A G; Whitcombe, M J

    2005-12-06

    Molecular imprinting is a method of inducing molecular recognition properties in synthetic polymers in response to the presence of a template species during formation of the three-dimensional structure of the polymer. The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) prepared in this way have been termed "plastic antibodies" and combine the robustness of the polymer scaffold with binding properties more readily associated with biological receptors. Smart polymers of this type may find applications in drug delivery, controlled release and monitoring of drug and metabolite concentrations. In this review the main synthetic strategies used in the preparation of imprinted organic polymers are described in terms of the chemical principles used in the templating step. These are illustrated with examples taken from the literature and are classified as covalent, semi-covalent, non-covalent, metal-mediated and non-polar. Finally strategies for the selection of monomers, optimisation and modification of the properties of imprinted polymers are reviewed.

  14. Recovery of thermal energy from the freshwater supply system; Gewinnung thermischer Energie aus dem Trinkwasserversorgungsnetz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plath, Michael [DVGW-Forschungsstelle an der Technischen Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany); Roettger, Sven [Wasserverband Suederdithmarschen, Nindorf (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Recovery of thermal energy from freshwater, which is then discharged, is not a new concept. The contribution presents a system in which the freshwater is recirculated into the freshwater supply system. A number of safety measures are incorporated in order to prevent contamination of the freshwater as well as closed-cycle circulation. (orig.)

  15. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Fratantonio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance use disorder treatment centers. Urine Drug Testing is utilized as a clinical diagnostic tool in substance use disorder treatment centers, and the furious pace at which new synthetic stimulants are introduced to the black market are making the detection via urine increasingly difficult. This article will discuss the prevalence, pharmacology and difficulty developing laboratory assays to detect synthetic stimulants.

  16. Synthetic neurosteroids on brain protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids, like allopregnanolone and pregnanolone, are endogenous regulators of neuronal excitability. Inside the brain, they are highly selective and potent modulators of GABA A receptor activity. Their anticonvulsant, anesthetics and anxiolytic properties are useful for the treatments of several neurological and psychiatric disorders via reducing the risks of side effects obtained with the commercial drugs. The principal disadvantages of endogenous neurosteroids administration are their rapid metabolism and their low oral bioavailability. Synthetic steroids analogues with major stability or endogenous neurosteroids stimulation synthesis might constitute promising novel strategies for the treatment of several disorders. Numerous studies indicate that the 3α-hydroxyl configuration is the key for binding and activity, but modifications in the steroid nucleus may emphasize different pharmacophores. So far, several synthetic steroids have been developed with successful neurosteroid-like effects. In this work, we summarize the properties of various synthetic steroids probed in trials throughout the analysis of several neurosteroids-like actions.

  17. Synthetic neurosteroids on brain protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariana Rey; Hctor Coirini

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids, like allopregnanolone and pregnanolone, are endogenous regulators of neuronal excitability. Inside the brain, they are highly selective and potent modulators of GABAA receptor activity. Their anticonvulsant, anesthetics and anxiolytic properties are useful for the treatments of several neurological and psychiatric disordersvia reducing the risks of side effects obtained with the commercial drugs. The principal disadvantages of endogenous neurosteroids adminis-tration are their rapid metabolism and their low oral bioavailability. Synthetic steroids analogues with major stability or endogenous neurosteroids stimulation synthesis might constitute prom-ising novel strategies for the treatment of several disorders. Numerous studies indicate that the 3α-hydroxyl conifguration is the key for binding and activity, but modiifcations in the steroid nucleus may emphasize different pharmacophores. So far, several synthetic steroids have been developed with successful neurosteroid-like effects. In this work, we summarize the properties of various synthetic steroids probed in trials throughout the analysis of several neurosteroids-like actions.

  18. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  19. Synthetic Melanin E-Ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xiaokang; Kuang, Tairong; Li, Mi; Hu, Jiaming; Shi, Junfeng; Lee, Ly James; Cheng, Huanyu; Li, Yiwen

    2017-05-17

    Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of surfactant-free electronic ink (E-ink) with excellent display resolution for high-definition resolution display. Herein, we report the use of polydopamine-based synthetic melanin, a class of functional nanoparticles with similar chemical compositions and physical properties to those of naturally occurring melanin, as a new E-ink material. It was found that such E-ink displays could achieve ultrahigh resolution (>10 000 ppi) and low power consumption (operation voltage of only 1 V) in aqueous solutions. Interestingly, simple oxidation of synthetic melanin nanoparticles enables the generation of intrinsic fluorescence, allowing further development of fluorescent E-ink displays with nanoscale resolution. We describe these bioinspired materials in an initial proof-of-concept study and propose that synthetic melanin nanoparticles will be suitable for electronic nanoinks with a potential wide range of applications in molecular patterning and fluorescence bioimaging.

  20. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratantonio, James; Andrade, Lawrence; Febo, Marcelo

    Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance use disorder treatment centers. Urine Drug Testing is utilized as a clinical diagnostic tool in substance use disorder treatment centers, and the furious pace at which new synthetic stimulants are introduced to the black market are making the detection via urine increasingly difficult. This article will discuss the prevalence, pharmacology and difficulty developing laboratory assays to detect synthetic stimulants.

  1. 同步合成模板炭化法制备双电层电容器电极用中孔炭材料的研究%New mesoporous carbons prepared by a simultaneous synthetic template carbonization method for electric double layer capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯朝辉; 李新海; 刘恩辉; 何则强; 邓凌峰

    2004-01-01

    以正硅酸乙酯为模板硅源,间苯二酚-甲醛凝胶为炭前驱体,采用同步合成模板炭化(SSTCM)法制备了具有可控结构的中孔炭材料.炭材料的比表面积可达1 500 m2/g,平均孔径在3 nm~10 nm之间.经过酸催化水解预处理的二氧化硅模板前驱体溶液与间苯二酚-甲醛溶液混合,碱性条件下使两者的溶胶凝胶反应同步发生,得到有机/无机凝胶混合物.再经炭化、HF去模,制得SSTCM炭材料.N2等温吸脱附研究表明,与炭前驱体聚合物同步合成的结构可调的二氧化硅模板,导致了SSTCM炭材料可控中孔结构的形成.循环伏安研究表明,采用这种同步合成模板炭化法制备的SSTCM炭材料质量比容量达270 F/g,炭材料具有的典型中孔结构使其可能成为一种理想的双电层电容器电极材料.%A simultaneous synthetic template carbonization method (SSTCM), where tetraethoxy silane (TEOS) was used as the source of the silica template and resorcinol-formaldehyde gel as the carbon precursor, was suggested for the preparation of mesoporous carbons with a controllable pore structure. A precursor solution of the silica template prepared by prehydrolysis of TEOS in an acid medium was blended with resorcinol-formaldehyde solution. The two sol-gel reactions proceeded simultaneously under basic conditions in a sealed vessel and resulted in the formation of organic/inorganic hybrids. A new mesoporous SSTCM carbon was obtained by dissolving the silica template with HF in the hybrid after carbonization, followed by drying. N2 adsorption isotherms at -196 ℃ suggested that the silica template synthesized simultaneously with the carbon precursor polymer resulted in the controllable mesoporous structure of the resultant carbons. Cyclic voltammetry measurements show that the as-prepared SSTCM carbons exhibit a high mass-specific capacitance up to 270 F/g. Their typical mesoporous structure makes these carbons promising materials for electric

  2. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative—additional investments will expand markets—but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized. PMID:26690379

  3. Synthetic biology as red herring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Beth

    2013-12-01

    It has become commonplace to say that with the advent of technologies like synthetic biology the line between artifacts and living organisms, policed by metaphysicians since antiquity, is beginning to blur. But that line began to blur 10,000 years ago when plants and animals were first domesticated; and has been thoroughly blurred at least since agriculture became the dominant human subsistence pattern many millennia ago. Synthetic biology is ultimately only a late and unexceptional offshoot of this prehistoric development. From this perspective, then, synthetic biology is a red herring, distracting us from more thorough philosophical consideration of the most truly revolutionary human practice-agriculture. In the first section of this paper I will make this case with regard to ontology, arguing that synthetic biology crosses no ontological lines that were not crossed already in the Neolithic. In the second section I will construct a parallel case with regard to cognition, arguing that synthetic biology as biological engineering represents no cognitive advance over what was required for domestication and the new agricultural subsistence pattern it grounds. In the final section I will make the case with regard to human existence, arguing that synthetic biology, even if wildly successful, is not in a position to cause significant existential change in what it is to be human over and above the massive existential change caused by the transition to agriculture. I conclude that a longer historical perspective casts new light on some important issues in philosophy of technology and environmental philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized.

  5. Design and evaluation of a gastroretentive drug delivery system for metformin HCl using synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Gorajana, Adinaravyana; Dharmanlingam, Senthil Rajan; Kolapalli, Venkata Ramana Murthy

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present research was to prepare and evaluate a gastroretentive drug delivery system for metformin HCl, using synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers. The floating approach was applied for preparing gastroretentive tablets (GRT) and these tablets were manufactured by the direct compression method. The drug delivery system comprises of synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers such as polyethylene oxide and Carboxymethyl ethyl cellulose (CMEC) as release-retarding polymers. GRT were evaluated for physico-chemical properties like weight variation, hardness, assay friability, in vitro floating behaviour, swelling studies, in vitro dissolution studies and rate order kinetics. Based upon the drug release and floating properties, two formulations (MP04 & MC03) were selected as optimized formulations. The optimized formulations MP04 and MC03 followed zero order rate kinetics, with non-Fickian diffusion and first order rate kinetics with erosion mechanism, respectively. The optimized formulation was characterised with FTIR studies and it was observed that there was no interaction between the drug and polymers.

  6. Sequential Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) is a novel technique which allows to implement synthetic aperture beamforming on a system with a restricted complexity, and without storing RF-data. The objective is to improve lateral resolution and obtain a more depth independent resolution...... and a range independent lateral resolution is obtained. The SASB method has been investigated using simulations in Field II and by off-line processing of data acquired with a commercial scanner. The lateral resolution increases with a decreasing F#. Grating lobes appear if F# 6 2 for a linear array with k-pitch...

  7. Design Automation in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Evan; Madsen, Curtis; Roehner, Nicholas; Densmore, Douglas

    2017-04-03

    Design automation refers to a category of software tools for designing systems that work together in a workflow for designing, building, testing, and analyzing systems with a target behavior. In synthetic biology, these tools are called bio-design automation (BDA) tools. In this review, we discuss the BDA tools areas-specify, design, build, test, and learn-and introduce the existing software tools designed to solve problems in these areas. We then detail the functionality of some of these tools and show how they can be used together to create the desired behavior of two types of modern synthetic genetic regulatory networks.

  8. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  9. Synthetic biology and its promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel De Cózar Escalante

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new science and emerging technology, or rather a technoscience, which converges with others such as nanotechnology, information technology, robotics, artificial intelligence and neuroscience. All have common features that could have highly concerning social and environmental impacts. With its ambitious goals of controlling complexity, redesigning and creating new living entities, synthetic biology perfectly exemplifies the new bioeconomic reality. This requires expanding the focus of the discussion beyond the limited comparative analysis of risks and benefits, to address uncertainties, reassign responsibilities and initiate a thorough social assessment of what is at stake.

  10. FRESHWATER FISHERY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Homen

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available As fishery, including freshwater, is very important for economy of the Republic of Croatia, the aim of this paper is to show its condition from 1995 to 1998. and also to draw a plan for fish production in 1999. The period from 1998-1999. is more stressed in order to have a total and detailed view into the present condition of the freshwater fishery and into the direction in wish that production is going. Data about carp ponds and also about trout ponds is presented. Twentynine fish-ponds are processed out of which 20 are carp ponds and 9 trout ponds. Data was delivered to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Fisheries Directorate. An assessment of the condition is made for 3 fish-ponds as the desired data was not provided. As to the number of employees on fish-ponds, a slight decline could be percived in the period from 1995 to 1997. In 1998 a number of employees considerably increased for 10.07% in relation to 1997. qualification of the employees in 1998. show that the most of them are unqualified what is in accord with the requirements of a job on a fish-pond. Overall surface of the carp ponds in 1998 was 12,708 and the production surface was 9,782 ha. The most of the fish-ponds have up to 500 ha of total surface (45.45%, while 50% of the fish-ponds have production surface from 500-100 ha. The production in the trout ponds is made on 165,905 m 2 of the overall surface of the ponds, and only 40,538 m 2 are the production surface of the ponds. The production of fish in that period was in constant increase and that increasing trend in expected in 1999, and it will be an 28.30 % increase in relation to 1998. The increase is expected for all kids of fish except for big head carps, silver carps and tinch fishs. As a part of the production of tinch fishs an increase in production of consumption tinch fish is expected, but a decrease in production of one-year and two-year old fishs and two-year old fish. Out of all kinds of fish, the most produced

  11. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread evidence shows that the modern rates of extinction in many plants and animals exceed background rates in the fossil record. In the present article, I investigate this issue with regard to North American freshwater fishes. From 1898 to 2006, 57 taxa became extinct, and three distinct populations were extirpated from the continent. Since 1989, the numbers of extinct North American fishes have increased by 25%. From the end of the nineteenth century to the present, modern extinctions varied by decade but significantly increased after 1950 (post-1950s mean = 7.5 extinct taxa per decade). In the twentieth century, freshwater fishes had the highest extinction rate worldwide among vertebrates. The modern extinction rate for North American freshwater fishes is conservatively estimated to be 877 times greater than the background extinction rate for freshwater fishes (one extinction every 3 million years). Reasonable estimates project that future increases in extinctions will range from 53 to 86 species by 2050.

  12. Imperiled Freshwater and Diadromous Fishes of North America

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — List of imperiled freshwater and diadromous fishes of North America as determined by the 2008 American Fisheries Society (AFS) Endangered Species Committee (ESC) on...

  13. Freshwater mussels of Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of 2004 freshwater mussel inventory on Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge. The Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge was established for the...

  14. Caernarvon freshwater diversion: Contaminants monitoring study (interim report)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion Structure was completed in January 1991 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose of the structure is to divert...

  15. Bibliography on cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRiviere, M.G.; Scott, A.J.; Woodfield, W.G.; Cushing, C.E.

    1978-07-01

    This bibliography is a listing of pertinent literature directly addressing the cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems. Data on cycling, including the influences of environmental mediators, are included. 151 references.

  16. The freshwater ecology of Amchitka Island: Progress reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the freshwater ecology of Amchitka Island. The objective of the study was to conduct a preliminary survey of lake types including chemical,...

  17. Freshwater mussels of North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A literature search of the distribution of freshwater mussels anticipated to be found on refuges assoicated with the North Mississippi Refuges Cjomplex and museum...

  18. A new numerical benchmark of a freshwater lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, L.; Walther, M.; Graf, T.

    2016-04-01

    A numerical benchmark for 2-D variable-density flow and solute transport in a freshwater lens is presented. The benchmark is based on results of laboratory experiments conducted by Stoeckl and Houben (2012) using a sand tank on the meter scale. This benchmark describes the formation and degradation of a freshwater lens over time as it can be found under real-world islands. An error analysis gave the appropriate spatial and temporal discretization of 1 mm and 8.64 s, respectively. The calibrated parameter set was obtained using the parameter estimation tool PEST. Comparing density-coupled and density-uncoupled results showed that the freshwater-saltwater interface position is strongly dependent on density differences. A benchmark that adequately represents saltwater intrusion and that includes realistic features of coastal aquifers or freshwater lenses was lacking. This new benchmark was thus developed and is demonstrated to be suitable to test variable-density groundwater models applied to saltwater intrusion investigations.

  19. Sublethal haematological effects of zinc on the freshwater fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Delta State University, ... exposure of a freshwater fish, Heteroclarias sp. to sublethal concentrations (5.0 .... Spain). Red and white blood cell counts were counted under light.

