WorldWideScience

Sample records for preparing future faculty

  1. The Relationships between Faculty Preparation Programs and Teaching Assistant Development Programs. Preparing Future Faculty. Occasional Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Stacey Lane

    This paper examines the relationship between teaching assistant (TA) development programs and faculty preparation programs, the commonalities between the two types of program, and the issues to be considered when making the transition from the former to the latter. It notes that many institutions adopted TA training programs in the 1980s in…

  2. The Perceived Benefits of a Preparing Future Faculty Program and Its Effect on Job Satisfaction, Confidence, and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurgler, Emily; VanHeuvelen, Jane S.; Rohrman, Shawna; Loehr, Annalise; Grace, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    The training of effective instructors and future faculty members is a critical component of doctoral programs in sociology. Many universities and departments have instituted a single course, course sequence, or certification program dedicated to the preparation of future academic faculty. This article evaluates the efficacy of one such program,…

  3. Integrating Research, Teaching and Learning: Preparing the Future National STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, E. J.; Pfund, C.; Mathieu, R.

    2010-08-01

    A network of universities (Howard, Michigan State, Texas A&M, University of Colorado at Boulder, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Vanderbilt) have created a National Science Foundation-funded network to prepare a future national STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) faculty committed to learning, implementing, and advancing teaching techniques that are effective for the wide range of students enrolled in higher education. The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL; http://www.cirtl.net) develops, implements and evaluates professional development programs for future and current faculty. The programs comprise graduate courses, internships, and workshops, all integrated within campus learning communities. These elements are unified and guided by adherence to three core principles, or pillars: "Teaching as Research," whereby research skills are applied to evaluating and advancing undergraduate learning; "Learning through Diversity," in which the diversity of students' backgrounds and experiences are used as a rich resource to enhance teaching and learning; and "Learning Communities" that foster shared learning and discovery among students, and between future and current faculty within a department or institution. CIRTL established a laboratory for testing its ideas and practices at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, known as the Delta Program in Research, Teaching and Learning (http://www.delta.wisc.edu). The program offers project-based graduate courses, research mentor training, and workshops for post-docs, staff, and faculty. In addition, graduate students and post-docs can partner with a faculty member in a teaching-as-research internship to define and tackle a specific teaching and learning problem. Finally, students can obtain a Delta Certificate as testimony to their engagement in and commitment to teaching and learning. Delta has proved very successful, having served over 1500 UW-Madison instructors from graduate

  4. Preparing Future Physics Faculty at the University of Arkansas: Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-04-01

    When we embarked upon an NSF supported curriculum development project, it became clear that the first and greatest need for educational reform to be embraced and sustained was for our future faculty to be prepared to be as professional about their roles as educators as their roles as researchers. A new college faculty member may find themselves preparing to teach a class for the first time, with little or no guidance. The biggest complaints employers have about those hired for ``pure" research positions involve interpersonal skills. Also, more researchers are being called upon to do outreach. Teaching and participating in outreach activities develop these skills. Our focus at this stage is to add these kinds of activities to the graduate program, with the same sort of mentoring that accompanies the development of research skills, without extending the time needed to complete a degree. Also, a new masters degree for those that find themselves insufficiently motivated to do research, but still loving physics, provides a route straight into teaching for these students at very low resource cost. Progress made toward these goals so far at the University of Arkansas will be presented.

  5. Faculty needs, doctoral preparation, and the future of teacher preparation programs in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Johnson, Harold; Antia, Shirin D

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to obtain and analyze data on the need for, and desired characteristics of, faculty in deaf education at American institutions of higher education (IHEs), and to assess the present and projected status of doctoral-level teacher preparation programs in deaf education at American IHEs. Program directors and coordinators provided information on current and projected faculty openings, the number of active doctoral students, faculty research interests, program strengths, and needs in the field. Results indicated a pending shortage due to faculty retirements and a paucity of doctoral-level graduates. Most faculty listed literacy and language as a primary research interest as well as a program strength. The ability to generate new knowledge through research was found to be less desirable for future faculty than teaching ability. Suggestions for improving doctoral preparation and moving the field to evidence-based practices are provided.

  6. The Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) Program: Examining Relationships and Regressions among Professional Identity, Career Expectations, and Teaching Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Temika Michael

    2009-01-01

    Boyer's (1990) seminal and influential discussion, "Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate," challenged the existing views of faculty roles and responsibilities and generated considerable discussion regarding the way colleges and universities evaluate and train faculty (Golde, et al., 2008). In response, institutions of higher…

  7. Gerontological nursing. Faculty preparation for teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchuck, E R; Kee, C C

    1991-10-01

    1. As the number of older adults in the US increases, nurse educators must be prepared to teach gerontological nursing to their students. A 3-year project addresses the need for faculty development in gerontological nursing. 2. A major objective of the project is to provide basic knowledge of gerontological nursing to regional nursing faculty through a series of 1-week workshops that include didactic content and clinical observation experiences. 3. All 1990 workshops were filled to capacity, with participants exhibiting wide variation in their gerontological knowledge base.

  8. Dental Hygiene Program Directors' Perceptions of Graduate Dental Hygiene Education and Future Faculty Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Rebecca S.; Mann, Ginger; Tishk, Maxine

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 161 dental-hygiene-program directors investigated perceived future needs for faculty, preferences for type of faculty degree for selection and promotion, the extent to which master's programs are meeting those needs in both numbers and skills, and how the programs can better prepare graduates for the millennium. (MSE)

  9. Preparing for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    Panos Charitos

    2016-01-01

    The second annual meeting of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study took place from 11 to 15 April in Rome.   The participants in the second annual meeting of the FCC design study. (Photo: Vinicio Tullio/INFN) More than 450 scientists, researchers and leaders of high-tech industry gathered in Rome to review the progress of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study. The study was kicked off in 2014 as a response to a statement in the European Strategy for Particle Physics, and today embraces 74 institutes from 26 countries. With the LHC programme well under way, particle physicists are at an exciting juncture. New results from the 13 TeV run could show that we are on the threshold of an eye-opening era that presents new challenges and calls for developments. “To prepare for its future, CERN should continue to develop a vibrant R&D programme that should take advantage of its strengths and uniqueness, pursue design studies for...

  10. Clinical teaching improvement: past and future for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeff, K M; Stratos, G A; Mygdal, W K; DeWitt, T G; Manfred, L M; Quirk, M E; Roberts, K B; Greenberg, L W

    1997-04-01

    Faculty development programs have focused on the improvement of clinical teaching for several decades, resulting in a wide variety of programs for clinical teachers. With the current constraints on medical education, faculty developers must reexamine prior work and decide on future directions. This article discusses 1) the rationale for providing faculty development for clinical teachers, 2) the competencies needed by clinical teachers, 3) the available programs to assist faculty to master those competencies, and 4) the evaluation methods that have been used to assess these programs. Given this background, we discuss possible future directions to advance the field.

  11. Faculty Unions, Business Models, and the Academy's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses questions about the future of faculty unions, business models, and the academy by providing some current and historical context regarding the causes of and conflicts about faculty unions. He also reviews trends in college and university management over the past three decades, using California, Ohio, and…

  12. Preparing Culturally Diverse Special Education Faculty: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Patricia; Showalter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes why more bilingual culturally responsive special education faculty are needed to meet the needs of the increasing number of culturally and linguistically diverse students with disabilities in the United States. In addition, the paper presents the successes and challenges in the journey to prepare university faculty leaders in…

  13. Development of future faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, J B

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and postdoctoral students considering a career as an educator would be well served by: (1) training in effective classroom communication skills, (2) the use of existing technology in teaching, (3) developing a new course or updating an existing course, and (4) availing themselves of campus teaching resources designed enhance their teaching portfolio. Universities need to place more attention on developing the teaching skills of their doctoral and postdoctoral students. This should include teaching methods and aids, communication skills, motivation, learning theory, testing, counselling and guidance, and course design. An important dimension from a guidance stand point is the conduct of a formal peer review process for beginning faculty.

  14. Challenges to Change: Institutionalizing a New University-Wide Faculty Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Pamela; Gunersel, Adalet Baris

    2014-01-01

    In implementing a university-wide programmatic innovation to prepare graduate students to become more effective instructors in their future careers as university educators, a faculty development center encountered various types of resistance, ranging from the structural to the cognitive to the affective. Elaborating upon models of organizational…

  15. Hiring Intentions of Directors of Nursing Programs Related to DNP- and PhD-Prepared Faculty and Roles of Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R; Agger, Charlotte A

    2016-01-01

    This study surveyed administrators of associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) programs across the United States to identify hiring intentions and describe the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and PhD-prepared faculty members. The final sample included 253 ADN and 229 BSN programs. ADN programs were neither intentionally hiring nor looking to hire doctorally prepared nurse faculty. Deans and directors of BSN programs reported an average of 3 openings for the next academic year, 2 projected for new PhD-prepared faculty and 1 for a faculty member with a DNP. Schools have made varying decisions regarding the type of appointment (tenure or nontenure track) for DNP-prepared faculty members. Challenges that DNP-prepared faculty members encountered in meeting the role and promotion expectations in their schools focused predominantly on scholarship.

  16. Reconceiving Higher Education and Medical Faculties, Planning Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ali GÜLPINAR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In our era in which the higher education is undergoing a fast transformation at the paradigm level throughout the world, it has become imperative to re-handle and restructure the higher education system in all its aspects. In this process, carrying out studies through various methods like holding search conferences/meetings, thematic meetings, workshops at the national level as well as more detailed studies done at university, faculty and department level are also of importance. In this context, this study aims at evaluating the search meeting in which the present and the future of a university and a faculty were handled, evaluating the ‘present of the faculty' and searching for answers to the question “How should tomorrow's School of Medicine be?” In four search meetings each lasted four hours overall and held with 58 participants at the total, an unusual format of ‘brainstorm' composed of three sessions was used and the content analysis of the writt en views and evaluations stated by the participants during the first session was performed. Th e findings obtained from the study indicate the importance of micro scale studies to be conducted on the university level, faculty level and department level as well as the macro scale studies to be conducted for restructuring the higher education with its main frame, structure, functions and administration.

  17. E-Science and Astronomy Faculty: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L. A.

    2010-10-01

    In 2003, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) began to recognize the implications of large-scale science and distributed networks on 21st century libraries and librarianship. Its members became very aware of e-science. The National Science Foundation (NSF) had already studied developing a major focus on cyberinfrastructure. This was stimulated by the awareness of the oncoming data deluge that started with astronomical research. This paper gives an overview of the history in the United States behind the NSF and ARL push among their constituents regarding each organization's e-science concepts and goals. In the present, it describes a brief case study involving the expectations of the astronomy/astrophysics faculty at Brown University. The future role of the astronomy librarian for his/her faculty at an academic institution greatly depends on mandates, policies, and the librarian's skills of archiving and providing access.

  18. Two Studies of a Faculty in Crisis: The CSU Crisis and California's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Rights Project / Proyecto Derechos Civiles, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental asset of a university is its faculty. Without faculty working with students, the university is just a set of buildings. The faculty design and teach the courses, keep the educational program updated, and work with students to help them gain the skills and knowledge they need to prepare for their careers or professional education.…

  19. Preparing Citizens for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinec, W.

    1995-05-01

    Introductory astronomy courses are heavily utilized by non-science majors to check off a general degree requirement in science. For a large portion of this population, this course will be their only academic encounter with science. Many of these students have not had successful preparatory experiences. Some individuals exhibit a math/science learned helplessness. These facts coupled with the need for science literacy are proper concerns in designing the educational experience called introductory astronomy. My course has been converted largely to a collaborative environment. A unique feature is an emphasis on science policy and the utilization of structured controversy. I use lecture and some video excerpts to introduce science policy and strategic planning. A specific controversial policy related to astronomy is posed. The students prepare pro and con arguments, debate the issue formally in class and engage in small-group discussions to discover common values and solutions. Personal beliefs and the views of various majors provide fuel for lively discourse. Structured controversy develops social responsibility, intellectual competence, conflict resolution skills and personal confidence. These attributes are essential for the techno-political future.

  20. Ready or not? Expectations of faculty and medical students for clinical skills preparation for clerkships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Wenrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preclerkship clinical-skills training has received increasing attention as a foundational preparation for clerkships. Expectations among medical students and faculty regarding the clinical skills and level of skill mastery needed for starting clerkships are unknown. Medical students, faculty teaching in the preclinical setting, and clinical clerkship faculty may have differing expectations of students entering clerkships. If students' expectations differ from faculty expectations, students may experience anxiety. Alternately, congruent expectations among students and faculty may facilitate integrated and seamless student transitions to clerkships. Aims: To assess the congruence of expectations among preclerkship faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students for the clinical skills and appropriate level of clinical-skills preparation needed to begin clerkships. Methods: Investigators surveyed preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students early in their basic clerkships at a North American medical school that focuses on preclerkship clinical-skills development. Survey questions assessed expectations for the appropriate level of preparation in basic and advanced clinical skills for students entering clerkships. Results: Preclinical faculty and students had higher expectations than clerkship faculty for degree of preparation in most basic skills. Students had higher expectations than both faculty groups for advanced skills preparation. Conclusions: Preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students appear to have different expectations of clinical-skills training needed for clerkships. As American medical schools increasingly introduce clinical-skills training prior to clerkships, more attention to alignment, communication, and integration between preclinical and clerkship faculty will be important to establish common curricular agendas and increase integration of student learning. Clarification of skills

  1. Preparing Special Education Higher Education Faculty: The Influences of Contemporary Education Issues and Policy Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBettencourt, Laurie U.; Hoover, John J.; Rude, Harvey A.; Taylor, Shanon S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a well-documented need for leadership personnel who are prepared at the doctoral level to fill special education faculty positions at institutions of higher education (IHEs) and train the next generation of teachers. The intersection of continued retirements of special education faculty, shortage of well-prepared special education faculty…

  2. Preparing Special Education Higher Education Faculty: The Influences of Contemporary Education Issues and Policy Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBettencourt, Laurie U.; Hoover, John J.; Rude, Harvey A.; Taylor, Shanon S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a well-documented need for leadership personnel who are prepared at the doctoral level to fill special education faculty positions at institutions of higher education (IHEs) and train the next generation of teachers. The intersection of continued retirements of special education faculty, shortage of well-prepared special education faculty…

  3. Higher Education Faculty versus High School Teacher: Does Pedagogical Preparation Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Higher education faculty are not held to the same standard of pedagogical preparation as primary and secondary teachers. This perspectives essay points out the difference in pedagogical preparations between higher education faculty and high school teachers. The essay highlights research indicating the importance of pedagogical training, offers…

  4. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Averting Current and Future Special Education Faculty Shortages: Policy Implications and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jane E.; Hardman, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The federal government plays an indispensable role in preparing special education personnel to become teacher educators in higher education. The 2011 Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment study documents a continued supply-demand imbalance of special education faculty. It also documents effectiveness and impact of the Office of Special…

  6. Averting Current and Future Special Education Faculty Shortages: Policy Implications and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jane E.; Hardman, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The federal government plays an indispensable role in preparing special education personnel to become teacher educators in higher education. The 2011 Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment study documents a continued supply-demand imbalance of special education faculty. It also documents effectiveness and impact of the Office of Special…

  7. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  8. A Study of Faculty Views of Statistics and Student Preparation beyond an Introductory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehler, Kirsten; Taylor, Laura; Smith, Jessalyn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to better understand the role of statistics in teaching and research by faculty from all disciplines and their perceptions of the statistical preparation of their students. This study reports the findings of a survey administered to faculty from seven colleges and universities regarding the use of statistics in…

  9. The Blame Game in the Science Preparation of Future Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2003-10-01

    Who is responsible for the general lack of science preparation in our newly certified K-12 teachers? If it is true that teachers "teach as they were taught," then we must look to the college and university departments. The American Physical Society (APS), in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP), has initiated PhysTEC in concert with national reports calling for the improvement of K-12 science teaching. PhysTEC aims to help physics and education faculty work together to provide an education for future teachers that emphasizes a student-centered, hands-on, inquiry-based approach to learning science. An update of the first two years of the project will be given. Program components include: (1) A long-term, active collaboration between the physics and education departments; (2) A full-time Teacher-in-Residence (TIR) program that provides for a local K-12 science teacher to become a full-time participant in assisting faculty with both team-teaching and course revisions; (3) The redesign of content and pedagogy of targeted physics and education courses; and (4) The establishment of a Induction and mentoring program novice science teachers. This includes the participation of physics faculty in increasing and improving a wide array of school experiences. http://www.phystec.org/

  10. Perceptions of veterinary faculty members regarding their responsibility and preparation to teach non-technical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F; Bogue, E Grady

    2010-01-01

    The development of non-technical competencies has become an important component of veterinary education. In this study, we determined faculty perspectives regarding their perceived involvement and ability in the cultivation of these competencies. A survey was administered to faculty members at five institutions. Respondents were asked whether the competency should be taught in their own courses and how prepared they felt to teach and evaluate the competency. Responses were analyzed by participant institution, gender, terminal degree and year, discipline, rank, and teaching experience. More than 90% of faculty respondents reported a personal responsibility to teach or cultivate critical thinking skills, communication skills, self-development skills, and ethical skills, with more than 85% also agreeing to a role in skills such as interpersonal skills, creativity, and self-management. The lowest percentages were seen for crisis and incident management (64%) and business skills (56%). Perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate these competencies paralleled the preceding findings, especially for the four consensus competencies and self-management. Faculty preparedness was lowest for business skills. Junior faculty were somewhat less likely than others to perceive a responsibility to teach non-technical competencies; however, instructors were more prepared to teach and evaluate business skills than were other faculty. Institutional trends were evident in faculty preparation. Although male faculty and non-DVM faculty tended to report a higher degree of preparedness, few differences reached statistical significance. Faculty perceptions of their responsibility to teach non-technical competencies vary by competency and parallel their perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate them.

  11. Self-care project for faculty and staff of future health care professionals: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Nancy; Strout, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Self-care among health care providers is an important component of their ability to provide quality health care to patients. Health care institutions have programs in place for students that emphasize health and wellness, but few programs are available for faculty and staff. To address this gap and facilitate modeling health and wellness strategies for students, a New England institution that educates health care practitioners began a pilot self-care project for faculty and staff. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The template used for this project could be used as a stepping-stone for future wellness self-care program in higher education for faculty, staff, and students.

  12. Preparing nurses for the new world order: a faculty development focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Anne; Roat, Cheryl; Kemper, Mori

    2012-01-01

    The new world order demands nursing faculty members be as competent in teaching and coaching students as they are about the art and science of nursing. The complexity associated with classroom management requires mastery of innovative learning modalities to assist students to think critically using research-based evidence in making patient care decisions. Grand Canyon University has made faculty competence a priority to ensure quality student outcomes. The College of Nursing has embraced a systematic process for creating faculty excellence through a comprehensive faculty development initiative. Developing faculty requires university support through policy and resources that is essential to prepare nurses for the new world order and therefore closing the education practice gap.

  13. Identifying Barriers and Facilitators to Future Nurse Faculty Careers for DNP Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D

    Increasing the pool of doctorally educated nurses pursuing faculty careers is imperative in the development of the nurse faculty workforce. This cross-sectional study aims to identify barriers and facilitators to academic careers for doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students. One thousand five hundred DNP students were randomly selected from nursing schools across the country to participate in our survey, and a 56.9% response rate was achieved. The study found that 32% of respondents planned to pursue faculty careers after graduating. Students with postgraduation plans for academic careers, nonacademic careers, and undecided careers did not show distinct differences in demographic and academic characteristics, except that students who planned to pursue academic careers were more likely to have full-time and part-time faculty status. However, students in the 3 groups perceived facilitators and barriers to academic careers differently. The most influential facilitators were interest in teaching and an appreciation of the impact of nursing research on patient care, and the most considered barriers were poor financial compensation and a negative perception of academia. In terms of academic preparation, a large percentage of DNP students who planned to pursue a faculty career reported that they were not confident in teaching informatics. These findings are also consistent for DNP students who were not a faculty member. The impact of DNP education appeared to have a small, although positive, impact on students' decisions to pursue academic careers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Utopia University: A Faculty Member Reflects on Recommendations for the Future of SoTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Krista D.

    2013-01-01

    The author, Krista D. Forrest, Professor of Psychology, University of Nebraska at Kearney, reports on what it would take to create a "Utopian university," a campus of the future where faculty members' scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) has gone on to change departments and as the departments changed, so did the institution.…

  15. Kinesiology Faculty for the 21st Century: Steping into the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Kinesiology faculty for the 21st century was one of the featured strands of the 2014 NAKHE Collaborative Congress: "STEPS into the future: Exploring opportunities and facing the challenges for the 21st century." Following a brief introduction delegates were assigned to discussion groups with conversations focused around six…

  16. Effectively Preparing College Bound Students for College-Level Mathematics: University Math Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Visit with any university math faculty member throughout the United States, and you will soon hear how the freshman students are not prepared to be successful in introductory college algebra classes. The opinions are varied regarding why the students are unsuccessful; however, the concern and frustration is universal. According to American College…

  17. Educating for advocacy: recommendations for professional preparation and development based on a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, Susan M; Galer-Unti, Regina A; Tappe, Marlene K

    2009-01-01

    An electronic survey was used to conduct a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty to determine the extent to which advocacy instruction is present in undergraduate and graduate curricula in health education and to identify faculty members' needs and capacity to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy. An analysis of the results reveals that most undergraduate and graduate health education programs include advocacy instruction. Although faculty believe advocacy and instruction related to advocacy are important, many lack advocacy-related professional preparation and development experiences and do not participate in advocacy-related training initiatives and advocacy activities. There is wide variability in faculty confidence in their competence to provide advocacy instruction. Partnerships among professional organizations, health education practitioners, university faculty, individuals engaged in policy advocacy initiatives, and policy makers are needed to enhance the capacity of university faculty to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy.

  18. A model for preparing faculty to teach model C clinical nurse leader students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Sherry; McKeon, Leslie

    2014-07-01

    Model C clinical nurse leader (CNL) programs are complex because they must meet the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing, as well as the graduate level competencies outlined in the white paper Competencies and Curricular Expectations for Clinical Nurse Leader Education and Practice. Faculty assigned to teach in these programs may be experts in education or areas of clinical specialty, but they may not have a clear understanding of the CNL role to teach and mentor CNL students. This article describes a faculty development model that includes an introduction to the CNL role, course mapping of the essentials, integration of CNL professional values into clinical evaluation, consultation with practicing model C graduates, and participation in a comprehensive CNL certification review course. The model was effective in preparing faculty to teach and mentor students in a model C CNL program.

  19. Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals: Needs, Strategies, Programs, and Online Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Dunbar, R. W.; Beane, R. J.; Bruckner, M.; Bralower, T. J.; Feiss, P. G.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geoscience faculty, departments, and programs play an important role in preparing future geoscience professionals. One challenge is supporting the diversity of student goals for future employment and the needs of a wide range of potential employers. Students in geoscience degree programs pursue careers in traditional geoscience industries; in geoscience education and research (including K-12 teaching); and opportunities at the intersection of geoscience and other fields (e.g., policy, law, business). The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project has documented a range of approaches that departments use to support the development of geoscience majors as professionals (serc.carleton.edu/departments). On the Cutting Edge, a professional development program, supports graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing an academic career through workshops, webinars, and online resources (serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep). Geoscience departments work at the intersection of student interests and employer needs. Commonly cited program goals that align with employer needs include mastery of geoscience content; field experience; skill in problem solving, quantitative reasoning, communication, and collaboration; and the ability to learn independently and take a project from start to finish. Departments and faculty can address workforce issues by 1) implementing of degree programs that develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students need, while recognizing that students have a diversity of career goals; 2) introducing career options to majors and potential majors and encouraging exploration of options; 3) advising students on how to prepare for specific career paths; 4) helping students develop into professionals, and 5) supporting students in the job search. It is valuable to build connections with geoscience employers, work with alumni and foster connections between students and alumni with similar career interests, collaborate with

  20. PRACTITIONER AND FACULTY PERSPECTIVES ON THE CAREER PREPARATION OF ENTRY-LEVEL PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Simms

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Entry-level public accountants in the U.S. must satisfy a litany of historically unparalleled requirements and demands. This unique set of challenges calls forth new questions about how effectively entry-level accountants are navigating the divide between their conceptual educations and the practical rigors of public practice. To examine these questions, we relied on qualitative analysis predicated on a theoretical framework of constructivism and systems theory. Our study confirmed practitioners’ perceptions about the preparation of entry-level accountants that have been documented for nearly a hundred years: Entry-level accountants’ shortcomings often include written and oral communications skills, interpersonal skills and critical thinking skills. However, what is unique to this study is that we also considered faculty perspectives. Faculty concurred with practitioners’ perspectives on entry-level accountants’ strengths and weaknesses-noting considerable growth in most problem areas over the college years. Practitioners and faculty also largely agreed about the pathway to successful and unsuccessful careers in public accounting. We suggest that continuing the historical perspective of extreme separation between academia and the business world is not particularly beneficial to the career preparation of junior accountants. Rather, we recommend that viewing accounting faculty and practitioners as part of the same continuum is likely to be more advantageous to the preparation of entry-level accountants and to the profession as a whole. We also conclude that differences in faculty and practitioner perspectives serve as checks and balances on the accounting profession-although more collaboration might facilitate greater improvements.

  1. ADAM: A Collaborative Effort To Prepare Future Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael D.; And Others

    ADAM (Administrative Development and Management), an administrator preparation partnership between Greenwood (South Carolina) School District 50 and Clemson University, is described in this paper. The program uses practicing administrators in collaboration with college faculty to train prospective school administrators. The purpose is to provide…

  2. faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardanov Rustam Sh.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes some of the psychological problems of the economic faculties’ students arising in the course of study of mathematical disciplines. These problems are primarily related with the lack of students’ awareness, misconception about the calculation methods in their future profession, low motivation and performance, math anxiety, etc. They makeadditional difficulties which impede successful mastering of sophisticated material. Based on the experience of mathematical disciplines teaching, the paper provides some possible solutions to these problems with the lecturer who has to play an important role. The lecturer should orientate students towards serious and profound knowledge of economic and mathematical methods, create conditions for students’ active participation in the educational process and provide them with comprehensive assistance in overcoming difficulties.

  3. Role Stress and Strain among Nondoctorally Prepared Undergraduate Faculty in a School of Nursing with a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Judy Wright; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative study looked at role stress in 11 nondoctorally prepared undergraduate nursing faculty in a southern university school of nursing with a doctoral program. Faculty reported that role stress and strain affect both their teaching and their decisions to remain in academia. (JOW)

  4. The Teaching Demonstration: What Faculty Expect and How to Prepare for This Aspect of the Job Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle K.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Tyler, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Many institutions require candidates for faculty positions to present a teaching demonstration as part of the interview process. To help job candidates prepare for this and to assist departments in planning how to structure this portion of the interview, we surveyed biology faculty from community and liberal arts colleges and master's- and…

  5. JET: Preparing the future in fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynár, J.; Ongena, J.; Duran, I.; Hron, M.; Pánek, R.; Petržílka, V.; Žáček, F.

    2004-03-01

    JET (Joint European Torus) is the largest tokamak in the world and the only fusion facility able to operate with Tritium, the fusion fuel, and Beryllium, the ITER first wall material. JET also features the most complete remote handling equipment for invessel maintenance. As a multinational research center, JET provides logistic experience in preparing for operation of the global facility, tokamak ITER. Experiments on JET are focused on ITER-relevant studies, in particular on detailing the operational scenarios (EL My H-modes and advanced regimes), on enhancing the heating systems, on developing diagnostics for burning plasmas etc. Pioneering real-time control techniques have been implemented that maximize performance and minimize internal disturbances of JET plasmas. In helium plasmas, ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) created fast α-particles, mimicking their populations in future burning plasmas. The recent successful Trace Tritium campaign provided important new data on fuel transport. Current enhancements on JET include a new ITER-like ELM-resilient high power ICRH antenna (7 MW) and over twenty new diagnostics that will further extend the JET scientific capabilities and push the facility even closer to the ITER parameters. A special mention is given to the involvement of the fusion experts from Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, who have been actively participating in the collective use of JET facility for more than three years.

  6. Mobilizing and training academic faculty for medical mission: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As more mission groups become involved with health care education, by starting medical and nursing schools, postgraduate training programs and paramedical professional training, there is a need to recruit expatriate faculty from high income countries to help start programs as there are few national health care education professionals available in the mission setting in most low- and middle-income countries. This paper outlines the current status and needs for academic faculty in health care education mission settings. A working group of medical educators met in conjunction with the Global Missions Health Conference in November 2015 and discussed the motivational factors which lead Christian academics to volunteer, both short- and long-term in mission settings. The group then looked at barriers to volunteering and made suggestions for future directions and best practices when mobilizing academics from high income countries.

  7. "Out" Gay and Lesbian Faculty and the Inclusion of Sexual Orientation Topics in Teacher Preparation Programmes in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Do "out" lesbian and gay faculty influence the inclusion of sexual orientation as a form of diversity in their teacher preparation programmes? Data gathered from 142 teacher preparation programmes across the USA (representing the preparation of 23,000-30,000 new teachers annually) suggest they do not. Likewise, the priority placed upon…

  8. "Out" Gay and Lesbian Faculty and the Inclusion of Sexual Orientation Topics in Teacher Preparation Programmes in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Do "out" lesbian and gay faculty influence the inclusion of sexual orientation as a form of diversity in their teacher preparation programmes? Data gathered from 142 teacher preparation programmes across the USA (representing the preparation of 23,000-30,000 new teachers annually) suggest they do not. Likewise, the priority placed upon…

  9. Preparing for practice: Nursing intern and faculty perceptions on clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlThiga, Hanan; Mohidin, Sharifah; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2017-04-01

    Clinical experience and exposure to real patients are required elements of nursing education. Trainees in nursing are expected to be prepared adequately for the hard-working environment, increasing patient complexity, and higher-level competencies. This study investigates differences between nursing interns and clinical faculty on actual and perceived importance of educational preparation and development of clinical competencies, focusing on the nursing curriculum and transition to practice. A convenient sampling technique with a mixed-methods design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data, by surveying and interviewing nursing interns and faculty members from King Abdul-Aziz University in Saudi Arabia; data collection occurred in December 2015. The survey (23 items) and focused interviews measured perceptions of clinical instruction and experience. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze differences in mean ratings between actual and perceived importance. Themes collected from narrative interview data were summarized. Significant differences were found between nursing interns (n = 46) and faculty (n = 29) perceptions of actual clinical teaching and experiences and its importance including the clinical teaching and the development of clinical competence, p interns rated actual experiences of knowledge base and skills significantly lower than faculty perceptions, p = .001. Narrative data provided in-depth information on factors contributing and hindering the learning and teaching environment. Findings from this study call for clinical instruction and experiences to take a step further to meet current practice standards and to improve patient safety in the health professions education of nurses.

  10. Preparing for the Future of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnell, Charles

    1983-01-01

    The crucial decisions and attitude changes that educators and administrators must make if higher education is to survive into the 21st century are identified using the insights and ideas of Alvin Toffler, John Naisbitt, Gerard O'Neill, and other futures thinkers. (Author/RM)

  11. Breaking the cycle: future faculty begin teaching with learner-centered strategies after professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L; Henkel, Timothy P; Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Momsen, Jennifer L; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reliable evidence for teaching practices after professional development is limited across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, making the identification of professional development "best practices" and effective models for change difficult. We aimed to determine the extent to which postdoctoral fellows (i.e., future biology faculty) believed in and implemented evidence-based pedagogies after completion of a 2-yr professional development program, Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching (FIRST IV). Postdocs (PDs) attended a 2-yr training program during which they completed self-report assessments of their beliefs about teaching and gains in pedagogical knowledge and experience, and they provided copies of class assessments and video recordings of their teaching. The PDs reported greater use of learner-centered compared with teacher-centered strategies. These data were consistent with the results of expert reviews of teaching videos. The majority of PDs (86%) received video ratings that documented active engagement of students and implementation of learner-centered classrooms. Despite practice of higher-level cognition in class sessions, the items used by the PDs on their assessments of learning focused on lower-level cognitive skills. We attributed the high success of the FIRST IV program to our focus on inexperienced teachers, an iterative process of teaching practice and reflection, and development of and teaching a full course.

  12. Breaking the Cycle: Future Faculty Begin Teaching with Learner-Centered Strategies after Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L.; Henkel, Timothy P.; Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reliable evidence for teaching practices after professional development is limited across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, making the identification of professional development “best practices” and effective models for change difficult. We aimed to determine the extent to which postdoctoral fellows (i.e., future biology faculty) believed in and implemented evidence-based pedagogies after completion of a 2-yr professional development program, Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching (FIRST IV). Postdocs (PDs) attended a 2-yr training program during which they completed self-report assessments of their beliefs about teaching and gains in pedagogical knowledge and experience, and they provided copies of class assessments and video recordings of their teaching. The PDs reported greater use of learner-centered compared with teacher-centered strategies. These data were consistent with the results of expert reviews of teaching videos. The majority of PDs (86%) received video ratings that documented active engagement of students and implementation of learner-centered classrooms. Despite practice of higher-level cognition in class sessions, the items used by the PDs on their assessments of learning focused on lower-level cognitive skills. We attributed the high success of the FIRST IV program to our focus on inexperienced teachers, an iterative process of teaching practice and reflection, and development of and teaching a full course. PMID:26033870

  13. Laying the Foundation for Transdisciplinary Faculty Collaborations: Actions for a Sustainable Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vanasupa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available How can academicians who desire a sustainable future successfully participate in transdisciplinary projects? Transcending our hidden thought patterns is required. Paradoxically, the disciplinary specialization that enabled the industrial era and its metaphors now function to undermine our ability to recognize and participate in the transformational learning that is needed. In this paper, we offer a post-industrial era metaphor for transdisciplinarity—that of complex dynamic system—that has helped us to work through the unexpected experiences encountered in the process of transformative learning. These insights are based on an ongoing transdisciplinary research collaboration (2008–present using action research methods; we focus on the faculty experience. Accepting the metaphors of complex systems, we describe the systemic conditions that seem to repeatedly reproduce the emergence of transformative learning for participants, as well as what one might expect to experience in the process. These experiences include: conflict, existential crisis, transformation and renewed vitality within the necessary context of a safe and caring community. Without the adoption of complexity metaphors, these elements would have been overlooked or interpreted as a hindrance to the work. These insights are intended to serve as socially robust knowledge to support the effective participation of faculty members in sustainability projects of a transdisciplinary nature.

  14. ADEA CCI vision focuses on preparing graduates for discoveries of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald J; Bushong, Martha

    2010-08-01

    The vision of the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) is embodied in its new slogan: building consensus and leading change to prepare graduates for an undiscovered future. The ADEA CCI envisions a future in which dental practice is vastly different from what it is today and dental education must be very different for graduates who face a future of unimaginable scientific discovery. Dental curricula need to change to better prepare today's dental students, not only for the practice of today but also for the challenges they will face in their practices of the future. The goal of "building consensus" is directed toward the many constituencies that work with dental education and its graduates. The ADEA CCI has developed a variety of policy recommendations, strategies, and resources to help policymakers, dental educators, and dental graduates better prepare for this undiscovered future. A key resource is twenty-two commissioned white papers that cover diverse topics, such as curriculum reform, facilitating change, faculty development, student assessment, and academic leadership.

  15. European neutron research prepares for future challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Neutrons are among the fundamental building blocks of matter. Some of the processes in which they are involved are responsible for energy generation in nuclear power plants. In this context, CERN’s n_TOF and other facilities participating in the ERINDA EU-funded programme help the community integrate all the scientific efforts needed to produce high-quality nuclear data for future nuclear technologies.   The 4π calorimeter inside the n_TOF experimental area. Image courtesy of the n_TOF Collaboration. Accurate measurements of the interactions between neutrons and each of the elements present in nuclear reactors are vital tools enabling scientists to explore solutions – other than simple protected storage – for the treatment of radioactive waste deriving from a number of applications, ranging from energy production to the medical field. Particularly valuable is the contribution provided by the 13 accelerator-based neutron sources, which the ERINDA EU-funded...

  16. The Teaching Demonstration: What Faculty Expect and How to Prepare for This Aspect of the Job Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle K.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Tyler, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Many institutions require candidates for faculty positions to present a teaching demonstration as part of the interview process. To help job candidates prepare for this and to assist departments in planning how to structure this portion of the interview, we surveyed biology faculty from community and liberal arts colleges and master's- and PhD-granting institutions concerning how their departments assess teaching potential. We also asked survey respondents to share advice on how candidates can prepare for teaching demonstrations. Here we report on the survey results and offer suggestions based on comments from respondents. PMID:23463224

  17. Futurism: A Needed Process in School Personnel Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L.

    This paper projects present trends and capabilities into the future, conjectures about the educational implications of these trends, and proposes some possible responses for those involved in the preparation of school personnel. It is simultaneously an illustration and an application of the process of "futurism" and its increasing relevance to…

  18. The percieved roles of academic libraries in present and in future: the case of Faculty of art’s libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Žugelj

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history libraries have had many different roles. They served as educational centres, manuscript transcriptors and collectors, places for study, places offering services, even museums and entertainment facilities, etc. Their quality depends on a number of different factors, e.g. quality of staff, and of services, as well as on environmental characteristics. The current development in the information and communication technology has an important impact on libraries functions and therefore demands their permanent adjustment. In this study the authors tried to find out how 171 students and librarians from the Faculty of Arts perceive the current and future roles of academic libraries. Following this, the questionnaire was prepared on the basis of the following domain facets: time frame, services, communication type and type of material. As expected in the partitions of the three dimensional (Smallest Space Analysis space three facets with ordered elements appeared (two axial: time frame and material, and one modular: communication type and one unordered with the polar role: services. With the exception of the service facet, all the other facets clearly revealed themselves.

