WorldWideScience

Sample records for preparing parents students

  1. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students' STEM preparation and career pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Christopher S; Svoboda, Ryan C; Harackiewicz, Judith M; Hulleman, Chris S; Hyde, Janet S

    2017-01-31

    During high school, developing competence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally. Given the importance of STEM careers as drivers of modern economies, this deficiency in preparation for STEM careers threatens the United States' continued economic progress. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term effects of a theory-based intervention designed to help parents convey the importance of mathematics and science courses to their high-school-aged children. A prior report on this intervention showed that it promoted STEM course-taking in high school; in the current follow-up study, we found that the intervention improved mathematics and science standardized test scores on a college preparatory examination (ACT) for adolescents by 12 percentile points. Greater high-school STEM preparation (STEM course-taking and ACT scores) was associated with increased STEM career pursuit (i.e., STEM career interest, the number of college STEM courses, and students' attitudes toward STEM) 5 y after the intervention. These results suggest that the intervention can affect STEM career pursuit indirectly by increasing high-school STEM preparation. This finding underscores the importance of targeting high-school STEM preparation to increase STEM career pursuit. Overall, these findings demonstrate that a motivational intervention with parents can have important effects on STEM preparation in high school, as well as downstream effects on STEM career pursuit 5 y later.

  2. Parents as Partners for Preparing Deaf Students for Bi-Bi Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, Carol J.; Metzger, Melanie A.

    This paper describes Bilingual-Bicultural (BiBi) instructional programs for students with hearing impairments and proposes a model for BiBi instruction which uses parents as partners with instructors to develop the linguistic abilities of hearing-impaired students. In the model, traditionally spoken languages are conveyed via cued speech instead…

  3. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Daniel

    This paper examines the potential impact of parent involvement in the formal education of their children and suggests ways that teacher education can be restructured to prepare teachers to work with parents. This paper attempts to answer five questions: (1) Why should parents be involved in the formal education of their children? (2) Why should…

  4. Perceived Ethnic Discrimination by Teachers and Ethnic Minority Students' Academic Futility: Can Parents Prepare Their Youth for Better or for Worse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hondt, Fanny; Eccles, Jacquelynne S; Van Houtte, Mieke; Stevens, Peter A J

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the interplay of perceived ethnic discrimination by teachers, parents' ethnic socialization practices, and ethnic minority students' sense of academic futility. Since discrimination creates barriers beyond control of the individual, the first research goal is to examine the association of perceived ethnic discrimination by teachers with ethnic minority students' sense of academic futility. The second research goal is to focus on the role of perceived parental ethnic socialization (e.g., cultural socialization and preparation for bias) to get a better understanding of the interaction between family level factors and the potentially negative consequences of ethnic teacher discrimination. A multilevel analysis on 1181 ethnic minority students (50.6 % girls; mean age = 15.5), originating from migration, in 53 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) shows that the frequent perception of ethnic discrimination by teachers is associated with stronger feelings of academic futility, and if these students also received high levels of parents' ethnic socialization, they perceive even stronger feelings of futility. The group of ethnic minority students, who perceive frequent ethnic teacher discrimination, is a group at risk, and parents' ethnic socialization does not seem able to change this.

  5. Parents' Perspectives on Parental Notification of College Students' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Although many colleges and universities use "parental notification" to inform parents of students' alcohol use, the impact of this intervention on student and parent behavior is unclear. Surveys were obtained from 326 parents of university undergraduates, 56 of whom had received a notification. Parent responses to the notification were…

  6. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international......A. Friesel. Preparing Students for Globalization Working with International Teams with Projects // Electronics and Electrical Engineering. - Kaunas: Technologija, 2019. - No. 6(102). - P. 111-114. This paper summarizes the activities, contents and overall outcomes of our experiences...... with international students studying at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering (in short - IHK); in particular students coming for one semester exchange program under Erasmus-programme. IHK's participation in EU-supported programmes like EIE-Surveyor and ELLEIEC, both ERASMUS thematic networks, have...

  7. Why It Is Important to Learn Algebra. Parent/Student Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Parent/Student Guide explains why Algebra I is a required subject, how it helps prepare students for the future, how Algebra I fits into the student's high school math program, and what parents can do to support their student's success in learning algebra. It also explains why California policymakers require all students to take algebra and…

  8. Student Parents and Financial Aid. Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsman, Mark; Engle, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Student parents face many challenges to accessing, persisting, and completing postsecondary education. While some of these challenges are unique to student parents--such as finding quality child care during class and work hours and juggling studying and academic assignments with parenting duties--others are typical of low-income and underserved…

  9. Reinforcing Students' Motivation through Parent Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nancy; Bruno, Ella; Burns, Traci

    This action research project implemented and evaluated a program for addressing the motivation of kindergarten, first-, and second-grade students by increasing parent participation in their children's schools and education. The problem of low motivation was documented through parent, teacher and student surveys, and analysis of student performance…

  10. Preparing Student Mobility through Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, Marta; Jeanneau, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, going to a foreign country has become all the more significant for Higher Education (HE) students, as concepts such as internationalisation and intercultural competencies have gained a more prominent role in HE. For students to fully benefit from this experience, it is paramount to prepare them for their stay in a foreign country…

  11. Preparing Students for Studying Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    This study is situated in the fields of language education, study abroad (SA) and intercultural communication. The interest in SA is increasing on the part of students, administrators, educators, and business companies for the learning opportunities that it offers. However, SA students are not always prepared to maximize their learning…

  12. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international...... semesters demonstrates the success of this form of education. Equally, the growing number of projects coming from industry demonstrates their positive interest in these kinds of skills for their future employees. Bibl. 6, tabl. 1 (in English; abstracts in English, Russian and Lithuanian)....

  13. College Students Who Are Parents Need Equitable Services for Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Elyse D'nn

    2014-01-01

    Growing populations which represent undergraduate students who are parents include females, non-traditional age students, and mothers who are single and living in poverty. Student-parent retention services appeared extremely disproportionate to the number of student-parents on campuses. Student parents in this quantitative analysis showed…

  14. Gender differences in the relationships among parenting styles and college student mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L; Kirtley, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Levels of student depression may increase as stress increases; parenting styles may be one indirect source of stress. The authors examined the role of parenting style in relationship to student stress, anxiety, and depression, with focused attention on gender differences. Participants were 290 undergraduate students (58% female, mean age = 19). Cross-sectional design. Participants completed surveys containing measures of parenting styles, college stress, anxiety, and depression. Anxiety and stress acted as mediators between some maternal parenting styles and female student depression. No mediational relationships were found for male student ratings. Daughters may be more susceptible to the influences of maternal parenting styles, which can either prepare or fail to prepare them for management and avoidance of stressors that are encountered during the college transition. College counseling centers and student affairs personnel may wish to focus attention on the instruction of self-management and problem-solving skills for incoming students.

  15. Perceived Parenting Styles on College Students' Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Debora R.; McIntyre, Anne; Hardaway, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived parenting styles and levels of optimism in undergraduate college students. Sixty-three participants were administered surveys measuring dispositional optimism and perceived parental Authoritative and Authoritarian styles. Multiple regression analysis revealed that both…

  16. Alcohol and College Students: Do Parents Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffes, Errin J.

    2001-01-01

    Higher education in America has attempted to define the relationships it has with both students and parents for many years. While some argue that the philosophy of in loco parentis has seemingly disappeared, others suggest that its return is imminent on American college campuses. One example of this return is the trend among campuses towards notifying parents when students are involved in judicial matters. Recent changes in federal privacy laws have clarified the right of colleges and univers...

  17. Can I Make It? A Transition Program for College Bound Learning Disabled Students and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ellen; Czamanske, Jackie

    The metaphor of a family road trip is used to describe a 10-week seminar program at the Rochester Institute of Technology (New York) for learning disabled high school students and their parents in preparation for student transition to college. The small group format (maximum eight families) allows for both whole group and separate (parents and…

  18. Parent attitudes towards medical student attendance and interaction in the paediatric burns outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shinichiro; McBride, Craig A; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-05-01

    Medical student attendance in the Outpatient Department is not only essential for the teaching of paediatric burns, but is also important in the recruitment of promising individuals for the growth of our speciality. In 2008, 110 consecutive parents were asked to complete written surveys before the start of their clinic appointment. Only one parent per family could choose to complete the survey. The response rate was 100%. Parents from a diverse range of cultural, educational and socioeconomic were represented in this study. Eighteen parents (16.4%), 48 parents (46.3%) and 44 parents (40.0%) considered their child's burn to be severe, moderate and mild, respectively. One hundred and nine parents (99.1%) accepted the attendance of medical students. Forty-two parents (38.5%) preferred fewer than 3 students, 35 parents (32.1%) would be comfortable with 3-5 medical students and 32 parents (29.4%) could accept more than 6 medical students. One hundred and two parents (92.7%) would allow students to physically interact with their children and 108 parents (99.2%) would allow medical students to freely ask questions in burns clinic. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that high income earners would be comfortable with fewer medical students attending clinic than low income earners (p=0.007). Also, younger parents (p=0.002) and parents from families who made less than A$25,000 a year (p=0.009), believed that they could perceive 'a lot of benefit' from observing medical students being taught, whereas older parents and parents from higher income families responded more often with a perception of only 'some benefit'. This first study in a paediatric outpatient setting shows that parents are overwhelmingly prepared to have medical students involved in the care of their child. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Support Parents to Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattanach, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    By all rights, Hispanic children should be performing better than test scores show. Strong parent-child relationships at home should equal student success, yet Hispanic students remain the least educated group in the country. The Hispanic family structure epitomizes the values normally associated with high academic performance. Hispanic families…

  20. Are These Parents for Real? Students' Views of Parents in Realistic and Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Janis M.; Gonzales, Monica C.

    2003-01-01

    Describes what students had to say about parental roles. Includes students' views about parental roles in real life, their expectations of parental roles in realistic and historical novels, their impressions of the parents they encountered in the selected books, and a comparison across genres about these parental characters. Presents guidelines…

  1. Are These Parents for Real? Students' Views of Parents in Realistic and Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Janis M.; Gonzales, Monica C.

    2003-01-01

    Describes what students had to say about parental roles. Includes students' views about parental roles in real life, their expectations of parental roles in realistic and historical novels, their impressions of the parents they encountered in the selected books, and a comparison across genres about these parental characters. Presents guidelines…

  2. Relations of Parenting Style and Parental Involvement with Ninth-Grade Students' Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Compared adolescents' and parents' perceptions of maternal and paternal demandingness, responsiveness, and parental involvement with schooling. Found that adolescents' reports of parenting correlated only moderately with parents' reports. Adolescents', but not parents', reports of parenting predicted students' achievement outcome, with parental…

  3. Relations of Parenting Style and Parental Involvement with Ninth-Grade Students' Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Compared adolescents' and parents' perceptions of maternal and paternal demandingness, responsiveness, and parental involvement with schooling. Found that adolescents' reports of parenting correlated only moderately with parents' reports. Adolescents', but not parents', reports of parenting predicted students' achievement outcome, with parental…

  4. Attitudes of parents of nondisabled students regarding inclusion of disabled students in Nevada's public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E J

    2001-02-01

    Opinions of 370 parents of students without disabilities about inclusive programming were compared with those obtained from a previous study of 65 parents of students with disabilities. Both groups of parents positively rated opinion statements favoring inclusion; however, parents of students with disabilities consistently rated inclusion-focused statements more positively than parents of nondisabled students.

  5. Parental Influences on Hmong University Students' Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports findings from a series of focus groups conducted on Hmong American university students. The purpose of the focus groups was to understand how, from the perspective of Hmong American students themselves, acculturative stress and parents influencedacademic success. Findings of a thematic analysis centered on general themes across focus group respondents that related to parental socialization, gendered socialization, and ethnic identification. Each identified themes is discussed in reference to gendered patterns of experiences in Hmong American families and in reference to academic success.

  6. Preparing Students for College... and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; Mero, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    In many ways, Roxbury Preparatory Charter School is typical of Boston's Mission Hill area: the student body is composed entirely of students of color, most of whom live in single-parent households. More than 68% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals. What is not typical is that for the fourth consecutive year, Roxbury Prep, which…

  7. Parentally Placed Private School Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    This document focuses on state education agency (SEA) support for child find, consultation and provision of equitable service provisions for parentally placed private school students with disabilities. Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) completed this activity as part of its cooperative…

  8. Prepare Your Child For Reading Tests: Tips for Parents = Prepare a sus hijos para tomar pruebas de lectura: Ideas para padres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Tori Mello

    Parents can help their children prepare for reading tests in a number of ways, not only just before the test, but also with everyday activities. There are generally two types of reading tests given to students: tests given by teachers throughout the year to see what information students have retained, and more formal, often standardized, tests…

  9. Expectations of Achievement: Student, Teacher and Parent Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie-Davies, Christine M.; Peterson, Elizabeth; Irving, Earl; Widdowson, Deborah; Dixon, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' expectations of students have been extensively studied for forty years. However, students' self-expectations and the expectations of parents are less well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of student, teacher and parent expectations in relation to student achievement from the perspective of each group. Focus…

  10. Expectations of Achievement: Student, Teacher and Parent Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie-Davies, Christine M.; Peterson, Elizabeth; Irving, Earl; Widdowson, Deborah; Dixon, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' expectations of students have been extensively studied for forty years. However, students' self-expectations and the expectations of parents are less well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of student, teacher and parent expectations in relation to student achievement from the perspective of each group. Focus…

  11. Student Preparation for the International Environmental Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Meehan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have strategies for exposing students to international experiences, but little is reported on their implementation. One example of an implemented activity is the multidisciplinary research project for undergraduate environment students, at RMIT University, that both prepares students to work in the environment profession and…

  12. College Students' Adjustment: The Role of Parent-College Student Expectation Discrepancies and Communication Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliata, Allison Kanter; Renk, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    Parents' influence on college students' adjustment is underestimated frequently. As college students often set goals based on their perceptions of their parents' expectations, discrepancies between college students' and their parents' expectations may be related to their adjustment. The purpose of this study was to examine parent-college student…

  13. Parental Influence on Academic Achievement among the Primary School Students in Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan; Descartes, Christine H.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the level of parental influence on academic achievement in primary school students who prepare for the National-level test at standard five (grade 6), Secondary Entrance Examinations in Trinidad. A sample of 128 students studying standard five from primary schools was randomly selected. The data were analysed using SPSS.…

  14. Parenting Style as a Moderator for Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Zahari; Low, Suet Fin; Lau, Poh Li

    2012-01-01

    Parenting styles have always been a crucial factor in influencing all aspects of a person's development. The purpose of this study is to test the structural equation model of academic achievement among the students using parenting styles as a moderator. The sample comprised 493 students from eight schools. Parenting styles are determined using the…

  15. Parenting Style as a Moderator for Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Zahari; Low, Suet Fin; Lau, Poh Li

    2012-01-01

    Parenting styles have always been a crucial factor in influencing all aspects of a person's development. The purpose of this study is to test the structural equation model of academic achievement among the students using parenting styles as a moderator. The sample comprised 493 students from eight schools. Parenting styles are determined using the…

  16. Students' Perceptions of Parents' and Teachers' Qualities of Interpersonal Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevets, Roma K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Predominantly white midwestern high school students (n=561) rated a parent and a teacher on the Barret-Lennard Relationship Inventory (1962, 1978). Overall, girls perceived greater warmth from parents and teachers. Evidence of age differences and of greater warmth from parents with whom students lived was also found. (SLD)

  17. Students' Perceptions of Parental Bonding Styles and Their Academic Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyojung; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Boyoung; Lee, Sang Min

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how parental bonding style affects academic burnout in Korean adolescents. Participants were 447 middle school students, who completed the Parental Bonding Instrument and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey. MANCOVA results confirmed that adolescents reporting the optimal bonding parental style, for both mother and…

  18. Students' Perceptions of Parental Bonding Styles and Their Academic Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyojung; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Boyoung; Lee, Sang Min

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how parental bonding style affects academic burnout in Korean adolescents. Participants were 447 middle school students, who completed the Parental Bonding Instrument and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey. MANCOVA results confirmed that adolescents reporting the optimal bonding parental style, for both mother and…

  19. Preparing Students for Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Richard; Peterson, Amelia; Weinstein, Emily

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aspects in our lives is learning how to have mutual, caring romantic relationships. Yet while schools and many other industries in this country devote tremendous attention and resources to preparing the young for work, they do remarkably little to prepare them for generous, self-respecting sex and love. Educators and…

  20. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald J.; Grossman, Pamela L.; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, whereas others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  1. Preparing Students for the Electronic Cottage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Sally L.; Burdin, Joel

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on Alvin Toffler's "electronic cottage" concept as a way of helping counselors become aware of futuristic thinking patterns, changing work roles and patterns in society, and techniques for preparing students for these changes. (Author/ABB)

  2. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  3. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  4. Parental Communication and Perceived Parental Attitudes about Sexuality among Turkish College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, Nursel

    2012-01-01

    This current study was conducted to examine parental communication and perceived parental attitudes about sexuality with respect to gender among Turkish college students. Moreover, attitudes toward premarital sexuality with respect to gender were explored. A demographic data form, premarital sexual permissiveness scale, parental communication…

  5. High School Students' Career Decision-Making Pattern across Parenting Styles and Parental Attachment Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenkseven-Onder, Fulya; Kirdok, Oguzhan; Isik, Erkan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this research was to investigate career decision among high school students regarding to their parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful) and parental attachment levels. Method: With this purpose, 382 (200 females; 182 males) Turkish high school students aged 14-18 completed Career…

  6. High School Students' Career Decision-Making Pattern across Parenting Styles and Parental Attachment Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenkseven-Onder, Fulya; Kirdok, Oguzhan; Isik, Erkan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this research was to investigate career decision among high school students regarding to their parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful) and parental attachment levels. Method: With this purpose, 382 (200 females; 182 males) Turkish high school students aged 14-18 completed Career…

  7. Parent Involvement and Student Performance: The Influence of School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers focusing on parent involvement continue to concentrate their efforts on the relationship between involvement and student performance in isolation of the school context in which involvement occurs. This research outlines an ecology of involvement and how this social context affects parent involvement and student performance. Relying on…

  8. Parental Influence on Chinese Students' Achievement: A Social Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how social capital formed by effective parental practices within Chinese families influences student achievement. Survey responses from 266 students from Grades 4 to 6 in a suburban elementary school in China were analysed to identify their perceptions of parental practices (support, pressure, help, monitoring and…

  9. Parental Influence on Chinese Students' Achievement: A Social Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how social capital formed by effective parental practices within Chinese families influences student achievement. Survey responses from 266 students from Grades 4 to 6 in a suburban elementary school in China were analysed to identify their perceptions of parental practices (support, pressure, help, monitoring and…

  10. Parental Involvement in Schooling, Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, Aurora; Fraser, Barry J.; Peiro, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relationships between students' perceptions of parental involvement in schooling, their Spanish classroom environment and student outcomes (attitudes and achievement). Modified Spanish versions of the What Is Happening In this Class?, Test of Spanish-Related Attitudes-L[subscript 1], a parental involvement questionnaire and a…

  11. The Predictive Strength of Perceived Parenting and Parental Attachment Styles on Psychological Symptoms among Turkish University Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serdar Körük; Abdülkadir Öztürk; Ahmet Kara

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationships between perceived parenting, parental attachment styles and psychological symptoms among Turkish university students and it also aims to find out which...

  12. Student-Led Parent Conferences: A Model for Teaching Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Jane M.; Fielstein, Lynda L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes program in which elementary school students lead parent-teacher conferences, shares authors' experiences with the student-led conferences, and discusses how the process has fostered student responsibility. Describes results of informal study that support the student-led conference. (NB)

  13. Student-Led Parent Conferences: A Model for Teaching Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Jane M.; Fielstein, Lynda L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes program in which elementary school students lead parent-teacher conferences, shares authors' experiences with the student-led conferences, and discusses how the process has fostered student responsibility. Describes results of informal study that support the student-led conference. (NB)

  14. Insomnia and styles of parental authority in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, G S

    1994-06-01

    This study explored the hypothesis that styles of parental authority are related to insomnia in college students. To do this, I asked a large group of university students (N = 757) to respond to a questionnaire that included the items of Buri's Parental Authority Questionnaire and the Coren Insomnia Scale. Analysis suggested that more strict and uncompromising discipline engaged in by authoritarian parents was associated with higher insomnia in young adults, while the firm though flexible and warm discipline associated with the authoritative parents was associated with less insomnia. Further, as fathers' permissiveness increased, insomnia decreased, while mothers' permissiveness seemed to be unrelated to insomnia.

  15. Teacher, Parent and Student Perceptions of the Motives of Cyberbullies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Louise; Campbell, Marilyn A.; Mergler, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the motivation of students who cyberbully is important for both prevention and intervention efforts for this insidious form of bullying. This qualitative exploratory study used focus groups to examine the views of teachers, parents and students as to the motivation of students who cyberbully and who bully in other traditional forms.…

  16. College Student Mind-Set: Does Student-Parental Relationship Influence the Student's Mind-Set?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waithaka, Abel Gitimu; Furniss, Teresa M.; Gitimu, Priscilla N.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine influence mother and father nurturance on college students fixed and growth mindset. Studies have shown that students who have support of their parents have a better chance of acquiring a growth mindset and attitudes in order to succeed in post-secondary education. Data were collected among 167 adult…

  17. Anxiety in school students: Role of parenting and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhla, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Prakriti; Sharan, Rajiv; Binay, Yashi; Verma, Vijay; Chaudhury, Suprakash

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of anxiety is high in school going children; however pattern of parenting and gender of the child are important factors for the development of anxiety. Gender role and parenting patterns are important construct that vary across different sociocultural setting hence are important to be studied in Indian context. In a cross sectional study all students of both sexes studying in class VIII, were assessed using the Spence anxiety scale (children version). The sample consisted of 146 (55% male and 45% female) with a mean age of 12.71 years. A total of 16 (11%) students scored above cutoff for high anxiety, the mean scores across gender shows that female students scored significantly higher in total and all sub types of anxiety. Most of the students perceived their parents 'Democratic' and other two authoritarian and permissive type of parenting were almost equal. There was significantly higher anxiety among the students who perceived their parents as authoritarian. The prevalence of high anxiety was 11% in class VIII students. High anxiety in students was significantly associated with female gender and authoritarian parenting pattern as perceived by the children.

  18. Anxiety in school students: Role of parenting and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Bakhla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of anxiety is high in school going children; however pattern of parenting and gender of the child are important factors for the development of anxiety. Gender role and parenting patterns are important construct that vary across different sociocultural setting hence are important to be studied in Indian context. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study all students of both sexes studying in class VIII, were assessed using the Spence anxiety scale (children version. Results: The sample consisted of 146 (55% male and 45% female with a mean age of 12.71 years. A total of 16 (11% students scored above cutoff for high anxiety, the mean scores across gender shows that female students scored significantly higher in total and all sub types of anxiety. Most of the students perceived their parents ′Democratic′ and other two authoritarian and permissive type of parenting were almost equal. There was significantly higher anxiety among the students who perceived their parents as authoritarian. Conclusions: The prevalence of high anxiety was 11% in class VIII students. High anxiety in students was significantly associated with female gender and authoritarian parenting pattern as perceived by the children.

  19. Engaging Parents of Eighth Grade Students in Parent-Teacher Bidirectional Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett-Conroy, Waveline

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of a classroom-based, low-cost intervention to increase parents' involvement in their children's education. In Phase 1 of the study, 17 parents of 8th grade students in a low-income, high immigrant and minority school district were interviewed to conduct a qualitative assessment of factors…

  20. 22 CFR 96.48 - Preparation and training of prospective adoptive parent(s) in incoming cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... adequate prior training or have prior experience as parent(s) of children adopted from abroad. (h) The... least ten hours (independent of the home study) of preparation and training, as described in paragraphs... and children with a history of multiple caregivers may experience, before and after their adoption; (6...

  1. Parenting Style as a Moderator for Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Zahari; Low, Suet Fin; Lau, Poh Li

    2012-08-01

    Parenting styles have always been a crucial factor in influencing all aspects of a person's development. The purpose of this study is to test the structural equation model of academic achievement among the students using parenting styles as a moderator. The sample comprised 493 students from eight schools. Parenting styles are determined using the Parental Authority Questionnaire (Buri in J Pers Assess 57:110-119, 1991). Academic achievement is measured based on the students' performance in the Lower Secondary Assessment. Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling. Results demonstrated that model of authoritative and model of authoritarian fit the data of this study well. Both authoritative and authoritarian parenting styles are the most common practice of the parents. Parenting styles have been found to be a moderator of this study. The results indicated that parenting styles moderated the effect of academic self-concept on academic achievement. The impact of academic self-concept on academic achievement is found to be greater for the authoritative than the authoritarian parenting style.

  2. Parenting Styles and Adjustment Outcomes among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Keisha M.; Thomas, Deneia M.

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that parenting styles partially explain college students' academic adjustment. However, to account for academic adjustment more fully, additional contributors should be identified and tested. We examined the fit of a hypothesized model consisting of parenting styles, indicators of well-being, and academic adjustment…

  3. Parenting Styles and Adjustment Outcomes among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Keisha M.; Thomas, Deneia M.

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that parenting styles partially explain college students' academic adjustment. However, to account for academic adjustment more fully, additional contributors should be identified and tested. We examined the fit of a hypothesized model consisting of parenting styles, indicators of well-being, and academic adjustment…

  4. At Issue: Helicopter Parents and Millennial Students, an Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricer, Wayne F.

    2008-01-01

    Technological advances have made it easy for parents and children--many of them students--to communicate instantaneously. Devices and technologies such as cell phones, laptops, texting, and e-mail all enable various forms of instant communication. "Helicopter parents" are regarded as very overprotective and overly involved in the affairs of their…

  5. School Learning Environments as Reported by Teachers, Parents, and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Nicholas; Nolin, Mary Jo

    American parents who are trying to rear their children in responsible ways do so in the face of peer influences that may be at odds with the parents' values. This report examines some of the findings of the 1993 National Household Education Survey (NHES) to show how families and students' peers sometimes work at cross-purposes. Specifically…

  6. Studying and parenting: Experiences of student mother in Ugandan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the past, University education in Uganda mainly catered for direct entrants from secondary ... mature students include women who are parents as well. This trend has been influenced by the ... affecting the performance of the organization.

  7. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students’ STEM preparation and career pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Christopher S.; Svoboda, Ryan C.; Harackiewicz, Judith M.; Hulleman, Chris S.; Hyde, Janet S.

    2017-01-01

    During high school, developing competence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally. Given the importance of STEM careers as drivers of modern economies, this deficiency in preparation for STEM careers threatens the United States’ continued economic progress. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term effects of a theory-based intervention designed to help parents convey the importance of mathematics and science courses to their high-school–aged children. A prior report on this intervention showed that it promoted STEM course-taking in high school; in the current follow-up study, we found that the intervention improved mathematics and science standardized test scores on a college preparatory examination (ACT) for adolescents by 12 percentile points. Greater high-school STEM preparation (STEM course-taking and ACT scores) was associated with increased STEM career pursuit (i.e., STEM career interest, the number of college STEM courses, and students’ attitudes toward STEM) 5 y after the intervention. These results suggest that the intervention can affect STEM career pursuit indirectly by increasing high-school STEM preparation. This finding underscores the importance of targeting high-school STEM preparation to increase STEM career pursuit. Overall, these findings demonstrate that a motivational intervention with parents can have important effects on STEM preparation in high school, as well as downstream effects on STEM career pursuit 5 y later. PMID:28096393

  8. What are other parents saying? Perceived parental communication norms and the relationship between alcohol-specific parental communication and college student drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Lucy E; Hummer, Justin F; Lac, Andrew; Labrie, Joseph W

    2014-03-01

    This study examined parents' normative perceptions of other college parents' alcohol-specific communication, and how parents' perceived communication norms and alcohol-specific communication relate to student drinking outcomes. A sample of 457 student-parent dyads were recruited from a midsize university. Students completed Web-based assessments of alcohol-related attitudes and behaviors. Parents completed alcohol-specific measures of communication norms and parent-child communication, including communication content (i.e., targeted communication) and frequency of communication. Results indicated that parents overestimated how much other parents talked to their college students about the frequency and quantity of alcohol use, but underestimated how often parents initiated conversations about alcohol. In a path model, perceived communication norms positively predicted both targeted communication and frequency of communication. Perceived communication norms and targeted communication negatively predicted students' attitude toward alcohol use. In contrast, more frequent communication predicted students holding more approving attitudes toward alcohol. The relationship between parents' perceived communication norms and students' drinking behaviors was mediated by the parental communication variables and student attitudes. Tests of indirect effects were undertaken to examine meditational processes. The findings underscore relations involving parental perceived communication norms and parents' own alcohol communication and their children's drinking outcomes. The complex relationships of different types of parental communication and student outcomes warrant further research.

  9. Parenting Style and Generativity Measured in College Students and Their Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise D. Guastello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The logical consistency between generativity and the authoritative parenting style led to the hypothesis that the two behavior patterns or orientations were related. Survey measurements of perceived parenting style (authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive and generativity in 559 university students and their respective parents were compared. The authoritative parenting style correlated positively with generativity for both students and parents. Both students and mothers scored significantly higher on generativity than fathers, but no significant difference was found between students’ and mothers’ generativity. Hierarchical regression showed that students’ generativity was proximally related to their perceptions of their mothers’ authoritative parenting style, their mothers’ reports of parenting style, and their mothers’ generativity. Father’s generativity or parenting style did not make any additional contributions. The pattern of results suggested that generativity is a learned orientation and more often from mothers than from fathers. The role of maturation might not be as strong as developmental theory would suggest. Several avenues of future research were outlined.

  10. Parent Involvement Practices of High-Achieving Elementary Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Samara Susan

    This study addressed a prevalence of low achievement in science courses in an urban school district in Georgia. National leaders and educators have identified the improvement of science proficiency as critical to the future of American industry. The purpose of this study was to examine parent involvement in this school district and its contribution to the academic achievement of successful science students. Social capital theory guided this study by suggesting that students achieve best when investments are made into their academic and social development. A collective case study qualitative research design was used to interview 9 parent participants at 2 elementary schools whose children scored in the exceeds category on the Science CRCT. The research questions focused on what these parents did at home to support their children's academic achievement. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview protocol and analyzed through the categorical aggregation of transcribed interviews. Key findings revealed that the parents invested time and resources in 3 practices: communicating high expectations, supporting and developing key skills, and communicating with teachers. These findings contribute to social change at both the local and community level by creating a starting point for teachers, principals, and district leaders to reexamine the value of parent input in the educational process, and by providing data to support the revision of current parent involvement policies. Possibilities for further study building upon the findings of this study may focus on student perceptions of their parents' parenting as it relates to their science achievement.

