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Sample records for preparing drosophila embryos

  1. In-vivo Centrifugation of Drosophila Embryos

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    Tran, Susan L.; Welte, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, an...

  2. DAPI Staining of Drosophila Embryos.

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    Rothwell, Wendy F; Sullivan, William

    2007-10-01

    INTRODUCTIONDrosophila embryos can be stained with specific fluorescent probes or antibodies through either direct or indirect immunofluorescence. In particular, several effective probes exist for visualizing DNA. 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) is a commonly used DNA-binding dye. Because it is specific for double-stranded DNA, no prior RNase treatment is required. While the embryo staining method described here uses DAPI, other fluorescent DNA probes can be processed similarly.

  3. In-vivo centrifugation of Drosophila embryos.

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    Tran, Susan L; Welte, Michael A

    2010-06-23

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, and their outer egg shells are removed by treatment with 50% bleach. Embryos are then transferred to a small agar plate and inserted, posterior end first, into small vertical holes in the agar. The plates containing embedded embryos are centrifuged for 30 min at 3000 g. The agar supports the embryos and keeps them in a defined orientation. Afterwards, the embryos are dug out of the agar with a blunt needle. Centrifugation separates major organelles into distinct layers, a stratification easily visible by bright-field microscopy. A number of fluorescent markers are available to confirm successful stratification in living embryos. Proteins associated with certain organelles will be enriched in a particular layer, demonstrating colocalization. Individual layers can be recovered for biochemical analysis or transplantation into donor eggs. This technique is applicable for organelle separation in other large cells, including the eggs and oocytes of diverse species.

  4. Microfluidic system with integrated microinjector for automated Drosophila embryo injection.

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    Delubac, Daniel; Highley, Christopher B; Witzberger-Krajcovic, Melissa; Ayoob, Joseph C; Furbee, Emily C; Minden, Jonathan S; Zappe, Stefan

    2012-11-21

    Drosophila is one of the most important model organisms in biology. Knowledge derived from the recently sequenced 12 genomes of various Drosophila species can today be combined with the results of more than 100 years of research to systematically investigate Drosophila biology at the molecular level. In order to enable automated, high-throughput manipulation of Drosophila embryos, we have developed a microfluidic system based on a Pyrex-silicon-Pyrex sandwich structure with integrated, surface-micromachined silicon nitride injector for automated injection of reagents. Our system automatically retrieves embryos from an external reservoir, separates potentially clustered embryos through a sheath flow mechanisms, passively aligns an embryo with the integrated injector through geometric constraints, and pushes the embryo onto the injector through flow drag forces. Automated detection of an embryo at injection position through an external camera triggers injection of reagents and subsequent ejection of the embryo to an external reservoir. Our technology can support automated screens based on Drosophila embryos as well as creation of transgenic Drosophila lines. Apart from Drosophila embryos, the layout of our system can be easily modified to accommodate injection of oocytes, embryos, larvae, or adults of other species and fills an important technological gap with regard to automated manipulation of multicellular organisms.

  5. Drosophila chem mutations disrupt epithelial polarity in Drosophila embryos

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    José M. Zamudio-Arroyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila embryogenesis has proven to be an extremely powerful system for developmental gene discovery and characterization. We isolated five new EMS-induced alleles that do not complement the l(3R5G83 lethal line isolated in the Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus screens. We have named this locus chem. Lethality of the new alleles as homozygous zygotic mutants is not completely penetrant, and they have an extended phenocritical period. Like the original allele, a fraction of mutant embryos die with cuticular defects, notably head involution and dorsal closure defects. Embryonic defects are much more extreme in germline clones, where the majority of mutant embryos die during embryogenesis and do not form cuticle, implying a strong chem maternal contribution. chem mutations genetically interact with mutations in cytoskeletal genes (arm and with mutations in the epithelial polarity genes coracle, crumbs, and yurt. chem mutants dorsal open defects are similar to those present in yurt mutants, and, likewise, they have epithelial polarity defects. chem1 and chem3 mutations suppress yurt3, and chem3 mutants suppress crumbs1 mutations. In contrast, chem1 and coracle2 mutations enhance each other. Compared to controls, in chem mutants in embryonic lateral epithelia Crumbs expression is mislocalized and reduced, Coracle is increased and mislocalized basally at embryonic stages 13–14, then reduced at stage 16. Arm expression has a similar pattern but levels are reduced.

  6. Tracking individual nanodiamonds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, David A; Kowarsky, Mark; Zeeshan, Nida F; Barson, Michael S J; Hall, Liam; Yan, Yan; Kaufmann, Stefan; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Scholten, Robert; Saint, Robert B; Murray, Michael J; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2013-01-01

    Tracking the dynamics of fluorescent nanoparticles during embryonic development allows insights into the physical state of the embryo and, potentially, molecular processes governing developmental mechanisms. In this work, we investigate the motion of individual fluorescent nanodiamonds micro-injected into Drosophila melanogaster embryos prior to cellularisation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and wide-field imaging techniques are applied to individual fluorescent nanodiamonds in blastoderm cells during stage 5 of development to a depth of ~40 \\mu m. The majority of nanodiamonds in the blastoderm cells during cellularisation exhibit free diffusion with an average diffusion coefficient of (6 $\\pm$ 3) x 10$^{-3}$ \\mu m$^2$/s, (mean $\\pm$ SD). Driven motion in the blastoderm cells was also observed with an average velocity of 0.13 $\\pm$ 0.10 \\mu m/s (mean $\\pm$ SD) \\mu m/s and an average applied force of 0.07 $\\pm$ 0.05 pN (mean $\\pm$ SD). Nanodiamonds in the periplasm between the nuclei and yolk were also...

  7. Determination of gene expression patterns using high-throughput RNA in situ hybridizaion to whole-mount Drosophila embryos

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    Weiszmann, R.; Hammonds, A.S.; Celniker, S.E.

    2009-04-09

    We describe a high-throughput protocol for RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) to Drosophila embryos in a 96-well format. cDNA or genomic DNA templates are amplified by PCR and then digoxigenin-labeled ribonucleotides are incorporated into antisense RNA probes by in vitro transcription. The quality of each probe is evaluated before ISH using a RNA probe quantification (dot blot) assay. RNA probes are hybridized to fixed, mixed-staged Drosophila embryos in 96-well plates. The resulting stained embryos can be examined and photographed immediately or stored at 4oC for later analysis. Starting with fixed, staged embryos, the protocol takes 6 d from probe template production through hybridization. Preparation of fixed embryos requires a minimum of 2 weeks to collect embryos representing all stages. The method has been used to determine the expression patterns of over 6,000 genes throughout embryogenesis.

  8. The embryo as a laboratory: quantifying transcription in Drosophila

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    Gregor, Thomas; Garcia, Hernan G.; Little, Shawn C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression is fundamental to most cellular processes, including determination of cellular fates. Quantitative studies of transcription in cultured cells have led to significant advances in identifying mechanisms underlying transcriptional control. Recent progress allowed implementation of these same quantitative methods in multicellular organisms to ask how transcriptional regulation unfolds both in vivo and at the single molecule level in the context of embryonic development. Here we review some of these advances in early Drosophila development, which bring the embryo on par with its single-celled counterparts. In particular, we discuss progress in methods to measure mRNA and protein distributions in fixed and living embryos, and we highlight some initial applications that lead to fundamental new insights about molecular transcription processes. We end with an outlook on how to further exploit the unique advantages that come with investigating transcriptional control in the developmental context of the embryo. PMID:25005921

  9. The syncytial Drosophila embryo as a mechanically excitable medium

    CERN Document Server

    Idema, Timon; Manning, M Lisa; Nelson, Philip C; Liu, Andrea J

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis in the early syncytial Drosophila embryo is highly correlated in space and time, as manifested in mitotic wavefronts that propagate across the embryo. In this paper we investigate the idea that the embryo can be considered a mechanically-excitable medium, and that mitotic wavefronts can be understood as nonlinear wavefronts that propagate through this medium. We study the wavefronts via both image analysis of confocal microscopy videos and theoretical models. We find that the mitotic wavefront can be resolved into two distinct wavefronts in each cycle, corresponding to metaphase and anaphase, respectively. The two wavefronts have the same speed and are separated by a time interval that is independent of cycle, supporting the idea that they are two different markers for the same process. To understand the wavefronts theoretically we analyze wavefront propagation in excitable media. We study two classes of models, one with biochemical signaling and one with mechanical signaling. We find that the depende...

  10. Embryo-scale tissue mechanics during Drosophila gastrulation movements

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    Rauzi, Matteo; Krzic, Uros; Saunders, Timothy E.; Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož; Hufnagel, Lars; Leptin, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis of an organism requires the development of its parts to be coordinated in time and space. While past studies concentrated on defined cell populations, a synthetic view of the coordination of these events in a whole organism is needed for a full understanding. Drosophila gastrulation begins with the embryo forming a ventral furrow, which is eventually internalized. It is not understood how the rest of the embryo participates in this process. Here we use multiview selective plane illumination microscopy coupled with infrared laser manipulation and mutant analysis to dissect embryo-scale cell interactions during early gastrulation. Lateral cells have a denser medial–apical actomyosin network and shift ventrally as a compact cohort, whereas dorsal cells become stretched. We show that the behaviour of these cells affects furrow internalization. A computational model predicts different mechanical properties associated with tissue behaviour: lateral cells are stiff, whereas dorsal cells are soft. Experimental analysis confirms these properties in vivo. PMID:26497898

  11. Multiplex detection of RNA expression in Drosophila embryos.

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    Kosman, Dave; Mizutani, Claudia M; Lemons, Derek; Cox, W Gregory; McGinnis, William; Bier, Ethan

    2004-08-06

    We present a fluorescence-based, multiplex in situ hybridization method that permits the simultaneous detection of five differently labeled antisense RNA probes and up to seven differ-ent transcripts in a single Drosophila embryo. We also show that it should be possible to increase the number of detected transcripts substantially with nascent transcript multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization. These multiplex methods fill a current technological gap between high-resolution in situ hybridization with one or two fluorescently labeled probes and low-resolution but genome-wide microarray RNA profiling and should be of great utility in establishing gene networks.

  12. Tracing myoblast fusion in Drosophila embryos by fluorescent actin probes.

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    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast fusion in the Drosophila embryo is a highly elaborate process that is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs). It occurs through an asymmetric event in which actin foci assemble in the FCMs at points of cell-cell contact and direct the formation of membrane protrusions that drive fusion. Herein, we describe the approach that we have used to image in living embryos the highly dynamic actin foci and actin-rich projections that precede myoblast fusion. We discuss resources currently available for imaging actin and myogenesis, and our experience with these resources if available. This technical report is not intended to be comprehensive on providing instruction on standard microscopy practices or software utilization. However, we discuss microscope parameters that we have used in data collection, and our experience with image processing tools in data analysis.

  13. Optical Tweezing Nuclei in the Cellular Blastoderm of Drosophila Embryos

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    Schoetz, Eva-Maria; Chaikin, Paul M.; Wieschaus, Eric F.

    2004-03-01

    Optical tweezers are used to manipulate nuclei in the syncytial blastoderm of Drosophila embryos. Our aim is to move a nucleus in a living embryo and study the reactions of its nearest neighbors to this displacement. Effects on the surrounding nuclei may allow us to test models in which actin-microtubule networks connect individual nuclei and keep them in place. In our experiments we use video analysis to follow individual nuclei using GFP-labeled histone protein. In a first approach, we were able to move nuclei in embryonic homogenates suspended in oil. Although the squashing destroys the cell, mitotic nuclear divisions continue, implying that the cytoskeleton, which connects the nuclei to the cortex, is still functioning. We will present studies of nuclear interactions in these squashes and in intact syncytial blastoderms.

  14. An integrated platform for large-scale data collection and precise perturbation of live Drosophila embryos

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    Levario, Thomas J.; Zhao, Charles; Rouse, Tel; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.; Lu, Hang

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental principles governing embryogenesis is a key goal of developmental biology. Direct observation of embryogenesis via in vivo live imaging is vital to understanding embryogenesis; yet, tedious sample preparation makes it difficult to acquire large-scale imaging data that is often required to overcome experimental and biological noises for quantitative studies. Furthermore, it is often difficult, and sometimes impossible, to incorporate environmental perturbation for understanding developmental responses to external stimuli. To address this issue, we have developed a method for high-throughput imaging of live embryos, delivering precise environmental perturbations, and unbiased data extraction. This platform includes an optimized microfluidic device specifically for live embryos and also for precise perturbations in the microenvironment of the developing embryos. In addition, we developed software for simple, yet accurate, automated segmentation of fluorescent images, and automated data extraction. Using a quantitative assessment we find that embryos develop normally within the microfluidic device. Finally, we show an application of the high-throughput assay for monitoring developmental responses to external stimuli: anoxia-induced developmental arrest in Drosophila embryos. With slight modifications, the method developed in this work can be applied to many other models of development and other stimulus-response behaviors during development.

  15. Procedure for the permeabilization and cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

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    Cole, K.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biology Div.; Schreuders, P.D. [Univ. of Tennessee-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Science, TN (United States); Mahowald, A.P. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology; Mazur, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biology Div.]|[Univ. of Tennessee-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Science, TN (United States)

    1993-05-06

    The authors describe the detailed protocol developed in their laboratory at Oak Ridge for the permeabilization and cryobiological preservation of embryos of Drosophila melanogaster, Oregon R strain. The protocol is supplemented by notes containing two sorts of information. One category includes references to the appropriate portions of their published papers giving the scientific rationale and experimental basis for important steps. The other category is concerned with the criticality of certain steps and the precision with which they need to be performed. As an aid to investigators, the authors list even ordinary pieces of equipment. Brand names and model numbers are given where it is either important or convenient for readers to know precisely what is used.

  16. Shadow enhancers enable Hunchback bifunctionality in the Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Max V; Vincent, Ben J; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Lydiard-Martin, Tara; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-01-20

    Hunchback (Hb) is a bifunctional transcription factor that activates and represses distinct enhancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Hb can activate and repress the same enhancer. Computational models predicted that Hb bifunctionally regulates the even-skipped (eve) stripe 3+7 enhancer (eve3+7) in Drosophila blastoderm embryos. We measured and modeled eve expression at cellular resolution under multiple genetic perturbations and found that the eve3+7 enhancer could not explain endogenous eve stripe 7 behavior. Instead, we found that eve stripe 7 is controlled by two enhancers: the canonical eve3+7 and a sequence encompassing the minimal eve stripe 2 enhancer (eve2+7). Hb bifunctionally regulates eve stripe 7, but it executes these two activities on different pieces of regulatory DNA--it activates the eve2+7 enhancer and represses the eve3+7 enhancer. These two "shadow enhancers" use different regulatory logic to create the same pattern.

  17. Centrosome splitting during nuclear elongation in the Drosophila embryo.

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    Callaini, G; Anselmi, F

    1988-10-01

    In the early Drosophila embryo, nuclear elongation occurs during cellularization of the syncytial blastoderm. This process is closely related to the presence of microtubular bundles forming a basket-like structure surrounding the nuclei. In immunofluorescence observations with antibodies against alpha-tubulin, the microtubules appear to radiate from two bright foci widely separated from each other. We used electron microscopy to show that these foci are true centrosomes constituted by daughter and parent centrioles orthogonally disposed and surrounded by pericentriolar electrondense material. The centrosomes may be observed in the apical region of the blastoderm cells from the beginning of cellularization until the reestablishment of the first postblastodermic mitosis, when they organize the spindle poles. Until this time the dimensions of the procentrioles remain unchanged. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to the known behavior of centrioles in the cell cycle.

  18. PS2 integrin requirements in Drosophila embryo and wing morphogenesis.

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    Brabant, M C; Brower, D L

    1993-05-01

    The Drosophila inflated (if) gene encodes the alpha PS2 subunit of the PS integrins. We describe the generation of new if mutations, their lethal embryonic phenotype, and experiments that examine the spatial and temporal requirements for integrins in adult wing morphogenesis. Embryos hemizygous for either new allele, ifA7 or ifB2, make reduced amounts of alpha PS2. In a variety of genetic tests, these alleles behave similarly to ifk27e, which makes no detectable alpha PS2, and all three alleles display the same embryonic phenotype. We therefore conclude that all of the lethal alleles retain little or no wild-type alpha PS2 function. As seen for strong mutations at the myospheroid (mys) locus, which encodes the beta PS integrin subunit, if mutants show extreme defects in somatic muscle attachments and in midgut morphogenesis. Unlike mys, however, there is no dorsal herniation of the if mutant embryos. With respect to wing morphogenesis, clonal analysis experiments demonstrate that if+ function is required only in cells of the ventral wing surface. We have rescued the wing blister phenotype of double mutants for the hypomorphic mysnj42 and if3 alleles using a heat shock-inducible mys+ transgene. By varying times of transgene induction, we find that integrin function is required from very early in metamorphosis until at least the last 24-48 hr of wing development.

  19. Ndae1 expression and regulation in Drosophila embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Florencia Tevy

    Full Text Available The construction and prediction of cell fate maps at the whole embryo level require the establishment of an accurate atlas of gene expression patterns throughout development and the identification of the corresponding cis-regulatory sequences. However, while the expression and regulation of genes encoding upstream developmental regulators such as transcription factors or signaling pathway components have been analyzed in detail, up to date the number of cis-regulatory sequences identified for downstream effector genes, like ion channels, pumps and exchangers, is very low. The control and regulation of ion homeostasis in each cell, including at blastoderm stages, are essential for normal embryonic development. In this study, we analyzed in detail the embryonic expression pattern and cis-regulatory modules of the Drosophila Na+-driven anion exchanger 1 (Ndae1 gene, involved in the regulation of pH homeostasis. We show that Ndae1 is expressed in a tight and complex spatial-temporal pattern. In particular, we report that this downstream effector gene is under the control of the canonical dorsal-ventral patterning cascade through dorsal, Toll, twist and snail at early embryogenesis. Moreover, we identify several cis-regulatory modules, some of which control discrete and non-overlapping aspects of endogenous gene expression throughout development.