  19. SMART-1 technology preparation for future planetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A. E.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.

    SMART-1 is the first ESA Small Mission for Advanced Research in Technology, with the prime objective of demonstrating the use of Solar Electric Primary Propulsion in a planetary mission. Further to this, SMART-1 will test novel spacecraft technologies and will host six instruments carrying out nine technology and science experiments, all aimed at preparing future ESA Cornerstones, including the ESA Mercury Cornerstone (now named BepiColombo) and other future planetary missions under study, as well as solar and fundamental physics missions.

  20. Preparing for a digital future - Advertising to Finnish Millennials

    OpenAIRE

    Miiluvaara, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores the topic of online advertising. The main focus of the thesis is to find out how advertisers can reach Millennials through online advertising. The researcher explores which online channels Millennials prefer among other things. Therefore, the purpose of the thesis is to find out which advertising channels and formats advertisers should use in order to reach this generation and prepare for future trends. In other words, finding out which advertising methods advertisers sho...

  1. Sample preparation for atomic spectroscopy: evolution and future trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Elisabeth de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is the critical step of any analytical protocol, and involves steps from simple dilution to partial or total dissolution. The methods include dry or wet decomposition of the samples in open or closed systems, using thermal, ultrasonic or radiant (infrared, ultraviolet and microwaves energy. This review emphasizes sample preparation for atomic spectroscopy. The present and future tendencies for sample preparation also involve on-line dissolution, extraction of the analytes, speciation, solid sample and slurry analysis, in situ and in vivo procedures, etc. Nowadays the goals are the best result, in the shortest time, with minimum contamination, using the smallest quantities of reagents and samples, and having low residue and waste generation, as well as maintaining the integrity of the sample and the traceability of the results, to have quality and confidence in the measurements as the primordial attributes required by the community and by the users.

  2. Faculty Development for Advancing Community Engagement in Higher Education: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Marshall; Plaxton-Moore, Star

    2017-01-01

    This research involved the conduct of a conceptual review of 28 refereed journal articles and a survey of campus centers for community engagement staff to identify salient features and trends of existing faculty development programming designed to advance service-learning and community engagement in higher education. Results of this investigation…

  3. Mentored Discussions of Teaching: An Introductory Teaching Development Program for Future STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiduc, Rachael R.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Ruggeri, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Today's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are tomorrow's new faculty members; but these junior academicians often receive limited pedagogical training. We describe four iterations of an entry-level program with a low time commitment, Mentored Discussions of Teaching (MDT). The…

  4. Back to the Future: Prospects for Education Faculty and Librarian Collaboration Thirty Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripps-Hoekstra, Lindy; Hamilton, Erica R.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago, education conference panelists shared concerns regarding collaboration between education faculty and librarians and they presented ideas for expanding these partnerships. A review of their ideas raises an important question: In what ways have their ideas for collaboration and partnership been realized? To answer this question,…

  5. The Integrate Student Portal: Online Resources to Prepare Students for the Workforce of a Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Manduca, C. A.; Egger, A. E.; Macdonald, H.

    2014-12-01

    The InTeGrate Student Portal is a suite of web pages that utilize InTeGrate resources to support student success by providing undergraduates with tools and information necessary to be proactive in their career choices and development. Drawn from various InTeGrate workshops and programming, the Portal organizes these resources to illuminate a variety of career opportunities and pathways to both traditional and non-traditional jobs that support a sustainable future. Informed from a variety of sources including employers, practitioners, faculty, students, reports, and articles, the pages explore five facets: (1) sustainability across the disciplines, (2) workforce preparation, (3) professional communication, (4) teaching and teaching careers, and (5) the future of green research and technology. The first three facets explore how sustainability is integrated across disciplines and how sustainability and 'green' jobs are available in a wide range of traditional and non-traditional workplaces within and beyond science. They provide students guidance in preparing for this sustainability workforce, including where to learn about jobs and how to pursue them, advice for strengthening their job applications, and how to build a set of skills that employers seek. This advice encompasses classroom skills as well as those acquired and strengthened as part of extracurricular or workplace experiences. The fourth facet, aimed at teaching assistants with little or no experience as well as at students who are interested in pursuing teaching as a career, provides information and resources about teaching. The fifth facet explores future directions of technology and the need for innovations in the workforce of the future to address sustainability issues. We seek your input and invite you to explore the Portal at: serc.carleton.edu/integrate/students/

  6. THE PROBLEM OF PREPARATION OF FUTURE TEACHERS OF HUMANITARIAN CYCLE SUBJECTS TO THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMATIC FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena S. Tselykh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The actual questions related to the development of methods and receptions of improvement of preparation of future teachers of humanitarian cycle subjects to application the educational programmatic facilities (EPF in their professional activity are examined in the article. On the basis of the conducted research the level of readiness of students of humanitarian faculties of the South Ukrainian National Pedagogical University by K. D. Ushinskogo is analyzed the noted activity. It is set that application of educational programmatic facilities considerably intensifies professional preparation of future teachers of humanitarian cycle subjects. It is well-proven that teaching technologies which oriented on application of EPF in professional activity can considerably facilitate and improve teacher’s work to high-quality level, increase the level of knowledge and abilities of students.

  7. A National Workshop in the United States to Prepare New Faculty in Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Kenneth S.

    2010-07-01

    Starting in 1996, newly hired college and university faculty in physics and astronomy from throughout the U.S. have been invited to attend a workshop to help them improve their teaching skills. More than 1000 faculty have participated, representing more than 25% of the new hires at all U. S. institutions that award a baccalaureate in physics or astronomy, from 4-year colleges through research universities. The workshops seek to improve physics teaching by introducing new faculty to instructional strategies and innovations that have been shown to be effective in a variety of contexts. Such a national mentoring workshop can effectively address a commonality of physics and astronomy teaching challenges that transcend institutional characters and types. Based on surveys of the participants (and their department chairs), we have found that a large fraction of the participants have become adopters of innovative teaching techniques and that they rate the workshops as the most significant cause of the improvements in their teaching.

  8. Searching for ``Preparation for Future Learning'' in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia; Gentile, Michael; Karelina, Anna; Ruibal-Villasenor, Maria R.; Suran, Gregory

    2009-11-01

    "Preparation for future learning" is a term describing a new approach to transfer. In addition to focusing on learning environments that help students better apply developed knowledge in new situations; education researchers are searching for educational interventions that better prepare students to learn new information. The pioneering studies in this field were conducted by J. Branford and D. Schwartz in psychology and mathematics, specifically in the area of statistics. They found that students who engaged in innovation before being exposed to new material, learned better. We attempted to replicate their experiments in the field of physics, specifically in the area of conductivity. Using two experimental conditions and one control, we compared student learning of thermal and electrical conductivity from a written text. We present the results of groups' performance on seven qualitative questions after their learning in this area.

  9. Future education in ecological agriculture and food systems: A student-faculty evaluation and planning process

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Metadata only record This paper provides an evaluation of three short graduate-level courses on ecological agriculture and food systems offered in Norway 1995-1997. The evaluation took place in 1999, in the form of a three day workshop involving both students and faculty. Their objectives were to evaluate the impacts of the courses, assess relative importance of the course content areas, evaluate the different learning methods used especially case studies, and develop a vision and plan for...

  10. Foreign Student Advising : Current Issues and Future Directions for University Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Discussion about foreign student a di vising in Japanese universities has mostly been concerned with the establishment and organization of the systems of services for foreign students in the universities: it has neglected discussion of how well the system has functioned. One of the reasons this system malfunctions is due to the lack of communication or meaningful conversation between and among the faculty who work with foreign students in the different sections in a university, that is fa...

  11. On the Cutting Edge: Face-to-Face and Virtual Professional Development for Current and Future Geoscience Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Iverson, E. A.; Kirk, K. B.; Beane, R. J.; McConnell, D.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    On the Cutting Edge, a comprehensive, discipline-wide professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, aims to develop a geoscience professoriate committed to high-quality instruction based on currency in scientific knowledge, good pedagogic practice, and research on learning. Our program provides an integrated workshop series and online teaching resources. Since 2002, we have offered more than 80 face-to-face workshops, virtual workshops and webinars, and hybrid events. Participants come from two-year colleges and four-year colleges and universities. The workshop series is designed to address the needs of faculty in all career stages at the full spectrum of institutions and covering the breadth of the geoscience curriculum. We select timely and compelling topics and create opportunities of interest to faculty. We offer workshops on course design, new geoscience research and pedagogical topics, core geoscience curriculum topics, and introductory courses as well as workshops for early career faculty and for future faculty. Our workshops are designed to model good teaching practice. We set workshop goals that guide workshop planning and evaluation. Workshops are interactive, emphasize participant learning, provide opportunities for participants to interact and share experience/knowledge, provide good resources, give participants time to reflect and to develop action plans, and help transform their ideas about teaching. We emphasize the importance of adaptation in the context of their specific situations. For virtual workshops and webinars we use icebreakers and other structured interactions to build a comfortable workshop community; promote interaction through features on webinar software, chat-aided question and answer, small-group synchronous interactions, and/or discussion boards; plan detailed schedules for workshop events; use asynchronous discussions and recordings of synchronous events given that participants are busy with their

  12. Preparing the Next Generation of Higher Education Faculty in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBettencourt, Laurie U.

    2014-01-01

    There is a shortage in the number of funded doctoral programs in the field of special education. As a result the number of higher education faculty who are trained in the knowledge and skills necessary to train the next generation of special education teachers is critically low. This article describes a doctoral program funded by the Office of…

  13. Preparing nurses to intervene in the tobacco epidemic: Developing a model for faculty development and curriculum redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Berit; Meyer, Bonnie; Sachs, Bonnie L; Bialous, Stella A; Cataldo, Janine K

    2017-07-01

    As the largest group of health professionals, nurses have a tremendous potential to help curb the tobacco epidemic. However, studies conducted across a range of global settings continue to indicate that both practicing nurses and nursing student have limited knowledge, skills and confidence needed to implement evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions. A contributing factor is the limited inclusion of tobacco control content in nursing curricula. Additionally, there is limited understanding of nurse educators' knowledge and perceptions about teaching tobacco dependence content. This paper presents the Loma Linda University School of Nursing's concurrent experience with both faculty development and curriculum redesign in the area of tobacco dependence prevention and treatment. An internal survey was administered at baseline and at 2-year follow-up to assess faculty's knowledge, perceptions and practices related to teaching tobacco dependence content and skills (n = 42). Faculty and curriculum development strategies and resources utilized, evaluation findings and subsequent lessons learned are described. The findings have implications for nursing programs seeking to enhance their curricula and commitment to ensuring that their graduates are prepared to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions with each patient they encounter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Dozen Years and a Thousand Participants: The Workshops for Preparing New Faculty in Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Kenneth

    2009-03-01

    Beginning in 1996, an annual workshop for newly hired faculty in physics and astronomy has been held under the organizational leadership of AAPT, APS, and AAS. To date more than 1000 faculty have participated in this workshop, representing approximately 25% of the new hires at all U. S. institutions that award a baccalaureate in physics or astronomy, from 4-year colleges through research universities. The original motivation for the workshops was to improve physics teaching by introducing new faculty to instructional strategies and innovations that had been shown to be effective in a variety of contexts. The need for such a program was suggested in part by the belief that a national mentoring workshop could effectively address a commonality of physics and astronomy teaching challenges that transcended institutional characters and types, and also in part by the reaction to a significant decrease in the number of baccalaureate physics degrees awarded in the U. S. in the 1990s, which many believed was due to ineffective and uninspiring teaching at the undergraduate level and especially in introductory courses. Based on surveys of the participants (and their department chairs), we have found that a large fraction of the participants have become adopters of innovative teaching techniques and that they rate the workshops as the most significant cause of the improvements in their teaching. This talk will summarize the development of the workshop program since its inception, the measures of its success in improving teaching, and the plans for its future.

  15. Resources to Transform Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Activities in Support of Earth, Oceans and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty, and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Singer, J.

    2013-12-01

    that their institutions did not recognize the value of education-related scholarly activities, or undervaluing it compared to more traditional research activities. Given this reality, faculty desire strategies for balancing their time to allow time to pursue both. The current restructuring of NSF educational programs raises questions regarding future directions and the scale of support that may be available from the proposed Catalyzing Advances in Undergraduate STEM Education (CAUSE) Program. At the time of writing this abstract, specific details have not been communicated, but it appears that CAUSE could encompass components from several programs within the Division of Undergraduate Education's TUES, STEP, and WIDER programs, as well as the Geoscience Education and OEDG programs in the Geosciences Directorate. The RTUGeoEd project will continue to provide support to faculty seeking CAUSE (and other educational funding within DUE).

  16. The Role of Geoscience Departments in Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments program ran a workshop on the role of geoscience departments in preparing geoscience professionals. Workshop participants asserted that geoscience departments can help support the flow of geoscience graduates into the geoscience workforce by providing students with information about jobs and careers; providing experiences that develop career-oriented knowledge, attitudes and skills; encouraging exploration of options; and supporting students in their job searches. In conjunction with the workshop, we have developed a set of online resources designed to help geoscience departments support their students’ professional development in these ways. The first step toward sending geoscience graduates into related professions is making students aware of the wide variety of career options available in the geosciences and of geoscience employment trends. Successful means of achieving this include making presentations about careers (including job prospects and potential salaries) in geoscience classes, providing examples of practical applications of course content, talking to advisees about their career plans, inviting alumni to present at departmental seminars, participating in institutional career fairs, and publishing a departmental newsletter with information about alumni careers. Courses throughout the curriculum as well as co-curricular experiences can provide experiences that develop skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will be useful for a range of careers. Successful strategies include having an advisory board that offers suggestions about key knowledge and skills to incorporate into the curriculum, providing opportunities for students to do geoscience research, developing internship programs, incorporating professional skills training (such as HazMat training) into the curriculum, and teaching professionalism. Students may also benefit from involvement with the campus career center or from conducting informational

  17. Marketing faculty of Bucharest Economic Studies University: historic landmarks, present and future developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Călin Petrică Vegheş

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present the main events that left their mark on the history and evolution of the Marketing Faculty of Bucharest Economic Studies University, an academic body that this will mark its 10th anniversary this fall. As the only school dedicated exclusively to the study of marketing in Romania, as well as one of the few exclusively marketing schools in Europe, the history of the Marketing Department and, subsequently, of the Marketing Faculty overlaps in the last four decades with that of Romanian marketing higher education, as well as with the graduate transformation of Romania’s economy to a post-industrial, information-based and customer centric economy. Part of Economic Sciences domain, marketing contains a set of concepts, tools, methods and techniques through which the organization, irrespective of its profile, analyzes the environment where it lives (marketing research, sets goals and strategies to be achieved (strategic marketing planning, design and execute operational activities (marketing programs in order to maximize profits and to satisfy customer’s and society’s needs at the required level. Marketing as a strategic and operational area, captures the interest of Romanian managers and specialists of international organizations, being a source of competitive advantage and positioning of the company and its portfolio brands, in the mind and soul of current and potential customers

  18. Infusing the Core Curriculum with Societally Relevant Issues and Preparing Faculty to Work with Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellito, L. J.; Straw, B.; Sexton, J. M.; Hoyt, W.

    2016-12-01

    The way we teach our courses has an impact on student experience, and ultimately, student interest and persistence in geoscience majors and career paths. With that in mind, the primary goal of the InTeGrate implementation program in the University of Northern Colorado Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science is to promote retention in the Earth Science major through interventions that impact student classroom experience. We used two approaches to accomplish this. 1) We developed interdisciplinary curricular activities that are based on societally-relevant issues, engage students in problem-solving, and that prompt students to consider the relationships between science, society, and sustainability. We implemented these activities in core earth science courses and in a general education scientific writing course. 2) Our Earth and Atmospheric Science faculty participated in diversity and equity awareness training. In this presentation, we share our initial assessment of the effectiveness of new curricular activities and the effectiveness of a workshop developed for faculty that promotes awareness of teaching styles and behaviors that promote inclusion of students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences. Our results suggest that incorporating a societally-relevant component to activities improves student interest in the material and provides them with experience in interdisciplinary analysis and problem solving. The implementation of sustainability issues into a general education scientific writing course has a demonstrated impact on student perception of climate change and sustainability. Faculty report that they are more aware of teaching styles that promote inclusion of students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences.

  19. Cultivating adjunct faculty: strategies beyond orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Lisette; Egues, Aida L

    2014-01-01

    Schools of nursing across the country are using adjunct faculty to meet clinical, didactic, and online instructional needs of their nursing programs. While adjunct faculty are vital to the alleviation of the nursing shortage and the shortage of nursing faculty, and to the preparation of the current and future nursing workforce, little is known about cultivating adjunct faculty as nurse educators. To investigate the cultivation of adjunct nursing faculty, the authors engaged in a comprehensive review of the extant literature of primary databases and reports from accredited nursing programs and professional nursing organizations. Scant literature exists that seeks to identify issues associated with developing adjunct nursing faculty as educators, including role transition needs, and useful approaches to orientation, mentorship, or retention. Working toward cultivation of adjunct faculty includes innovative support measures beyond simple orientation. Orientation should be comprehensive, and move to mentorship as a key component that helps establish a sustainable nurse educator career for adjunct nursing faculty. It is incumbent upon schools of nursing to cultivate their adjunct faculty, and this article includes creative approaches to doing so, with recommendations for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research settings. While adjunct faculty may successfully meet some of the challenges faced by nursing programs, they themselves face many challenges that may hinder their success as nurse educators. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Preparing future fisheries professionals to make good decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Michael E.; Peterson, James T.

    2017-01-01

    Future fisheries professionals will face decision-making challenges in an increasingly complex field of fisheries management. Though fisheries students are well trained in the use of the scientific method to understand the natural world, they are rarely exposed to structured decision making (SDM) as part of an undergraduate or graduate education. Specifically, SDM encourages users (e.g., students, managers) to think critically and communicate the problem and then identify specific, measurable objectives as they relate to the problem. Next, users must think critically and creatively about management alternatives that can be used to meet the objectives—there must be more than one alternative or there is no decision to be made. Lastly, the management alternatives are evaluated with regard to how likely they are to succeed in terms of multiple, possibly completing, objectives, such as how stakeholder groups value outcomes of management actions versus monetary cost. We believe that exposure to SDM and its elements is an important part of preparing future fisheries professional to meet the challenges they may face. These challenges include reduced budgets, the growth of potentially competing natural resource interest groups, and stakeholder desire to be involved in management decisions affecting public trust resources, just to name a few.

  1. Preparing the Future Dental Hygiene Workforce: Knowledge, Skills, and Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L; Maxey, Hannah L; Battani, Kathryn; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Byrd, Tammi O; Brunick, Ann

    2017-09-01

    With the health care delivery system in transition, the way in which oral health care services are delivered in 2040 will inevitably change. To achieve the aims of reduced cost, improved access, and higher quality and to advance population wellness, oral health care will likely become a more integrated part of medical care. An integrated primary care system would better meet the needs of an increasingly diverse and aging U.S. population with uneven access to health care services. By 2040, trends suggest that a smaller proportion of dental hygienists will work in traditional solo dental offices; many more will practice with multidisciplinary health care teams in large-group dental and medical practices and in a variety of non-traditional community settings. This integration will require changes in how dental hygienists are educated. To shape the skill sets, clinical judgment, and knowledge of future practitioners, current dental hygiene curricula must be reexamined, redirected, and enhanced. This article examines some of the factors that are likely to shape the future of dental hygiene practice, considers the strengths and weaknesses of current curricula, and proposes educational changes to prepare dental hygienists for practice in 2040. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  2. Electromembrane extraction--three-phase electrophoresis for future preparative applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the principle and the future potential for electromembrane extraction (EME). EME was presented in 2006 as a totally new sample preparation technique for ionized target analytes, based on electrokinetic migration across a supported liquid membrane under the influence of an external electrical field. The principle of EME is presented, and typical performance data for EME are discussed. Most work with EME up to date has been performed with low-molecular weight pharmaceutical substances as model analytes, but the principles of EME should be developed in other directions in the future to fully explore the potential. Recent research in new directions is critically reviewed, with focus on extraction of different types of chemical and biochemical substances, new separation possibilities, new approaches, and challenges related to mass transfer and background current. The intention of this critical review is to give a flavor of EME and to stimulate into more research in the area of EME. Unlike other review articles, the current one is less comprehensive, but put more emphasis on new directions for EME.

  3. The CIRTL Network: A Professional Development Network for Future STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) is an NSF Center for Learning and Teaching in higher education using the professional development of graduate students and post-doctoral scholars as the leverage point to develop a national STEM faculty committed to implementing and advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences as part of successful professional careers. The goal of CIRTL is to improve the STEM learning of all students at every college and university, and thereby to increase the diversity in STEM fields and the STEM literacy of the nation. The CIRTL network seeks to support change at a number of levels to support its goals: individual, classroom, institutional, and national. To bring about change, which is never easy, the CIRTL network has developed a conceptual model or change model that is thought to support the program objectives. Three central concepts, Teaching-as-Research, Learning Communities, and Learning-through-Diversity, underlie the design of all CIRTL activities. STEM faculty use research methods to systematically and reflectively improve learning outcomes. This work is done within a community of shared learning and discovery, and explicitly recognizes that effective teaching capitalizes on the rich array of experiences, backgrounds, and skills among the students and instructors to enhance the learning of all. This model is being refined and tested through a networked-design experiment, where the model is tested in diverse settings. Established in fall 2006, the CIRTL Network comprises the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU), Howard University, Michigan State University, Texas A&M University, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The diversity of these institutions is by design: private/public; large/moderate size; majority-/minority-serving; geographic location. This talk will describe the theoretical constructs and efficacy of Teaching-as Research as a

  4. Students’ evaluation of preclinical simulation for all ceramic preparation (In Faculty of Dentistry Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasya Ahmad Tarib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to evaluate all ceramic crown (ACC preparations those were made by dental undergraduate students during the preclinical sessions. 104 plastic teeth were prepared by 4th year dental undergraduates during the preclinical session for ACC crown examined. The teeth were placed on the frasaco arches and were mounted in the frasaco head. The preparations were examined for the tapering, presence of undercuts, incisal and cingulum reductions as well as preparation of shoulder margin. Preparations were examined using hand instruments and visual. The sample size was 92 plastic teeth. Most of the preparations were acceptable with acceptable placement and types of margins, adequate axial and incisal reductions and acceptable tapered of the axial walls. On the other hand, most of the teeth showed absence of cingulum wall. Most of the crowns prepared by the students were acceptable. It showed that they understood the principles of crown preparation. Cingulum wall preparation has to be given greater emphasis as it is important in the retention and resistance of the restoration.

  5. Preservice Interdisciplinary Preparation of Early Intervention Specialists in a College of Nursing: Faculty Reflections and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Athleen B.

    1995-01-01

    This article relates experiences and insights gained by a nurse educator directing the University of Utah College of Nursing's Utah Early Intervention Personnel Preparation project, a graduate-level interdisciplinary program to prepare early intervention specialists. Recommendations are offered for development of preservice or inservice…

  6. The Impact of Preparing Faculty in the Effective Use of Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Mark E.; Matkin, Gina S.; Gambrell, Kem M.; Harding, Heath E.

    2010-01-01

    Companies increasingly rely on teams to improve productivity, and consequently employers expect colleges and universities to prepare graduates to effectively work in teams. To help with this need, instructors must be equipped to prepare students to fully capitalize on the power of teamwork. This study examines the effect of college instructor…

  7. All In: Teachers' and College Faculty's Roles in Recruiting Future Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Amelia Mays; Richards, K. Andrew R.; Ayers, Suzan F.

    2016-01-01

    A 10-year trend of nationwide decreases in teacher preparation enrollments has been notable in physical education teacher education (PETE) programs. Many factors have been offered as an explanation for this drop, including the convenience of online options, a strained economy, political factors, and widespread "teacher bashing." This…

  8. Preparation of faculty members and students to be citizen leaders and pharmacy advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leigh Ann; Janke, Kristin K; Boyle, Cynthia J; Gianutsos, Gerald; Lindsey, Cameron C; Moczygemba, Leticia R; Whalen, Karen

    2013-12-16

    To identify characteristics and quality indicators of best practices for leadership and advocacy development in pharmacy education, a national task force on leadership development in pharmacy invited colleges and schools to complete a phone survey to characterize the courses, processes, and noteworthy practices for leadership and advocacy development at their institution. The literature was consulted to corroborate survey findings and identify additional best practices. Recommendations were derived from the survey results and literature review, as well as from the experience and expertise of task force members. Fifty-four institutions provided information about lecture-based and experiential curricular and noncurricular components of leadership and advocacy development. Successful programs have a supportive institutional culture, faculty and alumni role models, administrative and/or financial support, and a cocurricular thread of activities. Leadership and advocacy development for student pharmacists is increasingly important. The recommendations and suggestions provided can facilitate leadership and advocacy development at other colleges and schools of pharmacy.

  9. Faculty Development for Simulation Programs: Five Issues for the Future of Debriefing Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Adan; Grant, Vincent; Dieckmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    the future of debriefing training for simulation educators, specifically the following: (1) Are we teaching the appropriate debriefing methods? (2) Are we using the appropriate methods to teach debriefing skills? (3) How can we best assess debriefing effectiveness? (4) How can peer feedback of debriefing...... be used to improve debriefing quality within programs? (5) How can we individualize debriefing training opportunities to the learning needs of our educators?...

  10. Teaching-as-Research Internships: A Model for the Development of Future Chemistry Faculty and the Improvement of Teaching in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillian-Daniel, Donald L.; Walz, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) and Madison Area Technical College (Madison College) partnered to create an internship pathway for graduate students pursuing careers as future science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) faculty members. Since 2003, 10 doctoral students from the university completed…

  11. Preparing Future Faculty for Community Engagement: Barriers, Facilitators, Models, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the historical and current national context for integrating community engagement into graduate education. While it might be argued that most graduate education contributes generally to society by advancing knowledge, we are referring here to community engagement that involves some reciprocal interaction between graduate…

  12. Changing the Learning Environment in the College of Engineering and Applied Science: The impact of Educational Training on Future Faculty and Student- Centered Pedagogy on Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Whitney

    Over the past 20 years there have been many changes to the primary and secondary educational system that have impacted students, teachers, and post-secondary institutions across the United States of America. One of the most important is the large number of standardized tests students are required to take to show adequate performance in school. Students think differently because they are taught differently due to this focus on standardized testing, thus changing the skill sets students acquire in secondary school. This presents a critical problem for colleges and universities, as they now are using practices for and have expectations of these students that are unrealistic for the changing times. High dropout rates in the College of Engineering have been attributed to the cultural atmosphere of the institution. Students have reported a low sense of belonging and low relatability to course material. This study developed a "preparing the future" faculty program that gave graduate students at the University of Cincinnati a unique training experience that helped them understand the students they will educate. They received educational training, developed from a future educator's curriculum that covered classroom management, standards, and pedagogy. Graduate students who participated in the training program reported increases in self-efficacy and student understanding. To reduce negative experiences and increase motivation, Challenge Based Learning (CBL) was introduced in an undergraduate Basic Electric Circuits (BEC) course. CBL is a structured model for course content with a foundation in problem-based learning. CBL offers general concepts from which students derive the challenges they will address. Results show an improved classroom experience for students who were taught with CBL.

  13. Social Work Faculty Support for Same-Sex Marriage: A Cross-National Study of U.S. and Anglophone Canadian MSW Teaching Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R.; Luke, Katherine P.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.; Gutierrez, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Attention to same-sex marriage has increased in the past decade. This study examines the perceptions of same-sex marriage among social work faculty. Faculty play a critical role in preparing future social workers for competent, ethical practice--including advocacy for social policies inclusive of sexual minorities. The present study investigates…

  14. Social Work Faculty Support for Same-Sex Marriage: A Cross-National Study of U.S. and Anglophone Canadian MSW Teaching Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R.; Luke, Katherine P.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.; Gutierrez, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Attention to same-sex marriage has increased in the past decade. This study examines the perceptions of same-sex marriage among social work faculty. Faculty play a critical role in preparing future social workers for competent, ethical practice--including advocacy for social policies inclusive of sexual minorities. The present study investigates…

  15. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Rama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods: Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results: Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows’ professional growth. Conclusion: The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn.

  16. Intercultural Preparation for Future Mobile Students: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, Ana; Golubeva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Higher education (HE) student mobility offers the opportunity to acquire, among other things, intercultural experience. Nevertheless, it is crucial to prepare students and give them the tools to reflect on their experiences before, during and after study abroad. In this pedagogical paper, we present and discuss "Perceptions of self and…

  17. Emerging Risk Identification Support : Preparing for present and future hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, M.M.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Food and feed companies need to be well-prepared for hazards resulting from their products and production processes. TNO has developed a unique Emerging Risk Identification Support service (ERIS ) that identifies new and unexpected hazards and helps stakeholders make well-considered decisions at an

  18. Emerging Risk Identification Support : Preparing for present and future hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, M.M.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Food and feed companies need to be well-prepared for hazards resulting from their products and production processes. TNO has developed a unique Emerging Risk Identification Support service (ERIS ) that identifies new and unexpected hazards and helps stakeholders make well-considered decisions at an

  19. Preparing Teachers of Statistics: A Graduate Course for Future Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Joan; Everson, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a unique graduate-level course that prepares teachers of introductory statistics at the college and high school levels. The course was developed as part of a graduate degree program in statistics education. Although originally taught in a face-to-face setting, the class has been converted to an online course to be accessible…

  20. Considering the Future of University-Based Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, James W.

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, James W. Fraser, a noted historian of education, cites examples from several teacher education programs at more than 30 universities partnering with the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowships in various ways. Additionally, Fraser reviews decades of challenges to traditional teacher preparation, looks at some current reforms, and…

  1. Preparing Teachers and Librarians to Collaborate to Teach 21st Century Skills: Views of LIS and Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Don; Gross, Melissa; Witte, Shelbie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the results of an exploratory research project in which library and information studies (LIS) faculty and education faculty were asked about their views on teaching pre-service school librarians and teachers 21st Century Skills (as defined by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills) and librarian-teacher collaboration.…

  2. Citizenship Education and the Preparation of Future Teachers: A Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Sjoerd; Cogan, John J.; Grossman, David L.; Liu, Mei-hui; Pitiyanuwat, Somwung

    2002-01-01

    Report of a study that examines the views of 250 future teachers of social studies regarding significant global trends, required citizenship characteristics, and educational strategies to develop such characteristics. Subjects were from China, Hong Kong, Japan, The Netherlands, Taiwan, Thailand, and the United States. (Contains 4 tables and 41…

  3. Faculty perceptions of the strengths, weaknesses and future prospects of the current medical undergraduate experimental physiology curriculum in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralikar, Swapnil; Shah, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an opinion has emerged in India that the current practical curricula in medical schools fail to meet many of the objectives for which they were instituted. Hence, this study has assessed the perception of physiology faculty members regarding the current experimental physiology curriculum in one Indian state, Gujarat. The faculty were of the opinion that many of the topics currently taught in experimental physiology (amphibian nerve-muscle and heart muscle experiments) were outdated and clinically irrelevant: Therefore, the faculty advocated that duration of teaching time devoted to some of these topics should be reduced and topics with clinical relevance should be introduced at the undergraduate level. The faculty also felt that more emphasis should be laid on highlighting the clinical aspect related to each concept taught in experimental physiology . Moreover, a majority of faculty members were in favour of replacing the current practice in Gujarat of teaching experimental physiology only by explanation of graphs obtained from experiments conducted in the previous years, with computer assisted learning in small groups.

  4. Web-Based Resources to Help Students and Faculty Prepare to use Information Technology in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    Teaching in the field is undergoing a revolution as new information technologies are being used to support a wide range of instructional activities in geology, oceanography, ecology, and related disciplines. In particular, the use of ruggedized laptop and palmtop computers with integrated GPS, GIS, data management, imaging and note-taking software presents a fundamentally new way to map and collect other data in the field. By bringing information technologies into the field, it is now possible to integrate many types of data such as digital elevation maps, air photo and satellite imagery, a variety of geophysical and geochemical databases (e.g. chemical anomaly maps, aeromagnetics, gravity). This allows students to engage much deeper levels of decision-making, problem-solving, and critical-thinking while still in the field setting. This technology also allows instructors to more closely monitor the progress of student projects in the field, and to assess the process as well as the products of student field work. For professional geologists, data acquisition and interpretation using digital technology in the field will rapidly become the industry standard, and now is the time to begin to prepare students to regularly use these new capabilities. To address the new possibilities of teaching with information technology in the field, a workshop was convened in February 2007 at Montana State University to aggregate and disseminate the practical advice and experience of geoscience instructors already using this technology. The outcome of this workshop is a website that contains advice on "best practices" in using these information technologies in field instruction including sections on: definition of learning goals, thinking skills and problem solving strategies, student and faculty preparation, selecting hardware and software, data resources, logistical consideration, GPS and learning, taking e-notes, mobile collaborations, and examples of field exercises. This website

  5. Business Continuity Planning: Are We Prepared for Future Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naill M. Momani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Natural and man-made disasters could cause a lot of monetary, mortality and morbidity losses for our business’ operations such as: Activities, products and services. In order to minimize losses from such disasters, it is essential to prepare and implement effective business continuity plans that could deal with abnormal conditions. Approach: In this study, a discussion of the major risk factors that could cause business disruption and the main strategies to prevent business’ losses were discussed so as to advice effective business continuity plans for organizations. Results: Risks are due to human and technology factors, natural and man-made disasters are the main contributors to business’ losses. Conclusion/Recommendations: This study introduced the main components to evaluate and modernize business continuity plans with the intention to develop effective business continuity plans.

  6. Preparing for the future: opportunities for ML in ATLAS & CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    ML is an established tool in HEP and there are many examples which demonstrate its importance for the kind of classification and regression problem we have in our field. However, there is also a big potential for future applications in yet untapped areas. I will summarise these opportunities and highlight recent, ongoing and planned studies of novel ML applications in HEP. Certain aspects of the problems we are faced with in HEP are quite unique and represent interesting benchmark problems for the ML community as a whole. Hence, efficient communication and close interaction between the ML and HEP community is expected to lead to promising cross-fertilisation. This talk attempts to serve as a starting point for such a prospective collaboration.

  7. Is the US Workforce Prepared to Thrive in the Past or in the Future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrus, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Past education focused on the three Rs (reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic), but these no longer give humans an edge over advanced computers and automation systems. This is why we need to understand where the future is heading and better prepare both our current workforce as well as the future workforce for tomorrow's job market. Of…

  8. Envisioning the Future of Special Education Personnel Preparation in a Standards-Based Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leko, Melinda M.; Brownell, Mary T.; Sindelar, Paul T.; Kiely, Mary Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the future of special education personnel preparation by responding to an overarching question: "What frameworks might teacher educators use as a basis to promote special education teacher effective performance now and in the future?" In answering this question, they summarize current trends in the context of…

  9. An Exploration of Policies Governing Faculty-to-Student Consensual Sexual Relationships on University Campuses: Current Strategies and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tara N.; Crittenden, Courtney; Garland, Tammy S.; McGuffee, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Consensual sexual relationships between students and faculty have traditionally been viewed as private matters and have been ignored by university administrators except in cases that resulted in sexual harassment claims. Due to increasing sexual harassment litigation and the liabilities associated with such relationships, universities have…

  10. Investing in the Future: The Importance of Faculty Mentoring in the Development of Students of Color in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Perez, David, II; Holmes, Annie P. E.; Mayo, Claude E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Underrepresented racial minority students often seek a high level of contact with professors of color, viewing them as role models and proof that success in higher education is possible. These faculty members are often able to connect with students of color in deep and meaningful ways based on shared experiences in higher education. That is, many…

  11. Perspectives on the Present State and Future of Higher Education Faculty Development in Kazakhstan: Implications for National Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitova, Dinara

    2016-01-01

    The article aims at examining the present state of higher education faculty development in Kazakhstan in the context of multidimensional nationwide development reforms and exploring implications for the National Human Resource Development of the country. For the purpose of this research, theoretical human resource development (HRD) and…

  12. Forming of communicative competence as condition of professional preparation of future teachers of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsutina NM.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern state and necessity of realization of forming communicative competence of future teachers of physical culture is found out in the process of professional preparation. 294 students took part in an experiment. Rotined expedience of realization of forming of communicative competence of future teachers of physical culture. The questionnaire of students of higher educational establishments is conducted. The level of formed of communicative competence for students remains at low level. It needs strengthening of attention to perfection of process of professional preparation of future teachers of physical culture.

  13. Preparing nursing students for the future: an innovative approach to clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ann E; Noone, Joanne; Voss, Heather; Mathews, Launa Rae

    2013-07-01

    A clinical education model was developed and implemented by nursing faculty in the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education undergraduate curriculum to improve clinical learning for preparation of nurses to practice in the 21st century. This clinical education model, developed though collaborative work by nursing practice and education representatives throughout the state, moves away from a "random access opportunity" model of clinical education reliant on "total patient care" experiences to an intentional design of clinical learning activities based on course competencies appropriate to student level. Five elements of the model were proposed: case-based, concept-based, intervention skill-based, focused direct client care and integrative experiences. Different elements are dominant in early, middle and late clinical experiences to best support the developmental level of the student. Expectations for faculty, students and clinical staff were also developed to enhance best practices in clinical learning. Preparation of clinical partners for a change in clinical learning and student accountability are essential for optimal learning. This paper provides an overview of the model with clinical application examples for each element with a particular emphasis on case-based, concept-based and integrative clinical experiences.