  11. Preparing Graduate Students as Science Communicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K.; Gutstein, J.

    2012-12-01

    Our presentation introduces our interdisciplinary curriculum that teaches graduate students at our R-1 university to translate their research to general audiences. We also discuss the challenges we have faced and strategies we have employed to broaden graduate education at our campus to include preparation in science communication. Our "Translating Research beyond Academia" curriculum consists of three separate thematically based courses taught over the academic year: Education and Community Outreach, Science Communication and Writing, Communicating with Policy- and Decision-makers. Course goals are to provide professional development training so that graduate students become more capable professionals prepared for careers inside and outside academia while increasing the public understanding of science and technology. Open to graduate students of any discipline, each course meets weekly for two hours; students receive academic credit through a co-sponsoring graduate program. Students learn effective strategies for communicating research and academic knowledge with the media, the general public, youth, stakeholders, and decision- and policy-makers. Courses combine presentations from university and regional experts with hands-on work sessions aimed towards creating effective communications, outreach and policy plans, broader impacts statements, press releases, blogs, and policy briefs. A final presentation and reflections are required. Students may opt for further training through seminars tailored to student need. Initial results of our analyses of student evaluations and work indicate that students appreciate the interdisciplinary, problem-based approach and the low-risk opportunities for learning professional development skills and for exploring non-academic employment. Several students have initiated engaged work in their disciplines, and several have secured employment in campus science communication positions. Two have changed career plans as a direct result of

  12. Achieving fruit, juice, and vegetable recipe preparation goals influences consumption by 4th grade students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski Tom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Including children in food preparation activities has long been recommended as a method to encourage children's consumption, but has not been evaluated. Goal setting is also a common component of behavior change programs. This study assessed the impact of attaining goals to prepare fruit-juice or vegetable recipes on student fruit and vegetable consumption as part of a 10-week fruit and vegetable intervention for fourth grade students. Methods At six of the 10 sessions, students (n = 671 selected a fruit-juice or vegetable recipe to prepare at home before the next session. Students returned parent-signed notes reporting their child's goal attainment. Baseline and post consumption were assessed with up to four days of dietary recalls. Analyses included regression models predicting post consumption from the number of fruit-juice or vegetable recipe preparation goals attained, controlling for baseline consumption. Results In general, girls and Hispanic students achieved the most recipe preparation goals. For students with highest baseline fruit-juice consumption, post fruit-juice consumption was higher by about 1.0 serving for those achieving 2 or 3 fruit-juice recipe preparation goals. Post vegetable consumption was highest for students reporting the highest baseline vegetable consumption and who achieved two or three vegetable recipe preparation goals. In general, recipe goal setting was a useful procedure primarily for those with high baseline consumption. Conclusion This is one of the first reports demonstrating that home recipe preparation was correlated with dietary change among children.

  13. Transportation challenges for urban students with disabilities: parent perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Benjamin C; Keys, Christopher B; McMahon, Susan D; Brubacher, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored parent perspectives of the transportation difficulties students with disabilities experienced getting to and around school. Participants were parents of predominantly African American and Latino/a high school youth with disabilities from low income neighborhoods. Content analysis of 14 meetings with 5 to 12 parents sponsored by the school district revealed five primary themes concerning transportation: the role of aides, exclusion from school programming, scheduling problems, equipment problems, and physical safety issues. Findings are discussed in regard to students' social and emotional experiences at school. Implications for school policy include improving the integration of transportation within inclusion best practice models. Incorporating parent perspectives can help school administrators and staff enrich the quality of inclusive, socially just education for students with disabilities.

  14. Consulting parents on childhood obesity and implications for medical student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Maree; Coat, Suzette

    2009-10-01

    It is important that medical schools take some account of community expectations for health care when planning curricula. This is particularly important for emerging public health problems such as childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to explore parent attitudes to the role of the doctor in childhood obesity and implications for medical student learning. The views of eight mothers and one father were explored through interview. Transcripts were analysed using an iterative process of theme identification and testing against transcript data. A range of recruitment strategies were used in an attempt to increase participant numbers. Participants believed doctors should support parent decisions about children's diet and life-style and be prepared to 'step-in' with a more active role when, in the parent's view, this was needed. Participants wanted doctors to provide advice on healthy nutrition, be proficient in child physical assessment and be able to communicate sensitively with both children and parents. Although the parents who agreed to be interviewed expressed views demonstrating their commitment to preventing and reducing childhood obesity, many other parents declined the invitation to contribute. It may be that parent concern within the broader community that childhood obesity is a real and significant health risk does not reflect the level of concern of the medical profession. The most likely implications for the teaching of medical students are a need for more comprehensive teaching around healthy diet and activity for all children, improved recognition of overweight and obesity and ongoing communication skills development.

  15. parents' perception, students' and teachers' attitude towards school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... responsibilities, abstinence, contraception, family planning, body image, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure ... 386 students, total census of 94 teachers and 10 parents in Merawi Town from March 13-27, 2011. Data ..... In United Kingdom the students more .... Fentie A. Predictors of Sexual Value Systems.

  16. Participatory action research: involving students in parent education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Cathrine; Wu, Cynthia; Lam, Winsome

    2014-01-01

    Competition for scarce clinical placements has increased requiring new and innovative models to be developed to meet the growing need. A participatory action research project was used to provide a community nursing clinical experience of involvement in parent education. Nine Hong Kong nursing students self-selected to participate in the project to implement a parenting program called Parenting Young Children in a Digital World. Three project cycles were used: needs identification, skills development and program implementation. Students were fully involved in each cycle's planning, action and reflection phase. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to inform the project. The overall outcome of the project was the provision of a rich and viable clinical placement experience that created significant learning opportunities for the students and researchers. This paper will explore the student's participation in this PAR project as an innovative clinical practice opportunity.

  17. The Predictive Strength of Perceived Parenting and Parental Attachment Styles on Psychological Symptoms among Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körük, Serdar; Öztürk, Abdülkadir; Kara, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationships between perceived parenting, parental attachment styles and psychological symptoms among Turkish university students and it also aims to find out which perceived parenting and parental attachment styles predict psychological symptoms which were measured. This study is a quantitative research and…

  18. Students' Self-Esteem in an Asian Educational System: The Contribution of Parental Involvement and Parental Investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Esther Sui-chu

    2003-01-01

    Seeks to identify factors related to parental involvement and investment having the greatest impact on the self-esteem of Hong Kong middle-school students. Finds, for example, that the effect of parental involvement on student's self-esteem is greater than that of parental investment, with home-based involvement having the strongest effect. Draws…

  19. PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF STUDENTS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Hentonen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem and the essence of training students for inclusive education in terms of higher education. The implementation of inclusive education is seen in several ways: the traditional school attendance by students with disabilities, learning at home and distance learning. The need for a barrier-free environment in the educational institutions represented by the basic requirements for the training of students for inclusion, providing mastery of pedagogical knowledge, promoting the development of creativity, the ability to generate new ideas, the implementation of a humanistic position that is based on ownership, dialogue, understanding and acceptance of the child with special abilities for granted. Competence approach is the methodological basis of training future teachers to work with children in the conditions of inclusive education. On the basis of this approach, the article presents a set of competencies that can successfully carry out the work with children and families in the conditions of inclusive education. The main competence of professional readiness of students for Inclusive Educ ation: monitoring,  diagnostic and informative.  Mon itoring competence involves tracking the process of training and education of children in inclusive education. Diagnostic ability to work with this category of   children   and   their   parents.   The   content   knowledge  of  the  problems  of  training  and  educ ation, understanding of the content of inclusive ed ucation, acquisition of knowledge and skills in wor king with children with special needs.

  20. The Role of Parents in College Students' Sociopolitical Awareness, Academic, and Social Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Casandra E.; Sax, Linda J.; Wolf, De'Sha S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental contact (frequency of student-parent communication) and involvement (parents' interest and/or involvement in students' academic progress and decision-making) with college students' personal, social, and academic development. Parental involvement accounted for over two-thirds of the significant…

  1. Parent involvement and student academic performance: a multiple mediational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, David R; Keane, Susan P; Shelton, Terri L; Calkins, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year-old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives are discussed.

  2. How do medical students prepare for flipped classrooms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM; de Kleijn, R.A.M.; ten Cate, TJ; van Rijen, HVM; Westerveld, HE

    A flipped classroom, an approach abandoning traditional lectures and having students come together to apply acquired knowledge, requires students to come to class well prepared. The nature of this preparation is currently being debated. Watching web lectures as a preparation has typically been

  3. DIFFERENCES IN THE PREPARATION OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES OF HIGH AND LOW IN DEALING WITH NATIONAL EXAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Fitria

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To pass the examination, the most important thing to be considered by the students is the examination preparation. There are so many kinds of examination faced by the students, one of it is national examination. Therefore, the national examination should be prepared well by the students, school, and parents since it is a tool to measure students competency of achievement which held by education unit in order to obtain learning confession and it is a requirement of finishing education level. This research is aimed to describe and differentiate the preparation of students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement in facing national examination. This is a comparative quantitative descriptive approach supported with interview. The target of the research is students of SMA Adabiah Padang, with 327 students as the population. There are 80 students placed as sample. The research finding reveals that (1 physical preparation of students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement in facing national examination is in well prepared category (2 psychology preparation for both students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement is in well prepared category, (3 the preparation in mastering the learning material for both students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement is in well prepared category,(4 the analysis of t test result reveals that there is a significant difference between students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement of SMA Adabiah Padang.Keywords: Preparation National Examination, Students Learning Achievement.

  4. Teachers', Students' and Parents' Attitudes towards Disruptive Behaviour Problems in High School: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romi, Shlomo; Freund, Mira

    1999-01-01

    Explores the attitudes of students, teachers, and parents toward students' disruptive behavior as part of school discipline. Finds that teachers agreed on the severity of most disruptive behavior problems, while parents and students disagreed among themselves. Indicates that parents and students should be involved with discipline-related policies.…

  5. Investigating and comparing the relationship between parental monitoring types and perceived parenting styles of the Turkish students

    OpenAIRE

    Ayse Dilek Öğretir Özçelik

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between parental monitoring and parental styles are considered as an important subject for child development field. The aim of this article is to analyze the perceptions of the adolescents about their parents’ parental monitoring and parenting styles in terms of the participants’ gender, family education and family jobs status. The sample size is 252 adolescents with 158 female nd 94 male students. The data were collected by the Parental Monitoring Instrument (PMI) and the Pa...

  6. Measuring Parent Time Scarcity and Fatigue as Barriers to Meal Planning and Preparation: Quantitative Scale Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storfer-Isser, Amy; Musher-Eizenman, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the psychometric properties of 9 quantitative items that assess time scarcity and fatigue as parent barriers to planning and preparing meals for their children. Methods: A convenience sample of 342 parents of children aged 2-6 years completed a 20-minute online survey. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine the…

  7. Preparing Today's Nursing Students for Tomorrow's Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Federal directives, nursing and nursing education associations, as well as accrediting bodies emphasize the importance of integrating health information technology and EHRs into nursing practice. Additionally, informatics is a required competency of baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing education's efforts to enhance students' learning in the area of electronic documentation is at its peak. The goal of enabling nurses to make healthcare safer, more effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable can only be achieved if a variety of technologies are clearly integrated into nursing education. Therefore, some schools have developed educational innovations to incorporate academic EHRs. As the mental health setting is unique, extraordinary attention has to be provided during the education of electronic documentation. Nursing education efforts must focus on interventions that provide resources that enhance the participant's knowledge and skills related to electronic documentation in a variety of clinical settings. Additionally, implementing academic EHRs in clinical settings offers nursing educators an opportunity to note the benefits. The state of nursing education depends on the accessibility to utilize academic EHRs in the nursing curriculum within the clinical setting to effectively prepare students for real-word practice.

  8. 34 CFR 99.20 - How can a parent or eligible student request amendment of the student's education records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the student's education records? 99.20 Section 99.20 Education Office of the Secretary, Department... Records? § 99.20 How can a parent or eligible student request amendment of the student's education records? (a) If a parent or eligible student believes the education records relating to the student...

  9. Parental relationships, autonomy, and identity processes of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullis, Ronald L; Graf, Shruti Chatterjee; Mullis, Ann K

    2009-12-01

    To examine the interrelations among parental relationships, emotional autonomy, and identity statuses, the authors asked 234 (105 male, 129 female) high school students to complete the Parental Bonding Scale (G. Parker, H. Tupling, & L. B. Brown, 1979), Emotional Autonomy Scale (L. D. Steinberg & S. B. Silverberg, 1986), and Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Scale-II (L. D. Bennion & G. R. Adams, 1986). There continues to be controversy about whether adolescents' identity formation is related to their emotional separation from their parents. According to Eriksonian and neo-Eriksonian theory (J. E. Marcia, 1980, 1984), adolescents who are successful in resolving their identity issues are better able to emotionally individuate from their parents. That is, adolescents have fewer conflicts with parents as they become more independent of them. Results of the present study indicate that adolescent perceptions of mother's caring behavior, but not father's caring behavior, predicted higher foreclosure identity status scores among adolescents. In addition, 2 dimensions of emotional autonomy (i.e., perceiving parents as people and parental deidealization) best predicted the adolescent identity statuses of moratorium and foreclosure. Results also indicate that future research may need to establish a better theoretical conceptualization of the constructs of interest in this study and better measures of emotional autonomy among adolescents.

  10. Students, Parents Give Thumbs-Up to Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    The Flipped Classroom isn't for everyone, but it's been well received by Math and Biology students and their parents at Okanagan Mission Secondary School (OKM) in Kelowna, B.C., and was strongly supported by the OKM principal, Scott Mclean. As teacher Graham Johnson noted in his personal account of his first year using the Flipped Classroom…

  11. Communication with Parents and Body Satisfaction in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Emiko; Aune, R. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined how communication with parents is related to college students' body satisfaction. Participants and Methods: Participants ("N" = 134; 58 males and 76 females) completed a survey in March 2011 assessing body satisfaction and perceptions of communication with mothers and fathers. Results: Daughters' body…

  12. Sustained parenting and college drinking in first-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrisi, Rob; Ray, Anne E

    2010-04-01

    Research indicates that for many students excessive drinking in college is a continuation of high school drinking tendencies. However, there have been limited theory-driven, systematic interventions targeting students so as to prevent alcohol misuse in their transition to college. Almost all current prevention approaches tend to be focused on younger populations and college-drinking interventions are typically delivered to students when they are already on campus. These analyses draw from a novel program of research involving parents of college freshmen based on the work of Turrisi et al. [Turrisi et al. [2001] Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 15(4), 366-372; Turrisi, et al. [2009] Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 7, 315-326] and focuses on examining: (1) the relationship between parenting and student drinking tendencies during the transitional period between high school and college and into the first year of college, and (2) the mediation process by which sustained parenting throughout the first year is related to college-drinking outcomes and consequences so as to inform future intervention efforts. The empirical evidence from this study suggests that sustained parental efforts have a beneficial effect on reducing high-risk drinking and preventing harm even at this late stage of late adolescent/early adult development. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Parents' Expectations and Students' Achievement in Two Western Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Markus P.; Vida, Mina; Garrett, Jessica L.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2007-01-01

    The present study compares the relations of family SES and parents' educational expectations during early adolescence with students' self-concept of ability and academic achievement in mathematics and language in two western countries, Switzerland and USA Participants were drawn from two US longitudinal samples, The Michigan Study of Adolescent…

  14. Obesity Prevention in Early Adolescence: Student, Parent, and Teacher Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Thomas G.; Bindler, Ruth C.; Goetz, Summer; Daratha, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a significant health problem among today's youth; however, most school-based prevention programs in this area have had limited success. Focus groups were conducted with seventh- to eighth-grade students, parents, and teachers to provide insight into the development of a comprehensive program for the prevention of adolescent…

  15. Why They Come: SSATB Survey of Parents of Incoming Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Independent School, 2015

    2015-01-01

    What motivates families to consider an independent private school education and ultimately make the commitment to enroll their children? The Secondary School Admission Test Board (SSATB) surveyed 2,300 parents of private school-bound students in 2014 to answer this question. Based on the results of the survey, this brief article highlights five of…

  16. Communication with Parents and Body Satisfaction in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Emiko; Aune, R. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined how communication with parents is related to college students' body satisfaction. Participants and Methods: Participants ("N" = 134; 58 males and 76 females) completed a survey in March 2011 assessing body satisfaction and perceptions of communication with mothers and fathers. Results: Daughters'…

  17. The DELF in Canada: Perceptions of Students, Teachers, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The "Diplôme d'études de langue française" (DELF) has recently gained attention in Canada for its potential as a national French second language (FSL) proficiency test. This article explores the perceptions of students, teachers, and parents in various school jurisdictions across Canada on a range of issues related to the DELF test and…

  18. Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

  19. Communication with Parents and Body Satisfaction in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Emiko; Aune, R. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined how communication with parents is related to college students' body satisfaction. Participants and Methods: Participants ("N" = 134; 58 males and 76 females) completed a survey in March 2011 assessing body satisfaction and perceptions of communication with mothers and fathers. Results: Daughters' body…

  20. Final Year Faculty of Education Students' Views Concerning Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, E. Nihal

    2014-01-01

    This study has aimed to determine the knowledge, skills, and views held by pre-service teachers attending different teacher training programs about parent involvement. A total of 520 4th year students receiving education in primary school teaching and in branch teaching programs participated in the study. Data were collected by the "Parent…

  1. What are other parents saying? Perceived parental communication norms and the relationship between alcohol-specific parental communication and college student drinking

    OpenAIRE

    Napper, Lucy E.; Hummer, Justin F.; Lac, Andrew; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined parents’ normative perceptions of other college parents’ alcohol-specific communication, and how parents’ perceived communication norms and alcohol-specific communication relate to student drinking outcomes. A sample of 457 student-parent dyads were recruited from a mid-size university. Students completed web-based assessments of alcohol-related attitudes and behaviors. Parents completed alcohol-specific measures of communication norms and parent-child communication, inclu...

  2. Parental Engagement Using Effective Communication for K-2 Students in an Urban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lynn Renee'

    2013-01-01

    Parental involvement is a factor in student achievement. Low parental engagement at home and school has created a problem in an urban elementary school. Guided by Epstein's 6 types of parental involvement, the purpose of this case study was to examine and describe the perspectives of 17 parents of K-2 students in an urban school in Michigan. Few…

  3. Parent-nursing student communication practice: role-play and learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark J; Taylor, Erin A; High, Patricia L

    2012-02-01

    Parents accompanying their child's hospitalization can experience stress associated with the child's illness, treatments, and major alterations in family life. Nurses often serve as the primary communicator and cultural broker because of their constant presence at the child's bedside. Nursing students may not have essential parent-nurse communication competencies. In an innovative method of teaching nursing students about communicating with parents, 64 undergraduate nursing students participated in a parent-led postconference with a nursing instructor. The parents provided background and led role-play activities and debriefing sessions with students. Feedback provided by students before and after the parent session included requests for additional parents' experiences, appreciation and exceeded expectations of hands-on experience, recognized value of information provided, and the recommendation that all students attend. We demonstrate that empathy is a teachable skill, nursing students are apprehensive about communicating with parents, and nursing students do not understand how much families rely on nurses. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. What is the better predictor of students' personal values : Parents' values or students' personality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobowik, Magdalena; van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; Basabe, Nekane; Telletxea, Saioa; Paez, Dario; Nasabe, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between young adults' values, multicultural personality traits and their parents' values. A total of 102 students and their matched parents filled in the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire and the Portrait Value Questionnaire. The influence of one's personal

  5. What is the better predictor of students' personal values : Parents' values or students' personality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobowik, Magdalena; van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; Basabe, Nekane; Telletxea, Saioa; Paez, Dario; Nasabe, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between young adults' values, multicultural personality traits and their parents' values. A total of 102 students and their matched parents filled in the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire and the Portrait Value Questionnaire. The influence of one's personal

  6. College Choices Guide for Migrant Students and Parents = Guia de Elecciones de Universidades para Estudiantes Migrantes y sus Padres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy/Northeast Health, Troy, NY.

    This brief guide is a planning outline to help migrant students and parents prepare for, choose, and apply to college. The first section, "Thinking About College," offers specific tips for each grade from 9-12; discusses high school graduation requirements and college admission requirements, using Johnston County (North Carolina) schools and the…

  7. Helicopter Parenting and Related Issues: Psychological Well Being, Basic Psychological Needs and Depression on University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Okray, Zihniye

    2016-01-01

    Helicopter parenting is not a new dimension of parenting but it is a parenting that involves hovering parents who are potentially over-involved in the lives of their child. (Padilla-Walker, Nelson, 2012) Helicopter parenting is a unique phenomenon (Odenweller et al, 2014) and unique form of parental control (Willoughby et al., 2013) which can be described as highly involved, intensive, a hands-on method. (Schiffrin et al, 2014) In this study, university students examined about their parental ...

  8. Group-based antenatal birth and parent preparation for improving birth outcomes and parenting resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Axelsen, Solveig Forberg

    2013-01-01

    To examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of group based antenatal education for improving childbirth and parenting resources compared to auditorium based education.......To examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of group based antenatal education for improving childbirth and parenting resources compared to auditorium based education....

  9. Parents' Attitudes toward Mathematics and the Influence on Their Students' Attitudes toward Mathematics: A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr-Schroeder, Margaret J.; Jackson, Christa; Cavalcanti, Maureen; Jong, Cindy; Schroeder, D. Craig; Speler, Lydia G.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate parents' attitudes toward mathematics, their students' attitude toward mathematics, and the influence of the parents' attitude on the students' attitude toward mathematics. Data analyses revealed statistically significant positive correlations between parents' and students' attitudes toward mathematics.…

  10. Parental Involvement in Middle School Predicting College Attendance for First-Generation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Khanh; Rush, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, this report examined the relationship between parental involvement in eighth grade and college attendance by eight years after high school for students whose parents have no college education (i.e., first-generation students; n = 1,358) in comparison to students whose parents have some…

  11. The effectiveness of Family Science and Technology Workshops on parental involvement, student achievement, and student curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Lora Bechard

    The literature suggests that parental involvement in schools results in positive changes in students and that schools need to provide opportunities for parents to share in the learning process. Workshops are an effective method of engaging parents in the education of their children. This dissertation studies the effects of voluntary Family Science and Technology Workshops on elementary children's science interest and achievement, as well as on parents' collaboration in their child's education. The study involved 35 second and third-grade students and their parents who volunteered to participate. The parental volunteers were randomly assigned to either the control group (children attending the workshops without a parent) or the treatment group (children attending the workshops with a parent). The study was conducted in the Fall of 1995 over a four-week period. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to determine the effects of the workshops on children's science achievement and science curiosity, as well as on parents' involvement with their child's education. The study revealed that there was no significant statistical difference at the.05 level between the treatment/control groups in children's science achievement or science curiosity, or in parent's involvement with their children's education. However, the study did focus parental attention on effective education and points the way to more extensive research in this critical learning area. This dual study, that is, the effects of teaching basic technology to young students with the support of their parents, reflects the focus of the Salve Regina University Ph.D. program in which technology is examined in its effects on humans. In essence, this program investigates what it means to be human in an age of advanced technology.

  12. Roles of Principals in the Preparing Students to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Bingul, Murat

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the impacts of school leaders on the school curriculums of preparing students to life. Even if the school leaders and teachers are expert in their area related to the functions of the schools, it seems that schools are failing in the preparation of the students to life. The school leaders may play an important role to…

  13. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  14. In Their Words: Student Preparation and Perspectives on US Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    US universities are admitting higher percentages of international students, bringing into focus concerns with how to best support them once they are at the university. However, less attention has been paid to the preparation they undertake before matriculation. This study looks at how students are prepared before arrival and how this preparation…

  15. Comparisons of parents', teachers', and students' perceptions of self-concept in children from one- and two-parent families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensink, T; Carroll, J L

    1989-08-01

    19 pairs of third grade children from intact and single-parent families matched for sex, intellectual ability, and academic achievement were administered a brief self-concept measure. Teachers and parents rated the students' self-concept on similar measures. There were no significant differences in scores between the groups; however, within each group the teachers and parents consistently overestimated students' self-esteem.

  16. Increased Student Achievement through Parental Involvement and Increased Student Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Tim; Carpenter, Kerry; Haiges, Shelley; Lundsgaard, Barb

    This action research project addressed the problem of missing assignments among fourth- and fifth-graders at a school in northern Illinois. In order to document the extent to which students lacked responsibility for turning in daily assignments, the teacher-researchers kept track of missing assignments for each student and grade book records for 6…

  17. University Preparation for Native American Students: Theory and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Jeanna; Chiste, Katherine Beaty

    1986-01-01

    Describes a summer program at the University of Lethbridge designed to improve the retention and graduation rates of Native American students, most of whom are adult reentry students with incomplete secondary school preparation; covers program theory, cultural background, staffing, student screening, curriculum, and outcomes. (JHZ)

  18. Preparing Students for After-College Life: The Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelli K.

    2012-01-01

    Historical context informs the work of student affairs professionals and others in higher education in striking the right balance in helping prepare students for life after college, but significant new pressures face students, their mentors, and educational institutions today. This chapter discusses the contexts that shape the work of student…

  19. Do Parents Know Best? Examining the Relationship Between Parenting Profiles, Prevention Efforts, and Peak Drinking in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Kimberly A; Turrisi, Rob; Ray, Anne E; Stapleton, Jerod; Abar, Caitlin; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Tollison, Sean; Grossbard, Joel; Larimer, Mary E

    2011-12-01

    The study examined parent profiles among high school athletes transitioning to college and their association with high-risk drinking in a multi-site, randomized trial. Students (n = 587) were randomized to a control or combined parent-based and brief motivational intervention condition and completed measures at baseline and at 5- and 10-month follow-ups. Four parent profiles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, indifferent) were observed among participants. Findings indicated control participants with authoritarian parenting were at the greatest risk for heavy drinking. Alternately, students exposed to permissive or authoritarian parenting reported lower peak drinking when administered the combined intervention, compared to controls. Findings suggest the combined intervention was efficacious in reducing peak alcohol consumption among high-risk students based on athlete status and parenting profiles.

  20. Do Parents Know Best? Examining the Relationship Between Parenting Profiles, Prevention Efforts, and Peak Drinking in College Students1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Kimberly A.; Turrisi, Rob; Ray, Anne E.; Stapleton, Jerod; Abar, Caitlin; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Tollison, Sean; Grossbard, Joel; Larimer, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined parent profiles among high school athletes transitioning to college and their association with high-risk drinking in a multi-site, randomized trial. Students (n = 587) were randomized to a control or combined parent-based and brief motivational intervention condition and completed measures at baseline and at 5- and 10-month follow-ups. Four parent profiles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, indifferent) were observed among participants. Findings indicated control participants with authoritarian parenting were at the greatest risk for heavy drinking. Alternately, students exposed to permissive or authoritarian parenting reported lower peak drinking when administered the combined intervention, compared to controls. Findings suggest the combined intervention was efficacious in reducing peak alcohol consumption among high-risk students based on athlete status and parenting profiles. PMID:24109150

  1. Parental Involvement with College Students in Germany, Hong Kong, Korea, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Kim, Kyungmin; Fung, Helene H.; Han, Gyounghae; Lang, Frieder R.; Lee, Wonkyung; Wagner, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Rates of college attendance have increased throughout the world. This study asked whether students across nations experience high involvement with parents (frequent contact and support) and how satisfied they are with parental involvement. College students from four major Western and Asian economies participated: Germany (n = 458), Hong Kong (n = 276), Korea (n = 257), and the United States (n = 310). Consistent with solidarity theory, students across nations reported frequent contact with parents and receiving several forms of social support (e.g., practical, emotional, and advice) every month. Multilevel models revealed Asian students received more frequent parental support than German or US students, but were less satisfied with that support. Students in Hong Kong resided with parents more often and gave more support to parents than students in other cultures. Discussion focuses on cultural (i.e., filial obligation) and structural (i.e., coresidence) factors explaining parental involvement. PMID:27594722

  2. Help Students Prepare for High School Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Christopher; Connor, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety! Stress! Fear! Everyone lives in a time of escalating accountability in terms of state, district, and city-wide examinations that measure student growth in the acquisition of skills and content area knowledge. All students feel increased pressure to constantly demonstrate improved levels of academic performance. For students with cognitive…

  3. Online Discussion Assignments Improve Students' Class Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T.

    2010-01-01

    To increase the number of students who read the text before class and to promote student interaction centering on text material, I developed an online discussion assignment as a required component of a cognitive psychology course. Across 2 studies, this assignment had a limited effect on examination performance, but students completing online…

  4. Relationship Between the Parenting Styles and Students' Educational Performance Among Iranian Girl High School Students, A Cross- Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Parivash; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh; Hashemian, Ataollah

    2015-12-01

    Parenting styles are effective in the educational performance of their child. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the parenting styles and students' educational performance among Iranian girl high school students. In a cross-sectional survey, female students in high schools of Ilam (Iran) evaluated during the academic year 2014-15. Multistage cluster random sampling was used to select the participants. Data were collected by two demographic and Baumrind's parenting styles questionnaire. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was measured as an index of internal identicalness of the questionnaire to verify its reliability. A total 400 students were studied. The Mean±SD of the students' age were 14±1.08. The students' school grades were the first year of high school to pre-university course. The Mean±SD of parenting styles were 35.37±5.8, 34.69±6.34 and 19.17±6.64 for permissive parenting style, authoritarian parenting style and authoritative parenting styles, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the score of permissive parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.151), authoritarian parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.343) and authoritative parenting style (p=0. 001, r= 0.261) with the students' average score for studying. The results of this study demonstrate that parental influence plays an important role in students' educational performance.