  20. Ena drives invasive macrophage migration in Drosophila embryos.

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    Tucker, Philippa K; Evans, Iwan R; Wood, Will

    2011-01-01

    It is seldom the primary tumour that proves fatal in cancer, with metastasis the fundamental pathological process for disease progression. Upregulation of Mena, a member of the evolutionarily conserved Ena/VASP family of actin cytoskeletal regulators, promotes metastasis and invasive motility of breast cancer cells in vivo. To complement in vitro studies of Ena/VASP function in fibroblasts, we manipulated levels of Ena, the Drosophila homologue of Mena, in migrating embryonic macrophages (haemocytes). Consistent with data from fibroblasts in vitro, Ena localises to regions of actin dynamics within migrating haemocytes, stimulates lamellipodial dynamics and positively regulates the number and length of filopodia. However, whereas Ena overexpression in fibroblasts reduces migration speeds, overexpressing Ena in haemocytes leads to a dramatic increase in migration speeds, more closely resembling the increased motility of breast cancer cells that overexpress Mena. We provide evidence that this key difference is due to spatial constraints imposed on cells within the three-dimensional environment of the embryo; this might explain how Mena can be used to promote aggressive migratory behaviour during cancer progression.

  1. Stable, precise, and reproducible patterning of bicoid and hunchback molecules in the early Drosophila embryo.

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    Yurie Okabe-Oho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise patterning of morphogen molecules and their accurate reading out are of key importance in embryonic development. Recent experiments have visualized distributions of proteins in developing embryos and shown that the gradient of concentration of Bicoid morphogen in Drosophila embryos is established rapidly after fertilization and remains stable through syncytial mitoses. This stable Bicoid gradient is read out in a precise way to distribute Hunchback with small fluctuations in each embryo and in a reproducible way, with small embryo-to-embryo fluctuation. The mechanisms of such stable, precise, and reproducible patterning through noisy cellular processes, however, still remain mysterious. To address these issues, here we develop the one- and three-dimensional stochastic models of the early Drosophila embryo. The simulated results show that the fluctuation in expression of the hunchback gene is dominated by the random arrival of Bicoid at the hunchback enhancer. Slow diffusion of Hunchback protein, however, averages out this intense fluctuation, leading to the precise patterning of distribution of Hunchback without loss of sharpness of the boundary of its distribution. The coordinated rates of diffusion and transport of input Bicoid and output Hunchback play decisive roles in suppressing fluctuations arising from the dynamical structure change in embryos and those arising from the random diffusion of molecules, and give rise to the stable, precise, and reproducible patterning of Bicoid and Hunchback distributions.

  2. Dynamin regulates metaphase furrow formation and plasma membrane compartmentalization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

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    Richa Rikhy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The successive nuclear division cycles in the syncytial Drosophila embryo are accompanied by ingression and regression of plasma membrane furrows, which surround individual nuclei at the embryo periphery, playing a central role in embryo compartmentalization prior to cellularization. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle changes in dynamin localization and activity at the plasma membrane (PM regulate metaphase furrow formation and PM organization in the syncytial embryo. Dynamin was localized on short PM furrows during interphase, mediating endocytosis of PM components. Dynamin redistributed off ingressed PM furrows in metaphase, correlating with stabilized PM components and the associated actin regulatory machinery on long furrows. Acute inhibition of dynamin in the temperature sensitive shibire mutant embryo resulted in morphogenetic consequences in the syncytial division cycle. These included inhibition of metaphase furrow ingression, randomization of proteins normally polarized to intercap PM and disruption of the diffusion barrier separating PM domains above nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle changes in dynamin orchestrate recruitment of actin regulatory machinery for PM furrow dynamics during the early mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo.

  3. Dynamin regulates metaphase furrow formation and plasma membrane compartmentalization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

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    Rikhy, Richa; Mavrakis, Manos; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The successive nuclear division cycles in the syncytial Drosophila embryo are accompanied by ingression and regression of plasma membrane furrows, which surround individual nuclei at the embryo periphery, playing a central role in embryo compartmentalization prior to cellularization. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle changes in dynamin localization and activity at the plasma membrane (PM) regulate metaphase furrow formation and PM organization in the syncytial embryo. Dynamin was localized on short PM furrows during interphase, mediating endocytosis of PM components. Dynamin redistributed off ingressed PM furrows in metaphase, correlating with stabilized PM components and the associated actin regulatory machinery on long furrows. Acute inhibition of dynamin in the temperature sensitive shibire mutant embryo resulted in morphogenetic consequences in the syncytial division cycle. These included inhibition of metaphase furrow ingression, randomization of proteins normally polarized to intercap PM and disruption of the diffusion barrier separating PM domains above nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle changes in dynamin orchestrate recruitment of actin regulatory machinery for PM furrow dynamics during the early mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:25661871

  4. Fluorescently labeled inhibitors detect localized serine protease activities in Drosophila melanogaster pole cells, embryos, and ovarian egg chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus Kragh; Ono, S.; Powers, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    processes that they mediate. Until only recently, the tools to conveniently address the question of where and when serine proteases are active within complex tissues have been lacking. In order to detect spatially restricted serine protease activities in Drosophila embryos and ovaries we introduce...... activity localized to the oocyte-somatic follicle cell interface of the developing egg chamber. Our results suggest that this technique holds promise to identify new spatially restricted activities in adult Drosophila tissues and developing embryos....

  5. The endo-siRNA pathway is essential for robust development of the Drosophila embryo.

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    Elena M Lucchetta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Robustness to natural temperature fluctuations is critical to proper development in embryos and to cellular functions in adult organisms. However, mechanisms and pathways which govern temperature compensation remain largely unknown beyond circadian rhythms. Pathways which ensure robustness against temperature fluctuations may appear to be nonessential under favorable, uniform environmental conditions used in conventional laboratory experiments where there is little variation for which to compensate. The endo-siRNA pathway, which produces small double-stranded RNAs in Drosophila, appears to be nonessential for robust development of the embryo under ambient uniform temperature and to be necessary only for viral defense. Embryos lacking a functional endo-siRNA pathway develop into phenotypically normal adults. However, we hypothesized that small RNAs may regulate the embryo's response to temperature, as a ribonucleoprotein complex has been previously shown to mediate mammalian cell response to heat shock. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that the genes DICER-2 and ARGONAUTE2, which code for integral protein components of the endo-siRNA pathway, are essential for robust development and temperature compensation in the Drosophila embryo when exposed to temperature perturbations. The regulatory functions of DICER-2 and ARGONAUTE2 were uncovered by using microfluidics to expose developing Drosophila embryos to a temperature step, in which each half of the embryo develops at a different temperature through developmental cycle 14. Under this temperature perturbation, dicer-2 or argonaute2 embryos displayed abnormal segmentation. The abnormalities in segmentation are presumably due to the inability of the embryo to compensate for temperature-induced differences in rate of development and to coordinate developmental timing in the anterior and posterior halves. A deregulation of the length of nuclear division cycles 10-14 is also observed in

  6. On the mechanics of cardiac function of Drosophila embryo.

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    Wu, Mingming; Sato, Thomas N

    2008-01-01

    The heart is a vital organ that provides essential circulation throughout the body. Malfunction of cardiac pumping, thus, leads to serious and most of the times, to fatal diseases. Mechanics of cardiac pumping is a complex process, and many experimental and theoretical approaches have been undertaken to understand this process. We have taken advantage of the simplicity of the embryonic heart of an invertebrate, Drosophila melanogaster, to understand the fundamental mechanics of the beating heart. We applied a live imaging technique to the beating embryonic heart combined with analytical imaging tools to study the dynamic mechanics of the pumping. Furthermore, we have identified one mutant line that exhibits aberrant pumping mechanics. The Drosophila embryonic heart consists of only 104 cardiac cells forming a simple straight tube that can be easily accessed for real-time imaging. Therefore, combined with the wealth of available genetic tools, the embryonic Drosophila heart may serve as a powerful model system for studies of human heart diseases, such as arrhythmia and congenital heart diseases. We, furthermore, believe our mechanistic data provides important information that is useful for our further understanding of the design of biological structure and function and for engineering the pumps for medical uses.

  7. Maternal effect mutations of the sponge locus affect actin cytoskeletal rearrangements in Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    In the syncytial blastoderm stage of Drosophila embryogenesis, dome- shaped actin "caps" are observed above the interphase nuclei. During mitosis, this actin rearranges to participate in the formation of pseudocleavage furrows, transient membranous invaginations between dividing nuclei. Embryos laid by homozygous sponge mothers lack these characteristic actin structures, but retain other actin associated structures and processes. Our results indicate that the sponge product is specifically re...

  8. High resolution mapping of Twist to DNA in Drosophila embryos: Efficient functional analysis and evolutionary conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Ozdemir, Anil; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I.; Pepke, Shirley; Samanta, Manoj; Dunipace, Leslie; McCue, Kenneth; Zeng, Lucy; Ogawa, Nobuo; Wold, Barbara J; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) function by binding sequence specific transcription factors, but the relationship between in vivo physical binding and the regulatory capacity of factor-bound DNA elements remains uncertain. We investigate this relationship for the well-studied Twist factor in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by analyzing genome-wide factor occupancy and testing the functional significance of Twist occupied regions and motifs within regions. Twist ChIP-seq data efficiently identif...

  9. [A method for DNA template preparation using a single embryo].

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    Li, Jun-Feng; Li, Hai-Feng; Song, Yan-Hua; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Jia-Hua

    2005-09-01

    We established a simple method for the preparation of DNA template from a single oocyte or early embryo by KOH/DTT-Triton X disintegration. The PCR amplification efficiency of DNA template prepared by this method was compared with that prepared by TE-proteinase K. Single oocyte, 2-cell embryo, 8-cell embryo, morula or blastocyst were separately treated by KOH/DTT-Triton X, then the DNA template was directly used to amplify mitochondrial DNA segment by PCR. The overall PCR success rate of the 3 pairs of primers was 100% (70/70), while the overall PCR success rate of single oocyte treated by TE-proteinase K was 92.9% (65/70). Difference between the two results was significant (PDNA template of a single early embryo. It needed only one cycle of PCR amplification to get clear aimed DNA stripe and the efficiency was high enough to meet the need of early embryonic genetic material detection.

  10. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

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    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  11. Parallel imaging of Drosophila embryos for quantitative analysis of genetic perturbations of the Ras pathway

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    Yogesh Goyal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ras pathway patterns the poles of the Drosophila embryo by downregulating the levels and activity of a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor Capicua (Cic. We demonstrate that the spatiotemporal pattern of Cic during this signaling event can be harnessed for functional studies of mutations in the Ras pathway in human diseases. Our approach relies on a new microfluidic device that enables parallel imaging of Cic dynamics in dozens of live embryos. We found that although the pattern of Cic in early embryos is complex, it can be accurately approximated by a product of one spatial profile and one time-dependent amplitude. Analysis of these functions of space and time alone reveals the differential effects of mutations within the Ras pathway. Given the highly conserved nature of Ras-dependent control of Cic, our approach provides new opportunities for functional analysis of multiple sequence variants from developmental abnormalities and cancers.

  12. Drosophila embryos as model systems for monitoring bacterial infection in real time.

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    Isabella Vlisidou

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila embryos are well studied developmental microcosms that have been used extensively as models for early development and more recently wound repair. Here we extend this work by looking at embryos as model systems for following bacterial infection in real time. We examine the behaviour of injected pathogenic (Photorhabdus asymbiotica and non-pathogenic (Escherichia coli bacteria and their interaction with embryonic hemocytes using time-lapse confocal microscopy. We find that embryonic hemocytes both recognise and phagocytose injected wild type, non-pathogenic E. coli in a Dscam independent manner, proving that embryonic hemocytes are phagocytically competent. In contrast, injection of bacterial cells of the insect pathogen Photorhabdus leads to a rapid 'freezing' phenotype of the hemocytes associated with significant rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. This freezing phenotype can be phenocopied by either injection of the purified insecticidal toxin Makes Caterpillars Floppy 1 (Mcf1 or by recombinant E. coli expressing the mcf1 gene. Mcf1 mediated hemocyte freezing is shibire dependent, suggesting that endocytosis is required for Mcf1 toxicity and can be modulated by dominant negative or constitutively active Rac expression, suggesting early and unexpected effects of Mcf1 on the actin cytoskeleton. Together these data show how Drosophila embryos can be used to track bacterial infection in real time and how mutant analysis can be used to genetically dissect the effects of specific bacterial virulence factors.

  13. Mid-embryo patterning and precision in Drosophila segmentation: Kruppel dual regulation of hunchback.

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    David M Holloway

    Full Text Available In early development, genes are expressed in spatial patterns which later define cellular identities and tissue locations. The mechanisms of such pattern formation have been studied extensively in early Drosophila (fruit fly embryos. The gap gene hunchback (hb is one of the earliest genes to be expressed in anterior-posterior (AP body segmentation. As a transcriptional regulator for a number of downstream genes, the spatial precision of hb expression can have significant effects in the development of the body plan. To investigate the factors contributing to hb precision, we used fine spatial and temporal resolution data to develop a quantitative model for the regulation of hb expression in the mid-embryo. In particular, modelling hb pattern refinement in mid nuclear cleavage cycle 14 (NC14 reveals some of the regulatory contributions of simultaneously-expressed gap genes. Matching the model to recent data from wild-type (WT embryos and mutants of the gap gene Krüppel (Kr indicates that a mid-embryo Hb concentration peak important in thoracic development (at parasegment 4, PS4 is regulated in a dual manner by Kr, with low Kr concentration activating hb and high Kr concentration repressing hb. The processes of gene expression (transcription, translation, transport are intrinsically random. We used stochastic simulations to characterize the noise generated in hb expression. We find that Kr regulation can limit the positional variability of the Hb mid-embryo border. This has been recently corroborated in experimental comparisons of WT and Kr- mutant embryos. Further, Kr regulation can decrease uncertainty in mid-embryo hb expression (i.e. contribute to a smooth Hb boundary and decrease between-copy transcriptional variability within nuclei. Since many tissue boundaries are first established by interactions between neighbouring gene expression domains, these properties of Hb-Kr dynamics to diminish the effects of intrinsic expression noise may

  14. Wnt, Hedgehog and junctional Armadillo/beta-catenin establish planar polarity in the Drosophila embryo.

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    Pamela F Colosimo

    Full Text Available To generate specialized structures, cells must obtain positional and directional information. In multi-cellular organisms, cells use the non-canonical Wnt or planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathway to establish directionality within a cell. In vertebrates, several Wnt molecules have been proposed as permissible polarity signals, but none has been shown to provide a directional cue. While PCP signaling components are conserved from human to fly, no PCP ligands have been reported in Drosophila. Here we report that in the epidermis of the Drosophila embryo two signaling molecules, Hedgehog (Hh and Wingless (Wg or Wnt1, provide directional cues that induce the proper orientation of Actin-rich structures in the larval cuticle. We further find that proper polarity in the late embryo also involves the asymmetric distribution and phosphorylation of Armadillo (Arm or beta-catenin at the membrane and that interference with this Arm phosphorylation leads to polarity defects. Our results suggest new roles for Hh and Wg as instructive polarizing cues that help establish directionality within a cell sheet, and a new polarity-signaling role for the membrane fraction of the oncoprotein Arm.

  15. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

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    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates.

  16. Waves of Cdk1 Activity in S Phase Synchronize the Cell Cycle in Drosophila Embryos.

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    Deneke, Victoria E; Melbinger, Anna; Vergassola, Massimo; Di Talia, Stefano

    2016-08-22

    Embryos of most metazoans undergo rapid and synchronous cell cycles following fertilization. While diffusion is too slow for synchronization of mitosis across large spatial scales, waves of Cdk1 activity represent a possible process of synchronization. However, the mechanisms regulating Cdk1 waves during embryonic development remain poorly understood. Using biosensors of Cdk1 and Chk1 activities, we dissect the regulation of Cdk1 waves in the Drosophila syncytial blastoderm. We show that Cdk1 waves are not controlled by the mitotic switch but by a double-negative feedback between Cdk1 and Chk1. Using mathematical modeling and surgical ligations, we demonstrate a fundamental distinction between S phase Cdk1 waves, which propagate as active trigger waves in an excitable medium, and mitotic Cdk1 waves, which propagate as passive phase waves. Our findings show that in Drosophila embryos, Cdk1 positive feedback serves primarily to ensure the rapid onset of mitosis, while wave propagation is regulated by S phase events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualization of protein interactions in living Drosophila embryos by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay

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    Merabet Samir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions control the regulatory networks underlying developmental processes. The understanding of developmental complexity will, therefore, require the characterization of protein interactions within their proper environment. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC technology offers this possibility as it enables the direct visualization of protein interactions in living cells. However, its potential has rarely been applied in embryos of animal model organisms and was only performed under transient protein expression levels. Results Using a Hox protein partnership as a test case, we investigated the suitability of BiFC for the study of protein interactions in the living Drosophila embryo. Importantly, all BiFC parameters were established with constructs that were stably expressed under the control of endogenous promoters. Under these physiological conditions, we showed that BiFC is specific and sensitive enough to analyse dynamic protein interactions. We next used BiFC in a candidate interaction screen, which led to the identification of several Hox protein partners. Conclusion Our results establish the general suitability of BiFC for revealing and studying protein interactions in their physiological context during the rapid course of Drosophila embryonic development.

  18. Drosophila embryos as model to assess cellular and developmental toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT in living organisms.

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    Boyin Liu

    Full Text Available Different toxicity tests for carbon nanotubes (CNT have been developed to assess their impact on human health and on aquatic and terrestrial animal and plant life. We present a new model, the fruit fly Drosophila embryo offering the opportunity for rapid, inexpensive and detailed analysis of CNTs toxicity during embryonic development. We show that injected DiI labelled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs become incorporated into cells in early Drosophila embryos, allowing the study of the consequences of cellular uptake of CNTs on cell communication, tissue and organ formation in living embryos. Fluorescently labelled subcellular structures showed that MWCNTs remained cytoplasmic and were excluded from the nucleus. Analysis of developing ectodermal and neural stem cells in MWCNTs injected embryos revealed normal division patterns and differentiation capacity. However, an increase in cell death of ectodermal but not of neural stem cells was observed, indicating stem cell-specific vulnerability to MWCNT exposure. The ease of CNT embryo injections, the possibility of detailed morphological and genomic analysis and the low costs make Drosophila embryos a system of choice to assess potential developmental and cellular effects of CNTs and test their use in future CNT based new therapies including drug delivery.