  14. Pediatrics in the year 2020 and beyond: preparing for plausible futures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, Amy J; Duby, John C; Slaw, Kenneth M; Edwards, Anne; Leslie, Laurel K

    2010-11-01

    Although the future of pediatrics is uncertain, the organizations that lead pediatrics, and the professionals who practice within it, have embraced the notion that the pediatric community must anticipate and lead change to ultimately improve the health of children and adolescents. In an attempt to proactively prepare for a variety of conceivable futures, the board of directors of the American Academy of Pediatrics established the Vision of Pediatrics 2020 Task Force in 2008. This group was charged to think broadly about the future of pediatrics, to gather input on key trends that are influencing the future, to create likely scenarios of the future, and to recommend strategies to best prepare pediatric clinicians and pediatric organizations for a range of potential futures. The work of this task force led to the development of 8 "megatrends" that were identified as highly likely to have a profound influence on the future of pediatrics. A separate list of "wild-card" scenarios was created of trends with the potential to have a substantial influence but are less likely to occur. The process of scenario-planning was used to consider the effects of the 8 megatrends on pediatrics in the year 2020 and beyond. Consideration of these possible scenarios affords the opportunity to determine potential future pediatric needs, to identify potential solutions to address those needs, and, ultimately, to proactively prepare the profession to thrive if these or other future scenarios become realities.

  15. Perceptions of distance education among nursing faculty members in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Josephine M

    2009-06-01

    A strategy to increase access to nursing education, train nurses for practice, and prepare future nurse educators is distance education. Faculty member shortages are cited as the main reason for not accepting qualified applicants. Faculty members are the core of nursing education. In order to address nursing faculty members' concerns regarding distance education and to assist in faculty member recruitment, retention, growth, and development in order to improve and enhance the quality of distance education, one must answer the question: What are nursing faculty members' perceptions of distance education in nursing? Utilizing a number of databases to locate research specific to this topic, this article provides an integrative review of the nursing literature to ascertain the faculty members' perspective of distance education. The research was analyzed, findings summarized, and limitations mentioned. Utilizing a brief supplementary review of the literature, the implications, recommendations, and need for future research are discussed.

  16. Nursing faculty preparedness for clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Gardner, Marcia; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie

    2014-03-01

    Nursing faculty who teach in clinical settings face complex situations requiring evidence-based educational and evaluative strategies, yet many have had limited preparation for these tasks. A convenience sample of 74 nursing faculty participated in a survey about clinical teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Most faculty developed teaching skills through conferences (57%), orientation at their educational institution (53%), or exposure in graduate school (38%). Thirty-one percent reported having no preparation for clinical teaching. Faculty felt least prepared to manage students with learning, physical, or emotional disabilities and incivility. Twenty-six percent had no preparation for evaluating students in the clinical setting, and only 17% had worked with a faculty mentor. Few evidence-based teaching strategies were used by the faculty. These findings indicate gaps exist in the preparation of clinical faculty. Graduate education, comprehensive orientation programs, and continuing professional development may help to ensure faculty are effective in managing and evaluating student learning. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Flexible Pedagogies: Technology-Enhanced Learning. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This publication is part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future". It focuses on a better understanding of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) and: (1) identifies key international drivers in the move towards technology-enhanced learning; (2) highlights some of the challenges and opportunities…

  18. Flexible Pedagogies: Employer Engagement and Work-Based Learning. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This publication focuses on national and international policy initiatives to develop a better understanding of work-based learners and the types of flexibility that may well enhance their study especially pedagogically. As part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future" it: (1) highlights the…

  19. Hope for the best, prepare for the worst? Future self-views and preparation for age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornadt, Anna E; Voss, Peggy; Rothermund, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Extending research on the impact of views on aging and developmental regulation across the life span, we tested the hypothesis that more positive views of oneself as an older person predict more preparation for age-related changes. Drawing on recent evidence regarding the domain specificity of aging-related developmental processes, we assumed this relationship to be moderated by the relevance of preparation in different life domains for different age groups. We investigated these research questions in a longitudinal study that assessed future self-views and preparation for different life domains in a sample covering a large part of the adult life span. Findings supported our hypotheses: More positive/negative personal views of one's own aging at T1 predicted subsequent increases/decreases in preparation, with influences being strongest for those domains in which relevant age-related changes are expected to occur for the respective age groups. Our study provides additional evidence for the idea that views on aging shape development, identifying age-related provision making as an important mediating process. Furthermore, our findings highlight the added value of a domain-specific approach that takes the differential relevance of life domains and age-related developmental tasks into account.

  20. Financial Exigency and Dismissal of Higher Education Faculty: Be Prepared. An Investigation Carried Out as Part of a Study of the Legal Aspects of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rod E.

    The way that college faculty and institutions are affected by financial exigency is examined through a study of case law. Selected cases demonstrate the legal principles involved when faculty are dismissed and seek relief in the courts. Cases concerning private colleges relate to tenured faculty, because nontenured faculty in private have legal…

  1. [TEACHING BIO-MEDICAL INFORMATICS TO MEDICAL STUDENTS IN THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE IN THE GALILEE - GOALS, LESSONS AND A FUTURE PERSPECTIVE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Amir; Onn, Itay

    2016-04-01

    Bioinformatics is a scientific discipline that deals with the processing of biological data by computers. In recent years, bioinformatic tools were applied to the analysis of medical databases in order to develop new pathways for diagnosis and to improve medical treatment. The best example is personalized medicine, which depends on bioinformatic analysis. Despite early assessments, bioinformatics didn't change the clinical landscape dramatically, and personalized medicine is still not a main approach in healthcare. One of the holdbacks is the knowledge gap among clinicians. Therefore, massive integration of bioinformatics into the clinic will most likely be the challenge of the new generations of clinicians to come. As part of the innovative curriculum of the newly established Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, it took up the challenge of teaching bioinformatics, and by doing so, joined some of the leading medical schools worldwide. In this review we will provide a few examples for the use of bioinformatics in the clinic. Furthermore, we will describe the content of the bioinformatics course in the Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee and discuss some of the lessons learned and future perspectives.

  2. ROLE OF EXPERIMENT IN PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF FUTURE SPECIALISTS IN THE SYSTEM «COLLEGE-UNIVERSITY»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia T. Levochko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article a value and role of experiment in professional preparation of future specialists opens up in the system “college-university”. An experiment plays a considerable role during realization of pedagogical, educational reforms, enables to check up the professional competence of specialists, professional abilities and skills, theoretical purchased knowledgе which are inculcated in practical activity in practicе. During research, by carrying out the experiments, the basic criteria of learning efficiency with use of test tasks and questioning for formation of professional competence and professional skills of the future specialists of economic branch in the system "college-university" have been offered.

  3. Supporting Future Faculty in Developing Their Teaching Practices: An Exploration of Communication Networks among Graduate Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that informal communications among Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are more influential in shaping their teaching practices than formal induction programs. Yet little is known about how these informal helping relationships evolve and how universities can help support their formation as part of the preparation of future…

  4. Using Place-Based Independent Class Projects as a Means to Hone Research Skills and Prepare a Future Geospatial Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A.; Gens, R.; Cristobal, J.; Waigl, C. F.; Balazs, M. S.; Graham, P. R.; Butcher, C. E.; Sparrow, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    It is never too early to bring in your own research into teaching. Considerable efforts have been made globally to introduce STEM research themes in K12 environments. These efforts a laudable as they help to create STEM identity in students and get students excited to pursue higher education. The task of a post-secondary educator is to build on that excitement and ensure that the students who enter higher education come out knowledgeable, skilled, and employable. At the University of Alaska Fairbanks we have structured our geospatial curricula to include place-based, independent research projects in several semester-long classes. These class-projects serve as mini capstone research experiences that take a student through the entire process of research including: identifying a problem or need; building a hypothesis; formulating the science question; searching, acquiring, and processing data; analyzing and interpreting the research results; and presenting the outcomes in written and oral format to a peer group. Over a decade of experience has shown that students tend to engage and perform well when the research addresses an authentic problem they can relate to and take ownership of. Over 150 student-lead class projects using a variety of freely available datasets have contributed not only to preparing the future workforce, but also to enhancing the research profile of UAF. We extended the same model to a summer internship program where graduate students who have gone through the experience of an in-class research project serve as mentors for undergraduate interns. Even the condensed time frame yields positive outcomes including joint publications between faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduate students in the peer-reviewed literature.

  5. Preparation of human resources for future nuclear energy using FBNR as the instrument of learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefidvash, Farhang; Espinoza, Patricio; Guerrero, Victor Hugo [Escuela Politecnica Nacional (EPN), Quito (Ecuador); and others

    2015-11-15

    An increasing number of developing countries are showing interest to become the emerging countries to nuclear energy. Most of these countries lack human resources and adequate infrastructures to enter such a venture. The principle objective of activities of FBNR Group is to train human resources for the countries that at the present lack the necessary conditions, but aim at the future clean and safe nuclear energy through the fourth generation and INPRO compatible nuclear reactors. The preparation for the future nuclear energy is done through development of innovative nuclear reactor that meets the INPRO philosophies and criteria. These countries may or may not have decided as yet to utilize nuclear energy, but are interested to gain a strong educational foundation for their future. The research and development of a small innovative nuclear reactor FBNR is used as the instrument for learning. The young scientists will learn how to be innovative with the vision of INPRO philosophy and criteria.

  6. Workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Providing resources and support for new faculty to succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Beane, R. J.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Yuretich, R.; Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A vital strategy to educate future geoscientists is to support faculty at the beginning of their careers, thus catalyzing a career-long impact on the early-career faculty and on their future students. New faculty members are at a pivotal stage in their careers as they step from being research-focused graduate students and post-doctoral scholars, under the guidance of advisors, towards launching independent careers as professors. New faculty commonly, and not unexpectedly, feel overwhelmed as they face challenges to establish themselves in a new environment, prepare new courses, begin new research, and develop a network of support. The workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career has been offered annually in the U.S. since 1999. The workshop is currently offered through the National Association of Geoscience Teachers On the Cutting Edge professional development program with support from the NSF, AGU and GSA. This five-day workshop, with associated web resources, offers guidance for incorporating evidence-based teaching practices, developing a research program, and managing professional responsibilities in balance with personal lives. The workshop design includes plenary and concurrent sessions, individual consultations, and personalized feedback from workshop participants and leaders. Since 1999, more than 850 U.S. faculty have attended the Early Career Geoscience Faculty workshop. Participants span a wide range of geoscience disciplines, and are in faculty positions at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, comprehensive universities and research universities. The percentages of women (~50%) and underrepresented participants (~8%) are higher than in the general geoscience faculty population. Multiple participants each year are starting positions after receiving all or part of their education outside the U.S. Collectively, participants report that they are better prepared to move forward with their careers as a result of

  7. Playing to our human strengths to prepare medical students for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We are living in an age where artificial intelligence and astounding technological advances are bringing truly remarkable change to healthcare. Medical knowledge and skills which form the core responsibility of doctors such as making diagnoses may increasingly be delivered by robots. Machines are gradually acquiring human abilities such as deep learning and empathy. What, then is the role of doctors in future healthcare? And what direction should medical schools be taking to prepare their graduates? This article will give an overview of the evolving technological landscape of healthcare and examine the issues undergraduate medical education may have to address. The experience at The University of Hong Kong will serve as a case study featuring several curricular innovations that aim to empower medical graduates with the capabilities to thrive in the future.

  8. What is the Future of Pediatric Neurology in Canada? Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Training and Workforce Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Clarkin, Chantalle; Whiting, Sharon; Moharir, Mahendranath

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric neurology trainee numbers have grown considerably in Canada; recent research, however, has shown that the number of pediatric neurology graduates is outpacing the need for future pediatric neurologists. The purpose of this study was to seek the opinion of pediatric neurology program directors and trainees regarding possible solutions for this issue. Two focus groups were convened during the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation annual congress in June 2012; one consisted of current and former program directors, and the other of current pediatric neurology trainees. Groups were asked for their perceptions regarding child neurology manpower issues in Canada as well as possible solutions. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Theme-based qualitative analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Major themes emerging from both focus groups included the emphasis on community pediatric neurology as a viable option for trainees, including the need for community mentors; recognizing the needs of underserviced areas; and establishing academic positions for community preceptors. The need for career mentoring and support structures during residency training was another major theme which arose. Program directors and trainees also gave examples of ways to reduce the current oversupply of trainees in Canada, including limiting the number of trainees entering programs, as well as creating a long-term vision of child neurology in Canada. A nationwide dialogue to discuss the supply and demand of manpower in academic and community pediatric neurology is essential. Career guidance options for pediatric neurology trainees across the country merit further strengthening.

  9. An alternative path to improving university Earth science teaching and developing the geoscience workforce: Postdoctoral research faculty involvement in clinical teacher preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirakparvar, N. A.; Sessa, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Nadeau, P. A.; Flores, K. E.; Ebel, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2020 relative to 2009, there will be 28% more Earth Science jobs paying ≥ $75,000/year1 in the U.S.A. These jobs will require advanced degrees, but compared to all arts and science advanced degrees, the number of physical science M.S. and Ph.D. awarded per year decreased from 2.5% in 1980 to 1.5% in 20092. This decline is reflected on a smaller scale and at a younger age: in the New York City school system only 36% of all 8th graders have basic proficiency in science 3. These figures indicate that the lack achievement in science starts at a young age and then extends into higher education. Research has shown that students in grades 7 - 12 4,5 and in university level courses 6 both respond positively to high quality science teaching. However, much attention is focused on improving science teaching in grades 7- 12, whereas at many universities lower level science courses are taught by junior research and contingent faculty who typically lack formal training, and sometimes interest, in effective teaching. The danger here is that students might enter university intending to pursue geoscience degrees, but then encounter ineffective instructors, causing them to lose interest in geoscience and thus pursue other disciplines. The crux of the matter becomes how to improve the quality of university-level geoscience teaching, without losing sight of the major benchmark of success for research faculty - scholarly publications reporting innovative research results. In most cases, it would not be feasible to sidetrack the research goals of early career scientists by placing them into a formal teacher preparation program. But what happens when postdoctoral research scientists take an active role in clinical teacher preparation as part of their research appointments? The American Museum of Natural History's Masters of Arts in Teaching (AMNH-MAT) urban residency pilot program utilizes a unique approach to grade 7 - 12 Earth Science teacher

  10. Melting in the Arctic: Preparing Now for Possibilities in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Two, as well as the rest of the students, faculty, and staff, made this year a tremendous learning experience. ii ...Although the issue of Taiwan reunification with mainland China 21 Jim Sciutto, “Exclusive: China

  11. A novel preparation procedure of future weather datasets for building performance simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Tsang; Chuang, Kai-Han

    2014-05-01

    a given future period under certain climate change scenarios should be identified. The GCMs provided by the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) were used to calculate these changes of every accounted meteorological elements that need to be morphed. Since these GCMs may deviates substantially, one might choose an appropriate GCM prior to the morphing procedure. Therefore, to identify the GCM that project well against actual local climate trends, principle component analysis (PCA) was introduced. First principle component of each GCM predicted weather data as well as the observed data from the same period were obtained by PCA. Afterwards, root mean square deviation (RMSD) was used to identify the GCM that suits local trends. The results show that the morphed TMYs agree well with the observed data during the validation process, revealing that the proposed procedure of future weather preparation for building simulation is reliable and also feasible. Hourly future weather datasets for the purpose of building performance simulation for northern and southern Taiwan with two greenhouse gas emission scenarios covering three future timeframes (i.e. 2030s, 2050s, 2080s) were established and discussed herein.

  12. The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; Wamsley, Maria A; Azzam, Amin; Julian, Katherine; Irby, David M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-01-01

    Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of engagement, imagination, and alignment for identity formation. Through course requirements, learners engage and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners imagine personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to align with the broader educator community of practice. From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued engagement with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations (imagination), joined an educator-in-training community (engagement/imagination), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications (alignment). Learners identified engagement with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for imagining and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator

  13. Keeping up with the Future: Preparing Leadership Talent for the Evolving Space Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Yoshiki; Peeters, Walter

    Space and globalization are closely related. Not only for financial, but also for far-reaching political motives space activities have played a role as ‘globalization catalyst’. Many international space projects have been used in the past as symbols for political cooperation, and we can safely assume that this will continue to be the case in the future. In addition to this, industrial cooperation is equally becoming more global, starting off with the telecommunication sector. From this point of view it seems logic that also space education programs prepare the young professionals for a global environment. The programs of the International Space University (ISU) have been designed to satisfy these needs. This article attempts to make the link between the global, philosophical dimension of space programs with space education curricula emphasizing international and intercultural dimensions. In particular, the excellent interrelation between the Japanese space sector and ISU will be highlighted.

  14. Informatization and computerization of process of professional preparation of future teacher of physical culture is the future of athletic education in Ukraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragnev Y.V.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article informatization and computerization of process of professional preparation of future teacher of physical culture is examined. Specified on the improvement of all of on-line tutorials which it is necessary to do and offer to the future teachers of physical culture taking into account the world tendencies of informatization of education. It is marked that modern higher athletic education in informative society Ukraine must show by itself component part of this society, to answer the requirements of contemporary in relation to informatization of education in general, to give possibility the future teacher of physical culture to promote the level of computer literacy.

  15. An Imperative for Leadership Preparation Programs: Preparing Future Leaders to Meet the Needs of Students, Schools, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the structure, philosophy, and curriculum of educational leadership preparation programs and the importance of preparing schools leaders to address the unique needs of students and communities. In particular, it will address how programs can be enhanced by integrating organizational research and philosophies from educational,…

  16. ESMD Space Grant Faculty Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang; Whitmore, Stephen; Radcliff, Roger; Misra, Prabhakar; Prasad, Nadipuram; Conrad, James; Lackey, Ellen; Selby, Gregory; Wersinger, Jean-Marie; Lambright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The strength of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate ESMD Faculty Project lies in its ability to meet National Aeronautics Space Administration NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1 by developing a sustainable and long-term integration of student involvement at academic institutions with all NASA Centers. This outcome is achieved by a three-fold approach: 1) by collecting Senior Design projects pertaining to Constellation work performed at each of the ten NASA Centers, 2) by engaging students at Minority Serving Institutions in the art of systems engineering and systems design of technologies required for space exploration, and 3) by identifying potential internships at each Center relative to exploration that provide students who are supported by their institutional Space Grant to engage in on-going mission-level and explorative systems designs. The objectives of the ESMD Faculty Project are to: 1. Aid the Centers (both Education Offices and associated technical organizations) in providing relevant opportunities for the ESMD Space Grant Program to support student and faculty in Senior Design projects 2. Enable better matches between the ESMD work required and what the Space Grant Consortia can do to effectively contribute to NASA programs 3. Provide the Space Grant Consortia an opportunity to strengthen relations with the NASA Centers 4. Develop better collective understanding of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy by the Center, Space Grant, faculty, Education Office, and students 5. Enable Space Grant institution faculty to better prepare their students to meet current and future NASA needs 6. Enable the Center Education Offices to strengthen their ties to their technical organizations and Space Grant Consortia 7. Aid KSC in gaining a greater and more detailed understanding of each of the Center activities Senior Design projects are intended to stimulate undergraduate students on current NASA activities related to lunar, Mars, and other planetary missions

  17. The Development of TAs: Preparing for the Future while Enhancing the Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svinicki, Marilla D.

    1989-01-01

    Departments have a responsibility for helping TAs develop as teachers, for evaluating TA performance, and or addressing the special needs of foreign-born TAs. The Teaching Assistant's role, course assignment procedures, supervising faculty, training programs, and informative feedback systems are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  18. Sweet smells prepare plants for future stress: airborne induction of plant disease immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Ryu, Choong-Min; Heil, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Plants require protection against a wide range of attackers such as insects and pathogens. The adequate plant defense responses are regulated via sophisticated signal cascades, which are activated following the perception of specific cues of the attackers. Plants might, however, gain a significant fitness advantage when pre-empting enemy attack before it actually occurs. Monitoring cues from attacked neighbors can permit plants to reach this goal. We have recently found airborne disease resistance against a bacterial pathogen in uninfected lima bean plants when these were located close to conspecific, resistance-expressing neighbors. The emitters could be chemically induced with benzothiadiazole or biologically with an avirulent pathogen. Unexpectedly, receiver plants, although expressing a functioning resistance, did not show reduced growth rates, which represent a common side-effect of directly induced pathogen resistance. Nonanal was identified as an active volatile and, rather than directly inducing full resistance, primed defense gene expression, which became fully activated only when the plants were subsequently challenged by a virulent pathogen. Priming by airborne signals allows for a more efficient and less costly preparation of plants for future attack and airborne signaling can affect resistance against both major groups of plant enemies: herbivores and pathogens.

  19. The challenge of monitoring the cryosphere in alpine environments: Prepare the present for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrea; Helfricht, Kay; Seiser, Bernd; Stocker-Waldhuber, Martin; Hartl, Lea; Wiesenegger, Hans

    2017-04-01

    , limits the number of potential candidates for future monitoring drastically. In the light of these developments, sample sizes are a critical question for reliable monitoring, together with strategies for coping with changing monitoring sites and composition of time series. As a first step, the Austrian monitoring network has been analyzed from 1891 onwards. Past changes evident from the glacier inventories capturing all glaciers have been compared to the subsamples of glaciers monitored for length change, mass balance and ice flow velocities. The results show that for capturing the full bandwidth of regional changes, glacier inventories are necessary. Without the analysis of larger scale changes, the interpretation of records with very low sample sizes, such as mass balance or length change, has a high uncertainty level. For specific research or monitoring purposes, for example, the development of runoff master sites with all types of monitoring techniques improve the certainty of the spatial extrapolations of local records or the interpretation of volume changes. The challenge of preparing the present network for the future requires a thorough analysis of potential future developments to be able to switch sites with a common observation period necessary to investigate the different sensitivities.

  20. Preparing the Dutch delta for future droughts: model based support in the national Delta Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Maat, Judith; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; van der Vat, Marnix; Hunink, Joachim; Prinsen, Geert; Visser, Martijn

    2014-05-01

    Keywords: uncertainty, policymaking, adaptive policies, fresh water management, droughts, Netherlands, Dutch Deltaprogramme, physically-based complex model, theory-motivated meta-model To prepare the Dutch Delta for future droughts and water scarcity, a nation-wide 4-year project, called Delta Programme, is established to assess impacts of climate scenarios and socio-economic developments and to explore policy options. The results should contribute to a national adaptive plan that is able to adapt to future uncertain conditions, if necessary. For this purpose, we followed a model-based step-wise approach, wherein both physically-based complex models and theory-motivated meta-models were used. First step (2010-2011) was to make a quantitative problem description. This involved a sensitivity analysis of the water system for drought situations under current and future conditions. The comprehensive Dutch national hydrological instrument was used for this purpose and further developed. Secondly (2011-2012) our main focus was on making an inventory of potential actions together with stakeholders. We assessed efficacy, sell-by date of actions, and reassessed vulnerabilities and opportunities for the future water supply system if actions were (not) taken. A rapid assessment meta-model was made based on the complex model. The effects of all potential measures were included in the tool. Thirdly (2012-2013), with support of the rapid assessment model, we assessed the efficacy of policy actions over time for an ensemble of possible futures including sea level rise and climate and land use change. Last step (2013-2014) involves the selection of preferred actions from a set of promising actions that meet the defined objectives. These actions are all modeled and evaluated using the complex model. The outcome of the process will be an adaptive management plan. The adaptive plan describes a set of preferred policy pathways - sequences of policy actions - to achieve targets under

  1. Dynamics of Faculty Engagement in the Movement for Democracy's Education at Northern Arizona University: Backgrounds, Practices, and Future Horizons. Kettering Foundation Working Paper: [2015:02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Romand; Scarnati, Blase

    2015-01-01

    As scholarship has become increasingly narrow and disconnected from public life, Kettering research has documented an intense sense of malaise in higher education, what Harry Boyte has called a loss of civic agency. Surprisingly, however, faculty at a few campuses have begun to self-organize to integrate civic work into their teaching and…

  2. On being examined: do students and faculty agree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Andrew; Koenig, Joshua; Kwon, Henry; Nastos, Stash; Rangachari, P K

    2015-12-01

    Students measure out their lives, not with coffee spoons, but with grades on examinations. But what exams mean and whether or not they are a bane or a boon is moot. Senior undergraduates (A. Perrella, J. Koenig, and H. Kwon) designed and administered a 15-item survey that explored the contrasting perceptions of both students (n = 526) and faculty members (n = 33) in a 4-yr undergraduate health sciences program. A series of statements gauged the level of agreement on a 10-point scale. Students and faculty members agreed on the value of assessing student learning with a variety of methods, finding new information to solve problems, assessing conceptual understanding and logical reasoning, having assessments with no single correct answer, and having comments on exams. Clear differences emerged between students and faculty members on specific matters: rubrics, student choice of exam format, assessing creativity, and transfer of learning to novel situations. A followup questionnaire allowed participants to clarify their interpretation of select statements, with responses from 71 students and 17 faculty members. All parties strongly agreed that exams should provide a good learning experience that would help them prepare for the future (students: 8.64 ± 1.71 and faculty members: 8.03 ± 2.34). Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  3. Flexible Pedagogies: Part-Time Learners and Learning in Higher Education. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This publication focuses on national and international policy initiatives to develop a better understanding of part-time learners and the types of flexibility that may enhance their study especially pedagogically. As part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future" it: (1) highlights the challenges…

  4. Experience, Intersubjectivity, and Reflection: A Human Science Perspective on Preparation of Future Professionals in Adaptive Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standal, Øyvind F.; Rugseth, Gro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show that and how philosophy and philosophical thinking can be of relevance for the preparation of future professionals in adaptive physical activity. To this end we utilize philosophical insights from the human science perspective on two central issues, namely experience and intersubjectivity, which are weaved…

  5. Diversity Competencies within Early Childhood Teacher Preparation: Innovative Practices and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chih-Ing; Able-Boone, Harriet

    2005-01-01

    With classrooms becoming increasingly diverse due to children's various cultural backgrounds and varying abilities, early childhood teacher education programs face the challenge of how best to prepare the workforce. Various initiatives have been implemented in teacher preparation programs to prepare early childhood educators to become competent in…

  6. Analogue Missions on Earth, a New Approach to Prepare Future Missions on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeuf, Martin

    Human exploration of the Moon is a target by 2020 with an initial lunar outpost planned in polar regions. Current architectures maintain a capability for sorties to other latitudes for science activities. In the early stages of design of lunar outpost infrastructure and science activity planning, it has been recognized that analogue missions could play a major role in Moon mission design. Analogue missions, as high fidelity simulations of human and robotic surface operations, can help field scientists and engineers develop and test strategies as well as user requirements, as they provide opportunities to groundtruth measurements, and for the team to share understanding of key science needs and key engineering trades. These types of missions also provide direct training in planning science operations, and in team building and communication. The Canadian Space Agency's Exploration Core Program targets the development of technology infrastructure elements in key areas of science, technology and robotics in preparation for its role in the future exploration of the Moon and Mars. Within this Program, Analogue Missions specifically target the operations requirements and lessons learned that will reduce costs and lower the risk of planetary surface missions. Analogue missions are simulations of planetary surface operations that take place at analogue sites on Earth. A terrestrial analogue site resembles in some key way: eg. geomorphologically or geochemically, a surface environment of another planet. An analogue mission can, therefore, be defined as an integrated set of activities that represent (or simulate) entire mission designs or narrowly focus on specific aspects of planned or potential future planetary exploration missions. Within the CSA's Exploration Core Program, Analogue Missions facilitate the maturation of science instruments and mission concepts by integrating ongoing space instrument and technology development programs with science and analogue elements. As

  7. Futurism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jane Loring

    The objectives of this research report are to gain insight into the main problems of the future and to ascertain the attitudes that the general population has toward the treatment of these problems. In the first section of this report the future is explored socially, psychologically, and environmentally. The second section describes the techniques…

  8. Faculty development in medical education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Joseph; Hamstra, Stanley J; Martin, Daniel R; Searle, Nancy; Love, Jeffrey; Castaneda, Jill; Aziz-Bose, Rahela; Smith, Michael; Griswold-Therodorson, Sharon; Leuck, JoAnna

    2012-12-01

    This 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference breakout session was devoted to the task of identifying the history and current state of faculty development in education research in emergency medicine (EM). The participants set a future agenda for successful faculty development in education research. A number of education research and content experts collaborated during the session. This article summarizes existing academic and medical literature, expert opinions, and audience consensus to report our agreement and findings related to the promotion of faculty development.

  9. Student and Faculty Ethnic Diversity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Keith; Girardi, Anthony G.

    2007-01-01

    The annual Ethnic Diversity Report provides information about minority student enrollment and minority faculty at Iowa colleges and universities. The "Student and Faculty Ethnic Diversity Report" has been prepared annually since 1992 and is provided to the Governor and General Assembly leadership. This summary is based on a Fall 2006…

  10. Preparing Future Teachers for Inclusion Classrooms Using Virtual World Role-Play Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirliss, Danielle Salomone

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs are exploring opportunities to better prepare pre-service teachers for the realities of managing inclusion classrooms. The ability to manage a classroom while meeting the learning needs of all students is critical to the success of a teacher. Research suggests that a teacher's positive attitudes toward inclusion and…

  11. Faculty development needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Thomas K; Ferenchick, Gary S; Clark, Jeanne M; Bowen, Judith L; Branch, William T; Alguire, Patrick; Esham, Richard H; Clayton, Charles P; Kern, David E

    2004-04-01

    We compared prior training in 4 areas (general teaching skills, teaching specific content areas, teaching by specific methods and in specific settings, and general professional skills) among community-based teachers based in private practices (N = 61) compared with those in community sites operated by teaching institutions (N = 64) and hospital-based faculty (N = 291), all of whom attended one of three national faculty development conferences. The prevalence of prior training was low. Hospital-based faculty reported the most prior training in all 4 categories, teaching hospital affiliated community-based teachers an intermediate amount, and private practice community-based teachers the least (all P <.05). This association remained after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, and amount of time spent in teaching and clinical activities. Preferences for future training reported frequently by the private practice community-based teachers included: time management (48%); teaching evidence-based medicine (46%); evaluation of learners (38%); giving feedback (39%); outpatient precepting (38%); and "teaching in the presence of the patient" (39%).

  12. Faculty Perceptions of Basic Skills Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michelle Moreau

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of faculty regarding why they choose to attend basic skills faculty development; what they choose to implement in their classrooms; and how they determine the effectiveness of the strategies selected. A survey was completed by 173 full and part-time faculty from a large, suburban single-campus community…

  13. Association of faculty perceptions of work-life with emotional exhaustion and intent to leave academic nursing: report on a national survey of nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J; Chou, Jolene; Brownlee, Susan; Flynn, Linda; Tanner, Christine A

    2014-10-01

    The current and projected nurse faculty shortage threatens the capacity to educate sufficient numbers of nurses for meeting demand. As part of an initiative to foster strategies for expanding educational capacity, a survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,120 full-time nurse faculty members in 269 schools and programs that offered at least one prelicensure degree program was conducted. Nearly 4 of 10 participants reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, and one third expressed an intent to leave academic nursing within 5 years. Major contributors to burnout were dissatisfaction with workload and perceived inflexibility to balance work and family life. Intent to leave was explained not only by age but by several potentially modifiable aspects of work, including dissatisfaction with workload, salary, and availability of teaching support. Preparing sufficient numbers of nurses to meet future health needs will require addressing those aspects of work-life that undermine faculty teaching capacity. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Developing a Laboratory Model for the Professional Preparation of Future Science Teachers: A Situated Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin E.; Paradis, Jeffrey A.

    2004-04-01

    Although laboratory activities are widely acknowledged as being fundamental to the teaching of science, many secondary science school teachers have limited knowledge of how to design and run effective teaching laboratories. Utilising a situated cognition theoretical framework, we discuss our collaborative efforts to develop a laboratory based model for the professional preparation of secondary level science teachers. Findings from the study suggest that the learning which occurs in the laboratory context may be transferred (with appropriate modifications) to the secondary science classroom. Implications also are presented for science teacher preparation, ongoing professional development, and further study.

  15. Exploring early and future use of DNP prepared nurses within healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Catherine; O'Connor, Nancy; Dunn, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    A strategy to gather data on DNP utilization and impact was designed using Donabedian's conceptual model and was piloted by surveying chief nursing officers (CNOs) leading Michigan's public and teaching hospital systems. Few of the responding CNOs reported currently employing DNP-prepared nurses. The majority reported gaps in knowledge related to role expectations and projected outcomes from a DNP-prepared nurse. Nurse leaders should become familiar with the role competencies of the DNP in order to maximize the potential contribution of this new level of care provider to improving care quality and access.

  16. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  17. Experiential Placements: Dissemination and Stakeholder Engagement for Curriculum Planning Action to Prepare Future Pharmacy Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susanne; Stupans, Ieva

    2009-01-01

    Preparing graduates for the professions is increasingly recognised as involving a partnership approach to curriculum design, implementation and evaluation. Experiential placements play a critical role in developing discipline-specific knowledge and skills and also generic professional dispositions including relationships, communication, problem…

  18. Preparing Educational Technology Leaders: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Vanessa P.; Spector, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    The field of educational technology is continuously changing to reflect the increasingly global workplace and development of new technologies and standards. Are educational technology programs keeping up? Are they, in their present form, able to address the evolving needs of the workplace and prepare the next generation of educational technology…

  19. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…

  20. Preparing Educational Technology Leaders: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Vanessa P.; Spector, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    The field of educational technology is continuously changing to reflect the increasingly global workplace and development of new technologies and standards. Are educational technology programs keeping up? Are they, in their present form, able to address the evolving needs of the workplace and prepare the next generation of educational technology…

  1. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…

  2. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  3. Preparing the future internet for ad-hoc business network support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinderen, van M.J.; Lagerström, Robert; Ekstedt, Mathias; Johnson, Pontus; Zelm, M.; Sanchis, R.; Poler, R.; Doumeingts, G.

    2012-01-01

    The generally agreed upon basic architecture for the Future Internet contains Internet of Things, Internet of Services, and Internet of Contents and Knowledge. The main contribution presented in this paper is an extension to this architecture, which includes three additional components, namely Busin

  4. Nursing and eHealth: are we preparing our future nurses as automatons or informaticians?

    OpenAIRE

    Honey, Michelle; Procter, Paula; Wilson, Marisa; Moen, Anne; Dal Sasso, Grace

    2016-01-01

    The Education Working Group of IMIA NI present this thought provoking panel where the changing and challenging role of nursing will be explored within the information intensive eHealth arena. The session will be of interest to any nurse as the discussion will be driven by the objective of trying to understand how best to prepare nurses to be actively engaged in information and communication technology (ICT) developments that enhance care assessment, delivery, evaluation and audit. As a balanc...

  5. Innovations in community-based nursing education: transitioning faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kimberly Ferren; Fournier, Maggie; Grover, Susan; Kiehl, Ermalynn M; Sims, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    The health-care climate is changing rapidly and in ways that challenge the abilities of professionals who provide health care. Nursing educators are preparing professional nurses who can think critically, use sound clinical judgment, and participate as full partners in shaping health-care delivery and policy. Therefore, many schools of nursing, including five schools of nursing whose experiences are synthesized in this article, are revising their curricula to a community-based nursing perspective. Strategies to assist faculty in the transition to a community-based nursing curriculum include using change theory, creating a supportive environment, reducing tension and isolation, and evaluating. Potential challenges during transition include addressing grief and loss, overcoming the tedium of curricular development, moving the revision along while allowing opportunities for faculty input and consensus building, exploring alternative pedagogies, managing faculty workload and qualification issues, and preparing for transition. Outcomes include a more complete understanding of the community client as a partner in the delivery of health care, increased visibility and role modeling to potential future candidates for health careers, cultural transformations within a university, and promotion of the overall health of a community.

  6. Optimization of professional preparation of future teacher of physical culture in informatively-educational space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragnev Y. V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is marked that reformation of higher education is an objective necessity. It is marked that the educational system of Ukraine answers the new requirements of informative society not fully. It is certain that optimization of professional education of future teacher of physical culture must be characterized the choice of the most favourable variant of terms and teaching facilities. It is set that transitions within the limits of one informative space have an influence on professional development of future teacher during his studies. The followings terms of optimization of professional education of teacher are selected: system use of active and interactive methods; bringing in to the advanced study; the increase of role is informative of communication technologies in an educational process. The concordance of maintenance of curriculum of education of teachers of physical culture with the programs of education of the European countries and standardization is recommended them within the limits of Ukraine.

  7. Megacities and the United States Army: Preparing for a Complex and Uncertain Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    may face in mega - cities in the future. The growing global population is becoming increasingly urbanized. d, e 6 The Chief of Staff of the...contingencies and test capabilities against them. Though cities are fea- tured in many of the current planning tools, they all fail to incorporate... cities as units of analysis and absence of large cities in force planning scenarios combine to yield both a lack of understanding of the challenges

  8. The Lived Experience of Novice Nursing Faculty in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Shirley S.

    2013-01-01

    To relieve the nursing faculty shortage, notable numbers of master's prepared clinical nurse experts are entering the ranks of nursing faculty to teach the prelicensure nursing student. The transition from clinical practice to the academia raises concern about the adequacy of preparation for the complex specialization role of nurse educator. In…

  9. Fueling the Future Force: Preparing the Department of Defense for a Post-Petroleum Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    avail- ability of petroleum. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects that world energy demand will grow from its 2007 level of 495.2...and can be recov- ered under current geological, economic and technological conditions) are often cited in consid- ering the future of world energy trends...N r At I o S ? By Alexandra Stark | 25 Figure 2: WOrlD peTrOleum reserve-TO-prODuCTiOn raTiOs Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2010

  10. Preparing Corrections Staff for the Future: Results of a 2-Day Training About Aging Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Julie L; Magnuson, Thomas M; Bayer, Barbara L; Potter, Jane F; Falkowski, Paul P

    2016-04-01

    The aging of the prison population presents corrections staff with unique challenges in knowing how to support inmates while maintaining security. This article describes a 2-day training program to introduce the aging process to select staff at all levels. While the results of a pre-posttest measure, using a modified version of Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz, did not produce a statistically significant difference at the conclusion of the training, attendees did express satisfaction with the training and their newfound insight into the challenges faced by aging inmates. They also offered recommendations for future training to include more practical suggestions for the work environment.