  5. Introduction to Psychology Students' Parental Status Predicts Learning Preferences and Life Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Elyse D'nn; Munn, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    This study explores Introduction to Psychology students' learning preferences and their personal search for meaning while considering their parental status. The findings suggest that parents show preferences for project-based learning and have lower levels of searching for meaning than non-parents. When parental status, age, and finances were…

  6. Exploring Parental Factors, Adjustment, and Academic Achievement among White and Hispanic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Toews, Michelle L.; Navarro, Alice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether college adjustment mediated the relationship between parental factors, such as parental attachment, parental education, and parental expectations, and academic achievement among White and Hispanic first-year college students. We found that adjustment mediated the relationship between parental…

  7. Vocational Aspirations of Chinese High School Students and Their Parents' Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhi-Jin; Leung, S. Alvin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the vocational aspirations and parental vocational expectations of high school students and their parents (1067 parent-child dyads). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and an Occupations List. The Occupations List consisted of 126 occupational titles evenly distributed across the six Holland types. Parents were…

  8. The Relationship among Parenting Styles Experienced during Childhood, Anxiety, Motivation, and Academic Success in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marc; Dorso, Erin; Azhar, Aisha; Renk, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the relationships among parenting styles experienced in childhood, anxiety, motivation, and academic success in college students. Results suggested that fathers' authoritative parenting was related to decreases, whereas mothers' authoritarian parenting was related to increases, in college students' anxiety. Further,…

  9. The Impact of Different Parenting Styles on First-Year College Students' Adaptation to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the impact of different parenting styles on college students' adaptation to college. During the second week of college, 80 first-year students from two-parent families completed the Tests of Reactions and Adaptations to College, English version and the Parental Authority Questionnaire. Authoritative…

  10. The Relationship among Parenting Styles Experienced during Childhood, Anxiety, Motivation, and Academic Success in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marc; Dorso, Erin; Azhar, Aisha; Renk, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the relationships among parenting styles experienced in childhood, anxiety, motivation, and academic success in college students. Results suggested that fathers' authoritative parenting was related to decreases, whereas mothers' authoritarian parenting was related to increases, in college students' anxiety. Further,…

  11. The Role of Student-Teacher Ratio in Parents' Perceptions of Schools' Engagement Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Raymond J.; Elbaum, Batya

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests a positive relationship between schools' efforts to engage parents and parents' involvement in their child's education. The authors investigated school socioeconomic status, school size, grade level, and student-teacher ratio as predictors of schools' efforts to engage parents of students receiving special education services. The…

  12. The Role of Perceived Parental Over-Involvement in Student Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadach, Eran; Ganor-Miller, Orit

    2013-01-01

    The effects of perceived parental over-involvement on students' level of test anxiety were examined in two studies. In study 1, parental over-involvement scale was developed. The sample comprised 105 male and female undergraduate college students between the ages of 21 and 26. The scale contained two aspects of parental over-involvement: parental…

  13. Motivations for Involvement: An Empirical Test of Parents of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Callen E.

    2011-01-01

    Parents of students in special education have greater barriers to parent involvement than parents of students in general education. Little is known, however, about the factors that facilitate or impede involvement practices for this group. This study investigated the extent to which the motivational factors from Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's (2005)…

  14. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 57 - Parent and Student Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parent and Student Rights F Appendix F to Part 57 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND..., App. F Appendix F to Part 57—Parent and Student Rights A. Parental Consent (1) The consent of a...

  15. The relationship between child abuse awareness and parental nurturing attitudes in the students

    OpenAIRE

    森, 名月; 山本, 真由美

    2010-01-01

    This research is aimed at investigeting the generational transmission of child abuse. We examined the relation between the child abuse awareness in the students and parents, the relation between the child abuse awareness in the students and their reception of parental attitudes, and finally the relation between child abuse awareness in the students and their feeling toward parents nurturing attitudes. Three results were abtained.First, the awareness of child abuse in students ...

  16. Developing a "Self-Directed Learning Preparation Skills Scale for Primary School Students": Validity and Reliability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Gülten Feryal; Selvi, Kiymet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop "Self-Directed Learning Preparation Skills Scale" for primary school students. Data were gathered according to the principles of descriptive research method. In order to develop this scale, draft items were developed through review of literature, interviews done with teachers, parents and students…

  17. First-time parents are not well enough prepared for the safety of their infant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam E J van Beelen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unintentional falls and poisonings are major causes of death and disability among infants. Although guidelines are available to prevent these injuries, safety behaviours are not performed by parents, causing unnecessary risks. Little is known about safety behaviours of first-time parents and whether they behave according to these guidelines. AIMS/OBJECTIVES/PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to compare safety behaviours of first-time parents with those of non-first-time parents and to determine correlates of unsafe behaviour of parents of infants. We used self-report questionnaires to assess safety behaviours in a cross-sectional study sample. METHODS: A total of 1439 parents visiting a preventive youth healthcare centre in the Netherlands were invited to complete a questionnaire with regard to the prevention of falls and poisonings. Parents were categorized into first-time parents and non-first-time parents. Correlates of parents' child safety behaviours were determined using multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS/OUTCOME: Most respondents were mothers (93.2%; 48.2% of families were first-time parents. The mean age of the infants was 7.2 months (SD 1.1; range 4-12, 51.8% were boys, and 34.5% of infants could crawl. First-time parents were more likely not to have a stair gate installed (OR 16.46; 95% CI 12.36-21.93; were more likely to store cleaning products unsafely (OR 4.55; 95% CI 3.59-5.76; and were more likely to store medicines unsafely (OR 2.90; 95% CI 2.31-3.63 than non-first-time parents. First-time parents were more likely to not have a window guard installed (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.08-2.15 (all P<0.05. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: First-time parents are not well prepared for the safety of their infant, causing unnecessary risks. The various parents' safety behaviours were influenced by different variables, for example, age of the infant, crawling of the infant, mother's educational level, mother's ethnicity, self

  18. Comparison of parent and student responses to asthma surveys: students grades 3-12 and their parents from a suburban private school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter; Kurland, Marge; Bertram, Susan

    2006-08-01

    Schools are being called upon to help address asthma, a common problem in school-aged children. School-based asthma programs need information about asthma diagnoses, asthma symptoms, and asthma's impact on school attendance. Parent or student surveys are the most common method of collecting these data. However, medical literature offers little guidance to help schools determine whether parents or students are the most appropriate and effective source of asthma-related information. This study compares student and parent responses to the same set of asthma-related questions. In general, parents and students have a high level of agreement in reporting the absence of an asthma diagnosis or asthma symptoms. When parents and students disagreed, students reported many more asthmalike symptoms, especially symptoms with exercise and symptoms at night, than did their parents. The disparity in student and parent symptom reporting did not vary by age of the student. Students appear to provide the most sensitive measure of asthma-related problems.

  19. Oregon Students Help Prepare Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Tom

    1973-01-01

    Describes a field-biology research project conducted at Coos Bay, Oregon by high school students attending the summer sessions at Terramar Field Science Facility during the summer of 1972. Discusses the value of this type of environmental survey for both the students and the community. (JR)

  20. Community Colleges: Preparing Students for Diverse Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    Postgraduation outcomes for community college students are complex. In addition to traditional job placement and earnings information, transferring to a 4-year institution is a positive first-destination outcome. Furthermore, community college students may have education and career goals that do not include earning a degree. Community college…

  1. Student USMLE Step One Preparation and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    This study investigated factors associated with medical students performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step One examination. The USMLE Step One emphasizes basic mechanisms and principles that are typically covered in the first 2 years of medical school. The study examined the relationship among student performance…

  2. Are Teacher and Principal Candidates Prepared to Address Student Cyberbullying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Bonner, Jessica L.; Styron, Jennifer L.; Bridgeforth, James; Martin, Cecelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the preparation of teacher and principal candidates to address problems created in K-12 settings as a result of cyberbullying. Participants included teacher and principal preparation students. Findings indicated that respondents were familiar with the most common forms of cyberbullying and its impact on…

  3. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  4. Intercultural Preparation for Future Mobile Students: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, Ana; Golubeva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Higher education (HE) student mobility offers the opportunity to acquire, among other things, intercultural experience. Nevertheless, it is crucial to prepare students and give them the tools to reflect on their experiences before, during and after study abroad. In this pedagogical paper, we present and discuss "Perceptions of self and…

  5. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  6. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  7. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  8. Conceptions of a Good College Student, Parent-Student Communication About College, First-Year Grades, and College Retention Among First- and Non-First-Generation College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Palbusa, Julienne Marie Alipio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined conceptions of a good college student, parent-student communication about college, academic achievement, college student retention, and college generation status among first-year college students. 344 undergraduates described the characteristics and skills of a good college student. In addition, they reported the frequency, perceived helpfulness, and quality (instrumental and emotional support) of parent-student communication about college. Student GPA and second year rete...

  9. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students’ STEM preparation and career pursuit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rozek, Christopher S; Svoboda, Ryan C; Harackiewicz, Judith M; Hulleman, Chris S; Hyde, Janet S

    2017-01-01

    ...) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally...

  10. Gender Differences in the Relationships among Parenting Styles and College Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L.; Kirtley, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Levels of student depression may increase as stress increases; parenting styles may be one indirect source of stress. The authors examined the role of parenting style in relationship to student stress, anxiety, and depression, with focused attention on gender differences. Participants: Participants were 290 undergraduate students (58%…

  11. Gender Differences in the Relationships among Parenting Styles and College Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L.; Kirtley, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Levels of student depression may increase as stress increases; parenting styles may be one indirect source of stress. The authors examined the role of parenting style in relationship to student stress, anxiety, and depression, with focused attention on gender differences. Participants: Participants were 290 undergraduate students (58%…

  12. Adolescent Perceptions of School Safety for Students with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; McGuire, Jenifer K.; Lee, Sun-A; Larriva, Jacqueline C.; Laub, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of research indicates that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are often unsafe at school. Little research has examined school safety for students with LGBT parents. We examined adolescents' perceptions of school safety for students with LGBT parents using data from a survey of 2,302 California sixth through…

  13. Exploring the Parental Role in First-Year Students' Emotional Well-Being: Considerations by Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Linda J.; Weintraub, Dayna S.

    2014-01-01

    During a time of growing parental involvement in the lives of college-going students, this study examines how interactions with parents relate to students' sense of emotional well-being and how this varies by gender. Using longitudinal data on first-year college students at one institution, the study reveals the importance of both quality and…

  14. Disparities in Debt: Parents' Socioeconomic Resources and Young Adult Student Loan Debt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    In an era of rising college costs and stagnant grant-based student aid, many young adults rely on their parents' resources and student loans to pay for their postsecondary education. In this study I ask how parents' income and education are linked to young adults' student loan debt. I develop and test two perspectives regarding the…

  15. Adolescent Perceptions of School Safety for Students with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; McGuire, Jenifer K.; Lee, Sun-A; Larriva, Jacqueline C.; Laub, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of research indicates that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are often unsafe at school. Little research has examined school safety for students with LGBT parents. We examined adolescents' perceptions of school safety for students with LGBT parents using data from a survey of 2,302 California sixth through…

  16. Perfection of physical preparation of students by facilities of boxing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylovskiy O.V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The question of physical preparedness of students of the unspecialized institutes of higher of I-IV of courses is considered. Offered and grounded idea of the use of facilities of boxing in form educational trainings employments. They are used for perfection of physical preparation of students as an alternative to the lessons on physical education. For the students of experimental group more considerable increase of indexes of physical preparedness is marked by comparison to a control group.

  17. What parents and carers think medical students should be learning about communication with children and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Margaret; McLean, Elspeth

    2009-09-01

    Our objective was to dynamically engage with parents and carers of children treated in a large children's hospital as experts by experience, to find out what they thought medical students should be learning about communicating with children and families in order to inform our communication teaching. We used focus groups to facilitate parents and carers in articulating the communication issues they felt were important for medical students to learn. These data were analysed, using qualitative and quantitative methods, to produce a survey for a Delphi consultation. The results of this stage were mapped onto the Calgary-Cambridge framework for the medical interview. There was considerable overlap of the data on the Calgary-Cambridge framework. There was, however, an emphasis by respondents on perceptual skills, self-awareness and partnership. Within the main tasks of the Calgary-Cambridge framework, new objectives emerged, including giving information in the right place, and the importance of the family in the multidisciplinary team. A new main task, Preparation, was highlighted. Active collaboration with parents and carers revealed areas for enhancement in our communication skill teaching, particularly with regard to relational and perceptual skills. Ways of including effective teaching of perceptual skills and the relational and humanistic aspects of communication must be explored in order to meet the needs of child patients and their families.

  18. (Academic) preparation of/for students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Engstrøm, Emma; Sandermann, Weibke

    of both cases include the methodological empirical approach, emphasis on the process of ‘othering’, ethnocentrism and ethno- racial representations. The first case deals with pre-departure preparation inspired by MUD (memory, understanding and doing) principles, while the second deals with the ongoing in...

  19. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students’ depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students. ...

  20. Investigating and comparing the relationship between parental monitoring types and perceived parenting styles of the Turkish students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Dilek Öğretir Özçelik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between parental monitoring and parental styles are considered as an important subject for child development field. The aim of this article is to analyze the perceptions of the adolescents about their parents’ parental monitoring and parenting styles in terms of the participants’ gender, family education and family jobs status. The sample size is 252 adolescents with 158 female nd 94 male students. The data were collected by the Parental Monitoring Instrument (PMI and the Parenting Styles Scale. The sample was chosen from one Anatolian high school in Ankara, one Multi-Programme High School in Çankırı and one Multi-Programme High School in Yozgat with simple and random sampling. The results showed that there were statistically significant differences between mother acceptance/warmth and gender scores t(250=3,281 and mother control and gender scores t(250=2,263; p<0.05. The study also analyzed the relationship between adolescent ages and grades as well as the number of children, mothers’ ages and fathers’ ages and the parental style with some statistically significant results. The one-way ANOVA results indicated that there are statistically significant differences between adolescents’ perceptions of parental monitoring sub-scales and the mothers’ parenting styles sub-scales. Except computer monitoring, in all parental monitoring sub-scales, the mothers parenting styles have shown statistically significant differences.

  1. Determinants of witnessed parental physical violence among university students in transitional Albania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burazeri, Genc; Qirjako, Gentiana; Roshi, Enver; Brand, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess the extent and the socioeconomic correlates of witnessed parental physical violence among university students in Albania, a country in transition from rigidly structured socialism...

  2. Parents' and students' perceptions of college alcohol risk: the role of parental risk perception in intentions to communicate about alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Lucy E; Grimaldi, Elizabeth M; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2015-03-01

    The current study aims to examine discrepancies in parents' and college students' perceptions of alcohol risk and the role of perceived risk in predicting parents' intentions to discuss alcohol with their child. In total, 246 college student-parent dyads (56.1% female students, 77.2% mothers) were recruited from a mid-size university. Participants completed measures of absolute likelihood, comparative likelihood, and severity of alcohol consequences. In comparison to students, parents perceived the risks of alcohol poisoning (palcohol consequences (e.g., passing out, regrettable sexual situation, throwing up) as more severe than students (all psalcohol consequences. After controlling for demographics and past alcohol communication, greater absolute likelihood (β=.20, p=.016) and less confidence in knowledge of student behavior (β=.20, p=.013) predicted greater intentions to discuss alcohol. Providing parents of college students with information about college drinking norms and the likelihood of alcohol consequences may help prompt alcohol-related communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  4. Preparing Students for the AP Economics Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Sally; Ashmead, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The first step in teaching-to-understand economics is not teaching "the rules," but working with fundamental economic models from the outset. Many of the concepts in economics are illustrated through models. Students must: (1) be able to draw these models; (2) understand the assumptions of the models; and (3) use the models for analysis.…

  5. Instructional Innovations: Preparing Students for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Norman

    1994-01-01

    Forward-looking educators are teaching students to be flexible, creative thinkers by using cooperative learning, authentic assessments, interdisciplinary units taught to heterogeneous groups. Principals should facilitate appropriate staff development, build master planning schedule providing for team planning periods, allow staff members to attend…

  6. Undergraduate Accounting Students: Prepared for the Workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers-Clark, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore and investigate student perceptions as to what generic skills they considered were important for accountants and to what extent these skills were developed by their programme of study. Design/methodology/approach: Data gathered from 357 UK undergraduate accounting degree graduates were used to develop insights…

  7. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  8. The Predictive Strength of Perceived Parenting and Parental Attachment Styles on Psychological Symptoms among Turkish University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Körük

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the relationships between perceived parenting, parental attachment styles and psychological symptoms among Turkish university students and it also aims to find out which perceived parenting and parental attachment styles predict psychological symptoms which were measured. This study is a quantitative research and uses causal comparative research design. The sample of this study consists of 400 university students. Young Parenting Inventory, Parental Bonding Instrument and Brief Symptom Inventory were used for gathering data. The depressive, hostility and anxiety symptoms were determined as the most prevalent psychological symptoms among the sample. The conditional/achievement-oriented and ruling/former mother perceptions were found as the most prevalent perceived parenting styles for mother and the conditional/achievement-oriented and close/repressed feelings perceived as parenting styles for father. Pessimistic/fearful mother, belittling/captious mother and overprotective/worrywart father were found as the most predictive perceived parenting styles which predict the psychological symptoms in a significant level and in a positive way

  9. Digital games and learning mathematics: Student, teacher and parent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ting Yong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the potential use of digital games in learning mathematics at secondary school level in Malaysia. Three secondary school students, three mathematics teachers and three parents were interviewed in this study. All the participants were asked for their views and experiences in mathematics, technology usage and the use of digital games in learning mathematics. The results suggested that students were supportive and positive towards the use of computer games in learning mathematics. Nevertheless, parents preferred conventional teaching approach, in which they recognized personal communication and socialization as a significant component in learning. Although the teachers did not go on to oppose the idea of using computer games for teaching mathematics, they still perceived the use of discursive approaches as the best teaching approach for learning mathematics with digital technologies at best a possible additional complementary feature. In view of that, the combination of classroom teaching and computer games might the best mathematics pedagogy. 

  10. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  11. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  12. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  13. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhai

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students' depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students.A total of 5180 respondents were selected using a cross-sectional survey. We examined the association of parental education, adverse family and college environments with depression in college students using the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory and socio-demographic questionnaires.Lower parental educational level is significantly correlated with depression in college students in our sample. Additionally, low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, having been scolded and beaten by parents, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends, heavy course load and failure in selection processes are also associated with parental education. Low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends and heavy course load mediated the relationship between parental education and depression in college students.Adverse family and college environments could explain the influence of parental educational level on depression in college students.

  14. Achievement Outcomes of Sixth-Grade Students with a Military Parent Deployed to a War Zone or a Military Parent Not Deployed Compared to Same School Students Whose Parents Have No Military Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Robert L., III

    2014-01-01

    The need for accurate information about the achievement of students whose military parents are deployed to a war zone or whose military parents are eligible although not currently deployed to a war zone is important in order to ensure that we are providing for the educational wellbeing of these children as their parents defend our nations…

  15. Parental and Peer Support as Predictors of Depression and Self-Esteem among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Susan Tinsley; Albert, Arielle Berman; Dwelle, Deborah G.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between parent support and peer support as predictors of depression and self-esteem in college students. Several competing models of parental and peer influence were compared including a mediational model in which peer support was hypothesized to mediate the effects of parental support on adjustment. The results…

  16. A Study of the Relationship between Assertive Parenting Styles and Career Indecision in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Keith C.

    2013-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, higher levels of parental assertiveness have begun to impact even the basic conflicts college students encounter while in attendance. Called "helicopter parenting" within the popular press, these parents are described as involving themselves in the minutia of their child's college experience, engaging with…

  17. Parental Involvement, Selected Student Attributes, and Learning Outcomes in Instrumental Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdzinski, Stephen F.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses relationships among selected aspects of parental involvement as they relate to the cognitive, affective, and performance outcomes of instrumental music students. Discovers that for cognitive musical and musical performance outcomes parental influence is strongest at the elementary level. For affective outcomes parental involvement…

  18. A Study of the Relationship between Assertive Parenting Styles and Career Indecision in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Keith C.

    2013-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, higher levels of parental assertiveness have begun to impact even the basic conflicts college students encounter while in attendance. Called "helicopter parenting" within the popular press, these parents are described as involving themselves in the minutia of their child's college experience, engaging with…

  19. The Role of Parents' Motivation in Students' Autonomous Motivation for Doing Homework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Idit; Kaplan, Avi; Buzukashvily, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The present research employed Self-Determination Theory as a theoretical framework for investigating the role of parents in the quality of the motivation that students adopt towards homework. One hundred and thirty five dyads of 4th grade Jewish-Israeli children and one of their parents responded to surveys. The findings indicated that parents'…

  20. Parental and Peer Support as Predictors of Depression and Self-Esteem among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Susan Tinsley; Albert, Arielle Berman; Dwelle, Deborah G.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between parent support and peer support as predictors of depression and self-esteem in college students. Several competing models of parental and peer influence were compared including a mediational model in which peer support was hypothesized to mediate the effects of parental support on adjustment. The results…

  1. Parent Engagement in Science with Ninth Graders and with Students in Higher Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumow, Lee; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    By high school, parent engagement is likely to differ not only by grade, but by subject. This study surveyed students enrolled in high school science classes and found that parents of freshmen (9th graders) are more involved at home, less involved at school, and equally involved in educational planning compared to parents of high school students…

  2. Parental Encouragement in Relation to Academic Achievement of Higher Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Barathi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Parental Encouragement refers to the general process undertaken by the parents to initiative and directs the behaviour of the children towards high academic achievement. The present study aims to probe the relationship between Parental Encouragement and Academic Achievement of Higher Secondary School Students. Survey method was employed and the…

  3. Links between parent characteristics and attachment variables for college students of parental divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Laura V; Kilmann, Peter R; Vendemia, Jennifer M C

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated links between offsprings' attachment patterns and parent characteristics in 157 females and 62 males of parental divorce. Secure females and males reported affection, respect, and closeness toward both biological parents. Offsprings' insecure attachment pattern was associated with negative parent characteristics. Participants who perceived their same-sex parent negatively were more likely to report an insecure attachment. Our findings suggest delayed negative consequences of parental divorce for college women and men.

  4. Students and Institutions Protecting Whiteness as Property: A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Student Affairs Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study is based on interviews with White students graduating from a student affairs preparation program as well as a literature review of whiteness in education. Applying "critical race theory," the author examined the ways that students and institutions protected whiteness. Institutions and those within them concerned with equity must have…

  5. Preparing Vietnamese student teachers for teaching with a student-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Dekker, R.; Goedhart, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Vietnamese curriculum reform which trends toward a student-centered approach requires Vietnamese teacher educators to prepare student teachers for teaching using this approach. In this article, we present a case study of three Vietnamese student teachers working in groups in a methods course to

  6. College students' use of communication technology with parents: comparisons between two cohorts in 2009 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Meagan A; Gentzler, Amy L; Morey, Jennifer N; Oberhauser, Ann M; Westerman, David

    2013-10-01

    Although communication technology is beneficial to maintain important close relationships, not all findings suggest that communication technology use between college students and their parents is indicative of positive adjustment or relational qualities. A study in 2009 found that only 24.2% of college students used a social networking site (SNS) to communicate with a parent, yet those students reported more loneliness, anxious attachment, and conflict with their parent (Gentzler et al., 2011 ). Because technology and trends in use change rapidly, we investigated a new cohort of college students 2 years later to determine if rates of using communication technology with parents and their links to student adjustment have changed. Comparisons between 2009 and 2011 samples indicated that in-person contact and telephone use did not vary across cohorts. However, texting and SNS use with parents became more common, and using e-mail with parents declined. Consistent with the 2009 data, students' phone use with parents was related to positive relationship qualities (satisfaction, intimacy, support, instrumental aid). In the new 2011 sample, e-mail was linked to aid. However, the present findings indicate students' SNS use with parents is no longer linked to maladaptive outcomes. The study highlights how quickly the use and implications of communication technology changes, and suggests that communication patterns may reflect broader psychosocial adjustment and parent-child dynamics.

  7. Science for Kids Outreach Programs: College Students Teaching Science to Elementary Students and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Birgit G.; Park, Lee Y.; Kaplan, Lawrence J.

    1999-11-01

    For a number of years we have been organizing and teaching a special outreach course during our Winter Study Program (the month of January). College students plan, develop, and present hands-on workshops to fourth-grade students and their parents, with faculty providing logistical support and pedagogical advice. Recent topics have been "Forensic Science", "Electricity and Magnetism", "Chemistry and Cooking", "Waves", "Natural Disasters", "Liquids", "Pressure", "Color and Light", "Momentum and Inertia", "Illusions", and "The Senses". The two-hour workshops, held one weekend on campus, emphasize hands-on experiments involving both the kids and the parents. Handouts for each workshop give instructions for doing several experiments at home. This program has been a great success for all involved: the college students gain insight into an aspect of science and what it takes to develop and teach that topic, the elementary school students participate in an exciting and challenging scientific exploration, and the parents have a chance to learn some science while spending time working on projects with their children. We provide an overview of the pedagogical aims of our current approach and a sense of the time-line for putting together such a program in a month.

  8. Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    and construction. Health Sciences – Thinking about medical school? Join us in this workshop to discuss how doctors diagnose and treat diseases...science educators’ academy: Benefits of inquiry- based teaching for educators and their students. Manuscript in preparation. Kuehler, C. P., Marle, P. D...Henry, R. M. (2012). CSI- chocolate science investigation and the case of the recipe rip-off: Using forensic science to engage students. Manuscript

  9. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development......This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  10. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  11. What Matters Most: Factors Influencing the University Application Choice Decisions of Korean International Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Breanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine factors influencing Korean parents' and students' university application choice decisions in three international schools in the Republic of Korea (South). Institutional and individual factors that influenced Korean students' university application choice decisions and their parents' university application…

  12. Parents Influencing Secondary Students' University Aspirations: A Multilevel Approach Using School-SES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart; Vernon, Lynette; Seddon, Sarah; Andrews, Yolanda; Wang, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Students' university aspirational capacity and expectancies are key factors in predicting future university participation. Aspirations and expectations to attend university are strongly influenced by parent educational socialisation and school culture. This study investigates associations between students' university discussions with parents and…

  13. Parental Influence on Exploratory Students' College Choice, Major, and Career Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores parental influence on exploratory students' college choice, major, and career decision making. The research began with examination of a first year academic advising model and Living Learning Community. Parental influence emerged as a key theme in student decision making processes. The project was conducted using grounded…

  14. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  15. The Relationship between Parenting Styles and Students' Attitude toward Leisure Time Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rena, Syahidah; Abedalaziz, Nabeel; Leng, Chin Hai

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to state the relationship between the parenting style and students' attitude toward leisure reading. A total of 147 (65 male and 82 female) students from two classes (class five, 80 and class six, 67) were participated in the present study. The Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ) and the Elementary Reading…

  16. Single Parenting and Placement of Elementary Students: A Review of the Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Kathleen R.

    This review summarizes the current literature on the effect of single-parent homes on the academic achievement and learning disability placement of students. One finding of the review is that the research is inconclusive on the effect of single-parent homes on student academic achievement or on learning disability program placement. A…

  17. Engaging Students and Parents in Transition-Focused Individualized Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavendish, Wendy; Connor, David J.; Rediker, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The reauthorizations of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act emphasize that students and parents are to be considered equal partners in the individualized education program (IEP) process. This article addresses how to move from compliance with the law to facilitating meaningful involvement of high school students and their parents in…

  18. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  19. Organizational Culture and University Responses to Parenting Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Tracy R.; Biederman, Donna J.; Gringle, Meredith R.

    2017-01-01

    This case study examines implications of a university's culture on advocating for supportive policies and programs for parenting students. Four themes illuminated several key tensions within the institution that affected support for parenting students: the lack of formal policy, an emphasis on faculty practices around accommodations, concerns…

  20. A Multilevel Perspective on the Climate of Bullying: Discrepancies among Students, School Staff, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Pas, Elise T.; O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2011-01-01

    Although many bullying prevention programs aim to involve multiple partners, few studies have examined perceptual differences regarding peer victimization and the broader bullying climate among students, staff, and parents. The present study utilized multilevel data from 11,674 students, 960 parents, and 1,027 staff at 44 schools to examine the…

  1. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mathematics Achievement for Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnall, Michele Capella; Cavenaugh, Brenda S.; Giesen, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    The effect of parental involvement on achievement has received a significant amount of research attention in the general student population, but surprisingly very little research has been conducted in this area for students with disabilities. This study investigated the association between parental involvement (both at home and at school) and…

  2. ТHE INFLUENCE OF PARENTS ON PREPARING A CHILD FOR SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Veličković

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : Starting school is an important developmental step / task not only for the child but also for their parents and family in which to grow up. The accomplishment of this task expands the boundaries of family / parent and the child's functioning in social, emotional and  cognitive sense. The aim of this paper is to highlight the need to educate the parents of the child going to school, which would contribute to parents with awareness and sensitivity to the nature of long-term process of entering the child's entry into school, to a child's socialization process related to school and proceeded in a favorable direction. The author emphasizes the importance of having a separate program prepares parents for the child starting school, as part of the annual program of preschools / schools that educators / teachers should realize and thus improve their educational work with one hand, while on the other hand its value will be reported in a balanced relation between child-school-family, but also to avert the potential emotional difficulties, or, the child's dysfunctional behavior. Participation of professional services and school teachers / teachers in the implementation of such programs can enhance compliance of educational values that are placed in front of the child in the family and in the school environment.

  3. The Longitudinal Process of Early Parent Involvement on Student Achievement: A Path Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Englund, Michelle M.; Warner-Richter, Mallory N.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the process whereby early parent involvement in preschool effects student achievement from kindergarten through 6th grade. Participants were 1,539 low-income, mainly African American children and their mothers, in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. Program children (N = 989) received one or two years of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program – a preschool intervention that strongly promoted parents' development of parent involvement skills within the school an...

  4. Online personalized normative alcohol feedback for parents of first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Lucy E; LaBrie, Joseph W; Earle, Andrew M

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a personalized normative feedback (PNF) alcohol intervention for parents of students transitioning into college. A sample of 399 parent-student dyads were recruited to take part in the intervention during the summer prior to matriculation. Parents were randomly assigned to receive either normative feedback regarding student drinking and other college parents' alcohol-related communication or general college health norm information. Students completed measures of alcohol use, alcohol consequences, and parent-child alcohol-specific communication both 1 and 6 months after matriculation. The results indicated that in comparison with the control condition parents who received PNF reported immediate changes in their perceptions of other parents' behaviors; however, these changes in parent perceived norms did not translate into long-term changes in student drinking behaviors or parent-child communication. Findings highlight the need to consider content beyond normative feedback for parent based alcohol intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Analysis of Anxiety Levels of Nursing Students While Preparing Their Thesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur SARUHAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out as a descriptive study in order to determine the anxiety levels of third and last year students of Ege University School of Nursing while preparing their thesis and the factors affecting this. The research was performed with 142 students from third and last year students studying at Ege University School of Nursing. Data was collected using a questionnaire prepared by the researchers and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. It was determined that, 52,1% of the students were above the age of 23 years, 53,5% were last year students, 44,4% stayed in dormitory, 61,3% indicated that they experienced anxiety problems while determining the subject of thesis, and 38,7% got sufficient assistance from their supervisor. State anxiety average was 49,11± 12,23 and Trait anxiety average was 45,14± 7,8. Age groups, year of their study, staying with parents or receiving help from the supervisor were determined not to be effective in anxiety levels. Guiding and supporting attitudes of the teaching staff were thought to be helpful in increasing self-confidence of young people by reducing anxiety.