  19. Human BMP sequences can confer normal dorsal-ventral patterning in the Drosophila embryo.

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    Padgett, R W; Wozney, J M; Gelbart, W M

    1993-04-01

    The type beta transforming growth factor family is composed of a series of processed, secreted growth factors, several of which have been implicated in important regulatory roles in cell determination, inductive interactions, and tissue differentiation. Among these factors, the sequence of the DPP protein from Drosophila is most similar to two of the vertebrate bone morphogenetic proteins, BMP2 and BMP4. Here we report that the human BMP4 ligand sequences can function in lieu of DPP in Drosophila embryos. We introduced the ligand region from human BMP4 into a genomic fragment of the dpp gene in place of the Drosophila ligand sequences and recovered transgenic flies by P-element transformation. We find that this chimeric dpp-BMP4 transgene can completely rescue the embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning defect of null dpp mutant genotypes. We infer that the chimeric DPP-BMP4 protein can be processed properly and, by analogy with the action of other family members, can activate the endogenous DPP receptor to carry out the events necessary for dorsal-ventral patterning. Our evidence suggests that the DPP-BMP4 signal transduction pathway has been functionally conserved for at least 600 million years.

  20. Medea SUMOylation restricts the signaling range of the Dpp morphogen in the Drosophila embryo.

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    Miles, Wayne O; Jaffray, Ellis; Campbell, Susan G; Takeda, Shugaku; Bayston, Laura J; Basu, Sanjay P; Li, Mingfa; Raftery, Laurel A; Ashe, Mark P; Hay, Ronald T; Ashe, Hilary L

    2008-09-15

    Morphogens are secreted signaling molecules that form concentration gradients and control cell fate in developing tissues. During development, it is essential that morphogen range is strictly regulated in order for correct cell type specification to occur. One of the best characterized morphogens is Drosophila Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a BMP signaling molecule that patterns the dorsal ectoderm of the embryo by activating the Mad and Medea (Med) transcription factors. We demonstrate that there is a spatial and temporal expansion of the expression patterns of Dpp target genes in SUMO pathway mutant embryos. We identify Med as the primary SUMOylation target in the Dpp pathway, and show that failure to SUMOylate Med leads to the increased Dpp signaling range observed in the SUMO pathway mutant embryos. Med is SUMO modified in the nucleus, and we provide evidence that SUMOylation triggers Med nuclear export. Hence, Med SUMOylation provides a mechanism by which nuclei can continue to monitor the presence of extracellular Dpp signal to activate target gene expression for an appropriate duration. Overall, our results identify an unusual strategy for regulating morphogen range that, rather than impacting on the morphogen itself, targets an intracellular transducer.

  1. The Atg1-Tor pathway regulates yolk catabolism in Drosophila embryos.

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    Kuhn, Hallie; Sopko, Richelle; Coughlin, Margaret; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Tim

    2015-11-15

    Yolk provides an important source of nutrients during the early development of oviparous organisms. It is composed mainly of vitellogenin proteins packed into membrane-bound compartments called yolk platelets. Catabolism of yolk is initiated by acidification of the yolk platelet, leading to the activation of Cathepsin-like proteinases, but it is unknown how this process is triggered. Yolk catabolism initiates at cellularization in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Using maternal shRNA technology we found that yolk catabolism depends on the Tor pathway and on the autophagy-initiating kinase Atg1. Whereas Atg1 was required for a burst of spatially regulated autophagy during late cellularization, autophagy was not required for initiating yolk catabolism. We propose that the conserved Tor metabolic sensing pathway regulates yolk catabolism, similar to Tor-dependent metabolic regulation on the lysosome.

  2. SWATH-MS dataset of heat-shock treated Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

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    Fabre, Bertrand; Korona, Dagmara; Nightingale, Daniel J H; Russell, Steven; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2016-12-01

    Data independent acquisition (DIA) has emerged as a promising mass spectrometry based approach, combining the advantages of shotgun and targeted proteomics. Here we applied a DIA approach (termed SWATH) to monitor the dynamics of the Drosophila melanogaster embryonic proteome upon heat-shock treatment. Embryos were incubated for 0.5, 1 or 3 h at 37 °C to induce heat-shock or maintained at 25 °C. The present dataset contains SWATH files acquired on a Sciex Triple-TOF 6600. A spectral library built in-house was used to analyse these data and led to the quantification of more than 2500 proteins at every timepoint. The files presented here are permanent digital maps and can be reanalysed to search for new questions. The data have been deposited with the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD004753.

  3. SWATH-MS dataset of heat-shock treated Drosophila melanogaster embryos

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    Bertrand Fabre

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Data independent acquisition (DIA has emerged as a promising mass spectrometry based approach, combining the advantages of shotgun and targeted proteomics. Here we applied a DIA approach (termed SWATH to monitor the dynamics of the Drosophila melanogaster embryonic proteome upon heat-shock treatment. Embryos were incubated for 0.5, 1 or 3 h at 37 °C to induce heat-shock or maintained at 25 °C. The present dataset contains SWATH files acquired on a Sciex Triple-TOF 6600. A spectral library built in-house was used to analyse these data and led to the quantification of more than 2500 proteins at every timepoint. The files presented here are permanent digital maps and can be reanalysed to search for new questions. The data have been deposited with the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD004753.

  4. Syndapin promotes pseudocleavage furrow formation by actin organization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo.

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    Sherlekar, Aparna; Rikhy, Richa

    2016-07-01

    Coordinated membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling activities are required for membrane extension in processes such as cytokinesis and syncytial nuclear division cycles in Drosophila Pseudocleavage furrow membranes in the syncytial Drosophila blastoderm embryo show rapid extension and retraction regulated by actin-remodeling proteins. The F-BAR domain protein Syndapin (Synd) is involved in membrane tubulation, endocytosis, and, uniquely, in F-actin stability. Here we report a role for Synd in actin-regulated pseudocleavage furrow formation. Synd localized to these furrows, and its loss resulted in short, disorganized furrows. Synd presence was important for the recruitment of the septin Peanut and distribution of Diaphanous and F-actin at furrows. Synd and Peanut were both absent in furrow-initiation mutants of RhoGEF2 and Diaphanous and in furrow-progression mutants of Anillin. Synd overexpression in rhogef2 mutants reversed its furrow-extension phenotypes, Peanut and Diaphanous recruitment, and F-actin organization. We conclude that Synd plays an important role in pseudocleavage furrow extension, and this role is also likely to be crucial in cleavage furrow formation during cell division.

  5. Overlapping functions of argonaute proteins in patterning and morphogenesis of Drosophila embryos.

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    Wibke J Meyer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Argonaute proteins are essential components of the molecular machinery that drives RNA silencing. In Drosophila, different members of the Argonaute family of proteins have been assigned to distinct RNA silencing pathways. While Ago1 is required for microRNA function, Ago2 is a crucial component of the RNA-induced silencing complex in siRNA-triggered RNA interference. Drosophila Ago2 contains an unusual amino-terminus with two types of imperfect glutamine-rich repeats (GRRs of unknown function. Here we show that the GRRs of Ago2 are essential for the normal function of the protein. Alleles with reduced numbers of GRRs cause specific disruptions in two morphogenetic processes associated with the midblastula transition: membrane growth and microtubule-based organelle transport. These defects do not appear to result from disruption of siRNA-dependent processes but rather suggest an interference of the mutant Ago2 proteins in an Ago1-dependent pathway. Using loss-of-function alleles, we further demonstrate that Ago1 and Ago2 act in a partially redundant manner to control the expression of the segment-polarity gene wingless in the early embryo. Our findings argue against a strict separation of Ago1 and Ago2 functions and suggest that these proteins act in concert to control key steps of the midblastula transition and of segmental patterning.

  6. Early development of Drosophila embryos requires Smc5/6 function during oogenesis.

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    Tran, Martin; Tsarouhas, Vasilios; Kegel, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Mutations in structural maintenance of chromosomes (Smc) proteins are frequently associated with chromosomal abnormalities commonly observed in developmental disorders. However, the role of Smc proteins in development still remains elusive. To investigate Smc5/6 function during early embryogenesis we examined smc5 and smc6 mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster using a combination of reverse genetics and microscopy approaches. Smc5/6 exhibited a maternally contributed function in maintaining chromosome stability during early embryo development, which manifested as female subfertility in its absence. Loss of Smc5/6 caused an arrest and a considerable delay in embryo development accompanied by fragmented nuclei and increased anaphase-bridge formation, respectively. Surprisingly, early embryonic arrest was attributable to the absence of Smc5/6 during oogenesis, which resulted in insufficient repair of pre-meiotic and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of Smc proteins in higher eukaryotic development by highlighting a maternal function in chromosome maintenance and a link between oogenesis and early embryogenesis.

  7. Early development of Drosophila embryos requires Smc5/6 function during oogenesis

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    Martin Tran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in structural maintenance of chromosomes (Smc proteins are frequently associated with chromosomal abnormalities commonly observed in developmental disorders. However, the role of Smc proteins in development still remains elusive. To investigate Smc5/6 function during early embryogenesis we examined smc5 and smc6 mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster using a combination of reverse genetics and microscopy approaches. Smc5/6 exhibited a maternally contributed function in maintaining chromosome stability during early embryo development, which manifested as female subfertility in its absence. Loss of Smc5/6 caused an arrest and a considerable delay in embryo development accompanied by fragmented nuclei and increased anaphase-bridge formation, respectively. Surprisingly, early embryonic arrest was attributable to the absence of Smc5/6 during oogenesis, which resulted in insufficient repair of pre-meiotic and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of Smc proteins in higher eukaryotic development by highlighting a maternal function in chromosome maintenance and a link between oogenesis and early embryogenesis.

  8. Mitigating phototoxicity during multiphoton microscopy of live Drosophila embryos in the 1.0-1.2 µm wavelength range.

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    Delphine Débarre

    Full Text Available Light-induced toxicity is a fundamental bottleneck in microscopic imaging of live embryos. In this article, after a review of photodamage mechanisms in cells and tissues, we assess photo-perturbation under illumination conditions relevant for point-scanning multiphoton imaging of live Drosophila embryos. We use third-harmonic generation (THG imaging of developmental processes in embryos excited by pulsed near-infrared light in the 1.0-1.2 µm range. We study the influence of imaging rate, wavelength, and pulse duration on the short-term and long-term perturbation of development and define criteria for safe imaging. We show that under illumination conditions typical for multiphoton imaging, photodamage in this system arises through 2- and/or 3-photon absorption processes and in a cumulative manner. Based on this analysis, we derive general guidelines for improving the signal-to-damage ratio in two-photon (2PEF/SHG or THG imaging by adjusting the pulse duration and/or the imaging rate. Finally, we report label-free time-lapse 3D THG imaging of gastrulating Drosophila embryos with sampling appropriate for the visualisation of morphogenetic movements in wild-type and mutant embryos, and long-term multiharmonic (THG-SHG imaging of development until hatching.

  9. Preferential genome targeting of the CBP co-activator by Rel and Smad proteins in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

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    Per-Henrik Holmqvist

    Full Text Available CBP and the related p300 protein are widely used transcriptional co-activators in metazoans that interact with multiple transcription factors. Whether CBP/p300 occupies the genome equally with all factors or preferentially binds together with some factors is not known. We therefore compared Drosophila melanogaster CBP (nejire ChIP-seq peaks with regions bound by 40 different transcription factors in early embryos, and we found high co-occupancy with the Rel-family protein Dorsal. Dorsal is required for CBP occupancy in the embryo, but only at regions where few other factors are present. CBP peaks in mutant embryos lacking nuclear Dorsal are best correlated with TGF-ß/Dpp-signaling and Smad-protein binding. Differences in CBP occupancy in mutant embryos reflect gene expression changes genome-wide, but CBP also occupies some non-expressed genes. The presence of CBP at silent genes does not result in histone acetylation. We find that Polycomb-repressed H3K27me3 chromatin does not preclude CBP binding, but restricts histone acetylation at CBP-bound genomic sites. We conclude that CBP occupancy in Drosophila embryos preferentially overlaps factors controlling dorso-ventral patterning and that CBP binds silent genes without causing histone hyperacetylation.

  10. Preferential Genome Targeting of the CBP Co-Activator by Rel and Smad Proteins in Early Drosophila melanogaster Embryos

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    Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Boija, Ann; Philip, Philge; Crona, Filip; Stenberg, Per; Mannervik, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    CBP and the related p300 protein are widely used transcriptional co-activators in metazoans that interact with multiple transcription factors. Whether CBP/p300 occupies the genome equally with all factors or preferentially binds together with some factors is not known. We therefore compared Drosophila melanogaster CBP (nejire) ChIP–seq peaks with regions bound by 40 different transcription factors in early embryos, and we found high co-occupancy with the Rel-family protein Dorsal. Dorsal is required for CBP occupancy in the embryo, but only at regions where few other factors are present. CBP peaks in mutant embryos lacking nuclear Dorsal are best correlated with TGF-ß/Dpp-signaling and Smad-protein binding. Differences in CBP occupancy in mutant embryos reflect gene expression changes genome-wide, but CBP also occupies some non-expressed genes. The presence of CBP at silent genes does not result in histone acetylation. We find that Polycomb-repressed H3K27me3 chromatin does not preclude CBP binding, but restricts histone acetylation at CBP-bound genomic sites. We conclude that CBP occupancy in Drosophila embryos preferentially overlaps factors controlling dorso-ventral patterning and that CBP binds silent genes without causing histone hyperacetylation. PMID:22737084

  11. CLOCK expression identifies developing circadian oscillator neurons in the brains of Drosophila embryos

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    Ng Fanny

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Drosophila circadian oscillator is composed of transcriptional feedback loops in which CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC heterodimers activate their feedback regulators period (per and timeless (tim via E-box mediated transcription. These feedback loop oscillators are present in distinct clusters of dorsal and lateral neurons in the adult brain, but how this pattern of expression is established during development is not known. Since CLK is required to initiate feedback loop function, defining the pattern of CLK expression in embryos and larvae will shed light on oscillator neuron development. Results A novel CLK antiserum is used to show that CLK expression in the larval CNS and adult brain is limited to circadian oscillator cells. CLK is initially expressed in presumptive small ventral lateral neurons (s-LNvs, dorsal neurons 2 s (DN2s, and dorsal neuron 1 s (DN1s at embryonic stage (ES 16, and this CLK expression pattern persists through larval development. PER then accumulates in all CLK-expressing cells except presumptive DN2s during late ES 16 and ES 17, consistent with the delayed accumulation of PER in adult oscillator neurons and antiphase cycling of PER in larval DN2s. PER is also expressed in non-CLK-expressing cells in the embryonic CNS starting at ES 12. Although PER expression in CLK-negative cells continues in ClkJrk embryos, PER expression in cells that co-express PER and CLK is eliminated. Conclusion These data demonstrate that brain oscillator neurons begin development during embryogenesis, that PER expression in non-oscillator cells is CLK-independent, and that oscillator phase is an intrinsic characteristic of brain oscillator neurons. These results define the temporal and spatial coordinates of factors that initiate Clk expression, imply that circadian photoreceptors are not activated until the end of embryogenesis, and suggest that PER functions in a different capacity before oscillator cell development is

  12. A gene expression atlas of a bicoid-depleted Drosophila embryo reveals early canalization of cell fate.

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    Staller, Max V; Fowlkes, Charless C; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-02-01

    In developing embryos, gene regulatory networks drive cells towards discrete terminal fates, a process called canalization. We studied the behavior of the anterior-posterior segmentation network in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by depleting a key maternal input, bicoid (bcd), and measuring gene expression patterns of the network at cellular resolution. This method results in a gene expression atlas containing the levels of mRNA or protein expression of 13 core patterning genes over six time points for every cell of the blastoderm embryo. This is the first cellular resolution dataset of a genetically perturbed Drosophila embryo that captures all cells in 3D. We describe the technical developments required to build this atlas and how the method can be employed and extended by others. We also analyze this novel dataset to characterize the degree and timing of cell fate canalization in the segmentation network. We find that in two layers of this gene regulatory network, following depletion of bcd, individual cells rapidly canalize towards normal cell fates. This result supports the hypothesis that the segmentation network directly canalizes cell fate, rather than an alternative hypothesis whereby cells are initially mis-specified and later eliminated by apoptosis. Our gene expression atlas provides a high resolution picture of a classic perturbation and will enable further computational modeling of canalization and gene regulation in this transcriptional network. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Function and dynamics of slam in furrow formation in early Drosophila embryo.

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    Acharya, Sreemukta; Laupsien, Philip; Wenzl, Christian; Yan, Shuling; Großhans, Jörg

    2014-02-15

    The Drosophila embryo undergoes a developmental transition in the blastoderm stage switching from syncytial to cellular development. The cleavage furrow, which encloses nuclei into cells, is a prominent morphological feature of this transition. It is not clear how the pattern of the furrow array is defined and how zygotic genes trigger the formation and invagination of interphase furrows. A key to these questions is provided by the gene slam, which has been previously implicated in controlling furrow invagination. Here we investigate the null phenotype of slam, the dynamics of Slam protein, and its control by the recycling endosome. We find that slam is essential for furrow invagination during cellularisation and together with nullo, for specification of the furrow. During cellularisation, Slam marks first the furrow, which is derived from the metaphase furrow of the previous mitosis. Slightly later, Slam accumulates at new furrows between daughter cells early in interphase. Slam is stably associated with the furrow canal except for the onset of cellularisation as revealed by FRAP experiments. Restriction of Slam to the furrow canal and Slam mobility during cellularisation is controlled by the recycling endosome and centrosomes. We propose a three step model. The retracting metaphase furrow leaves an initial mark. This mark and the border between corresponding daughter nuclei are refined by vesicular transport away from pericentrosomal recycling endosome towards the margins of the somatic buds. Following the onset of zygotic gene expression, Slam and Nullo together stabilise this mark and Slam triggers invagination of the cleavage furrow.

  14. A rapid, membrane-dependent pathway directs furrow formation through RalA in the early Drosophila embryo.

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    Holly, Ryan M; Mavor, Lauren M; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Blankenship, J Todd

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane furrow formation is crucial in cell division and cytokinesis. Furrow formation in early syncytial Drosophila embryos is exceptionally rapid, with furrows forming in as little as 3.75 min. Here, we use 4D imaging to identify furrow formation, stabilization, and regression periods, and identify a rapid, membrane-dependent pathway that is essential for plasma membrane furrow formation in vivo. Myosin II function is thought to provide the ingression force for cytokinetic furrows, but the role of membrane trafficking pathways in guiding furrow formation is less clear. We demonstrate that a membrane trafficking pathway centered on Ras-like protein A (RalA) is required for fast furrow ingression in the early fly embryo. RalA function is absolutely required for furrow formation and initiation. In the absence of RalA and furrow function, chromosomal segregation is aberrant and polyploid nuclei are observed. RalA localizes to syncytial furrows, and mediates the movement of exocytic vesicles to the plasma membrane. Sec5, which is an exocyst complex subunit and localizes to ingressing furrows in wild-type embryos, becomes punctate and loses its cortical association in the absence of RalA function. Rab8 also fails to traffic to the plasma membrane and accumulates aberrantly in the cytoplasm in RalA disrupted embryos. RalA localization precedes F-actin recruitment to the furrow tip, suggesting that membrane trafficking might function upstream of cytoskeletal remodeling. These studies identify a pathway, which stretches from Rab8 to RalA and the exocyst complex, that mediates rapid furrow formation in early Drosophila embryos.