  20. Freshwater fishes of suriname : the genus Heptapterus (Pimelodidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, G.F.

    1967-01-01

    Ichthyological investigations in Suriname, carried out in connection with the "Brokopondo project", financed jointly by the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie and the Stichting voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek in de Tropen, have yielded large collections of freshwater fishes. These collections will

  1. Predicting freshwater habitat integrity using land-use surrogates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Keywords: freshwater habitat integrity, land use, GIS, conservation planning, predictive modelling. Introduction ... One reason for the disparity between freshwa- ... Definitions of river health and ecological integrity, and.

  2. Stimulatory activity of four green freshwater sponges on aquatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stimulatory activity of four green freshwater sponges on aquatic mycotal communities. ... The influence of the four species of green sponges (Ephydatia muelleri, Heteromeyenia stepanowii, Spongilla fluviatilis, and Spongilla ... Article Metrics.

  3. Phthalate ester plasticizers in freshwater systems of Venda, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phthalate ester plasticizers in freshwater systems of Venda, South Africa and potential health effects. ... Abstract. Phthalate ester plasticizers were determined in rivers and dams of the Venda region, South Africa. Liquid-liquid ... Article Metrics.

  4. [Latin American malacology. Freshwater mollusks from Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, Alejandra; Gregoric, Diego E Gutiérrez; Núñez, Verónica; Darrigran, Gustavo A

    2008-03-01

    A report and an updated list with comments on the species of freshwater molluscs of Argentina which covers an area of 2 777 815 km2 is presented. Distributions of Gastropoda and Bivalvia families, endemic, exotic, invasive as well as entities of sanitary importance are also studied and recommendations on their conservation are provided. Molluscs related to the Del Plata Basin have been thoroughly studied in comparison to others areas of the country. This fauna exhibits relatively the biggest specific richness and keeps its affinity with the fauna of other regions of the basin in areas of Paraguay and Brasil. The 4 500 records of molluscs considered in this paper arise from the study of the collections of Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Buenos Aires; Museo de La Plata, La Plata and Fundación "Miguel Lillo", Tucumán. These institutions keep very important collections of molluscs in southern South America. Field information has recently been obtained and localities cited by other authors are also included in the data base. Until today, 166 species have been described, 101 belonging to 10 families of Gastropoda and 65 to 7 of Bivalvia. Families with highest specific richness are Lithoglyphidae (22) and Sphaeriidae (25), respectively. The number of endemic species (those present only in Argentina) by family is: Gastropoda: Ampullariidae (1), Cochliopidae (10), Lithoglyphidae (11), Thiariidae (3), Chilinidae (11), Lymnaeidae (2) and Physidae (2?); Bivalvia: Hyriidae (1?); Etheriidae (1?) and Sphaeriidae (10). Families with a distribution that comprise almost the whole country are: the Sphaeriidae and the gastropods Cochliopidae, Chilinidae and Lymnaeidae. Families Erodonidae and Solecurtidae (Bivalvia) were registered in mixohaline environments from Buenos Aires province. Gastropod families Thiaridae and Glacidorbiidae show a very restricted distribution. The rest of the families are present mainly in the center and north of the country

  5. Ecological speciation in marine v. freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, O

    2009-10-01

    Absolute barriers to dispersal are not common in marine systems, and the prevalence of planktonic larvae in marine taxa provides potential for gene flow across large geographic distances. These observations raise the fundamental question in marine evolutionary biology as to whether geographic and oceanographic barriers alone can account for the high levels of species diversity observed in marine environments such as coral reefs, or whether marine speciation also operates in the presence of gene flow between diverging populations. In this respect, the ecological hypothesis of speciation, in which reproductive isolation results from divergent or disruptive natural selection, is of particular interest because it may operate in the presence of gene flow. Although important insights into the process of ecological speciation in aquatic environments have been provided by the study of freshwater fishes, comparatively little is known about the possibility of ecological speciation in marine teleosts. In this study, the evidence consistent with different aspects of the ecological hypothesis of speciation is evaluated in marine fishes. Molecular approaches have played a critical role in the development of speciation hypotheses in marine fishes, with a role of ecology suggested by the occurrence of sister clades separated by ecological factors, rapid cladogenesis or the persistence of genetically and ecologically differentiated species in the presence of gene flow. Yet, ecological speciation research in marine fishes is still largely at an exploratory stage. Cases where the major ingredients of ecological speciation, namely a source of natural divergent or disruptive selection, a mechanism of reproductive isolation and a link between the two have been explicitly documented are few. Even in these cases, specific predictions of the ecological hypothesis of speciation remain largely untested. Recent developments in the study of freshwater fishes illustrate the potential for

  6. Environmental Impact Research Program. An Instruction Report on Freshwater Mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    appears to be specific in the digestion of carbohydrates . Undigested material passes through the intestine and out the anus into an area near the excurrent...stomachs of large catfish, freshwater drum, and aquatic turtles . h. At times of low water in bayous, canals, creeks, and marshes. i. In large rivers...Badman, D. G., and Chin, S. L. 1973. " Metabolic Responses of the Fresh-Water Bivalve, Pleurobema coccineum (Conrad), to Anaerobic Conditions

  7. Restricted-range fishes and the conservation of Brazilian freshwaters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Nogueira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geographic resolution. Brazil harbors the richest freshwater ichthyofauna in the world, but knowledge on endemic areas and conservation in Brazilian rivers is still scarce. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data on environmental threats and revised species distribution data we detect and delineate 540 small watershed areas harboring 819 restricted-range fishes in Brazil. Many of these areas are already highly threatened, as 159 (29% watersheds have lost more than 70% of their original vegetation cover, and only 141 (26% show significant overlap with formally protected areas or indigenous lands. We detected 220 (40% critical watersheds overlapping hydroelectric dams or showing both poor formal protection and widespread habitat loss; these sites harbor 344 endemic fish species that may face extinction if no conservation action is in place in the near future. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first analysis of site-scale conservation priorities in the richest freshwater ecosystems of the globe. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that freshwater biodiversity has been neglected in former conservation assessments. The study provides a simple and straightforward method for detecting freshwater priority areas based on endemism and threat, and represents a starting point for integrating freshwater and terrestrial conservation in representative and biogeographically consistent site-scale conservation strategies, that may be scaled-up following naturally linked

  8. Freshwater Cyanobacteria (Blue-Green Algae) Toxins: Isolation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-15

    exclusively caused by strains of species that are members of the L division Cyanophyta , commonly called blue -green algae or cyanobacteria . Although...0 0 Lfl (NAD FRESHWATER CYANOBACTERIA ( BLUE -GREEN ALGAE ) TOXINS: ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION ANNCUAL REPORT Wayne W. Carmichael Sarojini Bose...Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 62770A 6277GA871 AA 378 11 TITLE &who* Secwn~y C11mrfaon) Freshwater Cyanobacteria ( blue -green algae ) Toxins: Isolation

  9. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    André Rinaldo Garraffoni; Thiago Araujo; Anete Lourenço; Maria Balsamo

    2010-01-01

    Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, C. heideri, C. cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an undescribed species belonging ...

  10. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    André R. S. Garraffoni; Araujo, Thiago Q.; Lourenço, Anete P.; Balsamo, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, Chaetonotus heideri, Chaetonotus cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an und...

  11. Optimizing Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Spatial compound images are constructed from synthetic aperture data acquired using a linear phased-array transducer. Compound images of wires, tissue, and cysts are created using a method, which allows both transmit and receive compounding without any loss in temporal resolution. Similarly to co...

  12. Stereoscopy in cinematographic synthetic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Jonathan; Parent, Rick

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present experiments and results pertaining to the perception of depth in stereoscopic viewing of synthetic imagery. In computer animation, typical synthetic imagery is highly textured and uses stylized illumination of abstracted material models by abstracted light source models. While there have been numerous studies concerning stereoscopic capabilities, conventions for staging and cinematography in stereoscopic movies have not yet been well-established. Our long-term goal is to measure the effectiveness of various cinematography techniques on the human visual system in a theatrical viewing environment. We would like to identify the elements of stereoscopic cinema that are important in terms of enhancing the viewer's understanding of a scene as well as providing guidelines for the cinematographer relating to storytelling. In these experiments we isolated stereoscopic effects by eliminating as many other visual cues as is reasonable. In particular, we aim to empirically determine what types of movement in synthetic imagery affect the perceptual depth sensing capabilities of our viewers. Using synthetic imagery, we created several viewing scenarios in which the viewer is asked to locate a target object's depth in a simple environment. The scenarios were specifically designed to compare the effectiveness of stereo viewing, camera movement, and object motion in aiding depth perception. Data were collected showing the error between the choice of the user and the actual depth value, and patterns were identified that relate the test variables to the viewer's perceptual depth accuracy in our theatrical viewing environment.

  13. Synthetic Biological Engineering of Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    photosynthesis into artificial metabolic pathways. During the course of the granting period, we also made significant progress on understanding the...compartmentalization of carbon fixation and flux in relationship to photosynthesis and obtained 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Synthetic Biological Engineering of Photosynthesis The views, opinions and/or

  14. Digital 'faces' of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Kathrin

    2013-06-01

    In silicio design plays a fundamental role in the endeavour to synthesise biological systems. In particular, computer-aided design software enables users to manage the complexity of biological entities that is connected to their construction and reconfiguration. The software's graphical user interface bridges the gap between the machine-readable data on the algorithmic subface of the computer and its human-amenable surface represented by standardised diagrammatic elements. Notations like the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), together with interactive operations such as drag & drop, allow the user to visually design and simulate synthetic systems as 'bio-algorithmic signs'. Finally, the digital programming process should be extended to the wet lab to manufacture the designed synthetic biological systems. By exploring the different 'faces' of synthetic biology, I argue that in particular computer-aided design (CAD) is pushing the idea to automatically produce de novo objects. Multifaceted software processes serve mutually aesthetic, epistemic and performative purposes by simultaneously black-boxing and bridging different data sources, experimental operations and community-wide standards. So far, synthetic biology is mainly a product of digital media technologies that structurally mimic the epistemological challenge to take both qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of biological systems into account in order to understand and produce new and functional entities.

  15. Forthcoming Oversupply for Synthetic Ammonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhantong

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable output increase The total capacity of synthetic ammonia in China is 52.0 million t/a today.There are around 540 producers mainly located in Shandong, Shanxi, Hebei,Henan, Jiangsu and Sichuan provinces.The cumulative capacity in Shandong province ranks the highest, accounting for 14.6% of the national total.

  16. Broadband Synthetic Ground Motion Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset contains broadband synthetic ground motion records for three events: 1) 1994 M6.7 Northridge, CA, 2) 1989 M7.0 Loma Prieta, CA, and 3) 1999 M7.5 Izmit,...

  17. Where Synthetic Biology Meets ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  18. Synthetic biology meets tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jamie A; Cachat, Elise

    2016-06-15

    Classical tissue engineering is aimed mainly at producing anatomically and physiologically realistic replacements for normal human tissues. It is done either by encouraging cellular colonization of manufactured matrices or cellular recolonization of decellularized natural extracellular matrices from donor organs, or by allowing cells to self-organize into organs as they do during fetal life. For repair of normal bodies, this will be adequate but there are reasons for making unusual, non-evolved tissues (repair of unusual bodies, interface to electromechanical prostheses, incorporating living cells into life-support machines). Synthetic biology is aimed mainly at engineering cells so that they can perform custom functions: applying synthetic biological approaches to tissue engineering may be one way of engineering custom structures. In this article, we outline the 'embryological cycle' of patterning, differentiation and morphogenesis and review progress that has been made in constructing synthetic biological systems to reproduce these processes in new ways. The state-of-the-art remains a long way from making truly synthetic tissues, but there are now at least foundations for future work. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. The synthetic biology open language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Chris; Clancy, Kevin; Misirli, Goksel; Oberortner, Ernst; Pocock, Matthew; Quinn, Jacqueline; Roehner, Nicholas; Sauro, Herbert M

    2015-01-01

    The design and construction of engineered organisms is an emerging new discipline called synthetic biology and holds considerable promise as a new technological platform. The design of biologically engineered systems is however nontrivial, requiring contributions from a wide array of disciplines. One particular issue that confronts synthetic biologists is the ability to unambiguously describe novel designs such that they can be reengineered by a third-party. For this reason, the synthetic biology open language (SBOL) was developed as a community wide standard for formally representing biological designs. A design created by one engineering team can be transmitted electronically to another who can then use this design to reproduce the experimental results. The development and the community of the SBOL standard started in 2008 and has since grown in use with now over 80 participants, including international, academic, and industrial interests. SBOL has stimulated the development of repositories and software tools to help synthetic biologists in their design efforts. This chapter summarizes the latest developments and future of the SBOL standard and its supporting infrastructure.

  20. utilisation of synthetic amino acids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    student

    intake, bodyweight gain, egg weight or efficiency of lysine utilisation, but ... When modelling the amino acid requirements of broiler breeder ... Two hundred and forty Cobb broiler breeder hens aged 27 weeks were housed in individual cages. ..... feeds with synthetic amino acids is of importance not only on nutritional and.

  1. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  2. Acid-base responses to feeding and intestinal Cl- uptake in freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, an agastric euryhaline teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris M; Bucking, Carol; Grosell, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Marine teleosts generally secrete basic equivalents (HCO(3)(-)) and take up Na(+) and Cl(-) in the intestine so as to promote absorption of H(2)O. However, neither the integration of these functions with feeding nor the potential role of the gut in ionoregulation and acid-base balance in freshwater have been well studied. The euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is unusual in lacking both an acid-secreting stomach and a mechanism for Cl(-) uptake at the gills in freshwater. Responses to a satiation meal were evaluated in both freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish. In intact animals, there was no change in acid or base flux to the external water after the meal, in accord with the absence of any post-prandial alkaline tide in the blood. Indeed, freshwater animals exhibited a post-prandial metabolic acidosis ('acidic tide'), whereas seawater animals showed no change in blood acid-base status. In vitro gut sac experiments revealed a substantially higher rate of Cl(-) absorption by the intestine in freshwater killifish, which was greatest at 1-3 h after feeding. The Cl(-) concentration of the absorbate was higher in preparations from freshwater animals than from seawater killifish and increased with fasting. Surprisingly, net basic equivalent secretion rates were also much higher in preparations from freshwater animals, in accord with the 'acidic tide'; in seawater preparations, they were lowest after feeding and increased with fasting. Bafilomycin (1 micromol l(-1)) promoted an 80% increase in net base secretion rates, as well as in Cl(-) and fluid absorption, at 1-3 h post-feeding in seawater preparations only, explaining the difference between freshwater and seawater fish. Preparations from seawater animals at 1-3 h post-feeding also acidified the mucosal saline, and this effect was associated with a marked rise in P(CO(2)), which was attenuated by bafilomycin. Measurements of chyme pH from intact animals confirmed that intestinal fluid (chyme) pH and

  3. Diverse migration strategy between freshwater and seawater habitats in the freshwater eel genus Anguilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, T; Chino, N

    2012-07-01

    The freshwater eels of the genus Anguilla, which are catadromous, migrate between freshwater growth habitats and offshore spawning areas. A number of recent studies, however, found examples of the temperate species Anguilla anguilla, Anguilla rostrata, Anguilla japonica, Anguilla australis and Anguilla dieffenbachii that have never migrated into fresh water, spending their entire life history in the ocean. Furthermore, those studies found an intermediate type between marine and freshwater residents, which appear to frequently move between different environments during their growth phase. The discovery of marine and brackish-water residents Anguilla spp. suggests that they do not all have to be catadromous, and it calls into question the generalized classification of diadromous fishes. There has been little available information, however, concerning migration in tropical Anguilla spp. Anguilla marmorata, shows three fluctuation patterns: (1) continuous residence in fresh water, (2) continuous residence in brackish water and (3) residence in fresh water after recruitment, while returning to brackish water. Such migratory patterns were found in other tropical species, Anguilla bicolor bicolor and Anguilla bicolor pacifica. In A. b. bicolor collected in a coastal lagoon of Indonesia, two further patterns of habitat use were found: (1) constantly living in either brackish water or sea water with no freshwater life and (2) habitat shift from fresh water to brackish water or sea water. The wide range of environmental habitat use indicates that migratory behaviour of tropical Anguilla spp. is facultative among fresh, brackish and marine waters during their growth phases after recruitment to the coastal areas. Further, the migratory behaviours of tropical Anguilla spp. appear to differ in each habitat in response to inter and intra-specific competition. The results suggest that tropical Anguilla spp. have a flexible pattern of migration, with an ability to adapt to various

  4. Acid phosphatase complex from the freshwater snail Viviparus viviparus L. under standard conditions and intoxication by cadmium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, I L; Popov, A P; Konichev, A S

    2003-12-01

    Acid phosphatases differing in both subcellular localization and substrate specificity were isolated for the first time from the liver of the freshwater snail Viviparus viviparus L. by preparative isoelectrofocusing. One of five characterized phosphatases is highly specific to ADP and the others can hydrolyze (at variable rate) a series of natural substrates. A scheme is proposed for the involvement of the studied phosphatases in carbohydrate metabolism. We have also studied some peculiarities of the effect of Cd2+ in vitro and in vivo on the activities of individual components of the acid phosphatase complex and corresponding changes in metabolism of the freshwater snail as a new test-object allowing the estimation of toxicity in water.