  6. Aligning Student, Parent, and Teacher Incentives: Evidence from Houston Public Schools. NBER Working Paper No. 17752

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Roland, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to investigate the impact of aligning student, parent, and teacher incentives on student achievement. On outcomes for which incentives were provided, there were large treatment effects. Students in treatment schools mastered more than one standard deviation more math objectives than control students, and…

  7. Essential Measures for Student Success: Implementing Cooperation, Collaboration, and Coordination between Schools and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Edwena

    2012-01-01

    This book unveils "essential measures" that create a revitalized educational system of which educators and parents can use to promote student success. When these measures are applied properly, the benefits include, eradicating student fear, elevating student motivation, improving school attendance, and reducing student dropout rates. These…

  8. Thesis and Dissertation Writing: Preparing ESL Students for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program created to assist students of English as a Second Language in their preparation for thesis and dissertation writing by focusing on the thesis proposal as an important part of that process. Notes that they often experience difficulty meeting the demands of the kind of writing required at this level and often are unaware of the…

  9. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. D. C.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; van Beukelen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from conve

  10. Thesis and Dissertation Writing: Preparing ESL Students for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program created to assist students of English as a Second Language in their preparation for thesis and dissertation writing by focusing on the thesis proposal as an important part of that process. Notes that they often experience difficulty meeting the demands of the kind of writing required at this level and often are unaware of the…

  11. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  12. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. D. C.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; van Beukelen, P.

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from

  13. Preparing Students for Higher Education: The Role of Proactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertshuis, Susan; Jung, Moon; Cooper-Thomas, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Proactivity is important to individual success, particularly where individuals face significant obstacles and where formal support may be lacking or difficult to access. The study tracks mature students over a one-semester university preparation course designed for returners to learning. Measures of proactivity included proactive personality,…

  14. Education as a Value: Students, Teachers and Parents Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article based upon empiric empirical experimental research, we disclose point of view from students, teachers and parents side. Highlighting school and parents influence to students attitude to education importance. Disclosing different views on education between 10th and 12th grade students. Students view on modern youths values shows that they don’t really care about education (10th grade – 7%, 12th grade – 9%. The most valuable thing is money (10th gr. – 23%, 12th gr. – 32%, and independence (10th gr. – 23%, 12th gr. – 33%. This shows us that material fulfillment, as they think, leads to successful future. So in this case “fast” money and independence becomes a successful life standard. However answer to question what is most important to them personally education is most reachable value (10th gr. – 58%, 12th gr. – 49%. This shows us that youth is not ready (psychologically prepared to open up their true values. In the other hand that shows us lack of openness in our relationship. Personally highest rates goes to education (10th gr. – 58%, 12th gr. – 49%; communication and collaboration (10th gr. – 52%, 12th gr. – 45%, self esteem (10th gr. – 48%, 12th gr. – 49%, honesty (10th gr. – 41%, 12th gr. – 37%. In conclusion we can say that social relationship and collaboration helps to achieve goals, in this case – education. Most of students are looking forward to achieve higher education (10th gr. – 43%, 12th gr. – 46%. Planning to study in Lithuania (10th gr. – 44%, 12th gr. – 50%. Students planning to go for postgraduate studies (10th gr. – 18%, 12th gr. – 25%. This shows us that not only 12th grade students, but also 10th grade students understand higher education importance. It is not a surprise that amount of postgraduate students is growing each year. Achievement of higher education students are linking with opportunity to make more money (10th gr. – 26%, 12th gr. – 32%; getting

  15. Perspectives of Preservice and In-Service Teachers on Their Preparation to Work with Parents in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Zafer; Unal, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines preservice and in-service teachers' perspectives on their preparation in learning parental involvement strategies and explores their opinions on what kind of experiences regarding parental involvement they think teacher education programs should provide. The data from the study suggested that the preservice teachers held…

  16. ATTITUDE OF PLUS TWO STUDENTS TOWARDS PUBLIC EXAMINATION IN RELATION TO PARENTAL PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Vinolin Chrysolyte; Dr. B. William Dharma Raja

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the attitude of plus two students towards public examination and its relationship with parental pressure. The sample of the study comprised of 386 plus two students from Tirunelveli district. The authors employed survey method for collecting the data and they were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. It was found that there is a significant relation between the attitude of students towards +2 public examination and parental pressure.

  17. ATTITUDE OF PLUS TWO STUDENTS TOWARDS PUBLIC EXAMINATION IN RELATION TO PARENTAL PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Vinolin Chrysolyte; Dr. B. William Dharma Raja

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the attitude of plus two students towards public examination and its relationship with parental pressure. The sample of the study comprised of 386 plus two students from Tirunelveli district. The authors employed survey method for collecting the data and they were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. It was found that there is a significant relation between the attitude of students towards +2 public examination and parental pressure.

  18. A parent-based intervention reduces heavy episodic drinking among first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrie, Joseph W; Earle, Andrew M; Boyle, Sarah C; Hummer, Justin F; Montes, Kevin; Turrisi, Rob; Napper, Lucy E

    2016-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial tested an interactive normative feedback-based intervention-codenamed "FITSTART"-delivered to groups of 50-100 parents of matriculating college students. The 60-min session motivated parents to alter their alcohol-related communication by correcting normative misperceptions (e.g., about how approving other parents are of student drinking) with live-generated data. Then, tips were provided on discussing drinking effectively. Incoming students (N = 331; 62.2% female) completed baseline measures prior to new-student orientation. Next, at parent orientation in June, these students' parents were assigned to either FITSTART or a control session. Finally, 4 months later, students completed a follow-up survey. Results revealed that students whose parents received FITSTART during the summer consumed less alcohol and were less likely to engage in heavy episodic drinking (HED) during the first month of college. These effects were mediated by FITSTART students' lower perceptions of their parents' approval of alcohol consumption. Further, FITSTART students who were not drinkers in high school were less likely to initiate drinking and to start experiencing negative consequences during the first month of college, where FITSTART students who had been drinkers in high school experienced fewer consequences overall and were significantly more likely to report that they did not experience any consequences whatsoever during the first month of college. Importantly, FITSTART is the first parent-based intervention to impact HED, one of the most well-studied indicators of risky drinking. Thus, interactive group normative feedback with parents is a promising approach for reducing college alcohol risk. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Preparing Fourth-Year Medical Students to Teach During Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Richard J; Bardach, Naomi S; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Gillum, Leslie A; Haber, Lawrence A; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet S

    2006-01-01

    Interns are expected to teach medical students, yet there is little formal training in medical school to prepare them for this role. To enhance the teaching skills of our graduating students we initiated a 4-hour “teaching to teach” course as part of the end of the fourth-year curriculum. Course evaluations demonstrate that students strongly support this program (overall ratings 2000 to 2005: mean = 4.4 [scale 1 to 5], n = 224). When 2004 course participants were surveyed during the last month of their internship, 84%“agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “The teaching to teach course helped prepare me for my role as a teacher during internship” (2005: mean 4.2 [scale 1 to 5], n = 45, response rate 60%). A course preparing fourth-year students to teach during internship is both feasible and reproducible, with a minimal commitment of faculty and resident time. Participants identify it as an important addition to their education and as useful during internship. PMID:16704402

  20. Parent Involvement: Investigating the Parent-Child Relationship in Millennial College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth; Hicklen, Sherrell

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence of a surge in parent involvement in postsecondary education, and some scholarship suggests that this high level of parent involvement may inhibit epistemological development. Despite these claims, there is little empirical evidence on the level or impact of parent involvement during the college years. The aim of this research was…

  1. Attitudes of parents and staff towards medical students on the paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, A; Kennedy, C; Canas-Martinez, A; Gildea, D; Jamaludin, M A; Moore, M; Meehan, J; Nadeem, M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes of parents and staff to medical students on paediatric wards in a Dublin teaching hospital. We invited 100 parents of patients and 30 staff involved in the care of children on the paediatric wards to participate. The majority of parents agreed or strongly agreed that they would be happy for a student to interview them (n = 87; (87%)), interview their child (80%) or examine their child (74%). Of 30 staff, 12 (40%) staff agreed that the presence of medical students on the ward increased their job satisfaction, 13 (43%) agreed or strongly agreed that medical student presence encouraged them to keep up to date with recent medical developments and 6 (20%) felt that it increased the quality of patient care. Attitudes of both parents and staff to medical students on paediatric wards are positive with both emphasising the need for professional behaviour.

  2. FORUM: Instructional Communication and Millennial Students: Hoverboards and "Hovermoms": Helicopter Parents and Their Influence on Millennial Students' Rapport with Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, T. Kody; Tatum, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    Popular culture is all too familiar with the notion of the helicopter parent. This suffocating sheltering extends students' adolescence and delays the development of independence (Price, 2010), causing millennials to rely on their parents for financial stability (White, 2015) and emotional support (Raphelson, 2014). Even in the midst of…

  3. FORUM: Instructional Communication and Millennial Students: Hoverboards and "Hovermoms": Helicopter Parents and Their Influence on Millennial Students' Rapport with Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, T. Kody; Tatum, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    Popular culture is all too familiar with the notion of the helicopter parent. This suffocating sheltering extends students' adolescence and delays the development of independence (Price, 2010), causing millennials to rely on their parents for financial stability (White, 2015) and emotional support (Raphelson, 2014). Even in the midst of…

  4. Ubiquitous Mobile Educational Data Management by Teachers, Students and Parents: Does Technology Change School-Family Communication and Parental Involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina; Hameiri, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Digital educational data management has become an integral part of school practices. Accessing school database by teachers, students, and parents from mobile devices promotes data-driven educational interactions based on real-time information. This paper analyses mobile access of educational database in a large sample of 429 schools during an…

  5. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles....... Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  6. Quantifying parental preferences for interventions designed to improve home food preparation and home food environments during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virudachalam, Senbagam; Chung, Paul J; Faerber, Jennifer A; Pian, Timothy M; Thomas, Karen; Feudtner, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Though preparing healthy food at home is a critical health promotion habit, few interventions have aimed to improve parental cooking skills and behaviors. We sought to understand parents' preferences and priorities regarding interventions to improve home food preparation practices and home food environments during early childhood. We administered a discrete choice experiment using maximum difference scaling. Eighty English-speaking parents of healthy 1-4 year-old children rated the relative importance of potential attributes of interventions to improve home food preparation practices and home food environments. We performed latent class analysis to identify subgroups of parents with similar preferences and tested for differences between the subgroups. Participants were mostly white or black 21-45 year-old women whose prevalence of overweight/obesity mirrored the general population. Latent class analysis revealed three distinct groups of parental preferences for intervention content: a healthy cooking group, focused on nutrition and cooking healthier food; a child persuasion group, focused on convincing toddlers to eat home-cooked food; and a creative cooking group, focused on cooking without recipes, meal planning, and time-saving strategies. Younger, lower income, 1-parent households comprised the healthy cooking group, while older, higher income, 2-parent households comprised the creative cooking group (p food preparation practices. Such interventions are important for creating healthier home food environments and preventing obesity starting from early childhood.

  7. The Role of Educators in Preparing the Confident Graduate Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geri Dickey, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With large numbers of non-BSW graduates gravitating toward MSW programs of study, BSWs must demonstrate their ability to handle the rigor of graduate school in order to remain competitive in the classroom and field. This study utilized an online survey of MSW students (N=107 from four different universities to examine how well students believe their particular undergraduate degree program prepared them to meet the academic demands of the MSW programs. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed and results indicate BSW graduates feel more prepared than non-BSWs to complete their MSW program. The exception for BSWs was found in areas of research and statistics when compared specifically to those with psychology bachelor degrees.

  8. Parental Autonomy Support, Community Feeling and Student Expectations as Contributors to Later Achievement among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Worrell, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relationships among parental autonomy support, student intrinsic life goals (i.e. community feeling), student expectations for long-term educational attainment and later academic performance (measured by GPA) in 227 students in an ethnically and racially diverse high school. Hypotheses were tested with…

  9. Korean-English Dual Language Immersion: Perspectives of Students, Parents and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Sook; Jeong, Eunsook

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of Korean-American students, parents and teachers in a newly instituted 50/50 Korean-English dual language immersion programme, where the majority of the students are of Korean descent. Based on home and school observations, as well as interviews with six Korean-American students and their parents…

  10. Students' Perceptions of Parental and Teacher Academic Involvement: Consequences on Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regner, Isabelle; Loose, Florence; Dumas, Florence

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined whether students' perceptions of two major facets of parental and teacher academic involvement (i.e., academic support and academic monitoring), contribute to the process of students' achievement goals adoption. French junior high-school students completed two questionnaires assessing first their perceptions of parental…

  11. The Complete Science Fair Handbook. For Teachers and Parents of Students in Grades 4-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Anthony D.; Asimov, Isaac

    Interest in a science fair is low when students feel undirected and lack the information they need to produce a successful project. For many students, parents, and teachers, planning and carrying out a science fair project may be very frustrating. This book is designed to be a reference that helps teachers guide students through this process. The…

  12. Korean-English Dual Language Immersion: Perspectives of Students, Parents and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Sook; Jeong, Eunsook

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of Korean-American students, parents and teachers in a newly instituted 50/50 Korean-English dual language immersion programme, where the majority of the students are of Korean descent. Based on home and school observations, as well as interviews with six Korean-American students and their parents…

  13. Children's Perceptions of Parental Attitude Affecting Breakfast Skipping in Primary Sixth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tereza Sy; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Griffiths, Sian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Breakfast skipping is an international public health concern. This study investigated the prevalence of breakfast skipping among primary sixth-grade students in Hong Kong and the impact of students' perceptions of parental attitudes on breakfast skipping. Methods: A total of 426 students aged 10-14 years in 4 local schools participated…

  14. Preparing Business Language Students to Meet Employer Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Lear, Darcy

    2012-01-01

    Situated within the growing body of work on languages for specific purposes and community service-learning, this article explores the place of specific professional skills in the business language curriculum. It argues that the integration of explicit curricular content related to professional correspondence (emails, letter of recommendation requests, and cover letter content) will better prepare students for the work place without compromising the rigor of the traditional humanities discipli...

  15. Individualized transition support plans for students with intellectual disabilities : implications for involvement of the students and the parents

    OpenAIRE

    Mizutani, Yumi

    2003-01-01

    The present study conserned the student involvement in transition planning, and the partnership among students, their parents, and teachers in Japanese special high schools for students with intellectual disabilities. First, characteristics and problems in current practice of their involvement in individualized plans for instruction and career guidance at Japanese special high schools nationwide (N=220) were surveyed by the questionnaire. It was found that teachers for students with intellect...

  16. Self-Regulation and Dimensions of Parenting Styles Predict Psychological Procrastination of Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Habibeh Mortazanajad; Faride mostafafi; Shahram Vahedi

    2009-01-01

    "n Objective: "n "nPrevious research has linked self regulation and parenting styles separately to academic procrastination. This article investigates the impact of the dimensions of parenting styles, behavioral self regulation and short term self regulation on procrastination of students. "nMethod: A sample of 249 adolescents (174 females and 75 male) aged 19 - 21 years completed measures of Parent as Social Context Questionnaire- Adolescent Report, Self-regulation Questionnaire (SRQ), ...

  17. Reliability and validity of the Safe Routes to school parent and student surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evenson Kelly R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and validity of the U.S. National Center for Safe Routes to School's in-class student travel tallies and written parent surveys. Over 65,000 tallies and 374,000 parent surveys have been completed, but no published studies have examined their measurement properties. Methods Students and parents from two Charlotte, NC (USA elementary schools participated. Tallies were conducted on two consecutive days using a hand-raising protocol; on day two students were also asked to recall the previous days' travel. The recall from day two was compared with day one to assess 24-hour test-retest reliability. Convergent validity was assessed by comparing parent-reports of students' travel mode with student-reports of travel mode. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey was assessed by comparing within-parent responses. Reliability and validity were assessed using kappa statistics. Results A total of 542 students participated in the in-class student travel tally reliability assessment and 262 parent-student dyads participated in the validity assessment. Reliability was high for travel to and from school (kappa > 0.8; convergent validity was lower but still high (kappa > 0.75. There were no differences by student grade level. Two-week test-retest reliability of the parent survey (n = 112 ranged from moderate to very high for objective questions on travel mode and travel times (kappa range: 0.62 - 0.97 but was substantially lower for subjective assessments of barriers to walking to school (kappa range: 0.31 - 0.76. Conclusions The student in-class student travel tally exhibited high reliability and validity at all elementary grades. The parent survey had high reliability on questions related to student travel mode, but lower reliability for attitudinal questions identifying barriers to walking to school. Parent survey design should be improved so that responses clearly indicate

  18. Correlation of parents' religious behavior with family's emotional relations and students' self-actualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorsheikhali, Fatemah; Alavi, Hamid Reza

    2015-02-01

    The main goal of this research is to study the relationship between parents' religious behavior, emotional relations inside family, and self-actualization of male and female high school students of district 2 in Kerman city. Research method is descriptive and of correlative type. Questionnaires of parent's religious behavior, emotional relations inside family, and students' self-actualization were used in the research. After collecting questionnaires, data were analyzed by SPSS, MINITAB, and EXCEL software. The sample volume in the research has been 309 students and their parents, and the sampling method was in the form of classification and then in the form of cluster in two stages. 1.29 % of students had a low self-actualization, 17.15 % had average, and 81.55 % of them had high self-actualization. Also the results showed that 9.4 % of emotional relations in families were undesirable, 55.3 % were relatively desirable, and 35.3 % were desirable. Moreover, 2.27 % of parents' religious behavior was inappropriate, 29.13 % was relatively appropriate, and 68.61 % was appropriate. The main results of the research are as follows: (1) There is a significant positive correlation between parents' religious behavior and emotional relations inside students' family. (2) There is not any significant correlational between parents' religious behavior and students' self-actualization. (3) There is a significant positive correlation between emotional relations inside family and students' self-actualization.

  19. Correspondences among parent, teacher, and student perceptions of adolescents' learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, C A

    1997-01-01

    A group of 26 adolescents with learning disabilities (Grades 9 through 12), their parents, and their special education teachers were asked to rate the students' skills in each of 21 specific areas covering general ability, oral language, reading, written language, math, study skills, motivation, social skills, attention, and nonverbal skills. Correspondences in the absolute and relative ratings of parents, teachers, and students across the 21 skill areas were examined. The parents' ratings were consistent with those of the teachers in 16 areas and significantly lower than the teachers in 5 areas. The students' ratings were generally higher than those of their parents and teachers. The student-teacher differences were significant in 6 areas, whereas the student-parent differences were significant in 11 areas. Although generally lower in absolute terms than the ratings of their children, the parents' relative ratings were strikingly parallel to their children's ratings across skill areas (r = 80). Differences in the reference groups used for the ratings did not seem to account for the discrepant ratings. Possible implications of the differing perceptions of students' learning disabilities for students' self-esteem and academic progress are discussed.

  20. Relationship between Parenting Styles and Learning Strategies in High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Kolahi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship, between perceived parenting styles and learning strategies. Research method is correlation .Statistical population composes of all high school students in Urmia city. The sampling process conducted with random method of stage cluster sampling selected 127 high school students. The sample was 56% female students and 44% male students. The research tools were the Perceptions of Parent's Actions Questionnaire and The LASSI-HS measures. The results revealed that those students who perceived their parents as being authoritative tended to engage in more effective learning and study strategies. Implications are discussed for counselors and teachers using this information as a fostering tool in their work with Iranian students.

  1. Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Begeny, Suzanne

    2010-03-01

    As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education.

  2. The Longitudinal Process of Early Parent Involvement on Student Achievement: A Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Englund, Michelle M; Warner-Richter, Mallory N; Reynolds, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the process whereby early parent involvement in preschool effects student achievement from kindergarten through 6(th) grade. Participants were 1,539 low-income, mainly African American children and their mothers, in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. Program children (N = 989) received one or two years of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program - a preschool intervention that strongly promoted parents' development of parent involvement skills within the school and at home. Children from similar backgrounds who did not attend the CPC, but participated in available local resources (e.g. day care), were obtained as a comparison group (N = 550). Path analysis revealed an interactive process between parent involvement, academic achievement, and children's motivation. Early parent involvement directly influenced kindergarten achievement, which in turn influenced first grade student motivation. Highly motivated children then encouraged parents to continue involvement. The cyclic nature of this process across elementary school was observed. The model accounted for 61% of the variance in 6(th) grade achievement. Findings suggest that early parent involvement promoted in the CPC program, sets the stage for subsequent parent involvement, student motivation, and academic achievement throughout early and middle childhood.

  3. Parental Autonomy Support and Student Learning Goals: A Preliminary Examination of an Intrinsic Motivation Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark

    2011-01-01

    In a seven week quasi-experimental study, parents (n = 15) of elementary school students (n = 15) learned autonomy supportive communication techniques that included helping their children set learning goals for homework assignments. Treatment vs. comparison group (n = 30) ANCOVA analyses revealed that the parents in the treatment group perceived…

  4. Acculturative Stress, Parental and Professor Attachment, and College Adjustment in Asian International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suejung; Pistole, M. Carole; Caldwell, Jarred M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined parental and professor attachment as buffers against acculturative stress and as predictors of college adjustment of 210 Asian international students (AISs). Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed that acculturative stress negatively and secure parental and professor attachment positively predicted academic…

  5. Permissive Parenting and Mental Health in College Students: Mediating Effects of Academic Entitlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants:…

  6. Phenomenological Perceptions of Parental Evaluations in Depressed and Nondepressed College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined depressed and nondepressed students' perceptions of their parents' standards and evaluations. Data supported the hypotheses that depressogenic parents negatively evaluate their offspring and depressive offspring show lowered self-evaluations. Discusses results in terms of interpersonal attraction theory and mutual influencability in…

  7. The Ins and Outs of Homeschooling: The Determinants of Parental Motivations and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collom, Ed

    2005-01-01

    This research investigates two major aspects of homeschooling. Factors determining parental motivations to homeschool and the determinants of the student achievement of home-educated children are identified. Original survey data from an organized group of homeschoolers is analyzed. Regression models are employed to predict parents' motivations and…

  8. Homeschooling Parent/Teachers' Perceptions on Educating Struggling High School Students and their College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Brenda Tracy

    2013-01-01

    A general problem is that testing a homeschooled child for learning disabilities (LD) is not required in the state of Texas and therefore dependent on the homeschooling parent's recognition and desire to test. A qualitative exploratory method was used to determine the perceptions of parent/teachers on their struggling high school students'…

  9. The Perception of Gifted Students' Parents about the Term of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Esra; Ilgün, Sükrü

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to present the definition of "giftedness" made by the parents who have gifted children.The study is of importance for presenting the term of giftedness from parents of gifted students as a result of their experiences. Also, this study has a great importance as it allows us to have more information about…

  10. Parents and Teachers' Knowledge of Violent Disciplinary Practices against Secondary School Students in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoyemiju, M. A.; Ojo, O. O.; Olatomide, O. O.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the Violent Disciplinary Practices (VDP) perpetrated by parents and by teachers against secondary schools students. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. Six hundred and sixteen participants comprising 336 and 280 parents and teachers, respectively, were selected to participate in the study. Two instruments…

  11. Influence of Parenting Styles on the Adolescent Students' Academic Achievement in Kenyan Day Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, Alice Atieno; Aloka, Peter J. O.; Raburu, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to establish the influence of parenting styles on adolescent academic achievement in day secondary schools in North Rachuonyo Sub-County, Kenya. Baumrind's theory of parenting style informed the study. The Concurrent Triangulation Design was used. The target population comprised 2409 day secondary students registered for…

  12. Parenting Practices and Tobacco Use in Middle School Students in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poms, Laura W.; Fleming, Lila C.; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parenting practices have been shown to have a strong influence on adolescent tobacco use in high-income countries. This study examined whether parenting practices also were associated with tobacco use by middle school students (approximately ages 13-15) in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: A secondary analysis was performed on…

  13. Predictors and Outcomes of Parental Involvement with High School Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumow, Lee; Lyutykh, Elena; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Demographic and psychological predictors of parent involvement with their children's science education both at home and at school were examined during high school. Associations between both types of parent involvement and numerous academic outcomes were tested. Data were collected from 244 high school students in 12 different science classrooms…

  14. Graduate Students in a Service Learning Design Case: The Development of a Parenting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Monica W.; Kacin, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    The following design case illustrates the approach a group of advanced graduate online-design students, two design coaches, and an instructor used to design an online instructional intervention as a service-learning project for parents interested in improving their parenting skills with their pre-teens. This design case is distinctive in that it…

  15. Direct PLUS Loan Basics: Parent Loans for Students. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    The Direct PLUS Loan is one of the low-interest loans provided by the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. The U.S. Department of Education delivers loan proceeds through the student's school, and parents are responsible for repaying the Department. This booklet answers parents' questions about the loan program, including: (1) Am I…

  16. The Perception of Gifted Students' Parents about the Term of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Esra; Ilgün, Sükrü

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to present the definition of "giftedness" made by the parents who have gifted children.The study is of importance for presenting the term of giftedness from parents of gifted students as a result of their experiences. Also, this study has a great importance as it allows us to have more information about…

  17. Transition Planning Guide for Parents of Special Education Students. DISD Community Transition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones, Bill; Ozmun, Ellie

    This transition planning guide is intended as a resource for parents of severely handicapped students approaching or at the legal age for leaving public school services and entering community services. The guide was developed after a 2-year transition project, Project Impact, revealed common concerns and questions which parents and teachers…

  18. A Model of Parental Achievement-Oriented Psychological Control in Academically Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Alex C.; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated achievement-oriented parent socialization as it pertains to school avoidance in a sample of gifted students. A serial mediation model examining relationships among parental achievement-oriented psychological control (APC), fear of academic failure, academic amotivation, and school avoidance was tested. The sample included…

  19. The Effects of Parental Involvement on Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, Engagement and Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Williams, Cathy M.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined whether various dimensions of parental involvement predicted 10th-grade students' motivation (engagement, self-efficacy towards maths and English, intrinsic motivation towards maths and English) using data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS 2002). Results showed that both parents' educational aspiration for…

  20. The IEP Meeting: Perceptions of Parents of Students Who Receive Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Wade W.

    2008-01-01

    The author investigated parental perceptions of the individualized education program (IEP) meeting among 51 parents of students who were receiving special education services from 1 family support service agency. Survey questions pertained to the following areas: (a) IEP meeting experiences, (b) knowledge level of special education law, (c)…

  1. Parental Involvement as a Mediator of Academic Performance among Special Education Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores de Apodaca, Roberto; Gentling, Dana G.; Steinhaus, Joanna K.; Rosenberg, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined parental involvement as a mediator of the academic performance of middle school students with special needs. The study built on the different types of parental involvement theorized by Epstein and colleagues (2002) and studied empirically by Fan and Chen (2001). Using a specially developed questionnaire, a sample of 82 parents…

  2. A Quantitative Study of Michigan High School Students' Perception of Parents' Role in Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Veryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental involvement in academic success as determined by grade point average and Michigan high school students' perception of parent involvement with school, participation in homework, recognition of academic success, knowledge of school policies, and support of participation in…

  3. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  4. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Student Achievement in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on the relationship between parental involvement and student achievement, the effect of parental involvement in the U.S. Virgin Islands had not been substantiated empirically. It should not be assumed that research conducted in the United States or other geographic areas will necessarily apply to the…

  5. Parental Attachment, Cognitive Working Models, and Depression among African American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Keisha M.; Murdock, Tamera B.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the cognitive mechanisms by which parental attachments predict depression among African American college students, the authors examined a mediational path model containing parental attachment, cognitive working models, and depression. The model demonstrated a close fit to the data, and several significant paths emerged.…

  6. Parental Influences on College Student Drinking: Preliminary Test of a Social-Cognitive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kimberly Jean

    2010-01-01

    Problematic drinking in college students is a serious public health problem. Although parental influence wanes during the college years, research suggests that parental behaviors in high school, including monitoring, alcohol-specific control (i.e., rules or communication), and problematic modeling of drinking, continue to predict their children's…

  7. Parental Attachment, Separation-Individuation, and College Student Adjustment: A Structural Equation Analysis of Mediational Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattanah, Jonathan F.; Hancock, Gregory R.; Brand, Bethany L.

    2004-01-01

    Secure parental attachment and healthy levels of separation-individuation have been consistently linked to greater college student adjustment. The present study proposes that the relation between parental attachment and college adjustment is mediated by healthy separation-individuation. The authors gathered data on maternal and paternal…

  8. Parental Communication as a Tool Kit for Preventing Sexual Abuse among Adolescent Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayo, Ajayi Beatrice; Olawuyi, B. O.

    2016-01-01

    This study employed the survey design to investigate the relevance of parent communication in preventing sexual abuse among secondary school students in Nigeria. The instrument for data collection tagged "Parent Communication Strategy for Preventing Sexual Abuse questionnaire" (PCOSPSAQ), was a researcher designed instrument. It was…

  9. Indigenous and Immigrant Students in Transition to Higher Education and Perceptions of Parental Influence: A Bourdieusian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleanthous, Irene

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to compare and contrast the perceptions of parental influence of indigenous middle-class students and immigrant students in Cyprus, and to investigate how their family's capital mediates students' educational choices for studies in higher education. This study draws on interview data with two students and their parents and…

  10. Are the kids all right? The impact of school climate among students with LGBT parents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter, Tracey; Taylor, Catherine; Edkins, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    .... Results show that students who have an LGBT parent, and who report feeling unsafe at school due to their family type or their own real/perceived gender and/or sexual identity, were almost four times...

  11. Homework Hotline Questionnaires: For Parents (Elementary Schools); for Junior High School Students; for High School Students; Homework Hotline Questionnaire for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwant

    Four questionnaires, designed to measure attitudes toward a proposed homework hotline, are included in this document. There are versions for parents of students in grades 4 to 6, for junior high school students, for high school students, and for educators. The items concern student characteristics, desirable parental role in helping with homework,…

  12. Non-exposure parenting increases risk of bullying behavior in junior high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Surilena Hasan; Jessica Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Background Bullying behavior is one of many behavioral and disciplinary problems among school students, which has a wide impact on youth, families, schools, and communities. Parenting and the role of parents as good educators (exposure) can prevent mental, emotional and behavioral disorders caused by bullying. The aim of this study was to determine the role of self-esteem and family factors on bullying behavior in junior high schools students. Methods A cross-sectional study was ...

  13. A large-scale examination of the nature and efficacy of teachers' practices to engage parents: assessment, parental contact, and student-level impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitsinger, Anne M; Felner, Robert D; Brand, Stephen; Burns, Amy

    2008-08-01

    As schools move forward with comprehensive school reform, parents' roles have shifted and been redefined. Parent-teacher communication is critical to student success, yet how schools and teachers contact parents is the subject of few studies. Evaluations of school-change efforts require reliable and useful measures of teachers' practices in communicating with parents. The structure of teacher-parent-contact practices was examined using data from multiple, longitudinal cohorts of schools and teachers from a large-scale project and found to be a reliable and stable measure of parent contact across building levels and localities. Teacher/school practices in contacting parents were found to be significantly related to parent reports of school contact performance and student academic adjustment and achievement. Implications for school improvement efforts are discussed.