  15. Signalling crosstalk at the leading edge controls tissue closure dynamics in the Drosophila embryo

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    Carballès, Fabrice; Parassol, Nadège; Schaub, Sébastien; Cérézo, Delphine; Noselli, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis relies on proper differentiation of morphogenetic domains, adopting specific cell behaviours. Yet, how signalling pathways interact to determine and coordinate these domains remains poorly understood. Dorsal closure (DC) of the Drosophila embryo represents a powerful model to study epithelial cell sheet sealing. In this process, JNK (JUN N-terminal Kinase) signalling controls leading edge (LE) differentiation generating local forces and cell shape changes essential for DC. The LE represents a key morphogenetic domain in which, in addition to JNK, a number of signalling pathways converges and interacts (anterior/posterior -AP- determination; segmentation genes, such as Wnt/Wingless; TGFβ/Decapentaplegic). To better characterize properties of the LE morphogenetic domain, we sought out new JNK target genes through a genomic approach: 25 were identified of which 8 are specifically expressed in the LE, similarly to decapentaplegic or puckered. Quantitative in situ gene profiling of this new set of LE genes reveals complex patterning of the LE along the AP axis, involving a three-way interplay between the JNK pathway, segmentation and HOX genes. Patterning of the LE into discrete domains appears essential for coordination of tissue sealing dynamics. Loss of anterior or posterior HOX gene function leads to strongly delayed and asymmetric DC, due to incorrect zipping in their respective functional domain. Therefore, in addition to significantly increasing the number of JNK target genes identified so far, our results reveal that the LE is a highly heterogeneous morphogenetic organizer, sculpted through crosstalk between JNK, segmental and AP signalling. This fine-tuning regulatory mechanism is essential to coordinate morphogenesis and dynamics of tissue sealing. PMID:28231245

  16. Comparative gene expression analysis of Dtg, a novel target gene of Dpp signaling pathway in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodar, Christian; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Travisany, Dante; Chacon, Carlos; Pino, Michael; Maass, Alejandro; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2014-02-10

    In the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo, Dpp, a secreted molecule that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors, activates a set of downstream genes to subdivide the dorsal region into amnioserosa and dorsal epidermis. Here, we examined the expression pattern and transcriptional regulation of Dtg, a new target gene of Dpp signaling pathway that is required for proper amnioserosa differentiation. We showed that the expression of Dtg was controlled by Dpp and characterized a 524-bp enhancer that mediated expression in the dorsal midline, as well as, in the differentiated amnioserosa in transgenic reporter embryos. This enhancer contained a highly conserved region of 48-bp in which bioinformatic predictions and in vitro assays identified three Mad binding motifs. Mutational analysis revealed that these three motifs were necessary for proper expression of a reporter gene in transgenic embryos, suggesting that short and highly conserved genomic sequences may be indicative of functional regulatory regions in D. melanogaster genes. Dtg orthologs were not detected in basal lineages of Dipterans, which unlike D. melanogaster develop two extra-embryonic membranes, amnion and serosa, nevertheless Dtg orthologs were identified in the transcriptome of Musca domestica, in which dorsal ectoderm patterning leads to the formation of a single extra-embryonic membrane. These results suggest that Dtg was recruited as a new component of the network that controls dorsal ectoderm patterning in the lineage leading to higher Cyclorrhaphan flies, such as D. melanogaster and M. domestica. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The presence of nuclear cactus in the early Drosophila embryo may extend the dynamic range of the dorsal gradient.

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    Michael D O'Connell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a developing embryo, the spatial distribution of a signaling molecule, or a morphogen gradient, has been hypothesized to carry positional information to pattern tissues. Recent measurements of morphogen distribution have allowed us to subject this hypothesis to rigorous physical testing. In the early Drosophila embryo, measurements of the morphogen Dorsal, which is a transcription factor responsible for initiating the earliest zygotic patterns along the dorsal-ventral axis, have revealed a gradient that is too narrow to pattern the entire axis. In this study, we use a mathematical model of Dorsal dynamics, fit to experimental data, to determine the ability of the Dorsal gradient to regulate gene expression across the entire dorsal-ventral axis. We found that two assumptions are required for the model to match experimental data in both Dorsal distribution and gene expression patterns. First, we assume that Cactus, an inhibitor that binds to Dorsal and prevents it from entering the nuclei, must itself be present in the nuclei. And second, we assume that fluorescence measurements of Dorsal reflect both free Dorsal and Cactus-bound Dorsal. Our model explains the dynamic behavior of the Dorsal gradient at lateral and dorsal positions of the embryo, the ability of Dorsal to regulate gene expression across the entire dorsal-ventral axis, and the robustness of gene expression to stochastic effects. Our results have a general implication for interpreting fluorescence-based measurements of signaling molecules.

  18. The Presence of Nuclear Cactus in the Early Drosophila Embryo May Extend the Dynamic Range of the Dorsal Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Michael D.; Reeves, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    In a developing embryo, the spatial distribution of a signaling molecule, or a morphogen gradient, has been hypothesized to carry positional information to pattern tissues. Recent measurements of morphogen distribution have allowed us to subject this hypothesis to rigorous physical testing. In the early Drosophila embryo, measurements of the morphogen Dorsal, which is a transcription factor responsible for initiating the earliest zygotic patterns along the dorsal-ventral axis, have revealed a gradient that is too narrow to pattern the entire axis. In this study, we use a mathematical model of Dorsal dynamics, fit to experimental data, to determine the ability of the Dorsal gradient to regulate gene expression across the entire dorsal-ventral axis. We found that two assumptions are required for the model to match experimental data in both Dorsal distribution and gene expression patterns. First, we assume that Cactus, an inhibitor that binds to Dorsal and prevents it from entering the nuclei, must itself be present in the nuclei. And second, we assume that fluorescence measurements of Dorsal reflect both free Dorsal and Cactus-bound Dorsal. Our model explains the dynamic behavior of the Dorsal gradient at lateral and dorsal positions of the embryo, the ability of Dorsal to regulate gene expression across the entire dorsal-ventral axis, and the robustness of gene expression to stochastic effects. Our results have a general implication for interpreting fluorescence-based measurements of signaling molecules. PMID:25879657

  19. Noncanonical compensation of zygotic X transcription in early Drosophila melanogaster development revealed through single-embryo RNA-seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Lott

    Full Text Available When Drosophila melanogaster embryos initiate zygotic transcription around mitotic cycle 10, the dose-sensitive expression of specialized genes on the X chromosome triggers a sex-determination cascade that, among other things, compensates for differences in sex chromosome dose by hypertranscribing the single X chromosome in males. However, there is an approximately 1 hour delay between the onset of zygotic transcription and the establishment of canonical dosage compensation near the end of mitotic cycle 14. During this time, zygotic transcription drives segmentation, cellularization, and other important developmental events. Since many of the genes involved in these processes are on the X chromosome, we wondered whether they are transcribed at higher levels in females and whether this might lead to sex-specific early embryonic patterning. To investigate this possibility, we developed methods to precisely stage, sex, and characterize the transcriptomes of individual embryos. We measured genome-wide mRNA abundance in male and female embryos at eight timepoints, spanning mitotic cycle 10 through late cycle 14, using polymorphisms between parental lines to distinguish maternal and zygotic transcription. We found limited sex-specific zygotic transcription, with a weak tendency for genes on the X to be expressed at higher levels in females. However, transcripts derived from the single X chromosome in males were more abundant that those derived from either X chromosome in females, demonstrating that there is widespread dosage compensation prior to the activation of the canonical MSL-mediated dosage compensation system. Crucially, this new system of early zygotic dosage compensation results in nearly identical transcript levels for key X-linked developmental regulators, including giant (gt, brinker (brk, buttonhead (btd, and short gastrulation (sog, in male and female embryos.

  20. Preparation of Drosophila S2 cells for Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Daniel W.; Nye, Jonathan; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The ideal experimental system would be cheap and easy to maintain, amenable to a variety of techniques, and would be supported by an extensive literature and genome sequence database. Cultured Drosophila S2 cells, the product of disassociated 20-24 hour old embryos1, possess all these properties. Consequently, S2 cells are extremely well-suited for the analysis of cellular processes, including the discovery of the genes encoding the molecular components of the process or mechanism of interest. The features of S2 cells that are most responsible for their utility are the ease with which they are maintained, their exquisite sensitivity to double-stranded (ds)RNA-mediated interference (RNAi), and their tractability to fluorescence microscopy as either live or fixed cells. S2 cells can be grown in a variety of media, including a number of inexpensive, commercially-available, fully-defined, serum-free media2. In addition, they grow optimally and quickly at 21-24°C and can be cultured in a variety of containers. Unlike mammalian cells, S2 cells do not require a regulated atmosphere, but instead do well with normal air and can even be maintained in sealed flasks. Complementing the ease of RNAi in S2 cells is the ability to readily analyze experimentally-induced phenotypes by phase or fluorescence microscopy of fixed or live cells. S2 cells grow in culture as a single monolayer but do not display contact inhibition. Instead, cells tend to grow in colonies in dense cultures. At low density, S2 cultures grown on glass or tissue culture-treated plastic are round and loosely-attached. However, the cytology of S2 cells can be greatly improved by inducing them to flatten extensively by briefly culturing them on a surface coated with the lectin, concanavalin A (ConA)3. S2 cells can also be stably transfected with fluorescently-tagged markers to label structures or organelles of interest in live or fixed cells. Therefore, the usual scenario for the microscopic analysis of cells is

  1. In vivo imaging and tracking of individual nanodiamonds in drosophila melanogaster embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, David A.; Thompson, Amelia J.; Kowarsky, Mark; Zeeshan, Nida F.; Barson, Michael S. J.; Hall, Liam T.; Yan, Yan; Kaufmann, Stefan; Johnson, Brett C.; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Scholten, Robert E.; Robert B Saint; Murray, Michael J.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we incorporate and image individual fluorescent nanodiamonds in the powerful genetic model system Drosophila melanogaster. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and wide-field imaging techniques are applied to individual fluorescent nanodiamonds in blastoderm cells during stage 5 of development, up to a depth of 40 µm. The majority of nanodiamonds in the blastoderm cells during cellularization exhibit free diffusion with an average diffusion coefficient of (6 ± 3) × 10−3 µm2/s, ...

  2. Loss of PTB or negative regulation of Notch mRNA reveals distinct zones of Notch and actin protein accumulation in Drosophila embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric S Wesley

    Full Text Available Polypyrimidine Tract Binding (PTB protein is a regulator of mRNA processing and translation. Genetic screens and studies of wing and bristle development during the post-embryonic stages of Drosophila suggest that it is a negative regulator of the Notch pathway. How PTB regulates the Notch pathway is unknown. Our studies of Drosophila embryogenesis indicate that (1 the Notch mRNA is a potential target of PTB, (2 PTB and Notch functions in the dorso-lateral regions of the Drosophila embryo are linked to actin regulation but not their functions in the ventral region, and (3 the actin-related Notch activity in the dorso-lateral regions might require a Notch activity at or near the cell surface that is different from the nuclear Notch activity involved in cell fate specification in the ventral region. These data raise the possibility that the Drosophila embryo is divided into zones of different PTB and Notch activities based on whether or not they are linked to actin regulation. They also provide clues to the almost forgotten role of Notch in cell adhesion and reveal a role for the Notch pathway in cell fusions.

  3. The pathology of embryo death caused by the male-killing Spiroplasma bacterium in Drosophila nebulosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraty Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited bacteria that kill male offspring, male-killers, are known to be common in insects, but little is understood about the mechanisms used by male-killing bacteria to kill males. In this paper we describe the tempo and changes that occur during male-killing by Spiroplasma bacteria in the host Drosophila nebulosa. Results Spiroplasma infected D. nebulosa males were developmentally retarded from 6–8 h into embryonic development at 25°C, and arrested at between stages 12 and 13 of embryogenesis (10–12 h. Dying males were characterized by a failure to form segments, and ultimately disintegration of the normal oval embryonic shape. Prior to death, dying males exhibited widespread apoptosis, as testified by TUNEL staining. Conclusion The Spiroplasma kills male Drosophila in a narrow developmental period, shortly after the formation of the host dosage compensation complex that is required for male-killing. Male death is preceded by widespread apoptosis, but it is uncertain if this is primary or secondary apoptosis.

  4. P-TEFb, the super elongation complex and mediator regulate a subset of non-paused genes during early Drosophila embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Dahlberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a kinase consisting of Cdk9 and Cyclin T that releases RNA Polymerase II (Pol II into active elongation. It can assemble into a larger Super Elongation Complex (SEC consisting of additional elongation factors. Here, we use a miRNA-based approach to knock down the maternal contribution of P-TEFb and SEC components in early Drosophila embryos. P-TEFb or SEC depletion results in loss of cells from the embryo posterior and in cellularization defects. Interestingly, the expression of many patterning genes containing promoter-proximal paused Pol II is relatively normal in P-TEFb embryos. Instead, P-TEFb and SEC are required for expression of some non-paused, rapidly transcribed genes in pre-cellular embryos, including the cellularization gene Serendipity-α. We also demonstrate that another P-TEFb regulated gene, terminus, has an essential function in embryo development. Similar morphological and gene expression phenotypes were observed upon knock down of Mediator subunits, providing in vivo evidence that P-TEFb, the SEC and Mediator collaborate in transcription control. Surprisingly, P-TEFb depletion does not affect the ratio of Pol II at the promoter versus the 3' end, despite affecting global Pol II Ser2 phosphorylation levels. Instead, Pol II occupancy is reduced at P-TEFb down-regulated genes. We conclude that a subset of non-paused, pre-cellular genes are among the most susceptible to reduced P-TEFb, SEC and Mediator levels in Drosophila embryos.

  5. The L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian is necessary for maintenance of sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo

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    Martin Veronica

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion molecules have long been implicated in the regulation of axon growth, but the precise cellular roles played by individual cell adhesion molecules and the molecular basis for their action are still not well understood. We have used the sensory system of the Drosophila embryo to shed light on the mechanism by which the L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian regulates axon growth. Results We have found a highly penetrant sensory axon stalling phenotype in neuroglian mutant embryos. Axons stalled at a variety of positions along their normal trajectory, but most commonly in the periphery some distance along the peripheral nerve. All lateral and dorsal cluster sensory neurons examined, except for the dorsal cluster neuron dbd, showed stalling. Sensory axons were never seen to project along inappropriate pathways in neuroglian mutants and stalled axons showed normal patterns of fasciculation within nerves. The growth cones of stalled axons possessed a simple morphology, similar to their appearance in wild-type embryos when advancing along nerves. Driving expression of the wild-type form of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone rescued the neuroglian mutant phenotype of both pioneering and follower neurons. A partial rescue was achieved by expressing the Neuroglian extracellular domain. Over/mis-expression of Neuroglian in all neurons, oenocytes or trachea had no apparent effect on sensory axon growth. Conclusion We conclude that Neuroglian is necessary to maintain axon advance along axonal substrates, but is not required for initiation of axon outgrowth, axon fasciculation or recognition of correct growth substrates. Expression of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone is sufficient to promote axon advance and the intracellular region of the molecule is largely dispensable for this function. It is unlikely, therefore, that Nrg acts as a molecular 'clutch' to couple adhesion of F-actin within the growth cone to the

  6. Spatial reorganization of the endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis relies on mitotic kinase cyclin A in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J; Mclaurin, Justin D; Eritano, Anthony S; Johnson, Brittany M; Sims, Amanda Q; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  7. Depleting Gene Activities in Early Drosophila Embryos with the “Maternal-Gal4–shRNA” System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Max V.; Yan, Dong; Randklev, Sakara; Bragdon, Meghan D.; Wunderlich, Zeba B.; Tao, Rong; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; DePace, Angela H.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In a developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo, mRNAs have a maternal origin, a zygotic origin, or both. During the maternal–zygotic transition, maternal products are degraded and gene expression comes under the control of the zygotic genome. To interrogate the function of mRNAs that are both maternally and zygotically expressed, it is common to examine the embryonic phenotypes derived from female germline mosaics. Recently, the development of RNAi vectors based on short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) effective during oogenesis has provided an alternative to producing germline clones. Here, we evaluate the efficacies of: (1) maternally loaded shRNAs to knockdown zygotic transcripts and (2) maternally loaded Gal4 protein to drive zygotic shRNA expression. We show that, while Gal4-driven shRNAs in the female germline very effectively generate phenotypes for genes expressed maternally, maternally loaded shRNAs are not very effective at generating phenotypes for early zygotic genes. However, maternally loaded Gal4 protein is very efficient at generating phenotypes for zygotic genes expressed during mid-embryogenesis. We apply this powerful and simple method to unravel the embryonic functions of a number of pleiotropic genes. PMID:23105012

  8. Depleting gene activities in early Drosophila embryos with the "maternal-Gal4-shRNA" system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Max V; Yan, Dong; Randklev, Sakara; Bragdon, Meghan D; Wunderlich, Zeba B; Tao, Rong; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Depace, Angela H; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In a developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo, mRNAs have a maternal origin, a zygotic origin, or both. During the maternal-zygotic transition, maternal products are degraded and gene expression comes under the control of the zygotic genome. To interrogate the function of mRNAs that are both maternally and zygotically expressed, it is common to examine the embryonic phenotypes derived from female germline mosaics. Recently, the development of RNAi vectors based on short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) effective during oogenesis has provided an alternative to producing germline clones. Here, we evaluate the efficacies of: (1) maternally loaded shRNAs to knockdown zygotic transcripts and (2) maternally loaded Gal4 protein to drive zygotic shRNA expression. We show that, while Gal4-driven shRNAs in the female germline very effectively generate phenotypes for genes expressed maternally, maternally loaded shRNAs are not very effective at generating phenotypes for early zygotic genes. However, maternally loaded Gal4 protein is very efficient at generating phenotypes for zygotic genes expressed during mid-embryogenesis. We apply this powerful and simple method to unravel the embryonic functions of a number of pleiotropic genes.