  5. Investigation of strength properties of freshwater ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragov A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the strength and deformation properties of freshwater ice under compression, tension and shear in a wide range of strain rates (10−4 − 3 ⋅ 103 s−1 and temperatures of − 5∘ C, − 20∘ C, − 40∘ C and − 60∘ C was performed. Static stress-strain curves of ice under compression were obtained on which the identified strength properties of ice as well as compressive modulus. To determine the mechanical properties of ice at high-speed loading the Kolsky method was used with various embodiments of split Hopkinson bar. The deformation curves were obtained at various loading conditions. Thereon breaking points were defined as well as their dependence on the strain rate and temperature. Also static and dynamic strength properties of ice at splitting and circular shear were defined. Increase in the dynamic strength properties upon the static ones for all loading conditions was marked.

  6. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in freshwaters of Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Bonilla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are a worldwide environmental problem. This phenomenon is typically associated with eutrophication (nutrient enrichment and changes in hydrology. In this study we analysed the distribution of planktonic cyanobacteria in Uruguay and their toxins (microcystin, saxitoxin and cylindrospermopsin, working with an interagency team (OSE, DINAMA, IM, University of the Republic and IIBCE. An historical data base (n = 3061 for 64 ecosystems, years 1980-2014 was generated. Differences between lotic and lentic ecosystems were found in terms of chlorophyll a and nutrient concentrations, usually indicating eutrophication. Two geo-referenced maps for the country were generated with cyanobacteria biomass indicators and the most relevant toxin (microcystin, according to risk levels suggested by the World Health Organization for recreational waters. The areas of greatest risk of exposure were the reservoirs of large rivers (Uruguay and Río Negro and Río de la Plata beaches. In the second part of the study, up to 20 mg L-1of microcystin was quantified in bloom (scum samples, as well as the presence of genes that suggest more microcystin varieties, potentially with greater toxicity. This study provides basic information about the distribution of cyanobacteria in Uruguayan freshwaters that will be useful for national monitoring programs and scientific research.

  7. Title: Freshwater phytoplankton responses to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Fanesi, Andrea; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-09-20

    Global warming alters species composition and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, the impact of temperature on primary productivity is not sufficiently understood and water quality models need to be improved in order to assess the quantitative and qualitative changes of aquatic communities. On the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that the commonly used photosynthetic and water chemistry parameters alone are not sufficient for modeling phytoplankton growth under changing temperature regimes. We present some new aspects of the acclimation process with respect to temperature and how contrasting responses may be explained by a more complete physiological knowledge of the energy flow from photons to new biomass. We further suggest including additional bio-markers/traits for algal growth such as carbon allocation patterns to increase the explanatory power of such models. Although carbon allocation patterns are promising and functional cellular traits for growth prediction under different nutrient and light conditions, their predictive power still waits to be tested with respect to temperature. A great challenge for the near future will be the prediction of primary production efficiencies under the global change scenario using a uniform model for phytoplankton assemblages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Arsenic speciation patterns in freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slejkovec, Zdenka; Bajc, Zlatka; Doganoc, Darinka Z

    2004-04-19

    Muscle of 16 freshwater fish (9 different species belonging to 4 different families) was analysed for arsenic species using HPLC separation (anion and cation exchange) followed by on-line UV-decomposition, hydride generation and AFS detection. The main arsenic compounds found in the extracts were arsenobetaine (AsB), which accounted for 92-100% of extractable arsenic in species of salmonids (Salmo marmoratus, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Salmo trutta m. fario), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), which accounted for 75% of extractable arsenic in burbot (Lota lota). AsB was also found in lower concentrations in almost all other fish species analysed (Silurus glanis, L. lota, Barbus barbus, Rutilus pigus virgo, Chondrostoma nasus). Arsenite (As(III)) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were detected in low concentrations in some representatives of Cyprinidae only (R. pigus virgo, C. nasus). Except in salmonids, an unknown cationic compound was present in most of the samples in relatively low concentrations. Cluster analysis of the generated data seems to indicate that there is a correlation between fish family and the arsenic speciation pattern. This is especially clear for the salmonids which show a completely separate cluster and thus a very distinct arsenic speciation pattern.

  9. Biomass production by freshwater and marine macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, W.J.; Gerard, V.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Research on aquatic macrophytes as producers of biomass has been undertaken at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) on the east coast and on the west coast by a group of collaborators in a joint effort known as the Marine Biomass Project. Studies at WHOI have focused on estuarine and coastal situations with some attention recently to freshwater plants. The Marine Farm Project has primarily been concerned with oceanic biomass production. A group at WHOI has undertaken a wide variety of studies concerning aquatic macrophytes including nutrient uptake, growth, yields, and environmental factors affecting yields. Aquatic biomass production systems have been surveyed on a worldwide basis and currently the role of carbon as a potential limiting nutrient in biomass culturing is being examined. The Marine Farm Project is presently attempting to grow giant kelp in offshore waters off southern California. Other work related to aquatic biomass production includes an investigation at the University of California, Berkeley, of microalgae in ponds. This paper will emphasize discussion of the kelp production phases of the Marine Farm Project. Activities by the WHOI are briefly summarized.

  10. A Systematic Examination of Colour Development in Synthetic Ultramarine According to Historical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Hamerton; Lauren Tedaldi; Nicholas Eastaugh

    2013-01-01

    A number of historical texts are investigated to ascertain the optimum conditions for the preparation of synthetic ultramarine, using preparative methods that would have been available to alchemists and colour chemists of the nineteenth century. The effect of varying the proportion of sulphur in the starting material on the colour of the final product is investigated. The optimum preparation involves heating a homogenised, pelletised mixture of kaolin (100 parts), sodium carbonate (100 parts)...

  11. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillus (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12--21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values. Attachments to this report include: Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Copper analysis request and results; and Personnel training documentation.

  12. Characteristics of Color Produced by Awa Natural Indigo and Synthetic Indigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyoko Kawahito

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Color of cloth dyed with Awa natural indigo is quantitatively compared with color of the cloth dyed with synthetic indigo. Results showed that: 1 color produced by Awa natural indigo is bluer and brighter than color produced by synthetic indigo; 2 a single Gaussian function fits the profile of the running of color produced by Awa natural indigo and the running of color produced by synthetic indigo prepared with sodium hydrosulfite approximates a linear sum of two Gaussian functions; 3 before and after washing, color is quantitatively more uneven when produced by Awa natural indigo than when produced by synthetic indigo; 4 the diffusion coefficient of Awa natural indigo is lower than that of synthetic indigo; 5 color superiority of Awa natural indigorelates to smaller diffusion coefficient, slower reduction, poorer penetration, and higher dye aggregation.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of land and freshwater planarians (Tricladida, Platyhelminthes): from freshwater to land and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Presas, Marta; Baguñà, Jaume; Riutort, Marta

    2008-05-01

    The suborder Tricladida (phylum Platyhelminthes) comprises the well-known free-living flatworms, taxonomically grouped into three infraorders according to their ecology: Maricola (marine planarians), Paludicola (freshwater planarians), and Terricola (land planarians). Molecular analyses have demonstrated that the Paludicola are paraphyletic, the Terricola being the sister group of one of the three paludicolan families, the Dugesiidae. However, neither 18S rDNA nor COI based trees have been able to resolve the relationships among species of Terricola and Dugesiidae, particularly the monophyly of Terricola. Here, we present new molecular data including sequences of nuclear genes (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA) and a mitochondrial gene (COI) of a wider sample of dugesiid and terricolan species. The new sequences have been analyzed, together with those previously obtained, in independent and concatenated analyses using maximum likelihood and bayesian methods. The results show that, although some parts of the trees remain poorly resolved, they support a monophyletic origin for Terricola followed by a likely return of some species to freshwater habitats. Relationships within the monophyletic group of Dugesiidae are clearly resolved, and relationships among some terricolan subfamilies are also clearly established and point to the need for a thorough revision of Terricola taxonomy.

  14. Microplastics ingestion by a common tropical freshwater fishing resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Cavalcanti, Jacqueline Santos; Silva, José Diego B; França, Elton José de; Araújo, Maria Christina Barbosa de; Gusmão, Felipe

    2017-02-01

    Microplastics pollution is widespread in marine ecosystems and a major threat to biodiversity. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the impacts of microplastics in freshwater environments and biota is still very limited. The interaction of microplastics with freshwater organisms and the risks associated with the human consumption of organisms that ingested microplastics remain major knowledge gaps. In this study, we assessed the ingestion of microplastics by Hoplosternum littorale, a common freshwater fish heavily consumed by humans in semi-arid regions of South America. We assessed the abundance and diversity of both plastic debris and other food items found in the gut of fishes caught by local fishermen. We observed that 83% of the fish had plastic debris inside the gut, the highest frequency reported for a fish species so far. Most of the plastic debris (88.6%) recovered from the guts of fish were microplastics (microplastics at the urbanized sections of the river, and that the ingestion of microplastics was negatively correlated with the diversity of other food items in the gut of individual fish. Nevertheless, microplastics ingestion appears to have a limited impact on H. littorale, and the consequences of human consumption of this fish were not assessed. Our results suggest freshwater biota are vulnerable to microplastics pollution and that urbanization is a major factor contributing to the pollution of freshwater environments with microplastics. We suggest the gut content of fish could be used as a tool for the qualitative assessment of microplastics pollution in freshwater ecosystems. Further research is needed to determine the processes responsible for the high incidence of microplastics ingestion by H. littorale, and to evaluate the risk posed to humans by the consumption of freshwater fish that ingested microplastics.

  15. New Zealand Freshwater Management: Changing Policy for a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, H. L.; Norton, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fresh water is essential to New Zealand's economic, environmental, cultural and social well-being. In line with global trends, New Zealand's freshwater resources are under pressure from increased abstraction and changes in land-use which contribute contaminants to our freshwater systems. Recent central government policy reform introduces greater national direction and guidance, to bring about a step-change in freshwater management. An existing national policy for freshwater management introduced in 2011 requires regional authorities to produce freshwater management plans containing clear freshwater objectives (measurable statements about the desired environmental state for water bodies) and associated limits to resource use (such as environmental flows and quantity allocation limits, and loads of contaminants to be discharged). These plans must integrate water quantity and quality management, consider climate change, and incorporate tangata whenua (New Zealand māori) roles and interests. In recent (2014) national policy amendments, the regional authorities are also required to implement national 'bottom-line' standards for certain attributes of the system to be managed; undertake accounting for all water takes and all sources of contaminants; and to develop and implement their plans in a collaborative way with communities. This rapid change in national policy has necessitated a new way of working for authorities tasked with implementation; many obstacles lie in their path. The scientific methods required to help set water quantity limits are well established, but water quality methods are less so. Collaborative processes have well documented benefits but also raise many challenges, particularly for the communication of complex and often uncertain scientific information. This paper provides background on the national policy changes and offers some early lessons learned by the regional authorities implementing collaborative freshwater management in New Zealand.

  16. Anthropogenic litter in urban freshwater ecosystems: distribution and microbial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in freshwater habitats. We quantified AL from the Chicago River and Chicago's Lake Michigan shoreline, and found that AL abundance in Chicago freshwater ecosystems was comparable to previously reported data for marine and terrestrial ecosystems, although AL density and composition differed among habitats. To assess microbial interactions with AL, we incubated AL and natural substrates in 3 freshwater ecosystems, quantified biofilm metabolism as gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (CR), and characterized biofilm bacterial community composition via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The main driver of biofilm community composition was incubation location (e.g., river vs pond), but there were some significant differences in biofilm composition and metabolism among substrates. For example, biofilms on organic substrates (cardboard and leaves) had lower GPP than hard substrates (glass, plastic, aluminum and tiles). In addition, bacterial communities on organic substrates were distinct in composition from those on hard substrates, with higher relative abundances of bacteria associated with cellulose decomposition. Finally, we used our results to develop a conceptual diagram designed to unite the study of AL in terrestrial and freshwater environments with the well-established field of marine debris research. We suggest this broad perspective will be useful for future studies which synthesize AL sources, ecosystem effects, and fate across multiple ecosystem

  17. Large-scale degradation of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Leandro; Macedo, Marcia N

    2016-03-01

    Hydrological connectivity regulates the structure and function of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems and the provisioning of services that sustain local populations. This connectivity is increasingly being disrupted by the construction of dams, mining, land-cover changes, and global climate change. This review analyzes these drivers of degradation, evaluates their impacts on hydrological connectivity, and identifies policy deficiencies that hinder freshwater ecosystem protection. There are 154 large hydroelectric dams in operation today, and 21 dams under construction. The current trajectory of dam construction will leave only three free-flowing tributaries in the next few decades if all 277 planned dams are completed. Land-cover changes driven by mining, dam and road construction, agriculture and cattle ranching have already affected ~20% of the Basin and up to ~50% of riparian forests in some regions. Global climate change will likely exacerbate these impacts by creating warmer and dryer conditions, with less predictable rainfall and more extreme events (e.g., droughts and floods). The resulting hydrological alterations are rapidly degrading freshwater ecosystems, both independently and via complex feedbacks and synergistic interactions. The ecosystem impacts include biodiversity loss, warmer stream temperatures, stronger and more frequent floodplain fires, and changes to biogeochemical cycles, transport of organic and inorganic materials, and freshwater community structure and function. The impacts also include reductions in water quality, fish yields, and availability of water for navigation, power generation, and human use. This degradation of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems cannot be curbed presently because existing policies are inconsistent across the Basin, ignore cumulative effects, and overlook the hydrological connectivity of freshwater ecosystems. Maintaining the integrity of these freshwater ecosystems requires a basinwide research and policy framework

  18. ELECTROOXIDATION OF USED SYNTHETIC ENGINE OIL IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION OF H2SO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Piotr Włodarczyk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possibility of using used synthetic engine oil to direct electricity production. The measurements conducted in the temperature range 293-333 K. Were measured electrooxidation of used synthetic engine oil emulsion on a smooth platinum electrode in an aqueous solution of H2SO4. The emulsion prepared on the basis of a nonionic surfactant Syntanol DS-10. The maximum current density reached the level of 22 mA/cm2 (temp. 333 K. Measurements shows possibility of direct electricity production from used synthetic engine oil emulsion, so powering fuel cell of this oil.