  14. Parental Involvement, Is It Real? A Study of Viewpoints Promoting Parental Involvement That Enhances Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Lorretta Faye

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the motives, practices, attitudes, and barriers of parental involvement as recognized by administrators and teachers in southwest Tennessee in order to improve the school-home and community relationship in southwest Tennessee. This study investigated the benefits of parental involvement and…

  15. School-Age Parents: Federal Programs and Policies Relevant to Pregnant or Parenting Secondary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kristin A.

    Federal programs and policies that affect pregnant and parenting teenagers, particularly those programs that are of relevance to schools, are briefly described. The main categories of programs and legislation described are: (1) those bearing on teenage parents and education; (2) pre-school programs; (3) day care; (4) welfare; (5) social services;…

  16. The Effect of Parental Divorce on Relationships with Parents and Romantic Partners of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, David; Zusman, Marty; DeCuzzi, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Three-hundred-and-thirty undergraduates at a large southeastern university completed a confidential anonymous 26 item questionnaire designed to assess the effect of parental divorce/remarriage on the relationship with their respective parents and on their own romantic relationships. The data revealed several significant relationships-respondents…

  17. Expectations of Parents of First-Year Students regarding Collegiate Teaching and Caring at a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Christina J.

    2010-01-01

    Parental involvement in higher education has greatly increased, specifically in the last 30 years. Some parents are hyper-involved in their children's lives, and educational leaders often spend almost as much time working with parents as they do students. The body of literature on parental involvement in higher education is limited. Therefore, the…

  18. Heavy Episodic Drinking and Alcohol-Related Consequences: Sex-Specific Differences in Parental Influences among Ninth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.; Hausheer, Robin; Esp, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Parents impact adolescent substance abuse, but sex-specific influences are not well-understood. This study examined parental influences on adolescent drinking behavior in a sample of ninth-grade students (N = 473). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated parental monitoring, disapproval of teen alcohol use, and quality of parent-teen general…

  19. The Relationship of Parental Practices and Knowledge to School Adaptation for Immigrant and Nonimmigrant High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Dina; Espino, Susan Ryerson

    2007-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of parent practices and knowledge of school on school success for a sample of 240 immigrant and nonimmigrant high school students and their parents. Immigrant parents from the former Soviet Union were less knowledgeable about and had less contact with the school, and allowed less autonomy than U.S.-born parents. Some…

  20. Survey Finds Mismatch in Student Achievement and Parents' College Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Education Department released a report last week, "Parent Expectations and Planning for College," that offers new insights into the factors influencing whether parents expect their children to enroll at four-year colleges. It suggests that many young people who could succeed at such institutions are not being encouraged by their families or…

  1. The Parent Interview; Guidelines for Student and Practicing Speech Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerick, Lon

    The importance and nature of the speech clinician's diagnostic interview with his client's parents are discussed; also discussed are factors preventing establishment of effective communication, including the clinician's fears and attitudes toward parents. An approach to interviewing is presented in terms of the goals of obtaining and giving…

  2. The Lived Experiences of Successful ELL Student Regarding Second Language Acquisition from the Perspective of Students, Parents, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohensky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study investigated the perspectives of successful Limited English Proficient (LEP) students along with their parents and teachers. Narrative inquiry was used to collect data and template analysis was used to triangulate trends. A purposeful snowball sample of six 4 th grade students that have been identified as…

  3. Preparing minority undergraduate students for successful science careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akundi, Murty

    2008-03-01

    Xavier University of Louisiana is well known for being number one in graduating the most minority students in physical and biological sciences. The reason for this success is built on the concept of Standards with Sympathy in the Sciences (Triple S). This is an outgrowth of over twenty years of planning and development by the Xavier science faculty to devise a program for preparing and retaining students in the sciences and engineering. Xavier has been successfully conducting for over ten years, Summer Science Academy (SSA) for middle and high school students; Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars and Howard Hughes Biomedical programs for in-coming freshmen. Recently, through a grant from NSF, we have developed the Experiential Problem-solving and Analytical Reasoning (EPsAR) summer bridge program for in-coming freshmen who were given conditional admission to the university (i.e., those students who scored below the acceptable range for placement into degree mathematics courses). In this program, EPsAR participants will be engaged in problem-solving and critical thinking activities for eight hours per day, five days per week, for six weeks. Additionally, an interdisciplinary approach is taken to convey the mathematical skills learned to relate to physics, chemistry, biology, and computer science. Sixty-six students have participated in the last two years in the EPsAR program. During the first year 23 of 28 students successfully bi-passed the algebra review course and were placed into a degree credit course in mathematics. In the second year, thirty-one (31) of the 38 were advanced to a higher-level mathematics course. Twenty-three (23) out of 38 went on to degree credit math course. To retain students in the sciences peer tutoring in all the science disciplines are made available to students throughout the day for 5 days per week. Faculty and students are available to give guidance to the needed students. The University has established a

  4. Are students' perceptions of parental acceptance of academic dishonesty associated with its occurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljatic, Mladen; Silva, Mónica; Ardiles, Jorge

    2003-08-01

    The study explored the association between the perceptions 175 Chilean business students held about their parents' acceptance of academic dishonesty and their self-reports of academic dishonesty. Regressing scores for parental acceptance onto self-reported academic dishonesty indicated it accounted for a small (2.2%) but significant amount of variance beyond demographic and academic performance variables. Effect size analysis based on structure coefficients indicated that parental acceptance was the second best predictor in the equation, suggesting that parental acceptance is a correlate that merits further study.

  5. Maladaptive schemas mediate poor parental attachment and suicidality in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Thompson, Kali; Selwyn, Candice; Finnegan, Heather; Misra, Tiffany

    2017-07-01

    In college-aged adults (n = 766), the transition to adulthood may aggravate risk factors for suicidal behavior such as poor parental attachment and maladaptive self-schemas. Because poor parental attachment may facilitate developing maladaptive self-related schemas, this study was designed to determine whether specific maladaptive schemas mediate the relation between poor parental attachment and college students' suicide proneness and ideation. Findings supported this hypothesis. Defectiveness and emotional deprivation schemas, which are consistent with "perceived burdensomeness" and "thwarted belonging," may be important intervention targets for suicide prevention programs. The ongoing role of parental attachment during early adult development is highlighted.

  6. Childhood discipline, perceptions of parents, and current functioning in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, Kimberly; McKinney, Cliff; Klein, Jenny; Oliveros, Arazais

    2006-02-01

    This study examined the relationships among the childhood discipline styles experienced by 116 female college students, their perceptions of their parents, and their current functioning. Results of this study indicated that female college students' report of childhood discipline, their perceptions of their parents, and their outcomes were related uniquely when examining responses for mothers and fathers. Further, regression analyses suggested that negative perceptions of mothers may mediate the relationship between maternal psychologically assaultive discipline and female college students' depression and self-esteem and mediate partially the relationship between maternal psychologically and physically assaultive discipline and female college students' anxiety. In contrast, fathers' use of psychologically assaultive discipline and female college students' positive and negative perceptions of their fathers predicted depression, whereas only their perceptions predicted anxiety and self-esteem. These results suggested the importance of examining discipline and perceptions of parents when examining the functioning of late adolescents and emerging adults.

  7. Loneliness of homosexual male students: parental bonding attitude as a moderating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the relationships of homosexual male students at the senior high school level and their loneliness using parental bonding attitude as a moderating factor. An amount of 127 homosexual male senior high school students in Taiwan is studied. The Pearson correlation analysis and the hierarchical regression analysis are adapted to examine two proposed hypotheses. Based on the results, homosexual male senior high school students in both hyper-masculine and feminine gender roles are found to feel loneliness, but levels of loneliness of those who possess hyper-masculine gender role are relatively lower than those in a feminine role. In addition, the levels of loneliness of homosexual male senior high school students could be negatively affected by parental bonding attitudes (Care). Recommendations and suggestions for parents as well as teachers of homosexual senior high school male students and future studies are underscored at the end of this article.

  8. Relationships between Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework, Student Homework Behaviors, and Academic Achievement: Differences among Elementary, Junior High, and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, J. C.; Suárez, N.; Rosário, P.; Vallejo, G.; Valle, A.; Epstein, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to produce a deeper understanding of the relationship between perceived parental homework involvement (i.e., parental homework control and parental homework support), student homework behaviors (i.e., time spend on homework completion, time management, and amount of homework completed), and student academic achievement. Using…

  9. Comparison of Parent and Student Responses to Asthma Surveys: Students Grades 3 12 and Their Parents from a Suburban Private School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P.; Wollan, Peter; Kurland, Marge; Bertram, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Schools are being called upon to help address asthma, a common problem in school- aged children. School-based asthma programs need information about asthma diagnoses, asthma symptoms, and asthma's impact on school attendance. Parent or student surveys are the most common method of collecting these data. However, medical literature offers little…

  10. Influences of personal standards and perceived parental expectations on worry for Asian American and White American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Anne; Berenbaum, Howard; Okazaki, Sumie

    2013-03-01

    The current study examined perceptions of living up to parental expectations (LPE) and personal standards as possible mediators of the relationship between ethnicity and worry in a sample of 836 Asian American and 856 White American college students. Asian Americans reported higher frequency of academic- and family-related worries, but they did not report higher levels of global tendency to worry. Perceptions of LPE of current academic performance and personal standards for preparation for a future career partially explained ethnic differences in frequency of academic worry. Personal standards and perceptions of LPE for respect for the family partially explained ethnic differences in frequency of family worry. The findings highlight the importance of targeting domain-specific personal standards and perceived parental expectations to reduce worry among Asian Americans.

  11. Perceived Parental Monitoring and Health Risk Behavior among Public Secondary School Students in El Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Springer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although parental monitoring has received considerable attention in studies of U.S. adolescents, few published studies have examined how parents' knowledge of their children's whereabouts may influence health risk behaviors in adolescents living in Latin America. We investigated the association between perceived parental monitoring and substance use, fighting, and sexual behaviors in rural and urban Salvadoran adolescents (n = 982. After adjusting for several sociodemographic covariates, multilevel regression analyses indicated that students reporting low parental monitoring were between 2 to 3.5 times more likely to report risk behaviors examined. The promotion of specific parenting practices such as parental monitoring may hold promise for reducing adolescent risk behaviors in El Salvador.

  12. Preparing students for graduate study: an eLearning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintz, Christine; Posey, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the development and preliminary evaluation of an eLearning program intended to provide incoming nursing students with the basic knowledge, skills and abilities needed to succeed in graduate-level, online coursework. Using Mayer's principles (2008) for the effective design of multimedia instruction, an open-access, self-directed, online program was developed. The Graduate School Boot Camp includes five online modules focused on learning strategies and time management, academic writing, technology, research, and library skills. To motivate and engage learners, the program integrates a fun, graphical sports theme with audiovisual presentations, examples, demonstrations and practice exercises. Learners begin with a self-assessment based on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire or MSLQ (Pintrich et al., 1993). To assess change in knowledge levels before and after completing the program, learners take a pre-test and post-test. Preliminary findings indicate that the students found the information relevant and useful. They enjoyed the self-paced, multimedia format, and liked the option to return to specific content later. This innovative program offers a way to prepare students proactively, and may prove useful in identifying students at risk and connecting them with the appropriate resources to facilitate successful program completion.

  13. Parent-Child Communication to Reduce Heavy Alcohol Use among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremeens, Jennifer L.; Usdan, Stuart L.; Brock-Martin, Amy; Martin, Ryan J.; Watkins, Ken

    2008-01-01

    With extreme rates of binge drinking among young adults, college students continue to be a primary focus for a range of alcohol prevention efforts. Most universities are attempting to change the alcohol environment by implementing a variety of strategies to reduce heavy drinking among college students. With the exception of parental notification…

  14. Educational Encouragement, Parenting Styles, Gender and Ethnicity as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aqeel; Ahmad, Roslee; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Mustaffa, Mohamed Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Current study examines the predictors of academic achievement: role of parenting styles, educational encouragement, gender and ethnicity among special education students. Participants of this study consisted 200 special education students (N = 105 boys and N = 95 girls) age varies 14 to 19 years from one school located at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.…

  15. Parenting Styles Influence on Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy and Academic Adjustment in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kimberly Tracey

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between perceived parenting style, locus of control, self-efficacy, and student outcome (i.e. academic performance, GPA) in a sample of college students. The relationship among gender and ethnicity were also examined across these variables. There were 100 participants in this study,…

  16. Influence of Mothers' Parenting Styles on Self-Regulated Academic Learning among Saudi Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnafea, Tahany; Curtis, David D.

    2017-01-01

    Much of the research on self-regulation has investigated the influence of school settings. However, fewer studies have concentrated on the home environment and its influence on student's academic behaviour in school. The present research investigates the influence of mothers' parenting styles on students' self-regulated learning behaviours in…

  17. Single Student Parents Face Financial Difficulties, Debt, without Adequate Aid. Fact Sheet #C394

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Parents with dependent children were nearly one quarter of students enrolled for credit at American postsecondary institutions in 2008. These students face significant challenges to remaining enrolled and graduating, including limited access to affordable child care, difficulty balancing the demands of school with the demands of work and family,…

  18. Pregnant and Parenting Students on Campus: Policy and Program Implications for a Growing Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Virginia; Nichols, Tracy R.

    2013-01-01

    The number of pregnant and parenting students in higher education is increasing. Research suggests this population experiences added pressure and stress while pursuing their education. Few resources exist for these students and the universities who provide services do not adequately promulgate them to the campus community. The research presented…

  19. Perceptions of Self and Parents among College Students of Different Sexual Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Loyd S.; Fling, Sheila

    To determine how college students would rate themselves on a 5-point continuum from homosexual to heterosexual and then to see how those classified individuals perceived themselves and their parents, 1,783 single college students (741 males, 1,032 females), between the ages of 18 and 23, completed two self-report questionnaires. The first assessed…

  20. Examination of the Link between Parental Racial Socialization Messages and Racial Ideology among Black College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Simone C.; Neville, Helen A.

    2008-01-01

    The relations between racial socialization and color-blind racial beliefs (i.e., the denial, distortion, or minimization of racism) among 153 Black American college students, including 34 college student-parent dyads, were examined. Findings from open-ended data indicate that participants identified receiving both protective (i.e., messages about…

  1. Social and Spatial Disparities in Emotional Responses to Education: Feelings of "Guilt" among Student-Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the emotional responses to higher education of students with dependent children, and draws on 68 in-depth interviews conducted with student-parents in universities in the UK and Denmark. By focussing on one specific emotion--guilt--it contends that emotions are important in helping to understand the way in which particular…

  2. Perceptions of Self and Parents among College Students of Different Sexual Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Loyd S.; Fling, Sheila

    To determine how college students would rate themselves on a 5-point continuum from homosexual to heterosexual and then to see how those classified individuals perceived themselves and their parents, 1,783 single college students (741 males, 1,032 females), between the ages of 18 and 23, completed two self-report questionnaires. The first assessed…

  3. Experiencing Integration in Louisville: How Parents and Students See the Gains and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary; Frankenberg, Erica

    2011-01-01

    As the first part of research on the student assignment plan that seeks to create and maintain diverse schools in Jefferson County, the authors surveyed samples of both parents and students across the county. These surveys were designed to learn more about their experiences with integration efforts after the implementation of Jefferson County…

  4. The Role of Life Satisfaction and Parenting Styles in Predicting Delinquent Behaviors among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Fulya Cenkseven; Yilmaz, Yasin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the parenting styles and life satisfaction predict delinquent behaviors frequently or not. Firstly the data were collected from 471 girls and 410 boys, a total of 881 high school students. Then the research was carried out with 502 students showing low (n = 262, 52.2%) and high level of delinquent…

  5. Predicting Career Indecision in College Students: The Roles of Identity Formation and Parental Relationship Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Antonia L.; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates students' identity formation and perceptions of parental acceptance and encouragement of independence as predictors of career indecision. Four measurements were administered to 169 undergraduate students for the study. Results show career indecision was predicted by higher identity moratorium, less maternal acceptance, and fewer years…

  6. Use of unstructured parent narratives to evaluate medical student competencies in communication and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gilbert C; Harris, Mitchell A; Keyton, Stacey A; Frankel, Richard M

    2007-01-01

    Medical education programs across the country are now required to conduct meaningful assessments of trainees' competencies, although uniform standards for conducting these evaluations have yet to be established. In 1999, the Indiana University School of Medicine introduced a comprehensive competency-based undergraduate curriculum. The overall goal of the curriculum is to make medical students' day-to-day experiences of training a source of learning about professionalism, communication, and aspects of medicine beyond factual knowledge. We sought to examine free-text comments by parents of pediatric inpatients as substrate for competency evaluation and feedback for third-year students on their pediatrics rotation. The study was conducted from June 2001 to February 2004. Parents of hospitalized children completed a short medical student evaluation form that included 2 questions inviting free-text response. We used narrative analysis, a qualitative research technique, to describe both the content and meaning of the parents' responses. We collected 573 evaluations with narrative comments about 412 students. The most common aspect of medical student performance commented on by parents related to communication (53.8%). The next most common narrative comment was some form of affirmation of the student as a health care professional (26.0%). Other themes included establishing context for the comment, perceptions of the health care system, criticizing medical student performance, perceptions of the role of medical students, physical approach to the patient, expression of humility by the student, holistic approach to the patient, physical appearance of the student, superlative description of student, and advocating for the patient. Multiple themes were identified in 232 narrative comments (40.4%). Examples of each theme are provided. Family members of pediatric inpatients are a valuable source of information about medical student performance in at least 2 of the Accreditation

  7. Parent Support and Stress among First-Generation and Continuing-Generation Female Students during the Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Susan R.; Fong, Kristen; Carter, Rebecca; Boehme, Julia; Alpert, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This study compares first-generation and continuing-generation female college students in terms of: (a) level of parents' emotional and informational support; (b) level of students' stress; and (c) the relationship between both types of parent support and students' stress during the transition to college. We collected survey data from an…

  8. Parent Support and Stress among First-Generation and Continuing-Generation Female Students during the Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Susan R.; Fong, Kristen; Carter, Rebecca; Boehme, Julia; Alpert, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This study compares first-generation and continuing-generation female college students in terms of: (a) level of parents' emotional and informational support; (b) level of students' stress; and (c) the relationship between both types of parent support and students' stress during the transition to college. We collected survey data from an…

  9. Relationship between parenting styles and gender role identity in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Ching; Billingham, Robert E

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between perceived parenting styles and gender role identity was examined in college students. 230 undergraduate students (48 men, 182 women; 18-23 years old) responded to the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ) and the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI). The hypothesis was that parenting styles (authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive for both fathers and mothers) would be significantly associated with gender role identity (undifferentiated, feminine, masculine, and androgynous) of college students, specifically whether authoritative parenting styles associated with androgyny. To account for differences in sex on gender role identity or parenting styles, sex was included as a factor. The pattern of the difference in identity groups was similar for males and females. There were significant differences in parenting styles between gender role groups. Maternal and paternal authoritativeness correlated with participants' femininity, and for both parents, the relationship was observed to be stronger in males than females; paternal authoritativeness was significantly associated with androgyny. Future research based on these results should investigate how the findings relate to children's psychological well-being and behavioral outcomes.

  10. Success in introductory college physics: The role of gender, high school preparation, and student learning perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean Chi-Jen

    Physics is fundamental for science, engineering, medicine, and for understanding many phenomena encountered in people's daily lives. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between student success in college-level introductory physics courses and various educational and background characteristics. The primary variables of this study were gender, high school mathematics and science preparation, preference and perceptions of learning physics, and performance in introductory physics courses. Demographic characteristics considered were age, student grade level, parents' occupation and level of education, high school senior grade point average, and educational goals. A Survey of Learning Preference and Perceptions was developed to collect the information for this study. A total of 267 subjects enrolled in six introductory physics courses, four algebra-based and two calculus-based, participated in the study conducted during Spring Semester 2002. The findings from the algebra-based physics courses indicated that participant's educational goal, high school senior GPA, father's educational level, mother's educational level, and mother's occupation in the area of science, engineering, or computer technology were positively related to performance while participant age was negatively related. Biology preparation, mathematics preparation, and additional mathematics and science preparation in high school were also positively related to performance. The relationships between the primary variables and performance in calculus-based physics courses were limited to high school senior year GPA and high school physics preparation. Findings from all six courses indicated that participant's educational goal, high school senior GPA, father's educational level, and mother's occupation in the area of science, engineering, or computer technology, high school preparation in mathematics, biology, and the completion of additional mathematics and science courses were

  11. Parental Alcoholism, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Later Risk of Personal Alcohol Abuse among Chinese Medical Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN XIAO; MA-XIA DONG; JIE YAO; WEN-XIAN LI; DONG-QING YE

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the status of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the association of multiple ACEs with both parental alcoholism and later personal alcohol abuse among Chinese medical students with a view of improving adolescent health and reducing alcohol abuse among them. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 2073 Chinese medical students completed a survey on ten categories of ACEs in Anhui province of China. The association of parental alcoholism with ACEs and personal lcohol abuse was assessed by logistic regression analyses. Results The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for each category of ACEs in the subjects whose parents (either fathers or mothers or oth) had alcohol abuse was 2 to 14 times higher than that inthose with parental alcoholism (P<0.05). Subjects with i-parental alcoholism had the highest likelihood of ACEs. Compared with the subjects without ACEs, the risk of personal alcohol abuse was increased by 2-4-folds in the subjects with ACEs, irrespective of parental alcoholism (P<0.05). The total number of ACEs (ACE score) had a graded relationship to 4 categories of personal alcohol abuse with or without parental alcoholism. The prevalence of personal alcohol abuse among the subjects with parental alcoholism was higher, which was ndependent of ACE scores. Conclusion The prevalence of ACEs is generally serious in China. Efforts should be made to prevent and treat children with ACEs and subsequently to reduce alcohol abuse and later problems.

  12. Optimizing timing and dosage: does parent type moderate the effects of variations of a parent-based intervention to reduce college student drinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Scaglione, Nichole; Cleveland, Michael J; Mallett, Kimberly A; Turrisi, Rob; Abar, Caitlin C

    2014-02-01

    Research on parent-based interventions (PBIs) to reduce college student drinking has explored the optimal timing of delivery and dosage. The present study extended this work by examining the effectiveness of three different PBI conditions on student drinking outcomes as a function of parenting types and students' pre-college drinking patterns. Four hypotheses were evaluated (early intervention, increased dosage, invariant, and treatment matching risk). A random sample of 1,900 college students and their parents was randomized to four conditions: (1) pre-college matriculation, (2) pre-college matriculation plus booster, (3) post-college matriculation, or (4) control, and was assessed at baseline (summer prior to college) and 5-month follow-up. Baseline parent type was assessed using latent profile analysis (positive, pro-alcohol, positive, anti-alcohol, negative mother, and negative father). Student drinking patterns were classified at baseline and follow-up and included: non-drinker, weekend light drinker, weekend heavy episodic drinker, and heavy drinker. Consistent with the treatment matching risk hypothesis, results indicated parent type moderated the effects of intervention condition such that receiving the intervention prior to college was associated with lower likelihood of being in a higher-risk drinking pattern at follow-up for students with positive, anti-alcohol, or negative father parent types. The findings are discussed with respect to optimal delivery and dosage of parent-based interventions for college student drinking.

  13. Parents' Perceptions of Their Role in Children's Career Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2005-01-01

    This research used the Comprehensive Career Needs Survey to assess the career planning needs of junior and senior high students in southern Alberta. This article examines parents' perceptions of how prepared parents believe their children are for career planning; the role parents play; how parents can help their children with career planning; and…

  14. Teaching healthful food choices to elementary school students and their parents: the Nutrition Detectives™ program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David L; Katz, Catherine S; Treu, Judith A; Reynolds, Jesse; Njike, Valentine; Walker, Jennifer; Smith, Erica; Michael, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a nutrition education program designed to teach elementary school students and their parents, and to distinguish between more healthful and less healthful choices in diverse food categories. Three schools were assigned to receive the Nutrition Detectives™ program and 2 comparable schools served as controls. A total of 1180 second, third, and fourth grade elementary school students were included, with 628 students in the intervention and 552 in the control group. The program, delivered by physical education instructors over several sessions totaling less than 2 hours, taught the children how to read food labels and detect marketing deceptions, while learning to identify and choose healthful foods. Parents were introduced to the program through written materials sent home and at school functions. Assessments included a food label quiz, dietary pattern, and body mass index (BMI). Students in intervention schools showed a significant increase in nutrition label literacy (p parents of intervention group students also showed a significant increase in nutrition label literacy by 8% (p .05). BMI did not change over the short duration of the study. Nutrition Detectives effectively enhances the ability of students and their parents to identify more nutritious food choices. Further evaluation of the program and its potential to influence dietary pattern, BMI, and health outcomes in students and their families is warranted. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  15. Parental involvement and bullying among middle-school students in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdirahman, H; Fleming, L C; Jacobsen, K H

    2013-03-01

    Bullying, especially in developing countries, has not been much examined, especially the influence of parents on the risk of being bullied. The aim of this study was to determine whether active parenting is associated with reduced peer victimization among middle-school students in North Africa. A secondary analysis of data from more than 13,000 middle-school students who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) in Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia between 2006 and 2008, was conducted using multiple logistic regression models. About 60% of students in Egypt and one-third of students in Libya, Morocco and Tunisia reported having been bullied in the past month. In all 4 countries, boys reported more peer victimization than girls. In Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia, students who reported that their parents checked their homework, were understanding, and knew how the student spent free time had a reduced likelihood of peer victimization but this association was not significant in Libya. Interventions for reducing bullying should consider the positive impact of involved parents.

  16. Participation in Advanced Mathematics: Do Expectation and Influence of Students, Peers, Teachers, and Parents Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    2001-01-01

    Using six waves of data (Grades 7 through 12) from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), this study investigated the effects of expectation and influence of students, peers, teachers, and parents on participation in advanced mathematics. Results of survival analysis indicated a significant decline in participation rate in the transition from Grades 11 to 12. Students with higher future expectation were more likely to participate in advanced mathematics. Peer influence and teacher expectation did not have strong effects, and the effect of student future expectation was independent of peer and teacher effects. The effect of parent expectation and parent college plan for children were strong, and in their presence, the effect of student future expectation declined. Mathematics achievement and attitude toward mathematics were the most important factors affecting participation in advanced mathematics. With control over achievement and attitude, (a) the effect of student future expectation declined, (b) the effects of peer influence and teacher expectation disappeared, and (c) the effects of parent expectation and parent college plan for children were reduced. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice.

  18. Bilingual communication methods, text versus video, to increase parent involvement and science fair project student achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenson, Rhonda Suzanne

    This research examined the responses of families to bilingual communication methods, text versus video, designed to facilitate school to home communication to increase parent involvement and seventh grade student achievement in the science fair project. Using an experimental design, 161 families were randomly selected to receive either a two part informational text or video series during the science fair unit taught at a culturally diverse urban middle school. The bilingual informational materials were created and produced by the staff at the research site. Measures were taken to make sure all families could access the informational materials and innovations such as a special travel envelope and reminding procedures aided data collection. Surveys measuring variables on a Likert scale with spaces for comments were collected from the parents and students. An interrater reliability study was completed to measure the agreement of the two teachers who used a grading checklist to score science fair project achievement. Quantitative methods including ANOVA and MLR were used to examine the data in terms of student achievement and the communication method (text or video), audience (students and parents), and the anticipated outcome (parent help). Nonparametric and qualitative data analyses were used to explore how families used and responded to the informational materials. Significant results were that the video communication method was positively associated with student achievement on the science fair project. Significant main effects were observed for the student characteristics, educational services (general and special education, and English as a Second Language), and previous achievement in science, and the parent characteristics, previous experience with science fair projects, primary viewing language (English or Spanish), and expectations for student achievement. Student achievement was not significantly related to the amount or usefulness of parent help. The amount

  19. Despite new law, parents still need to discuss finances with students

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphin, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    With a new law in effect requiring Virginia high schools to educate students about finances, many parents might wrongly assume their children are learning all they need to know about money in the classroom and do not need to hear about the touchy subject of finances again at home. But the truth is, parents still need to discuss money with their children before they graduate from high school.

  20. Meanings of family under the perspective of parents of adolescent students

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Georgina Macedo de Sousa; Leda Barros de Castro; Ana Larissa Araujo Nogueria; Italo Rodolfo Silva; Nayra Michele Anjos Amorim

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the meanings of family according to parents of adolescent students. A qualitative research conducted with nine parents of adolescents from a public school, Maranhão, Brazil. Data collection occurred through unstructured interview from February to April 2011, and were submitted to thematic content analysis. Eight themes emerged: Structure, values and meanings of family; Roles and functions of family members; Family and school; Family dynamics and the health-disea...

  1. Enhanced Learning for Young Music Students: Involving and Motivating Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Factors that determine the rate of a child's progress on a musical instrument include the quality, quantity, and regularity of home practice. Because a young pupil sometimes lacks the skills necessary to practice independently at times, music teachers could encourage and motivate parents/guardians to participate more fully in their child's music…

  2. Students, Parents, Educators: An Approach to Conflict of Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsino, Romulo F.

    1982-01-01

    Attempts by courts in the United States and Canada to define the rights of children, parents, and educators are described, and their shortcomings and contradictions are pointed out. The author suggests another approach based on utilitarian values and pre-suppositions presented in works by John Stuart Mill. (PP)

  3. Students, Parents, Educators: An Approach to Conflict of Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsino, Romulo F.

    1982-01-01

    Attempts by courts in the United States and Canada to define the rights of children, parents, and educators are described, and their shortcomings and contradictions are pointed out. The author suggests another approach based on utilitarian values and pre-suppositions presented in works by John Stuart Mill. (PP)

  4. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José C.; Epstein, Joyce L.; Suárez, Natalia; Rosário, Pedro; Vallejo, Guillermo; Valle, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how students’ prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework), and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support). A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated that students’ prior academic performance was significantly associated with both of the students’ homework variables, with direct and indirect results linking achievement and homework behaviors with perceived parental control and support behaviors about homework. Low-achieving students, in particular, perceived more parental control of homework in the secondary grades. These results, together with those of previous research, suggest a recursive relationship between secondary school students’ achievement and their perceptions of parental involvement in homework, which represents the process of student learning and family engagement over time. Study limitations and educational implications are discussed. PMID:28798702

  5. An Imperative for Leadership Preparation Programs: Preparing Future Leaders to Meet the Needs of Students, Schools, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the structure, philosophy, and curriculum of educational leadership preparation programs and the importance of preparing schools leaders to address the unique needs of students and communities. In particular, it will address how programs can be enhanced by integrating organizational research and philosophies from educational,…

  6. Parent Child Relationship Among High and Low Achieving High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Satish Kumar Kalhotra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to identify Parent Child Relationship Among High and Low Achieving High School Students. A sample of 151 students of IX class students of Govt. school were selected from stratified random sampling. Rao’s (1989 parent-child relationship scale were used to assess the parental relationship The statistical technique like mean, median critical ration was used to find the low and high achiever relationship between father-child & mother child relationship. Lamsal inventory was used to collected the data.The results reveals that High achievers are loved more by their fathers than low ones and are given due importance at home. In constant the mothers equally love both high and low achievers.