  9. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  10. From Embryo to Adult: piRNA-Mediated Silencing throughout Germline Development in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Pauline P.; Ronsseray, Stéphane; Boivin, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    In metazoan germ cells, transposable element activity is repressed by small noncoding PIWI-associated RNAs (piRNAs). Numerous studies in Drosophila have elucidated the mechanism of this repression in the adult germline. However, when and how transposable element repression is established during germline development has not been addressed. Here, we show that homology-dependent trans silencing is active in female primordial germ cells from late embryogenesis through pupal stages, and that genes related to the adult piRNA pathway are required for silencing during development. In larval gonads, we detect rhino-dependent piRNAs indicating de novo biogenesis of functional piRNAs during development. Those piRNAs exhibit the molecular signature of the “ping-pong” amplification step. Moreover, we show that Heterochromatin Protein 1a is required for the production of piRNAs coming from telomeric transposable elements. Furthermore, as in adult ovaries, incomplete, bimodal, and stochastic repression resembling variegation can occur at all developmental stages. Clonal analysis indicates that the repression status established in embryonic germ cells is maintained until the adult stage, suggesting the implication of a cellular memory mechanism. Taken together, data presented here show that piRNAs and their associated proteins are epigenetic components of a continuous repression system throughout germ cell development. PMID:27932388

  11. From Embryo to Adult: piRNA-Mediated Silencing throughout Germline Development in Drosophila

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    Pauline P. Marie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In metazoan germ cells, transposable element activity is repressed by small noncoding PIWI-associated RNAs (piRNAs. Numerous studies in Drosophila have elucidated the mechanism of this repression in the adult germline. However, when and how transposable element repression is established during germline development has not been addressed. Here, we show that homology-dependent trans silencing is active in female primordial germ cells from late embryogenesis through pupal stages, and that genes related to the adult piRNA pathway are required for silencing during development. In larval gonads, we detect rhino-dependent piRNAs indicating de novo biogenesis of functional piRNAs during development. Those piRNAs exhibit the molecular signature of the “ping-pong” amplification step. Moreover, we show that Heterochromatin Protein 1a is required for the production of piRNAs coming from telomeric transposable elements. Furthermore, as in adult ovaries, incomplete, bimodal, and stochastic repression resembling variegation can occur at all developmental stages. Clonal analysis indicates that the repression status established in embryonic germ cells is maintained until the adult stage, suggesting the implication of a cellular memory mechanism. Taken together, data presented here show that piRNAs and their associated proteins are epigenetic components of a continuous repression system throughout germ cell development.

  12. The Toll pathway is required in the epidermis for muscle development in the Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, M. S.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Toll signaling pathway functions in several Drosophila processes, including dorsal-ventral pattern formation and the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway is required in the epidermis for proper muscle development. Previously, we showed that the zygotic Toll protein is necessary for normal muscle development; in the absence of zygotic Toll, close to 50% of hemisegments have muscle patterning defects consisting of missing, duplicated and misinserted muscle fibers (Halfon, M.S., Hashimoto, C., and Keshishian, H., Dev. Biol. 169, 151-167, 1995). We have now also analyzed the requirements for easter, spatzle, tube, and pelle, all of which function in the Toll-mediated dorsal-ventral patterning pathway. We find that spatzle, tube, and pelle, but not easter, are necessary for muscle development. Mutations in these genes give a phenotype identical to that seen in Toll mutants, suggesting that elements of the same pathway used for Toll signaling in dorsal-ventral development are used during muscle development. By expressing the Toll cDNA under the control of distinct Toll enhancer elements in Toll mutant flies, we have examined the spatial requirements for Toll expression during muscle development. Expression of Toll in a subset of epidermal cells that includes the epidermal muscle attachment cells, but not Toll expression in the musculature, is necessary for proper muscle development. Our results suggest that signals received by the epidermis early during muscle development are an important part of the muscle patterning process.

  13. Effect of Adding Human Chorionic Gonadotropin to The Endometrial Preparation Protocol in Frozen Embryo Transfer Cycles

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    Maryam Eftekhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, one of the initial embryonic signals, isprobably a major regulator of the embryo-endometrial relationship. This study aims to assess theadvantage of HCG supplementation during the secretory phase of hormonally prepared cycles forthe transfer of cryopreserved-thawed embryos.Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. Infertile women who werecandidates for frozen-thawed embryo transfers entered the study and were divided into two groups,HCG and control. The endometrial preparation method was similar in both groups: all women receivedestradiol valerate (6 mg po per day from the second day of the menstrual cycle and progesteronein oil (100 mg intramuscular (I.M. when the endometrial thickness reached 8 mm. Estradiol andprogesterone were continued until the tenth week of gestation. In the HCG group, patients received anHCG 5000 IU injection on the first day of progesterone administration and the day of embryo transfer.Results: In this study, 130 couples participated: 65 in the HCG group and 65 in the control group.There was no statistically significant difference between groups regarding basic characteristics.Implantation rate, chemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, and abortion rateswere similar in both groups.Conclusion: Although HCG has some advantages in assisted reproductive technology (ARTcycles, our study did not show any benefit of HCG supplementation during the secretory phase offrozen cycles (Registration Number: IRCT201107266420N4.

  14. Cellular resolution models for even skipped regulation in the entire Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilsley, Garth R; Fisher, Jasmin; Apweiler, Rolf; DePace, Angela H; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional control ensures genes are expressed in the right amounts at the correct times and locations. Understanding quantitatively how regulatory systems convert input signals to appropriate outputs remains a challenge. For the first time, we successfully model even skipped (eve) stripes 2 and 3+7 across the entire fly embryo at cellular resolution. A straightforward statistical relationship explains how transcription factor (TF) concentrations define eve’s complex spatial expression, without the need for pairwise interactions or cross-regulatory dynamics. Simulating thousands of TF combinations, we recover known regulators and suggest new candidates. Finally, we accurately predict the intricate effects of perturbations including TF mutations and misexpression. Our approach imposes minimal assumptions about regulatory function; instead we infer underlying mechanisms from models that best fit the data, like the lack of TF-specific thresholds and the positional value of homotypic interactions. Our study provides a general and quantitative method for elucidating the regulation of diverse biological systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00522.001 PMID:23930223

  15. Embryo-larval exposure to atrazine reduces viability and alters oxidative stress parameters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Fernanda Hernandes; Aguiar, Lais Mattos de; Rosa, Carlos Eduardo da

    2017-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine has been used worldwide with subsequent residual contamination of water and food, which may cause adverse effects on non-target organisms. Animal exposure to this herbicide may affect development, reproduction and energy metabolism. Here, the effects of atrazine regarding survival and redox metabolism were assessed in the fruit fly D. melanogaster exposed during embryonic and larval development. The embryos (newly fertilized eggs) were exposed to different atrazine concentrations (10μM and 100μM) in the diet until the adult fly emerged. Pupation and emergence rates, developmental time and sex ratio were determined as well as oxidative stress parameters and gene expression of the antioxidant defence system were evaluated in newly emerged male and female flies. Atrazine exposure reduced pupation and emergence rates in fruit flies without alterations to developmental time and sex ratio. Different redox imbalance patterns were observed between males and females exposed to atrazine. Atrazine caused an increase in oxidative damage, reactive oxygen species generation and antioxidant capacity and decreased thiol-containing molecules. Further, atrazine exposure altered the mRNA expression of antioxidant genes (keap1, sod, sod2, cat, irc, gss, gclm, gclc, trxt, trxr-1 and trxr-2). Reductions in fruit fly larval and pupal viability observed here are likely consequences of the oxidative stress induced by atrazine exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Time-lapse cinematography in living Drosophila tissues: preparation of material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ilan; Parton, Richard M

    2006-11-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been an extraordinarily successful model organism for studying the genetic basis of development and evolution. It is arguably the best-understood complex multicellular model system, owing its success to many factors. Recent developments in imaging techniques, in particular sophisticated fluorescence microscopy methods and equipment, now allow cellular events to be studied at high resolution in living material. This ability has enabled the study of features that tend to be lost or damaged by fixation, such as transient or dynamic events. Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila are shared with the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties in keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick hazy cytoplasm. This protocol outlines the preparation of major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping them alive.

  17. Microdrop preparation factors influence culture-media osmolality, which can impair mouse embryo preimplantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J E; Cabrera, L; Xu, X; Smith, G D

    2012-02-01

    Because media osmolality can impact embryo development, the effect of conditions during microdrop preparation on osmolality was examined. Various sizes of microdrops were prepared under different laboratory conditions. Drops were pipetted directly onto a dish and covered by oil (standard method) or pipetted on the dish, overlaid with oil before removing the underlying media and replaced with fresh media (wash-drop method). Drops were made at 23°C or on a heated stage (37°C) and with or without airflow. Osmolality was assessed at 5 min and 24h. The biological impact of osmolality change was demonstrated by culturing 1-cell mouse embryos in media with varying osmolality. Reduced drop volume, increased temperature and standard method were associated with a significant increase in osmolality at both 5 min and 24h (P-values media with elevated osmolality (>310mOsm/kg; P<0.05). Procedures in the IVF laboratory can alter osmolality and impact embryo development.

  18. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Garcia

    Full Text Available The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind, a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box" present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh, a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator and Cic (repressor may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  19. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mayra; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind), a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box") present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh), a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic) also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator) and Cic (repressor) may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  20. Flat mount preparation for observation and analysis of zebrafish embryo specimens stained by whole mount in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christina N; Li, Yue; Marra, Amanda N; Verdun, Valerie; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2014-07-17

    The zebrafish embryo is now commonly used for basic and biomedical research to investigate the genetic control of developmental processes and to model congenital abnormalities. During the first day of life, the zebrafish embryo progresses through many developmental stages including fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, segmentation, and the organogenesis of structures such as the kidney, heart, and central nervous system. The anatomy of a young zebrafish embryo presents several challenges for the visualization and analysis of the tissues involved in many of these events because the embryo develops in association with a round yolk mass. Thus, for accurate analysis and imaging of experimental phenotypes in fixed embryonic specimens between the tailbud and 20 somite stage (10 and 19 hours post fertilization (hpf), respectively), such as those stained using whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH), it is often desirable to remove the embryo from the yolk ball and to position it flat on a glass slide. However, performing a flat mount procedure can be tedious. Therefore, successful and efficient flat mount preparation is greatly facilitated through the visual demonstration of the dissection technique, and also helped by using reagents that assist in optimal tissue handling. Here, we provide our WISH protocol for one or two-color detection of gene expression in the zebrafish embryo, and demonstrate how the flat mounting procedure can be performed on this example of a stained fixed specimen. This flat mounting protocol is broadly applicable to the study of many embryonic structures that emerge during early zebrafish development, and can be implemented in conjunction with other staining methods performed on fixed embryo samples.

  1. A functional genomic screen combined with time-lapse microscopy uncovers a novel set of genes involved in dorsal closure of Drosophila embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Jankovics

    Full Text Available Morphogenesis, the establishment of the animal body, requires the coordinated rearrangement of cells and tissues regulated by a very strictly-determined genetic program. Dorsal closure of the epithelium in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo is one of the best models for such a complex morphogenetic event. To explore the genetic regulation of dorsal closure, we carried out a large-scale RNA interference-based screen in combination with in vivo time-lapse microscopy and identified several genes essential for the closure or affecting its dynamics. One of the novel dorsal closure genes, the small GTPase activator pebble (pbl, was selected for detailed analysis. We show that pbl regulates actin accumulation and protrusion dynamics in the leading edge of the migrating epithelial cells. In addition, pbl affects dorsal closure dynamics by regulating head involution, a morphogenetic process mechanically coupled with dorsal closure. Finally, we provide evidence that pbl is involved in closure of the adult thorax, suggesting its general requirement in epithelial closure processes.

  2. The core planar cell polarity gene prickle interacts with flamingo to promote sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkusich, Eli M; Flanagan, Dustin J; Whitington, Paul M

    2011-10-01

    The atypical cadherin Drosophila protein Flamingo and its vertebrate homologues play widespread roles in the regulation of both dendrite and axon growth. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that underpin these functions. Whereas flamingo interacts with a well-defined group of genes in regulating planar cell polarity, previous studies have uncovered little evidence that the other core planar cell polarity genes are involved in regulation of neurite growth. We present data in this study showing that the planar cell polarity gene prickle interacts with flamingo in regulating sensory axon advance at a key choice point - the transition between the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system. The cytoplasmic tail of the Flamingo protein is not required for this interaction. Overexpression of another core planar cell polarity gene dishevelled produces a similar phenotype to prickle mutants, suggesting that this gene may also play a role in regulation of sensory axon advance.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of chicken embryo-adapted fowl adenovirus serotype 4 vaccine in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Muhammad Khalid; Hussain, Iftikhar; Arshad, Muhammad; Muhammad, Ghulam

    2011-02-01

    The current study was planned to develop an efficient vaccine against hydropericardium syndrome virus (HSV). Currently, formalin-inactivated liver organ vaccines failed to protect the Pakistan broiler industry from this destructive disease of economic importance. A field isolate of the pathogenic hydropericardium syndrome virus was adapted to chicken embryos after four blind passages. The chicken embryo-adapted virus was further serially passaged (12 times) to get complete attenuation. Groups of broiler chickens free from maternal antibodies against HSV at the age of 14 days were immunized either with 16th passage attenuated HSV vaccine or commercially formalized liver organ vaccine. The antibody response, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was significantly higher (P chickens in each group were challenged with 10(3.83) embryo infectious dose(50) of pathogenic HSV and were observed for 7 days post-challenge. Vaccination with the 16th passage attenuated HSV gave 94.73% protection as validated on the basis of clinical signs (5.26%), gross lesions in the liver and heart (5.26%), histopathological lesions in the liver (1.5 ± 0.20), and mortality (5.26%). The birds inoculated with liver organ vaccine showed significantly low (p chickens.

  4. Isolation of Drosophila egg chambers for imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an important model for basic research into the molecular mechanisms underlying cell function and development, as well as a major biomedical research tool. A significant advantage of Drosophila is the ability to apply live cell imaging to a variety of living tissues that can be dissected and imaged in vivo, ex vivo, or in vitro. Drosophila egg chambers, for example, have proven to be a useful model system for studying border cell migration, Golgi unit transport, the rapid movement of mRNA and protein particles, and the role of microtubules in meiosis and oocyte differentiation. A crucial first step before imaging is preparation of the experimental material to ensure physiological relevance and to achieve the best conditions for image quality. Early- to mid-stage egg chambers cannot be mounted in an aqueous-based medium, because this causes a change in microtubule organization and follicle cell morphology. Such egg chambers survive better in Halocarbon oil, which allows free diffusion of oxygen, has low viscosity, and thus prevents dehydration and hypoxia. With a refractive index similar to glycerol, Halocarbon oil also has good optical properties for imaging. It also provides a good environment for injection and is particularly useful for long-term imaging of embryos. However, unlike with aqueous solutions, changes in the medium are not possible. This protocol describes the isolation of Drosophila egg chambers.

  5. Culture systems: embryo density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Embryo density is defined as the embryo-to-volume ratio achieved during in vitro culture; in other words, it is the number of embryos in a defined volume of culture medium. The same density can be achieved by manipulating either the number of embryos in a given volume of medium, or manipulating the volume of the medium for a given number of embryos: for example, a microdrop with five embryos in a 50 μl volume under oil has the same embryo-to-volume ratio (1:10 μl) as a microdrop with one embryo in a 10 μl volume under oil (1:10 μl). Increased embryo density can improve mammalian embryo development in vitro; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect may be different with respect to which method is used to increase embryo density.Standard, flat sterile plastic petri dishes are the most common, traditional platform for embryo culture. Microdrops under a mineral oil overlay can be prepared to control embryo density, but it is critical that dish preparation is consistent, where appropriate techniques are applied to prevent microdrop dehydration during preparation, and results of any data collection are reliable, and repeatable. There are newer dishes available from several manufacturers that are specifically designed for embryo culture; most are readily available for use with human embryos. The concept behind these newer dishes relies on fabrication of conical and smaller volume wells into the dish design, so that embryos rest at the lowest point in the wells, and where putative embryotrophic factors may concentrate.Embryo density is not usually considered by the embryologist as a technique in and of itself; rather, the decision to culture embryos in groups or individually is protocol-driven, and is based more on convenience or the need to collect data on individual embryos. Embryo density can be controlled, and as such, it can be utilized as a simple, yet effective tool to improve in vitro development of human embryos.

  6. Tissue-specific direct microtransfer of nanomaterials into Drosophila embryos as a versatile in vivo test bed for nanomaterial toxicity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Alvarez S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sasha Vega-Alvarez,1 Adriana Herrera,2 Carlos Rinaldi,2–4 Franklin A Carrero-Martínez1,5 1Department of Biology, 2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico; 3J Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 5Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, Puerto Rico Abstract: Nanomaterials are the subject of intense research, focused on their synthesis, modification, and biomedical applications. Increased nanomaterial production and their wide range of applications imply a higher risk of human and environmental exposure. Unfortunately, neither environmental effects nor toxicity of nanomaterials to organisms are fully understood. Cost-effective, rapid toxicity assays requiring minimal amounts of materials are needed to establish both their biomedical potential and environmental safety standards. Drosophila exemplifies an efficient and cost-effective model organism with a vast repertoire of in vivo tools and techniques, all with high-throughput scalability and screening feasibility throughout its life cycle. Here we report tissue specific nanomaterial assessment through direct microtransfer into target tissues. We tested several nanomaterials with potential biomedical applications such as single-wall carbon nanotubes, multiwall carbon nanotubes, silver, gold, titanium dioxide, and iron oxide nanoparticles. Assessment of nanomaterial toxicity was conducted by evaluating progression through developmental morphological milestones in Drosophila. This cost-effective assessment method is amenable to high-throughput screening. Keywords: nanotoxicity, Drosophila, microtransfer, nanoparticle, iron oxide, silver, gold, titanium dioxide, carbon nanotube

  7. Embryo splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Illmensee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian embryo splitting has successfully been established in farm animals. Embryo splitting is safely and efficiently used for assisted reproduction in several livestock species. In the mouse, efficient embryo splitting as well as single blastomere cloning have been developed in this animal system. In nonhuman primates embryo splitting has resulted in several pregnancies. Human embryo splitting has been reported recently. Microsurgical embryo splitting under Institutional Review Board approval has been carried out to determine its efficiency for blastocyst development. Embryo splitting at the 6–8 cell stage provided a much higher developmental efficiency compared to splitting at the 2–5 cell stage. Embryo splitting may be advantageous for providing additional embryos to be cryopreserved and for patients with low response to hormonal stimulation in assisted reproduction programs. Social and ethical issues concerning embryo splitting are included regarding ethics committee guidelines. Prognostic perspectives are presented for human embryo splitting in reproductive medicine.