  19. Synthetic biology character and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Pade, Christian; Wigger, Henning; Gleich, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is already an object of intensive debate. However, to a great extent the discussion to date has been concerned with fundamental ethical, religious and philosophical questions. By contrast, based on an investigation of the field’s scientific and technological character, this book focuses on new functionalities provided by synthetic biology and explores the associated opportunities and risks. Following an introduction to the subject and a discussion of the most central paradigms and methodologies, the book provides an overview of the structure of this field of science and technology. It informs the reader about the current stage of development, as well as topical problems and potential opportunities in important fields of application. But not only the science itself is in focus. In order to investigate its broader impact, ecological as well as ethical implications will be considered, paving the way for a discussion of responsibilities in the context of a field at a transitional crossroads be...

  20. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  1. Synthetic microbial ecosystems for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhal, Jagroop; Noirel, Josselin

    2014-06-01

    Most highly controlled and specific applications of microorganisms in biotechnology involve pure cultures. Maintaining single strain cultures is important for industry as contaminants can reduce productivity and lead to longer "down-times" during sterilisation. However, microbes working together provide distinct advantages over pure cultures. They can undertake more metabolically complex tasks, improve efficiency and even expand applications to open systems. By combining rapidly advancing technologies with ecological theory, the use of microbial ecosystems in biotechnology will inevitably increase. This review provides insight into the use of synthetic microbial communities in biotechnology by applying the engineering paradigm of measure, model, manipulate and manufacture, and illustrate the emerging wider potential of the synthetic ecology field. Systems to improve biofuel production using microalgae are also discussed.

  2. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Trudy M.; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  3. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe

    OpenAIRE

    James Fratantonio; Lawrence Andrade; Marcelo Febo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance...

  4. Non-effect of water hardness on the accumulation and toxicity of copper in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum): how useful are hardness-modified copper guidelines for protecting freshwater biota?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markich, Scott J; King, Angus R; Wilson, Scott P

    2006-12-01

    Several nations have adopted hardness-modified copper (Cu) guidelines for protecting freshwater biota. However, there is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of Cu to freshwater biota, particularly macrophytes. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (35, 90 and 335 mg CaCO(3)/l, added as Ca and Mg chloride in a 1:1 mole ratio) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (96 h growth (biomass and stem length) and photosynthetic pigment inhibition) of Cu in the free-floating submerged macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum, in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (16 mg CaCO(3)/l) and pH (7.0). There were no significant (P>0.05) differences in the cell surface binding affinity, accumulation or toxicity of Cu in C. demersum with a 10-fold increase in water hardness from 35 to 335 mg CaCO(3)/l. The mean 96 h EC(50) values (and 95% confidence intervals) for biomass, the most sensitive endpoint, were 8.4 (7.6-9.2), 8.9 (8.0-9.8) and 9.9 (9.1-10.7) microg/l Cu for 35, 90 and 335 mg CaCO(3)/l, respectively. Speciation calculations indicated only very small (1-6%) differences in the percentage distribution (i.e. bioavailability) of Cu over the hardness range. These collective results indicate no apparent competition between Cu and Ca/Mg for binding sites on the cell surface. Given that the mechanism of Cu uptake (via Cu-specific and Na-linked transporters) is fundamentally different to that of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn (via Ca transporters), for which other hardness-dependent algorithms have been developed, it is doubtful whether a hardness-modified Cu guideline value will be sufficiently protective of sensitive freshwater biota, such as C. demersum, particularly in medium-hard fresh surface waters with low levels of dissolved organic carbon. The biotic ligand model offers a more flexible and mechanistic

  5. Cell microencapsulation with synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi, Ronke M

    2015-02-01

    The encapsulation of cells into polymeric microspheres or microcapsules has permitted the transplantation of cells into human and animal subjects without the need for immunosuppressants. Cell-based therapies use donor cells to provide sustained release of a therapeutic product, such as insulin, and have shown promise in treating a variety of diseases. Immunoisolation of these cells via microencapsulation is a hotly investigated field, and the preferred material of choice has been alginate, a natural polymer derived from seaweed due to its gelling conditions. Although many natural polymers tend to gel in conditions favorable to mammalian cell encapsulation, there remain challenges such as batch to batch variability and residual components from the original source that can lead to an immune response when implanted into a recipient. Synthetic materials have the potential to avoid these issues; however, historically they have required harsh polymerization conditions that are not favorable to mammalian cells. As research into microencapsulation grows, more investigators are exploring methods to microencapsulate cells into synthetic polymers. This review describes a variety of synthetic polymers used to microencapsulate cells. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Coherence Studies for Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coherence Studies for Synthetic Aperture Sonar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-13-1-0020 5c. PROGRAM...systematic look at, coherence. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Synthetic; Aperture Sonar , Coherence, Seafloor Scatter, Propagation Variability 16. SECURITY...reconstruction of the document. Coherence Studies for Synthetic Aperture Sonar Anthony P. Lyons The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research

  7. 21 CFR 178.3500 - Glycerin, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycerin, synthetic. 178.3500 Section 178.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3500 Glycerin, synthetic. Synthetic glycerin may be...

  8. Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

    2013-08-13

    Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

  9. An Integrated Laboratory Approach toward the Preparation of Conductive Poly(phenylene vinylene) Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoerzer, Timm A.; Balaich, Gary J.; Miller, Hannah A.; Iacono, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(phenylene vinylene) (PPV) represents an important class of conjugated, conducting polymers that have been readily exploited in the preparation of organic electronic materials. In this experiment, students prepare a PPV polymer via a facile multistep synthetic sequence with robust spectroscopic evaluation of synthetic intermediates and the…

  10. Groundwater Exploration in Freshwater/Saline Layered Aquifers - Southern Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, P. A.; Rahman, M.

    2001-05-01

    A major urban water supply and sanitation project is being implemented in the southern coastal districts of Bangladesh, by the Governments of Bangladesh and Denmark (DPHE/DANIDA). Due to the poor quality and reliability of surface water in the coastal districts, the source for these schemes will be groundwater. However, the abstraction of large quantities of water is complicated by the fact that the shallow aquifers are thin and of poor hydraulic quality. In addition, there is saline water underlying the shallow aquifer and, in recent years, arsenic has been discovered in many shallow wells throughout Bangladesh. Over the majority of the coastal districts, a thick freshwater sand underlies the saline aquifers, at depths below 200 m. This freshwater unit is bounded by thick clays which protect it from overlying and underlying saline water. The deep aquifer has been exploited in some of the project towns but in a few areas no freshwater aquifers had been located. An exploration programme was undertaken in each of these towns to prove the location of the freshwater sands and to help plan the location and depth of production well drilling. The first exploration stage was to locate any existing deep hand pumped wells and to carry out a water quality survey. Generally, this was sufficient to prove the existence of a thick freshwater aquifer. However, exact well depths and geological data were usually lacking and an exploration well was usually required. In three of the project towns, no deep aquifers had been exploited by existing hand pumped wells and geophysical surveys were undertaken to identify the locations of freshwater aquifers. These surveys comprised resistivity sounding both within the towns and in outlying areas within a feasible pumping distance. In two cases, freshwater aquifers were inferred from the geophysical surveys and exploration drilling was undertaken to prove the resource. Exploration drilling was undertaken by local contractors using hand

  11. Freshwater biodiversity: importance, threats, status and conservation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudgeon, David; Arthington, Angela H; Gessner, Mark O; Kawabata, Zen-Ichiro; Knowler, Duncan J; Lévêque, Christian; Naiman, Robert J; Prieur-Richard, Anne-Hélène; Soto, Doris; Stiassny, Melanie L J; Sullivan, Caroline A

    2006-05-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is the over-riding conservation priority during the International Decade for Action - 'Water for Life' - 2005 to 2015. Fresh water makes up only 0.01% of the World's water and approximately 0.8% of the Earth's surface, yet this tiny fraction of global water supports at least 100000 species out of approximately 1.8 million - almost 6% of all described species. Inland waters and freshwater biodiversity constitute a valuable natural resource, in economic, cultural, aesthetic, scientific and educational terms. Their conservation and management are critical to the interests of all humans, nations and governments. Yet this precious heritage is in crisis. Fresh waters are experiencing declines in biodiversity far greater than those in the most affected terrestrial ecosystems, and if trends in human demands for water remain unaltered and species losses continue at current rates, the opportunity to conserve much of the remaining biodiversity in fresh water will vanish before the 'Water for Life' decade ends in 2015. Why is this so, and what is being done about it? This article explores the special features of freshwater habitats and the biodiversity they support that makes them especially vulnerable to human activities. We document threats to global freshwater biodiversity under five headings: overexploitation; water pollution; flow modification; destruction or degradation of habitat; and invasion by exotic species. Their combined and interacting influences have resulted in population declines and range reduction of freshwater biodiversity worldwide. Conservation of biodiversity is complicated by the landscape position of rivers and wetlands as 'receivers' of land-use effluents, and the problems posed by endemism and thus non-substitutability. In addition, in many parts of the world, fresh water is subject to severe competition among multiple human stakeholders. Protection of freshwater biodiversity is perhaps the ultimate conservation challenge

  12. Bistability of mangrove forests and competition with freshwater plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Fuller, Douglas O; Teh, Su Yean; Zhai, Lu; Koh, Hock Lye; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Sternberg, L.D.S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Halophytic communities such as mangrove forests and buttonwood hammocks tend to border freshwater plant communities as sharp ecotones. Most studies attribute this purely to underlying physical templates, such as groundwater salinity gradients caused by tidal flux and topography. However, a few recent studies hypothesize that self-reinforcing feedback between vegetation and vadose zone salinity are also involved and create a bistable situation in which either halophytic dominated habitat or freshwater plant communities may dominate as alternative stable states. Here, we revisit the bistability hypothesis and demonstrate the mechanisms that result in bistability. We demonstrate with remote sensing imagery the sharp boundaries between freshwater hardwood hammock communities in southern Florida and halophytic communities such as buttonwood hammocks and mangroves. We further document from the literature how transpiration of mangroves and freshwater plants respond differently to vadose zone salinity, thus altering the salinity through feedback. Using mathematical models, we show how the self-reinforcing feedback, together with physical template, controls the ecotones between halophytic and freshwater communities. Regions of bistability along environmental gradients of salinity have the potential for large-scale vegetation shifts following pulse disturbances such as hurricane tidal surges in Florida, or tsunamis in other regions. The size of the region of bistability can be large for low-lying coastal habitat due to the saline water table, which extends inland due to salinity intrusion. We suggest coupling ecological and hydrologic processes as a framework for future studies.

  13. LICHENS AS BIOINDICATORS IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS - CHALLENGES AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nascimbene

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper  summarizes information on freshwater lichens in relation with their potential for bioindication, mainly pointing to ecological concepts and issues of practical relevance for promoting their  inclusion in routine biomonitoring practices, thus contributing to a full implementation of the EU Water Framework directive. Results highlight the sensitiveness of freshwater lichens to some factors which cannot be technically measured by singular visits, and have relevance for human planning purposes and environmental impact and risk assessment. However, a full inclusion of freshwater lichens in monitoring practices would benefit from further ecological research testing the influence of potentially meaningful ecological drivers and developing statistically robust sampling methods. This would allow the development of standard guidelines applicable across Europe according to the policies of the EU Water Framework directive. On the taxonomical side, further DNA-based revisions and the creation of a European checklist of freshwater lichens, should provide the basis for developing modern identification tools. Finally, it is suggested that the use of freshwater lichens in biomonitoring may be improved by model studies based on comparative trials of full, quantitative, species inventories at different spatial scales and by parallel simplified approaches with selected indicator species and morphological groups.

  14. Taking High Conservation Value from Forests to Freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Robin; Morgan, Siân K.; Morgan, Alexis J.

    2015-07-01

    The high conservation value (HCV) concept, originally developed by the Forest Stewardship Council, has been widely incorporated outside the forestry sector into companies' supply chain assessments and responsible purchasing policies, financial institutions' investment policies, and numerous voluntary commodity standards. Many, if not most, of these newer applications relate to production practices that are likely to affect freshwater systems directly or indirectly, yet there is little guidance as to whether or how HCV can be applied to water bodies. We focus this paper on commodity standards and begin by exploring how prominent standards currently address both HCVs and freshwaters. We then highlight freshwater features of high conservation importance and examine how well those features are captured by the existing HCV framework. We propose a new set of freshwater `elements' for each of the six values and suggest an approach for identifying HCV Areas that takes out-of-fence line impacts into account, thereby spatially extending the scope of existing methods to define HCVs. We argue that virtually any non-marine HCV assessment, regardless of the production sector, should be expanded to include freshwater values, and we suggest how to put those recommendations into practice.

  15. Malacofauna of Holocene freshwater calcareous deposits of Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanko, Aleksander; Vainorius, Julius; Melešytė, Monika

    2010-12-01

    The malacofauna of freshwater calcareous deposits of Lithuania was studied. Sections of the Mūšos Tyrelis and Pabaliai peatbogs near the town of Šiauliai, as well as Dubičiai section (three sites) in SE Lithuania and Dūkštos in Central Lithuania were investigated. Freshwater calcareous deposits are attributed to three groups of facies - lacustrine, valley-hollow-peatbog and terrestrial. Each group of facies consists of sub-facies (freshwater lime, "gazha" (limno-calcite), peat-tufa, calcareous tufa, "mada") varying the formation conditions, composition and other characteristics. The mollusc fauna in the lacustrine facies group (Mūšos Tyrelis and Pabaliai sections) is represented by lacustrine species containing euryecological freshwater molluscs. Terrestrial and rheophilous species are rare or absent in the lacustrine group. Deposits of valley-hollow-peatbog facies contain shells of euryecological freshwater and lacustrine molluscs together with rheophyl shells, sometimes with abundant terrestrial shells, as was observed in the Dubičiai-4 section. A characteristic feature of the terrestrial facies group deposits is the occurrence of solely terrestrial mollusc shells (Dūkštos section).

  16. Sea surface freshwater flux estimates from GECCO, HOAPS and NCEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.; Klepp, C.; Andersson, A.; Bakan, S.

    2010-08-01

    Surface net freshwater flux fields, estimated from the GECCO ocean state estimation effort over the 50 yr period 1951-2001, are compared to purely satellite-based HOAPS freshwater flux estimates and to the NCEP atmospheric re-analysis net surface freshwater flux fields to assess the quality of all flux products and to improve our understanding of the time-mean surface freshwater flux distribution as well as its temporal variability. Surface flux fields are adjusted by the GECCO state estimation procedure together with initial temperature and salinity conditions so that the model simulation becomes consistent with ocean observations. The entirely independent HOAPS net surface freshwater flux fields result from the difference between SSM/I based precipitation estimates and fields of evaporation resulting from a bulk aerodynamic approach using SSM/I data and the Pathfinder SST. All three products agree well on a global scale. However, overall GECCO seems to have moved away from the NCEP/NCAR first guess surface fluxes and is often closer to the HOAPS data set. This holds for the time mean as well as for the seasonal cycle.

  17. Are insect repellents toxic to freshwater insects? A case study using caddisflies exposed to DEET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Diana; Gravato, Carlos; Quintaneiro, Carla; Koba, Olga; Randak, Tomas; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pestana, João L T

    2016-04-01

    Stream ecosystems face ever-increasing pressures by the presence of emergent contaminants, such as, personal care products. N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is a synthetic insect repellent that is being found in surface waters environments in concentrations up to 33.4 μg/L. Information concerning DEET's toxicity in the aquatic environment is still limited and focused only on its acute effects on model species. Our main objective was to assess the effects of DEET exposure to a caddisfly non-target species using sub-lethal endpoints. For that, we chose Sericostoma vittatum, an important shredder in Portuguese freshwaters that has been already used in different ecotoxicological assays. Besides acute tests, S. vittatum were exposed during 6 days to a gradient of DEET concentrations (8, 18 and 40.5 mg/L) to assess effects on feeding behaviour and biochemical responses, such as, lipid peroxidation levels (LPO), catalase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities, and also assess effects on energy reserves and consumption. Acute tests revealed a 48 h-LC50 of 80.12 mg/L and DEET exposure caused feeding inhibition with a LOEC of 36.80 mg/L. Concerning the biochemical responses, DEET caused no effects in LPO nor on catalase activity. A non-significant decrease in AChE activity was observed. Regarding energetic reserves, exposure to DEET caused a significant reduction in S. vittatum carbohydrates levels. These results add important information for the risk assessment of insect repellents in the aquatic environment and suggest that reported environmental concentrations of DEET are not toxic to non-target freshwater insects.