  7. A collaboration of student nurse coaches and students with mental illnesses in a college preparation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nancye L

    2010-01-01

    With refined diagnostic tools, earlier recognition, new pharmacological and other treatment modalities, individuals living with mental illnesses are able to experience considerable recovery. Some individuals require support and guidance to build confidence and to manage in everyday situations. Previous to their illness, many had been functioning and able to meet their needs in most aspects of their lives, including academics, but, following illness, lacked confidence or skill to continue their education. This pilot program was designed to socialize students with a mental illness to life at college. To develop the pilot concept, college departments including nursing faculty and community mental health personnel collaborated together. Potential students attended informational sessions where those interested, applied for entry into the pilot. Each student was paired with a coach, a third year nursing student, with whom they established and evaluated goals geared towards registering independently in a college course the following semester. Evaluation of the program was measured in terms of attendance, registration in a college course for the following semester or job readiness, and focus group evaluation sessions. By the end of the semester, 12 of the 13 students completed the program. With support and guidance of their coaches, students gained confidence, developed a social support network and learned skills needed to be able to navigate the college system. This type of college preparation program is effective in assisting students with mental illness to access college courses and it is recommended that there be further similar programs offered as an orientation at the college level for students with mental illness in preparation for their registration and attendance at college. To minimize cost factors and gain administrative support, practitioners wishing to replicate this study would do well to consider sources of funding, as well as resource personal or volunteers

  8. How is gambling related to perceived parenting style and/or family environment for college students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Jeffrey; Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Worthy, Sheri Lokken

    2013-03-01

    Background and aims The relationship between college student gambling, parenting styles, and family environments is a neglected area of gambling research. Do parenting styles indirectly influence problem gambling behaviors via family environments? Do poor family environments, characterized by high levels of conflict and low levels of cohesion, increase the likelihood of problem gambling among youth? This study explored the interrelationships among college students' current gambling behaviors and a) having an emotionally close and supportive family environment, b) having nagging and critical parents, c) having an authoritative mother, and d) frequency of alcohol consumption. Methods and results Survey data were collected from 450 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory psychology classes at two state universities in a southern state. Feeling that one has nagging and critical parents was associated with gambling in more venues, while the opposite was true for having emotionally close and supportive families. However, perceptions of having authoritative mothers were not related to gambling. The results also showed that more frequent alcohol consumption was associated with higher odds of gambling in casinos, playing cards for money, betting on sports, gambling on the Internet, higher gambling losses, and a larger number of gambling venues. Conclusions As with any exploratory research, there are several unique lines of inquiry that can, and should, follow from these findings, including more research on how college students' attitudes toward gambling activities may have begun prior to college and been influenced by their feelings about their homes and parents.

  9. Preparing College Students to Teach an Environmental Problem Solving Curriculum to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    An NSF-funded project-based program was implemented by Clarkson University in 2000 to increase the interest and knowledge of middle school students in science, math and technology through the solution of an environmental problem that is relevant to their local school community. Clarkson students developed curricula for 7th and 8th grade science and technology classes and then worked with the middle school students throughout the year to reduce to transform solid waste into healthy soil for plant growth. The solution to this problem provided a vehicle to teach fundamental science and math content as well as the process of doing science and solving problems. Placing college science and engineering students in the classroom proved to be a great mechanism for engaging students in science topics and providing mentoring experiences that differ greatly from those that a practicing professional can provide. It is clear, however, that the students must be well prepared for this experience to maximize the benefits of university - school district partnership programs. The objective of this presentation will be to describe the training program that has been developed to prepare Clarkson students to work effectively in middle school classrooms. The Clarkson students are trained for their classroom experiences during the summer before they enter the classroom. They receive three credits for the training, curriculum development, and teaching efforts. It is expected that the students have the necessary background in science and technology to teach themselves the content and environmental relevance of the problem they will be teaching. Lectures and workshops focus on how to transform this knowledge into a project-based curriculum that meets the needs of the teachers, while also exciting the students. Lecture/workshops include: team work; components of an effective class and teacher; project planning and management; problem solving process; inquiry based learning, deductive

  10. Parental Support in the Development of Young Musicians: A Teacher's Perspective from a Small-Scale Study of Piano Students and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiotta, Mimia

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the influence of parental support and interactions on the young musicians' learning processes. In an attempt to corroborate the findings of the wider research, a case-study has been carried out comprising observations of 34 parents and 34 piano students taught by the author in three different locations (private studio,…

  11. The Effects of Parental Involvement, Trust in Parents, Trust in Students and Pupil Control Ideology on Conflict Management Strategies of Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Mehmet; Savas, Ahmet Cezmi

    2012-01-01

    In this study it was aimed to determine the effects of parental involvement, teachers' trust in parents and students, and teachers' pupil control ideology on the conflict management strategies used by teachers in classroom management. Data were collected from a sample of 254 teachers through paper and pencil questionnaires. Data were analyzed with…

  12. A cognitive behavioral course for at-risk senior nursing students preparing to take the NCLEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Susan G; Mastorovich, Melissa L; Liberto, Terri L; Gerwick, Michele

    2010-01-01

    For some nursing students, the stress of preparing for and taking the NCLEX can lead to maladaptive behaviors such as poor test performance and inadequate preparation. A different approach to NCLEX preparation for at-risk seniors is described. A 3-credit course that combines cognitive behavioral techniques, metacognitive strategies, test-taking strategies, and simulated NCLEX experience with practice questions is presented. Students also develop an individualized plan of preparation from graduation until they take the NCLEX.

  13. The relationship between parent and student religious coping and college alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Zaje A T; Powell, Kandace

    2014-06-01

    The present study examined social support and alcohol norms as mediators of the relationship between religious coping and college drinking (e.g., frequency and heavy drinking). The sample consisted of college students (n = 129) and their parents (n = 113). Religious coping (parent and student) was associated with less frequent alcohol use and less heavy drinking. Using a path model to test direct and indirect effects, the mediators were entered simultaneously and allowed to correlate with each other. Alcohol norms mediated the relationship between religious coping and drinking outcomes. Social support was not a significant mediator. Broader protective implications of religious coping are discussed.

  14. School, Parent, and Student Perspectives of School Drug Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Whipp, Tracy J.; Bond, Lyndal; Toumbourou, John W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Schools use a number of measures to reduce harmful tobacco, alcohol, and drug use by students. One important component is the school's drug policy, which serves to set normative values and expectations for student behavior as well as to document procedures for dealing with drug-related incidents. There is little empirical evidence of…

  15. Adolescents' perceptions of their parents' academic expectations: comparison of American, Chinese-American, and Chinese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Lan, W

    1998-01-01

    Cultural background not only influences family beliefs about the value of education, but may affect how academic expectations are communicated by parents and perceived by their children. This study examined differences in willingness to conform to parents' expectations of academic achievement as perceived by American, Chinese-American, and Chinese high school students. Findings indicated that Chinese students were more willing to accept their parents' advice and cared more about fulfilling academic expectations than did American students. Students in all three groups had similar feelings of independence. The views of Chinese-American students reflected the influence of both their Chinese heritage and the American culture in which they resided.

  16. Parent-Child Home Numeracy Intervention and the Mathematics Scores of First Grade Students in Urban Catholic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle-Lore, Millicent D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a parent-child home numeracy intervention on the mathematics scores of first grade students attending urban, Catholic schools. The participants included 60 parents (29 Black; 2 Asian; 1 Latino; 26 White; and 2 other) from two urban, Catholic schools. Parents, randomly assigned to the experimental group,…

  17. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Parental Expectations for the Mathematics Achievement of Their Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Daya; Panizzon, Debra

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from a survey of 80 parents and 120 secondary school students in Australia. Many parents report that their children put in all their effort into mathematics education but they believe that their children can do better if they try harder. This paradox is more evident among parents from Asian-Australian backgrounds…

  18. Risk moderation of a parent and student preventive alcohol intervention by adolescent and family factors : A cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdurmen, Jacqueline E E; Koning, Ina M.; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk moderation of an alcohol intervention targeting parents and adolescents. Design: A cluster randomized trial including 2937 Dutch early adolescents (m=12.68. years, SD=0.51) and their parents randomized over four conditions: parent intervention, student intervention, combin

  19. Building Bridges: A Case Study of the Perceptions of Parents of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) towards Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbacher, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the perceptions of parents of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) towards family/school partnerships. Interviews were conducted with parents of children with autism that belonged to a parent support group in western Pennsylvania. The resulting interviews cast light on the motivators and barriers that…

  20. Exploring the association between parental rearing styles and medical students' critical thinking disposition in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Wang, Zhaoxin; Yao, Yuhong; Shan, Chang; Wang, Haojie; Zhu, Mengyi; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Zhao, Xudong

    2015-05-14

    Critical thinking is an essential ability for medical students. However, the relationship between parental rearing styles and medical students' critical thinking disposition has rarely been considered. The aim of this study was to investigate whether parental rearing styles were significant predictors of critical thinking disposition among Chinese medical students. 1,075 medical students from the first year to the fifth year attending one of three medical schools in China were recruited via multistage stratified cluster sampling. The Chinese Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory(CTDI-CV) and The Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran (EMBU) questionnaire were applied to collect data and to conduct descriptive analysis. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the data. The critical thinking disposition average mean score was 287.44 with 632 participants (58.79%) demonstrating positive critical thinking disposition. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the rearing styles of fathers, including "overprotection", "emotional warmth and understanding", "rejection" and "over-interference" were significant predictors of medical students' critical thinking disposition that explained 79.0% of the variance in critical thinking ability. Rearing styles of mothers including "emotional warmth and understanding", "punishing" and "rejection" were also found to be significant predictors, and explained 77.0% of the variance. Meaningful association has been evidenced between parental rearing styles and Chinese medical students' critical thinking disposition. Parental rearing styles should be considered as one of the many potential determinant factors that contribute to the cultivation of medical students' critical thinking capability. Positive parental rearing styles should be encouraged in the cultivation of children's critical thinking skills.

  1. Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of junior middle school students in Jinan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xia; Zou, Huachun; Zhao, Fanghui; Wang, Shaoming; Zhang, Shaokai; Zhao, Yong; Marley, Gifty; Ma, Wei

    2015-05-21

    To determine the level of awareness on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and acceptance of HPV vaccination among parents of junior middle school students. A cross sectional survey employing cluster sampling was conducted in Jinan, Shandong Province of China in January of 2013. A total of 400 parents of junior middle school students participated in the questionnaire survey, among whom 360 (90%) completed valid questionnaires. About 88 (22.63%) parents had ever heard of HPV. Only one in ten (10.2%) knew about HPV vaccine. Parents willing to accept HPV vaccination for children accounted for 40.8%. Factors associated willing to accept HPV vaccination for children among parents were: female parent (AOR: 0.38, 95%CI: 0.21-0.67), having ever heard of HPV vaccine (AOR: 2.38, 95%CI: 1.01-5.61), thinking HPV vaccination should commence before sexual debut(AOR: 2.16, 95%CI: 1.21-3.85), thinking HPV vaccination should commence before 12 years old (AOR: 2.76, 95%CI: 1.02-7.46) or 13-15 years old (AOR: 4.75, 95%CI: 1.79-12.61), concern about suffering from cervical cancer and/or genital warts (AOR: 2.43, 95%CI: 1.31-4.50). About 60% of parents were in favor of future HPV vaccination promoting in China believing that HPV vaccine could efficiently prevent cervical cancer, anal cancer or genital warts, 37.4% of parents with expectation of governmental subsidy and price regulation. Parental awareness level of HPV vaccine and willingness to accept HPV vaccination for children was low. However, the general attitude of many participants toward future promoting of HPV vaccination in China was encouraging, particularly if certain expectations were met. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comparing students in inclusive education to those in special schools: the view of parents of children with learning disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klicpera, Christian; Klicpera, Barbara Gasteiger

    2004-12-01

    The paper presents the results of a survey of 755 parents of learning disabled children with certified special needs who either attended classes within regular education or special schools. All parents were involved in the decision on the school placement of their children. The experiences of 547 parents of learning disabled students in inclusive classes were contrasted with those of 207 parents of children in special schools. Besides a rather high satisfaction with previous school experiences of their children a number of differences between the two groups of parents could be observed. Parents of students in special schools viewed their children as rather little challenged by their educational requirements whereas those in inclusive education found their children to be overtaxed. The social development of the students in inclusive education was judged as more positive and, generally, a higher rate of parents of learning disabled students in inclusive classes were satisfied with their choice of the educational setting. Although the requirements for parental support concerning studying were higher in inclusive classes this cannot solely explain the differences of experiences with school. In a second step, satisfied parents were compared to dissatisfied parents. It could be found that the group of dissatisfied parents had to make their choice on the educational setting of their children under less favourable conditions and many could not accept that their child had been classified as having special needs. This applied to parents of students in inclusive education as well as to parents of children in special schools. Additionally, parents of students with German as a second language reported to be discontented more frequently. No significant discrepancies could be found between different grades or federal states with different quotas of inclusive education.

  3. The Pregnancy Assistance Fund as a Support for Student Parents in Postsecondary Education. Fact Sheet #C398

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn-Wright, Rhiana

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy and parenting can pose special challenges to students enrolled in secondary and postsecondary education, including issues related to child care, financial aid, transportation, and academic and career planning. In some circumstances, the responsibilities related to pregnancy and parenting can undermine students' ability to pursue and…

  4. Trust Me, Principal, or Burn Out! The Relationship between Principals' Burnout and Trust in Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Niyazi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the primary school principals' views on trust in students and parents and also, to explore the relationships between principals' levels of professional burnout and their trust in students and parents. To this end, Principal Trust Survey and Friedman Principal Burnout scales were administered on…

  5. Investigation into the Perceptions of Students, Parents, and Teachers in China's Education Reform in Grades 7 and 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joong, Peter; Xiong, Ying; Li, Lin; Pan, Chun Jian

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine how and to what extent Grades 7 and 8 teachers have implemented educational reforms in China that have had a direct impact on students, teachers, and parents. Major sources of data for this study were separate anonymous surveys for teachers, students, and parents. The study concluded that teachers and…

  6. Low-Income Hispanic and Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Parent and Peer Academic Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Lizbeth; Machida, Sandra K.; Kline, Linda; Huang, Leesa

    2014-01-01

    Socioeconomic status and parental support play important roles in determining academic achievement and have been positively correlated with academic success. It is important to determine if students from low-socioeconomic-status (SES) families perceive less parent support than students from middle-SES families. The participants (n?=?54) were high…

  7. Attitude of Students and Parents towards the Teaching of Sex Education in Secondary Schools in Cross Rivers State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjimi, L. O.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the disposition of students and parents towards the inclusion of sex education in the school curriculum in Cross River State. Using a random sampling technique, 602 secondary school students and 180 parents from Calabar, were selected for the study. Data were collected with the aid of self-administered…

  8. Halos vs. Stigmas: Long-Term Effects of Parent's Death or Divorce on College Students' Concepts of the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendal, Frederick G.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the effect of parental death or divorce on 351 college students. Results showed children of divorce rated father less favorably and rated divorce more favorably than other students. Results suggested long-term stigmas attached to family among children of divorce but no halo effect for children of deceased parents. (JAC)

  9. The Fiscal Impact of a Tuition Assistance Grant for Virginia's Special Education Students. Parent Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aud, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Parents of students with disabilities face a number of difficult choices in determining how to get the best education for their children. Too often, the special education system in public schools fails its students. Parents must become both experts and advocates for their children in order to navigate a burdensome maze of regulations to fight for…

  10. Dimensions of School and Classroom Climate: A Comparison of Teacher, Student and Parent Attitudes in One Massachusetts Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, Robert W.; Seldin, Clement A.

    A comparison is presented of how teachers, students, and parents perceive the climate of the secondary schools in Greenfield, Massachusetts, as measured by responses to eight selected value statements about the purposes of the school. Agreement among teachers, students, and parents indicates a school climate of collaboration, while disagreement…

  11. Why Go Back to School? Investigating the Motivations of Student Parents to Pursue Post-Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Tricia; Lero, Donna S.; Burke, Taniesha

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the factors that motivate student parents to pursue post-secondary education. Student parents at four Canadian universities (n = 398) completed open-ended questions on their reasons for attending school in an online survey. Using Possible Selves Theory as a lens, we conducted a directed content analysis and found that student…

  12. Self-Regulation and Dimensions of Parenting Styles Predict Psychological Procrastination of Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibeh Mortazanajad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nPrevious research has linked self regulation and parenting styles separately to academic procrastination. This article investigates the impact of the dimensions of parenting styles, behavioral self regulation and short term self regulation on procrastination of students. "nMethod: A sample of 249 adolescents (174 females and 75 male aged 19 - 21 years completed measures of Parent as Social Context Questionnaire- Adolescent Report, Self-regulation Questionnaire (SRQ, Adolescent Self- Regulatory Inventory (ASRI and Procrastination Tendency scale. Correlation coefficient indicted that in contrast to harsh or unsupportive parenting (rejection, chaos, and coercion, authoritative parenting (warmth, structure, and autonomy support was inversely related with procrastination. "nResults: The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed a clear negative relationship between a students' short term self regulation, dimensions of parenting styles (structure and warmth and procrastination consistent with the literature. "nConclusions: Surprisingly, in contrast to behavioral self regulation of Miler& Brown, short term self regulation was found to be negatively related to procrastination.

  13. The Integrate Student Portal: Online Resources to Prepare Students for the Workforce of a Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Manduca, C. A.; Egger, A. E.; Macdonald, H.

    2014-12-01

    The InTeGrate Student Portal is a suite of web pages that utilize InTeGrate resources to support student success by providing undergraduates with tools and information necessary to be proactive in their career choices and development. Drawn from various InTeGrate workshops and programming, the Portal organizes these resources to illuminate a variety of career opportunities and pathways to both traditional and non-traditional jobs that support a sustainable future. Informed from a variety of sources including employers, practitioners, faculty, students, reports, and articles, the pages explore five facets: (1) sustainability across the disciplines, (2) workforce preparation, (3) professional communication, (4) teaching and teaching careers, and (5) the future of green research and technology. The first three facets explore how sustainability is integrated across disciplines and how sustainability and 'green' jobs are available in a wide range of traditional and non-traditional workplaces within and beyond science. They provide students guidance in preparing for this sustainability workforce, including where to learn about jobs and how to pursue them, advice for strengthening their job applications, and how to build a set of skills that employers seek. This advice encompasses classroom skills as well as those acquired and strengthened as part of extracurricular or workplace experiences. The fourth facet, aimed at teaching assistants with little or no experience as well as at students who are interested in pursuing teaching as a career, provides information and resources about teaching. The fifth facet explores future directions of technology and the need for innovations in the workforce of the future to address sustainability issues. We seek your input and invite you to explore the Portal at: serc.carleton.edu/integrate/students/

  14. Are effective teachers like good parents? Teaching styles and student adjustment in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzel, Kathryn R

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the utility of parent socialization models for understanding teachers' influence on student adjustment in middle school. Teachers were assessed with respect to their modeling of motivation and to Baumrind's parenting dimensions of control, maturity demands, democratic communication, and nurturance. Student adjustment was defined in terms of their social and academic goals and interest in class, classroom behavior, and academic performance. Based on information from 452 sixth graders from two suburban middle schools, results of multiple regressions indicated that the five teaching dimensions explained significant amounts of variance in student motivation, social behavior, and achievement. High expectations (maturity demands) was a consistent positive predictor of students' goals and interests, and negative feedback (lack of nurturance) was the most consistent negative predictor of academic performance and social behavior. The role of motivation in mediating relations between teaching dimensions and social behavior and academic achievement also was examined; evidence for mediation was not found. Relations of teaching dimensions to student outcomes were the same for African American and European American students, and for boys and girls. The implications of parent socialization models for understanding effective teaching are discussed.

  15. Before Student Teaching: How Undergraduate Students in Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Programs Describe Their Early Classroom-Based Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Christine; La Paro, Karen M.; Johnson, Amy V.

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-based experiences, alternatively known as practica, are an integral component of undergraduate teacher preparation programs, which provide students essential opportunities to apply knowledge in practice. Though much is known about student teaching, much less is known about students' earlier classroom-based experiences. This…

  16. Informal Writing Assessment Linked to Instruction: A Continuous Process for Teachers, Students, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive model of daily, classroom informal writing assessment that is constantly linked to instruction and the characteristics of proficient writers. Methods for promoting teacher, student, and parent collaboration and their roles in dialoguing, conferencing, and reflection are discussed. Strategies for including…

  17. University Students' Perceptions of Childless Couples and Parents in Ankara, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, Zeynep; Koropeckyj-Cox, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    Changing perceptions of childlessness have been documented in the United States, but little is known about perceptions in developing countries undergoing rapid social changes and globalization, including Turkey. This project uses a survey and hypothetical vignettes about childless couples and parents to assess university students' perceptions of…

  18. It Takes a Village: Promoting Parent and Family Education on Healthy Lifestyles for Minnesota Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Mary O.; Wang, Qi; Grannon, Katherine; Davey, Cynthia S.; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examines school strategies to educate parents over time about physical activity and nutrition and how those strategies are related to adolescent health behaviors. Methods: Data from the Minnesota School Health Profiles Lead Health Education Teacher survey (2008-2012) and the Minnesota Student Survey (MSS, 2013) included…

  19. Conceptions of effort among students, teachers and parents within an English secondary school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stables, Andrew; Murakami, Kyoko; McIntosh, Shona

    2014-01-01

    widespread. This article reports on an exploratory case study of conceptions of effort among three major actors in an English secondary school. Qualitative and quantitative data from questionnaires and interviews with teachers, students and parents at an English comprehensive school were collected. Analysis...

  20. Web 2.0 Technologies and Parent Involvement of ELL Students: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-shin; Seger, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how ELL students' parents participated in a blog-mediated English language arts curriculum in a second grade classroom at a U.S. urban school, and how they supported their children's learning of school-based writing. Adopting ecological perspectives on technological affordances, this study views digital literacy as discursive…

  1. After School Violence: An Adapted Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Model for Student Survivors and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhnke, Gerald A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses how elementary and middle school counselors might use a stress debriefing model to address student-survivor and parent needs. The model uses a structured small group process consisting of seven stages. Looks at the school counselor's role in crisis debriefing, what should be accomplished prior to debriefing, and other strategies. (RJM)

  2. Educational Activities and the Role of the Parent in Homeschool Families with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dan; Gann, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Using a qualitative case study approach, this study looked at the educational activities that constitute a typical day in a homeschool family and the role that the parent has within those activities. Three homeschooling families with high school students in a single community in a southern state in the United States participated in the case study.…

  3. Parental, Behavioral, and Psychological Factors Associated with Cigarette Smoking among Secondary School Students in Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Mao, Rong; Stanton, Bonita; Zhao, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We designed this study to assess parental, behavioral, and psychological factors associated with tobacco use among Chinese adolescents. The data were collected from 995 middle school students in Nanjing, China. Both smoking experimentation and current smoking (smoking in the past 30 days) were assessed among the study sample. Psychosocial measures…

  4. Non-exposure parenting increases risk of bullying behavior in junior high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surilena Hasan

    2016-05-01

    Non-exposure parenting was the most relevant risk factor of bullying behavior. Low self-esteem increases the risk of bullying behavior. These findings suggest the need of timely bullying prevention and intervention programs that should have a special focus on families of primary high school students.

  5. Parent Assessments of Self-Determination Importance and Performance for Students with Autism or Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Cooney, Molly; Weir, Katherine; Moss, Colleen K.; Machalicek, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Fostering student self-determination is now considered an essential element of special education and transition services for children and youth with intellectual disability and/or autism. Yet, little is known about the pivotal role parents might play beyond the school campus in fostering self-determination among their children with developmental…

  6. Social Network to Support Parents and Teachers of Students with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Clarisse; Miranda, Guilhermina Lobato; Amaral, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze how the Social Software tools could respond to the needs of parents and teachers of students with multiple disabilities in improving their practices, as well as provide information and resources related to the topic of multiple disabilities. The study was implemented in Portugal and involved 45 participants: 25 special…

  7. Parental Alcohol Use, Family Relationship Quality, Self-Esteem, and Depression in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashubeck, Susan; Christensen, Sue A.

    1995-01-01

    Family relationship quality, not parental alcohol use, predicted levels of depression and self-esteem in 201 college students. Witnessing spousal abuse related to increased depression in adult children of alcoholics, whole poorer family relationship quality was associated with lower self-esteem, suggesting the experience of paternal alcoholism is…

  8. Pregnant and Parenting Students--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Bushmiaer, Margo; Desisto, Marie; Lambert, Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) believes that the school nurse is in a prime position to support the health and wellbeing of pregnant and parenting students and contribute to their lifelong success by linking them to resources and advocating for policies and practices that promote high school graduation. It is the position of NASN…

  9. Identity in University Students: The Role of Parental and Romantic Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Marisa; Cabral, Joana; Matos, Paula Mena

    2012-01-01

    In this study with 236 Portuguese university students, we examined two competing models for understanding identity. In the first model, the direct independent effects of parental and romantic attachment on identity were tested. The second model examined the mediating role of romantic attachment representations in the link between parental…

  10. Helping Your Teen-Age Student: What Parents Can Do To Improve Reading and Study Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Marvin

    This book is designed to teach parents the skills necessary to enable them to help their teenage children who are having study problems. The book covers a wide range of possible difficulties from basic reading problems to researching and writing a full-scale report. The book includes discussions of alibis students use to disguise poor study…

  11. Examining the Impact Parental Educational Attainment Has on Students' Perceptions of Residence Hall Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the impact parental educational attainment had on how students perceived their residence hall environment. This multi-campus study utilized the University Residence Environment Scale, along with a demographic form to gather data. The study occurred on three campuses during the Spring 2012 semester and had 347…

  12. Parent Assessments of Self-Determination Importance and Performance for Students with Autism or Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Cooney, Molly; Weir, Katherine; Moss, Colleen K.; Machalicek, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Fostering student self-determination is now considered an essential element of special education and transition services for children and youth with intellectual disability and/or autism. Yet, little is known about the pivotal role parents might play beyond the school campus in fostering self-determination among their children with developmental…

  13. School Engagement and Parental Involvement: The Case of Cross-Border Students in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Cheung, Alan C. K.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the mutual relationship between school engagement of cross-border students (CBS) from Malaysia in Singapore and parental involvement in education. Focus-group interviews were conducted with school personnel, CBS and their non-local counterparts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the…

  14. Bring Your Own Device to Secondary School: The Perceptions of Teachers, Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, David; Adhikar, Janak

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the first two years of a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiative in a New Zealand secondary school, using data derived from a series of surveys of teachers, parents and students, who are the main stakeholders in the transformation to a BYOD school. In this paper we analyse data gathered from these surveys, which consists…

  15. Parental Alcohol Use, Family Relationship Quality, Self-Esteem, and Depression in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashubeck, Susan; Christensen, Sue A.

    1995-01-01

    Family relationship quality, not parental alcohol use, predicted levels of depression and self-esteem in 201 college students. Witnessing spousal abuse related to increased depression in adult children of alcoholics, whole poorer family relationship quality was associated with lower self-esteem, suggesting the experience of paternal alcoholism is…

  16. Examining the Impact Parental Educational Attainment Has on Students' Perceptions of Residence Hall Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the impact parental educational attainment had on how students perceived their residence hall environment. This multi-campus study utilized the University Residence Environment Scale, along with a demographic form to gather data. The study occurred on three campuses during the Spring 2012 semester and had 347…

  17. Involving Immigrant Parents of Students with Disabilities in the Educational Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Suha; Gardner, Ralph, III

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the barriers that limit school participation by immigrant parents of students with disabilities, including language differences, lack of information, negative educational experiences, unfamiliarity with the U.S. educational practices, cultural differences, and differing views regarding involvement in schools. Strategies are…

  18. How Do Supports from Parents, Teachers, and Peers Influence Academic Achievement of Twice-Exceptional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Clare Wen; Neihart, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived external factors such as supports from parents and teachers, and influences from peers contributed to the academic successes and failures of Singaporean twice-exceptional (2e) students. A total of six 2e participants from one secondary school in Singapore voluntarily participated in the study. This study used…

  19. How Do Supports from Parents, Teachers, and Peers Influence Academic Achievement of Twice-Exceptional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Clare Wen; Neihart, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived external factors such as supports from parents and teachers, and influences from peers contributed to the academic successes and failures of Singaporean twice-exceptional (2e) students. A total of six 2e participants from one secondary school in Singapore voluntarily participated in the study. This study used…

  20. Predictors of Academic-Related Stress in College Students: An Examination of Coping, Social Support, Parenting, and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tara; Renk, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    This study examined potential predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. In particular, the relationships among the coping strategies used by college students, social support, the parenting style used by college students' mothers and fathers, college students' experience of anxiety, and academic-related stress were…

  1. Career Choice And College Students: Parental Influence on Career Choice Traditionalism among College Students in Selected Cities in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Sella Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the influence of parents on choosing career among college students in selected private colleges situated around Bahirdar City, Ethiopia. Choosing a suitable career is a vital part in every student’s life. Further, it ignites a person’s future life for his/her own job preference and life style. In this context, influence of social members is inevitable; generally the influence of family members and most particularly parents play a major role as an influencer and determiner o...

  2. Effects of Attendance at a New Zealand Residential School for Students with Emotional-Behavioural Difficulties: The Views of Former Students and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michael; Wilton, Keri

    2006-01-01

    Former students (34) of a residential school for students with emotional-behavioural difficulties, and their parents, were interviewed to determine their perceptions about the educational and social adjustment of the students. Following reintegration into mainstream schools, or work, the majority of the former students were reported as coping at…

  3. Preparing Students with Disabilities in an Urban School for Success in Supported and Competitive Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Valerie S.