  11. WHERE Are the Faculty? Fulfilling the Traditional Faculty Role at a Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Felecia G

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to retain seasoned nursing faculty. Technology provides opportunities for faculty to fulfill the traditional roles of teaching, research, and service from a site removed from the traditional campus. The purpose of this article is to encourage faculty and administrators in traditional, land-based colleges and universities to thoughtfully consider the advantages and challenges of the remote worksite for faculty based on the experience of one faculty. Some faculty are better suited to a remote work environment than others. Long-term established faculty may be better able to successfully transition to the tripartite faculty roles with greater ease than novice nurse educators as a result of their familiarity with the institutional resources and comfort in the teaching role. Preparation for the remote experience must be diligent and thoughtful, considering equipment needs, connectivity, and support personnel and strategies for ensuring continued engagement within the nursing education program. Institutional policies must also be considered related to fulfillment of the faculty role via distance technology. A pilot experience for one faculty, as described here, may be useful for evaluating the cost-benefit to the individual and the institution.

  12. Are Canadian General Internal Medicine training program graduates well prepared for their future careers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snell Linda

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At a time of increased need and demand for general internists in Canada, the attractiveness of generalist careers (including general internal medicine, GIM has been falling as evidenced by the low number of residents choosing this specialty. One hypothesis for the lack of interest in a generalist career is lack of comfort with the skills needed to practice after training, and the mismatch between the tertiary care, inpatient training environment and "real life". This project was designed to determine perceived effectiveness of training for 10 years of graduates of Canadian GIM programs to assist in the development of curriculum and objectives for general internists that will meet the needs of graduates and ultimately society. Methods Mailed survey designed to explore perceived importance of training for and preparation for various aspects of Canadian GIM practice. After extensive piloting of the survey, including a pilot survey of two universities to improve the questionnaire, all graduates of the 16 universities over the previous ten years were surveyed. Results Gaps (difference between importance and preparation were demonstrated in many of the CanMEDS 2000/2005® competencies. Medical problems of pregnancy, perioperative care, pain management, chronic care, ambulatory care and community GIM rotations were the medical expert areas with the largest gaps. Exposure to procedural skills was perceived to be lacking. Some procedural skills valued as important for current GIM trainees and performed frequently (example ambulatory ECG interpretation had low preparation ratings by trainees. Other areas of perceived discrepancy between training and practice included: manager role (set up of an office, health advocate (counseling for prevention, for example smoking cessation, and professional (end of life issues, ethics. Conclusion Graduates of Canadian GIM training programs over the last ten years have identified perceived gaps

  13. Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.: A Viable Credential for Faculty in Programmatically Accredited Business Degree Programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Pina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Is the Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A a viable degree option for those wishing a career in academe? The D.B.A. degree is often considered to be a professional degree, in-tended for business practitioners, while the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D. degree is por-trayed as the degree for preparing college or university faculty. Conversely, many academic programs market their D.B.A. programs to future academicians. In this study, we investigat-ed whether the D.B.A. is, in fact, a viable faculty credential by gathering data from univer-sity catalogs and doctoral program websites and handbooks from 427 graduate business and management programs to analyze the terminal degrees held by 6159 faculty. The analysis indicated that 173 institutions (just over 40% of the total employed 372 faculty whose ter-minal degree was the D.B.A. This constituted just over 6% of the total number of faculty. Additionally, the program and faculty qualification standards of the six regional accrediting agencies and the three programmatic accrediting agencies for business programs (AACSB, IACBE, and ACBSP were analyzed. Results indicated that all these accrediting agencies treated the D.B.A. and Ph.D. in business identically and that the D.B.A. was universally considered to be a valid credential for teaching business at the university level. Suggestions for future research are also offered.

  14. Is current medical education adequately preparing future physicians to manage concussion: an initial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaworth, Michael A; Grandhi, Ravi K; Logan, Kelsey; Gubanich, Paul J; Myer, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, there were 2.5 million hospitalizations, emergency room visits, or deaths associated with concussions in the United States.[1] Knowledge deficits exist among physicians regarding concussion management, which can lead to severe repercussions, including poor patient outcomes, poor patient satisfaction, and potential medical-legal issues. While concussion is a prevalent condition evaluated in the medical field, medical students continue to have a knowledge deficit regarding concussion diagnosis, prognosis, medical management, and return to play guidelines. Medical students from a mid-western medical school completed a survey on concussion diagnosis, prognosis, medical management, and return to play guidelines. The response rate was 40%. The data suggests that the vast majority of medical students are able to define concussion; however, most reported never having a lecture dedicated to concussion during medical school and also lacked clinical experience with acute concussion and post-concussive syndrome. There are clear areas of deficiency as noted by the inability of students to correctly identify symptoms and appropriate management of concussion. The current study indicates that at an individual, mid-western, top 50 medical school, current medical trainees may not be adequately educated to identify and manage concussion. Future research is warranted to determine the optimal guidelines to educate future physicians as it pertains to concussion diagnosis, management, prognosis, and return to play guidelines.

  15. Overview of ESA life support activities in preparation of future exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Paille, Christel

    2016-07-01

    Since 1987, the European Space Agency has been active in the field of Life Support development. When compare to its international colleagues, it is clear that ESA started activities in the field with a "delay of around 25 years. Due to this situation and to avoid duplication, ESA decided to focus more on long term manned missions and to consider more intensively regenerative technologies as well as the associated risks management ( e.g. physical, chemical and contaminants). Fortunately or not, during the same period, no clear plan of exploration and consequently not specific requirements materialized. This force ESA to keep a broader and generic approach of all technologies. Today with this important catalogue of technologies and know-how, ESA is contemplating the different scenario of manned exploration beyond LEO. In this presentation we review the key scenario of future exploration, and identify the key technologies who loo the more relevant. An more detailed status is presented on the key technologies and their development plan for the future.

  16. Ways to prepare future teachers to teach science in multicultural classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Berry

    2016-06-01

    Roussel De Carvalho uses the notion of superdiversity to draw attention to some of the pedagogical implications of teaching science in multicultural schools in cosmopolitan cities such as London. De Carvalho makes the case that if superdiverse classrooms exist then Science Initial Teacher Education has a role to play in helping future science teachers to become more knowledgeable and reflective about how to teach school students with a range of worldviews and religious beliefs. The aim of this paper is to take that proposition a step further by considering what the aims and content of a session in teacher education might be. The focus is on helping future teachers develop strategies to teach school students to think critically about the nature of science and what it means to have a scientific worldview. The paper draws on data gathered during an interview study with 28 students at five secondary schools in England. The data was analysed to discover students' perceptions of science and their perceptions of the way that science responds to big questions about being human. The findings are used to inform a set of three strategies that teachers could use to help young people progress in their understanding of the nature of science. These strategies together with the conceptual framework that underpins them are used to develop a perspective on what kinds of pedagogical content knowledge teacher education might usefully provide.

  17. Preparing Student Nurses for the Future of Wound Management: Telemedicine in a Simulated Learning Enviroment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sytter; Rethmeier, Anita

    2015-01-01

    was to integrate the concept of telemedicine for wound care into a simulation-based class for undergraduate student nurses and to evaluate their experiences with this integrated learning method. Methods: Five medium-fidelity mannequins were used in a simulated learning environment consisting of a simulated....... Findings: Students found the concept of telemedicine relevant and enjoyable, and the challenges and benefits of telemedicine clearly emerged in the simulated learning environment. Conclusions: Based on student evaluations and the need to prepare students for “real-life” telemedicine for wound management......, the simulated learning environment seems to be a constructive didactic method. The simulated learning environment should also be tested with postgraduate nurses with less experience in telemedicine....

  18. Clay-polymer Nanocomposites:Preparation, Properties, Future Applications and New Synthesis Approach of EPDM/clay Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. J. AHMADI; HUANG Yu-dong黄玉东; LI Wei李伟

    2004-01-01

    The synthtic routes, materials properties and future applications of clay-polymer nanocomposites are reviewed. Nannocomposites are composite materials.that contain particles in the size rang 1-100 nm. The particles generally have a high aspect ratio and a layered structure that maximizes bonding between the polymer and particle. Adding a small quantity of these additives (0.5% ~ 5% ) can increase many of the properties of polymer materials, such as tensile characteristics, heat distortion temperature, scratch resistance, gas permeability resistance, and flame retardancy. This new type of materials may be prepared via various synthetic routes comprising exfoliation adsorption, in-situ intercalative polymerization and melt intercalation. In this paper we report the new method for preparation EPDM-clay nanocomposites. The EPDM-clay nanocomposites were prepared by using two different approaches (direct and indirect). It is found that there is no difference between both methods but the direct method is easier, its cost is lower and industrially more practical. X-ray diffraction (XRD)and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results showed a exfoliation structure. The mechanical properties of these nanocomposites significantly improved.

  19. Health issues of internally displaced persons in Pakistan: preparation for disasters in future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasay, Mohammad; Mushtaq, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Army action against terrorism in Pakistan led to the largest human migration in this century. About 3.4 million people (internally displaced persons, IDPs) were displaced. The authors visited all major camps and some houses in Mardan area and interviewed IDPs and doctors at these camps and areas to identify medical needs and current state of provision of medical care. This disaster largely represented displacement of millions of people (IDPs) including women and children to a new weather and environment in overcrowded refugee camps and houses. Influx of large number of displaced people created excessive burden for already deprived local health services. The medical issues and requirements for these IDPs living in camps were totally different from a disaster like earthquake. Global response to this disaster was slow and less effective. The need for a WHO coordination center for creating quick and urgent response for such kind of disasters in future is emphasized in this article.

  20. The AGHS at JET and preparations for a future DT campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    The Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) at JET is a unique facility enabling JET to perform reactor like, DT operations. As a future DT experimental campaign (DTE2) is scheduled for 2017 this paper provides a brief overview of the AGHS and a summary of ongoing work supporting the currently JET experimental campaign. In order to improve tritium accountancy a solid state based detector for tritium is being developed. Another important upgrade concerns tritium injection, 4 existing GIMs (Tritium Gas Introduction Module) will inject a mix of D and T rather than T{sub 2} in the divertor region rather than in the torus mid plane enabling a far better control and variability of the introduction of tritium into the plasma. An overview of the scale of DTE2 is included as well as an example of some of the upgrades currently being undertaken to fully exploit the learning opportunities for ITER and DEMO DTE2 provides. (authors)

  1. Are local communities prepared to face a future volcanic emergency at Vesuvius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, S.; Somma, R.; Mayberry, G. C.

    2009-04-01

    The Vesuvius represents, undoubtedly, the icon of volcanic threats, since more than 600,000 people live very close to the volcano. This image is strengthened by the presence of the archaeological ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried by the 79 A.D. plinian eruption, testifying nowadays the highly destructive impact on humans, buildings and environments. Nevertheless, many young people live in the Vesuvian area show an inadequate preparedness to face the next eruption. This is inferred by the results of a multiple choice questionnaire, distributed to 400 high-school students in three municipalities located close to the volcano during the 2007. The questionnaire was aimed to understand the level of risk perception and preparedness of at-risk communities during the current quiescent period. The interviewed students show high levels of fear, poor perceived ability to protect themselves from the effects of a future eruption, and insufficient knowledge of the National Emergency Plan for Vesuvian Area (NEPVA). This result suggests that, during a future eruption of Vesuvius, there may not be enough time to educate the large number of people living near the volcano about how to appropriately respond. The lack of knowledge about NEPVA is a sign of the absence of well-tested communication strategies and effective information dissemination in the study area. This lack of knowledge also means there is little interest in participating in risk-reduction activities. The inadequate risk education and preparedness of respondents implies that a strong effort is needed to improve communication strategies in order to facilitate successful evacuations. Therefore, it is important to take advantage of the present period of quiescence at Vesuvius to increase the risk perception of youth in local communities. In the absence of adequate preparedness measures, an evacuation could become "enforced" or even worse, a "failure."

  2. Burning Out Faculty at Doctoral Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A; Thompson, Julia N

    2016-12-01

    The present study examined the importance of time allocation, pressure and support variables together as determinants of faculty burnout. Using a large sample of university faculty (N = 1439), we were able to show that time allocation variables and perceived pressure contribute to faculty burnout. As expected, decreased social support, family, sleep and leisure time were related to higher levels of burnout. Grantsmanship and service activities appeared as the most critical factors associated with faculty burnout. Faculty burnout is an important topic, and the insights provided here help offer some directions for future research as well as the development of effective institutional policies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Do Asian American Faculty Face a Glass Ceiling in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sharon M.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the glass ceiling hypothesis in relation to Asian American faculty using data from the 1993 National Study of Post-Secondary Faculty for 1,019 Asian American faculty members. Data limitations prevent concluding that such faculty do or do not face a glass ceiling; however, baseline findings for future research are established. (SLD)

  4. Do Asian American Faculty Face a Glass Ceiling in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sharon M.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the glass ceiling hypothesis in relation to Asian American faculty using data from the 1993 National Study of Post-Secondary Faculty for 1,019 Asian American faculty members. Data limitations prevent concluding that such faculty do or do not face a glass ceiling; however, baseline findings for future research are established. (SLD)

  5. Measurement and comparison of nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondy, Laurie C

    2011-03-01

    Nursing faculty members strive to teach students to think critically. It has long been assumed that nursing faculty members are good at critical thinking because they are expected to teach these skills to students, but this assumption has not been well supported empirically. Faculty members question their ability to think critically and are unsure of their skills. The purpose of this study was to address this assumption by measuring nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills and compare the faculty mean score to that of a student norming group, and to the mean scores of other nursing faculty studies. Findings can be used to increase nursing faculty members' understanding of their critical thinking skills, prompt discussion about critical thinking skills, and to help faculty members address concerns and uncertainty about the concept of critical thinking. This study also helps establish an empirical basis for future research.

  6. The Global Society will need commodities; how do we prepare for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, P. Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The global population currently stands at approximately 7 billion and is expected to increase to between 8.3 and 10.9 billion by 2050. To put this into perspective, today's global population is triple what it was in 1950. Commodities are required for healthy societies, for robust economies and to raise living standards in the developing world. With major increases the population particularly in nations with emerging economies, the demand for commodities such as water, energy and minerals will significantly increase during the next several decades. Among the concerns are clean and available freshwater, expanded energy sources from natural gas and nuclear to renewable energy, and emerging needs for specialty materials that are needed for advanced technology to expanded use of more conventional minerals for agriculture and commerce. The developing world may have the greatest need for these commodities and also be the source of many of them. At the conclusion of the International Year of Planet Earth, a small group was formed to assess the need for a major scientific effort in the geosciences. Under the auspices of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), the strategic initiatives group met and a broad initiative entitled 'Resourcing Future Generations' (RFG) that was designed to implement a scientific strategy to address the increasing demand for commodities over the next 25 years. The initiative focused on water resources, energy and minerals. The group felt strongly that the minerals component should be the initial emphasis and hoped that other global scientific organizations like IUGS would embrace the water and energy themes. Since this initial effort a number of workshops and presentations have been made including China, the International Geological Congress in Brisbane, the Davos Summit, Berlin, and Namibia amongst others. The strategic initiative planning group identifies 4 challenges to meeting future global mineral needs which are improved

  7. Perceptions from Library School Faculty on Meaningful Matters to Academic Librarians: Additional Degrees, Sabbaticals, Evaluation, and Governance.A Review of: Wyss, P. A. (2010. Library school faculty member perceptions regarding faculty status for academic librarians. College & Research Libraries, 71(4, 375-388.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Young

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To survey the faculty members of American Library Association (ALA-accredited library schools to gain insight into their perceptions on academic librarians obtaining faculty status and how the library school curricula prepare academic librarians for faculty roles.Design – Survey questionnaire.Setting – An e-survey was distributed online to 57 ALA-accredited library schools during April 2007, using Zoomerang.Subjects – The population consisted of 906 tenure-track or tenured faculty members.Methods – The 24 item survey was designed to answer eight specific research questions and evoke responses scored on a five-point Likert scale that corresponded to (1 Strongly Disagree, (2 Disagree, (3 Neutral, (4 Agree, and (5 Strongly Agree. For the analysis of data in questions 1 and 3 through 8, the perceptions of faculty members of ALA-accredited library schools were determined by calculating the mean and standard deviation. For the analysis of question 2 a t test was used to determine differences in faculty members’ perceptions based on gender and tenure. A one-way analysis of variance, or ANOVA, was used to determine library school faculty members’ perceptions based on academic rank. Main Results – A total of 906 individuals were sent the link to the survey, and 187 individuals completed the survey, making the response rate 20.6%. Of the respondents, 38.5% were professors, 25.7% were associate professors, 33.7% were assistant professors, and 2.1% were lecturers. The majority of respondents were female (60.0% and tenured (65.0%.Faculty members of the ALA-accredited library schools agreed that courses in statistical concepts, procedures, and research (both experimental and non-experimental should be required of those seeking a master’s or doctoral degree. They agreed that the Master of Library Science (MLS degree is insufficient in preparing librarians for faculty status, and that additional graduate degrees improve performance

  8. The Future of Climate Change Education and Communication: Preparing Our Posterity for Risks and Opportunity? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, T. S.; Niepold, F.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change will have impacts on all aspects of life. As such it is a topic that is interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary and thus requires input from a professionally diverse group of experts to be addressed effectively. This represents the next step in an evolution of how geoscientists see their work and their responsibility communicate and collaborate with other professionals to enable their findings and understanding of the Earth system to benefit society. In the late 1970's geoscience research extended beyond the traditional disciplinary perspectives to investigate the interactions of the components of the Earth system and the impacts of those interactions. Geoscience research became interdisciplinary. In the last 10 years as the reality of climate change has become more apparent,it is clear that the conversation needs to extend well beyond the geosciences to include for example agriculture, economics, psychology, architecture, urban planning, engineering and the social sciences. Climate change education and communication needs to become both interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary. This presentation will discuss the obstacles that need to be overcome to achieve interdisciplinary and transdiciplinary ways of addressing the problems and opportunities resulting from climate change, the efforts that are underway to help develop a common language and shared understanding to enable transdisciplinary solutions to societal issues in the future.

  9. Preparing primary care for the future - perspectives from the Netherlands, England, and USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Antje; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Baker, Richard; Goodwin, Nick; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Nolte, Ellen; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2011-01-01

    All modern healthcare systems need to respond to the common challenges posed by an aging population combined with a growing number of patients with (complex) chronic conditions and rising patient expectations. Countries with 'stronger' primary care systems (e.g. the Netherlands and England) seem to be better prepared to address these challenges than countries with 'weaker' primary care (e.g. USA). The role of primary care in a health care system is strongly related to its organisation and funding, thus determining the starting point and the possibilities for change. We selected the Netherlands, England, and USA as examples for the diversity of approaches to organise and finance health care. We analysed the main problems for primary care and reviewed strategies and practice models used to meet the challenges described above. The Netherlands aim to strengthen prevention for chronic diseases, while England strives to improve the management of patients with multimorbidity, prevent hospital admissions to contain costs, and to satisfy the increased demand of patients for access to primary care. Both countries seek to reorganise care around the patient and place their needs at the centre. The USA has to provide sufficient workforce, organisation, and funding for primary care to ensure better access, prevention, and provision of chronic care for its population. Strategies to improve (trans-sectoral) cooperation and care coordination, a main issue in all three countries, include the implementation of standards of care and bundled payments for chronic diseases in the Netherlands, GP commissioning, federated and group practice models in England, and the introduction of the Patient-Centred Medical Home and accountable care organisations in the USA. Organisation and financing of health care differ widely in the three countries. However, the necessity to improve coordination and integration of chronic disease care remains a common and core challenge. Copyright © 2011. Published

  10. Reflections on Leadership Preparation Programs and Social Justice: Are the Power and the Responsibility of the Faculty All in the Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Izhak

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Fundamental aspects of educational leadership preparation programs regarding social justice are embodied in program design elements, yet the scholarly community did not adequately address these issues. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: The essay suggests that organizational theories dealing with…

  11. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  12. Students Evaluation of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawabieh, Ahmad M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how students evaluate their faculty and the effect of gender, expected grade, and college on students' evaluation. The study sample consisted of 5291 students from Tafila Technical University Faculty evaluation scale was used to collect data. The results indicated that student evaluation of faculty was high (mean =…

  13. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  14. Book Review ~ Preparing your Campus for a Networked Future: Educuase Leadership Strategy No. 1. Editor: Mark A. Luker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Erin Keough

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This book is part of a series on leadership strategies “designed to help university and college presidents and other top leaders in higher education understand and prepare for the impact of advanced networking on the institutions” (p.xv. It is interesting to review following what some have termed the “nuclear winter” in telecommunications industry, a book related to the networked future that was written, or at least conceived, in 1999, when enthusiasm for how electronic networks would change the world was at its peak. Although these authors, like many of us, might wish to temper the predictions made about the speed at which advanced networking would “break the access, performance and cost barriers that have in the past presented an insurmountable obstacle to the new vision of education”(p.1, much of the information and policy advice in the book has withstood the test of a short but turbulent time.

  15. Understanding bat SARS-like coronaviruses for the preparation of future coronavirus outbreaks - Implications for coronavirus vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2017-01-02

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) first emerged in 2003, causing the SARS epidemic which resulted in a 10% fatality rate. The advancements in metagenomic techniques have allowed the identification of SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs) sequences that share high homology to the human SARS-CoV epidemic strains from wildlife bats, presenting concrete evidence that bats are the origin and natural reservoir of SARS-CoV. The application of reverse genetics further enabled that characterization of these bat CoVs and the prediction of their potential to cause disease in humans. The knowledge gained from such studies is valuable in the surveillance and preparation of a possible future outbreak caused by a spill-over of these bat SL-CoVs.

  16. Realization of Interdisciplinary Communications of Fundamental Disciplines and Disciplines of Mathematical Cycle in the Preparation of Future Programmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miсhaеl Lvov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to interdisciplinary communication in the process of preparation of the future programmers and implementation of the basic principles of these relations in the study of disciplines of professional and practical training and math courses. The article deals with the role of interdisciplinary connections, as well as their function and significance for the formation of cognitive activity, independence and positive learning motivation. The focus is on methodological aspects of realization of interdisciplinary communications at studying basic disciplines of training future programmers and disciplines of mathematical cycle. In particular, the issues of realization of interdisciplinary communications during the study such disciplines as "Computer graphics, computational geometry," "Basics of algorithms and programming", "Programming Technologies" and the course "Analytical geometry and linear algebra", which included in to normative part of the training of programmers. This article describes the theoretical aspects of the implementation of interdisciplinary connections in the study of these disciplines, as well as examples of practical tasks with which these relationships can be implemented most effectively during training

  17. Faculty perceptions of the integration of SAP in academic programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Khoury

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to prepare students for the workforce, academic programs incorporate a variety of tools that students are likely to use in their future careers. One of these tools employed by business and technology programs is the integration of live software applications such as SAP through the SAP University Alliance (SAP UA program. Since the SAP UA program has been around for only about 10 years and the available literature on the topic is limited, research is needed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the SAP UA program. A collaborative study of SAP UA faculty perceptions of their SAP UAs was conducted in the fall of 2011. Of the faculty invited to participate in the study, 31% completed the online survey. The results indicate that most faculty experienced difficulty implementing SAP into their programs and report that a need exists for more standardized curriculum and training, while a large percentage indicated that they are receiving the support they need from their schools and SAP.

  18. Rethinking CME: an imperative for academic medicine and faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, David A; Prescott, John; Fordis, C Michael; Greenberg, Stephen B; Dewey, Charlene M; Brigham, Timothy; Lieberman, Steve A; Rockhold, Robin W; Lieff, Susan J; Tenner, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    To help address the clinical care gap, a working group discussed the future of faculty development in academic medicine, explored problems within the large, current enterprise devoted to continuing medical education (CME), and described four domains core to its revitalization and reformation. These domains are (1) preparing and supporting an engaged clinician-learner, (2) improving the quality of knowledge or evidence shared, (3) enhancing the means by which to disseminate and implement that knowledge and evidence, and (4) reforming the patient, health care, and regulatory systems in and for which the process of CME exists. Reshaping these domains requires the consideration of a more seamless, evidence-based, and patient-oriented continuum of medical education. Revitalizing CME also requires the full engagement of the academic medical community and its faculty. To achieve the goal of creating a new, more effective, seamless process of CME, the working group recommended an active faculty development process to develop strong clinician-learners, strong involvement of academic health center leaders, the development of an educational home for clinician-learners, and a meaningful national conversation on the subject of CME. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  19. The Doctor of Philosophy Experience of Athletic Trainers: Facilitators and Barriers to Anticipatory Faculty Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas; Klossner, Joanne; Mazerolle, Stephanie

    2017-09-22

      It is important to understand the process whereby athletic trainers learn about their future roles, particularly when the roles can be complex and demanding. Little is known about the experiences of athletic training doctoral students, including facilitators and barriers to socialization as aspiring faculty members.   To investigate factors influencing the anticipatory socialization of athletic training doctoral students into future faculty roles.   Qualitative study.   Universities with athletic training doctoral students.   We recruited 28 students (19 women, 9 men, age = 28 ± 3 years) with a minimum of 1 year of doctoral coursework completed and participating in an assistantship at the time of the study to reach data saturation. Participants were certified for 6 ± 3 years and represented 5 National Athletic Trainers' Association districts and 9 institutions.   We completed semistructured, 1-on-1 telephone interviews with participants. We transcribed each interview verbatim and analyzed the data using an inductive approach. Peer review, multiple-analyst triangulation, and member checks ensured trustworthiness.   We uncovered 4 themes from our analysis: research, teaching, service, and administration. Participants described comprehensive autonomous experiences in research that allowed them to feel confident they could sustain a scholarly agenda. Independent experiences and lack of pedagogy training yielded mixed preparedness relative to teaching responsibilities. Limited formal experience led to incomplete role understanding related to the service component of the professoriate. Finally, with regard to the administrative duties associated with an athletic training faculty position, participants noted a lack of direct exposure to common responsibilities.   Role occupation in various aspects of the professoriate helped doctoral students prepare as future faculty members, although full role understanding was limited. Intentional exposure to

  20. Formation of self-regulation culture of physical education faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudin S.F.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally substantiate effectiveness of pedagogic conditions of self-regulation culture formation of future physical culture teachers. Material: in the research 110 3rd year students of physical education faculty participated. The students were questioned. The level of students’ anxiety was assessed. Results: Implementation of the author’s course in educational process facilitated formation of students’ self-regulation skills and abilities; raises confidence and self estimation; influences positively on functional state. It was found that students acquire ability to consciously observe their own verbal constructs of negative thinking and create positive alternatives. Conclusions: preparing of future physical culture teachers stipulates his (her ability to effectively fulfill professional functioning in the aspect of health preservation. The necessary conditions of self-regulation culture formation are formation of students’ holistic value-meaningful attitude to individual health and health of surrounding people.

  1. Methods and Teaching Strategies Used by Teacher Education Faculty Members in one State University in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Amado C. Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning across the nation are responding to political, economic, social and technological pressures to be more responsive to students' needs and more concerned about how well students are prepared to assume future societal roles. This study aimed to determine the methods and teaching strategies used by the PSU – CTE faculty members of Bayambang Campus, Bayambang, Pangasinan during the first semester of the school year 2013-2014. The descriptivecorrelational...

  2. Forming the Future Lawyers' Communicative Competence: The Experience of Higher Education in Ukraine and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilenko, Lyudmyla

    2014-01-01

    In the article the state of forming of communicative competence of future lawyers in higher education of Ukraine and Germany is analyzed. There is made the comparative description of preparation of the students of law faculty with an accent on forming of communicative competence on the example of the University of modern knowledge (Ukraine) and…

  3. Forming the Future Lawyers' Communicative Competence: The Experience of Higher Education in Ukraine and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilenko, Lyudmyla

    2014-01-01

    In the article the state of forming of communicative competence of future lawyers in higher education of Ukraine and Germany is analyzed. There is made the comparative description of preparation of the students of law faculty with an accent on forming of communicative competence on the example of the University of modern knowledge (Ukraine) and…

  4. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  5. Faculty Handbooks as Enforceable Contracts: A State Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each year, the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) receives many inquiries about the legal status of faculty handbooks. To respond to some common inquiries, the Association's legal office prepared this overview of faculty handbook decisions. It is arranged by state and includes decisions of which the Association is aware and that…

  6. Decentralization and Faculty Ownership: Keys to a Successful Assessment Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Terrence; And Others

    In an effort to prepare for a North Central Association accreditation visit, Henry Ford Community College (HFCC), in Michigan, developed and implemented a decentralized and faculty-driven assessment plan. First, a faculty member was assigned to begin the groundwork for the assessment plan and an Instructional Assessment Committee was formed to…

  7. Managing Simultaneous Renewal: Reward Structures for School and University Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Nate; Schwager, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Examined the impact of rewards and reward structures for mentor teachers and university faculty engaged in preparing teachers and the ongoing professional development of veteran teachers within Professional Development Schools. School faculty cited extrinsic reward structures as inadequate, emphasizing their importance as incentives for…

  8. A Compendium of Preparation and Application of Stem Cells in Parkinson's Disease: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Huang, Jinsha; Liu, Ling; Xu, Xiaoyun; Han, Chao; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Li, Jie; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressively neurodegenerative disorder, implicitly characterized by a stepwise loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and explicitly marked by bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor and postural instability. Currently, therapeutic approaches available are mainly palliative strategies, including L-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) replacement therapy, DA receptor agonist and deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures. As the disease proceeds, however, the pharmacotherapeutic efficacy is inevitably worn off, worse still, implicated by side effects of motor response oscillations as well as L-DOPA induced dyskinesia (LID). Therefore, the frustrating status above has propeled the shift to cell replacement therapy (CRT), a promising restorative therapy intending to secure a long-lasting relief of patients' symptoms. By far, stem cell lines of multifarious origins have been established, which can be further categorized into embryonic stem cells (ESCs), neural stem cells (NSCs), induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we intend to present a compendium of preparation and application of multifarious stem cells, especially in relation to PD research and therapy. In addition, the current status, potential challenges and future prospects for practical CRT in PD patients will be elaborated as well.

  9. Educational Background and Academic Rank of Faculty Members within US Schools of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assemi, Mitra; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Sowinski, Kevin M; Corelli, Robin L

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To characterize the educational background and academic rank of faculty members in US schools of pharmacy, estimate the extent to which they are employed by institutions where they received previous training, and determine whether differences in degree origin and rank exist between faculty members in established (≤1995) vs newer programs. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty database and demographic information from the public domain. Results. Among 5516 faculty members, 50.3% held two or more types of degrees. Established schools had a higher median number of faculty members and a higher mean faculty rank than did newer schools. Conclusion. The difference in mean faculty rank highlights the shortage of experienced faculty members in newer schools. Future research efforts should investigate educational attainment in correlation to other faculty and school characteristics and prospectively track and report trends related to pharmacy faculty members composition.

  10. Faculty Compensation Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silander, Fred

    1983-01-01

    Faculty compensation policy is seen as one means by which an institution influences the faculty to work toward institutional goals. Among the broad criteria for compensation are worth, equity, need, and market measures. Benefits and issues in compensation including differentials in compensation, merit, part-time instruction, etc. are discussed.…

  11. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  12. Faculty Growth Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    Growth contracts, described as faculty plans for personal and professional growth proposed by each member of the faculty, are examined. The rationale for growth contracts is explained and a list of some institutions using growth contracts or variations of the concept is provided. Growth contract advantages, the role of the evaluation committee or…

  13. Learner and Faculty Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Sharon; Stanford, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course…

  14. Neophyte facilitator experiences of interprofessional education: implications for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan-Lee, Eileen; Baker, Lindsay; Tobin, Stasey; Hollenberg, Elisa; Dematteo, Dale; Reeves, Scott

    2011-09-01

    The facilitation of learners from different professional groups requires a range of interprofessional knowledge and skills (e.g. an understanding of possible sources of tension between professions) in addition to those that are more generic, such as how to manage a small group of learners. The development and delivery of interprofessional education (IPE) programs tends to rely on a small cohort of facilitators who have typically gained expertise through 'hands-on' involvement in facilitating IPE and through mentorship from more experienced colleagues. To avoid burn-out and to meet a growing demand for IPE, a larger number of facilitators are needed. However, empirical evidence regarding effective approaches to prepare for this type of work is limited. This article draws on data from a multiple case study of four IPE programs based in an urban setting in North America with a sample of neophyte facilitators and provides insight into their perceptions and experiences in preparing for and delivering IPE. Forty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted before (n = 20) and after (n = 21) program delivery with 21 facilitators. Findings indicated that despite participating in a three-fold faculty development strategy designed to support them in their IPE facilitation work, many felt unprepared and continued to have a poor conceptual understanding of core IPE and interprofessional collaboration principles, resulting in problematic implications (e.g. 'missed teachable moments') within their IPE programs. Findings from this study are discussed in relation to the IPE, faculty development and wider educational literature before implications are offered for the future delivery of interprofessional faculty development activities.

  15. Problem-Based Learning across the Curriculum: Exploring the Efficacy of a Cross-Curricular Application of Preparation for Future Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Vahey, Philip; van 't Hooft, Mark; Kratcoski, Annette; Rafanan, Ken; Stanford, Tina; Yarnall, Louise; Cook, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The research reported in this paper explores the applicability and efficacy of a variant of problem-based learning, the Preparation for Future Learning (PFL) approach, to teaching and learning within the context of a cross-curricular, middle school data literacy unit called "Thinking with Data" (TWD). A quasi-experimental design was used…

  16. Creating an Effective System of Education to Prepare Future Human Resources within the Context Provided by the Global Shift toward a "Green Economy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Frolova, Evgenia Evgenevna; Kucherenko, Petr Aleksandrovich; Samusenko, Tatyana Mikhailovna; Voikova, Natalya Andreevna

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the major aspects of putting together effective national systems of education oriented toward providing academic instruction to the population and preparing future human resources for work within the economy in specific alignment with the concept of environmental responsibility (or that of "green economy"). The…

  17. Advancing Earth System Science Literacy and Preparing the Future Geoscience Workforce Through Strategic Investments at the National Science Foundation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Weiler, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created 60 years ago by the U.S. Congress "to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…" NSF is the primary funding agency in the U.S. to support basic, frontier research across all fields in science, engineering, and education, except for medical sciences. With a FY 2011 budget request of more than $955 million, the NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) is the principle source of federal funding for university-based fundamental research in the geosciences and preparation of the next generation of geoscientists. Since its inception, GEO has supported the education and training of a diverse and talented pool of future scientists, engineers, and technicians in the Earth, Ocean, Atmospheric and Geospatial Sciences sub-fields, through support of graduate research assistants, post-doctoral fellows, and undergraduate research experiences. In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, GEO initiated several programs that expanded these investments to also support improvements in pre-college and undergraduate geoscience education through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., professional development support for K-12 teachers, development of innovative undergraduate curricula, and scientist-mentored research experiences for elementary and secondary students). In addition to GEO’s Geoscience Education (GeoEd), Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG), Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), and Geoscience Teacher Training (GEO-Teach) programs, GEO participates in a number of cross-Foundation programs, including the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT), Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE), NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12), and Partnerships for International Research and Education

  18. Faculty members' perceptions of advising versus mentoring: does the name matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The recommendations, during the past 20 years, to improve PhD scientific training and graduate school success, have focused on the significance of mentoring. It is well established that PhD students with mentors have significantly more success in graduate school as demonstrated by publishing papers before they graduate and by making presentations. Have faculty and academic institutions embraced the mentoring role? This study explores the views of 3,500 scientists who have primary responsibilities to educate PhD and MD/PhD students. Faculty members report they are more likely to prefer being viewed as advisors (54 %) than mentors (38 %). Through an examination of perceptions about specific responsibilities of advisors and mentors, faculty members provide a description of their culture and the expectations they have about themselves and others. One would expect that because mentoring requires additional time and involvement that faculty would report differences between advising and mentoring. However, faculty members perceive few differences between advisors and mentors. We examine the implications of these findings. Future scientists need to be confident their education includes the opportunity to acquire the best possible research skills. To develop advisors who have the ability to provide this training, the process begins by defining role expectations and responsibilities and preparing advisors to interact with doctoral students in ways comparable to mentors. We expect faculty members to know how to teach and how to mentor; yet, we rarely discuss how to develop and shape the necessary skills of advisors so, that they more closely resemble those of mentors.

  19. Faculty perceptions of key factors in interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loversidge, Jacqueline; Demb, Ada

    2015-01-01

    Embedding interprofessional education (IPE) into academic programs presents structural, curricular and human factor challenges. Nurses and physicians comprise the dominant dyad in healthcare, and therefore nursing and medical faculty are key in guiding future IPE approaches. However, faculty experiences with IPE are rarely reported. This paper presents perceptions of medical and nursing faculty about key factors related to IPE for pre-licensure medical and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews with 32 faculty from three Midwest universities were analyzed thematically in this phenomenological study based on collaboration and cooperation theories. Findings clustered into six categories. Specific subthemes little discussed in the literature are addressed in detail. Study participants felt the most powerful interprofessional student experiences were authentic and faculty-facilitated, that constructive clinical environments were crucial, that curriculum design challenges included disparities between undergraduate and graduate education, and that leadership commitment to full-time and adjunct faculty engagement and development was imperative.

  20. A qualitative analysis of faculty advocacy on LGBT issues on campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Faculty activism is an integral part of shared governance in higher education institutions, yet little is known about the dynamics that underlie this activism. Using oral history interviews with 30 faculty members working to secure lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-supportive policies on their respective campuses, this article identifies reasons the faculty members became involved in this advocacy, types of advocacy in which they engaged, factors associated with engaging in advocacy, and challenges facing these faculty advocates. Specific dynamics facing LGBT faculty are discussed, and predictions are made for the future of faculty advocacy on LGBT campus policy issues.