  8. myFX: a turn-key software for laboratory desktops to analyze spatial patterns of gene expression in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Ivan; Konikoff, Charlotte; Braun, Bremen; Packard, Mary; Gramates, Sian L; Sun, Qian; Ye, Jieping; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-05-01

    Spatial patterns of gene expression are of key importance in understanding developmental networks. Using in situ hybridization, many laboratories are generating images to describe these spatial patterns and to test biological hypotheses. To facilitate such analyses, we have developed biologist-centric software (myFX) that contains computational methods to automatically process and analyze images depicting embryonic gene expression in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. It facilitates creating digital descriptions of spatial patterns in images and enables measurements of pattern similarity and visualization of expression across genes and developmental stages. myFX interacts directly with the online FlyExpress database, which allows users to search thousands of existing patterns to find co-expressed genes by image comparison.

  9. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy [Department of Biochemistry, Central Leather Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chennai 600020 (India); Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara [Bioproducts Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020 (India); Sathish Kumar, Muniram [Department of Pharmaceutics, Anna University, Trichy, Tamilnadu (India); Dinesh, Murugan Girija [Thanthai Hansroever College, Perambalur, Tamilnadu (India); Kannappan, Sudalyandi [Central Institute of Brackish Water Aquaculture, Chennai 600028 (India); Suguna, Lonchin, E-mail: slonchin@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Biochemistry, Central Leather Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chennai 600020 (India)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ► Can be used as drug delivery system. ► Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ► More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  10. Cappuccino, a Drosophila maternal effect gene required for polarity of the egg and embryo, is related to the vertebrate limb deformity locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, S; Phan, H; Calley, J; Chen, W; James, B; Manseau, L

    1995-10-15

    We report the molecular isolation of cappuccino (capu), a gene required for localization of molecular determinants within the developing Drosophila oocyte. The carboxy-terminal half of the capu protein is closely related to that of the vertebrate limb deformity locus, which is known to function in polarity determination in the developing vertebrate limb. In addition, capu shares both a proline-rich region and a 70-amino-acid domain with a number of other genes, two of which also function in pattern formation, the Saccharomyes cerevisiae BNI1 gene and the Aspergillus FigA gene. We also show that capu mutant oocytes have abnormal microtubule distributions and premature microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming within the oocyte, but that neither the speed nor the timing of the cytoplasmic streaming correlates with the strength of the mutant allele. This suggests that the premature cytoplasmic streaming in capu mutant oocytes does not suffice to explain the patterning defects. By inducing cytoplasmic streaming in wild-type oocytes during mid-oogenesis, we show that premature cytoplasmic streaming can displace staufen protein from the posterior pole, but not gurken mRNA from around the oocyte nucleus.

  11. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haralalka, Shruti [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Abmayr, Susan M., E-mail: sma@stowers.org [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 66160 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  12. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors...

  13. The Optimization of Preparating Conditions on Pig ICSI Embryos%猪ICSI胚胎制备条件的优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立苹; 刘西梅; 李莉; 肖红卫; 华文君; 毕延震; 郑新民

    2016-01-01

    为了进一步优化猪胞浆内单精子注射(intracytoplasmic sperm injection,ICSI)胚胎制备条件,本试验将Piezo操作系统应用于猪 ICSI 胚胎制备过程中,并以胚胎各阶段存活率、分裂率和囊胚率作为衡量指标,对比 Piezo操作系统与传统斜口针操作、Piezo 操作条件时操作液中添加 CB 浓度、操作台温度及精子的不同处理方法对猪ICSI胚胎发育的影响。结果表明,Piezo 操作系统可以显著提高注射卵的存活率和卵裂率(P <0.05),但对囊胚率没有显著影响(P >0.05);利用 Piezo 进行猪 ICSI 时,操作液中添加 CB,可以减少显微操作时注射针卵母细胞的损伤,其中以7.5μg/mL CB 效果最佳;操作台温度30℃最适合制备猪 ICSI 胚胎;精子预先进行超声波断尾处理对猪 ICSI 胚胎的早期发育无显著影响。研究结果表明,精子预先进行超声波断尾处理后,操作液中添加7.5μg/mL CB、操作台温度30℃,应用 Piezo 操作系统比较适合猪 ICSI 胚胎制备。%In order to optimize the preparating conditions on pig intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)embryos,the Piezo operating system was used in this experiment and the embryonic sur-vival rate,cleavage rate and cell numbers of blastocysts developed in various stages were measured as traditional and Piezo operating system,the concentration of CB,the operating temperature with Piezo operating system and different sperm processing method in preparating pig ICSI embryos. The results showed that Piezo operating system could significantly improve the survival rate and cleavage rate of injected oocytes (P <0.05),but there was no significant effect on blastocyst rate. There was a slight damage to oocyte added CB in the operating fluid,and adding 7.5 μg/mL CB was most concentration,30 ℃ was most appropriate operating temperature,but there was no sig-nificant effect of early development on pig ICSI embryos with breaking sperm tail with ultrasonic wave

  14. P element excision in drosophila melanogaster and related drosophilids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The frequency of P element excision and the structure of the resulting excision products were determined in three drosophilid species, Drosophila melanogaster, D. virilis, and Chymomyza procnemis. A transient P element mobility assay was conducted in the cells of developing insect embryos, but unlik...

  15. Requirement for Pak3 in Rac1-induced organization of actin and myosin during Drosophila larval wound healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baek, Seung Hee; Cho, Hae Weon; Kwon, Young-Chang; Lee, Hyangkyu; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Moon Jong; Choe, Kwang-Min

    2012-01-01

    .... In Drosophila embryos, Cdc42 mediates filopodial projection into the wound leading edge (LE) and is important for suturing of the wound hole, while Rho1 mediates actin cable formation, which is critical during the initial stage of wound contraction [10] . In Drosophila larvae, Rac1, Cdc42, and Rho1 are essential for wound closure and organi...

  16. Proteomics of early zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heisenberg Carl-Philipp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zebrafish (D. rerio has become a powerful and widely used model system for the analysis of vertebrate embryogenesis and organ development. While genetic methods are readily available in zebrafish, protocols for two dimensional (2D gel electrophoresis and proteomics have yet to be developed. Results As a prerequisite to carry out proteomic experiments with early zebrafish embryos, we developed a method to efficiently remove the yolk from large batches of embryos. This method enabled high resolution 2D gel electrophoresis and improved Western blotting considerably. Here, we provide detailed protocols for proteomics in zebrafish from sample preparation to mass spectrometry (MS, including a comparison of databases for MS identification of zebrafish proteins. Conclusion The provided protocols for proteomic analysis of early embryos enable research to be taken in novel directions in embryogenesis.

  17. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  18. Quantitative imaging of collective cell migration during Drosophila gastrulation: multiphoton microscopy and computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supatto, Willy; McMahon, Amy; Fraser, Scott E; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes imaging and computational tools to collect and analyze live imaging data of embryonic cell migration. Our five-step protocol requires a few weeks to move through embryo preparation and four-dimensional (4D) live imaging using multi-photon microscopy, to 3D cell tracking using image processing, registration of tracking data and their quantitative analysis using computational tools. It uses commercially available equipment and requires expertise in microscopy and programming that is appropriate for a biology laboratory. Custom-made scripts are provided, as well as sample datasets to permit readers without experimental data to carry out the analysis. The protocol has offered new insights into the genetic control of cell migration during Drosophila gastrulation. With simple modifications, this systematic analysis could be applied to any developing system to define cell positions in accordance with the body plan, to decompose complex 3D movements and to quantify the collective nature of cell migration.

  19. 果蝇(Drosophila melanogaster)唾腺染色体的制备及染色体识别%Preparation and identification of salivary gland chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨大祥; 程劼; 许也; 张一语

    2014-01-01

    果蝇(Drosophila melanogaster)唾腺染色体的制备与分析是果蝇细胞遗传研究的基本实验技术,也是非常流行的遗传学教学实验.国内绝大多数的实验教材介绍了这个实验的操作方法,但对于如何辨别染色体各条臂,并进而识别具体的带纹均未予以介绍.笔者详细介绍唾腺染色体的制备及拍摄、数码照片拼接方法;并着重介绍如何根据各条臂端粒端的形态特征,以及利用Lefevre的唾腺染色体照片图谱中指示的蓬突(puff)、缢缩及带纹组合特征识别染色体臂的方法,供研究和实验教学参考.

  20. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  1. Modeling transcriptional networks in Drosophila development at multiple scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative models of developmental processes can provide insights at multiple scales. Ultimately, models may be particularly informative for key questions about network level behavior during development such as how does the system respond to environmental perturbation, or operate reliably in different genetic backgrounds? The transcriptional networks that pattern the Drosophila embryo have been the subject of numerous quantitative experimental studies coupled to modeling frameworks in recent years. In this review, we describe three studies that consider these networks at different levels of molecular detail and therefore result in different types of insights. We also discuss other developmental transcriptional networks operating in Drosophila, with the goal of highlighting what additional insights they may provide.

  2. Drosophila homolog of the murine Int-1 protooncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated phage clones from Drosophila melanogaster genomic and cDNA libraries containing a sequence homologous to the murine Int-1 protooncogene. The Drosophila gene is represented by a single locus at position 28A1-2 on chromosome 2. The gene is expressed as a 2.9-kilobase-long polyadenylylated mRNA in embryo, larval, and pupal stages. It is hardly detectable in adult flies. The longest open reading frame of the cDNA clone corresponds to a protein 469 amino acids long. Alignment of t...

  3. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated genome engineering in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Andrew; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-09-01

    Genome engineering has revolutionised genetic analysis in many organisms. Here we describe a simple and efficient technique to generate and detect novel mutations in desired target genes in Drosophila melanogaster. We target double strand breaks to specific sites within the genome by injecting mRNA encoding the Cas9 endonuclease and in vitro transcribed synthetic guide RNA into Drosophila embryos. The small insertion and deletion mutations that result from inefficient non-homologous end joining at this site are detected by high resolution melt analysis of whole flies and individual wings, allowing stable lines to be made within 1 month.

  4. Digital microfluidic processing of mammalian embryos for vitrification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G Pyne

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation is a key technology in biology and clinical practice. This paper presents a digital microfluidic device that automates sample preparation for mammalian embryo vitrification. Individual micro droplets manipulated on the microfluidic device were used as micro-vessels to transport a single mouse embryo through a complete vitrification procedure. Advantages of this approach, compared to manual operation and channel-based microfluidic vitrification, include automated operation, cryoprotectant concentration gradient generation, and feasibility of loading and retrieval of embryos.

  5. Precocious germination and its regulation in embryos of triticale caryopses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Weidner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triticale var. Lasko embryos, isolated from grain gathered at milk ripeness, the beginning of wax ripeness and at full ripeness, were allowed to germinate for 48 h on agar with glucose. The highest incorporation of tritiated adenosine into polyribosomal RNA during germination was found in the ribosome fractions from embryos of grain gathered at full ripeness, lower incorporation was in preparations from embryos of milk ripe grain and the lowest in preparations from embryos of wax ripe grain. Different tendencies were observed in respect to the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. The highest incorporation of 14C-amino acids into ribosomal proteins was found in preparations of ribosome fractions from embryos of milk ripe grain, lower in preparations of embryos from fully ripe grain, the lowest in preparations of embryos from wax ripe grain. ABA (10-4 M completely inhibited the external symptoms of germination of immature embryos, while its inhibition of the synthesis of polyribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins was greater the more mature the embryos that were germinated. The greatest stimulation of precocious germination by exogenous BA and GA3 was demonstrated in the least mature embryos isolated from milk ripe grain. Under the influence of both stimulators, an increase of the proportion of polyribosomes in the total ribosome fraction occurred in this sample, as did a rise in the intensity of ribosomal protein synthesis. The incorporation of 3H-adenosine into polyribosomal RNA, however, was lower than in the control sample. The results obtained suggest that the regulation of precocious germination of triticale embryos by phyto-hormones is not directly related to transcription.

  6. Multiscale diffusion in the mitotic Drosophila melanogaster syncytial blastoderm

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of diffusion for embryonic morphogen gradient formation in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo, there remains controversy regarding both the extent and the rate of diffusion of well-characterized morphogens. Furthermore, the recent observation of diffusional “compartmentalization” has suggested that diffusion may in fact be nonideal and mediated by an as-yet-unidentified mechanism. Here, we characterize the effects of the geometry of the early syncytial...

  7. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal-ventral body axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David S; Stevens, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) that is expressed by the follicular epithelium cells that envelop the oocyte. Follicle cells that are not exposed to Gurken follow a ventral fate and express Pipe, a sulfotransferase that enzymatically modifies components of the inner vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell, thereby transferring DV spatial information from the follicle to the egg. These ventrally sulfated eggshell proteins comprise a localized cue that directs the ventrally restricted formation of the active Spätzle ligand within the perivitelline space between the eggshell and the embryonic membrane. Spätzle activates Toll, a transmembrane receptor in the embryonic membrane. Transmission of the Toll signal into the embryo leads to the formation of a ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the transcription factor Dorsal within the nuclei of the syncytial blastoderm stage embryo. Dorsal controls the spatially specific expression of a large constellation of zygotic target genes, the Dorsal gene regulatory network, along the embryonic DV circumference. This article reviews classic studies and integrates them with the details of more recent work that has advanced our understanding of the complex pathway that establishes Drosophila embryo DV polarity. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal–ventral body axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David S.; Stevens, Leslie M.

    2016-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal–ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) that is expressed by the follicular epithelium cells that envelop the oocyte. Follicle cells that are not exposed to Gurken follow a ventral fate and express Pipe, a sulfotransferase that enzymatically modifies components of the inner vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell, thereby transferring DV spatial information from the follicle to the egg. These ventrally sulfated eggshell proteins comprise a localized cue that directs the ventrally restricted formation of the active Spätzle ligand within the perivitelline space between the eggshell and the embryonic membrane. Spätzle activates Toll, a transmembrane receptor in the embryonic membrane. Transmission of the Toll signal into the embryo leads to the formation of a ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the transcription factor Dorsal within the nuclei of the syncytial blastoderm stage embryo. Dorsal controls the spatially specific expression of a large constellation of zygotic target genes, the Dorsal gene regulatory network, along the embryonic DV circumference. This article reviews classic studies and integrates them with the details of more recent work that has advanced our understanding of the complex pathway that establishes Drosophila embryo DV polarity. PMID:25124754

  9. POSH misexpression induces caspase-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Ashley L; Stronach, Beth

    2010-02-01

    POSH (Plenty of SH3 domains) is a scaffold for signaling proteins regulating cell survival. Specifically, POSH promotes assembly of a complex including Rac GTPase, mixed lineage kinase (MLK), MKK7, and Jun kinase (JNK). In Drosophila, genetic analysis implicated POSH in Tak1-dependent innate immune response, in part through regulation of JNK signaling. Homologs of the POSH signaling complex components, MLK and MKK7, are essential in Drosophila embryonic dorsal closure. Using a gain-of-function approach, we tested whether POSH plays a role in this process. Ectopic expression of POSH in the embryo causes dorsal closure defects due to apoptosis of the amnioserosa, but ectodermal JNK signaling is normal. Phenotypic consequences of POSH expression were found to be dependent on Drosophila Nc, the caspase-9 homolog, but only partially on Tak1 and not at all on Slpr and Hep. These results suggest that POSH may use different signaling complexes to promote cell death in distinct contexts.

  10. Specification of the somatic musculature in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobi, Krista C; Schulman, Victoria K; Baylies, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    The somatic muscle system formed during Drosophila embryogenesis is required for larvae to hatch, feed, and crawl. This system is replaced in the pupa by a new adult muscle set, responsible for activities such as feeding, walking, and flight. Both the larval and adult muscle systems are comprised of distinct muscle fibers to serve these specific motor functions. In this way, the Drosophila musculature is a valuable model for patterning within a single tissue: while all muscle cells share properties such as the contractile apparatus, properties such as size, position, and number of nuclei are unique for a particular muscle. In the embryo, diversification of muscle fibers relies first on signaling cascades that pattern the mesoderm. Subsequently, the combinatorial expression of specific transcription factors leads muscle fibers to adopt particular sizes, shapes, and orientations. Adult muscle precursors (AMPs), set aside during embryonic development, proliferate during the larval phases and seed the formation of the abdominal, leg, and flight muscles in the adult fly. Adult muscle fibers may either be formed de novo from the fusion of the AMPs, or are created by the binding of AMPs to an existing larval muscle. While less is known about adult muscle specification compared to the larva, expression of specific transcription factors is also important for its diversification. Increasingly, the mechanisms required for the diversification of fly muscle have found parallels in vertebrate systems and mark Drosophila as a robust model system to examine questions about how diverse cell types are generated within an organism.

  11. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  12. Multiscale diffusion in the mitotic Drosophila melanogaster syncytial blastoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Brian R; Rikhy, Richa; Renz, Malte; Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2012-05-29

    Despite the fundamental importance of diffusion for embryonic morphogen gradient formation in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo, there remains controversy regarding both the extent and the rate of diffusion of well-characterized morphogens. Furthermore, the recent observation of diffusional "compartmentalization" has suggested that diffusion may in fact be nonideal and mediated by an as-yet-unidentified mechanism. Here, we characterize the effects of the geometry of the early syncytial Drosophila embryo on the effective diffusivity of cytoplasmic proteins. Our results demonstrate that the presence of transient mitotic membrane furrows results in a multiscale diffusion effect that has a significant impact on effective diffusion rates across the embryo. Using a combination of live-cell experiments and computational modeling, we characterize these effects and relate effective bulk diffusion rates to instantaneous diffusion coefficients throughout the syncytial blastoderm nuclear cycle phase of the early embryo. This multiscale effect may be related to the effect of interphase nuclei on effective diffusion, and thus we propose that an as-yet-unidentified role of syncytial membrane furrows is to temporally regulate bulk embryonic diffusion rates to balance the multiscale effect of interphase nuclei, which ultimately stabilizes the shapes of various morphogen gradients.