    2010-01-01

    In schools that serve students with varying disabilities, community-based education has become an important element in preparing students for competitive and supported employment. Because of the constant change in demographics and the overall competitiveness of the job market, it is essential that schools are prepared to find ways of infusing…

  4. Preparing Students for College and Career: California Multiple Pathways. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Eric

    2009-01-01

    To prepare students for success in life, the twenty-first-century American high school needs to shift its focus from preparing for college or career to achieving college and career readiness for every student. One of the most comprehensive efforts towards this goal is the "multiple pathways" initiative in California, which is a reform…

  5. Pre-University Prepared Students: A Programme for Facilitating the Transition from Secondary to Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The expectations of first-year students are becoming more widely researched and understood. How to realign perceptions and prepare students for the transition from secondary school to tertiary education is less well considered. This paper presents an account of a pre-university preparation programme embedded in the senior years of secondary…

  6. Parental Support for Students Who Participate in High School Athletics: An Exploration of the Perceived Influence of Parents and Its Effect on Student Self-Efficacy and Academic Success

    OpenAIRE

    To, Daniel Ming Lui

    2017-01-01

    This mixed method study explored student athletes’ perception of parental influence in their high school athletic endeavours and how this perceived influence affected their self efficacy and academic success.   The quantitative data was derived from surveys that gauged student perceived parental involvement, self efficacy and academic success in two high schools in a large metropolitan school district in British Columbia. One of the schools was a school composed primarily of students of mid t...

  7. Latino Migrant Parent Influence on Latino Migrant Student University Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Migrant families have long been victims of their unusual lifestyle. High poverty conditions combined with constant mobility in search for agricultural work have contributed to their challenging lifestyle. As a result, Latino migrant students are among the least likely to graduate from high school and pursue a college degree. However, in spite of…

  8. PARENT AND PEER GROUP PRESSURES TOWARD DEVIANT STUDENT BEHAVIOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILL, ROBERT B.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS PROJECT WAS TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE FOLLOWING FOUR FACTORS, SIMULTANEOUSLY AND SEPARATELY, AFFECT THE RATES OF CHEATING AMONG 10TH GRADE STUDENTS--(1) INDIVIDUAL ROLE ADAPTATIONS, (2) PEER GROUP INFLUENCE, (3) SOCIAL CONTEXT, AND (4) FAMILY INFLUENCE. A PARADIGM (MERTON'S) THAT RELATES INDIVIDUAL ANOMIA, SOCIAL…

  9. Como Prepararse a Tiempo para la Universidad: Un Manual para los Padres de Alumnos que Cursan la Escuela Intermedia (Getting Ready for College Early: A Handbook for Parents of Students in the Middle and Junior High School Years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Planning, Budget, and Evaluation.

    This Spanish language booklet, also available in English, provides "los cuatro pasos"--four steps that parents and children can take to ensure that students properly prepare for college. Step one discusses why it is important to go to college; reasons include better job opportunities, more earning potential, and the increased variety of jobs one…

  10. Career Choice And College Students: Parental Influence on Career Choice Traditionalism among College Students in Selected Cities in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sella Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the influence of parents on choosing career among college students in selected private colleges situated around Bahirdar City, Ethiopia. Choosing a suitable career is a vital part in every student’s life. Further, it ignites a person’s future life for his/her own job preference and life style. In this context, influence of social members is inevitable; generally the influence of family members and most particularly parents play a major role as an influencer and determiner on choosing a career option. Students in Ethiopia are not exceptional to this phenomenon of selecting right and suitable career. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted and multi stage sampling technique was employed to identify the participants. Totally, 175 participants (Male=99 and (Female =76 responded to Holland Personality Inventory (Holland, 1997 and Career Choice Traditionalism Scale (Hensely, 2003. The collected data were statistically processed using SPSS version 16. Descriptive and inferential statistics was employed to analyze the data. The results revealed that there is a significant influence of parents on career choice among students. Specifically, father’s influence is found to be more significant on career choice decision making among students than their mothers.

  11. Child physical abuse - High school students' mental health and parental relations depending on who perpetrated the abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, D; Nordås, E; Pribe, G; Svedin, C G

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to contribute to the research of child physical abuse (CPA) by examining if there were any differences in high school students' mental health (in this study symptoms of depression and anxiety, self-esteem and sense of coherence) and/or, in how they perceive their parents, depending on whether or not they had been subjected to CPA during childhood. In addition, if high school students reported different mental health and/or, relationships with their parents, depending on if their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. A representative national sample of high school students (N=3288, data collected 2009) participated in the study. Participants completed the following: questions about CPA and alleged perpetrators, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Sense of Coherence Scale and Parental Bonding Instrument. The results showed students who reported experiences of CPA were more likely to report symptoms of mental illness and negative perceptions of their parents' parenting. However, there were no mental health differences depending on whether their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. Still, there were differences in perceived parenting indicating that mothers' parenting was perceived as more negative when mothers only or both parents were perpetrators of the abuse than when only fathers were perpetrators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital Divide: How Do Home Internet Access and Parental Support Affect Student Outcomes?

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    Jing Lei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between home Internet access/parental support and student outcomes. Survey data were collected from 1,576 middle school students in China. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, independent-samples T-test, and regression analysis. Results indicate that students who had home Internet access reported higher scores than those without home Internet on all three dimensions: Computer and Internet self-efficacy, Attitudes towards technology and Developmental outcomes. Home Internet access and parental support were significantly positively associated with technology self-efficacy, interest in technology, perceived importance of the Internet, and perceived impact of the Internet on learning. Findings from this study have significant implications for research and practice on how to narrow down the digital divide.

  13. Financial literacy among Turkish college students: the role of formal education, learning approaches, and parental teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akben-Selcuk, Elif; Altiok-Yilmaz, Ayse

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed financial literacy and its correlates among Turkish college students, with special emphasis on the role of formal education, learning approaches, and parental influences. Financial literacy was measured by the College Student Financial Literacy Survey, which assesses knowledge in four areas: general financial management, saving and borrowing, insurance, and investing. 853 Turkish university students were administered the survey (416 men, 437 women; M age = 20.3 yr., SD = 0.6). The mean percentage of correct responses was 45% (SD = 12.8%). Regression results showed that formal finance education in college, a deep approach to learning, and direct financial teaching by parents were significantly associated with higher financial literacy scores.

  14. Instrumental and expressive traits of the spanish community education: students, parents and teachers

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    Yolanda Rodríguez Castro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the expressive and instrumental traits of the Spanish Educational Community (students, teachers and parents and to determine whether fathers and mothers or teachers are who have the greatest infl uence in the transmission of stereotypes gender to students in secondary education. The sample were of teacher (n = 744, students (n = 1113 and their mothers and fathers (n = 917. The scales were administered: the Personal Attributes Questionnaire, PAQ (Spence et al., 1974. The results showed that women are being more expressive, whereas men are more Instrumental and Instrumental-Expressive. Furthermore, teachers are more expressive and more instrumental. This is that they are less stereotyped. Therefore, schools should involve parents in co-educational practices.

  15. Relationship Between the Parenting Styles and Students’ Educational Performance Among Iranian Girl High School Students, A Cross- Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Parivash; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parenting styles are effective in the educational performance of their child. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the parenting styles and students’ educational performance among Iranian girl high school students. Materials and Methods In a cross–sectional survey, female students in high schools of Ilam (Iran) evaluated during the academic year 2014-15. Multistage cluster random sampling was used to select the participants. Data were collected by two demographic and Baumrind’s parenting styles questionnaire. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was measured as an index of internal identicalness of the questionnaire to verify its reliability. Results: A total 400 students were studied. The Mean±SD of the students’ age were 14±1.08. The students’ school grades were the first year of high school to pre-university course. The Mean±SD of parenting styles were 35.37±5.8, 34.69±6.34 and 19.17±6.64 for permissive parenting style, authoritarian parenting style and authoritative parenting styles, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the score of permissive parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.151), authoritarian parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.343) and authoritative parenting style (p=0. 001, r= 0.261) with the students’ average score for studying. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that parental influence plays an important role in students’ educational performance. PMID:26813692

  16. Stigma toward schizophrenia among parents of junior and senior high school students in Japan

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    Yoshii Hatsumi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stigma toward schizophrenia is a substantial barrier to accessing care and adhering to treatment. Provisions to combat stigma are important, but in Japan and other developed countries there are few such provisions in place that target parents of adolescents. The attitudes of parents are important to address as first schizophrenic episodes typically occur in adolescence. In overall efforts to develop an education program and provisions against stigma, here we examined the relationship between stigma toward schizophrenia and demographic characteristics of parents of junior and senior high school students in Japan. The specific hypothesis tested was that contact and communication with a person with schizophrenia would be important to reducing stigma. A questionnaire inquiring about respondent characteristics and which included a survey on stigma toward schizophrenia was completed by 2690 parents. Results The demographic characteristics significantly associated with the Devaluation- Discrimination Measure were family income, occupation, presence of a neighbor with schizophrenia, and participation in welfare activities for people with mental illness (p Conclusions Stigma toward schizophrenia among parents of junior and senior high school students was in fact significantly stronger among members of the general public who had had contact with individuals with schizophrenia. In addition, stigma was associated with family income.

  17. Conceptions of parents of adolescent students about the sexuality of their children

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    Pollyanna de Siqueira Queirós

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the conceptions of parents of adolescent students about the sexuality of their children. Methods: it is a qualitative research modality Strategic Research, using focus groups guided by a semi structured instrument with 15 parents of adolescent students. The data were submitted to content analysis in which the following categories emerged: “Understanding aspects related to sexuality”; “Difficulties for dialogue”; “Facilities for dialogue”; and “The tasks of the family and the school to support the theme.” Results: parents had superficial knowledge and misconceptions on the subject. Great difficulty of dialogue between parents and children has been identified, justified by ignorance and timidity of parents and the lack of opening of the adolescent, still, there was recognition of family responsibility in this context. Conclusion: there is need for expansion of intersectoral work involving segments of the education, health and universities to support families with information about sexuality in the school context.

  18. Influence of parenting style on the academic performance of middle school students

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    María José Domínguez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Students who don't succeed in school are a persistent problem in our educational system. This fact shows that all the efforts to reduce this problem are not succeeding. One third of our students are left behind by the educational system; their results are discouraging. The measures to fight the academic failure are not working and that we have to put into practice new ways of analysis and treatment of this problem. This research explores the relationship between the way children perceive the parenting style of their parents and his o her own academic performance. In the intersection of both phenomena we find our hypothesis: the way parents socialise their children influences significantly on their academic performance. This research is orientated to decision taking process: the aim is to define the level of influence of the parenting style on academic outcomes. The main result is that parents acceptation/implication appears to be significantly linked to the school performance (this evidence shows a big area for new researches: the family. Our research confirms and frames the correlation between these two variables and underlies the family as a new scenario of pedagogical concern to explain and treat school failure.

  19. Small Voices, Big Impact: Preparing Students for Learning and Citizenship

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    Cody, Jennifer L.; McGarry, Lorraine S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, two teachers from a public school in the United States describe their beliefs about the importance of using student voice as a foundation for increasing student efficacy, recognizing student individuality, and addressing curriculum standards. Sharing examples from their classrooms, the authors illustrate how student voice can help…

  20. Programmatic-methodical providing of preparation of student commands on basketball

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    Troyan V.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic directions of perfection of sporting preparation of student team are considered on basketball. The terms of effective education of personality of student are selected. The positive and subzero aspects of forms of physical preparation of sportsmen are rotined. The ways of rational development and use of natural capabilities of sportsman are certain in his professional and public activity. It is presented programmatic-methodical providing of training process of student commands in the institutes of higher of Russia.

  1. Perceptions of nursing students' parents regarding the profession and their college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, U; Altuntas, S

    2011-06-01

    To ensure client satisfaction, it is important for all educational institutions to identify the characteristics of their clients and to consider their expectations and demands through quality studies. The study aims to identify the perceptions of parents of nursing students regarding the nursing profession and the related educational institution. The parents of all students attending the nursing school of a public Turkish university were included in the study. Following permission from the university management, questionnaires developed by the researchers in light of the related literature were sent to 474 parents via mail, and 133 completed questionnaires (28% response rate) were analysed statistically. Mothers of nursing students were mostly ≤45 years of age, primary school graduates and housewives, while fathers were ≥46 years of age, at least secondary school graduates, old-age pensioners or had an independent business. In general, the responding fathers and mothers preferred not to get involved in their children's choice of profession, perceiving nursing as a helpful and sacred profession. Therefore, they also recommended nursing to others and had no problems with the idea of male nurses. Study findings demonstrated that the parents had positive attitudes towards the nursing profession and were satisfied with the nursing college. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  2. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    had agreed to implement it, not because they appreciated its worth to students and their families. Altering candidate beliefs in one semester prior to student teaching proved difficult, especially when cooperating teachers were demonstrating and encouraging methodologies which were frowned upon during the science methods coursework. Therefore, this study also raised issues with teacher education and identified the need to better align educational philosophies taught throughout the program and those showcased by cooperating teachers if science education reform is to transpire. Teacher candidates very often abandoned the inquiry-based modes of instruction taught to them during the science methods course prior to student teaching and replaced them with ideas and suggestions from their cooperating teacher, approaches which were more traditional and teacher-centered. Cooperating teacher opinions and suggestions appeared to take precedence over what was taught and practiced during their preparation coursework. Candidates' prior beliefs and experiences with education appeared to dominate their teaching repertoire. The culmination of their own K-12 education and much of their undergraduate courses made altering their beliefs toward inquiry-based methodologies difficult during only one semester prior to student teaching. Therefore, all candidates reverted back to some level of teacher-centered, recipe-like science lessons and tasks. It was also noted that the candidates' understanding of hands-on versus inquiry learning was often blurred. Hands-on learning was often demonstrated and applauded by cooperating teachers, as well as parents, once they responded to Science in a Bag surveys and interviews, further supporting this misconception by praising hands-on learning and in some cases stating it was the way students learned best. Most parents were willing to and enjoyed performing these take-home family activities. Some of the most frequent parent comments related to family

  3. Parental bonding and attitudes toward suicide among medical college students in Japan

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    Hashimoto K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kojiro Hashimoto,1 Norio Sugawara,2 Osamu Tanaka,2 Kazuhiko Nakamura,1 Norio Yasui-Furukori1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori, Japan; 2Aomori Prefectural Center for Mental Health and Welfare, Aomori, Japan Background: Suicide is a grave public health issue that is responsible for a high mortality rate among individuals aged 15–44 years. Attitudes toward suicide among medical staff members have been associated with appropriate therapeutic responses to suicidal individuals. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of parental rearing on attitudes toward suicide among Japanese medical college students. Methods: We examined the association between parental bonding and attitudes toward suicide in 160 medical college students in Japan. The Parental Bonding Instrument was used to assess the attitudes and behaviors of parents. The attitudes toward suicide were evaluated using the Japanese version of the Attitudes Toward Suicide questionnaire. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 25.2±4.0 years old. The majority of the participants in our study agreed that anyone could commit suicide (88.8% and that suicide is preventable (86.3%. After adjusting for age and sex, multivariate regression analysis revealed that maternal care approached a statistically significant association with the “right to suicide” attitude. Under the same conditions, maternal care was shown to be significantly associated with the “common occurrence” attitude. No other significant relationships were observed between parental bonding and attitudes toward suicide.Conclusion: This study suggests that a higher level of maternal care ensures that children think that suicide occurs less commonly. The promotion of best practices for suicide prevention among medical students is needed. Child rearing support might be associated with suicide prevention.Keywords: attitudes toward suicide, Japanese, medical college

  4. Parental Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ezra S Simon

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted in Ghana to investigate, (1) factors that predict parental involvement, (2) the relationship between parental home and school involvement and the educational achievement of adolescents, (3) the relationship between parental authoritativeness and the educational achievement of adolescent students, (4) parental involvement serving as a mediator between their authoritativeness and the educational achievement of the students, and (5) whether parental involvement decreases...

  5. Medical Student Use of Facebook to Support Preparation for Anatomy Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D.; Bickerdike, Suzanne R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of Facebook to support students is an emerging area of educational research. This study explored how a Facebook Page could support Year 2 medical (MBChB) students in preparation for summative anatomy assessments and alleviate test anxiety. Overall, Facebook analytics revealed that in total 49 (19.8% of entire cohort) students posted a…

  6. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  7. Teacher Preparation to Deliver Inclusive Services to Students with Disabilities: TQ Connection Issue Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. Inclusion of students with disabilities in general education environments has a long history in special education law;…

  8. A Dual Approach to Fostering Under-Prepared Student Success: Focusing on Doing and Becoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Suzanne C.; Eshbach, Barbara E.; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    A paired course model for under-prepared college students incorporates a dual instructional approach, academic skill building and lifelong learning development, to help students do more academically and become stronger lifelong learners. In a reading support course, students improved their reading skills and applied them directly to the paired…

  9. Using Social Justice Vignettes to Prepare Students for Social Action Engagement

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    Burrell Storms, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    One of the learning goals for social justice education courses is to prepare students for social action engagement. Teaching students about issues related to social justice is complex. Prior studies have found a positive relationship between student enrollment in social justice education courses and action-oriented outcomes. While these findings…

  10. Linking Theory with Practice: A Longitudinal Analysis of Student Portfolios in Principal Preparation

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    Knoeppel, Robert; Logan, Joyce P.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation analyses five years of data from student portfolios required as part of a principal preparation programme. Portfolios serve as continuous student progress assessment from programme entry to exit, evaluation of each student's understanding and application of Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) and National…

  11. Assessing and Monitoring Student Progress in an E-Learning Personnel Preparation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyen, Edward L.; Aust, Ronald J.; Bui, Yvonne N.; Isaacson, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-learning in special education personnel preparation focuses on student assessment in e-learning environments. It includes a review of the literature, lessons learned by the authors from assessing student performance in e-learning environments, a literature perspective on electronic portfolios in monitoring student progress, and the…

  12. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  13. Preparing Students for Success in Hybrid Learning Environments with Academic Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel; Dickinson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes institutional and andragogical best practices for preparing students to succeed in hybrid courses through the programming of academic resource centers, offers information on how to create peer support systems for students, and outlines some of the common pitfalls for students encountering a hybrid course for the first time.

  14. Negotiating a new day: parents' contributions to supporting students' school functioning after exposure to trauma

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    Grell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Eline Grelland Røkholt,1 Jon-Håkon Schultz,2,3 Åse Langballe2 1Department of Allied Health, Bereavement Support Center, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, 2Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, 3Department of Education, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Abstract: Parents are advised to get their children back to school soon after exposure to trauma, so that they may receive social support and restore the supportive structure of everyday life. This study explores parents' experiences of supporting adolescents in regaining school functioning after the July 2011 massacre at Utøya summer camp in Norway. One year after the attack, 87 parents of 63 young people who survived the massacre were interviewed using qualitative interviews. The qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. All parents were actively supportive of their children, and described a demanding process of establishing new routines to make school attendance possible. Most parents described radical changes in their adolescents. The struggle of establishing routines often brought conflict and frustration into the parent–adolescent relationship. Parents were given general advice, but reported being left alone to translate this into action. The first school year after the trauma was described as a frustrating and lonely struggle: their adolescents were largely unable to restore normal daily life and school functioning. In 20% of the cases, school–home relationships were strained and were reported as a burden because of poor understanding of needs and insufficient educational adaptive measures; a further 20% reported conflict in school–home relationships, while 50% were either positive or neutral. The last 10%, enrolled in apprenticeship, dropped out, or started working, instead of finishing school. Implications for supporting parents with traumatized adolescent students are indicated. Keywords

  15. Ready or not? Expectations of faculty and medical students for clinical skills preparation for clerkships

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    Marjorie Wenrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preclerkship clinical-skills training has received increasing attention as a foundational preparation for clerkships. Expectations among medical students and faculty regarding the clinical skills and level of skill mastery needed for starting clerkships are unknown. Medical students, faculty teaching in the preclinical setting, and clinical clerkship faculty may have differing expectations of students entering clerkships. If students' expectations differ from faculty expectations, students may experience anxiety. Alternately, congruent expectations among students and faculty may facilitate integrated and seamless student transitions to clerkships. Aims: To assess the congruence of expectations among preclerkship faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students for the clinical skills and appropriate level of clinical-skills preparation needed to begin clerkships. Methods: Investigators surveyed preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students early in their basic clerkships at a North American medical school that focuses on preclerkship clinical-skills development. Survey questions assessed expectations for the appropriate level of preparation in basic and advanced clinical skills for students entering clerkships. Results: Preclinical faculty and students had higher expectations than clerkship faculty for degree of preparation in most basic skills. Students had higher expectations than both faculty groups for advanced skills preparation. Conclusions: Preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students appear to have different expectations of clinical-skills training needed for clerkships. As American medical schools increasingly introduce clinical-skills training prior to clerkships, more attention to alignment, communication, and integration between preclinical and clerkship faculty will be important to establish common curricular agendas and increase integration of student learning. Clarification of skills

  16. The Decision to Home School Children; Primary Parental Motivators; Primary Student Motivators

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    Wade Clay Smith

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the USA the many parents decide to teach their children in their home. This paper explores the factors that influenced the parents’ and the students’ decisions to home school. The author conducted a series of one to one interviews with the parents and students seven factors were revealed. Once the interviews were completed and coded, each parent received a summary of her/his interview and de-identified summaries of all other interviews. Then as a group these areas of concern were discussed. The first result of these group discussions was the development of consensus definitions for the above factors and secondly an ordinal ranking of these defined factors was created.

  17. Using Technology To Prepare All Students for Success in Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin

    This paper discusses uses of TI-73 graphing calculators for middle school mathematics students. It indicates that with the appropriate use of the TI-73, students can develop understanding about variables and basic concepts of algebra, and explore mathematical topics. Background on middle school students' difficulties with those subjects is…

  18. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  19. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  20. Preparing Students for Flipped or Team-Based Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Peter; Clark, Michele; Restall, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching methods such as Flipped Learning and Team-Based Learning require students to pre-learn course materials before a teaching session, because classroom exercises rely on students using self-gained knowledge. This is the reverse to "traditional" teaching when course materials are presented during a lecture, and students are…

  1. Effect of Video Assisted Instruction on Parent, Teacher and Student Perceptions of a Quality 5th Grade Math Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Donald Roy

    2010-01-01

    This research has been conducted in response to struggling math students and parents who become frustrated while trying to help their student at home. A need remains for a treatment that can increase math success and lower the anxiety level associated with math. The rationale for this research is an attempt to increase students' math success by…

  2. Assessment of 6th Grade Elementary School Students, Their Parents' and Branch Teachers' Perspective on Physical Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Sirin; Ozbar, Nurper; Yetgin, Meral Kucuk; Koksalan, Burke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 437 volunteers including 54 teachers, 218 6th grade students and 102 parents from Beykoz Elementary Schools participated in this study to understand the perspectives of students, families and teachers on Physical Education classes. The perspectives of students, families and teachers of other branches are identified by survey method.…

  3. Parents' Socio-Economic Status as Predictor of Secondary School Students' Academic Performance in Ekiti State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu-Raheem, B. O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated parents' socio-economic status on secondary school students' academic performance in Ekiti State. Descriptive research design of the survey type was adopted. The population for the study comprised all Junior Secondary School students in Ekiti State. The sample consisted of 960 students from 20 secondary schools randomly…

  4. The effects of maternal parenting style and religious commitment on self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior among African-American parochial college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Beau; Carter, Kermit L; Winsler, Adam

    2009-04-01

    This study explored relations between religiosity, both parent and student, and maternal parenting style and student academic self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior among African-American youth attending a parochial college. Eighty-five students completed self-report survey measures of religiosity, self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior. Participants also completed youth report measures of parental religiosity and perceived maternal parenting style. Correlational analyses show authoritative parenting to be associated with high levels of academic performance and study skills. Additional correlations revealed that highly religious students tend to perform well academically, study better, and engage in fewer risk behaviors than youth less committed to religion. Although no direct relations were observed between parenting style and student religiosity, maternal parenting style was found to moderate relations between parental and student religiosity. Findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to the population studied.

  5. Should we tell Annie? Preparing for death at the intersection of parental authority and adolescent autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Erica K

    2013-01-01

    This case analysis examines the pediatric clinical ethics issues of adolescent autonomy and parental authority in medical decision-making. The case involves a dying adolescent whose parents request that the medical team withhold diagnosis and prognosis information from the patient. The analysis engages two related ethical questions: Should Annie be given information about her medical condition? And, who is the proper decision-maker in Annie's case? Ultimately, four practical recommendations are offered.

  6. Perceived parenting and separation-individuation in Belgian college students: associations with emotional adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhaye, Marie; Kempenaers, Chantal; Linkowski, Paul; Stroobants, Rob; Goossens, Luc

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined associations among perceived parenting, separation-individuation, and emotional adjustment in a convenience sample of college students in Belgium (N=350; 68% female; aged 18 to 26). In line with a conceptual model advanced in the literature, factor analysis supported the distinction between three dimensions of separation-individuation: overdependence and healthy separation (both of which had already been described in earlier research) and a new dimension, labeled excessive autonomy. Path analysis findings were consistent with a mediational model in which lower quality of perceived parenting predicted more excessive autonomy, which in turn predicted poorer emotional adjustment. In addition, healthy separation predicted superior emotional adjustment, whereas overdependence was not associated with this particular type of adjustment. Implications for current understanding of the process of separation-individuation in college students and of excessive autonomy, in particular, are discussed.

  7. Influence of parental education on Honduran medical students' labour perspectives: rural work and emigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Lysien I; Pereyra-Elías, Reneé; Reyes-García, Selvin Z; Fuentes, Itzel; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the intentions of Honduran medical students to emigrate or to work in a rural setting, and their association with parental education. We performed a cross-sectional, analytic study at a Honduran medical school. Student participants completed a structured questionnaire, which assessed their intentions to emigrate or work in a rural setting after finishing medical school and the highest level of education achieved by their parents. We calculated crude and adjusted prevalence ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals. Of 868 surveys distributed, 564 were completed. The mean age of the participants was 21 (standard deviation 3) years, and 62.2% were female. Of the respondents, 16.6% intended to emigrate to work and 11.2% intended to work in a rural setting. Higher paternal education (i.e., technical, university and postgraduate training) was associated with a higher rate of intention to emigrate. Students whose fathers underwent postgraduate education were less likely to intend to work in a rural setting. For maternal education, only the postgraduate level was associated with the outcomes in some of the tested models. The frequency of students intending to emigrate was relatively low. However, the frequency of students being willing to work in rural settings was also low. Students whose parents had higher levels of education were more likely to intend to work abroad and less likely to intend to work in a rural area. These factors should be considered in medical schools' selection processes to improve retention and ensure adequate distribution of physicians.

  8. Japanese Undergraduates' Attitudes Toward Students Survivors of Parental Suicide: A Comparison With Other Stigmatized Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Japanese undergraduates' attitudes toward a fellow student whose parent has died by suicide. One hundred thirty-four participants responded to four versions of a brief fictional case describing a male undergraduate whose father had died. These presented fictional cases described the cause of the death as being suicide, cancer, AIDS, or murder. Results indicated that participants had more negative attitudes toward the suicide survivor student than the nonstigmatized death (cancer) survivor. Further, results indicated that participants viewed suicide survivors as more to blame for the death and had a more negative image of them than of the other stigmatized death (AIDS and murder) survivors.

  9. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 14314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  10. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement. Working Paper 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  11. Math Achievement in Early Adolescence: The Role of Parental Involvement, Teachers' Behavior, and Students' Motivational Beliefs about Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levpuscek, Melita Puklek; Zupancic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Contributions of parental involvement in educational pursuits as well as math teachers' classroom behavior to students' motivation and performance in math were investigated. By the end of the first school term, 365 Slovene eighth graders reported on their parents' academic involvement (pressure, support, and help) and their math teachers' behavior…

  12. Perceived Parental Acculturation Behaviors and Control as Predictors of Subjective Well-Being in Arab American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hani M.; Stiles, William B.; Biran, Mia W.; Hinkle, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the relations of the well-being of college students whose parents immigrated to America from Arab countries with their perceptions of their parents' (a) acculturation behaviors (i.e., openness to the American culture and preservation of the Arab culture) and (b) control. Results indicate that the perceived acculturation…

  13. "If You Can Dream It, You Can Achieve It." Parent Memorable Messages as Indicators of College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranstuber, Haley; Carr, Kristen; Hosek, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated various aspects of parents' memorable messages about college as they relate to indicators of college student success. Findings revealed that parents' memorable messages about college focused on working (and playing) hard, the necessity of attending college, providing encouragement and support, and general advice based on…

  14. Influence of Perceived Parenting Styles: Goal Orientations and Career Aspirations of High School Science Students in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ravinder; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita; Poondej, Chanut

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable research interest into the relationship between the parenting styles of Asians, and student motivation and achievement. The investigation presented in this paper contributes to the literature in this area by examining the influence of perceived parenting style on goal orientations and career aspirations of a sample of…

  15. Housing Resources and Programs for Single Student Parents at Community and Technical Colleges. Fact Sheet #C396

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorman, Abby; Otto, Jessica; Gunn-Wright, Rhiana

    2012-01-01

    Parents with dependent children now make up almost one in four students pursuing higher education in the United States (Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011). Single parents face particular challenges pursuing higher education, including securing safe and affordable housing. Single mothers often must spend over half of their income on housing expenses,…

  16. The Status of Parental Notification Policy and Practice for Students Involved with Alcohol Abuse at a Private University in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaore, Augusta; Olaore, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Parental notification policies and practices have been found to reduce alcohol and drug use at universities in the United States of America. This study examined the status of parental notification policy and practice at a faith-based private university in Nigeria for students involved with alcohol use. The study revealed that the absence of a…

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, and acceptability of a human papilloma virus vaccine among students, parents and teachers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songthap, Archin; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Fungladda, Wijitr; Bussaratid, Valai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes about human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and the acceptability of HPV vaccine among students, parents and teachers in secondary schools in Bangkok, Thailand. We conducted a school-based cross-sectional study at four public secondary schools in Bangkok. A total of 644 students aged 12-15 years, 664 parents and 304 teachers were recruited into the study. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires. The percentages of students, parents and teachers who were willing to be vaccinated were 26, 49 and 43%, respectively. Forty-one percent of parents wanted their children to be vaccinated. Students, parents and teachers had a moderate knowledge of HPV, cervical cancer and the HPV vaccine with mean scores of 6.91 (SD = 1.75), 6.82 (SD = 1.88), and 6.70 (SD = 1.89), respectively. The attitudes of students, parents, and teachers were fair with scores of 3.46 (SD = 0.41), 3.52 (SD = 0.43), and 3.46 (SD = 0.47) out of 5, respectively. Twenty-nine percent of students and 36% of parents were willing to pay USD 14.3-28.5 per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine; 33% of teachers were willing to pay Thailand. The findings suggest the willingness to pay was relatively low and related to the price, while knowledge and attitudes regarding the importance of the HPV vaccine were fair particularly among parents and teachers. Greater effort may be needed to educate people regarding the cost and benefits of HPV vaccination before it would be more acceptable to parents, teachers and students in Thailand.