  1. The Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR): Supporting Faculty that Mentor Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L. K.; Guertin, L. A.; Manley, P. L.; Fortner, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Undergraduate research is a proven effective pedagogy that has a number of benefits including: enhancing student learning through mentoring relationships with faculty; increasing retention; increasing enrollment in graduate programs; developing critical thinking, creativity, problem solving and intellectual independence; and, developing an understanding of research methodology. Undergraduate research also has been demonstrated in preparing students for careers. In addition to developing disciplinary and technical expertise, participation in undergraduate research helps students improve communication skills (written, oral, and graphical) and time management. Early involvement in undergraduate research improves retention and, for those engaged at the 2YC level, helps students successfully transfers to 4YC. The Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR) supports faculty in their development of undergraduate research programs at all levels. GeoCUR leads workshops for new and future faculty covering all aspects of undergraduate research including incorporating research into coursework, project design, mentoring students, sustaining programs, and funding sources. GeoCUR members support new faculty by providing a range of services including: peer-review of grant proposals; advice on establishing an undergraduate research program; balancing teaching and research demands; and networking with other geoscientist. GeoCUR has also developed web resources that support faculty and departments in development of undergraduate research programs (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/undergraduate_research/index.html). This presentation will describe the services provided by GeoCUR and highlight examples of programs and resources available to geoscientists in all career stages for effective undergraduate research mentoring and development.

  2. An Optical Lightning Simulator in an Electrified Cloud-Resolving Model to Prepare the Future Space Lightning Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovalo, Christophe; Defer, Eric; Pinty, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The future decade will see the launch of several space missions designed to monitor the total lightning activity. Among these missions, the American (Geostationary Lightning Mapper - GLM) and European (Lightning Imager - LI) optical detectors will be onboard geostationary satellites (GOES-R and MTG, respectively). For the first time, the total lightning activity will be monitored over the full Earth disk and at a very high temporal resolution (2 and 1 ms, respectively). Missions like the French Tool for the Analysis of Radiation from lightNIng and Sprites (TARANIS) and ISS-LIS will bring complementary information in order to better understand the lightning physics and to improve the weather prediction (nowcasting and forecasting). Such missions will generate a huge volume of new and original observations for the scientific community and weather prediction centers that have to be prepared. Moreover, before the launch of these missions, fundamental questions regarding the interpretation of the optical signal property and its relation to cloud optical thickness and lightning discharge processes need to be further investigated. An innovative approach proposed here is to use the synergy existing in the French MesoNH Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM). Indeed, MesoNH is one of the only CRM able to simulate the lifecycle of electrical charges generated within clouds through non-inductive charging process (dependent of the 1-moment microphysical scheme). The lightning flash geometry is based on a fractal law while the electrical field is diagnosed thanks to the Gauss' law. The lightning optical simulator is linked to the electrical scheme as the lightning radiance at 777.4 nm is a function of the lightning current, approximated by the charges neutralized along the lightning path. Another important part is the scattering of this signal by the hydrometeors (mainly ice particles) that is taken into account. Simulations at 1-km resolution are done over the Langmuir Laboratory (New

  3. Plagiarism Among Faculty Applicants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2012-01-01

    ....5 Re-education and re-emphasizing the importance of "no plagiarism" in academic work, as well as establishing standards for all present academic faculty members, including senior and administrative...

  4. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  5. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  6. A comparative analysis of strategic plans of forestry faculties in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçil Yurdakul Erol

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Strategic planning, with a future-focused approach, contributes to realizing to higher education institutes’ functions, such as directing change and being pioneer to society in a systematic and sustainable way. However, it is inevitable for higher education institutes to have different priorities and roles besides their joint functions. Strategic plans are effective tools in terms of explaining these differences and to make them perceived by related stakeholders. Thus a similar approach is valid for forestry faculties which are increasing in numbers and serve diverse functions in our country. In this context, the aims of this study are to evaluate similarities and differences in statements of mission and vision and make a comparative assessment of future-oriented goals, targets and strategies of forestry faculties. According to findings of content analysis there are no significant differences between the statements of mission and vision. Moreover, it has pointed out that the emphasized factors in these statements are not reflected to the goals, targets and strategies in the same proportion. As a result, it is clear that the mission and vision statements of forestry faculties need to be prepared in order to emphasize their unique characteristics and differences. Furthermore, it is essential to determine focused goals, targets and strategies that are the main tools of realizing these statements.

  7. TEACHING IN ONLINE COURSES: Experiences of Instructional Technology Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omur AKDEMIR

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and computer technology have altered the education landscape. Online courses are offered throughout the world. Learning about the experiences of faculty members is important to guide practitioners and administrators. Using qualitative research methodology, this study investigated the experiences of faculty members teaching online courses. A convenience sampling was used to select the instructional technology faculty members to investigate their experiences in online courses. Semi-structured interviews with faculty members teaching online courses were used as the primary source to collect data about the experiences of faculty members in online courses. Results of the study showed that faculty members' interest in using technology and the amount of time available to them for online course design affected the quality of online courses. The findings of this study also indicated that design quality of online courses is affected by the interest of faculty members to use the technology and the time that they can devote to planning, designing, and developing online courses. The poor design of existing online courses, high learning expectations of ndividuals from these courses, and the future of online courses are the concerns of faculty members. Higher education institutions should support workshops and trainings to increase the skills and interests of non-instructional design faculty members to design and develop online courses.

  8. The Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: implications for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Kent J; Quirk, Mark E; Davis, Ardis K

    2007-01-01

    Faculty development implications related to implementing the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR) Project provide an opportunity to look at the recommendations of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's federally funded Faculty Futures Initiative (FFI) and the recent Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project. Implications for faculty development include the importance of the clerkship setting, originally defined in 1991, with new features added in today's practice environment as outlined by the FFM and the changing assumptions in approaching faculty development. Previously, faculty development focused on teaching learners to master current knowledge. Now, faculty must teach learners how to master new competencies throughout their lives; learners need to learn how they and others learn now. Teaching must focus on how to learn in the future as well as what to learn for the present. Competence ("what individuals know or are able to do in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes") has become the focus of curriculum development efforts over the last few years and most appropriately serves as the focus of curriculum development in the FMCR Project. Implications for developing teachers and preceptors focus on the skills and circumstances required to teach and evaluate all types (cognitive, metacognitive, and affective) of competence. In the new culture, novel teaching methods will serve as the focus of faculty development in teaching and of educational ("best practices") research.

  9. Restructuring Principal Preparation in Illinois: Perspectives on Implementation Successes, Challenges, and Future Outlook. Policy Research: IERC 2015-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, Brenda K.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Hart, Holly; White, Bradford R.; Huynh, Michelle Hanh

    2015-01-01

    In June 2010, the Illinois General Assembly passed Public Act 96-0903, a sweeping restructuring of the preparation of school principals and assistant principals that represented 10 years of effort from a broad coalition of stakeholders. The restructuring in Illinois was part of a movement nationwide to provide stronger training for principals in…

  10. Restructuring Principal Preparation in Illinois: Perspectives on Implementation Successes, Challenges, and Future Outlook. Executive Summary. IERC 2015-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, Brenda K.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Hart, Holly; White, Bradford R.; Huynh, Michelle Hanh

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current mixed methods study--the Illinois Principal Preparation Implementation Review Project (I-PREP)--are to describe how the new policy is being implemented, learning which aspects of the implementation have been challenging and why they present challenges, and how programs are addressing challenges and realizing improvements…

  11. Restructuring Principal Preparation in Illinois: Perspectives on Implementation Successes, Challenges, and Future Outlook. IERC 2015-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, Brenda K.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Hart, Holly; White, Bradford R.; Huynh, Michelle Hanh

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current mixed methods study--the Illinois Principal Preparation Implementation Review Project (I-PREP)--are to describe how the new policy is being implemented, learning which aspects of the implementation have been challenging and why they present challenges, and how programs are addressing challenges and realizing improvements…

  12. Preparing Medical Graduates for an Interconnected World: Current Practices and Future Possibilities for Internationalizing the Medical Curriculum in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stütz, Alexander; Green, Wendy; McAllister, Lindy; Eley, Diann

    2015-01-01

    Preparing medical graduates who are competent to work in a global environment requires broad integration of international and intercultural perspectives throughout the medical curriculum. Employing Leask and Bridge's "conceptual framework of internationalisation of the curriculum," this article first highlights the emphasis placed on…

  13. Preparing Medical Graduates for an Interconnected World: Current Practices and Future Possibilities for Internationalizing the Medical Curriculum in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stütz, Alexander; Green, Wendy; McAllister, Lindy; Eley, Diann

    2015-01-01

    Preparing medical graduates who are competent to work in a global environment requires broad integration of international and intercultural perspectives throughout the medical curriculum. Employing Leask and Bridge's "conceptual framework of internationalisation of the curriculum," this article first highlights the emphasis placed…

  14. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2017-10-12

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  15. Selecting a Dean of Faculty through a Partially Democratic Process to Improve Health Programs: Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali E. Oskouei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dean of Faculties is normally selected by the Chancellor of Universities. The democratic way of selecting a dean of faculties is an innovative procedure that first happened in 2013 at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. A brief survey of the faculties revealed that there were some disadvantages of this procedure. An insufficient number of candidates, obligation in nomination in some cases, casting ballots only by faculty members, and lack of future and strategic plans by candidates are some deficits in the process that brought some risk to the faculties and sometimes unrest to TUMS. These risks made the process more dangerous than it used to be previously, when we used more traditional ways of selecting a dean of faculty. In order to prevent possible risks to the faculty and university, we offer some suggestions to make the ground ready for democratic practices in selecting a dean of faculty.

  16. The Journey of a Science Teacher: Preparing Female Students in the Training Future Scientists after School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hill, Rona M.

    2013-01-01

    What affect does female participation in the Training Future Scientist (TFS) program based on Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and Maslow's Hierarchies of Needs have on female adolescents' achievement levels in science and their attitude toward science and interest in science-based careers? The theoretical framework for this study was developed…

  17. The Journey of a Science Teacher: Preparing Female Students in the Training Future Scientists after School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hill, Rona M.

    2013-01-01

    What affect does female participation in the Training Future Scientist (TFS) program based on Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and Maslow's Hierarchies of Needs have on female adolescents' achievement levels in science and their attitude toward science and interest in science-based careers? The theoretical framework for this study was developed…

  18. Use of Tablet PCs to Enhance Instruction and Promote Group Collaboration in a Course to Prepare Future Mathematics Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Aimee J.; Wilson, Jill H.; Nugent, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    This article details the use of tablet PCs in a mathematics content course for future Mathematics Specialists. Instructors used tablet PCs instead of a traditional whiteboard to capture demonstration and discussion. Students were grouped for collaborative problem solving and exploration exercises. Each group was provided with a tablet PC for…

  19. Learner-Centered Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

  20. Contingent Faculty as Nonideal Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Bernstein-Sierra, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how contingent faculty address the issue of work and family and demonstrates the importance of understanding the diversity of contingent faculty experiences and of underemployment rather than notions of the ideal worker to explain their work lives.

  1. Learner-Centered Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

  2. The Paradox of Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the weaknesses in university faculty development efforts when compared with corporate professional development practices. Suggestions are offered to think of faculty development as a process rather than as isolated development activities.

  3. Faculty-Librarian Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Renee

    1997-01-01

    A survey was designed to foster collaborative development of instructional strategies between education faculty and librarians at a state institution in California. Strategies from the survey results were utilized in developing instructional programs to teach education students information retrieval skills needed to access information from…

  4. Where Are the Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how faculty members feel about the growth and quality of distance, distributed, and online higher education. The twenty-first century university must innovate to survive as the Internet becomes the dominant source of knowledge and learning. The twenty-first century student connects with information differently than earlier…

  5. Anticipatory guidance as a principle of faculty development: managing transition and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F; Guillet, Ronnie; McAnarney, Elizabeth R

    2011-10-01

    Although one cannot anticipate every individual's unique responses to the transitions and changes that regularly occur in academic medicine, a department-wide faculty development program, based on predictable transition points and supporting faculty at all levels, can minimize such negative responses to change as stress and burnout. In 2007, the authors implemented a new, formal faculty development program in the pediatrics department built on the principle of anticipatory guidance, defined as providing guidance in anticipation of future academic events. The primary components of the program are mentoring committees for individual junior faculty, group leadership development and teaching forums for midlevel faculty, and events that focus on life and career changes for senior faculty. Other department-wide activities augment the program, including review of grant submissions, annual review by a senior faculty committee of the progress of National Institutes of Health mentored research (K-) awardees, women faculty luncheons, and discussions about faculty development at regular faculty meetings. The department's faculty also participate in the University of Rochester Medical Center's active faculty development program. Feedback on the faculty development program has been constructive and mainly positive and will serve to guide the continuing evolution of the program.

  6. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  7. Faculty Demand in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the factors that shift the demand curve for faculty at not-for-profit private institutions. It is unique in that to the author's knowledge no other study has directly addressed the question of how the positive correlation between average faculty salaries and faculty-student ratios can be reconciled with…

  8. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  9. Colgate University Faculty Handbook, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate Univ., Hamilton, NY.

    Designed to supplement the university catalog and handbook, this 1970 faculty handbook is primarily for the information and guidance of new members of the faculty. The community is described, and university organization and campus governance outlined. Specific details are reported on various topics, including: faculty use of college facilities,…

  10. Mentoring and Pretenure Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Alan A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) Dental School uses teaching and research mentors for new faculty, together with a structured semiannual review process, to clearly identify faculty expectations for tenure. Pretenure faculty have appreciated the clear and regular input concerning their progress, and mentors enjoy the interaction with…

  11. Faculty Development: The American Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    A growing movement to improve the quality of teaching has been called "faculty development." It is based on three assumptions: the primary professional activity of most faculty is teaching; instructional behaviors are learned skills, attitudes, and goals; and faculty can be taught how to improve their classroom performance. Interest in faculty…

  12. Faculty Perspectives on Administrator Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, James L.

    The sources of faculty perspectives on the personal effectiveness of administrators are analyzed. It is proposed that faculty will be predisposed to see administrators in different lights, depending on structural elements in decision making and the orientation of the faculty members. Attention is directed to Talcott Parson's theory for classifying…

  13. Axiological approach in the process of professionally - pedagogical preparation of future teachers of physical education [Aksiologicheskij podkhod v processe professional'no- pedagogicheskoj podgotovki budushchikh uchitelej fizicheskogo vospitaniia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deminskaya L.A.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It is considered humanism principles of the modern system of education based on the axiological approach near pedagogical process. The analysis of publications is conducted on questions of maintenance and realization of axiological approach in the field of trade pedagogical education. It is set that axiological approach in the process of professional-pedagogical preparation of future teachers is oriented to forming of the system of pedagogical values and values of physical education. Such valued orientations answer the requirements of modern teacher of physical education.

  14. Gender in Science and Engineering Faculties: Demographic Inertia Revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R Thomas

    Full Text Available The under-representation of women on faculties of science and engineering is ascribed in part to demographic inertia, which is the lag between retirement of current faculty and future hires. The assumption of demographic inertia implies that, given enough time, gender parity will be achieved. We examine that assumption via a semi-Markov model to predict the future faculty, with simulations that predict the convergence demographic state. Our model shows that existing practices that produce gender gaps in recruitment, retention, and career progression preclude eventual gender parity. Further, we examine sensitivity of the convergence state to current gender gaps to show that all sources of disparity across the entire faculty career must be erased to produce parity: we cannot blame demographic inertia.

  15. Gender in Science and Engineering Faculties: Demographic Inertia Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicole R; Poole, Daniel J; Herbers, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The under-representation of women on faculties of science and engineering is ascribed in part to demographic inertia, which is the lag between retirement of current faculty and future hires. The assumption of demographic inertia implies that, given enough time, gender parity will be achieved. We examine that assumption via a semi-Markov model to predict the future faculty, with simulations that predict the convergence demographic state. Our model shows that existing practices that produce gender gaps in recruitment, retention, and career progression preclude eventual gender parity. Further, we examine sensitivity of the convergence state to current gender gaps to show that all sources of disparity across the entire faculty career must be erased to produce parity: we cannot blame demographic inertia.

  16. Use of an Experiential Learning Assignment to Prepare Future Health Professionals to Utilize Social Media for Nutrition Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twynstra, Jasna; Dworatzek, Paula

    2016-03-01

    Social media has become a popular platform for reputable health organizations to disseminate health information to the public. However, future health professionals may receive little training in social media communication. To train future dietetic professionals, we incorporated a social media assignment into a Communications course curriculum to facilitate effective use of social media for the profession. For the assignment, students were instructed to make 2 posts on Facebook. The posts were due 3 weeks apart so that students received feedback on their first post before making their second post. To demonstrate the type of social media communication commonly used by reputable health organizations, the first post raised awareness or provided nutrition education. The second post used Facebook's "comment" feature, to respond to another student's first post, demonstrating the use of social media for community engagement. Both posts included a hyperlink that the user could click to get more information. Students were evaluated on the hook, main points, professionalism, credibility, and effectiveness of inviting the reader to the hyperlinked website and its ease of navigation. Dietetics educators should be encouraged to incorporate social media education into their curriculums for the benefit of future dietitians and their clients.

  17. Integration of a NASA faculty fellowship project within an undergraduate engineering capstone design class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen, C.

    2012-11-01

    The United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) provides university faculty fellowships that prepare the faculty to implement engineering design class projects that possess the potential to contribute to NASA ESMD objectives. The goal of the ESMD is to develop new capabilities, support technologies and research that will enable sustained and affordable human and robotic space exploration. In order to create a workforce that will have the desire and skills necessary to achieve these goals, the NASA ESMD faculty fellowship program enables university faculty to work on specific projects at a NASA field center and then implement the project within their capstone engineering design class. This allows the senior - or final year - undergraduate engineering design students, the opportunity to develop critical design experience using methods and design tools specified within NASA's Systems Engineering (SE) Handbook. The faculty fellowship projects focus upon four specific areas critical to the future of space exploration: spacecraft, propulsion, lunar and planetary surface systems and ground operations. As the result of a 2010 fellowship, whereby faculty research was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama (AL), senior design students in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) department at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) had the opportunity to complete senior design projects that pertained to current work conducted to support ESMD objectives. Specifically, the UAH MAE students utilized X-TOOLSS (eXploration Toolset for the Optimization Of Launch and Space Systems), an Evolutionary Computing (EC) design optimization software, as well as design, analyze, fabricate and test a lunar regolith burrowing device - referred to as the Lunar Wormbot (LW) - that is aimed at exploring and retrieving samples of lunar regolith. These two projects were

  18. Preparation of nano-compounded polyolefin materials through in situ polymerization technique: status quo and future prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN YaWei; DONG JinYong

    2009-01-01

    Nano-compounding of polyolefins,an economical yet very effective route to high-performance poly-olefin materials,has considerable attention in recent years.Unlike most of the other polymers,polyolefins are chemically inert,which dictates that nano-compounding of polyolefins has to be con-ducted via in situ polymerization.In this review,a technological progress of the nano-compounding of polyolefins via in situ polymerization technique was summarized thoroughly,with emphasis laid on the current research status of polyolefin/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites.A clear perspective for future researches on this specific family of materials was envisaged.

  19. Social Work Gerontological Practice: The Need for Faculty Development in the New Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Barbara; Silverstone, Barbara; June Simmons, W; Volland, Patricia J; Howe, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need to upgrade the gerontological knowledge and skills of practicing social workers. Geriatrics and gerontology, as specialized fields of knowledge, have not been sufficiently integrated into formal academic training programs. There are major trends in the health care environment which impact on social work education, including technological advances, a shift from inpatient to outpatient and community care settings, increasing diversity of the older population, and client and family participation in decisionmaking. These trends necessitate social work education to emphasize new content areas in gerontology and the development of new skills in clinical, case management, care coordination, and teamwork. A significant obstacle to the preparation of future social workers to deliver the complex services needed by older adults and their families is a serious shortage of social work faculty in gerontology. Sustained and broad initiatives, such as the John A. Hartford Foundation funded Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholars Program, are needed to develop academic and practice-based faculty in gerontology. This is crucial if social work is to maintain an important service role in the new millennium.

  20. DIRECTIONS OF PREPARATION OF FUTURE TEACHERS TO THE USE OF DISTANCE LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES IN PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY (PRAXIOLOGICAL ASPECT OF THE ACTIVITY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Boronenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to demonstrate the need of preparing future teachers to use distance learning technologies in the professional activities. Introduction in educational process of distance learning technologies contributes to improving the quality of education. Methods. The authors’ technique of preparation of students of pedagogical specialities to work in the information-educational environment is designed on the basis of the analysis and generalisation of numerous scientific publications. Results. The system of training to implementation of the distance learning technologies in the teaching activity is developed and described, consisting of the following directions: realisation within the program of the principal educational program of specialised training courses in variable-based curriculum parts; the organisation of educational and research activity of students with the use of distance learning technologies; classroom-based and extracurricular independent work of students directed to designing of teaching and learning aids and materials on the basis of distance learning technologies; application of elements of distance learning technologies for students’ teaching; attraction of students to formation of corpus of multimedia educational resources of university. The purposes, the content and expected results of each direction are specified. Scientific novelty. The authors point out that concrete scientifically wellfounded methodical recommendations for the future teachers on implementation of distance learning technologies haven’t been presented in the Russian literature till now; despite an abundance of scientifically-information sources of distance learning technologies and sufficiently high-leveled degree knowledge of the issues of its efficiency in educational activity, conditions of introduction of such technologies in high school, construction of models of distance training. Authors of article have tried to close this

  1. Extended training to prepare GPs for future workforce needs: a qualitative investigation of a 1-year fellowship in urgent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeremy; Russell, Rachel; Harkness, Frances; Wilkie, Veronica; Aiello, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    It has been argued that UK general practice specialist training should be extended to better prepare GPs for the challenges facing 21st-century health care. Evidence is needed to inform how this should occur. To investigate the experience of recently trained GPs undertaking a 1-year full-time fellowship programme designed to provide advanced skills training in urgent care, integrated care, leadership, and academic practice; and its impact on subsequent career development. Semi-structured interviews conducted longitudinally over 2 years augmented by observational data in the West Midlands, England. Participants were interviewed on at least three occasions: twice while undertaking the fellowship, and at least once post-completion. Participants' clinical and academic activities were observed. Data were analysed using a framework approach. Seven GPs participated in the pilot scheme. The fellowship was highly rated and felt to be balanced in terms of the opportunities for skill development, academic advancement, and confidence building. GPs experienced enhanced employability on completing the scheme, and at follow-up were working in a variety of primary care/urgent care interface clinical and leadership roles. Participants believed it was making general practice a more attractive career option for newly qualified doctors. The 1-year fellowship provides a defined framework for training GPs to work in an enhanced manner across organisational interfaces with the skills to support service improvement and integration. It appears to be well suited to preparing GPs for portfolio roles, but its wider applicability and impact on NHS service delivery needs further investigation. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  2. Facile and simple preparation of pH-sensitive chitosan-mesoporous silica nanoparticles for future breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nanocarrier is linked to the core and shell by hydrogen bond. This drug delivery system represents a smart, biodegradable, and pH-sensitive nanocarrier for breast cancer therapy. These drug nanocarriers were linked by hydrogen bond from –NH2 on chitosan and –OH on mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN. And MSN was prepared by the cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB-templated method via sol-gel and the loading of ibuprofen (IBU into the pores of MSN was visualized by coprecipitation which was assessed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques. The wrapping of chitosan (CS onto the surface of MSN was demonstrated by FTIR too. When the nanocarriers entered an acidic environment where large quantity cancer cells existed, the chitosan shell swell into loose random coil, exposing the drug and making them easy to be released. The results showed that the IBU could be successfully and effectively loaded into MSN and CS/MSN. The system was pH responsive. Drug release was much higher at pH 6.8 than at 7.4. This drug delivery system will represent a smart and biodegradable pH-responsive nanocarrier for breast cancer.

  3. Forming the Future Lawyers’ Communicative Competence: The Experience of Higher Education in Ukraine and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasilenko Lyudmyla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the state of forming of communicative competence of future lawyers in higher education of Ukraine and Germany is analyzed. There is made the comparative description of preparation of the students of law faculty with an accent on forming of communicative competence on the example of the University of modern knowledge (Ukraine and Frankfort university is named after Goethe (Germany.

  4. The Relation Between Smoking Habit Among the Students and Faculty Members in Marmara University and Steady Cost of Smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşegül YILDIRIM KAPTANOĞLU; Gülden POLAT; Makbule SOYER

    2012-01-01

    It was aimed in this study to quantify smoking habits and nicotine dependency of future health care professionals such as doctors, dentists, pharmacists, nurses, and midwives, as well as academic members of associated faculties and to calculate the economic steady cost of smoking. Students in the faculties of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy, and Faculty of Health Sciences Department of Nursing and Midwifery and faculty members in Marmara University were included in the study. As a means of ...

  5. The journey of a science teacher: Preparing female students in the Training Future Scientists after school program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hill, Rona M.

    What affect does female participation in the Training Future Scientist (TFS) program based on Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and Maslow's Hierarchies of Needs have on female adolescents' achievement levels in science and their attitude toward science and interest in science-based careers? The theoretical framework for this study was developed through a constructivist perspective, using dialogic engagement, coinciding with Lev Vygotsky's sociocultural learning theory. This action research project used mixed methods research design, targeted urban adolescent females who were members of Boys & Girls Club of Greater St. Louis (BGCGSTL) after-school program. The data collection measures were three qualitative instruments (semi-structured interviews, reflective journal entries and attitudinal survey open-ended responses) and two quantitative instruments (pre-test and posttests over the content from the Buckle-down Curriculum and attitudinal survey scaled responses). The goal was to describe the impact the Training Future Scientist (TFS) after-school program has on the girls' scientific content knowledge, attitude toward choosing a science career, and self-perception in science. Through the TFS after-school program participants had access to a secondary science teacher-researcher, peer leaders that were in the 9th--12th grade, and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) role models from Washington University Medical School Young Scientist Program (YSP) graduate and medical students and fellows as volunteers. The program utilized the Buckle-down Curriculum as guided, peer-led cooperative learning groups, hands-on labs and demonstrations facilitated by the researcher, trained peer leaders and/or role models that used constructivist science pedagogy to improve test-taking strategies. The outcomes for the TFS study were an increase in science content knowledge, a positive trend in attitude change, and a negative trend in choosing a science career. Keywords: informal

  6. A selected bibliography for nursing faculty and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Paula

    2009-01-01

    This bibliography is prepared for nursing faculty and nursing students to acquaint them with some resources which might contribute to their success. The bibliography is divided into two parts: (1) resources for nursing faculty; and (2) resources for nursing students. The major content of the resources for nursing faculty are: mentoring; research and publishing; tenure and new information technologies. The resources for nursing students contain: study tips and skills; success of the NCLEX-RN exam and informational monographs. With the time constraints of nursing faculty and nursing students and the abundance of materials available, this bibliography provides a set of resources for them to peruse. Electronic resources, journal articles, and monographs are included.

  7. Preparing nursing students to be competent for future professional practice: applying the team-based learning-teaching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Hsu, Tsui-Hua; Pan, Mei-Yu; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) has been used for many years in business and science, but little research has focused on its application in nursing education. This quasi-experimental study was to apply the TBL in four nursing courses at a university in Taiwan and to evaluate its effect on students' learning outcomes and behaviors. Adult health nursing, maternal-child nursing, community health nursing, and medical-surgical nursing were the 4 designated courses for this study. Three hundred ninety-nine students in 2-year registered nurse-bachelor of science in nursing, and regular 4-year nursing programs enrolled in the designated courses were contacted. Three hundred eighty-seven students agreed to participate in the data collection. Results showed that the TBL significantly improved the learning behaviors of students in both programs, including class engagement (p learning (p learning behaviors and academic performance. These learning behaviors are important and beneficial for the students' future professional development. The TBL method can be considered for broader application in nursing education.

  8. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty Competencies and Teaching Strategies to Enhance the Care of the Veteran Population: Perspectives of Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Judy

    2016-01-01

    It is critical that faculty competencies, teaching strategies, and the essential knowledge relating to the care of our veterans be delineated and taught to health care professionals in order for our Veterans to receive optimal care. The purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain from nursing faculty members who have worked extensively with veterans, the necessary faculty competencies, essential knowledge, and teaching strategies needed to prepare baccalaureate level nurses to provide individualized, quality, and holistic care to veterans. Six Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy faculty members participated in two 2-hour focus group sessions. There were a total of 12 multidimensional major concepts identified: 5 faculty competencies, 4 essential knowledge areas, and 3 teaching strategies specifically related to veteran care. The information generated can be used for faculty, staff, and or nurse development. Having a comprehensive understanding of veteran health care needs enable effective patient-centered care delivery to veterans, which is the gold standard in health care our veterans deserve.

  9. Junior faculty core curriculum to enhance faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Ronnie; Holloway, Robert G; Gross, Robert A; Libby, Katie; Shapiro, Janine R

    2017-04-01

    Senior Instructors and Assistant Professors in their first academic appointment may not have all the tools for an efficient start to their careers. Although many institutions provide access to mentoring programs and seminars on faculty development, the timing and format of the offerings often conflict with ongoing responsibilities of the faculty, particularly clinical faculty. We established a collaboration between the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the University of Rochester Medical Center Office for Faculty Development with the goal of developing a week-long Junior Faculty Core Curriculum that would better suit faculty schedules. We convened focus groups and with their help, identified themes for inclusion in the course. Speakers were identified from among local senior faculty. University leadership was enlisted in promoting the course. Individual speakers and course content were evaluated daily, at the end of the week-long course, and 6 months later. Planning for subsequent years incorporated the feedback. Yearly evaluations and subsequent course modification continued. Junior faculty from nearly every department in the Medical Center were represented. There was high learner satisfaction and participation however several limitations were identified and addressed in subsequent years. The focus on principles and available resources, not specific skills or content was appropriate. Daily interactions among participants from a wide variety of departments fostered networking among faculty who may not otherwise have met and discussed common interests. The ultimate value of such an early, intensive faculty development program will depend on whether it equips junior faculty to organize, develop, and achieve their academic goals better than alternative formats. This will require further study.

  10. Knowledge processing and faculty engagement in multicultural university settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    productive and healthier faculty members. In this study, based on a sample consisting of 489 members of multicultural university departments, we set out to investigate the relationship between internal knowledge processing – conceptualised as the ability to locate and share knowledge in the faculty group......In educational studies much attention has been directed to engagement as a precondition for positive student outcomes. Very few studies, however, have focused on the engagement of the faculty members. This is a regrettable omission because engagement has been argued to lead to more satisfied, more...... indicators of behavioural, cognitive and emotional engagement. Results showed consistent positive associations between group knowledge processing and all the studied faculty engagement indicators. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed in detail....

  11. Evaluation of a Training Program in Aging Research for Social Work Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.; Townsend, Aloen; Berkman, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, we have offered a postgraduate training program in aging research for social work faculty from across the country. The overarching goal of the program is to expand the pool of social work faculty engaged in aging research. This, in turn, will reinvigorate participants' teaching; prepare them to update aging-related content in the…

  12. Using a Preflective Activity to Identify Faculty Beliefs Prior to an International Professional Development Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Amy; Lamm, Alexa; Roberts, T. Grady; Navarro, Maria; Ricketts, John

    2012-01-01

    Today's college graduates in agricultural and life sciences must be prepared to work in a global society. Increasing the integration of international content into on-campus courses requires globally competent faculty members. This study reports faculty's initial attitudes and beliefs about Latin American culture prior to participating in a 12-day…

  13. Faculty Development for Teaching in a Changing Health Care Environment: A Statewide Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, Mary E.; Billings, Diane M.

    1999-01-01

    Nursing faculty (n=352) identified the following inservice needs: preparation for teaching in community settings; refining of faculty roles; and the basics of teaching, evaluation, and curriculum. Years of teaching and type of program did not make a difference in the needs expressed. (SK)

  14. Characterization of the calcium-fluoroaluminosilicate glass prepared by a non-hydrolytic sol-gel route for future dental application as glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Cestari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements are widely employed in dentistry due to their physical, biological and mainly anti-caries properties. Glass ionomers consist of an aluminosilicate glass matrix modified with other elements, and they contain large quantities of fluorine. In this study, we report on the preparation of calcium-fluoroaluminosilicate glasses by a nonhydrolytic sol-gel route as an alternative approach to obtaining alumina-silica matrices. The glass powders were prepared via the non-hydrolytic sol-gel method, by mixing AlCl3, SiCl4, CaF2, AlF3, NaF, and AlPO4. The powders were studied by thermal analysis (TG/DTA/DSC, photoluminescence (PL, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR27Al-29Si, and X ray diffraction (XRD. TG/DTA/DSC analyses revealed a constant mass loss due to structural changes during the heating process, which was confirmed by NMR and PL. A stable aluminosilicate matrix with potential future application as a glass ionomer base was obtained.

  15. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence

    2017-01-01

    good or excellent. Conclusion The findings from this study show that job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members is a multi-dimensional construct. Future improvement in overall level of job satisfaction will therefore require multiple strategies. PMID:28292815

  16. Faculty Agency: Departmental Contexts That Matter in Faculty Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Corbin M.; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2014-01-01

    In a modern context of constrained resources and high demands, faculty exert agency to strategically navigate their careers (Baez 2000a; Neumann et al. 2006). Guided by the O'Meara et al. (2011) framework on agency in faculty professional lives, this study used Structural Equation Modeling to investigate which departmental factors…

  17. Undergraduate Geoscience Education in the United States: Helping Faculty to Meet Changing Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C.; Mogk, D.

    2003-04-01

    In the past two decades, undergraduate geoscience education in the United States has undergone substantial changes in its goals, methods, and content, reflecting changes in our societal needs, major improvements in our understanding of how students learn, and the advent of a systems approach to understanding the Earth. Looking in an integrated fashion at US undergraduate education across the spectrum of institutional settings shows that in aggregate, our goals have broadened from a focus primarily on training future scientists to include major efforts to improve preparation for future teachers and to strengthen the understanding of science and geoscience in the broader student population. Supporting a more diverse population of students and increasing the diversity of the geoscience workforce are also priorities. Recommendations for strengthening undergraduate geoscience education to meet these changing circumstances were put forward in Shaping the Future of Undergraduate Earth Science Education: An Earth System Approach published by the AGU in 1997 (Ireton, Manduca, and Mogk). The report recommended two major changes: 1) development of an Earth System approach as the backbone of geoscience education to tie instruction in the various disciplines into a cohesive study of the Earth and 2) implementation of effective teaching strategies based on research on learning. Since 1997 major strides have been made in supporting geoscience faculty in making these changes. Building on the work of individuals, three important community-wide efforts have been established. 1) Professional societies have increased their support for educational programs, expanded education sessions and fostered a variety of workshops in conjunction with national and regional meetings. 2) The Digital Library for Earth System Education is being developed to enable sharing of resources and to provide a virtual community center. 3) The On the Cutting Edge faculty professional development program

  18. Methods and Teaching Strategies Used by Teacher Education Faculty Members in one State University in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amado C. Ramos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Institutions of higher learning across the nation are responding to political, economic, social and technological pressures to be more responsive to students' needs and more concerned about how well students are prepared to assume future societal roles. This study aimed to determine the methods and teaching strategies used by the PSU – CTE faculty members of Bayambang Campus, Bayambang, Pangasinan during the first semester of the school year 2013-2014. The descriptivecorrelational method of research was employed in this study where it involved the collection of pertinent data in order to answer questions concerning the current status of the subject of the study. Majority of the faculty members are females, they are master’s degree holders, have a permanent position with an academic rank of instructor, and most of the faculty members are graduate of SUCs. They also have high attitude toward teaching; generally, the faculty members perceived themselves to be often in using teaching approaches and teaching methods; and sometimes in using teaching techniques/styles, instructional support activities, and non-formal activities; and no significant relationships exist between the faculty members’ profile variables and their level of pedagogical approaches in teaching approaches, teaching methods, teaching techniques/styles, non-formal activities and instructional support activities. Teachers should be encouraged to pursue/finish higher education, likewise they should be motivated to conduct research studies like action researches as part of their functions, particularly along their area of specialization. Teachers should be encouraged to explore and view other effective teaching strategies and find more ways to entice other students challenge themselves to create their own strategies to use in the field and to become more global in perspective. The use computer technology can be an effective teaching strategy, especially when students are given

  19. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty: Findings from a faculty work-life and leadership survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence

    2017-03-01

    family medicine faculty members is a multi-dimensional construct. Future improvement in overall level of job satisfaction will therefore require multiple strategies. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  20. University Faculty Gender Roles Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Sue; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 400 college faculty men and women to determine gender role preferences and perceptions. Perceptions of the ideal woman, ideal man, most women, most men, and self were measured. Results from the Sex Role Trait Inventory show that both men and women faculty preferences and perceptions were generally very similar. Implications are discussed.…

  1. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  2. Reframing research on faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2011-04-01

    Research on faculty development has focused primarily on individual participants and has produced relatively little generalizable knowledge that can guide faculty development programs. In this article, the authors examine how current research on faculty development in medical education can be enriched by research in related fields such as teacher education, quality improvement, continuing medical education, and workplace learning. As a result of this analysis, the authors revise the old model for conceptualizing faculty development (preferably called professional development). This expanded model calls for research on educational process and outcomes focused on two communities of practice: the community created among participants in faculty development programs and the communities of teaching practice in the workplace (classroom or clinic) where teaching actually occurs. For the faculty development community, the key components are the participants, program, content, facilitator, and context in which the program occurs and in which the faculty teach. For the workplace community, associated components include relationships and networks of association in that environment, the organization and culture of the setting, the teaching tasks and activities, and the mentoring available to the members of that academic and/or clinical community of teaching practice. This expanded model of faculty development generates a new set of research questions, which are described along with six recommendations for enhancing research, including establishment of a national center for research in health professions education.