  18. Bioactivities of ethanol extract from the Antarctic freshwater microalga, Chloromonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Yang, Eun Jin; Lee, Sung Gu; Youn, Ui Joung; Han, Se Jong; Kim, Il-Chan; Kim, Sanghee

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is the principal cause of human death and occurs through highly complex processes that involve the multiple coordinated mechanisms of tumorigenesis. A number of studies have indicated that the microalgae extracts showed anticancer activity in a variety of human cancer cells and can provide a new insight in the development of novel anti-cancer therapy. Here, in order to investigate molecular mechanisms of anticancer activity in the Antarctic freshwater microalga, Chloromonas sp., we prepared ethanol extract of Chloromonas sp. (ETCH) and performed several in vitro assays using human normal keratinocyte (HaCaT) and different types of cancer cells including cervical, melanoma, and breast cancer cells (HeLa, A375 and Hs578T, respectively). We revealed that ETCH had the antioxidant capacity, and caused significant cell growth inhibition and apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it showed no anti-proliferation to normal cells. In addition, ETCH had a significant inhibitory effect on cell invasion without the cytotoxic effect. Furthermore, ETCH-induced apoptosis was mediated by increase in pro-apoptotic proteins including cleaved caspase-3 and p53, and by decrease in anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2 in ETCH-treated cancer cells. Taken together, this work firstly explored the antioxidant and anticancer activities of an Antarctic freshwater microalga, and ETCH could be a potential therapeutic candidate in the treatment of human cancer.

  19. Water hardness reduces the accumulation and toxicity of uranium in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markich, Scott J

    2013-01-15

    There is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of uranium (U) to freshwater biota. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (20, 75, 150, 275 and 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1)) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (growth inhibition) of U in a submerged, rootless, macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum) in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (13 mg CaCO(3) L(-1)) and pH (6.2) over 7 days. A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity (median effect concentration (EC50)=134 μg L(-1)U at 20 mg CaCO(3 )L(-1) hardness, increasing to 547 μg L(-1) U at 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness), cell surface binding affinity (log K=6.25 at 20 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness, decreasing to log K=5.64 at 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness) and accumulation (the concentration factor decreased from 63 at 20 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness to 15 at 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness) of U. Calcium provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U accumulation and toxicity compared to Mg. Speciation calculations indicated negligible differences in the percentages of key U species (UO(2)(2+), UO(2)OH(+), UO(2)(OH)(2)) over the range of water hardness tested. The inhibition of U binding at the cell surface, and subsequent uptake, by C. demersum, with increasing Ca and/or Mg concentration, may be explained in terms of (i) competition between Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) and UO(2)(2+) (and/or UO(2)OH(+)) for physiologically active sites at the cell surface, and/or (ii) reduced negative charge (electrical potential) at the cell surface, resulting in a decrease in the activity of UO(2)(2+) (and/or UO(2)OH(+)) at the plant/water interface (boundary layer), and consequently, less U bound to physiologically active cell surface sites. In the absence of a biotic ligand model for U, the results of this study (together with

  20. Printability of Synthetic Papers by Electrophotography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the printability of synthetic papers by the electrophotography technique. Prints of cmyk colour fields from 20% to 100% raster tone values were printed on three types of synthetic papers (one film synthetic paper and two fiber synthetic papers. The investigation of the appearance included densitometric measurement of the cmyk prints. The results have shown differences in the optical density and optical tone value between cmyk prints made on various synthetic papers. The highest optical density and the increase of the optical tone value were observed on the film synthetic paper, where cmyk prints were more saturated. The highest abrasion resistance of cmyk prints was obtained from the fibre synthetic paper.

  1. Synthetic biology: Emerging bioengineering in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandono, Sony

    2017-05-01

    The development of synthetic biology will shape the new era of science and technology. It is an emerging bioengineering technique involving genetic engineering which can alter the phenotype and behavior of the cell or the new product. Synthetic biology may produce biomaterials, drugs, vaccines, biosensors, and even a recombinant secondary metabolite used in herbal and complementary medicine, such as artemisinin, a malaria drug which is usually extracted from the plant Artemisia annua. The power of synthetic biology has encouraged scientists in Indonesia, and is still in early development. This paper also covers some research from an Indonesian research institute in synthetic biology such as observing the production of bio surfactants and the enhanced production of artemisinin using a transient expression system. Synthetic biology development in Indonesia may also be related to the iGEM competition, a large synthetic biology research competition which was attended by several universities in Indonesia. The application of synthetic biology for drug discovery will be discussed.

  2. Multi proxy chemical properties of freshwater sapropel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevica, Karina; Rutina, Liga; Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris

    2014-05-01

    Freshwater sapropel is organic rich lake sediment firstly named "gyttja" by Hampus van Post in 1862. It is composed of organic remains such as shell detritus, plankton, chitin of insects, spores of higher plants and mineral part formed in eutrophic lake environments. The most appropriate environments for the formation of sapropel are in shallow, overgrown post-glacial lakes and valleys of big rivers in boreal zone, while thick deposits of such kind of organic sediments rarely can be found in lakes on permafrost, mountainous regions or areas with increased aridity. Organic lake sediments are divided in 3 classes according the content of organic matter and mineral part: biogenic, clastic and mixed. The value of sapropel as natural resource increases with the content of organic matter and main applications of sapropel are in agriculture, medicine, cosmetic and chemical industry. The research of sapropel in Latvia has shown that the total amount of this natural resource is close to 2 billion m3 or ~500 million tons. Sapropel has fine, dispersed structure and is plastic, but colour due to the high natural content of phosphorus usually is dark blue, later after drying it becomes light blue. Main research of the sapropel nowadays is turned to investigation of interactions among organic and mineral part of the sapropel with living organisms thus giving the inside look in processes and biological activity of the formation. From the chemical point of view sapropel contains lipids (bitumen), water-soluble substances that are readily hydrolyzed, including humic and fulvic acids, cellulose and the residual part, which does not hydrolyze. In this work we have analyzed the class of organic sapropel: peaty, cyanobacterial and green algal types, as well as siliceous sapropel, in order to determine the presence of biologically active substances, including humic substances, proteins and enzymes as well as to check free radical scavenging activity. Samples were collected from lakes

  3. Assessing and managing freshwater ecosystems vulnerable to environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G; Allen, Craig R; Birgé, Hannah E; Drakare, Stina; McKie, Brendan G; Johnson, Richard K

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are important for global biodiversity and provide essential ecosystem services. There is consensus in the scientific literature that freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to the impacts of environmental change, which may trigger irreversible regime shifts upon which biodiversity and ecosystem services may be lost. There are profound uncertainties regarding the management and assessment of the vulnerability of freshwater ecosystems to environmental change. Quantitative approaches are needed to reduce this uncertainty. We describe available statistical and modeling approaches along with case studies that demonstrate how resilience theory can be applied to aid decision-making in natural resources management. We highlight especially how long-term monitoring efforts combined with ecological theory can provide a novel nexus between ecological impact assessment and management, and the quantification of systemic vulnerability and thus the resilience of ecosystems to environmental change.

  4. There and back again: migration in freshwater fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brönmark, C.; Hulthén, K.; Nilsson, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Animal migration is an amazing phenomenon that has fascinated humans for long. Many freshwater fishes also show remarkable migrations, whereof the spectacular mass migrations of salmonids from the spawning streams are the most well known and well studied. However, recent studies have shown...... that migration occurs in a range of freshwater fish taxa from many different habitats. In this review we focus on the causes and consequences of migration in freshwater fishes. We start with an introduction of concepts and categories of migration, and then address the evolutionary causes that drive individuals...... to make these migratory journeys. The basis for the decision of an individual fish to migrate or stay resident is an evaluation of the costs and benefits of different strategies to maximize its lifetime reproductive effort. We provide examples by discussing our own work on the causes behind seasonal...

  5. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rinaldo Garraffoni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, C. heideri, C. cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an undescribed species belonging to the genus Redudasys (incertae sedis: this is the first finding of specimens of Redudasys outside of original type locality. These preliminary observations suggest that the knowledge of the biodiversity of Gastrotricha in the Minas Gerais State, as well as in the whole Brazil, will certainly increase as further investigations are undertaken, and that freshwater Macrodasyida may be more common than previously thought.

  6. Synthetic nacre by predesigned matrix-directed mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Bo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Yao, Hong-Bin; Liu, Lei; Cölfen, Helmut; Liu, Gang; Chen, Si-Ming; Li, Shi-Kuo; Yan, You-Xian; Liu, Yang-Yi; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Although biomimetic designs are expected to play a key role in exploring future structural materials, facile fabrication of bulk biomimetic materials under ambient conditions remains a major challenge. Here, we describe a mesoscale “assembly-and-mineralization” approach inspired by the natural process in mollusks to fabricate bulk synthetic nacre that highly resembles both the chemical composition and the hierarchical structure of natural nacre. The millimeter-thick synthetic nacre consists of alternating organic layers and aragonite platelet layers (91 weight percent) and exhibits good ultimate strength and fracture toughness. This predesigned matrix-directed mineralization method represents a rational strategy for the preparation of robust composite materials with hierarchically ordered structures, where various constituents are adaptable, including brittle and heat-labile materials.

  7. Removal of heavy metals from synthetic solution by electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ilou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work concerns the optimization of the operating conditions for the removal of heavy metals from synthetic solution by Electrocoagulation (EC. To reach this purpose, we prepared a synthetic wastewater containing certain heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe and Pb to study the influence of various parameters (conductivity, pH, time of electrolysis, current density and the initial concentration of the metal on the rate of removal of these metals. The results show that this rate of removal can reach 99.9 % in the following optimal conditions: pH included between 6 and 8 and a density of the current of 1~1.5A / dm2. This study shows that it is possible to remove metals in aqueous solution by the technique of electrocoagulation. 

  8. Synthetic Biology and Human Health: Potential Applications for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Carr, Christopher; Cai, Yizhi; Chen, Y.; Grenon, Marlene; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Santos, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physiologic adaptation. Spaceflight-related changes have been reported in the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems. The spacecraft environment further subjects the traveler to noise and gravitational forces, as well as airborne chemical, microbiological contaminants, and radiation exposure. As humans prepare for longer duration missions effective countermeasures must be developed, verified, and implemented to ensure mission success. Over the past ten years, synthetic biology has opened new avenues for research and development in areas such as biological control, biomaterials, sustainable energy production, bioremediation, and biomedical therapies. The latter in particular is of great interest to the implementation of long-duration human spaceflight capabilities. This article discusses the effects of spaceflight on humans, and reviews current capabilities and potential needs associated with the health of the astronauts where synthetic biology could play an important role in the pursuit of space exploration.

  9. Effects of C/N controlled periphyton based organic farming of freshwater prawn on water quality parameters and biotic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezoanul Haque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of C:N controlled periphyton based organic farming of freshwater prawn on water quality parameters and biotic factors were investigated. The experiment had two treatments: T1 and T2 each with three replications. Stocking density was maintained at 20,000 juveniles ha-1. In T1, only commercially available prawn feed was applied and in T2, a locally formulated and prepared feed containing 24% crude protein with C:N ratio close to 20 was used, and maize flour and bamboo side shoots were provided for maintaining C:N ratio 20.Mean values of water quality parameters did not vary significantly (P>0.05 between treatments. Periphytic biomass in terms of dry matter, ash free dry matter (AFDM and chlorophyll a showed significant difference (P<0.05 among different sampling months. Individual harvesting weight, individual weight gain, specific growth rates, gross and net yields of prawn were significantly higher (P<0.05 in T2 than T1. Therefore, it was concluded that freshwater prawn might consume periphyton biomass in C:N controlled periphyton based organic farming practices resulted a significantly (P<0.05 higher production of freshwater prawn than traditional farming.

  10. 2H and 18O Freshwater Isoscapes of Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Kemp, Helen; Frew, Danny

    2013-04-01

    Scotland's freshwater lochs and reservoirs provide a vital resource for sustaining biodiversity, agriculture, food production as well as for human consumption. Regular monitoring of freshwaters by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) fulfils legislative requirements with regards to water quality but new scientific methods involving stable isotope analysis present an opportunity combining these mandatory monitoring schemes with fundamental research to inform and deliver on current and nascent government policies [1] through gaining a greater understanding of Scottish waters and their importance in the context of climate change, environmental sustainability and food security. For example, 2H and 18O isoscapes of Scottish freshwater could be used to underpin research and its applications in: • Climate change - Using longitudinal changes in the characteristic isotope composition of freshwater lochs and reservoirs as proxy, isoscapes will provide a means to assess if and how changes in temperature and weather patterns might impact on precipitation patterns and amount. • Scottish branding - Location specific stable isotope signatures of Scottish freshwater have the potential to be used as a tool for provenancing and thus protecting premium Scottish produce such as Scottish beef, Scottish soft fruit and Scottish Whisky. During 2011 and 2012, with the support of SEPA more than 110 samples from freshwater lochs and reservoirs were collected from 127 different locations across Scotland including the Highlands and Islands. Here we present the results of this sampling and analysis exercise isotope analyses in form of 2H and 18O isoscapes with an unprecedented grid resolution of 26.5 × 26.5 km (or 16.4 × 16.4 miles). [1] Adaptation Framework - Adapting Our Ways: Managing Scotland's Climate Risk (2009): Scotland's Biodiversity: It's in Your Hands - A strategy for the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in Scotland (2005); Recipe For Success - Scotland

  11. Patterns of Freshwater Species Richness, Endemism, and Vulnerability in California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette K Howard

    Full Text Available The ranges and abundances of species that depend on freshwater habitats are declining worldwide. Efforts to counteract those trends are often hampered by a lack of information about species distribution and conservation status and are often strongly biased toward a few well-studied groups. We identified the 3,906 vascular plants, macroinvertebrates, and vertebrates native to California, USA, that depend on fresh water for at least one stage of their life history. We evaluated the conservation status for these taxa using existing government and non-governmental organization assessments (e.g., endangered species act, NatureServe, created a spatial database of locality observations or distribution information from ~400 data sources, and mapped patterns of richness, endemism, and vulnerability. Although nearly half of all taxa with conservation status (n = 1,939 are vulnerable to extinction, only 114 (6% of those vulnerable taxa have a legal mandate for protection in the form of formal inclusion on a state or federal endangered species list. Endemic taxa are at greater risk than non-endemics, with 90% of the 927 endemic taxa vulnerable to extinction. Records with spatial data were available for a total of 2,276 species (61%. The patterns of species richness differ depending on the taxonomic group analyzed, but are similar across taxonomic level. No particular taxonomic group represents an umbrella for all species, but hotspots of high richness for listed species cover 40% of the hotspots for all other species and 58% of the hotspots for vulnerable freshwater species. By mapping freshwater species hotspots we show locations that represent the top priority for conservation action in the state. This study identifies opportunities to fill gaps in the evaluation of conservation status for freshwater taxa in California, to address the lack of occurrence information for nearly 40% of freshwater taxa and nearly 40% of watersheds in the state, and to

  12. Evaluating Alternative Strategies for Investments in Freshwater Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvelil, K. S.; Kramer, D. B.; Zhang, T.; Ligmann-Zielinska, A.; Soranno, P.; Bremigan, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Efforts towards systematic conservation planning for freshwaters have progressed far less than similar efforts in the terrestrial and marine environments. Although there are differences in the coupled human and natural systems that distinguish freshwater, terrestrial, and marine environments, many of the tools that have been used in terrestrial and marine systems can also be used for conservation planning for freshwater resources. In this paper, we used one such tool, return on investment (ROI), to identify optimal conservation portfolios. Our overarching research question is: how do different strategies for evaluating ROI benefits influence the resulting portfolio and the outcome of interest - in our case, water quality? Specifically, we examined investments to convert farmed agricultural land to fallow land to improve water quality in 55 inland lakes in southwestern Michigan. We simulated investments and compared the ROIs for the following strategies: 1) economic; 2) ecological; 3) environmental policy and 4) agricultural policy. We also tested the well-established assumption that riparian lands, those abutting and within 30 m of freshwater shorelines, have the greatest potential to influence water quality. We found that 1) investments in freshwater resources through the conservation of riparian land are more effective than the conservation of randomly selected parcels of similar land area in the catchment; 2) the costs and benefits of riparian land conservation vary considerably among lakes; 3) the choice of investment strategies results in very different conservation portfolios; 4) the resulting conservation portfolios have very different distributional and policy implications. These analyses and results provide a foundation on which to improve systematic conservation planning for freshwaters.