  18. [Elaboration enrich cereals gruels fast preparation for the students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭkov, V G; Bakumenko, O E; Doronin, A F

    2008-01-01

    Reviews results research on the appraisal actual mode of life and actual nutrition student's in the result established breach consumption organism important food substances - carbo-hydrates, fiber foods, vitamins and mineral substances. Establishment level intellectual, physical loading, bad habits, in the result that at the student's reviews oridin different diseases. Science basis need introduce in the retion student's food substances promoting foudation and preservation health.

  19. Preparing High School Students for the Interdisciplinary Nature of Modern Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Preparing students for the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology will require changes in curriculum, instruction, assessments, and teacher professional development in order to support teaching for conceptual understanding and for making cross-disciplinary connections.

  20. A Cavity Preparation Evaluation System in the Skill Assessment of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Huiru; Jin, Shufeng; Sun, Jianping; Dai, Yanmei

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a computerized, laser-scanning Cavity Preparation Skill Evaluation System (CPSES) with conventional teachers' eye-hand grading assessment of dental students' Class I cavity preparation evaluations. Thirty-eight cavity preparations of lower left first molars made by junior dental students at a dental school in China were tested from September 2013 to November 2014. The outline and retention form, smoothness, depth, wall angulation, and cavity margin index of the preparations were evaluated by CPSES and then by teachers' eye-hand grading. The mean difference in scores for each method was considered, as was the variability of scores within each method. Compared with the teachers' eye-hand grading method, CPSES provided objective evaluation results that had statistically significant differences (pcavity preparation skills and encourage students in their self-paced learning and independent practice.

  1. Psychological Well-being and Parenting Styles as Predictors of Mental Health among Students: Implication for Health Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad reza khodabakhsh; Fariba kiani; Soliman Ahmedbookani

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The lack of mental health interferes with one's individual achievement and ability for undertaking the responsibilities of everyday life. Researches show that psychological well-being and parenting styles have an important role in ones' increasing general health. The current study examined the relationship between psychological well-being and parenting styles with students' mental health. Methods: This study was carried out on 278 students (124 boys and 154 girls) of Boukan's hi...

  2. Using human simulation to prepare physical therapy students for acute care clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Nicki J; Panzarella, Karen J; Melzer, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The acute care setting requires a unique skill set for all health care providers, including Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. This study explores high-fidelity human simulation (HFHS) training in a DPT education program to achieve learning objectives specific to preparation of DPT students for acute care clinical practice. Twenty-three DPT students participated in a HFHS acute care experience, provided feedback about the learning experience, and completed a survey regarding preparedness for clinical practice. Student feedback was interpreted to gain content validity of the learning experience, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey results. In this pilot study, students identified four learning objectives met during the simulation experience: interprofessional communication, preparation of the treatment environment, patient safety, and discharge planning. Following the experience, 91.5% of the students reported more confidence in interprofessional communication, and 67% were more knowledgeable in discharge disposition. All students agreed that simulations should be part of the curriculum, and 95.2% reported simulation valuable in preparation for clinical practice. As a result of HFHS training in the DPT program, students' educational objectives were met, and simulation was deemed valuable in integrating prior learning and providing an enhanced understanding of the acute care setting. The findings support continued investigation of the effectiveness of simulation to prepare DPT students for acute care clinical practice.

  3. Preparing Students for a Diverse Workplace: Strategies to Improve Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Deana; Dail, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The curriculum for kinesiology students typically includes foundation courses focused on the scientific principles underlying human movement. Modifications for gender, age, and physical ability are also commonly included in these courses. Rarely addressed, however, are students' dispositions toward diverse groups. This article examines several…

  4. Preparation for Computer Usage in Social Work: Student Consumer Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurius, Paula S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of students in a large master's program in social work investigated student training in and experience with computers and attitudes about computer applications for human service activities. The value of the findings in curriculum planning, practica development, computer resources management, and faculty and agency involvement are…

  5. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  6. Reflective Ethical Inquiry: Preparing Students for Life. IDEA Paper #54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualters, Donna M.; McDaniels, Melissa; Cohen, Perrin

    2013-01-01

    Although universities often teach ethics courses, they do not always teach students how to apply ethical course content to ethical dilemmas they encounter on a day-to-day basis. The Awareness-Investigation-Responding (AIR) model of ethical inquiry bridges this gap by scaffolding the reflective process and empowering students to make more caring,…

  7. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  8. How IELTS Preparation Courses Support Students: IELTS and Academic Socialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanxian; Badger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IELTS scores are widely used in combination with academic results as a way of judging whether non-English background students should be admitted to degree-level courses in Anglophone contexts. However, successful study at university requires more than language competence and intellectual ability and international students often seem to start from…

  9. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

  10. Engaging Diverse Students Through International Collaboration and Professional Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feineman, M. D.; Nyblade, A.; Webb, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The AfricaArray-Bushveld REU is a partnership between the Pennsylvania State University and the University of the Witwatersrand. The primary goal is to engage a diverse cohort of students in international scientific collaboration through a program of training, field work, and laboratory and/or computational analysis. At least 50% of the student participants each year are from under-represented minorities. Students spend 2-3 weeks at Penn State, then 3 weeks in South Africa, followed by another 2-3 weeks in the US. The introductory 2-3 week session at Penn State is devoted to ethics and safety training, the human history, culture, and geologic history of South Africa, and Earth Science Literacy. Upon arriving in South Africa, the students are placed into field groups with students, post-docs, and faculty from Wits and other African nations participating in the AfricaArray Geophysics Field School. Each disciplinary group includes at least 1 mentor from the US and 1 from South Africa. Students spend time collecting rock samples for geochemical analysis, installing and servicing seismometers, and/or collecting data from the shallow subsurface using a variety of geophysical techniques. All students attend lectures by faculty at Wits, receive training in proper use and maintenance of scientific instrumentation, and interact with industry representatives. The culmination of this part of the REU is a day of oral presentations, where all students (REU and AfricaArray Geophysics Field School) share their experiences and data. After returning to the US, students engage in geochemical analysis, processing of seismic data, and modeling geophysical data. In addition to faculty mentors, the students work closely with graduate students and post-docs. All participate in mentor-led discussions about future career paths and graduate school options. As a capstone to the REU, each student writes a conference abstract and gives a poster presentation of their research. Each abstract

  11. What do Parents Teach their Children? – The Effects of Parental Involvement on Student Performance in Dutch Compulsory Education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabus, Sofie; Ariës, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Theory and evidence indicate that, if family size grows, the younger children will get less parental involvement than the older children. These differences in parental involvement through birth order may impact academic achievement if, and only if, parental involvement is an important determinant of

  12. What do Parents Teach their Children? – The Effects of Parental Involvement on Student Performance in Dutch Compulsory Education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabus, Sofie; Ariës, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Theory and evidence indicate that, if family size grows, the younger children will get less parental involvement than the older children. These differences in parental involvement through birth order may impact academic achievement if, and only if, parental involvement is an important determinant of

  13. The Cheer Study to Reduce BMI in Elementary School Students: A School-Based, Parent-Directed Study in Framingham, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Elissa A.; Bishop, Marilyn; O'Connell, Anne; Hugo, Beverly; Isern, Germinal; Timm, Alison; Ozonoff, Al; Geller, Alan C.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity may be lessened by parent-focused interventions. A pilot parent-directed trial with 46 parents of overweight and obese elementary school students was conducted at two ethnically diverse public schools in Framingham, Massachusetts. Parents were randomly assigned to either the Materials Group, which received mailed educational…

  14. Preparing Students with Learning Disabilities for Large-Scale Writing Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Colwell, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for teachers to better prepare 3rd through 12th grade students with learning disabilities for large-scale writing assessments. The variation across large-scale writing assessments and the multiple needs of struggling writers indicate the need for test preparation to be embedded within a comprehensive,…

  15. Preparing School Personnel to Assist Students with Life-Threatening Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Genevieve H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of and preparation for life-threatening food allergies will enable school personnel to better respond to students who have severe allergic reactions. Given the high incidence of food-related anaphylaxis in public places, teachers and school personnel should be aware of and prepared to handle severe food allergy reactions. (SM)

  16. Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Peggy; Warde, Beverly; Rody, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Given federal mandates, public school districts have adopted inclusive practices with the expectation that general education teachers can accommodate students with disabilities. For teacher preparation programs to prepare future teachers for this reality, it is important to understand the composition of a "typical" general education…

  17. How Well Does A-Level Mathematics Prepare Students for the Mathematical Demands of Chemistry Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    332 undergraduate chemistry students were surveyed in order to establish whether they had found A-level Mathematics and/or Further Mathematics to be good preparation for their degree. Perceptions of both subjects were found to be positive, with more than 80% of participants describing Mathematics or Further Mathematics as good preparation. In…

  18. The Impact of Preparing Faculty in the Effective Use of Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Mark E.; Matkin, Gina S.; Gambrell, Kem M.; Harding, Heath E.

    2010-01-01

    Companies increasingly rely on teams to improve productivity, and consequently employers expect colleges and universities to prepare graduates to effectively work in teams. To help with this need, instructors must be equipped to prepare students to fully capitalize on the power of teamwork. This study examines the effect of college instructor…

  19. Teaching Students with Disabilities: A Web-Based Examination of Preparation of Preservice Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer; O'Neill, Sue; Carter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    With increasing expectations that preservice teachers will be prepared to teach students with special needs in regular classrooms, it is timely to review relevant units in teacher education courses. Units relevant to special education/inclusion in primary undergraduate teacher preparation courses in Australian tertiary institutions, delivered in…

  20. Preparing Your Students for Careers in Science and Engineering: How Is Your State Doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Cottle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    With one glance at the starting salaries of new bachelor's degree recipients in Fig. 1, a teacher or parent can see the career fields to which their high school students interested in the best economic opportunities might aspire: several engineering fields (chemical, electrical, mechanical), computer science, physics, and mathematics.

  1. Aggression, alcohol dependency, and self-consciousness among high school students of divorced and nondivorced parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, M; Beer, J

    1992-08-01

    134 high school students from a small high school in north central Kansas completed the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale, Fenigstein, et al.'s Self-consciousness Scale, and Zaks' Aggression Scale. Analyses of variance showed significant differences between boys and girls but not among grades. On the aggression and alcohol measures boys scored higher than girls, but lower on public self-consciousness. Youth of divorced parents scored significantly higher than those of nondivorced parents on aggression, private self-consciousness, and general self-consciousness. Aggression scores were significantly and positively correlated with those on the alcohol and private self-consciousness scales. When students' alcoholism scores indicate problems with alcohol, their scores on aggression indicate greater aggression and their private self-consciousness scores indicate sensitivity toward events in their environment, then having concerns about inner self can inhibit the action required for change. MacAndrew scores correlated significantly and negatively with scores on social anxiety about self-consciousness. When MacAndrew scores indicated problems with alcohol, the students' scores on social anxiety about self-consciousness suggested confidence in social settings, being at ease interacting with people. The present study involved students from a single rural district so increased understanding will require more extensive research if strategies for prevention and intervention are to be developed and utilized.

  2. First-Time Parents Are Not Well Enough Prepared for the Safety of Their Infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E.J. van Scholing-van Beelen (Mirjam); T.M.J. Beirens (Tinneke); P. den Hertog (Paul); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); H. Raat (Hein)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Unintentional falls and poisonings are major causes of death and disability among infants. Although guidelines are available to prevent these injuries, safety behaviours are not performed by parents, causing unnecessary risks. Little is known about safety behaviours of first-

  3. The World Ahead: Black Parents Prepare Their Children for Pride and Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Presents interviews with Blacks about past experiences with racial discrimination and the impact of integration and prejudice on their children. Discusses the importance of parental guidance in teaching young Blacks about their cultural heritage and how to cope with prejudice and discrimination. (SA)

  4. Effect of Chinese Parental Practices on Their Adolescent Children's School Performance, Moderated by Student's Conformity to Parents, Self-Esteem, and Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuh-Ling; Peterson, Gary

    This study examined how parental practices in mainland China influence adolescents' school performance, including school motivation and grade point average (GPA), when moderated by self-esteem and self-efficacy. Participating in the study were 497 students, ranging in age from 12 to 19 years, attending six public junior and senior high schools.…

  5. Psychological Well-being and Parenting Styles as Predictors of Mental Health among Students: Implication for Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad reza khodabakhsh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The lack of mental health interferes with one's individual achievement and ability for undertaking the responsibilities of everyday life. Researches show that psychological well-being and parenting styles have an important role in ones' increasing general health. The current study examined the relationship between psychological well-being and parenting styles with students' mental health. Methods: This study was carried out on 278 students (124 boys and 154 girls of Boukan's high schools. The participants were asked to complete psychological well-being inventory and mental health parenting style questionnaire. Data was analyzed using of Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis. Results: The results showed that psychological well-being and authoritative parenting styles were significantly related with mental health; also, Permissive parenting styles has significant positive relationship with mental health. The regression analysis indicated that mental health is predictable by psychological well-being and parenting styles. Conclusion: The knowledge of parenting styles and psychological well-being and their relationships with general well-being can provide the significant implications on the provision of students' health. Parenting styles and psychological well-being, as significant variables in general well-being, needs more clinical research.

  6. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  7. Preparing Graduates for Work in the Creative Industries: A Collaborative Learning Approach for Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of collaborative learning strategies in higher education is growing as educators seek better ways to prepare students for the workplace. In design education, teamwork and creativity are particularly valued; successful collaborative learning depends on knowledge sharing between students, and there is increasing recognition that…

  8. Preparing Attitude Scale to Define Students' Attitudes about Environment, Recycling, Plastic and Plastic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Cagri; Aydinli, Bahattin; Bakar, Fatma; Alboga, Yunus

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce an attitude scale in order to define students? attitudes about environment, recycling, plastics, plastic waste. In this study, 80 attitude sentences according to 5-point Likert-type scale were prepared and applied to 492 students of 6th grade in the Kastamonu city center of Turkey. The scale consists of…

  9. Moving toward a Global Community: An Analysis of the Internationalization of Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Scott Andrew; Lee, Jenny J.; Cantwell, Brendan; McClellan, George; Woodard, Dudley B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Student affairs could potentially play a vital role in the internationalization of colleges and universities, but the extent to which international issues are included in the preparation of future student affairs administrators has remained relatively unknown. As such, a team of researchers sought to investigate the extent of internationalization…

  10. Tour Guide Robots: An Integrated Research and Design Platform to Prepare Engineering and Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting research and design questions occur at the intersections of traditional disciplines, yet most coursework and research programs for undergraduate engineering students are focused on one discipline. This leads to underutilization of the potential in better preparing students through multidisciplinary projects. Identifying this…

  11. Supporting Students' Preparation for the Viva: Their Pre-Conceptions and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the pre-conceptions of doctoral students about the final examination, the viva voce and hence there is a shortage of evidence to underpin activities designed to prepare them for this experience. The present paper, which is based upon data from a wide range of focus groups of pre-viva students, seeks to…

  12. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  13. Curriculum Type and Sophomore Students' Preparation Time for the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Boyd F.; Cariaga-Lo, Liza

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen medical students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum reported that on average they spent twice as much time preparing for step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination as did 52 students in the traditional lecture-based curriculum at the same school. Different learning approaches were also employed. (SLD)

  14. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…

  15. Listening, Grammar, Reading, Writing: Preparing Foreign Students for English and the TOEFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Mary Ellen; Pyle, Michael A.

    The Santa Fe Community College (Gainesville, Florida) offers courses to prepare students for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The two classes--one intermediate and one advanced--meet three times a week for three hours each session. Grammar explanations are presented during the first two classes each week, and students are offered…

  16. Preparing Graduates for Work in the Creative Industries: A Collaborative Learning Approach for Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of collaborative learning strategies in higher education is growing as educators seek better ways to prepare students for the workplace. In design education, teamwork and creativity are particularly valued; successful collaborative learning depends on knowledge sharing between students, and there is increasing recognition that…

  17. Preparing Students in Foster Care for Emancipation, Employment, and Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Tracey G.

    2015-01-01

    Students preparing to emancipate from the foster care system face multiple challenges. For many formerly fostered teens, outcomes are relatively poor. Others have shown incredible resilience in the face of adversity. School psychologists can help address obstacles to postsecondary success for students living in foster care preventively while they…

  18. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MetLife, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers" was conducted by Harris Interactive and is the twenty-seventh in a series sponsored annually by MetLife since 1984 to give voice to those closest to the classroom. This MetLife Survey examines the priority that all students graduate from high school prepared…

  19. An analysis of high-performing science students' preparation for collegiate science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Karen

    This mixed-method study surveyed first year high-performing science students who participated in high-level courses such as International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), and honors science courses in high school to determine their perception of preparation for academic success at the collegiate level. The study used 52 students from an honors college campus and surveyed the students and their professors. The students reported that they felt better prepared for academic success at the collegiate level by taking these courses in high school (pstudent GPA with honors science courses (n=55 and Pearson's r=-0.336), while AP courses (n=47 and Pearson's r=0.0016) and IB courses (n=17 and Pearson's r=-0.2716) demonstrated no correlation between perception of preparation and GPA. Students reported various themes that helped or hindered their perception of academic success once at the collegiate level. Those themes that reportedly helped students were preparedness, different types of learning, and teacher qualities. Students reported in a post-hoc experience that more lab time, rigorous coursework, better teachers, and better study techniques helped prepare them for academic success at the collegiate level. Students further reported on qualities of teachers and teaching that helped foster their academic abilities at the collegiate level, including teacher knowledge, caring, teaching style, and expectations. Some reasons for taking high-level science courses in high school include boosting GPA, college credit, challenge, and getting into better colleges.

  20. Effectively Preparing College Bound Students for College-Level Mathematics: University Math Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Visit with any university math faculty member throughout the United States, and you will soon hear how the freshman students are not prepared to be successful in introductory college algebra classes. The opinions are varied regarding why the students are unsuccessful; however, the concern and frustration is universal. According to American College…

  1. Internationalising the Student Experience: Preparing Instructors to Embed Intercultural Skills in the Curriculum

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    Mak, Anita S.; Kennedy, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The Internationalising the Student Experience Project was devised and piloted as a teaching innovation to improve the intercultural awareness of instructors and, subsequently, that of their domestic and international students. In this article we claim that instructor preparation in the use of the Alliance Building and Cultural Mapping tools of the…

  2. Tour Guide Robots: An Integrated Research and Design Platform to Prepare Engineering and Technology Students

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    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting research and design questions occur at the intersections of traditional disciplines, yet most coursework and research programs for undergraduate engineering students are focused on one discipline. This leads to underutilization of the potential in better preparing students through multidisciplinary projects. Identifying this…

  3. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

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    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…

  4. Preparation for Full Time Employment: A Capstone Experience for Students in Leadership Programs

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    Gifford, Gregory T.; Cannon, Karen J.; Stedman, Nicole L.; Telg, Ricky W.

    2011-01-01

    This practice paper describes the development and implementation of a senior capstone course for communication and leadership development for undergraduate students. The resulting course is a unique combination of experiential skill development and career preparation. The success of this course provides students with an important and meaningful…

  5. System for Preparing High School Learners and Students for Self-Education.

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    Rudzitis, Guntis

    2000-01-01

    Presents advice on how to promote student self-learning. Finds that it can be achieved by using specially prepared didactic material, specific recommendations for intellectual work, and general techniques of self-education in independent student work. (Author/CCM)

  6. Participation of Parents of Elementary School Students in their Children’s Academic Activities

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    Ángel Alberto Valdés Cuervo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the degree of parental involvement in the educational activities of elementary school children in the State of Yucatán. Based on the opinion of experts and references in the relevant literature, a Likert-type scale with 36 items was designed and applied to 106 parents of students at a public elementary school in the city of Mérida, capital of the state of Yucatan, in order to evaluate their involvement. The results show that the scale has an acceptable reliability coefficient (Cronbach’s alpha = .92 and its underlying structure, after a factor analysis with varimax rotation, consists of three unit factors: 1 Communication with the school; 2 Communication with the child, and 3 Knowledge of the school. Generally, the results show that parent involvement in children’s educational activities is low or precarious, especially in regard to the factors of Communication and Knowledge of the school, although mothers have a considerably higher level of involvement than fathers in these factors. The implications of these findings for the school as well as for research on parental participation in the educational process are discussed in light of the results.

  7. Perceived parenting and social support: can they predict academic achievement in Argentinean college students?

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    de la Iglesia, Guadalupe; Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustin; Fernández Liporace, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the ability to predict academic achievement through the perception of parenting and social support in a sample of 354 Argentinean college students. Their mean age was 23.50 years (standard deviation =2.62 years) and most of them (83.3%) were females. As a prerequisite for admission to college, students are required to pass a series of mandatory core classes and are expected to complete them in two semesters. Delay in completing the curriculum is considered low academic achievement. Parenting was assessed taking into account the mother and the father and considering two dimensions: responsiveness and demandingness. Perceived social support was analyzed considering four sources: parents, teachers, classmates, and best friend or boyfriend/girlfriend. Path analysis showed that, as hypothesized, responsiveness had a positive indirect effect on the perception of social support and enhanced achievement. Demandingness had a different effect in the case of the mother as compared to the father. In the mother model, demandingness had a positive direct effect on achievement. In the case of the father, however, the effect of demandingness had a negative and indirect impact on the perception of social support. Teachers were the only source of perceived social support that significantly predicted achievement. The pathway that belongs to teachers as a source of support was positive and direct. Implications for possible interventions are discussed.

  8. Financial socialization of first-year college students: the roles of parents, work, and education.

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    Shim, Soyeon; Barber, Bonnie L; Card, Noel A; Xiao, Jing Jian; Serido, Joyce

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional study tests a conceptual financial socialization process model, specifying four-levels that connect anticipatory socialization during adolescence to young adults' current financial learning, to their financial attitudes, and to their financial behavior. A total of 2,098 first-year college students (61.9% females) participated in the survey, representing a diverse ethnic group (32.6% minority participation: Hispanic 14.9%, Asian/Asian American 9%, Black 3.4%, Native American 1.8% and other 3.5%). Structural equation modeling indicated that parents, work, and high school financial education during adolescence predicted young adults' current financial learning, attitude and behavior, with the role played by parents substantially greater than the role played by work experience and high school financial education combined. Data also supported the proposed hierarchical financial socialization four-level model, indicating that early financial socialization is related to financial learning, which in turn is related to financial attitudes and subsequently to financial behavior. The study presents a discussion of how the theories of consumer socialization and planned behavior were combined effectively to depict the financial development of young adults. Several practical implications are also provided for parents, educators and students.

  9. Usage of Web Service in Mobile Application for Parents and Students in Binus School Serpong

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    Karto Iskandar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A web service is a service offered by a device electronically to communicate with other electronic device using the World wide web. Smartphone is an electronic device that almost everyone has, especially student and parent for getting information about the school. In BINUS School Serpong mobile application, web services used for getting data from web server like student and menu data. Problem faced by BINUS School Serpong today is the time-consuming application update when using the native application while the application updates are very frequent. To resolve this problem, BINUS School Serpong mobile application will use the web service. This article showed the usage of web services with XML for retrieving data of student. The result from this study is that by using web service, smartphone can retrieve data consistently between multiple platforms. 

  10. A Dual Approach to Fostering Under-Prepared Student Success: Focusing on Doing and Becoming

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    Suzanne C. Shaffer, MsEd, MEd

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A paired course model for under-prepared college students incorporates a dual instructional approach, academic skill building and lifelong learning development, to help students do more academically and become stronger lifelong learners. In a reading support course, students improved their reading skills and applied them directly to the paired content course. They also developed lifelong learning attributes through increased self-knowledge (using the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory, reflection, and coaching. Students showed significant gains in lifelong learning, an 85% success rate in the paired content course, and a higher retention rate than students outside the project with similar SAT critical reading scores.

  11. Preparing the Field for Feasibility Testing of a Parenting Intervention for War-Affected Mothers in Northern Uganda.

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    Wieling, Elizabeth; Mehus, Christopher; Yumbul, Cigdem; Möllerherm, Julia; Ertl, Verena; Laura, Achan; Forgatch, Marion; Neuner, Frank; Catani, Claudia

    2015-10-26

    In this article, we discuss the successful implementation of an adapted evidence-based parenting intervention for families affected by two decades of war in Northern Uganda. The adaptation and adoption of such interventions to support mental health and family functioning is widely endorsed by prevention scientists and considered a priority in global mental health. The preparation and early adoption phases of engaging with a highly vulnerable community affected by war trauma are documented in this paper along with a discussion of the steps taken to adapt a parenting intervention for cultural and contextual fit. This study is a component of an overall program of research aimed at reducing the long-term negative effects of war on parenting practices and childhood outcomes, which have considerable implications for preventing mental, neurological, and substance-use disorders. The processes described here cover a 4-year period culminating in the implementation of the nine-session Enhancing Family Connection intervention piloted with a group of 14 mothers. The lessons in cultural adaptation have been valuable and the feasibility results promising for further testing the intervention.

  12. Exploring the meaning of parental involvement in physical education for students with developmental disabilities.

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    An, Jihoun; Hodge, Samuel R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to explore the experiences and meaning of parental involvement in physical education from the perspectives of the parents of students with developmental disabilities. The stories of four mothers of elementary aged children (3 boys, 1 girl), two mothers and one couple (mother and father) of secondary-aged youth (1 girl, 2 boys) with developmental disabilities, were gathered by using interviews, photographs, school documents, and the researcher's journal. Bronfenbrenner's (2005) ecological system theory provided a conceptual framework to interpret the findings of this inquiry. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis: being an advocate for my child, understanding the big picture, and collaborative partnerships undeveloped in GPE. The findings lend additional support to the need for establishing collaborative partnerships in physical education between home and school environments (An & Goodwin, 2007; Tekin, 2011).

  13. Meanings of family under the perspective of parents of adolescent students

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    Francisca Georgina Macedo de Sousa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the meanings of family according to parents of adolescent students. A qualitative research conducted with nine parents of adolescents from a public school, Maranhão, Brazil. Data collection occurred through unstructured interview from February to April 2011, and were submitted to thematic content analysis. Eight themes emerged: Structure, values and meanings of family; Roles and functions of family members; Family and school; Family dynamics and the health-disease process in the family; Affective bonds and family relationships; Strategies for family functioning; Feelings and support network; Adolescence and the adolescent in the family. The meanings of family overtook consanguinity, extending to friendship, solidarity and affection in a dynamic relationship that involves dialogue, affection, love and responsibility.

  14. Developing Research-Ready Skills: Preparing Early Academic Students for Participation in Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Morris, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Engaging lower-division undergraduates in research experiences is a key but challenging aspect of guiding talented students into the geoscience research pipeline. UNAVCO conducted a summer internship program to prepare first and second year college students for participation in authentic, scientific research. Many students in their first two years of academic studies do not have the science content knowledge or sufficient math skills to conduct independent research. Students from groups historically underrepresented in the geosciences may face additional challenges in that they often have a less robust support structure to help them navigate the university environment and may be less aware of professional opportunities in the geosciences.UNAVCO, manager of NSF's geodetic facility, hosted four students during summer 2015 internship experience aimed to help them develop skills that will prepare them for research internships and skills that will help them advance professionally. Students spent eight weeks working with UNAVCO technical staff learning how to use equipment, prepare instrumentation for field campaigns, among other technical skills. Interns also participated in a suite of professional development activities including communications workshops, skills seminars, career circles, geology-focused field trips, and informal interactions with research interns and graduate student interns at UNAVCO. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges of engaging students early in their academic careers and outline the unique role such experiences can have in students' academic careers.

  15. Role of parents in literature education among secondary school students: Poetic appreciation as focus

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    Daniel, I.O.A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to investigate what makes poetic appreciation an unpopular task among students of secondary school, with particular reference to the role of parents and the home. A questionnaire was administered and data collected from two secondary schools in Ibadan. The result was analysed using mean, frequency count, and rank scale. It was found that linguistic difficulties and book scarcity are the major factors the students identified as hindrances to their positive development of poetic appreciation skills. The source of these two problems was traced to the home background of the students. It was therefore suggested that students could be helped to improve on their literary appreciation skills through the right linguistic exposure at home by giving students good grounding in their L1. This would facilitate rather than hinder their proper development of poetic appreciation skills, if properly handled. Moreover, improving the economic condition of Nigerian homes would enable students afford the needed books to be better literary scholars. All which should eventually lead to the production of better citizens, who would positively impact the attainment of the national agenda.

  16. Preparing for Distance Learning: Designing An Online Student Orientation Course

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    Diane D. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the analysis undertaken to design a 1-credit-hour online orientation course for students new to online learning. An instructional design team, as a part of an advanced instructional design course, worked with a university-based client. The client identified specific problem areas encountered by novice students of online courses and the team designed a comprehensive program to meet those needs. Analysis of the data revealed surprising differences in expectations between instructors of online courses and their students of what an orientation to online learning should include. The team also conducted a task analysis to aid in further identifying the skills, knowledge and attitudes required by students for success in online courses. Findings indicated that there is a need for online learners to understand the time commitment required of an online course and possess or develop strong time management skills. Because of small sample size, results cannot be generalized beyond the respondents. The authors found a mismatch in the perception of instructor technical skills versus student technical skill. Based on their findings, the paper provides recommendations on the appropriate design, development and implementation of an orientation to online learning.

  17. Student Perception of Online Learning in ESL Bilingual Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Mayra C.; Schumacher, Gail; Stelter, Nicole; Riley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies are changing delivery options for post-graduate teacher education. Many practicing teachers who return to school to prepare to educate English learners choose distance learning. This article explores teachers' perceived satisfaction with the quality of online courses, with the collaborative tasks required in these, and the…

  18. Engaging Students in Career Planning and Preparation through Ementoring

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    Kinkel, Doreen H.

    2011-01-01

    Following a developmental model of career planning and preparation, an ementoring program was devised for first semester freshmen to (1) heighten career awareness and stimulate career exploration in food and agricultural sciences; (2) expand interest and willingness to follow career opportunities beyond the regional geographic area; and (3)…

  19. Parent Perceptions of the Anticipated Needs and Expectations for Support for Their College-Bound Students with Asperger's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Sansosti, Frank J.; Hadley, Wanda M.

    2009-01-01

    Many students with Asperger's Syndrome have the cognitive ability and specific interests to be successful academically at the college level. However, these students often have difficulties navigating social systems, and higher education presents great challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore parent perceptions regarding the: (a)…

  20. A Growth Status Measurement Pilot in Four Calgary Area Schools: Perceptions of Grade 5 Students and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. Cyne T.; McNeil, Deborah A.; Best, Maureen; MacLeod, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Reliable measures of growth in children are necessary for planning and evaluating obesity prevention programs. Currently, measured growth data are unavailable in Calgary for school-age children. This single sample, cross-sectional study included Grade 5 students and their parents. Height and weight measurements of 305 students (68% of those…