  13. A role for CKII phosphorylation of the Cactus PEST domain in dorsoventral patterning of the Drosophila embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhi-Ping; Galindo, Rene L.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis of Cactus, the cytoplasmic inhibitor of the Rel-related transcription factor Dorsal, is an essential step in patterning of the Drosophila embryo. Signal-induced Cactus degradation frees Dorsal for nuclear translocation on the ventral and lateral sides of the embryo, establishing zones of gene expression along the dorsoventral axis. Cactus stability is regulated by amino-terminal serine residues necessary for signal responsiveness, as well as by a carboxy-terminal PEST do...

  14. Mechanical Coupling between Endoderm Invagination and Axis Extension in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Lye

    Full Text Available How genetic programs generate cell-intrinsic forces to shape embryos is actively studied, but less so how tissue-scale physical forces impact morphogenesis. Here we address the role of the latter during axis extension, using Drosophila germband extension (GBE as a model. We found previously that cells elongate in the anteroposterior (AP axis in the extending germband, suggesting that an extrinsic tensile force contributed to body axis extension. Here we further characterized the AP cell elongation patterns during GBE, by tracking cells and quantifying their apical cell deformation over time. AP cell elongation forms a gradient culminating at the posterior of the embryo, consistent with an AP-oriented tensile force propagating from there. To identify the morphogenetic movements that could be the source of this extrinsic force, we mapped gastrulation movements temporally using light sheet microscopy to image whole Drosophila embryos. We found that both mesoderm and endoderm invaginations are synchronous with the onset of GBE. The AP cell elongation gradient remains when mesoderm invagination is blocked but is abolished in the absence of endoderm invagination. This suggested that endoderm invagination is the source of the tensile force. We next looked for evidence of this force in a simplified system without polarized cell intercalation, in acellular embryos. Using Particle Image Velocimetry, we identify posteriorwards Myosin II flows towards the presumptive posterior endoderm, which still undergoes apical constriction in acellular embryos as in wildtype. We probed this posterior region using laser ablation and showed that tension is increased in the AP orientation, compared to dorsoventral orientation or to either orientations more anteriorly in the embryo. We propose that apical constriction leading to endoderm invagination is the source of the extrinsic force contributing to germband extension. This highlights the importance of physical

  15. DNA damage leads to a Cyclin A-dependent delay in metaphase-anaphase transition in the Drosophila gastrula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Jaklevic, B

    2001-01-09

    In response to DNA damage, fission yeast, mammalian cells, and cells of the Drosophila gastrula inhibit Cdk1 to delay the entry into mitosis. In contrast, budding yeast delays metaphase-anaphase transition by stabilization of an anaphase inhibitor, Pds1p. A variation of the second response is seen in Drosophila cleavage embryos; when nuclei enter mitosis with damaged DNA, centrosomes lose gamma-tubulin, spindles lose astral microtubules, chromosomes fail to reach a metaphase configuration, and interphase resumes without an intervening anaphase. The resulting polyploid nuclei are eliminated. The cells of the Drosophila gastrula can also delay metaphase-anaphase transition in response to DNA damage. This delay accompanies the stabilization of Cyclin A, a known inhibitor of sister chromosome separation in Drosophila. Unlike in cleavage embryos, gamma-tubulin remains at the spindle poles, and anaphase always occurs after the delay. Cyclin A mutants fail to delay metaphase-anaphase transition after irradiation and show an increased frequency of chromosome breakage in the subsequent anaphase. DNA damage delays metaphase-anaphase transition in Drosophila by stabilizing Cyclin A. This delay may normally serve to preserve chromosomal integrity during segregation. To our knowledge this is the first report of a metazoan metaphase-anaphase transition being delayed in response to DNA damage. Though mitotic progression is modulated in response to DNA damage in both cleaving and gastruating embryos of Drosophila, different mechanisms operate. These differences are discussed in the context of differential cell cycle regulation in cleavage and gastrula stages.

  16. A quantitative spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression in the Drosophila blastoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, Charless C; Hendriks, Cris L Luengo; Keränen, Soile V E; Weber, Gunther H; Rübel, Oliver; Huang, Min-Yu; Chatoor, Sohail; DePace, Angela H; Simirenko, Lisa; Henriquez, Clara; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan; Hamann, Bernd; Knowles, David W; Biggin, Mark D; Eisen, Michael B; Malik, Jitendra

    2008-04-18

    To fully understand animal transcription networks, it is essential to accurately measure the spatial and temporal expression patterns of transcription factors and their targets. We describe a registration technique that takes image-based data from hundreds of Drosophila blastoderm embryos, each costained for a reference gene and one of a set of genes of interest, and builds a model VirtualEmbryo. This model captures in a common framework the average expression patterns for many genes in spite of significant variation in morphology and expression between individual embryos. We establish the method's accuracy by showing that relationships between a pair of genes' expression inferred from the model are nearly identical to those measured in embryos costained for the pair. We present a VirtualEmbryo containing data for 95 genes at six time cohorts. We show that known gene-regulatory interactions can be automatically recovered from this data set and predict hundreds of new interactions.

  17. Biolistic techniques for transfection of mosquito embryos (Anopheles gambiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialhe, E; Miller, L H

    1994-05-01

    To compensate for the extremely low rates of transformation by DNA microinjection into mosquito embryos of Anopheles gambiae, biolistic techniques were evaluated for introduction of DNA into large numbers of mosquito embryos. Biolistic experiments were first performed with a commercially available instrument intended for this purpose, according to the recommended procedure. The amount of DNA delivered was measured by the expression of luciferase under the control of the Drosophila heat shock protein (hsp) 70 promoter. Despite attempts to optimize biolistic parameters, the level of luciferase activity was low and highly variable. Two other methods of biolistic delivery of DNA-coated particles in aqueous suspension were then evaluated. One method used the gas explosion of the commercially available instrument (mentioned above) to drive an aqueous suspension of DNA-coated particles at high pressure. This method reproducibly increased the level of expression about 100-fold without greatly reducing embryo viability. Another method, which was recently described for plant transfection, uses lower pressure to deliver the aqueous suspension of DNA-coated particles. The level of expression of luciferase and the survival of embryos were equivalent to that obtained with the instrument modified for aqueous delivery of particles. Thus, both aqueous methods offer the advantages of reproducibly delivering more DNA to the embryos. Moreover, these methods could be suitable for delivering DNA mixed with proteins, such as restriction endonucleases and integrases, that may be destroyed by ethanol precipitation used in the standard PDS-1000/He method.

  18. Embryo-maternal communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Esben; Hyttel, Poul; Østrup, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Communication during early pregnancy is essential for successful reproduction. In this review we address the beginning of the communication between mother and developing embryo; including morphological and transcriptional changes in the endometrium as well as epigenetic regulation mechanisms...... directing the placentation. An increasing knowledge of the embryo-maternal communication might not only help to improve the fertility of our farm animals but also our understanding of human health and reproduction....

  19. Adult Neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Fernández-Hernández; Christa Rhiner; Eduardo Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been linked to several cognitive functions and neurological disorders. Description of adult neurogenesis in a model organism like Drosophila could facilitate the genetic study of normal and abnormal neurogenesis in the adult brain. So far, formation of new neurons has not been detected in adult fly brains and hence has been thought to be absent in Drosophila. Here, we used an improved lineage-labeling method to show that, surprisingly, adult neurogenesis occurs in the m...

  20. 正丁醇替代无水乙醇和二甲苯在制作大鼠全胚切片中的应用%Replacing absolute ethanol-xylene by n-butanol during preparation of sections of whole rat embryos at different gestational ages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨世明; 李和

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore a simple method to replace absolute ethanol and xylene with n-butanol for preparation of sections of whole rat embryos at different gastational ages. Methods Embryonic day ( E) 14, 16, 18,20 rat embryos were collected and fixed. After dehydration in low concentrations of the ethanol, some embryos were treated with the traditional absolute ethanol-xylene method in which absolute ethanol and xylene were used for dehydration and clearing, and other embryos were further dehydrated and cleared with the n-butanol method. Then, all the embryos were embedded in paraffin, cut on a microtome, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The quality of embedded blocks and embryo sections was compared and evaluated. Results Compared with the absolute ethanol-xylene method for preparation of whole rat embryo sections, the n-butanol method was more simple, and easier to control the time in the whole processes. Moreover, the embryos treated with n-butanol had better cutting performance and higher quality in morphological preservation of the hepatic tissue. Conclusion As a simple, safe and reliable method, the n-butanol method can replace the absolute ethanol-xylene method for preparation of whole rat embryo sections.%目的 探索一种以正丁醇替代无水乙醇和二甲苯制作不同胎龄大鼠全胚切片的简便方法.方法 收集胚龄14d(El4)、El6、El8、E20大鼠胚胎,固定及低浓度乙醇脱水后,部分标本按传统方法用无水乙醇脱水和二甲苯透明(无水乙醇-二甲苯法),另一部分标本用正丁醇脱水、透明(正丁醇法).所有标本进行石蜡包埋、切片、HE染色.对两种方法从蜡块质量和切片质量等方面进行比较和评价.结果 正丁醇法大大简化了操作步骤,标本处理时间容易控制,包埋块的切割性能及对肝脏组织的保存优于无水乙醇-二甲苯制片法.结论 正丁醇法步骤简单且制片安全可靠,可替代无水乙醇-二甲苯法制作大鼠全胚切片.

  1. Suffix-specific RNAi leads to silencing of F element in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolai A Tchurikov

    Full Text Available Separate conserved copies of suffix, a short interspersed Drosophila retroelement (SINE, and also divergent copies in the 3' untranslated regions of the three genes, have already been described. Suffix has also been identified on the 3' end of the Drosophila non-LTR F element, where it forms the last conserved domain of the reverse transcriptase (RT. In our current study, we show that the separate copies of suffix are far more actively transcribed than their counterparts on the F element. Transcripts from both strands of suffix are present in RNA preparations during all stages of Drosophila development, providing the potential for the formation of double-stranded RNA and the initiation of RNA interference (RNAi. Using in situ RNA hybridization analysis, we have detected the expression of both sense and antisense suffix transcripts in germinal cells. These sense and antisense transcripts are colocalized in the primary spermatocytes and in the cytoplasm of the nurse cells, suggesting that they form double-stranded RNA. We performed further analyses of suffix-specific small RNAs using northern blotting and SI nuclease protection assays. Among the total RNA preparations isolated from embryos, larvae, pupae and flies, suffix-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs were detected only in pupae. In wild type ovaries, both the siRNAs and longer suffix-specific Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs were observed, whereas in ovaries of the Dicer-2 mutant, only piRNAs were detected. We further found by 3' RACE that in pupae and ovaries, F element transcripts lacking the suffix sequence are also present. Our data provide direct evidence that suffix-specific RNAi leads to the silencing of the relative LINE (long interspersed element, F element, and suggests that SINE-specific RNA interference could potentially downregulate a set of genes possessing SINE stretches in their 5' or 3' non-coding regions. These data also suggest that double stranded RNAs possessing suffix

  2. Polarity and cell division orientation in the cleavage embryo: from worm to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajduk, Anna; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Cleavage is a period after fertilization, when a 1-cell embryo starts developing into a multicellular organism. Due to a series of mitotic divisions, the large volume of a fertilized egg is divided into numerous smaller, nucleated cells—blastomeres. Embryos of different phyla divide according to different patterns, but molecular mechanism of these early divisions remains surprisingly conserved. In the present paper, we describe how polarity cues, cytoskeleton and cell-to-cell communication interact with each other to regulate orientation of the early embryonic division planes in model animals such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and mouse. We focus particularly on the Par pathway and the actin-driven cytoplasmic flows that accompany it. We also describe a unique interplay between Par proteins and the Hippo pathway in cleavage mammalian embryos. Moreover, we discuss the potential meaning of polarity, cytoplasmic dynamics and cell-to-cell communication as quality biomarkers of human embryos. PMID:26660321

  3. Automatic zebrafish heartbeat detection and analysis for zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylatiuk, Christian; Sanchez, Daniela; Mikut, Ralf; Alshut, Rüdiger; Reischl, Markus; Hirth, Sofia; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Just, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    A fully automatic detection and analysis method of heartbeats in videos of nonfixed and nonanesthetized zebrafish embryos is presented. This method reduces the manual workload and time needed for preparation and imaging of the zebrafish embryos, as well as for evaluating heartbeat parameters such as frequency, beat-to-beat intervals, and arrhythmicity. The method is validated by a comparison of the results from automatic and manual detection of the heart rates of wild-type zebrafish embryos 36-120 h postfertilization and of embryonic hearts with bradycardia and pauses in the cardiac contraction.

  4. The effect of soluble uterine factors on porcine embryo development within a three-dimensional alginate matrix system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Between day 10 and 12 of gestation in the pig, the embryo undergoes a dramatic morphological change, known as elongation. During elongation the embryo produces and secretes estrogen, which serves as a key signal for maternal recognition of pregnancy. The uterine environment prepares for embryo elong...

  5. Cellular Mechanisms of Drosophila Heart Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Vogler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many of the major discoveries in the fields of genetics and developmental biology have been made using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. With regard to heart development, the conserved network of core cardiac transcription factors that underlies cardiogenesis has been studied in great detail in the fly, and the importance of several signaling pathways that regulate heart morphogenesis, such as Slit/Robo, was first shown in the fly model. Recent technological advances have led to a large increase in the genomic data available from patients with congenital heart disease (CHD. This has highlighted a number of candidate genes and gene networks that are potentially involved in CHD. To validate genes and genetic interactions among candidate CHD-causing alleles and to better understand heart formation in general are major tasks. The specific limitations of the various cardiac model systems currently employed (mammalian and fish models provide a niche for the fly model, despite its evolutionary distance to vertebrates and humans. Here, we review recent advances made using the Drosophila embryo that identify factors relevant for heart formation. These underline how this model organism still is invaluable for a better understanding of CHD.

  6. Drosophila MOF controls Checkpoint protein2 and regulates genomic stability during early embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpavalli Sreerangam NCVL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila embryos, checkpoints maintain genome stability by delaying cell cycle progression that allows time for damage repair or to complete DNA synthesis. Drosophila MOF, a member of MYST histone acetyl transferase is an essential component of male X hyperactivation process. Until recently its involvement in G2/M cell cycle arrest and defects in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage pathways was not well established. Results Drosophila MOF is highly expressed during early embryogenesis. In the present study we show that haplo-insufficiency of maternal MOF leads to spontaneous mitotic defects like mitotic asynchrony, mitotic catastrophe and chromatid bridges in the syncytial embryos. Such abnormal nuclei are eliminated and digested in the yolk tissues by nuclear fall out mechanism. MOF negatively regulates Drosophila checkpoint kinase 2 tumor suppressor homologue. In response to DNA damage the checkpoint gene Chk2 (Drosophila mnk is activated in the mof mutants, there by causing centrosomal inactivation suggesting its role in response to genotoxic stress. A drastic decrease in the fall out nuclei in the syncytial embryos derived from mof1/+; mnkp6/+ females further confirms the role of DNA damage response gene Chk2 to ensure the removal of abnormal nuclei from the embryonic precursor pool and maintain genome stability. The fact that mof mutants undergo DNA damage has been further elucidated by the increased number of single and double stranded DNA breaks. Conclusion mof mutants exhibited genomic instability as evidenced by the occurance of frequent mitotic bridges in anaphase, asynchronous nuclear divisions, disruption of cytoskeleton, inactivation of centrosomes finally leading to DNA damage. Our findings are consistent to what has been reported earlier in mammals that; reduced levels of MOF resulted in increased genomic instability while total loss resulted in lethality. The study can be further extended using

  7. Drosophila MOF controls Checkpoint protein2 and regulates genomic stability during early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpavalli, Sreerangam N C V L; Sarkar, Arpita; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Chowdhury, Debabani Roy; Bhadra, Utpal; Pal-Bhadra, Manika

    2013-01-24

    In Drosophila embryos, checkpoints maintain genome stability by delaying cell cycle progression that allows time for damage repair or to complete DNA synthesis. Drosophila MOF, a member of MYST histone acetyl transferase is an essential component of male X hyperactivation process. Until recently its involvement in G2/M cell cycle arrest and defects in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage pathways was not well established. Drosophila MOF is highly expressed during early embryogenesis. In the present study we show that haplo-insufficiency of maternal MOF leads to spontaneous mitotic defects like mitotic asynchrony, mitotic catastrophe and chromatid bridges in the syncytial embryos. Such abnormal nuclei are eliminated and digested in the yolk tissues by nuclear fall out mechanism. MOF negatively regulates Drosophila checkpoint kinase 2 tumor suppressor homologue. In response to DNA damage the checkpoint gene Chk2 (Drosophila mnk) is activated in the mof mutants, there by causing centrosomal inactivation suggesting its role in response to genotoxic stress. A drastic decrease in the fall out nuclei in the syncytial embryos derived from mof¹/+; mnkp⁶/+ females further confirms the role of DNA damage response gene Chk2 to ensure the removal of abnormal nuclei from the embryonic precursor pool and maintain genome stability. The fact that mof mutants undergo DNA damage has been further elucidated by the increased number of single and double stranded DNA breaks. mof mutants exhibited genomic instability as evidenced by the occurance of frequent mitotic bridges in anaphase, asynchronous nuclear divisions, disruption of cytoskeleton, inactivation of centrosomes finally leading to DNA damage. Our findings are consistent to what has been reported earlier in mammals that; reduced levels of MOF resulted in increased genomic instability while total loss resulted in lethality. The study can be further extended using Drosophila as model system and carry out the interaction of MOF

  8. Oxygen diffusion in fish embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenbarg, S.

    2002-01-01

    All vertebrate embryos pass through a developmental period of remarkably low morphological variability. This period has been called phylotypic period. During the phylotypic period, organogenesis takes place, including blood vessel development. Before the phylotypic period, the embryos

  9. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  10. Fluorescent visualization of macromolecules in Drosophila whole mounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ricardo Guelerman Pinheiro; Machado, Luciana Claudia Herculano; Moda, Livia Maria Rosatto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to determine the expression dynamics of individual genes "in situ" by visualizing the precise spatial and temporal distribution of their products in whole mounts by histochemical and immunocytochemical reactions has revolutionized our understanding of cellular processes. Drosophila developmental genetics was one of the fields that benefited most from these technologies, and a variety of fluorescent methods were specifically designed for investigating the localization of developmentally important proteins and cell markers during embryonic and post embryonic stages of this model organism. In this chapter we present detailed protocols for fluorescence immunocytochemistry of whole mount embryos, imaginal discs, pupal retinas, and salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster, as well as methods for fluorescent visualization of specific subcellular structures in these tissues.