  13. Vulnerability of European freshwater catchments to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Danijela; Carrizo, Savrina F; Kärcher, Oskar; Walz, Ariane; David, Jonathan N W

    2017-02-10

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate the current threats to freshwater ecosystems, yet multifaceted studies on the potential impacts of climate change on freshwater biodiversity at scales that inform management planning are lacking. The aim of this study was to fill this void through the development of a novel framework for assessing climate change vulnerability tailored to freshwater ecosystems. The three dimensions of climate change vulnerability are as follows: (i) exposure to climate change, (ii) sensitivity to altered environmental conditions and (iii) resilience potential. Our vulnerability framework includes 1685 freshwater species of plants, fishes, molluscs, odonates, amphibians, crayfish and turtles alongside key features within and between catchments, such as topography and connectivity. Several methodologies were used to combine these dimensions across a variety of future climate change models and scenarios. The resulting indices were overlaid to assess the vulnerability of European freshwater ecosystems at the catchment scale (18 783 catchments). The Balkan Lakes Ohrid and Prespa and Mediterranean islands emerge as most vulnerable to climate change. For the 2030s, we showed a consensus among the applied methods whereby up to 573 lake and river catchments are highly vulnerable to climate change. The anthropogenic disruption of hydrological habitat connectivity by dams is the major factor reducing climate change resilience. A gap analysis demonstrated that the current European protected area network covers climate change. Priority should be placed on enhancing stakeholder cooperation at the major basin scale towards preventing further degradation of freshwater ecosystems and maintaining connectivity among catchments. The catchments identified as most vulnerable to climate change provide preliminary targets for development of climate change conservation management and mitigation strategies.

  14. Fish and mussels: importance of fish for freshwater mussel conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Co-extinctions have received trivial consideration in discussions about the global conservation crisis, even though recent studies have emphasised their importance. This situation is even more pronounced in freshwater ecosystems where this phenomenon is largely unrecognized. In this presentation we explore the role of fish for freshwater mussels’ conservation. Freshwater mussels’ need fish as a host to complete their life cycle and given this premise is expected that changes in the fish community due to species extinctions or additions may have great effects. We reviewed the published information and we found: 1 that most of the studies were published in the last few years; 2 that most of the studies were performed in North America (69%, which is probably due to the high number of endemic threatened species in this continent; 3 that most of the mussel species that are specialists in fish hosting are listed as vulnerable or endangered (55%; 4 most studies were performed in laboratory (83% and 5 that the majority of studies were focused on life cycle or on identifying suitable fish hosts of freshwater mussel species with few studies focusing on threats. Since the interaction between fish and freshwater mussels can be easily disrupted and serious threats to this interaction have arisen (e.g. loss and fragmentation of habitat, changes in river flow, climate change, introduction of invasive species, pollution a more holistic approach is needed to find the best management strategies to conserve these animals. In addition, more field studies are required and more information on African, South American and Asian species is essential. Neglect the possible fundamental role of fish in the decline or extinction of freshwater mussels may impair the success of any measure devoted to their conservation; therefore, this issue cannot be ignored.

  15. Synthetic cornea: biocompatibility and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Kaminski, Stefan; Fernandez, Viviana; Alfonso, E.; Lamar, Peggy; Lacombe, Emmanuel; Duchesne, Bernard; Dubovy, Sander; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose. Experimentally find a method to provide a safe surgical technique and an inexpensive and long lasting mesoplant for the restoration of vision in patients with bilateral corneal blindness due to ocular surface and stromal diseases. Methods. Identify the least invasive and the safest surgical technique for synthetic cornea implantation. Identify the most compatible biomaterials and the optimal shape a synthetic cornea must have to last a long time when implanted in vivo. Results. Penetrating procedures were deemed too invasive, time consuming, difficult and prone to long term complications. Therefore a non-penetrating delamination technique with central trephination was developed to preserve the integrity of Descemet's membrane and the anterior segment. Even though this approach limits the number of indications, it is acceptable since the majority of patients only have opacities in the stroma. The prosthesis was designed to fit in the removed tissue plane with its skirt fitted under the delaminated stroma. To improve retention, the trephination wall was made conical with the smallest opening on the anterior surface and a hat-shaped mesoplant was made to fit. The skirt was perforated in its perimeter to allow passage of nutrients and tissues ingrowths. To simplify the fabrication procedure, the haptic and optic were made of the same polymer. The intrastromal biocompatibility of several hydrogels was found superior to current clinically used PMMA and PTFE materials. Monobloc mesoplants made of 4 different materials were implanted in rabbits and followed weekly until extrusion occurred. Some remained optically clear allowing for fundus photography. Conclusions. Hydrogel synthetic corneas can be made to survive for periods longer than 1 year. ArF excimer laser photoablation studies are needed to determine the refractive correction potential of these mesoplants. A pilot FDA clinical trial is needed to assess the mesoplant efficacy and very long-term stability.

  16. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    of the thesis considers a method for estimating the two-dimensional velocity vector within the image plane. This method, called synthetic aperture vector flow imaging, is first shortly reviewed. The main contribution of this work is partly an analysis of the method with respect to focusing effects, motion...... estimation. The method can be used for increasing the frame rate of color flow maps or alternatively for a new imaging modality entitled quadroplex imaging, featuring a color flow map and two independent spectrograms at a high frame rate. The second is an alternative method for ultrasonic vector velocity...

  17. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael R.; Atsumi, Shota

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges. PMID:20827393

  18. Synthetic Studies in Phytochrome Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Peter A; Adel Odeh, Imad M; Buddhu, Subhas C; Cai, Guolin; Rajeswari, Sundaramoorthi; Fry, Douglas; Zheng, Wanjun; Desimone, Robert W; Guo, Jiasheng; Coutts, Lisa D; Hauck, Sheila I; Leung, Sam H; Ghosh, Indranath; Pippin, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    An account is given of the author's several approaches to the synthesis of the parent chromophore of phytochrome (1), a protein-bound linear tetrapyrrole derivative that controls photomorphogenesis in higher plants. These studies culminated in enantioselective syntheses of both 2R- and 2S-phytochromobilin (4), as well as several (13)C-labeled derivatives designed to probe the site of Z,E-isomerization during photoexcitation. When reacted in vitro, synthetic 2R-4 and recombinant-derived phytochrome apoprotein N-C produced a protein-bound chromophore with identical difference spectra to naturally occurring 1.

  19. Space noise synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof S.

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents limitations of space borne synthetic aperture radars, caused by range and Doppler velocity ambiguities, and the concept of usage of the noise radar technology for creation of high-resolution space SAR images. The noise SAR is free from limitation caused by the periodicity of pulse waveform ambiguity function, and therefore this technology can be used in the future space missions. The basic concept of noise SAR image formation is also presented. The image formation algorithm has been verified using the simulated data produced by Raw Radar Data Simulator.

  20. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Connor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges.

  1. Why freshwater organisms survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Roughly 65.5 million years ago, a massive asteroid smashed into present-day Chicxulub, Mexico. The impact set fire to Earth's surface. Dust and ash darkened the sky, sending the planet into an "impact winter" that lasted months to years and caused the extinction of nonavian dinosaurs and half of ocean-dwelling species. However, life in inland freshwater ecosystems largely escaped this fate. To try to understand why freshwater organisms held on while ocean life failed, Robertson et al. surveyed relevant research to understand how the mechanisms of extinction would have operated differently in the two environments.

  2. What makes a healthy environment for native freshwater mussels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are sensitive to contamination of sediment that they inhabit and to the water that they filter, making the presence of live, adult mussels an excellent indicator of ecosystem health and stability. Freshwater mussels are relatively immobile, imbedded in the streambed with part of the shell sticking up into the water so that they can filter water to obtain oxygen and food. This lack of mobility makes them particularly vulnerable to water and sediment contamination, changes in sedimentation, or prolonged drought. Thus, ecosystem health and stability are critical for their reproduction and survival.

  3. Freshwater flushing time scales of the Vashishti Estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Sarma, R.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    Results are presented for the Vashishti estuary, Kerala, India to evaluate its freshwater flushing time scales based on 8 sets of observations of longitudinal salinity distributions. The results of the flushing time using the fraction of freshwater...

  4. National Action Plan: Priorities for Managing Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Action Plan is based on the latest science on climate risks to freshwater resources. The Plan establishes a national goal to have government agencies and citizens collaboratively manage freshwater resources in response to a changing climate.

  5. How to prevent legionella infestation. Pt. 1. Central freshwater heating systems; Wie man Legionellen vermeiden. T. 1. Zentrale Trinkwassererwaermungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Robert [DVGW-Fachausschuss Trinkwasserhygiene in Gebaeuden, Leverkusen (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The contribution focuses on hygienically safe freshwater heating. Legionella prophylaxis is discussed, as are new findings concerning practical implementation of new requirements on modern freshwater supply systems. (orig.)

  6. Analysis on the Difference between Synthetic Hydroxyapatite and Bone Apatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The composition and structure of bone apatite and synthetic hydroxyapatite powder prepared by precipitation method, sol-gel method was studied by FTIR, EMPA, AFM in this paper. The results showed that the composition and phase structure of apatite powder prepared by sol-gel method was most similar with that in the bone. The calcium phosphate ratios of apatite prepared by two kinds of wet precipitation was 1.69, and 1.73 respectively. The calcium phosphate ratio of apatite prepared by sol-gel methnd was 1.66. The apatite powder prepared by sol-gel method was hoped to be more bioactive and biocompatible compared with apatite powder prepared by wet precipitation method. The EMPA results proved that the bone consisted of Ca, P, O, Na, Mg, K, Cl,etc elements. The amount of apatite decreased while amount of collagen increased from the outer layer to inner layer of the bone. AFM results showed that HA particle, with the size about 150-450 nm in length, 100-150 nm in width, 15-40 nm in thickness, grown layer upon layer regularly. The long axis was not always parallel to the collagen fiber. The angle between collagen fiber and apatite lamellar was about 30-45 degree.

  7. Motion measurement for synthetic aperture radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3-D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Crystal Structure Refinement of Synthetic Pure Gyrolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arūnas Baltušnikas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure calcium silicate hydrate – gyrolite was prepared under the saturated steam pressure at 473 K temperature in rotating autoclave. The crystal structure of synthetic gyrolite was investigated by X-ray diffraction and refined using Le Bail, Rietveld and crystal structure modelling methods. Background, peak shape parameters and verification of the space group were performed by the Le Bail full pattern decomposition. Peculiarities of interlayer sheet X of gyrolite unit cell were highlighted by Rietveld refinement. Possible atomic arrangement in interlayer sheet X was solved by global optimization method. Most likelihood crystal structure model of gyrolite was calculated by final Rietveld refinement. It was crystallographically showed, that cell parameters are: a = 0.9713(2 nm, b = 0.9715(2 nm, c = 2.2442(3 nm and alfa = 95.48(2 º, beta = 91.45(2 °, gamma = l20.05(3 °.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5460

  9. Semiconductor photocatalysis--mechanistic and synthetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Horst

    2013-01-14

    Preceding work on photoelectrochemistry at semiconductor single-crystal electrodes has formed the basis for the tremendous growth in the three last decades in the field of photocatalysis at semiconductor powders. The reason for this is the unique ability of inorganic semiconductor surfaces to photocatalyze concerted reduction and oxidation reactions of a large variety of electron-donor and -acceptor substrates. Whereas great attention was paid to water splitting and the exhaustive aerobic degradation of pollutants, only a small amount of research also explored synthetic aspects. After introducing the basic mechanistic principles, standard experiments for the preparation and characterization of visible light active photocatalysts as well as the investigation of reaction mechanisms are discussed. Novel atom-economic C-C and C-N coupling reactions illustrate the relevance of semiconductor photocatalysis for organic synthesis, and demonstrate that the multidisciplinary field combines classical photochemistry with electrochemistry, solid-state chemistry, and heterogeneous catalysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  11. Cold fronts and reservoir limnology: an integrated approach towards the ecological dynamics of freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tundisi, J G; Matsumura-Tundisi, T; Pereira, K C; Luzia, A P; Passerini, M D; Chiba, W A C; Morais, M A; Sebastien, N Y

    2010-10-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the effects of cold fronts on the dynamics of freshwater ecosystems of southeast South America. Cold fronts originating from the Antarctic show a monthly frequency that promotes turbulence and vertical mixing in reservoirs with a consequence to homogenize nutrient distribution, dissolved oxygen and temperature. Weak thermoclines and the athelomixis process immediately before, during and after the passage of cold fronts interfere with phytoplankton succession in reservoirs. Cyanobacteria blooms in eutrophic reservoirs are frequently connected with periods of stratification and stability of the water column. Cold fronts in the Amazon and Pantanal lakes may produce fish killings during the process of "friagem" associated mixing events. Further studies will try to implement a model to predict the impact of cold fronts and prepare management procedures in order to cope with cyanobacteria blooms during warm and stable water column periods. Changes in water quality of reservoirs are expected during circulation periods caused by cold fronts.

  12. Process for the preparation of aromatic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, N.J.; Biesbroek, Arnold; Heeres, André; Heeres, Hero

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are prepared from a feed stream comprising biomass or a mixture of biomass and synthetic polymer in a process, comprising: a) subjecting the feed stream to a pyrolysis treatment in the presence of a cracking catalyst to yield a vaporous fraction comprising hydrocarbons with

  13. Quantifying the Mediterranean freshwater budget throughout the late Miocene: New implications for sapropel formation and the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dirk; Marzocchi, Alice; Flecker, Rachel; Lunt, Daniel J.; Hilgen, Frits J.; Meijer, Paul Th.