  3. Perspectives on nordic faculty developmet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Vinther, Ole; Andersson, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Faculty development in nordic engineering" education and describes todays challenges in developing engineering education.......The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Faculty development in nordic engineering" education and describes todays challenges in developing engineering education....

  4. Changing Practices in Faculty Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    A guide to understanding and improving faculty evaluation procedures at all types of colleges and universities is presented. The causes of today's crisis in higher education and survival strategies are reviewed, and the search for solvency is related to major changes in assessing faculty performance. The proliferation of court challenges to…

  5. Professorship: A Faculty Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd M.; Davis, Jane F.

    1987-01-01

    A faculty development program at a traditionally black college was designed to enhance the ability of graduate faculty to supervise research activities of graduate students. Focus was on interpersonal problem solving in advisement and professional issues; classroom techniques of discussion teaching, case methods, and psychodrama encouraged the…

  6. Accreditation: Impact on Faculty Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    The new mission-linked accreditation standards of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business represent a fundamental change in how business schools operate. Emphases on strategic planning, stakeholder participation, faculty teams, and continuous improvement will encourage institutional cultural change and help faculty respond with…

  7. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  8. Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Esther; McDyre, Brian; Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Gatenby, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in distance learning in higher education. Given this, it is extremely important to understand faculty attitudes about distance education, not only because they can vary widely, but also because it is the faculty, through their design and implementation of online courses, that will shape the…

  9. Faculty Retention in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Tariq Rahim; Ahmad, Reyaz

    2013-01-01

    Criteria for retaining or firing a highly qualified faculty in higher education in many cases are vague and unclear. This situation is neither a comfortable, nor a healthy, both for the faculty and the administration. Stakeholders have enough reason to blame each other in the absence of transparent mechanism. This paper proposes a transparent…

  10. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the refle

  11. Scholarship and Dental Education: New Perspectives for Clinical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E.

    1984-01-01

    Career advancement in academic dentistry appears to demand success in teaching, scholarship, and service, but foremost in research or scholarship. As a result, many dental faculty believe they are forced to choose between providing excellent professional preparation for their students or ensuring their academic careers. (MLW)

  12. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the

  13. Ghana Fiasco Shows Risks of Faculty-Led Study Trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karin

    2007-01-01

    This article illustrates the importance of preparation for professors who take students overseas. A University of Washington study-abroad program in Ghana that was cut short last summer after the medical evacuation of half of its participants highlights the potential hazards associated with programs led by individual faculty members who may lack…

  14. Arkansas State University Beebe Branch Faculty Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Univ., Beebe.

    Arkansas State University Beebe Branch provides a liberal arts oriented program for traditional and nontraditional students. Its faculty handbook contains institutional goals, description of responsibilities of administrative officers and faculty committees, faculty employment policies, and administrative and instructional policies. The…

  15. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  16. The Challenges of Cultural Diversity in the Recruitment of Faculty and Students from Diverse Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josey, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of cultural diversity and the significance of ethnicity, race, and race relations in the workplace focuses on the need to recruit library school faculty and students from diverse backgrounds. Highlights include racism; minority faculty; retaining and recruiting minority students; funding; and future possibilities. (Contains 12…

  17. What Can Happen When Business and Language Faculty Cooperate across an Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael; Karney, Dennis; Vigier, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Management schools are expected to educate future professionals with the necessary skills to operate successfully in a global business environment. In this paper, the authors analyze and reflect on an experiment in interdisciplinary cooperation undertaken by business faculty at a US university and language faculty at a French School of Management.…

  18. Student and Faculty Perceptions of ICT Use in Undergraduate Agriculture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald M.; Edgar, Leslie D.; Cox, Casandra K.

    2013-01-01

    Students and faculty in a land-grant college of agriculture were surveyed to determine their perceptions of current and future Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in undergraduate agriculture courses. There was a large, positive relationship (r = 0.83) between student and faculty perceptions of the extent to which 40 specific ICT…

  19. Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training. Methods Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed. Results In total, 25% of residents (128/505 and 28% of faculty (118/413 responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58% and faculty (63% were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9% and faculty (11% assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55 of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58 of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46 would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health. Conclusion Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

  20. The Current Status of Nursing Professionalism Among Nursing Faculty in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Taketomi, Kikuko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2017-02-01

    The faculty of nursing schools plays an important role in the successful execution of nursing education. Therefore, faculty behavior strongly affects the professional development of nurses. However, few studies have examined professional nursing behaviors from the perspective of nursing faculty. Members of nursing faculty in Japan were surveyed regarding their perspectives on behaviors related to professionalism. The model, Miller's Wheel of Professionalism in Nursing, was used as the theoretical framework. The Behavioral Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing (BIPN) was completed by 74 full-time nursing faculty who were currently working at 10 institutes of nursing education in Japan. The mean BIPN score for the participants was 11.56 (SD = 6.08) of a possible total of 27. The highest and lowest BIPN category scores were for "research development, use, and evaluation" and "community service," respectively. Professionalism was found to relate significantly to higher educational preparation (F = 32.17, p professionalism (p professionalism and both educational preparation (r = .85, p nursing educator (r = .31, p = .0077). The results support the idea that a higher level of educational preparation and more years of experience as a member of a nursing faculty are associated with higher levels of nursing professionalism. The professional behavior scores suggest that "community service" is an issue that requires further improvement among Japanese nursing faculty. Awareness of extrinsic factors such as education is important to maximize nursing professionalism. The findings of this study may help nursing faculty continue their self-development.

  1. Identifying Best Practices for Engaging Faculty in International Agricultural Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa J. Lamm

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Universities are being called upon to internationalize curriculum as the need for a globally competent workforce increases. Without globally-competent faculty, international integration within higher education cannot occur. Literature indicates that participation in short-term international agricultural education experiences is important to increasing agricultural faculty members’ cultural awareness. However, the best way to design and implement such experiences for faculty is uncharted. The purpose of the study was to identify best practices for facilitating a short-term international education experience for faculty in the agricultural and life sciences that encouraged learning, discussion, and reflection leading faculty to further integrate international perspectives in their agricultural courses in the U.S. Through a qualitative research design, reflective observations and statements from a planning team conducting short-term international agricultural education experience in Ecuador were used to provide a thick, rich description of the successes/challenges faced while designing and implementing the experience. The results provided a list of best practices future planning team members can use to emphasize learning before, during, and after a short-term international agricultural education experience for faculty.

  2. Evaluating Competitiveness of Faculties of Higher Educational Establishments in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayevnyeva Olena V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of competitiveness of higher education, efficiency of its functioning and training graduates of higher educational establishments according to the current and future needs of the market are among the key issues of socio-economic development strategy in EU countries. The aim of the study is to determine the competitiveness of faculties of major higher educational establishments based on the use of the cluster analysis and rating evaluations provided by national experts. The paper describes the methodology of rating evaluation of faculties of higher educational establishments in Slovakia on the basis of such components as: educational process; attractiveness of the program; science and research activities; doctoral studies; attracted grants. Shortcomings of the approach to faculty rating evaluations based on the averaged value have been determined. In order to improve analysis of the competitive positions of individual faculties of higher educational establishments in Slovakia, the cluster analysis was used and the results of breaking the faculties into five groups were presented. To forecast changes in the competitive positions of faculties of higher educational establishments in Slovakia, discriminant functions enabling to determine possible qualitative changes in the state of the faculties’ competitiveness due to external or internal factors have been built.

  3. Education Prepares for the Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hubei Province is making efforts to make school children in ethnic areas better understand their culture wang Sirui,8,is a grade-3 pupil at the Ethnic Primary School of Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture (shortened as Enshi Prefecture (shortened as Enshi Prefecture), central China’s Hubei Province. Although from the Tujia ethnic group, the little girl knew little about the Tujia culture before she came to study in the school in 2008.

  4. Exam preparation course in obstetrics and gynecology for the German Medical State Examination: proof of concept and implications for the recruitment of future residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Fabian; Fremd, Carlo; Tabatabai, Patrik; Smetanay, Katharina; Doster, Anne; Heil, Joerg; Schuetz, Florian; Sohn, Christof; Hennigs, André

    2016-11-01

    Today´s written part of the medical state examination requires students to retrieve a comprehensive amount of knowledge in a limited period of time. Therefore, the main study objectives were to implement and to evaluate a two-day exam preparation course for the German Medical State Examination in obstetrics and gynecology. The project evaluation focused on acceptability, satisfaction and the gain of knowledge for the participants of such a face-to-face course. The two-day intensive training for senior medical students offered a review of the entire exam-relevant content in the field of obstetrics and gynecology in combination with interactive discussions along selected exam questions. Skill gains were assessed using pre- and post-course multiple choice tests. In addition, a qualitative questionnaire assessed attitudes and satisfaction of course participants. A total of 101 fifth year senior medical students from Heidelberg University Medical School participated in the two pilot courses (summer 2014 and winter 2015). Pre- and post-course tests showed a significant skill-gain from 14.9 to 18.0 points [of a maximum of 20; pre-post difference 95 % CI (2.21; 3.98), t test: p obstetrics and gynecology is feasible, effective and highly appreciated by senior medical students preparing for the Second German Medical State Examination. It further suggests surplus value for academic clinical departments to recruit future residents. Methods and tools presented in this paper are intended to inspire and guide clinical colleagues in implementing the format at their respective universities.

  5. Academic Medical Library Services Contribute to Scholarship in Medical Faculty and Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peace Ossom Williamson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Quesenberry, A. C., Oelschlegel, S., Earl, M., Leonard, K., & Vaughn, C. J. (2016. The impact of library resources and services on the scholarly activity of medical faculty and residents. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 35(3, 259-265. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2016.1189778 Abstract Objective – To assess the impact of academic medical library services and resources on information-seeking behaviours during the academic efforts of medical faculty and residents. Design – Value study derived from a 23-item survey. Setting – Public medical residency program and training hospital in Tennessee, USA. Subjects – 433 faculty and residents currently employed by or completing residency in an academic medical centre. Methods – Respondents completed a 23-question survey about their use of library resources and services in preparation for publishing, presenting, and teaching. The library services in the survey included literature searches completed by librarians and document delivery for preparation of publications, presentations, and lecture material. The survey also included questions about how resources were being accessed in preparation for scholarship. The survey sought information on whether respondents published articles or chapters or presented papers or posters in the previous three years. If respondents answered in the affirmative to one of the aforementioned methods of scholarship, they were provided with further questions about how they access library resources and whether they sought mediated literature search and document delivery services in preparation for their recent presentations and publications. The survey also included questions concerning what types of scholarly activity prompt faculty and residents to use online library resources. Main Results – The study was provided to 433 subjects, including 220 faculty and 213 residents, contacted through an email distribution list. The response rate to the

  6. Comparison of Scientific Research Projects of Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Esen; Tonbul, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Many studies indicate that knowledge and knowledge production are the main predictors of social development, welfare and the ability to face the future with confidence. It could be argued that knowledge production is mainly carried out by universities. This study compares 1266 scientific research projects (SRPs) completed by faculties of education…

  7. We Are All Teachers: Modeling Democratic Engagement in Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Morgan; Rogers, Christian; Benton, Melissa; Quirke, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    As service-learning and community engagement (SLCE) have become increasingly legitimized in higher education as scholarly pedagogical practice, resources to support faculty in learning about and undertaking this engaged work have grown. As Zlotkowski (2015) points out in his framing essay for the SLCE Future Directions Project (FDP), the movement…

  8. Comparison of Scientific Research Projects of Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Esen; Tonbul, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Many studies indicate that knowledge and knowledge production are the main predictors of social development, welfare and the ability to face the future with confidence. It could be argued that knowledge production is mainly carried out by universities. This study compares 1266 scientific research projects (SRPs) completed by faculties of education…

  9. Faculty as Border Crossers: A Study of Fulbright Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2014-01-01

    As adult learners, faculty members approach new experiences based on events of the past, but this underlying framework of understanding is challenged when they work abroad for an extended period of time.

  10. Keeping Faculty [Happy]: The Critical Role of a Faculty Center in Developing and Retaining Quality, Collegial Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jace; Gilbertson, Phil

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative approach to retaining happy and healthy faculty members in a collegial, productive teaching and learning environment. A major portion of the paper shares how the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning plays a significant role in the faculty interview process, new faculty orientation, and subsequent mentoring of…

  11. [Responding to patients with home mechanical ventilation after the Great East Japan Earthquake and during the planned power outages. How should we be prepared for a future disaster ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi, Yukako

    2011-12-01

    The unprecedented earthquake(magnitude-9 in the Japanese seismic intensity scale)hit off the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. Consequently, there were planned power outages in the area nearby Tokyo to avoid massive blackouts caused by a stoppage of Fukushima nuclear plants.Our clinic located in Kawasaki city was also hit by the earthquake(magnitude- 5).During the period of two months(March and April 2011), we had a total of 52 patients with home respiratory care (5-TPPV, 11-NPPV and 36-HOT)at that time.Two out of three 24 hour-TPPV users had no external battery.After the earthquake, there was a 7-hour electricity failure in some areas, and a patient with ASV(adaptive servo ventilator)was living there.Moreover, 3-hour/day power outages were carried out from March 14 to March 28, affecting people's everyday lives. However, the patient had no harmful influences from the power failure because a ventilation company lent us an external battery(4-9 hour life capacity)for the patients, and we were able to avoid an emergency situation caused by the power failure.In conclusion, we ought to be prepared for patients with home mechanical ventilation in the future toward unforeseen large scale power outages.

  12. Partial Discharge Characteristics of Polymer Nanocomposite Materials in Electrical Insulation: A Review of Sample Preparation Techniques, Analysis Methods, Potential Applications, and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Akmal Izzati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanocomposites have recently been attracting attention among researchers in electrical insulating applications from energy storage to power delivery. However, partial discharge has always been a predecessor to major faults and problems in this field. In addition, there is a lot more to explore, as neither the partial discharge characteristic in nanocomposites nor their electrical properties are clearly understood. By adding a small amount of weight percentage (wt% of nanofillers, the physical, mechanical, and electrical properties of polymers can be greatly enhanced. For instance, nanofillers in nanocomposites such as silica (SiO2, alumina (Al2O3 and titania (TiO2 play a big role in providing a good approach to increasing the dielectric breakdown strength and partial discharge resistance of nanocomposites. Such polymer nanocomposites will be reviewed thoroughly in this paper, with the different experimental and analytical techniques used in previous studies. This paper also provides an academic review about partial discharge in polymer nanocomposites used as electrical insulating material from previous research, covering aspects of preparation, characteristics of the nanocomposite based on experimental works, application in power systems, methods and techniques of experiment and analysis, and future trends.

  13. Preparing Graduate Students To Teach. A Guide to Programs That Improve Undergraduate Education and Develop Tomorrow's Faculty. From a Comprehensive National Survey of Teaching Assistant Training Programs and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Leo M., Ed.; Tice, Stacey Lane, Ed.

    This report describes and documents the state of affairs in preparing graduate students for college and university teaching responsibilities. Chapter 1 summarizes the results of a survey on teacher assistant training and publishing and provides a review of the centrality of the teaching assistantship in graduate education. The publication's two…

  14. The Future of Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Ossandón, José

    2013-01-01

    Review of Elena Esposito: The Future of Futures. The Time of Money in Financing and Society Cheltenham. Edward Elgar, 2011.......Review of Elena Esposito: The Future of Futures. The Time of Money in Financing and Society Cheltenham. Edward Elgar, 2011....

  15. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  16. Academic Incivility among Health Sciences Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Melissa; Hill, Lilian H.

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers are under pressure to graduate more health professionals and, therefore, must retain talented faculty members who can educate students in respective disciplines. Faculty-to-faculty incivility is especially relevant to academic medical centers because faculty in the health professions must not only meet university tenure and…

  17. Resources for Developing Senior Faculty as Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated list of 38 resources is provided to help administrators, faculty developers, and faculty in designing effective renewal interventions for senior faculty. Topics include research on senior faculty, personnel policies (tenure, growth contracting), program strategies (mentoring, team teaching, motivation), and assessment of institutional…

  18. Promoting a healthy workplace for nursing faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Dorrie K; Koh, Elyta H; Carroll, Theresa

    2012-12-01

    Promoting a healthy workplace in academic nursing settings is vital to recruit new faculty and enhance the work life of all faculty and staff for retention and happiness. When a healthy work environment is fostered, incivility becomes unacceptable, and individuals embrace a culture where all can flourish. This article addresses the imperative of a healthy workplace, with practical suggestions for making the academic setting in schools of nursing one of optimism and confidence where future generations of nurse leaders are developed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic Preparation for Teaching in a Nursing Doctor of Philosophy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Ruth; Degenhardt, Marguerite; Engstrom, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    Lack of preparation for the faculty role, particularly for teaching, has long been an area of concern in graduate nursing education. This article describes a systematic approach to preparing students in a doctor of philosophy (PhD) program for their future roles as nurse educators. All PhD students at Rush University are required to take a nursing education course that contains four modules: the teacher, learner, and learning environment; the basics of curriculum and course design; evaluation of the learner, course, program, and institution; and the new faculty member. Students also complete a practicum in the course. Students are interviewed before the course begins and complete a self-assessment of their teaching experiences. Based on their learning needs, students are enrolled in the course for variable credit. The course has received excellent evaluations since its inception. The success of this course demonstrates that an education course can be an essential component of the nursing PhD curriculum.

  20. Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide No. 1: developing faculty to effectively facilitate interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leslie Walter; Zierler, Brenda K

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice in health professional schools, faculty members are being asked to assume new roles in leading or delivering interprofessional curriculum. Many existing faculty members feel ill-prepared to face the challenges of this curricular innovation. From 2012-2013, University of Missouri - Columbia and University of Washington partnered with six additional academic health centers to pilot a faculty development course to prepare faculty leaders for IPE. Using a variety of techniques, including didactic teaching, small group exercises, immersion participation in interprofessional education, local implementation of new IPE projects, and peer learning, the program positioned each site to successfully introduce an interprofessional innovation. Participating faculty confirmed the value of the program, and suggested that more widespread similar efforts were worthwhile. This guide briefly describes this faculty development program and identifies key lessons learned from the initiative. Peer learning arising from a faculty development community, adaptation of curricula to fit local context, experiential learning, and ongoing coaching/mentoring, especially as it related to actual participation in IPE activities, were among the key elements of this successful faculty development activity.

  1. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  2. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  3. Development and Assessment of Discrimination Exercises for Faculty Calibration in Preclinical Operative Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sumitha N; Sturdevant, John; Wilder, Rebecca; Kowlowitz, Vicki; Boushell, Lee

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the level of interexaminer agreement among preclinical operative dentistry faculty members when grading Class II preparations performed by first-year dental students; to develop discrimination exercises for specific preparation components where interexaminer agreement was poor; and to evaluate if the discrimination exercises were able to improve inter- and intraexaminer agreement. In the preliminary phase of this study, 13 components of 32 Class II cavity preparations were assessed by eight course faculty members at one U.S. dental school. Analysis of average interexaminer agreement on these components revealed that six were below 60%. These were proximal contact clearance, retention groove placement, retention groove depth, preparation walls, preparation margins, and preparation toilet/debris. A 30-minute calibration session was subsequently developed to provide discrimination exercises utilizing 3-D models and digital images of various levels of student performance for five of the six components. Immediately following calibration, the course faculty assessed the same 32 preparations (Phase I) followed by a delayed assessment without calibration (Phase II) approximately six months later. The results showed that overall interexaminer reliability improved after calibration. Although there was a decline in interexaminer reliability after an interval of six months (Phase II), the degree of variation among examiners was lower than in the preliminary assessment. These findings support the use of discrimination exercises for preclinical operative dentistry course faculty to increase interexaminer agreement and thereby improve the consistency of faculty-student communication.

  4. How a faculty group's peer mentoring of each other's scholarship can enhance retention and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T; Oberleitner, Melinda G

    2012-01-01

    At a time when schools of nursing seek to retain and recruit faculty ready to meet promotion and tenure requirements, many faculty are less than able to fulfill scholarly expectations. As senior scholars begin to retire, today's faculty groups are a mix of master's-prepared clinicians and recent graduates with professional (doctor of nursing practice) or research doctorates. This means that novice and midcareer faculty often lack the educational preparation for and/or a proper introduction into the scholarly role. A transition that can take 5 years or more, internalizing a scholarly identity is a process that unfolds over time in the course of presenting, publishing, and conducting research with the support of scholarly colleagues. With an eye toward easing this developmental/relational transition, chairs and deans search for professional development approaches to meet the diverse scholarly learning needs of a mixed faculty group. Given a dearth of scholar-mentors, professional development approaches that engage faculty groups in making scholarship a cooperative venture and a collective responsibility are appealing. This article explores whether a project that systematically prepared a faculty group to peer-mentor each other's scholarly success from hire to retire holds promise for fostering academic workplaces productive and pleasurable enough to attract and retain the best and the brightest.

  5. New Program for New Faculty Mentoring at California State University, Chico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, R.; McCarthy, K.; Phillips, C.; Silliman, K.; Fosen, C.; Thomas, M.

    2015-12-01

    CSU, Chico is a comprehensive university with high expectations for both teaching (4 courses per semester) and scholarly work. In an attempt to introduce faculty to their new positions, a two-day New Faculty Orientation has been offered for the last two decades. In AY 2014-15, in an attempt to improve the first year experience for new faculty, the Office of Faculty Affairs established and assessed a New Faculty Mentoring program. Eight college-based mentors were selected based on recommendations by College Deans who suggested successful teachers and scholars who could provide the social and leadership skills to effectively guide others. Based on a needs-assessment survey new faculty completed during orientation, mentors met with their new faculty cohort at least monthly to discuss campus resources, host workshops and provide other support in areas of time management, work-life balance, teaching pedagogies, discipline-specific internal and external funding resources, student support resources, and the preparation of Review/Retention documents. Mentors were paid a small stipend for their work and met twice each semester to discuss readings on mentoring best practices, their mentoring activities with new faculty and to compare the needs of their mentees. Survey results from 28 of 37 new faculty respondents indicate they valued Review/Retention workshops, mentor reviews of teaching and the opportunity to visit mentor classrooms for examples of good teaching practices. Social events helped establish cohorts, although some mentees indicated that some cohorts were too large. An unforeseen outcome was recognition that mid-year hires need to also be included in new faculty cohort groups. Moving forward, mentors will continue to work with their original mentees for a 2nd year. A new group of mentors will be identified for faculty starting in fall 2015 who will work with smaller first-year faculty cohorts and will coordinate with the first generation mentors for peer support.

  6. Research-based assessment affordances and constraints: Perceptions of physics faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Adrian; McKagan, Sarah B.; Martinuk, Mathew Sandy; Bell, Alexander; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] To help faculty use research-based materials in a more significant way, we learn about their perceived needs and desires and use this information to suggest ways for the physics education research community to address these needs. When research-based resources are well aligned with the perceived needs of faculty, faculty members will more readily take them up. We used phenomenographic interviews of ordinary physics faculty and department chairs to identify four families of issues that faculty have around research-based assessments (RBAs). First, many faculty are interested in using RBAs but need help with the practicalities of administering RBAs: how to find them, which ones there are, and how to administer them. Second, at the same time, many faculty think that RBAs are limited and do not measure many of the things they care about, or are not applicable in their classes. They want assessments to measure skills, perceptions, and specific concepts. Third, many faculty want to turn to communities of other faculty and experts to help them interpret their assessment results and suggest other ways to do assessment. They want to better understand their assessment results by comparing to others and interacting with faculty from other schools to learn about how they do assessment. Fourth, many faculty consider their courses in the broader contexts of accountability and their departments. They want help with assessment in these broader contexts. We also discuss how a faculty member's role in their department and type of institution influence their perceived wants and needs around assessment.

  7. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  8. THE ROLE OF SERVANT LEADERSHIP IN FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS: A Review of The Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric James RUSSELL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The following note is that a review of existing literature pertaining to servant leadership and faculty development. Specifically, this work discussed delivering servant leadership to online faculty through the utilization of a faculty development program. The idea for this literature review stemmed from the author asking how an online academic administrator could utilize the practice of servant leadership in order to improve the overall online academic experience. The intent of the review involved discovering, through a review of the literature, a way of opening up a dialogue that can possibly drive future research studies regarding the practice of servant leadership to improve of the overall online academic teaching experience. In this work, the author conducted a literature review that identified strengths in both faculty development as well as practicing servant leadership within the online education modality. The literature identified the issue of faculty isolation as challenge for academic administrators and offered up faculty development as a possible solution to overcoming it. The findings of the work showed a benefit to bringing servant leadership practices into faculty development programs in order to improve the overall online teaching environment. The work generates future empirical research ideas regarding building community, the use of servant leadership, and faculty development programs.

  9. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Mason-Suares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today’s trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills.

  10. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A; Lindeman, Neal I; Morton, Cynthia C

    2016-01-07

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today's trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills.

  11. Outcomes of a faculty development conference in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Kroeker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical Education International (MEI, an organization that provides faculty development to medical educators in developing countries, wanted information on the program effectiveness of its faculty development conferences. Objectives: To assess the outcomes of an MEI faculty development conference in Mongolia on the knowledge, confidence in applying new skills, and attitudes of participants. Methods: A retrospective pretest survey of participants was used to assess the outcomes of a 3-day faculty development conference given twice at the Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences. The survey assessed participant views on their ability to meet the objectives of the conference, the perceived overall value of the conference, and their suggestions for improvements in future MEI conferences. Results: Twenty participants (65% completed surveys. Participants reported significant changes in agreement with their ability to meet the objectives of the conference in all of the pre-post measures (pre-post p<0.001. The value of attending the conference was ranked at a mean score of 4.05 on a Likert scale from 1 to 5, with 1 indicating “Strongly Disagree” and 5 “Strongly Agree.” Conference attendees indicated interest in additional training on more advanced topics. Conclusion: Overall, the findings indicate that conference attendees gained knowledge and confidence in applying new skills and valued the training received from a faculty development conference led by physicians from the USA. Further research is needed to determine long-term impact on residency education in Mongolia.

  12. Climate Change Education for General Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, G.; Fox-Lykens, R.; Fuoco, M. J.; Phalen, L.; Harcourt, P.; Veron, D. E.; Rogers, M.; Merrill, J.

    2016-12-01

    As MADE-CLEAR scientists, our ultimate goal is to inform the public about climate change through education. Education will provide citizens with important tools for adapting and coping against climate change through the understanding of the cause and effects of climate change, and the role they play in counteracting these effects. MADE-CLEAR is connecting educators with resources such as lesson plans and hands-on activities so they can easily incorporate climate change into their curriculum. This past year Delaware State University held workshops for Chemistry and Math faculty to provide information and resources to help integrate climate change education into their classes. We presented them with information on climate change and demonstrated several laboratory activities that would be applicable to their classes. Such activities included a sea level rise graphing exercise, ocean acidification pH demonstration, ocean acidification's effect on organism's demonstration, carbon dioxide variability and heat trapping gas simulation. The goals of the workshops are to implement a multidisciplinary approach in climate change education. Workshops are prepared hands-on heavy followed by the lectures and video resources. Pre- and post-workshop assessment questions on the workshop contents are provided to monitor faculty understanding of the climate change content. In doing so, we aim to improve climate literacy in our higher education students.

  13. Faculty development: principles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Mann, Karen V

    2006-01-01

    Instructors in the health professions today must acquire knowledge and competencies that go beyond disciplinary expertise. It is now generally accepted that educational training as a teacher is essential to a faculty member's effectiveness as an educator. The educational challenges across the health professions share many similarities. In this article, we draw on the medical education literature and focus on faculty development designed to enhance teaching effectiveness. We first address commonly included faculty development topics, including instructional improvement, organizational development, the development of professional academic skills, and the teaching of specific content areas. We then review a variety of educational approaches and formats that are described in the literature. Included in this discussion are commonly used workshops, seminars, short courses, and fellowships, as well as longitudinal programs, peer coaching, mentorship, self-directed learning, and computer-aided instruction. We also briefly explore learning at work and in communities of practice, and we discuss several frequently encountered challenges in designing and implementing faculty development activities, including motivating colleagues and assessing program effectiveness. We conclude the discussion by presenting a set of guidelines for the design of effective faculty development programs.

  14. Czech medical faculties and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králíková, E; Kozák, J; Rames, J; Zámecník, L; Wallenfels, I

    1995-05-01

    At the 1st Medical Faculty of Charles University in Prague the prevalence of smoking was investigated among the faculty, staff, students and among health professionals in the country. We found 38.1% smokers (current and occasional) among malephysicians (N = 625), 25.6% smokers among women physicians (N = 394), 48.7% smoking nurses (N = 729) and 42.3% smokers among paramedical staff (N = 298). We have also followed up smoking habits among our students since 1989 (N = 1235). The number of smokers among them rose from 7% in 1989 to 18% in 1994. Students were also asked about their opinion on smoking as a risk factor for coronary heart disease which has a rising trend. Trying to coordinate the anti-smoking activity at all seven medical faculties in the Czech Republic, in collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine of Masaryk University in Brno, the National Centre for Health Promotion and the Czech Commission of EMASH, present the main points of the anti-smoking strategy at Czech medical faculties.

  15. Applied Grant Writing Training for Future Health Communication Researchers: The Health Communication Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Donovan, Erin E; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2017-02-01

    Health communication faculty face increasing expectations regarding their academic productivity, including the expectation to seek and secure external funding. Doctoral training in health communication that does not fully prepare students for the challenges of securing external funding is doing them a disservice that will make them less competitive for academic positions and less likely to succeed in the academic positions they assume. The purpose of this study is to share the evaluation of a program, the Health Communication Scholars Program (HCSP), designed to train future health communication researchers in the pursuit of external funding. The HCSP includes a grant-writing workshop, requires interdisciplinary graduate student teams to submit applications, and awards funding to top proposals. HCSP participants responding to an evaluation survey (N = 25) had overwhelmingly positive experiences; respondents felt the program provided great value, improved their writing skills, gave them skills to pursue funding in the future, and helped them secure tenure-track faculty positions. The results of this formal evaluation suggest the HCSP is an experience that builds crucial skills and prepares graduate students for the demands they will face as faculty. It is a relatively low-cost, replicable model that merits consideration and adoption at other institutions that hope to provide professional development for doctoral students interested in health communication.

  16. ["...such refuges are the collections and museums, which represent the current aspects of science, and prepare for its future". Social aspects of anatomy and the collections of the Vienna medical faculty, 1790 - 1840].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenauer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This paper arises out of my research which I have been conducting in the context of my dissertation project. It explores the relationship between teaching, research and collecting practices in Viennese anatomy during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. In a time in which Viennese medicine tried to reinvent itself through both the creation of a new curriculum and several other institutional measures the practice of establishing comparative and human anatomical collections can be seen as a strategic key field of action. By concentrating on scientific journals, popular texts, catalogues, correspondences and specimens this paper aims at revealing specific social systems which must be understood as parts of the 'social history' of Viennese anatomy. By looking closely at these social aspects of anatomical teaching and research, this work tries to contribute to recent discussions addressed by historians of science and medicine.

  17. Educational Transfers in Postcolonial Contexts: Preliminary Results from Comparative Research on Workers' Faculties in Vietnam, Cuba, and Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Tim; Kriele, Tobias; Miethe, Ingrid; Piepiorka, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Worker's Faculties, which have been widespread in the Soviet Union up until 1941, combined the two goals of preparing adult workers and peasants for university entrance through the provision of general education, as well as creating a new socialist intelligentsia from among these groups. After World War II, Workers' Faculties were also established…

  18. Assessing the Special Education Faculty Shortage: The Crisis in California--A Statewide Study of the Professoriate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Susan; Eliot, Michael; Hood, Jolene; Driggs, Max; Mori, Ayako; Johnson, Theresa

    2005-01-01

    This article examines several questions related to the faculty shortage in special education. Using California as a case, the authors address these questions: (1) What were the personal and professional characteristics of current special education faculty preparing special education credential and doctoral candidates?; (2) What were the…

  19. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation.

  20. Exploring the Relationship between Faculty Concerns and Faculty Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsook; Cho, YoonJung; Svinicki, Marilla D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how college faculty characteristics are related to their teaching concerns based on Fuller's model of teacher concern (self, task, and impact concern). Fuller's model was supported by self and task concerns, though impact concern did not follow the model. Impact concern was the highest among the three…

  1. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of…

  2. Faculty-Curriculum Development. Curriculum Design by Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Helen; And Others

    Faculty curriculum development, and specific applications to nursing education, are addressed in 37 papers and 6 discussion summaries from 1973 and 1974 workshops sponsored by the National League for Nursing. Attention is directed to: the curriculum development process, curriculum evaluation, the conceptual framework as a part of curriculum…

  3. A profile of U.S. nursing faculty in research- and practice-focused doctoral education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Nthenge, Serah; Jenkinson, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    This study, which is part of a larger project, was conducted to profile the nursing faculty in the United States teaching in PhD and DNP programs. This is a descriptive study. A sample of 554 nursing faculty who teach in PhD and DNP programs was recruited by email solicitation to represent all geographic regions of the United States. Data were collected from November 2013 through January 2014 using an online survey instrument. The instrument was developed based on results of review of the literature and of focus groups of doctoral faculty (faculty teaching in doctoral programs) to ascertain characteristics of faculty teaching in doctoral programs and of the schools in which they teach. Frequencies and descriptive statistics are reported. Growth in DNP programs has outpaced growth in PhD programs, and DNP graduates have moved into doctoral education in greater numbers than PhD graduates. DNP faculty report less prior experience and current productivity scholarship than faculty in PhD programs only or both types of programs. Strategies are needed to ensure that doctoral programs are staffed by faculty who are prepared for doctoral education and the development of nursing science. The Institute of Medicine has recommended doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses in the United States by 2020 to ensure that sufficient numbers of faculty are available to prepare the nursing labor force that is needed for delivery of healthcare services. Nurse scientists are needed to contribute to improvement in patient care quality and safety, and practice leaders are needed to facilitate the translation of research into safe, high-quality, and cost-effective care. The landscape of doctoral education in nursing is rapidly changing. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Graduate Social Work Faculty's Support for Educational Content on Women and on Sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Dana S; Woodford, Michael R; Gutiérrez, Lorraine M; Luke, Katherine P

    2015-10-01

    Social work faculty play an important role in preparing students to address sexism and engage in culturally competent practice with women. This study examines the nature of U.S. and Anglo-Canadian graduate social work faculty's support for content on women and on sexism. Although support appears high for both content areas, results suggest that faculty endorsement for content on women is significantly greater than that for sexism. Further, bivariate and multivariate analyses indicate that the nature of support differs for each content area. Implications for social work education are discussed.

  5. FACULTY PERCEPTION OF PBL CURRICULUM IN MELAKA MANIPAL MEDICAL COLLEGE,MANIPAL, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruprasd Rao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Present study was carried out to gauge the perception of the faculty members of Melaka Manipal Medical College (MMMC, Manipal, India regarding the problem-based learning (PBL curriculum. The faculty were divided into those with prior experience of PBL (group A and those without it (group B and were asked to respond to a Likert scale questionnaire regarding the PBL curriculum. Majority of the faculty members agreed that PBL curriculum helps students to acquire critical thinking skills and has made them more responsible towards self-study. Majority of the inexperienced faculty members felt that students tend to selectively prepare for certain learning objectives rather than for the entire problem whereas majority of the experienced faculty disagreed (p<0.01. A greater majority of those in group A than group B opined that students initially reluctant to participate in PBL discussions improve their participation over the year (p<0.05. Majority of faculty in group A agreed that student assessment method currently followed in PBL is adequate to grade student involvement in PBL whereas half of those in group B disagreed. Most of the faculty members in both groups felt that the present PBL-lecture hybrid system is better than the entirely lecture-based curriculum. Most faculty in group B would like more PBL sessions to be introduced whereas most of those in group A disagreed. A good number in both groups felt that greater integration of the different disciplines in PBL is desirable.

  6. A Case Study of the Perceptions of Faculty in a Formalized Mentoring Program at a Private 4-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Sheri E.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study was designed to investigate mentors and mentees and their relationships in a formal group-mentoring program. Results and findings were expected to contribute to the literature on how to best support future new faculty and senior faculty careers by providing data on the opinions of those who participated in the mentoring…

  7. Education: Chemistry Faculty Job Mobility Surveyed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey undertaking to describe the extent of movement of chemistry faculty members (N=1207) from academic to industrial positions. Numbers of male and female faculty within categories of reasons for leaving are also reported. (CS)

  8. Faculty Changing Departments: Why, Who, and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George

    1976-01-01

    Departmental changes by faculty staff are suggested to be one solution to the budgetary problems of some institutions, rather than the more prevalent practice of nonreappointment of untenured faculty. (LBH)

  9. Comparison of attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer veterinary faculty and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lisa M; Trower, Cathy A; Tan, Rachael J B; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p = 0.03) and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p < 0.001). Compared to faculty, house officers preferred more frequent (p = 0.03) and critical (p = 0.02) feedback. The most common responses to the question on effective non-monetary rewards for hard work, from both faculty and house officers, were recognition and time off. No attitudinal differences were detected between generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations.