    2017-08-01

    The cyclic sedimentary record of the late Miocene Mediterranean shows a clear transition from open marine to restricted conditions and finally to evaporitic environments associated with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. This evolution has been attributed to changes in Mediterranean-Atlantic connectivity and regional climate, which has a strong precessional pulse. 31 Coupled climate simulations with different orbital configurations have been combined in a regression model that estimates the evolution of the freshwater budget of the Mediterranean throughout the late Miocene. The study suggests that wetter conditions occur at precession minima and are enhanced at eccentricity maxima. We use the wetter peaks to predict synthetic sapropel records. Using these to retune two Mediterranean sediment successions indicates that the overall net freshwater budget is the most likely mechanism driving sapropel formation in the late Miocene. Our sapropel timing is offset from precession minima and boreal summer insolation maxima during low eccentricity if the present-day drainage configuration across North Africa is used. This phase offset is removed if at least 50% more water drained into the Mediterranean during the late Miocene, capturing additional North African monsoon precipitation, for example via the Chad-Eosahabi catchment in Libya. In contrast with the clear expression of precession and eccentricity in the model results, obliquity, which is visible in the sapropel record during minimum eccentricity, does not have a strong signal in our model. By exploring the freshwater evolution curve in a box model that also includes Mediterranean-Atlantic exchange, we are able, for the first time, to estimate the Mediterranean's salinity evolution, which is quantitatively consistent with precessional control. Additionally, we separate and quantify the distinct contributions regional climate and tectonic restriction make to the lithological changes associated with the Messinian Salinity

  14. Tracking the emergence of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Philip; Kwon, Seokbeom; Youtie, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging domain that combines biological and engineering concepts and which has seen rapid growth in research, innovation, and policy interest in recent years. This paper contributes to efforts to delineate this emerging domain by presenting a newly constructed bibliometric definition of synthetic biology. Our approach is dimensioned from a core set of papers in synthetic biology, using procedures to obtain benchmark synthetic biology publication records, extract keywords from these benchmark records, and refine the keywords, supplemented with articles published in dedicated synthetic biology journals. We compare our search strategy with other recent bibliometric approaches to define synthetic biology, using a common source of publication data for the period from 2000 to 2015. The paper details the rapid growth and international spread of research in synthetic biology in recent years, demonstrates that diverse research disciplines are contributing to the multidisciplinary development of synthetic biology research, and visualizes this by profiling synthetic biology research on the map of science. We further show the roles of a relatively concentrated set of research sponsors in funding the growth and trajectories of synthetic biology. In addition to discussing these analyses, the paper notes limitations and suggests lines for further work.

  15. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-06-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of novel microbial genetic circuitry for human therapeutics will greatly benefit from the data generated by 'omics' approaches and multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology. Development of novel antimicrobial drugs and vaccines by engineering microbial systems are a promising area of research in the field of synthetic biology for human theragnostics. Expression of plant based medicinal compounds in the microbial system using synthetic biology tools is another avenue dealt in the present study. Additionally, the study suggest that the traditional medicinal knowledge can do value addition for developing novel drugs in the microbial systems using synthetic biology tools. The presented work envisions the success of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach in a holistic manner. Keeping this in view, various legal and socio-ethical concerns emerging from the use of synthetic biology via microbial approach such as patenting, biosafety and biosecurity issues have been touched upon in the later sections.

  16. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, C

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken int...

  17. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems.

  18. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander I; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Smola, Matthew J; Morgunov, Alexey S; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-02-19

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers such as RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life, pre-dating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (arabino nucleic acids, ANA; 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids, FANA; hexitol nucleic acids, HNA; and cyclohexene nucleic acids, CeNA) directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere in the Universe.

  19. Lysogenic infection in sub-tropical freshwater cyanobacteria cultures and natural blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhauer, L.M.; Pollard, P.C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Säwström, C.

    2014-01-01

    Lysogeny has been reported for a few freshwater cyanobacteria cultures, but it is unknown how prevalent it is in freshwater cyanobacteria in situ. Here we tested for lysogeny in (a) cultures of eight Australian species of subtropical freshwater cyanobacteria; (b) seven strains of one species: Cylind

  20. Host diversity and latitude drive trematode diversity patterns in the European freshwater fauna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thieltges, D.W.; Hof, C.; Dehling, D.M.; Brändle, M.; Brändl, R.; Poulin, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim We investigated the relationship between host and parasite diversity as well as latitudinal gradients in parasite diversity on a continental scale in European freshwater trematodes.
    Location European freshwaters.
    Methods We extracted distributional data for 564 freshwater trematodes across

  1. Multiple drivers of decline in the global status of freshwater crayfish (Decapoda:Astacidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadia I. Richman; Monika Böhm; Susan B. Adams; Fernando Alvarez; Elizabeth A. Bergey; John J. S. Bunn; Quinton Burnham; Jay Cordeiro; Jason Coughran; Keith A. Crandall; Kathryn L. Dawkins; Robert J. DiStefano; Niall E. Doran; Lennart Edsman; Arnold G. Eversole; Leopold Füreder; James M. Furse; Francesca Gherardi; Premek Hamr; David M. Holdich; Pierre Horwitz; Kerrylyn Johnston; Clive M. Jones; Julia P. G. Jones; Robert L. Jones; Thomas G. Jones; Tadashi Kawai; Susan Lawler; Marilu López-Mejía; Rebecca M. Miller; Carlos Pedraza-Lara; Julian D. Reynolds; Alastair M. M. Richardson; Mark B. Schultz; Guenter A. Schuster; Peter J. Sibley; Catherine Souty-Grosset; Christopher A. Taylor; Roger F. Thoma; Jerry Walls; Todd S. Walsh; Ben Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Rates of biodiversity loss are higher in freshwater ecosystems than in most terrestrial or marine ecosystems, making freshwater conservation a priority. However, prioritization methods are impeded by insufficient knowledge on the distribution and conservation status of freshwater taxa, particularly invertebrates. We evaluated the extinction risk of the world’s 590...

  2. Lysogenic infection in sub-tropical freshwater cyanobacteria cultures and natural blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhauer, L.M.; Pollard, P.C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Säwström, C.

    2014-01-01

    Lysogeny has been reported for a few freshwater cyanobacteria cultures, but it is unknown how prevalent it is in freshwater cyanobacteria in situ. Here we tested for lysogeny in (a) cultures of eight Australian species of subtropical freshwater cyanobacteria; (b) seven strains of one species:

  3. Host diversity and latitude drive trematode diversity patterns in the European freshwater fauna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thieltges, D.W.; Hof, C.; Dehling, D.M.; Brändle, M.; Brändl, R.; Poulin, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim We investigated the relationship between host and parasite diversity as well as latitudinal gradients in parasite diversity on a continental scale in European freshwater trematodes.
    Location European freshwaters.
    Methods We extracted distributional data for 564 freshwater trematodes across

  4. 78 FR 61331 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... International Trade Administration Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China... order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China (PRC). The period of review...: Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the antidumping duty order is freshwater crawfish...

  5. 77 FR 61383 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... International Trade Administration Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic... order is freshwater crawfish tail meat. The product is currently classified in the Harmonized...

  6. 76 FR 62349 - Preliminary Results Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... International Trade Administration Preliminary Results Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic... review of the antidumping duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China... duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the PRC. See Notice of Amendment to...

  7. 78 FR 52192 - Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-Freshwater 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... AGENCY Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-- Freshwater 2013 AGENCY... from effects of ammonia in freshwater (EPA 822-R-13-001). The final criteria incorporate the latest scientific knowledge on the toxicity of ammonia to freshwater aquatic life. On December 30, 2009,...

  8. "Key to Freshwater Algae": A Web-Based Tool to Enhance Understanding of Microscopic Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayler, Hannah A.; Siver, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    The Freshwater Ecology Laboratory at Connecticut College has developed an interactive, Web-based identification key to freshwater algal genera using the Lucid Professional and Lucid 3 software developed by the Centre for Biological Information Technology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The "Key to Freshwater Algae"…

  9. Solution preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results.

  10. Application of living microbial cells entrapped with synthetic resin prepolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, S; Tanaka, A

    1989-12-01

    Living and growing microbial cells were immobilized by entrapping in synthetic resin gels prepared from their prepolymers, and used in the production of various useful substances. The production of the desired metabolites and also both the activity and the stability of the catalytic systems were seriously affected by the physico-chemical properties of the prepolymers, and those of the resin gels subsequently formed, such as gel network, hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance and ionic nature, as well as by the type of bioreactors. Hydroxylation of steroids and production of antibiotics, polypeptides and other biologically active substances, and the effects of gel properties on them are discussed as examples.

  11. Synthetic Aziridines in Medicinal Chemistry: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Girija S

    2016-01-01

    Azaheterocyclic compounds are well-known to have diverse types of biological activity. Among them, azacyclopropanes, commonly referred as aziridines, occupy a prominent place in synthetic organic and medicinal chemistry due to its occurrence in natural resources, complexity involved in synthesis due to ring-strain, building blocks in organic synthesis, and its biological properties. Several novel compounds containing aziridine ring have been designed and synthesized recently by medicinal chemists for evaluating their biological profile. A number of compounds are reported as cysteine protease inhibitors, antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antileishmanial, and antimalarial agents. This review article summarizes the biological activity of such compounds. The preparation of such compounds is also described.

  12. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brianna; Snell, Sam; Bye-Nagel, Kyri; Tonidandel, Scott; Heyer, Laurie J; Campbell, A Malcolm

    2011-07-21

    Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008). Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  13. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonidandel Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008. Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  14. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K.; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  15. Synthetic biology - the state of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitney, Richard; Freemont, Paul

    2012-07-16

    Just over two years ago there was an article in Nature entitled "Five Hard Truths for Synthetic Biology". Since then, the field has moved on considerably. A number of economic commentators have shown that synthetic biology very significant industrial potential. This paper addresses key issues in relation to the state of play regarding synthetic biology. It first considers the current background to synthetic biology, whether it is a legitimate field and how it relates to foundational biological sciences. The fact that synthetic biology is a translational field is discussed and placed in the context of the industrial translation process. An important aspect of synthetic biology is platform technology, this topic is also discussed in some detail. Finally, examples of application areas are described. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Differential responses of freshwater wetland soils to sulphate pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, L.P.M.; Dolle, ten G.E.; Berg, van den S.T.G.; Delft, van S.P.J.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sulphate (SO42-) reduction rates are generally low in freshwater wetlands and are regulated by the scarce availability of the ion. Increased concentrations of this electron acceptor due to sulphur (S) pollution of groundwater and surface water may, however, lead to high sulphate reduction rates now

  17. Phenotypic plasticity and differentiation in an invasive freshwater microalga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassenhagen, Ingrid; Wilken, Susanne; Godhe, Anna; Rengefors, Karin

    Recent studies show that both marine and limnic microalgal species often consist of several genetically distinct populations. This is also valid for the nuisance freshwater algae Gonyostomum semen, which originates from acidic, brown water swamp lakes, but can nowadays also be found in clearer lakes

  18. Estimating the recreational value of freshwater inflows into the Klein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-14

    Dec 14, 2009 ... It was deduced that in 2006 the marginal recreational value of freshwater inflow into the Klein Estuary was ... properties of and processes occurring in and around estuaries ..... ise that it is possible to infer people's preferences for ecosystem .... up the user population was identified using GIS data as well.

  19. Growth and longevity in freshwater mussels: evolutionary and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell R. Haag; Andrew L.. Rypel

    2010-01-01

    The amount of energy allocated to growth versus other functions is a fundamental feature of an organism’s life history. Constraints on energy availability result in characteristic trade-offs among life-history traits and reflect strategies by which organisms adapt to their environments. Freshwater mussels are a diverse and imperiled component of aquatic ecosystems but...

  20. Toxicity of rotenone to giant river freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaculturists have often suffered predation losses in the production of freshwater giant river prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii due to the presence of wild fish species in culture ponds. The piscicide rotenone is widely used to remove undesirable fish species from ponds. Although evidence in the t...

  1. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, Jan T M; Le Bars, Dewi; Van Kampenhout, Leo; Vizcaino, Miren; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850-2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  2. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, van M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  3. Subsurface storage of freshwater in south Florida; a prospectus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, M.L.; Meyer, F.W.; Sonntag, W.H.; Fitzpatrick, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method of increasing storage capacity for freshwater in south Florida is to use brackish artesian aquifers as reservoirs. In this way, water deficiencies occurring during the annual dry season can be offset by surplus water obtained during the wet season and injected underground. Most of south Florida is underlain by several deep, confined, carbonate waterbearing zones which might be suitable for freshwater storage. These zones are in the Avon Park, Ocala, Suwannee, Tampa, and Hawthorn Formations. Experimental freshwater injection systems have been operated at five locations with promising, but not fully definitive, results. A determination of the feasibility of freshwater injection at a selected site begins with an assessment of the local geologic suitability. Verification of feasibility, however, requires injection and recovery tests to be performed at the site. Recovery efficiency, a measure of the success of the operation, is the amount of potable water, expressed as a percentage of the volume injected, which can be recovered before its salinity, or the concentration of other chemical constituents present in the native aquifer water, increases to the point that the recovered water is no longer useable. (USGS)

  4. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, van M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  5. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work, th...

  6. Vectors of invasions in freshwater invertebrates and fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Pam L.; Canning-Clode, João

    2015-01-01

    Without human assistance, the terrestrial environment and oceans represent barriers to the dispersal of freshwater aquatic organisms. The ability to overcome such barriers depends on the existence of anthropogenic vectors that can transport live organisms to new areas, and the species’ biology to survive the transportation and transplantation into the new environment (Johnson et al., 2006).

  7. Cued in: advances and opportunities in freshwater chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Romi L; Lodge, David M

    2002-10-01

    We focus this mini-review on how naturally occurring chemical cues mediate ecological interactions, especially interspecific competition and predation in freshwater communities. Although freshwater chemical ecology lags behind terrestrial and marine chemical ecology, we identify recent progress toward: (1) identifying the chemical composition of cues important in food web interactions, e.g., specific glucosinolates, benzyl succinoates, and lignoids as deterrents to herbivory on freshwater macrophytes; (2) employing a nonreductionist approach that tests for emergent responses to suites of multiple chemical cues, e.g., trade-offs in snail refuge-seeking behavior in the presence of chemical cues from both fish and crayfish; (3) investigating how abiotic forces, such as hydrodynamics, impact chemical communication across a broad spatial and temporal scale, e.g., drift responses of mayfly nymphs to whole-stream additions of trout cue; and (4) quantifying the importance of genetic variability, e.g., how chemical cues change selective pressures of local environments. The questions of interest in freshwater chemical ecology cross taxonomic boundaries; traverse broad spatial and temporal scales; demonstrate nonlinear, unpredictable results; and necessitate a multidisciplinary approach for adequate understanding.

  8. Dinoflagellates associated with freshwater sponges from the ancient lake baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkova, Natalia V; Lavrov, Dennis V; Belikov, Sergey I

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of protists that are common in both marine and freshwater environments. While the biology of marine dinoflagellates has been the focus of several recent studies, their freshwater relatives remain little-investigated. In the present study we explore the diversity of dinoflagellates in Lake Baikal by identifying and analyzing dinoflagellate sequences for 18S rDNA and ITS-2 from total DNA extracted from three species of endemic Baikalian sponges (Baikalospongia intermedia,Baikalospongia rectaand Lubomirskia incrustans). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences revealed extensive dinoflagellate diversity in Lake Baikal. We found two groups of sequences clustering within the order Suessiales, known for its symbiotic relationships with various invertebrates. Thus they may be regarded as potential symbionts of Baikalian sponges. In addition,Gyrodinium helveticum, representatives from the genus Gymnodinium, dinoflagellates close to the family Pfiesteriaceae, and a few dinoflagellates without definite affiliation were detected. No pronounced difference in the distribution of dinoflagellates among the studied sponges was found, except for the absence of the Piscinoodinium-like dinoflagellates inL. incrustans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the diversity of dinoflagellates in freshwater sponges, the first systematic investigation of dinoflagellate molecular diversity in Lake Baikal and the first finding of members of the order Suessiales as symbionts of freshwater invertebrates.

  9. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work...

  10. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Le Bars, D.; Van Kampenhout, L.; Vizcaino, M.; Enderlin, E.M.; Van den Broeke, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850–2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  11. Herbivory on freshwater and marine macrophytes : A review and perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Wood, Kevin A.; Pages, Jordi F.; Veen, G. F. (Ciska); Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.; Santamaria, Luis; Nolet, Bart A.; Hilt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Until the 1990s, herbivory on aquatic vascular plants was considered to be of minor importance, and the predominant view was that freshwater and marine macrophytes did not take part in the food web: their primary fate was the detritivorous pathway. In the last 25 years, a substantial body of

  12. Herbivory on freshwater and marine macrophytes : A review and perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Wood, Kevin A.; Pages, Jordi F.; Veen, G. F. (Ciska); Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.; Santamaria, Luis; Nolet, Bart A.; Hilt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Until the 1990s, herbivory on aquatic vascular plants was considered to be of minor importance, and the predominant view was that freshwater and marine macrophytes did not take part in the food web: their primary fate was the detritivorous pathway. In the last 25 years, a substantial body of evidenc

  13. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    of eDNA is most important. In this study, we investigated the significance of eDNA during biofilm formation in four freshwater isolates. The aim was to relate the quantity and timing of eDNA production to the isolates’ ability to form biofilms. eDNA and biofilm biomass was quantified over time during...

  14. Field Study Manual to Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This field studies manual, developed by biology students in the 1971 Georgia Governor's Honors Program, was designed for collection of data pertinent to freshwater and estuarine habitats. In addition to the various methods of sampling the ecosystem and for quantification of the data, instructions for dividing the field study into three logical…

  15. Impacts of agricultural irrigation on nearby freshwater ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorente, Carmen; Causape, Jesus; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2015-01-01

    impacted the nearby freshwater ecosystems via runoff Specifically, we assessed the toxicity of three triazine herbicides, terbuthylazine, atrazine and simazine on the photosynthetic efficiency and structure of algal benthic biofilms (i.e., phototropic periphyton) in the small creek draining the basin...

  16. Freshwater Education: The Need, The Tools, and The "Vital Link."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroeder, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Freshwater education programs are beginning to instill in young people a sense of awareness and a sense of responsibility regarding the future of water resources. Several of these programs are discussed, including Project COAST (Coastal, Oceanic, and Aquatic Studies) and "Acid Precipitation Learning Materials, Grades 7-12." (JN)

  17. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Le Bars, D.; Van Kampenhout, L.; Vizcaino, M.; Enderlin, E.M.; Van den Broeke, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850–2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  18. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, Jan T M; Le Bars, Dewi; Van Kampenhout, Leo; Vizcaino, Miren; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850-2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  19. The Fresh-water Fishes of the Island of Trinidad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeseman, M.

    1960-01-01

    A few years ago, an interesting collection of fresh-water fishes from Trinidad was presented to the Leiden Museum by Mr. J. S. KENNY, fish culturist of the Trinidad Department of Agriculture. For this gift we are also greatly indebted to Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK of the Zoological Laboratory at Utr

  20. An Asymmetric Synthetic Approach to the A-ring of the Taxol Family of Anti-Cancer Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Marin

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic route developed for the preparation of the A-ring of Taxol family of molecules is reported. By means of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction an asymmetric approach to this ring has been accomplished. Also, initial studies to prepare the A ring using an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction have been successful.

  1. The Investigation of Culture Conditions of Agaricus campester (L.)Fr. on Synthetic Compost With Wheat Straw

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Celaleddin; KAŞIK, Gıyasettin

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the culture conditions of Agaricus campester on synthetic compost with wheat straw were investigated. The culture-medium was prepared with fermentation and cemical disinfection methods. After the yield period of 5 weeks, 228.6 kilos of mushroom were obtained from the prepared compost using 1 ton of wheat straw.

  2. Bioaccumulation and retention kinetics of cadmium in the freshwater decapod Macrobrachium australiense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresswell, Tom, E-mail: tom.cresswell@ansto.gov.au [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Plenty Road, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Simpson, Stuart L. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Plenty Road, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Smith, Ross E.W. [Hydrobiology, Lang Parade, Auchenflower, QLD 4066 (Australia); Nugegoda, Dayanthi [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Plenty Road, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Mazumder, Debashish [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia); Twining, John [Austral Radioecology, Oyster Bay, NSW, 2225 (Australia)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Sources and mechanisms of Cd bioaccumulation were examined using radiotracers. • Macrobrachium australiense readily accumulated cadmium from the dissolved phase. • Assimilation efficiencies were comparable for sediment and algae. • A biokinetic model predicted ingestion accounted for majority of bioaccumulated Cd. - Abstract: The potential sources and mechanisms of cadmium bioaccumulation by the native freshwater decapods Macrobrachium species in the waters of the highly turbid Strickland River in Papua New Guinea were examined using {sup 109}Cd-labelled water and food sources and the Australian species Macrobrachium australiense as a surrogate. Synthetic river water was spiked with environmentally relevant concentrations of cadmium and animals were exposed for 7 days with daily renewal of test solutions. Dietary assimilation of cadmium was assessed through pulse-chase experiments where prawns were fed separately {sup 109}Cd-labelled fine sediment, filamentous algae and carrion (represented by cephalothorax tissue of water-exposed prawns). M. australiense readily accumulated cadmium from the dissolved phase and the uptake rate increased linearly with increasing exposure concentration. A cadmium uptake rate constant of 0.10 ± 0.05 L/g/d was determined in synthetic river water. During depuration following exposure to dissolved cadmium, efflux rates were low (0.9 ± 5%/d) and were not dependent on exposure concentration. Assimilation efficiencies of dietary sources were comparable for sediment and algae (48–51%), but lower for carrion (28 ± 5%) and efflux rates were low (0.2–2.6%/d) demonstrating that cadmium was well retained by M. australiense. A biokinetic model of cadmium accumulation by M. australiense predicted that for exposures to environmentally relevant cadmium concentrations in the Strickland River, uptake from ingestion of fine sediment and carrion would be the predominant sources of cadmium to the organism. The model predicted

  3. Alkyl polyglucoside compound influences freshwater plankton community structure in floating field mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Steven F; Cohen, Risa A

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic surfactants in cleaners and detergents commonly contaminate freshwater systems, therefore use of low-toxicity alternatives is becoming increasingly important. Alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) derived from natural products are less toxic than synthetic surfactants, and degrade rapidly reducing chemical exposure time. However, single species toxicity tests showed APGs have toxic effects on aquatic primary producers and zooplankton, and that species demonstrate different sensitivities to APGs. Furthermore, species unaffected by APGs directly may be indirectly affected by removal of a food source or changes in predator densities, thereby changing plankton community structure. To determine the effects of APGs on plankton communities under environmental conditions, floating mesocosms were deployed in a shallow pond in southeast Georgia, USA and dosed with 0, 0.01, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg L(-1) APG. Zooplankton community composition and abundance, phytoplankton abundance (as chlorophyll a), and water column dissolved oxygen concentration were determined weekly for 1 month. Zooplankton abundance decreased primarily due to loss of copepods, and community composition shifted toward small-bodied cladocerans (Bosmina sp.), and chlorophyll a concentrations declined by up to 81 % following exposure to APG concentrations of 2.5 mg L(-1) or greater. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen never dropped below 5.70 mg L(-1), but the observed declines of ~2 mg L(-1) could become stressful during periods of high water temperatures. Nevertheless, the APG-induced shift from copepod to cladoceran dominated communities and decrease in autochthonous carbon availability has important implications for food availability and quality to higher trophic levels such as planktivorous fishes.

  4. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  5. Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: comparative toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Ames, B N; Profet, M; Gold, L S

    1990-01-01

    The toxicology of synthetic chemicals is compared to that of natural chemicals, which represent the vast bulk of the chemicals to which humans are exposed. It is argued that animals have a broad array of inducible general defenses to combat the changing array of toxic chemicals in plant food (nature's pesticides) and that these defenses are effective against both natural and synthetic toxins. Synthetic toxins such as dioxin are compared to natural chemicals, such as indole carbinol (in brocco...

  6. Synthetic Cathinones: A New Public Health Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Karila, Laurent; Megarbane, Bruno; Cottencin, Olivier; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) have completely modified the drug scene and the current landscape of addiction. Synthetic substances, such as substituted or synthetic cathinones, also known as « legal highs », are often produced and used to mimic the effects of controlled drugs such as cocaine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), and methamphetamine. The overwhelming majority of synthetic cathinones are produced in China and South East Asian countries. The Internet has emerged as...

  7. Rapid Identification of Synthetic Cannabinoids in Herbal Incenses with DART-MS and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Michael A; Voyer, Brandy; Cody, Robert B; Dane, A John; Veltri, Mercurio; Huang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The usage of herbal incenses containing synthetic cannabinoids has caused an increase in medical incidents and triggered legislations to ban these products throughout the world. Law enforcement agencies are experiencing sample backlogs due to the variety of the products and the addition of new and still-legal compounds. In our study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was employed to promptly screen the synthetic cannabinoids after their rapid, direct detection on the herbs and in the powders by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS). A simple sample preparation protocol was employed on 50 mg of herbal sample matrices for quick NMR detection. Ten synthetic cannabinoids were discovered in fifteen herbal incenses. The combined DART-MS and NMR methods can be used to quickly screen synthetic cannabinoids in powder and herbal samples, serving as a complementary approach to conventional GC-MS or LC-MS methods.

  8. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  9. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  10. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an......Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  11. Synthetic Applications of Chiral Furanboronate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN; KinFai

    2001-01-01

    We recently uncovered that consecutive reactions of chiral furfural-boronate 1 with a lithium alkoxide and a nucleophile led to the formation of alcohols 2 with good diastereoselection in favor of S-configuration at the newly generated chiral carbon. In addition, it was also found that 2a and 2b were chromatographically separable on a silica gel column. This reaction is believed to involve a tetrahedral borate intermediate, as can be substantiated by 11BNMR spectroscopic studies. Chiral furanmethanolboronates 2a(or 2b) underwent a palladium-catalyzed Suzuki coupling to form enantiomerically pure furans 3, which can be further converted to the synthetically useful hydroxypyranones 4.1,2,3 In addition, Mukaiyama reaction of 1 also led to chromatographically separable diastereomeric aldol-products. The scope and limitation of these conversions will be discussed.  ……

  12. Synthetically simple, highly resilient hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jun; Lackey, Melissa A; Madkour, Ahmad E; Saffer, Erika M; Griffin, David M; Bhatia, Surita R; Crosby, Alfred J; Tew, Gregory N

    2012-03-12

    Highly resilient synthetic hydrogels were synthesized by using the efficient thiol-norbornene chemistry to cross-link hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer chains. The swelling and mechanical properties of the hydrogels were controlled by the relative amounts of PEG and PDMS. The fracture toughness (G(c)) was increased to 80 J/m(2) as the water content of the hydrogel decreased from 95% to 82%. In addition, the mechanical energy storage efficiency (resilience) was more than 97% at strains up to 300%. This is comparable with one of the most resilient materials known: natural resilin, an elastic protein found in many insects, such as in the tendons of fleas and the wings of dragonflies. The high resilience of these hydrogels can be attributed to the well-defined network structure provided by the versatile chemistry, low cross-link density, and lack of secondary structure in the polymer chains.

  13. Engineering life through Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Paras; Kamma, Akhil

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is a field involving synthesis of novel biological systems which are not generally found in nature. It has brought a new paradigm in science as it has enabled scientists to create life from the scratch, hence helping better understand the principles of biology. The viability of living organisms that use unnatural molecules is also being explored. Unconventional projects such as DNA playing tic-tac-toe, bacterial photographic film, etc. are taking biology to its extremes. The field holds a promise for mass production of cheap drugs and programming bacteria to seek-and-destroy tumors in the body. However, the complexity of biological systems make the field a challenging one. In addition to this, there are other major technical and ethical challenges which need to be addressed before the field realizes its true potential.

  14. Synthetic biology: a utilitarian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I examine the positive and negative features of synthetic biology ('SynBio') from a utilitarian ethical perspective. The potential beneficial outcomes from SynBio in the context of medicine are substantial; however it is not presently possible to predict precise outcomes due to the nascent state of the field. Potential negative outcomes from SynBio also exist, including iatrogenesis and bioterrorism; however it is not yet possible to quantify these risks. I argue that the application of a 'precautionary' approach to SynBio is ethically fraught, as is the notion that SynBio-associated knowledge ought to be restricted. I conclude that utilitarians ought to support a broadly laissez-faire stance in respect of SynBio.

  15. Synthetic CA II Triplet Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, M. M.; Barbuy, B.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se hicieron calculos de sintesis del espectro en el ititervalo de longitud de onda - 8700 A, ara ? oder verificar el comporta- mien to de diferentes lineas moleculares y at5micas como funci5n de los parametros esteldres de temperatura, gravedad y metalicidad. El espec- tro sintetico ha sido generado para:(a) todas las , (b) solamente de CN, (c) solamente de TiO, y (d) solamente lineas at6micas. Abstract. Spectrum synthesis calculations are carried out in the wavelength interval X 8300 - 8700 A, in order to verify the behaviour of different molecular and atomic lines as a function of the stellar para meters temperature, gravity and metallicity. Synthetic spectra were ge nerated for: (a) all lines, (b) only CN lines, (c) only TiO lines, and (d) only atomic lines Key `td6: LINE-PROFILE - ST S-AThOSPHERES

  16. [Mephedrone: a new synthetic drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Aymeric; Karila, Laurent; Sananes, Michel; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Mephedrone is a synthetic psychostimulant derived from cathinone belonging to the family of phenylethylamines. Sold on the Internet, it has recently emerged in France in recreational settings, and is mostly consumed by young people from the gay community and festive environment. Identified in 2008 by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction as a new drug on the market, the use of mephedrone has attracted media attention following the suspicious deaths of two young adults in Sweden and in England. Its legal aspect, ease of getting it on the Internet and cheap price coupled and an alternative-seeking to other psychostimulants make mephedrone a prime target for these populations and a source of abuse, with psychiatric and somatic complications. There is no curative pharmacological treatment approved by health authorities.

  17. Parity-Time Synthetic Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Liang; Ma, Renmin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is a fundamental notion in quantum field theories1,2. It has opened a new paradigm for non-Hermitian Hamiltonians ranging from quantum mechanics, electronics, to optics. In the realm of optics, optical loss is responsible for power dissipation, therefore typically degrading device performance such as attenuation of a laser beam. By carefully exploiting optical loss in the complex dielectric permittivity, however, recent exploration of PT symmetry revolutionizes our understandings in fundamental physics and intriguing optical phenomena such as exceptional points and phase transition that are critical for high-speed optical modulators3-9. The interplay between optical gain and loss in photonic PT synthetic matters offers a new criterion of positively utilizing loss to efficiently manipulate gain and its associated optical properties10-19. Instead of simply compensating optical loss in conventional lasers, for example, it is theoretically proposed that judiciously designed delicate modu...

  18. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore, used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  19. Jet fuels from synthetic crudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, A. C.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the technical problems in the conversion of a significant portion of a barrel of either a shale oil or a coal synthetic crude oil into a suitable aviation turbine fuel. Three syncrudes were used, one from shale and two from coal, chosen as representative of typical crudes from future commercial production. The material was used to produce jet fuels of varying specifications by distillation, hydrotreating, and hydrocracking. Attention is given to process requirements, hydrotreating process conditions, the methods used to analyze the final products, the conditions for shale oil processing, and the coal liquid processing conditions. The results of the investigation show that jet fuels of defined specifications can be made from oil shale and coal syncrudes using readily available commercial processes.

  20. Synthetic Applications of Chiral Furanboronate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN KinFai; WONG Henry N,C.

    2001-01-01

    @@ We recently uncovered that consecutive reactions of chiral furfural-boronate 1 with a lithium alkoxide and a nucleophile led to the formation of alcohols 2 with good diastereoselection in favor of S-configuration at the newly generated chiral carbon. In addition, it was also found that 2a and 2b were chromatographically separable on a silica gel column. This reaction is believed to involve a tetrahedral borate intermediate, as can be substantiated by 11BNMR spectroscopic studies. Chiral furanmethanolboronates 2a(or 2b) underwent a palladium-catalyzed Suzuki coupling to form enantiomerically pure furans 3, which can be further converted to the synthetically useful hydroxypyranones 4.1,2,3 In addition, Mukaiyama reaction of 1 also led to chromatographically separable diastereomeric aldol-products. The scope and limitation of these conversions will be discussed.