  10. Faculty Satisfaction in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Julie G.; Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Teherani, Arianne

    2000-01-01

    Describes the challenges and elements of satisfaction in academic medicine. Proposes a model of academic faculty satisfaction which postulates that organizational, job-related, and personal factors combine to develop self-knowledge, social knowledge, and satisfaction with outcomes of productivity, retention, and learner-patient satisfaction. (DB)

  11. Faculty Organizational Commitment and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Bell, Alli

    2012-01-01

    Building on a theoretical framework that links characteristics of individuals and their work settings to organizational commitment (OC) and citizenship behavior, this study considers why faculty may be disengaging from institutional service. Analyses of survey data collected from a state system of higher education suggest that job characteristics,…

  12. Faculty Adoption of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Franziska Zellweger

    2007-01-01

    Although faculty support has been identified as a critical factor in the success of educational-technology programs, many people involved in such efforts underestimate the complexities of integrating technology into teaching. In this article, the author proposes an adoption cycle to help tackle the complex issue of technology adoption for…

  13. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  14. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  15. Teaching portfolios for faculty evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, H I; Volden, C M

    1996-01-01

    Teaching portfolios are stimulating much discussion as more comprehensive approaches to evaluating teaching are sought. Portfolios can be used effectively for both formative and summative evaluative purposes. The content of a portfolio may vary greatly, but commonly includes material that reflects student learning, evaluative materials, and a personal statement on the faculty's philosophy of education. Professional growth often accompanies developing a personal teaching portfolio.

  16. Electronic Portfolios for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Marilyn; Cockerham, Steve

    This paper examines the conceptual process of creating an electronic professional portfolio for faculty development. The characteristics of electronic professional portfolios and the benefits of electronic portfolio development are discussed. Additional topics covered include: collection and selection of portfolio contents; reflection on portfolio…

  17. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  18. Paperless Grades and Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James C.; Jones, Dennis; Turner, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Provides overview of process of switching from paper-based grade reporting to computer-based grading. Authors found that paperless grading decreased number of errors, made student access more immediate, and reduced costs incurred by purchasing and storing grade-scanning sheets. Authors also argue that direct entry grading encourages faculty to…

  19. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  20. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  1. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  2. Faculty Development: Assessing Learner Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Barbara A.; Overfield, Karen

    This study addressed the challenges of developing a faculty professional development workshop on assessment, measurement, and evaluation of achievement in adult learners. The setting for the workshop was a system of postsecondary career colleges throughout the United States. The curriculum development model of D. Kirkpatrick (1994) was used as a…

  3. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  4. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

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    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  5. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  6. New Challenges Facing Small Undergraduate Departments And The Role Of Faculty And Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shazly, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    Small geoscience departments with 5 faculty members or less in undergraduate institutions are facing serious challenges that will have a profound impact on their future, as well as the future of geoscience education. In addition to past and future budget cuts that affect all departments, small departments are more vulnerable to such problems as (i) decreased enrollments in introductory level classes, (ii) small number of geology majors, (iii) small number of graduates per year (iv) lack or paucity of equipment necessary for faculty and student research, (v) limited opportunities for external funding, (vi) need to offer upper division classes on an alternate year basis, (vii) difficulty in recruiting and retaining students, (viii) high teaching loads for faculty, and (ix) designing rigorous curricula based on 120 credit hours with a significant component of liberal art classes. These problems pose new challenges for faculty, department chairs and administrators. Faculty need to design curricula tailored to the need of the job market, without compromising rigor or the quality of the program. New classes/ concentrations in environmental science, hydrogeology and geographical information systems should be offered, and traditional classes in petrology, geophysics and tectonics should be maintained. Classes in Physics, Chemistry and Math should be core requirements. Student involvement in research should be encouraged at an early stage (sophomore/ junior levels). Department chairs need to assign duties in their department carefully to capitalize on the strengths of their faculty: faculty with strong research backgrounds should be helped in their efforts to pursue external funding opportunities, whereas those with strong teaching abilities should be evaluated primarily on their performance in the classroom. Student credit hour production should not be used as a criterion for evaluating faculty. Administrators should evaluate programs and departments based on the success

  7. Faculty Learning Matters: Organizational Conditions and Contexts That Shape Faculty Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Rivera, Mark; Kuvaeva, Alexandra; Corrigan, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between faculty scholarly learning, faculty teaching learning, institutional support, faculty demographics, disciplinary groups, working conditions, and career outcomes such as retention, productivity, satisfaction, and career agency. We found that the stronger the scholarly learning faculty members reported,…

  8. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Beck Dallaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional education (IPE is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods: A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results: The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (x24,285=19.17, p=0.001, lack of department support (4,285=10.09, p=0.039, and lack of awareness of events (x24,285=26.38, p=0.000. Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion: With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences.

  9. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  10. Retrenchment Clauses in Faculty Union Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Examination of retrenchment clauses in the faculty union contracts at 42 colleges and universities focused on implications for tenure rights and the roles prescribed for faculty and administrators. Concepts of financial exigency and shared governance are highlighted. Contracts were found to provide faculty with a limited and reactive role during…

  11. A Faculty Code is not a Coda

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    Many college and university faculties have adopted codes of faculty responsibilities and self-regulation. Firsthand advice on creating a code precedes an example of one: the new University of California Policy on Faculty Conduct and the Administration of Discipline. (Editor/PG)

  12. Development of New Faculty in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    Nursing faculty are challenged by changing expectations of undergraduate education, decreasing resources, and widespread technology use. Stressors on new faculty include time, lack of peer support, inadequate feedback, and family-work imbalance. Suggestions for new faculty development include orientation, mentoring, and strategic planning for…

  13. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  14. Faculty Senates and the Fiscal Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Julia

    1993-01-01

    A 1993 conference of college faculty senate members is discussed, focusing on common difficulties in governance during a period of retrenchment and due to the faculty culture. Some recent research into the relationship of finances to academic freedom and tenure is examined. Strategies for enhancing faculty senate effectiveness are suggested. (MSE)

  15. Faculty Members on Boards of Trustees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Patterson, Richard W.; Key, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2011-12 academic year, a group of faculty and student researchers at the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI) gathered information on which public and private institutions had faculty members on boards of trustees and obtained the names of the faculty members serving in these roles. In April and May 2012, the authors…

  16. Undergraduate Nursing Student Experiences with Faculty Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing education has become an area of increased interest. Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility. Less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive…

  17. Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.D.; Tyler, N.; Montrosse, B.E.; Young, C.; Robb, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study (SEFNA). Actions taken after the release of The 2001 Faculty Shortage Study demonstrate that supply-and-demand imbalances can be improved. The projected shortage of special education faculty will directly and negatively affect students with disabilities and…

  18. Defining "faculty" in academic medicine: responding to the challenges of a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Steven M; Sonnino, Roberta E; Bellini, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    Academic medicine in the United States is at a crossroads. There are many drivers behind this, including health care reform, decreased federal research funding, a refined understanding of adult learning, and the emergence of disruptive innovations in medicine, science, and education. As faculty members are at the core of all academic activities, the definition of "faculty" in academic medicine must align with the expectations of institutions engaged in patient care, research, and education. Faculty members' activities have changed and continue to evolve. Academic health centers must therefore define new rules of engagement that reflect the interplay of institutional priorities with the need to attract, retain, and reward faculty members. In this Commentary, the authors describe and explore the potential effects of the changing landscape for institutions and their clinical faculty members. The authors make a case for institutions to adapt faculty appointment, evaluation, and promotion processes, and they propose a framework for a standardized definition of "faculty" that allows for individual variability. This framework also provides a means to evaluate and reward faculty members' contributions in education, research, and clinical care. The authors propose a deliberate national conversation to ensure that careers in academic medicine remain attractive and sustainable and that the future of academic medicine is secure.

  19. Investigating Veterinary Medicine Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Capture: Issues, Concerns, and Promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Alison C; Demirbilek, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    Lecture capture technology is becoming more pervasive in today's classrooms. Students are demanding their lectures be recorded, but many instructors remain resistant. The goal of this study was to investigate faculty perceptions of lecture capture and to understand their concerns with the technology. Through a review of the existing literature, three common reasons for not recording were identified: impact on class attendance, incompatible pedagogy, and technical concerns. To test the hypotheses, an electronic survey was created and distributed to the faculty of a veterinary college in the southeastern US. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative questions. An invitation was emailed to all 134 faculty members, garnering 50 responses. Results were consistent with the hypotheses. Impact on class attendance, teaching styles, and technical considerations have dissuaded many instructors from adopting lecture capture technology. However, a fourth theme that emerged was faculty lack of awareness/familiarity. According to the qualitative responses, many faculty either did not know lecture recording was available in their teaching spaces or were not trained in how to use the technology. Recommendations for future research include distributing the survey campus-wide and providing more opportunities for faculty training. It would also be worthwhile to repeat the survey after providing more information and training materials to faculty, or after switching from an opt-in to an opt-out approach, to see whether perceptions have changed among the college's faculty.

  20. The relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical teaching effectiveness in nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Dianne E; Ploeg, Jenny; Kaasalainen, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in facilitating nursing student learning and shaping student experience in the clinical setting. Emotional intelligence (EI) in clinical nursing faculty may be one avenue to develop teaching effectiveness. This study investigated the relationship between EI and clinical teaching effectiveness of nursing faculty in an undergraduate nursing program. Using a cross-sectional correlation design, data were collected from a convenience sample of nursing faculty (N = 47) using the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Short (EQ-i:S), the Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI) and a demographic data page. The results indicated a statistically significant positive relationship between the EQ-i:S and the NCTEI total scores (rs = .599, P teaching effectiveness exists, (b) faculty exhibit effective overall EI functioning with room to enhance competencies, and (c) faculty members see themselves as effective in their clinical teaching. Implications for clinical teaching practice include the need for faculty development and strengthening the faculty-student relationship. Possibilities for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Forecasting the Educational Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L., Comp.; And Others

    This collection of essays on futurism is intended to open avenues for exploration, raise pertinent issues, and direct attention to new considerations. In "The Future: Implications for the Preparation of Educational Personnel," Dean C. Corrigan focuses on conditions that seem pertinent to development in future education and comments about two areas…

  2. Aligning teaching practices with an understanding of quality teaching: a faculty development agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiromi; Hitchcock, Maurice A

    2011-01-01

    To guide the future faculty development practices in a better manner, it is important to determine how clinical teachers perceive their own skill development. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which clinical teachers aligned their teaching practices, as measured with a self-rating instrument, with their understanding of what constitutes good clinical teaching. A sample of 1523 residents and 737 faculty members completed the clinical teaching perception inventory (CTPI) online and ranked 28 single-word descriptors that characterized clinical teachers along a seven-point scale in two measures, "My Ideal Teacher" and "Myself as a Teacher." Faculty and residents showed strikingly similar discrepancies, in both their magnitudes and directions, between their ratings of "My Ideal Teacher" and those of "Myself as a Teacher." Both residents and faculty found it most difficult to develop the stimulating, well-read, and innovative nature to meet their own standards. Data did not support our hypothesis that faculty would demonstrate stronger congruence between "My Ideal Teacher" and "Myself as a Teacher" than residents. Medical faculty would benefit from future faculty development practices that are designed to assist them in becoming stimulating, well-read, and innovative teachers, while using less control and caution in their teaching.

  3. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.

  4. The Role of HRM Practices in Predicting Faculty Turnover Intention: Empirical Evidence from Private Universities in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd H.R. Joarder

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to examine the relationship between human resource management practices and turnover intention among the faculty members of private universities in Bangladesh. The prime objective of this study was to understand whether the institution’s HRM practices can influence faculty turnover decision. A total of 317 faculty members of different private universities located in Dhaka Metropolitan Area (DMA participated in the survey and returned the questionnaire to the researchers which represented 57% response rate of the study. Multiple regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses of the study. The study found faculty compensation, supervisory support and job security as statistically significant predictors of faculty turnover intention. Therefore, private university management should pay much attention to this area of human resource practices (compensation, supervisory support, job security to retain the potential faculty, thus reducing turnover intention. Limitations and suggestions for future research are forwarded.

  5. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah B

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bahia Abdallah,1 Jihad Irani,2 Silva Dakessian Sailian,1 Vicky George Gebran,1 Ursula Rizk1 1Nursing Program at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, 2Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in

  6. Accommodating family life: mentoring future female faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-03-01

    The demands of family life are crucial factors in successfully retaining women in science. Retention efforts should focus on creating a family-friendly environment within the laboratory and the institute. Based on my own experiences, I suggest ways to attract top young scientists and support their development into leading researchers.

  7. The Future of EMC Education: Keeping Faculty Up to Date

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Sigurd

    1998-01-01

    An account of the activities of the Engineering Educations EMC Network during the project period 1995 - 1998. The network was initiateded by the National Advisory Educational Board for Technology with the objective to initiate a professional development in order to strengthen and renew the educat...

  8. The Future of EMC Education: Keeping Faculty Up to Date

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Sigurd

    1998-01-01

    An account of the activities of the Engineering Educations EMC Network during the project period 1995 - 1998. The network was initiateded by the National Advisory Educational Board for Technology with the objective to initiate a professional development in order to strengthen and renew the educat...

  9. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching.

  10. Recognition of Core Elements of Medical Professionalism among Medical Students and Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    irdous Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Medical students and future physicians have chosen to pursue a profession that requires personal integrity, compassion and a constant awareness of the commitment made by them. Professionalism includes personal behaviors, knowledge, and competency. It includes the attitudes and values one holds and that run through the profession as a whole. Medical students learn professionalism during the course by either direct teaching or experiential learning. We conducted this study to estimate the self-reported level of practice of the core elements of professionalism by medical students and medical faculty and compared the two groups. Methods: One-hundred and nine students and 83 faculty members of Oman Medical College completed a professionalism questionnaire. The survey questions related to core elements of professionalism and were grouped under professional knowledge, professional skills, professional attitude, and qualities essential for professionalism. Results: The response rate was 65.6% (109 of 166 among students and 75.5% (83 of 110 from faculty members. Response to the questions on professional skills between the student and faculty group was significantly different (p < 0.001. Similarly, there was a significant difference in the responses related to professional attitude between the student and faculty group (p < 0.001. Students and faculty members have a significant difference in opinion regarding up to date knowledge of basic and clinical sciences and clinical competency (p = 0.024. Similarly, significant differences in opinion regarding up to date knowledge of basic and clinical sciences and clinical competency in clinical and basic sciences faculty members (p = 0.001. Students identified good communication skills (82.6%, and faculty staff identified up to date professional knowledge (62.7% as the most important aspect of professionalism. Conclusions: Both students and teaching faculty agreed that the top most professional

  11. Faculty Hiring and Development at BYU: Perspectives of a Recent Hire and Department Chair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, R. Steven

    2002-04-01

    I will present a personal perspective on the transition from an industrial to an academic physicist. For those planning on a similar transition, I will mention several things that were helpful in preparing myself, marketing myself, and adapting to an academic setting. For instance, a significant difference between academic and industrial physics is the responsibility of classroom teaching. Several things that proved particularly useful in improving my own teaching were mentoring teaching partnerships, student evaluations, help in the tenure and promotion process, and programs available from our Faculty Center. From my current perspective as a department chair, I will further discuss mentoring practices I have found helpful with other new faculty. These include such things as inviting mentors to participate with new faculty in development workshops and providing financial and other recognition for participation as a mentor. In addition to developing professional skills, I have found that good mentoring is particularly critical in encouraging new faculty to adapt to departmental culture. Finally, I will discuss ideas I have found helpful in successfully recruiting new faculty. This involves researching, identifying, and actively recruiting faculty we think will build our department. For us, it has not been sufficient to passively rely on responses from applicants to advertisements and word-of-mouth inquiries. Through careful hiring and effective mentoring, we have developed an excellent record of having our faculty being successful in the tenure process.

  12. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  13. E-books: nurse faculty use and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Cathy H; Garrett-Wright, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nurse educators' stage of concern regarding e-books and examine relationships between stage of concern and demographic variables. The use of e-books is growing, and nursing faculty must be prepared to use this evolving technology. A descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of 50 nurse educators attending a professional conference. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Stages of Concern (SoC) questionnaire. Sixty-four percent of participants' first high stage was Stage 0 (awareness); 22 percent had a first high stage of Stage 1 (informational). Using ordinal regression, no statistical significance was noted with the highest Stage of Concern and age (p = .431) or experience as a nurse educator (p = .893). Findings indicate low usage, faculty concerns, and the need for ongoing education regarding e-books.

  14. Integrating patient safety into health professionals' curricula: a qualitative study of medical, nursing and pharmacy faculty perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane; Clarke, Beth; Norton, Peter

    2014-03-01

    As efforts to integrate patient safety into health professional curricula increase, there is growing recognition that the rate of curricular change is very slow, and there is a shortage of research that addresses critical perspectives of faculty who are on the 'front-lines' of curricular innovation. This study reports on medical, nursing and pharmacy teaching faculty perspectives about factors that influence curricular integration and the preparation of safe practitioners. Qualitative methods were used to collect data from 20 faculty members (n=6 medical from three universities; n=6 pharmacy from two universities; n=8 nursing from four universities) engaged in medical, nursing and pharmacy education. Thematic analysis generated a comprehensive account of faculty perspectives. Faculty perspectives on key challenges to safe practice vary across the three disciplines, and these different perspectives lead to different priorities for curricular innovation. Additionally, accreditation and regulatory requirements are driving curricular change in medicine and pharmacy. Key challenges exist for health professional students in clinical teaching environments where the culture of patient safety may thwart the preparation of safe practitioners. Patient safety curricular innovation depends on the interests of individual faculty members and the leveraging of accreditation and regulatory requirements. Building on existing curricular frameworks, opportunities now need to be created for faculty members to act as champions of curricular change, and patient safety educational opportunities need to be harmonises across all health professional training programmes. Faculty champions and practice setting leaders can collaborate to improve the culture of patient safety in clinical teaching and learning settings.

  15. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparing Future Teachers to Anticipate Student Difficulties in Physics in a Graduate-Level Course in Physics, Pedagogy, and Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John R.; Christensen, Warren M.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe courses designed to help future teachers reflect on and discuss both physics content and student knowledge thereof. We use three kinds of activities: reading and discussing the literature, experiencing research-based curricular materials, and learning to use the basic research methods of physics education research. We present a general…

  17. Faculty development initiatives designed to promote leadership in medical education. A BEME systematic review: BEME Guide No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Naismith, Laura; Mann, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of medical education and practice, the preparation of healthcare professionals for leadership roles and responsibilities has become increasingly important. To date, the literature on faculty development designed to promote leadership in medical education has not been reviewed in a systematic fashion. The objective of this review is to synthesize the existing evidence that addresses the following question: 'What are the effects of faculty development interventions designed to improve leadership abilities on the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of faculty members in medicine and on the institutions in which they work?' The search, which covered the period 1980-2009, included six databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC, and ABI/Inform) and used the following keywords: faculty development; in-service training; doctor; medic; physician; faculty; leadership; management; administration; executive; and change agent. Hand searches were also conducted, and expert recommendations were solicited. Articles with a focus on faculty development to improve leadership, targeting basic science and clinical faculty members, were reviewed. All study designs that included outcome data beyond participant satisfaction were examined. From an initial 687 unique records, 48 articles met the review criteria in three broad categories: (1) reports in which leadership was the primary focus of the intervention; (2) reports in which leadership was a component of a broader focus on educational development; and (3) reports in which leadership was a component of a broader focus on academic career development. Data were extracted by three coders using the standardized Best Evidence Medical Education coding sheet adapted for our use. One reviewer coded all of the articles, and two reviewers each coded half of the dataset. Coding differences were resolved through discussion. Data were synthesized using Kirkpatrick's four levels of educational outcomes

  18. Nurse Faculty Enrichment and Competency Development in Oral-Systemic Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Dolce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses are positioned to play a significant role in oral health promotion and disease prevention across the life cycle. Oral health has not been a high priority in nursing practice, and educating nurses about oral health has been inadequate particularly regarding the interrelationship between oral health and overall health. The first step for developing a nursing workforce with core competencies in oral health promotion and disease prevention is to prepare nurse faculty with the requisite knowledge, skills, attitudes, and best practices in oral-systemic health. The purpose of this paper is to present Smiles for Life: A National Oral Health Curriculum as a knowledge framework that nurse faculty can use for faculty enrichment and competency development in oral health across the life cycle. A variety of teaching-learning strategies and resources are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral-systemic health into existing nursing curricula.

  19. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  20. Gathering Feedback from Early-Career Faculty: Speaking with and Surveying Agricultural Faculty Members about Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, the Life Sciences Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign gave a data management presentation to early-career, agricultural faculty members participating in a selective program designed to help them succeed in the tenure process. After the presentation, the participants were invited to complete an online survey that included questions on how well informed and prepared they feel about funding agencies’ data requirements, what data challenges they face, and how the library can help with new or improved services in this area. The presentation discussion and survey responses suggested value in offering data training specifically for agricultural graduate students and research assistants and compiling examples of data management plans from successful grant proposals. Despite the small number of participants, the feedback provides an interesting glimpse into data management from the perspective of early-career faculty.

  1. Faculty teaching time: a comparison of web-based and face-to-face graduate nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Katherine M; Avery, Melissa D

    2008-01-01

    Web-based education brings a new dimension to the issue of measuring faculty workload. Current literature reflects instructor concerns related to the time required to teach web-based courses (McAlpine, Lockerbie, Ramsay & Beaman 2002; Sellani & Harrington, 2002; Smith, Ferguson & Caris, 2001). This descriptive, comparative study seeks to determine the time required to teach web-based graduate nursing courses and compare that to teaching similar courses in the face-to-face setting. Utilizing time records previously collected as part of a federally funded grant, data from 11 web-based and five face-to-face graduate level nursing courses were analyzed. Although a statistically significant difference in teaching time requirements was not demonstrated, several interesting trends did appear. Examples include differences related to preparation time and the division of teacher time while teaching web-based as opposed to face-to-face courses. Future research and continued data collection related to faculty workload and time usage will be needed as web-based courses become a growing part of graduate nursing education.

  2. Prediction of junior faculty success in biomedical research: comparison of metrics and effects of mentoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bartheld, Christopher S; Houmanfar, Ramona; Candido, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Measuring and predicting the success of junior faculty is of considerable interest to faculty, academic institutions, funding agencies and faculty development and mentoring programs. Various metrics have been proposed to evaluate and predict research success and impact, such as the h-index, and modifications of this index, but they have not been evaluated and validated side-by-side in a rigorous empirical study. Our study provides a retrospective analysis of how well bibliographic metrics and formulas (numbers of total, first- and co-authored papers in the PubMed database, numbers of papers in high-impact journals) would have predicted the success of biomedical investigators (n = 40) affiliated with the University of Nevada, Reno, prior to, and after completion of significant mentoring and research support (through funded Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence, COBREs), or lack thereof (unfunded COBREs), in 2000-2014. The h-index and similar indices had little prognostic value. Publishing as mid- or even first author in only one high-impact journal was poorly correlated with future success. Remarkably, junior investigators with >6 first-author papers within 10 years were significantly (p COBRE-support increased the success rate of junior faculty approximately 3-fold, from 15% to 47%. Our work defines a previously neglected set of metrics that predicted the success of junior faculty with high fidelity-thus defining the pool of faculty that will benefit the most from faculty development programs such as COBREs.

  3. Effective Preparation Program Features: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Gary M.; Whiteman, Rodney S.

    2016-01-01

    This article is a summary of a report prepared for the University Council for Educational Administration Program Improvement Project for the Wallace Foundation. This explores the research base for educational leadership preparation programs, specifically examining literature on program features. The review covers context, candidates, faculty,…

  4. The evolution of the music faculty: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Marc D; McDermott, Josh

    2003-07-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for exploring the evolution of the music faculty from a comparative perspective. This framework addresses questions of phylogeny, adaptive function, innate biases and perceptual mechanisms. We argue that comparative studies can make two unique contributions to investigations of the origins of music. First, musical exposure can be controlled and manipulated to an extent not possible in humans. Second, any features of music perception found in nonhuman animals must not be part of an adaptation for music, and must rather be side effects of more general features of perception or cognition. We review studies that use animal research to target specific aspects of music perception (such as octave generalization), as well as studies that investigate more general and shared systems of the mind/brain that may be relevant to music (such as rhythm perception and emotional encoding). Finally, we suggest several directions for future work, following the lead of comparative studies on the language faculty.

  5. Preparing Future Geoscientists at the Critical High School-to-College Junction: Project METALS and the Value of Engaging Diverse Institutions to Serve Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L. D.; Maygarden, D.; Serpa, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, the Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences (METALS) program, a collaboration among San Francisco State Univ., the Univ. of Texas at El Paso, the Univ. of New Orleans, and Purdue Univ., has created meaningful, field-based geoscience experiences for underrepresented minority high school students. METALS activities promote excitement about geoscience in field settings and foster mutual respect and trust among participants of different backgrounds and ethnicities. These gains are strengthened by the collective knowledge of the university partners and by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, scientists, and science teachers who guide the field trips and who are committed to encouraging diversity in the geosciences. Through the student experiences it provides, METALS has helped shape and shift student attitudes and orientation toward geoscience, during and beyond their field experience, just as these students are poised at the critical juncture from high school to college. A review of the METALS findings and summative evaluation shows a distinct pattern of high to moderately high impact on most students in the various cohorts of the program. METALS, overall, was perceived by participants as a program that: (1) opens up opportunities for individuals who might not typically be able to experience science in outdoor settings; (2) offers high-interest geology content in field contexts, along with social and environmental connections; (3) promotes excitement about geology while encouraging the development of mutual respect, interdependence, and trust among individuals of different ethnicities; (4) influences the academic choices of students, in particular their choice of major and course selection in college. Summative data show that multiple aspects of this program were highly effective. Cross-university collaborations create a dynamic forum and a high-impact opportunity for students from different backgrounds to meet and develop

  6. Participation of nursing faculty in university governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrawy, A A

    1992-03-01

    It has been suggested that faculty participation in governance in American colleges is low, and that faculty in schools of nursing are particularly unlikely to be involved in governance activities. This study was designed to determine actual and ideal levels of nursing faculty participation in five areas of governance: academic, student, personnel, public, and financial affairs. A survey of nursing faculty suggested that they were involved substantially in academic affairs, but less involved in the other areas of governance. Generally, the faculty indicated satisfaction with their high level of participation in academic affairs, and with their lower level of participation in student affairs, personnel affairs, and public affairs; the faculty did indicate dissatisfaction with their low level of participation in financial affairs.

  7. Professional Development For Community College Faculty: Lessons Learned From Intentional Mentoring Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Geoscience Workforce Development Initiative at UNAVCO supports attracting, training, and professionally developing students, educators, and professionals in the geosciences. For the past 12 years, UNAVCO has managed the highly successful Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) program, with the goal of increasing the diversity of students entering the geosciences. Beginning in 2015, UNAVCO added Geo-Launchpad (GLP), a summer research preparation internship for Colorado community college students to prepare them for independent research opportunities, facilitate career exploration in the geosciences, and provide community college faculty with professional development to facilitate effective mentoring of students. One core element of the Geo-Launchpad program is UNAVCO support for GLP faculty mentors. Each intern applies to the program with a faculty representative (mentor) from his or her home institution. This faculty mentor is engaged with the student throughout the summer via telephone, video chat, text message, or email. At the end of each of the past two summers, UNAVCO has hosted four GLP faculty mentors in Boulder for two days of professional development focused on intentional mentoring of students. Discussions focused on the distinction between mentoring and advising, and the array of career and professional opportunities available to students. Faculty mentors also met with the external evaluator during the mentor training and provided feedback on both their observations of their intern as well as the impact on their own professional experience. Initial outcomes include re-energizing the faculty mentors' commitment to teaching, as well as the opportunity for valuable networking activities. This presentation will focus on the ongoing efforts and outcomes of the novel faculty mentor professional development activities, and the impact these activities have on community college student engagement in the geosciences.

  8. Preparing future teachers to anticipate student difficulties in physics in a graduate-level course in physics, pedagogy, and education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Thompson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe courses designed to help future teachers reflect on and discuss both physics content and student knowledge thereof. We use three kinds of activities: reading and discussing the literature, experiencing research-based curricular materials, and learning to use the basic research methods of physics education research. We present a general overview of the two courses we have designed as well as a framework for assessing student performance on physics content knowledge and one aspect of pedagogical content knowledge—knowledge of student ideas—about one particular content area: electric circuits. We find that the quality of future teachers’ responses, especially on questions dealing with knowledge of student ideas, can be successfully categorized and may be higher for those with a nonphysics background than those with a physics background.

  9. Presentation rubric: improving faculty professional presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Arlene N; McDaniel, Gretchen S

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the content of a presentation evaluation rubric for use in the development and improvement in faculty performance to enhance learning. Lectures or professional presentations require skills that can be learned through the use of evidence-based practices for all forms of public speaking. A core competency of nursing faculty is to serve as a role model in skilled oral communication. The use of an evaluation presentation rubric can increase faculty competency in this area. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Performance Measurement and Faculty Pay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Pin-liang; RUI Ming-jie

    2002-01-01

    In classic agency models, first best efficiency can't be achieved due to the trade-off between risk and incentives except that agency is risk neutral. Whereas if the principal's objective is not contractible,an alternative objective performance measurement which is contractible is always proposed. However, if the reaction of this objective performance measurement to agency's effort differs from that of the principal's objective, the agent would game performance measures, which leads to loss of efficiency, even if agency is risk neutral. By adding subjective weights on objective measures, or combination of subjective performance measurement with objective performance measurement, efficiency can be regained. Implications for faculty pay are also discussed.

  11. A conceptual model for faculty development in academic medicine: the underrepresented minority faculty experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Sandra P; Broyles, Shelia L; Rivera, Lourdes M; Brennan, Jesse J; Lu, Ethel Regis; Reznik, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    In May 2010, the Association of American Medical Colleges reported that nonwhite professors have a lower promotion rate than white professors. A cohort of 30 underrepresented minority (URM) junior faculty who participated in a structured faculty development program at a public, research-intensive, academic medical center were followed in a 10-year longitudinal study. This paper reports on the career status of 12 of the 30 URM faculty who were eligible for promotion during this period. Ninety-two percent (11/12) of URM faculty eligible for promotion were promoted to associate professor. When asked what factors contributed to their success, these URM faculty identified access and support of senior faculty mentors, peer networking, professional skill development, and knowledge of institutional culture. A faculty development program that addresses these components can promote the success of URM faculty in academic medicine.

  12. Measures of homophobia among nursing students and faculty: a Midwestern perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, Shirley; Patzel, Brenda; McGuire, Michael J; Rolfs, Elaine; Purcell, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    It is well documented that homophobia exists among healthcare providers including nurses. However, little research is available on the level of homophobia among nursing students and nursing faculty. Using the Index of Attitudes Toward Homosexuals (IAH) and the Homophobic Behavior of Students Scale (HBSS) 241 nursing students and 32 faculty in a Midwest university were invited to participate. One hundred twenty six students completed the survey resulting in a 51% return rate. Fifteen faculty completed the survey. Results reveal that there is a low level of homophobia among students and faculty at this university. Religion and LGBT acquaintances or family members accounted for most of the variance within the homophobia scores. While scores reflect low levels of homophobia, it is the belief of these researchers that they actually may reflect ambivalent or heterosexist attitudes toward LGBT people which may impact healthcare delivered by these future nurses.

  13. Amateur Hour? Experience and Faculty Qualifications in U.S. Intelligence Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Smith

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As intelligence studies programs and courses continue to grow in the United States, the demand for qualified faculty to service these activities also continues to grow. However, the paucity of graduate programs in the field and the specialized nature of the instruction has the potential to lead to staffing challenges. This article reviews the findings of an empirical survey of intelligence faculty at U.S. civilian colleges and universities. It is found that most faculty who teach courses in intelligence have prior work experience in the field of intelligence. Indeed, many come with a substantial background in the craft, as well as some pedagogical training. However, a large proportion of these faculty are employed in an adjunct capacity, raising questions about the development of such programs in the future.

  14. "I got in trouble": A case study of faculty "doing school" during professional development

    CERN Document Server

    Olmstead, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Professional development workshops are commonly used to promote the adoption of research-based instructional strategies among physics and astronomy faculty. After learning about such strategies, faculty are often motivated to modify and adapt them within their own classrooms, but prior research shows they may be underprepared to do so in ways likely to maintain the positive student outcomes the designers were able to foster. In this paper, we analyze the experiences of a focal group of faculty during one session of the Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshop, where they are asked to engage in a task as mock physics students. We compare their experiences to student behaviors documented in others' research, and find that their group coordination and sense-making poorly represent the kinds of interactions our community would encourage them to foster in their own students. We briefly discuss the implications of these preliminary findings for professional development and our plans for future research.

  15. Faculty-Student Collaboration: Issues and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline L. Barretta-Herman

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory qualitative study of 11 social work faculty identified the benefits and risks of faculty-student collaboration. Benefits articulated include helping students learn to write for publication, learning the publication process, getting innovative student material published, and enriching the project through shared problem-solving. The benefits, however, must be weighed against the risks of exploitation of the student collaborator. Successful faculty-student collaboration in this dual relationship demands that faculty take responsibility for safeguarding boundaries, following the NASW Code of Ethics, and openly negotiating roles, tasks, workload, and order of authorship with the student.

  16. The Ruptured Pipeline: Analysis of the Mining Engineering Faculty Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, M.

    2011-12-01

    The booming commodities markets of the past seven years have created an enormous demand for economic geologists, mining engineers, and extractive metallurgists. The mining sector has largely been recession proof due to demand drivers coming from developing rather than developed nations. The strong demand for new hires as well as mid-career hires has exposed the weakness of the U.S. university supply pipeline for these career fields. A survey of mining and metallurgical engineering faculty and graduate students was conducted in 2010 at the request of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. The goals of the surveys were to determine the demographics of the U.S. faculty in mining and metallurgical engineering, the expected faculty turn over by 2010 and the potential supply of graduate students as the future professorate. All Mining Engineering and Metallurgical Engineering degrees in the U.S. are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) and the specific courses required are set by the sponsoring professional society, Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. There are 13 universities in the U.S. that offer a degree in Mining Engineering accredited as Mining Engineering and 1 university that grants a Mining Engineering degree accredited under general engineering program requirements. Faculty numbers are approximately 87 tenure track positions with a total undergraduate enrollment of slightly over 1,000 in the 2008-2009 academic year. There are approximately 262 graduate students in mining engineering in the U.S. including 87 Ph.D. students. Mining Engineering department heads have identified 14 positions open in 2010 and 18 positions expected to be open in the next 5 years and an additional 21 positions open by 2020. The current survey predicts a 56% turn over in mining faculty ranks over the next 10 years but a retirement of 100% of senior faculty over 10 years. 63% of graduate students say they are interested in

  17. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  18. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  19. Hardin-Simmons University Faculty Handbook, 1975-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Simmons Univ., Abilene, TX.

    The 1975 edition of the faculty handbook is divided into major sections covering administrative structure, faculty-administration relationships, faculty compensation and fringe benefits, faculty services, faculty-student responsibilities and relationships, and summer school employment. The university administration is described with regard to the…

  20. Faculty Rank System, Research Motivation, and Faculty Research Productivity: Measure Refinement and Theory Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Flora F.; Blackburn, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between the traditional system of college faculty rank and faculty research productivity from the perspectives of behavioral reinforcement theory and selection function. Six hypotheses were generated and tested, using data from a 1989 national faculty survey. Results failed to support completely either the…

  1. Expanding the Discussion of Faculty Vitality to Include Productive but Disengaged Senior Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Therese A.; Norman, Marie; Ambrose, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, the authors begin by examining and challenging the way in which faculty vitality has been operationalized in the past, arguing for the value of institution-specific analysis of the faculty vitality issue. They then propose alternative models for understanding previously unexplored aspects of faculty vitality, drawing on research in…

  2. Lecture | CERN prepares its long-term future: a 100-km circular collider to follow the LHC? | CERN Globe | 11 March

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle physics is a long-term field of research: the LHC was originally conceived in the 1980s, but did not start running until 25 years later. An accelerator unlike any other, it is now just at the start of a programme that is set to run for another 20 years.   Frédérick Bordry. While the LHC programme is already well defined for the next two decades, it is now time to look even further ahead, and so CERN is initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres. A worthy successor to the LHC, whose collision energies will reach 13 TeV in 2015, such an accelerator would allow particle physicists to push the boundaries of knowledge even further. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) programme will focus especially on studies for a hadron collider, like the LHC, capable of reaching unprecedented energies in the region of 100 TeV. Opening with an introduction to the LHC and...

  3. Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1980. [Pt/Pd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S

    1980-07-01

    Phase II of the contract, which involved catalyst preparation and evaluation, was nearly completed this quarter. Phase III, which calls for the design and construction of a fuel processor, was started. During the quarter, four types of tests were run on the small scale catalyst screening unit. The operating line for coke-free operations was found to be approximately between 0.41 to 0.44 O/sub 2//C level. Screening at lower O/sub 2//C levels led to problems with plugging. In other tests, increased severity for screening steam reforming catalysts was obtained by doubling the space velocity. Another series of tests were run to determine the gas composition from the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) section and to evaluate two CPO catalysts. In the other series of tests, catalysts were aged for about 20 hours using a propane, steam, and air mixture before testing with No. 2 oil for another five hours. This latter test has been used to study Pt/Rh catalysts made with various supports. Differences were readily determined for Pt/Rh supported on alpha alumina and Pt/Rh supported on stabilized alumina. This test method will find continued use in evaluating metal-support interactions. Several samples must be evaluated by this method before aging runs are made in the larger unit. After leaching alumina from a used Pt/Rh catalyst, the x-ray diffraction pattern showed the presence of a Pt-Rh alloy in the metal residue. Experiments were run to show that the alloy was formed in the reactor during testing and not during catalyst preparation. A larger version of the ATR reactor has been designed and major components are on order. Completion of the construction phase is scheduled for the next quarter.

  4. Preparation for Community Health Nursing: Issues and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; White, Caroline

    1980-01-01

    Highlights of a survey of community health nursing agencies and faculty suggest the need for better planning and collaboration between service and education in preparing students for this field. Survey data tables are included. (CT)

  5. Preparing young people for future decision-making about cancer risk in families affected or at risk from hereditary breast cancer: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Emma; Plumridge, Gill; Considine, Anna-Marie; Metcalfe, Alison

    2016-12-01

    Women carrying the mutated BRCA gene, have approximately an 80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer with 50% risk of their children inheriting the gene mutation. Many parents find it difficult to know when and how to disclose this information to their children and how such disclosure might affect their child's future decision-making. This study explored the communication of genetic risk information in families using qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted with parents, children (7-11years) and young people (12-18years) affected or at risk from a BRCA gene mutation. Thematic analysis was applied to coded transcripts producing four themes; family communication, perception of cancer risks, risk management strategies and impact of genetic risk communication in children and young people's decision making. Twenty-seven individuals from 11 families took part, recruited through purposive sampling techniques. Cancer risk caused by a BRCA gene mutation induced a sense of fear in parents about their children's future. As a result, parents with hereditary breast cancer disclosed limited information about the risks associated with prophylactic surgery and/or the psychological and emotional impacts of surgery on body image. This had implications to children and young people's perceptions of prophylactic procedures, which were already influenced by cultural understandings of the 'desirable body' and increasing acceptance and proliferation cosmetic surgery. Lack of risk management information and the acculturation of cosmetic surgery combined to limit children and young people's understanding of the impact of hereditary breast cancer; reducing their ability to actualise the physiological, psychological and emotional consequences of surgery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Factors Associated with Veterinary Clinical Faculty Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Martin

    2017-06-28

    Faculty attrition and recruitment for veterinary clinical faculty positions have been reported as significant problems in veterinary medical education. To investigate the factors that may be important in veterinary clinical faculty retention, the perceptions and views of veterinary clinical academic faculty were determined using a web-distributed electronic survey. Responses were dichotomized by whether the respondent had or had not left an academic position and were analyzed for their association with faculty attrition. A total of 1,226 responses were recorded and results demonstrated that factors other than compensation were associated with veterinary clinical faculty attrition, including departmental culture, work-life balance, and recognition and support of clinical medicine by the administration. Forty-four percent of respondents who had held a faculty appointment reported leaving academia either voluntarily or for non-voluntary reasons such as failure to achieve tenure, retirement, or having their position closed. Attention to correcting deficiencies in workplace culture and professional rewards could be a beneficial means by which to decrease the faculty attrition rates currently observed in clinical academic veterinary medicine.

  7. Teaching Evaluations: Perceptions of Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Sandip; Rustagi, Narendra

    2008-01-01

    This study conducts a survey of students and faculty at a business school on critical issues regarding student evaluations of teaching and identifies several significant differences between their perceptions. Students agreed more strongly than faculty that evaluations are higher in courses where the instructor teaches effectively and students…

  8. Motivational Issues of Faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Cader, Akram

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that faculty motivation influences profitability of academic programs. The problem researched in this mixed method study was the motivational factors that reduce faculty member effectiveness in improving the profitability of their universities' academic programs. Based on Maslow's theory of needs, the purpose of the…

  9. Aging in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Janna C.; Gutheil, Irene A.; White-Ryan, Linda; Phipps, Colette; Guishard, Dozene

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive study of undergraduate faculty (N = 177) ascertained the extent to which aging content is taught and faculty are interested in aging. The research was the result of a collaboration among an area agency on aging, an alliance of academic and community leaders, and a university-based research center. While approximately 43% of the…

  10. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  11. The organisational aspect of faculty development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Gynnild, Vidar; Roxå, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes.......The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes....

  12. A Service-Learning Curriculum for Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that higher education institutions should provide faculty development opportunities for service-learning that develop a common understanding on campus concerning the nature of service-learning, establish and maintain academic integrity of service-learning; increase faculty confidence in implementing a new pedagogy, and increase the…

  13. Harvard Law School's War over Faculty Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Matthew S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the controversy over the lack of faculty diversity at Harvard Law School and highlights the school's past practices regarding hiring and promotion of minority teaching staff. The pool problem issue is discussed, and the current status of faculty diversity is presented. (GLR)

  14. Faith and Faculty Autonomy at Calvin College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, George N., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that to prevent incursions on academic freedom, faculty members must make a strong commitment of time and expertise to institutional governance, and they must promote regulations and behavior that support academic freedom. Describes how the administration, faculty, and board of Calvin College, affiliated with the Christian Reformed Church,…

  15. Nursing Faculty: One Generation away from Extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtro, Mary; Hegge, Marge

    2000-01-01

    A statewide survey of 288 nurses with graduate degrees found that those were nursing faculty (n=79) were older than other nurses in the sample. There were no differences in job satisfaction between faculty and other nurses. Noncompetitive salaries, desire for clinical practice, and rising expectations in higher education were deterrents to…

  16. College Presidents' Role Performance and Faculty Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Dan R.; Thomas, Darwin L.

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered from 896 faculty members from two technical colleges, three community colleges, two private universities, and three public universities revealed three dimensions of the presidential role: personal-public image, faculty and student interaction with presidents, and absence of autocratic leadership style. (Author/LBH)

  17. Factors Explaining Faculty Technology Use and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong; Meyer, Katrina A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines factors related to technology use in teaching by university faculty. An EFA analysis of multiple questions of technology use in the classroom found two factors: one loaded with Web use and the second with email use. Therefore, three research questions were asked: What factors explain faculty use of the Web or email? Are these…

  18. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  19. The Madness of Weighted Mean Faculty Salaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micceri, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Higher education frequently uses weighted mean faculty salaries to compare either across institutions, or to evaluate an institution's salary growth over time. Unfortunately, faculty salaries are an extraordinarily complex phenomenon that cannot be legitimately reduced to a single number any more than the academic construct of skills, knowledge,…

  20. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  1. Information-Seeking Habits of Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp-Serrano, Karen; Robbins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the information-seeking behavior of academic education faculty from twenty large public research universities. The investigation includes an examination of how frequently education faculty seek or access information, how they stay up-to-date on current developments in the field and identify less recent journal literature, how…

  2. Rising Tides: Faculty Expectations of Library Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Erica Carlson; O'English, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 2003-2009 LibQUAL+ responses at research-oriented universities in the United States, faculty library users report a significant and consistent rise in desires and expectations for library-provided online tools and websites, even as student user groups show declining or leveling expectations. While faculty, like students, also report…

  3. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  4. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  5. Business Students' Ethical Evaluations of Faculty Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Sean; Kidwell, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to gauge business school student perceptions of the academic conduct of college professors, to determine students' ethical evaluations of certain potential faculty behaviors. The relationships between perceived faculty misconduct and several student demographic characteristics including sex and academic classification were…

  6. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology…

  7. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  8. Confidentiality and Faculty Representation in Academic Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report argues that requiring faculty members to sign confidentiality agreements as a requirement to serve on university committees is in most cases inconsistent with widely accepted standards of shared governance and with the concept of serving as a representative. This argument does not apply to faculty serving on promotion and tenure…

  9. Ethical Perspectives on Evaluating Community College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Dan; King, Stephanie; Blendinger, Jack; Davis, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Because the process of faculty evaluation in the community college gives rise to ethical concerns about what is evaluated, who is involved in the process, and how data are collected and used, the purpose of this paper is to provide a meaningful ethical perspective for conducting faculty evaluation. The authors discuss ethical issues that arise in…

  10. Engaging Faculty across the Community Engagement Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Irena; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists an incompatibility between the demands of university administrators for increased community engagement and the realities facing faculty who want to integrate it into their academic coursework, research, and professional service. This article provides insight on the complex challenges preventing faculty from becoming involved…

  11. Predicting Seminary Faculty Engagement with Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, Deborah Hearn-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Most multicultural theological education research has focused on theoretical or historical pieces and only on a few institutions. This study explored the personal, professional, institutional, and interactional predictors of seminary faculty engagement with multicultural education. Three hundred full-time faculty in U.S. seminaries affiliated with…

  12. Senior Faculty Perceptions of Social Work Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 421 senior faculty in graduate social work education investigated the familiarity and perceived quality of 120 professional journals in the field. Resulting ratings are presented for use by faculty seeking to publish their work in appropriate journals and those assessing the scholarly contribution of social work educators. (Author/MSE)

  13. Faculty on Facebook: Confirm or Deny?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, C. Michael; Walker, Christin

    2009-01-01

    Since its creation in 2004, Facebook has become one of the most frequently visited websites on college campuses. Because of this rise in popularity, the subject of social networking has grown as an idea and concern for both faculty members and students. At Lee University, it has been observed that a growing number of faculty members have indeed…

  14. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  15. Aging in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Janna C.; Gutheil, Irene A.; White-Ryan, Linda; Phipps, Colette; Guishard, Dozene

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive study of undergraduate faculty (N = 177) ascertained the extent to which aging content is taught and faculty are interested in aging. The research was the result of a collaboration among an area agency on aging, an alliance of academic and community leaders, and a university-based research center. While approximately 43% of the…

  16. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  17. Student versus Faculty Perceptions of Missing Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Merry J.; Ritzer, Darren R.; Casey, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares student and faculty attitudes towards students missing classes and class attendance. Surveys undergraduate students (n=231) in lower and upper level psychology courses and psychology faculty. Reports that students found more reasons acceptable for missing classes and that the amount of in-class material on the examinations…

  18. Predicting Faculty Integration of Faith and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Corina R.; Hardin, Kimberly A.; Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Concern regarding the secularization of Christian higher education has prompted researchers to investigate the extent that faith and learning is integrated at a faculty level and what factors might predict faculty integration (Lyon, Beaty, Parker, & Mencken, 2005). This research attempted to replicate Lyon et al.'s (2005) logistic regression…

  19. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  20. Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

  1. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  2. Information-Seeking Habits of Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp-Serrano, Karen; Robbins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the information-seeking behavior of academic education faculty from twenty large public research universities. The investigation includes an examination of how frequently education faculty seek or access information, how they stay up-to-date on current developments in the field and identify less recent journal literature, how…

  3. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.

  4. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Effective Clinical Instructors in ADN Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac-Caille; Anne Marie; Oermann, Marilyn H.

    2001-01-01

    Associate degree nursing students (n=292) and faculty (n=59) agreed on 6 of 10 characteristics of effective clinical instructors. Effective instructors are clinically competent, use effective evaluation strategies, explain clearly, are approachable, are well prepared to teach, and communicate clear expectations. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  5. Determining Data Information Literacy Needs: A Study of Students and Research Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jacob; Fosmire, Michael; Miller, C. C.; Nelson, Megan Sapp

    2011-01-01

    Researchers increasingly need to integrate the disposition, management, and curation of their data into their current workflows. However, it is not yet clear to what extent faculty and students are sufficiently prepared to take on these responsibilities. This paper articulates the need for a data information literacy program (DIL) to prepare…

  6. Expert clinician to clinical teacher: developing a faculty academy and mentoring initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Tina P; Hinderer, Katherine A; Jarosinski, Judith M; Mister, Brenda J; Seldomridge, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage. Adequate training for the new role is paramount to promote job satisfaction and reduce attrition. Various models for orienting and preparing expert nurse clinicians as clinical educators are reported in the literature with little consensus or research to support a single approach. This paper describes a collaborative effort to prepare experienced registered nurse clinicians for new roles as part-time clinical faculty. Using a blend of learning strategies (face-to-face, online, simulation, and group mentoring sessions), this training experience was designed to cover content while promoting discussion of issues and challenges and providing much-needed mentorship. Outcomes include 12 new clinical faculty, 25% from groups underrepresented in nursing, with nine newly employed as part-time clinical teachers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Through the MOOCing Glass: Professors' Perspectives on the Future of MOOCs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter introduces literature that predicts the future of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in higher education and argues that it is critical to understand faculty views of the future for this instructional form; it presents the results of a qualitative study investigating the views of faculty who have taught a MOOC.

  8. Through the MOOCing Glass: Professors' Perspectives on the Future of MOOCs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter introduces literature that predicts the future of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in higher education and argues that it is critical to understand faculty views of the future for this instructional form; it presents the results of a qualitative study investigating the views of faculty who have taught a MOOC.

  9. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Faculty Viewpoints on Teaching Quantway®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Howington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantway is a quantitative reasoning-based pathway for developmental math that has been developed as an alternative to the traditional remedial algebra sequence. To explore the experiences of faculty involved with Quantway, we interviewed eight individuals who have taught the course in the past year to survey their attitudes and opinions about students in their classes, the materials and pedagogies in use, and the collegial interaction of networked faculty. Faculty were selected with the intention of gathering a broad set of opinions resulting from differences of location, experience, and other factors. In this paper, we summarize those interviews by identifying common themes reported by the faculty that highlight strengths and challenges of teaching Quantway. Themes include perceptions about changes in student engagement and attitudes as well as changes in their own mindset; the evolution of teaching strategies and materials used inside and outside the classroom; and the relevance of connections between faculty at different institutions involved in the project.

  11. Planning for Internationalization By Investing in Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Childress

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last half century, major world events have prompted higher education institutions to develop internationalization plans. In order engage faculty in internationalization, higher education scholars and practitioners have recommended that internationalization plans include allocated resources, such as budgets for academic exchanges, faculty development workshops, and international curricular development and research grants (Olson, Green, & Hill, 2006; Paige, 2005; Siaya & Hayward, 2003. Yet, a frequently cited obstacle to faculty engagement in internationalization plans is lack of funding (Backman, 1984; Bond, 2003; Ellingboe, 1998; Green & Olson, 2003; Steers & Ungsen, 1992; Woolston, 1983. A cross-case analysis reveals that differential investment leads to faculty engagement in internationalization plans. This article discusses how two institutions developed funds from a variety of sources and institutional levels to engage faculty in an institutional planning process. This study offers implications for institutional planning, resource dependency theory, and internationalization.

  12. Predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Denise K; Kennerly, Susan

    2011-04-01

    Turnover of nurse faculty is an increasingly important issue in nursing as the available number of qualified faculty continues to decrease. Understanding the factors that contribute to turnover is important to academic administrators to retain and recruit qualified nursing faculty. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty working in departments and schools of nursing in Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities-Extensive, public and private, not-for-profit institutions. The multidimensional model of organizational commitment was used to frame this study. The predictor variables explored were organizational climate, organizational commitment, work role balance, role ambiguity, and role conflict. The work roles examined were research, teaching, and service. Logistical regression was performed to examine the predictors of turnover intention. Organizational climate intimacy and disengagement, affective and continuance organizational commitment, and role ambiguity were shown to predict turnover intention in nurse faculty. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Teaching and educational scholarship in Tanzania: faculty initiative to improve performance of health professions' students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkony, Charles A; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Owibingire, Sirra S; Fyfe, Molly V; Omer, Selma; Freeman, Phyllis; Makubi, Abel; Mloka, Doreen A; Portillo, Carmen J; Leyna, Germana H; Tarimo, Edith; Kaaya, Ephata E; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Well-educated and competent health professionals influence the health system in which they work to improve health outcomes, through clinical care and community interventions, and by raising standards of practice and supervision. To prepare these individuals, training institutions must ensure that their faculty members, who design and deliver education, are effective teachers. We describe the experience of the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) in encouraging improvements in the teaching capacity of its faculty and postgraduate students triggered by a major institutional transition to competency-based education. We employed a multi-stage process that started by identifying the teaching and learning needs and challenges of MUHAS students and faculty. Collaborating with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), MUHAS responded to these needs by introducing faculty to competency-based curricula and later to strategies for long term continuing improvement. We demonstrate that teaching faculty members are keen for local institutional support to enable them to enhance their skills as educators, and that they have been able to sustain a program of faculty development for their peers.

  14. Imagine Something Different: How a Group Approach to Scholarly Faculty Development Can Turn Joy-Stealing Competition Into Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T

    As academic institutions across the country raise the scholarly bar for retention, promotion, and tenure, academic leaders are being asked to scholar-ready nursing faculty. With the retirement of senior scholars and too few scholar-mentors to go around, leaders often find themselves squeezed between scholarly expectations on the rise and faculty groups less than ready to meet those expectations. Today's nursing faculty present a formidable scholarly development challenge. A diverse mix of master's-prepared clinicians and recent graduates from doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice programs, they come with a broad range of scholarly learning needs. These inequities not only leave many faculty feeling like scholar-impostors but also they can breed competitions that erode collegial bonds and sow the seeds of incivilities that steal scholarly joy, slow scholarly progress, and stress academic workplaces. What if leaders began imagining something different for themselves and with faculty groups? This is what can happen when leaders expand their perspective on scholarly faculty development from individual challenge to collective responsibility. More essay than research paper, this article describes how scholarly joy-stealing patterns can infiltrate faculty groups, shares thought leaders' visions for supportive scholarly communities, and offers strategies leaders can use to invite faculty groups to co-create cultures of scholarly caring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Navigating Distance and Traditional Higher Education: Online faculty experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice G. Yick

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The academic culture of higher educational institutions is characterized by specific pedagogical philosophies, assumptions about rewards and incentives, and values about how teaching is delivered. In many academic settings, however, the field of distance education has been viewed as holding marginal status. Consequently, the goal of this qualitative study was to explore faculty members’ experiences in a distance education, online university while simultaneously navigating within a traditional environment of higher education. A total of 28 faculty members participated in a threaded, asynchronous discussion board that resembled a focus group. Participants discussed perceptions about online teaching, working in an institution without a traditional tenure system, and the role of research in distance education. Findings indicated that online teaching is still regarded as less credible; however, participants also noted how this perception is gradually changing. Several benchmarks of legitimacy were identified for online universities to adopt in order to be viewed as credible. The issue of tenure still remains highly debated, although some faculty felt that tenure will be less crucial in the future. Finally, recommendations regarding attitudinal shifts within academic circles are described with particular attention to professional practice, program development, and policy decision-making in academia.

  16. Integrating patient safety into health professionals’ curricula: a qualitative study of medical, nursing and pharmacy faculty perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane; Clarke, Beth; Norton, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background As efforts to integrate patient safety into health professional curricula increase, there is growing recognition that the rate of curricular change is very slow, and there is a shortage of research that addresses critical perspectives of faculty who are on the ‘front-lines’ of curricular innovation. This study reports on medical, nursing and pharmacy teaching faculty perspectives about factors that influence curricular integration and the preparation of safe practitioners. Methods ...

  17. Establishing Instructional Technology Benchmarks for Teacher Preparation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Pamela Taylor; Little, Wesley

    1996-01-01

    Examines technology use in teacher preparation, emerging state and national standards for educators and technology, and benchmarks for teacher preparation programs (including faculty preparation), and notes the importance of creating school-business partnerships to help finance this costly venture. (SM)

  18. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  19. Facilitated Learning to Advance Geriatrics: Increasing the Capacity of Nurse Faculty to Teach Students About Caring for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichbaum, Kathleen; Kaas, Merrie J; Wyman, Jean F; Van Son, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The Facilitated Learning to Advance Geriatrics program (FLAG) was designed to increase the numbers of nurse faculty in prelicensure programs with basic knowledge about aging and teaching effectiveness to prepare students to provide safe, high quality care for older adults. Using a framework to improve transfer of learning, FLAG was designed to include: (a) a workshop to increase basic knowledge of aging and common geriatric syndromes, and effective use of evidence-based teaching/learning strategies; (b) a year-long mentoring program to support application of workshop learning and leading change in participants' schools to ensure that geriatrics is a priority. Both formative and summative evaluation methods were used, and included self-assessment of objectives, program satisfaction, and teaching self-efficacy. FLAG achieved its overall purpose by enrolling 152 participants from 19 states including 23 faculty from associate degree programs and 102 from baccalaureate programs. Self-rated teaching effectiveness improved significantly from pre- to post-workshop each year. Achievement of learning objectives was rated highly as was satisfaction. Transfer of learning was evidenced by implementation of educational projects in home schools supported by mentoring. The FLAG program provided opportunities for nurse educators to learn to teach geriatrics more effectively and to transfer learning to their work environment. Future FLAG programs will be offered in a shortened format, incorporating online content and strategies, adding other health professionals to the audience with the same goal of increasing the knowledge and abilities of educators to prepare learners to provide competent care for older adults. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Radial Velocity Prospects Current and Future: A White Paper Report prepared by the Study Analysis Group 8 for the Exoplanet Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG)

    CERN Document Server

    Plavchan, Peter; Gaudi, Scott; Crepp, Justin; Xavier, Dumusque; Furesz, Gabor; Vanderburg, Andrew; Blake, Cullen; Fischer, Debra; Prato, Lisa; White, Russel; Makarov, Valeri; Marcy, Geoff; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Haywood, Raphaëlle; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Anglada, Guillem; Muirhead, Philip

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] The Study Analysis Group 8 of the NASA Exoplanet Analysis Group was convened to assess the current capabilities and the future potential of the precise radial velocity (PRV) method to advance the NASA goal to "search for planetary bodies and Earth-like planets in orbit around other stars.: (U.S. National Space Policy, June 28, 2010). PRVs complement other exoplanet detection methods, for example offering a direct path to obtaining the bulk density and thus the structure and composition of transiting exoplanets. Our analysis builds upon previous community input, including the ExoPlanet Community Report chapter on radial velocities in 2008, the 2010 Decadal Survey of Astronomy, the Penn State Precise Radial Velocities Workshop response to the Decadal Survey in 2010, and the NSF Portfolio Review in 2012. The radial-velocity detection of exoplanets is strongly endorsed by both the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey "New Worlds, New Horizons" and the NSF Portfolio Review, and the community has recommended robust...

  1. Duty hour restrictions: organizational dynamics, systems issues, and the impact on faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Glen; Hynes, Melissa Kennedy; Spadafora, Salvatore M

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of resident duty hour restrictions on faculty is likely significant; however, the extent of this impact has still not been well documented. We undertook a narrative review of the literature to determine the magnitude of that potential impact and the nature of the evolving discourse related to faculty members as individuals. The literature provides an inconsistent picture of the impact of duty hour restrictions on faculty. While some studies have reported a significant increase in faculty workload, others suggest that the impact of duty hour restrictions has been minimal. Some papers suggest that duty hour restrictions may fundamentally change the nature of resident-teacher interactions and, as a result, will necessitate significant changes to the way education is delivered. Overall, the majority of issues of concern relate to one of the following: volume and composition of work, impact on faculty career choice, evolving perceptions of residents as learners, and the need to find an appropriate balance between learning and the quality and quantity of patient care. In describing these themes we identify some potential solutions and future directions for reconciling duty hour restrictions with faculty perceptions, anxieties, and desired outcomes.

  2. Using the Virtual World of Second Life in Veterinary Medicine: Student and Faculty Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mary M; Artemiou, Elpida; McGonigle, Dee; Conan, Anne; Sithole, Fortune; Yvorchuk-St Jean, Kathleen

    2017-09-08

    Virtual worlds are emerging technologies that can enhance student learning by encouraging active participation through simulation in immersive environments. At Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM), the virtual world of Second Life was piloted as an educational platform for first-semester students to practice clinical reasoning in a simulated veterinary clinical setting. Under the supervision of one facilitator, four groups of nine students met three times to process a clinical case using Second Life. In addition, three groups of four clinical faculty observed one Second Life meeting. Questionnaires using a 4-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree to 4=strongly agree) and open-ended questions were used to assess student and clinical faculty perceptions of the Second Life platform. Perception scores of students (M=2.7, SD=0.7) and clinical faculty (M=2.7, SD=0.5) indicate that Second Life provides authentic and realistic learning experiences. In fact, students (M=3.4, SD=0.6) and clinical faculty (M=2.9, SD=1.0) indicate that Second Life should be offered to future students. Moreover, content analyses of open-ended responses from students and faculty support the use of Second Life based on reported advantages indicating that Second Life offers a novel and effective instructional method. Ultimately, results indicate that students and clinical faculty had positive educational experiences using Second Life, suggesting the need for further investigation into its application within the curriculum.

  3. Generation X: implications for faculty recruitment and development in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Janet; Brown, Ann J

    2005-03-01

    Differences and tensions between the Baby Boom generation (born 1945-1962) and Generation X (born 1963-1981) have profound implications for the future of academic medicine. By and large, department heads and senior faculty are Boomers; today's residents and junior faculty are Generation X'ers. Looking at these issues in terms of the generations involved offers insights into a number of faculty development challenges, including inadequate and inexpert mentoring, work-life conflicts, and low faculty morale. These insights suggest strategies for strengthening academic medicine's recruitment and retention of Generation X into faculty and leadership roles. These strategies include (1) improving career and academic advising by specific attention to mentoring "across differences"--for instance, broaching the subject of formative differences in background during the initial interaction; adopting a style that incorporates information-sharing with engagement in problem solving; offering frequent, frank feedback; and refraining from comparing today to the glories of yesterday; to support such improvements, medical schools should recognize and evaluate mentoring as a core academic responsibility; (2) retaining both valued women and men in academic careers by having departments add temporal flexibility and create and legitimize less-than-full-time appointments; and (3) providing trainees and junior faculty with ready access to educational sessions designed to turn their "intellectual capital" into "academic career capital."Given the trends discussed in this article, such supports and adaptations are indicated to assure that academic health centers maintain traditions of excellence.

  4. Using Large-scale Spatially and Temporally Consistent Reanalysis Data to Assess Fire Weather and Fire Regimes in Siberia in Preparation for Future Fire Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A. J.; Westberg, D. J.; Stackhouse, P. W.; McRae, D.; Jin, J.

    2008-12-01

    A primary driving force of land cover change in boreal regions is fire, where extreme fire seasons are influenced by local weather and ultimately climate. It is predicted that fire frequency, area burned, fire severity, fire season length, and severe fire seasons will increase under current climate change scenarios. The use of local ground based weather data can be used to gauge the local fire potential on a daily, monthly, or seasonal basis. However, the number and distribution of surface observing stations in Siberia have been declining since the early 1990's. A compounding problem is existing observing stations have missing data on various time scales. The density of stations is limited; hence results may not be representative of the spatial reality. One solution is the temporally and spatially consistent NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 (GEOS-4) satellite-derived weather data interpolated to a 1x1 degree grid. In previous work, we showed the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) derived using GEOS-4 weather and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data compared well to ground based weather data from Jakutsk (Sakha) and Kyzyl (Tuva), Russia. Our primary focus is to expand on this work by spatially comparing the FWI derived from GEOS-4 / GPCP data and ground-based weather observations from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). Extreme fires burned in Sakha and Tuva in 2002 and 2004, respectively, while in contrast, normal fire seasons occurred in Sakha and Tuva in 1999 and 2002, respectively. For this reason, we focus on the 1999, 2002, and 2004 fire seasons (April - September). In this investigation, we demonstrate how fire weather models perform on a large scale and investigate the performance of these models relative to input uncertainties. We intend to use this information to build regional-scale fire predictions systems that can be used for future interactive fire-weather-climate assessments.

  5. The faculty of pain medicine of the Australian and New Zealand college of anaesthetists - history and strategic plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipton, Edward A; Moore, Brendan; Cousins, Michael; Atkinson, Leigh

    2014-12-01

    Since its formation, the Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM) has grown into an organization with 369 fellows. It has 29 accredited pain medicine training units in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and Singapore. This article reviews the history of its birth and subsequent growth. The FPM fellowship is widely recognized as a high-quality qualification, based on a sound curriculum, excellent clinical exposure, and robust continuing professional development. But how does the Faculty position itself for the future? The Faculty's 5-year Strategic Plan (from 2013 to 2017) sets out its vision "to reduce the burden of pain in society through education, advocacy, training and research."

  6. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  7. Motivational issues of faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram AbdulCader

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the factors that affect motivation of faculty in Saudi Arabia. It included two surveys and open-ended queries to a focus group of five academic managers and 25 faculty members of varying nationalities, rank, and institutes in Saudi Arabia. The research showed that the faculties in Saudi Arabia’s higher education industry feel disconnected from the program development. The faculty members did not feel motivated to participate in the development and improvement of the academic program due to: (a lack of monetary and non-monetary incentives, (b management not involving faculty in decision-making, and (c lack of recognition and moral support. However, the faculties were intrinsically motivated to perform their best within the confines of the classroom. The results of the study indicated that there was a greater interest in intrinsic motivation as a personal measure for success inside the classroom, but extrinsic motivation was a factor that needed greater improvement from the management of the universities for faculty to partake in development of the program. DOI:  10.18870/hlrc.v4i4.211

  8. Faculty and student perceptions of the feasibility of individual student-faculty meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, B F; Erich, M H; Borleffs, J C C; Elgersma, A F; Cohen-Schotanus, J

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which students feel involved in their education positively influences academic achievement. Individual student-faculty meetings can foster student involvement. To be effective, faculty acknowledgement of the benefit of these meetings is a prerequisite. The aim of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of individual student-faculty meetings. In addition we investigated students' perceptions. As part of the undergraduate programme, mandatory individual intake and follow-up meetings between first-year medical students (n = 425) and senior faculty members (n = 34) have been implemented from 2009 onwards. We administered a questionnaire on faculty perceptions of the benefit and impact of intake meetings. Subsequently, after both meetings had been held, strong and weak points of the mandatory programme were explored using open-ended questions. Students' perceptions were investigated by open-ended questions as a part of the curriculum evaluation process. Faculty enjoyed the meetings (90 %), perceived the meetings to be beneficial (74 %) and expected a positive effect on student involvement (74 %). Faculty appreciated the opportunity to give advice tailored to students' personal needs and levels of performance. The students appreciated the meetings and the attention given to their personal situation and study progress. Faculty and student appreciation of the meetings seems to support the assumption that the individual meetings increase students' social and academic involvement. Further research should focus on the impact of individual student-faculty meetings on students' learning behaviours.

  9. Faculty Online Technology Adoption: The Role of Management Support and Organizational Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui-Ting; Deggs, David M.; Jabor, M. Khata; Machtmes, Krisanna

    2011-01-01

    Although there is a plethora of online learning studies, relatively few studies have probed into teachers' online technology adoption. It is suggested that faculty resistance to technology be one of the key hindrances to the future development of distance learning. Several studies have argued that teachers' resistance to technology, one of the key…

  10. Exploring the Ambiguity: What Faculty Leaders Really Think of Sustainability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tarah; Horst, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university faculty leaders in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability initiatives on campus.…

  11. Identifying Faculty Types Using Peer Ratings of Teaching, Research, and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, John

    1991-01-01

    A study classified 90 full-time tenure-track faculty in 1 university into 5 discrete types based on teaching, research, and service. Types include all-stars, teachers and good citizens, researchers, teachers, and uninvolved. This mix of types is seen as resulting from past administrative decisions and helps shape future decisions. (Author/MSE)

  12. Training Community College faculty in the techniques and skills required for Solar Energy System installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    A project to train a specified number of community college, vocational/technical faculty in the techniques and skills required to install solar energy systems is described. The planning that led to the contract, the development and conduct of the training workshops, and the outcomes are detailed. An overall evaluation of the project and recommendations for the future are included. (MHR)

  13. Exploring the Ambiguity: What Faculty Leaders Really Think of Sustainability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tarah; Horst, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university faculty leaders in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability initiatives on campus.…

  14. Teaching Introductory Life Science Courses in Colleges of Agriculture: Faculty Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balschweid, Mark; Knobloch, Neil A.; Hains, Bryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Insignificant numbers of college students declaring STEM majors creates concern for the future of the U.S. economy within the global marketplace. This study highlights the educational development and teaching strategies employed by STEM faculty in teaching first-year students in contextualized life science courses, such as animal, plant, and food…

  15. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P; Whicker, Shari A; Benjamin, Robert W; Hawley, Jeffrey; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    Learner benefits of tablet computer use have been demonstrated, yet there is little evidence regarding faculty tablet use for teaching. Our study sought to determine if supplying faculty with tablet computers and peer mentoring provided benefits to learners and faculty beyond that of non-tablet-based teaching modalities. We provided faculty with tablet computers and three 2-hour peer-mentoring workshops on tablet-based teaching. Faculty used tablets to teach, in addition to their current, non-tablet-based methods. Presurveys, postsurveys, and monthly faculty surveys assessed feasibility, utilization, and comparisons to current modalities. Learner surveys assessed perceived effectiveness and comparisons to current modalities. All feedback received from open-ended questions was reviewed by the authors and organized into categories. Of 15 eligible faculty, 14 participated. Each participant attended at least 2 of the 3 workshops, with 10 to 12 participants at each workshop. All participants found the workshops useful, and reported that the new tablet-based teaching modality added value beyond that of current teaching methods. Respondents developed the following tablet-based outputs: presentations, photo galleries, evaluation tools, and online modules. Of the outputs, 60% were used in the ambulatory clinics, 33% in intensive care unit bedside teaching rounds, and 7% in inpatient medical unit bedside teaching rounds. Learners reported that common benefits of tablet computers were: improved access/convenience (41%), improved interactive learning (38%), and improved bedside teaching and patient care (13%). A common barrier faculty identified was inconsistent wireless access (14%), while no barriers were identified by the majority of learners. Providing faculty with tablet computers and having peer-mentoring workshops to discuss their use was feasible and added value.

  16. Explicit training in human values and social attitudes of future engineers in Spain : commentary on "preparing to understand and use science in the real world: interdisciplinary study concentrations at the technical University of Darmstadt".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Jaime

    2013-12-01

    In Spain before the 1990s there was no clear and explicit comprehensive training for future engineers with regard to social responsibility and social commitment. Following the Spanish university curricular reform, which began in the early 1990s, a number of optional subjects became available to students, concerning science, technology and society (STS), international cooperation, the environment and sustainability. The latest redefinition of the Spanish curriculum in line with the Bologna agreements has reduced the number of non-obligatory subjects, but could lead to improving preparation for social responsibility due to the requirement that the design of curricula and the assessment of students should be based on competencies, some of which include human values and attitudes.

  17. Becoming a nurse faculty leader: taking risks by doing the right thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Pardue, Karen; Young, Patricia K; Morales, Mary Lou; Halstead, Judith; Pearsall, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Risk taking is a key aspect of academic leadership essential to meeting the challenges and opportunities in higher education. What are the practices of risk taking in nurse faculty leaders? This interpretive phenomenological study examines the experience and meaning of risk taking among nurse leaders. The theme of doing the right thing is brought forth through in-depth hermeneutic analysis of 14 individual interviews and two focus group narratives. The practice of doing the right thing is propelled and captured by leaders through a sense professional responsibility, visioning the future, and being true to self and follow one's core values. This study develops an evidence base for incorporating ways of doing the right thing in leadership development activities at a time when there is tremendous need for highly effective leaders in academic settings. Examining the practices of doing the right thing as a part of leadership development lays a foundation for building the next generation of nursing leaders prepared to navigate the ever-changing and complex academic and health care environments.

  18. Assessment on regulatory framework for safety of radioactive waste management as preparation for future NPP in Indonesia; a comparison study with South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung Young [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    information regarding natural radioactive sources downhole in oil and gas exploration and exploitation. Tracer is another type of nuclear energy utilization in industrial facilities. Tracer is operated by utilizing radioactive source attached to the system to follow the behavior pathway of one or more components of the particular system. It is used to detect easily and clearly on low concentration radioactive level of the system, as well as to detect and take samples without destroying the active system. Number of total radioactive and/or nuclear facilities for industrial purposes in Indonesia tends to be increasing as the implementation is getting wider. One of the nuclear authorities in Indonesia is the Nuclear Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) which on behalf of the government grants the licenses to the respective facilities and monitors the regulation implementation on the facilities to ensure the safety, security and safeguard for the purpose providing protection to the people, property and environment. Considering the wide use of nuclear energy application and implementation in industrial purposes facilities, qualified human resources for controlling the law enforcement to ensure the proper standards of safety and security including the management of the waste generated by various nuclear energy utilization. Wide progressive demands of electricity for the future give challenges to the government to meet the projected needs of energy to be fulfilled. One of the options which can be considered reasonable in answering such problem to provide the high request of energy is by building nuclear power plant. Understanding the much wider use of nuclear energy implementation within the country, nuclear and radioactive waste facilities need to be developed in meeting the capacity required for prospective requirements.

  19. Analysis of the Clinical Advantages and Future of Hospital-dispensed Skin External preparations%医院皮肤外用制剂的临床优势与未来趋向浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申国庆

    2011-01-01

    Skin external preparations of our hospital are low in price with remarkable drug compliance. In addition. these drugs satisfy the requirements of specialized and personalized medicine. which are lacked in unitary post-market drugs. In the future. classical preparations of our hospital will be handed down and non-classical ones will be gradually converted to commercial products or will be replaced by new producls.%现阶段医院皮肤外用制剂紧贴临床疾病用药,满足细化和个体的专科治疗要求,价格低廉有很好的临床用药顺应性,弥补了上市药品品种单一的不足,凸显了其临床优势.未来一些经典的皮肤外用制剂医院将会继续传承,常规制剂随时间可能会逐渐转化成产品推向市场或被新品所替代.

  20. Reflections of pedagogy students on their future profession and the job search process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutvajn Nikoleta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, preparation of youth for their future profession and the job search process have become the leading topics in social sciences and an inevitable segment of a number of European policies in the field of education. The goal of our research was to obtain a more comprehensive insight into the ways in which pedagogy students perceive their preparation for the future profession and the opportunities for finding a job in their field of study. The sample comprised fifty-three third- and fourth-year students from the Department of Pedagogy of the Faculty of Philosophy in Belgrade. For the purposes of the research, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was constructed. Since our study is explorative in nature, we opted for qualitative analysis of the collected material. Research findings indicate that the majority of students predominantly believe that the acquired knowledge and skills are insufficiently usable in future professional work. Such beliefs lead towards the feeling of low competence for performing the future professional role. It was established that students use the “usual” methods for job search. However, the choice of these activities is not various enough, which consequently reduces the chances of pedagogy students to find employment. Negative perceptions of one’s own preparation for future profession point out to the necessity of a more efficient preparation of pedagogy students for their future job through establishing cooperation between institutions in the field of high education, research centres and world of labour. Key words: pedagogy students, personal meanings, high education, professional competences and the job search process.