  11. Spindle mechanics and dynamics during mitosis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2004-04-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model for studying mitosis. Syncytial embryos are amenable to time-lapse imaging of hundreds of synchronously dividing spindles, allowing the quantitation of spindle and chromosome dynamics with unprecedented fidelity. Other Drosophila cell types, including neuroblasts, cultured cells, spermatocytes and oocytes, contain spindles that differ in their design, providing cells amenable to different types of experiments and allowing identification of common core mechanisms. The function of mitotic proteins can be studied using mutants, inhibitor microinjection and RNA interference (RNAi) to identify the full inventory of mitotic proteins encoded by the genome. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how ensembles of mitotic proteins coordinate spindle assembly and chromosome motion in this system.

  12. Negative regulation of P element excision by the somatic product and terminal sequences of P in drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A transient in vivo P element excision assay was used to test the regulatory properties of putative repressor-encoding plasmids in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The somatic expression of an unmodified transposase transcription unit under the control of a heat shock gene promoter (phsn) effectivel...

  13. Ovarian stimulation and embryo quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, Esther; Macklon, Nick S.; Fauser, Bart J. C. M.

    2009-01-01

    To Study the effects of different ovarian stimulation approaches on oocyte and embryo quality, it is imperative to assess embryo quality with a reliable and objective method. Embryos rated as high quality by standardized morphological assessment are associated with higher implantation and pregnancy

  14. Collective synchronization of divisions in Drosophila development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergassola, Massimo

    Mitoses in the early development of most metazoans are rapid and synchronized across the entire embryo. While diffusion is too slow, in vitro experiments have shown that waves of the cell-cycle regulator Cdk1 can transfer information rapidly across hundreds of microns. However, the signaling dynamics and the physical properties of chemical waves during embryonic development remain unclear. We develop FRET biosensors for the activity of Cdk1 and the checkpoint kinase Chk1 in Drosophila embryos and exploit them to measure waves in vivo. We demonstrate that Cdk1 chemical waves control mitotic waves and that their speed is regulated by the activity of Cdk1 during the S-phase (and not mitosis). We quantify the progressive slowdown of the waves with developmental cycles and identify its underlying control mechanism by the DNA replication checkpoint through the Chk1/Wee1 pathway. The global dynamics of the mitotic signaling network illustrates a novel control principle: the S-phase activity of Cdk1 regulates the speed of the mitotic wave, while the Cdk1 positive feedback ensures an invariantly rapid onset of mitosis. Mathematical modeling captures the speed of the waves and predicts a fundamental distinction between the S-phase Cdk1 trigger waves and the mitotic phase waves, which is illustrated by embryonic ablation experiments. In collaboration with Victoria Deneke1, Anna Melbinger2, and Stefano Di Talia1 1 Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center 2 Department of Physics, University of California San Diego.

  15. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    . Whereas, 20% of Drosophila genes are annotated as encoding alternatively spliced premRNAs, splice-junction microarray experiments indicate that this number is at least 40% (ref. 7). Determining the diversity of mRNAs generated by alternative promoters, alternative splicing and RNA editing will substantially increase the inferred protein repertoire. Non-coding RNA genes (ncRNAs) including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAS (miRNAs) (reviewed in ref. 10), and longer ncRNAs such as bxd (ref. 11) and rox (ref. 12), have important roles in gene regulation, whereas others such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs)and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are important components of macromolecular machines such as the ribosome and spliceosome. The transcription and processing of these ncRNAs must also be fully documented and mapped. As part of the modENCODE project to annotate the functional elements of the D. melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes, we used RNA-Seq and tiling microarrays to sample the Drosophila transcriptome at unprecedented depth throughout development from early embryo to ageing male and female adults. We report on a high-resolution view of the discovery, structure and dynamic expression of the D. melanogaster transcriptome.

  16. The Drosophila HOAP protein is required for telomere capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Giovanni; Siriaco, Giorgia; Raffa, Grazia D; Kellum, Rebecca; Gatti, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    HOAP (HP1/ORC-associated protein) has recently been isolated from Drosophila melanogaster embryos as part of a cytoplasmic complex that contains heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and the origin recognition complex subunit 2 (ORC2). Here, we show that caravaggio, a mutation in the HOAP-encoding gene, causes extensive telomere-telomere fusions in larval brain cells, indicating that HOAP is required for telomere capping. Our analyses indicate that HOAP is specifically enriched at mitotic chromosome telomeres, and strongly suggest that HP1 and HOAP form a telomere-capping complex that does not contain ORC2.

  17. BMAA neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Bradley, Walter G; Zhai, R Grace

    2009-01-01

    We report the establishment of an in vivo model using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the toxic effects of L-BMAA. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced the lifespan as well as the neurological functions of flies. Furthermore, we have developed an HPLC method to reliably detect both free and protein-bound BMAA in fly tissue extracts.

  18. Cancer in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Héctor; Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genomics has greatly increased our understanding of the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic changes found in human tumors. Understanding the functional relationships among these elements calls for the use of flexible genetic models. We discuss the use of Drosophila models to study...

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediates the dynamic maintenance of nuclear Dorsal levels during Drosophila embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLotto, Robert; DeLotto, Yvonne; Steward, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    of Dorsal. We also find that diffusion of Dorsal is partially constrained to cytoplasmic islands surrounding individual syncitial nuclei. A model is proposed in which the generation and maintenance of the Dorsal gradient is a consequence of an active process involving both restricted long-range diffusion......In Drosophila, the NF-kappaB/REL family transcription factor, Dorsal, redistributes from the cytoplasm to nuclei, forming a concentration gradient across the dorsoventral axis of the embryo. Using live imaging techniques in conjunction with embryos expressing a chimeric Dorsal-GFP, we demonstrate...

  20. Oriented cell divisions in the extending germband of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sara Morais; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2007-09-01

    Tissue elongation is a general feature of morphogenesis. One example is the extension of the germband, which occurs during early embryogenesis in Drosophila. In the anterior part of the embryo, elongation follows from a process of cell intercalation. In this study, we follow cell behaviour at the posterior of the extending germband. We find that, in this region, cell divisions are mostly oriented longitudinally during the fast phase of elongation. Inhibiting cell divisions prevents longitudinal deformation of the posterior region and leads to an overall reduction in the rate and extent of elongation. Thus, as in zebrafish embryos, cell intercalation and oriented cell division together contribute to tissue elongation. We also show that the proportion of longitudinal divisions is reduced when segmental patterning is compromised, as, for example, in even skipped (eve) mutants. Because polarised cell intercalation at the anterior germband also requires segmental patterning, a common polarising cue might be used for both processes. Even though, in fish embryos, both mechanisms require the classical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, germband extension and oriented cell divisions proceed normally in embryos lacking dishevelled (dsh), a key component of the PCP pathway. An alternative means of planar polarisation must therefore be at work in the embryonic epidermis.

  1. Immunohistochemical tools and techniques to visualize Notch in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognon, Emiliana; Vaccari, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The ability to accurately visualize proteins in Drosophila tissues is critical for studying their abundance and localization relative to the morphology of cells during tissue development and homeostasis. Here we describe the procedure to visualize Notch localization in whole-mount preparations of several Drosophila organs using confocal microscopy. The use of monoclonal antibodies directed to distinct portions of Notch allows one to follow the fate of the receptor during constitutive and inductive processes. The protocol described here can be used to co-label with antibodies recognizing markers of subcellular compartments in wild-type as well as mutant tissues.

  2. Experimental cloning of embryos through human-rabbit inter-species nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Jingjuan; GUO Tonghang; TONG Xianhong; LUO Lihua; ZHOU Guixiang; FU Yingyun; LIU Yusheng

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic cloning,which is based on human somatic cell nuclear transfer,is one of our major research objectives.Though inter-species nuclear transfer has been introduced to construct human somatic cell cloned embryos,the effects of type,passage,and preparation method of donor cells on embryo development remain unclear.In our experiment,cloned embryos were reconstructed with different passage and preparation methods of ossocartilaginous cell,skin fibroblast,and cumulus cells.The cumulus cell embryos showed significantly higher development rates than the other two (P<0.05).The development rate of embryos reconstructed with skin fibroblasts of different passage number and somatic cells of different chilling durations showed no significant difference.Also,fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)was conducted to detect nuclear derivation of the embryos.The result showed that the nuclei of the inter-species cloned embryo cells came from human.We conclude that (1)cloned embryos can be constructed through human-rabbit interspecies nuclear transfer;(2)different kinds of somatic cells result in different efficiency of nuclear transfer,while in vitro passage of the donor does not influence embryo development;(3)refrigeration is a convenient and efficient donor cell preparation method.Finally,it is feasible to detect DNA gcnotype through FISH.

  3. Cryopreservation of human embryos and its contribution to in vitro fertilization success rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai Mee; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Repping, Sjoerd

    2014-07-01

    Cryopreservation of human embryos is now a routine procedure in assisted reproductive technologies laboratories. There is no consensus on the superiority of any protocol, and substantial differences exist among centers in day of embryo cryopreservation, freezing method, selection criteria for which embryos to freeze, method of embryo thawing, and endometrial preparation for transfer of frozen-thawed embryos. In the past decade, the number of frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles per started in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle increased steadily, and at the same time the percentage of frozen-thawed embryo transfers that resulted in live births increased. Currently, cryopreservation of human embryos is more important than ever for the cumulative pregnancy rate after IVF. Interestingly, success rates after frozen-thawed embryo transfer are now nearing the success rates of fresh embryo transfer. This supports the hypothesis of so called freeze-all strategies in IVF, in which all embryos are frozen and no fresh transfer is conducted, to optimize success rates. High-quality randomized controlled trials should be pursued to find out which cryopreservation protocol is best and whether the time has come to completely abandon fresh transfers.

  4. windbeutel, a gene required for dorsoventral patterning in Drosophila, encodes a protein that has homologies to vertebrate proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Konsolaki, Mary; Schüpbach, Trudi

    1998-01-01

    The formation of the dorsoventral axis of the Drosophila embryo depends on cell–cell interactions that take place in the female ovary and involve the activation of transmembrane receptors by secreted ligands. The gene windbeutel functions in the somatic follicle cells of the ovary and is required for the generation of a signal that will determine the ventral side of the embryo. This signal originates in the follicle cells during oogenesis, but its actions are only manifested after fertilizati...

  5. Singling out Drosophila tendon cells: a dialogue between two distinct cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, T

    1999-11-01

    The precise match between somatic muscles and their epidermal attachment cells is achieved through a continuous dialogue between these two cell types. Whereas tendon cells direct myotube migration and final patterning, the muscles are essential for the maintenance of the fate of tendon cells. The Drosophila neuregulin-like ligand, Vein, and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr), are critical components in the inductive signaling process that takes place between muscles and tendon cells. Additional gene products that relay the Vein-Egfr effect in Drosophila are conserved in the vertebrate neuregulin-mediated cascade. This review describes genetic and molecular aspects of the muscle-tendon inductive processes in Drosophila, and compares them with the relevant mechanisms in the vertebrate embryo.

  6. Drosophila by the dozen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  7. ART culture conditions change the probability of mouse embryo gestation through defined cellular and molecular responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarzer, Caroline; Esteves, Telma Cristina; Arau´zo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Le Gac, Séverine; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Do different human ART culture protocols prepare embryos differently for post-implantation development? ... Our data promote awareness that human ART culture media affect embryo development. Effects reported here in the mouse may apply also in human, because no ART medium presently available on the

  8. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  9. Gender determination of avian embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  10. A Conserved Di-Basic Motif of Drosophila Crumbs Contributes to Efficient ER Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumichel, Alexandra; Kapp, Katja; Knust, Elisabeth

    2015-06-01

    The Drosophila type I transmembrane protein Crumbs is an apical determinant required for the maintenance of apico-basal epithelial cell polarity. The level of Crumbs at the plasma membrane is crucial, but how it is regulated is poorly understood. In a genetic screen for regulators of Crumbs protein trafficking we identified Sar1, the core component of the coat protein complex II transport vesicles. sar1 mutant embryos show a reduced plasma membrane localization of Crumbs, a defect similar to that observed in haunted and ghost mutant embryos, which lack Sec23 and Sec24CD, respectively. By pulse-chase assays in Drosophila Schneider cells and analysis of protein transport kinetics based on Endoglycosidase H resistance we identified an RNKR motif in Crumbs, which contributes to efficient ER export. The motif identified fits the highly conserved di-basic RxKR motif and mediates interaction with Sar1. The RNKR motif is also required for plasma membrane delivery of transgene-encoded Crumbs in epithelial cells of Drosophila embryos. Our data are the first to show that a di-basic motif acts as a signal for ER exit of a type I plasma membrane protein in a metazoan organism. © 2015 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  12. Cryopreservation of primordial germ cells by rapid cooling of whole zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Shogo; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Akashi, Yuichiro; Yamaha, Etsuro; Katagiri, Seiji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The feasibility of cryopreservation of zebrafish (Danio rerio) primordial germ cells (PGCs) by rapid cooling (i.e., vitrification) of dechorionated whole embryos at the 14- to 20-somite stage was investigated. Initially, we examined the glass-forming properties and embryo toxicities of six cryoprotectants: methanol (MeOH), ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol (GC), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and 1,3-butylene glycol (1,3-BG). According to the results of glass-forming and embryo toxicity tests, pretreatment solution (PS) containing 2 or 3 M cryoprotectant and vitrification solution (VS) containing 5 M cryoprotectant and 0.5 M sucrose were prepared using each cryoprotectant. Dechorionated embryos, the PGCs of which were visualized by injection of green fluorescence protein-nos1 3'UTR mRNA, were cooled rapidly by plunging into liquid nitrogen after serial exposure to PS and VS. All embryos cooled with MeOH, PG and 1,3-BG showed ice formation during cooling, and few embryos had live PGCs after warming. Most embryos cooled with GC did not show ice formation; however, few embryos had live PGCs. All embryos cooled with EG and most embryos cooled with DMSO had live PGCs when the embryos did not show ice formation during cooling. Based on the number of live PGCs in fresh embryos, the maximum survival rates of PGCs recovered from embryos cooled with EG and DMSO were estimated to be about 40 and 20%, respectively. The present study indicates that rapid cooling of dechorionated whole embryos, especially using EG-based solutions, could be utilized as a simple and promising tool for cryopreservation of PGCs.

  13. Influence of recipient cytoplasm cell stage on transcription in bovine nucleus transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Steven D.; Soloy, Eva; Kanka, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    relies upon maternally derived RNA transcripts up to the 8-cell stage, at which time it begins to transcribe its own RNA. In this experiment, RNA synthesis was detected in nucleus transfer embryos (NTE) and control embryos by pulsing with 3H-uridine, fixation, and autoradiography on semithin sections...... of maturation. Control in-vitro-produced embryos were 3H-uridine-labelled and fixed at the 2-, 4-, early 8-, and late 8-cell stages. NTE were similarly prepared at 1, 3, and 20 hr postfusion and at the 2-, 4-, and 8-cell stages. In the control embryos, RNA synthesis was absent in the 2-, 4-, and early 8-cell...

  14. The Hydra FGFR, Kringelchen, partially replaces the Drosophila Heartless FGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Anja; Hübinger, Christine; Hüsken, Katrin; Vogt, Angelika; Rebscher, Nicole; Onel, Susanne-Filiz; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Hassel, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) are highly conserved receptor tyrosine kinases, and evolved early in metazoan evolution. In order to investigate their functional conservation, we asked whether the Kringelchen FGFR in the freshwater polyp Hydra vulgaris, is able to functionally replace FGFR in fly embryos. In Drosophila, two endogenous FGFR, Breathless (Btl) and Heartless (Htl), ensure formation of the tracheal system and mesodermal cell migration as well as formation of the heart. Using UAS-kringelchen-5xmyc transgenic flies and targeted expression, we show that Kringelchen is integrated correctly into the cell membrane of mesodermal and tracheal cells in Drosophila. Nevertheless, Kringelchen expression driven in tracheal cells failed to rescue the btl (LG19) mutant. The Hydra FGFR was able to substitute for Heartless in the htl (AB42) null mutant; however, this occurred only during early mesodermal cell migration. Our data provide evidence for functional conservation of this early-diverged FGFR across these distantly related phyla, but also selectivity for the Htl FGFR in the Drosophila system.

  15. Hybrid Lethal Systems in the Drosophila Melanogaster Species Complex. I. the Maternal Hybrid Rescue (Mhr) Gene of Drosophila Simulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, K.; Taira, T.; Watanabe, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid females from Drosophila simulans females X Drosophila melanogaster males die as embryos while hybrid males from the reciprocal cross die as late larvae. The other two classes are sterile adults. Letting C, X, and Y designate egg cytoplasm, X, and Y chromosomes, respectively, and subscripts m and s stand for melanogaster and simulans, C(m)X(m)Y(s) males are lethal in the larval stage and are rescued by the previously reported genes, Lhr (Lethal hybrid rescue) in simulans or Hmr (Hybrid male rescue) in melanogaster. We report here another rescue gene located on the second chromosome of simulans, mhr (maternal hybrid rescue) that, when present in the mother, rescues C(s)X(m)X(s) females from embryonic lethality. It has been postulated that the hybrids not carrying the X(s) like C(m)X(m)Y(s) males are larval lethal and that the hybrids carrying both the C(s) and the X(m) like C(s)X(m)X(s) females are embryonic lethal. According to these postulates C(s)X(m)Y(s) males (obtained by mating attached-X simulans females to melanogaster males) should be doubly lethal, at both embryo and larval stages. When both rescuing genes are present, Hmr in the father and mhr in the mother, males of this genotype are fully viable, as predicted. PMID:8436276

  16. Who abandons embryos after IVF?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, A P H

    2010-04-01

    This investigation describes features of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) patients who never returned to claim their embryos following cryopreservation. Frozen embryo data were reviewed to establish communication patterns between patient and clinic; embryos were considered abandoned when 1) an IVF patient with frozen embryo\\/s stored at our facility failed to make contact with our clinic for > 2 yrs and 2) the patient could not be located after a multi-modal outreach effort was undertaken. For these patients, telephone numbers had been disconnected and no forwarding address was available. Patient, spouse and emergency family contact\\/s all escaped detection efforts despite an exhaustive public database search including death records and Internet directory portals. From 3244 IVF cycles completed from 2000 to 2008, > or = 1 embryo was frozen in 1159 cases (35.7%). Those without correspondence for > 2 yrs accounted for 292 (25.2%) patients with frozen embryos; 281 were contacted by methods including registered (signature involving abandoned embryos did not differ substantially from other patients. The goal of having a baby was achieved by 10\\/11 patients either by spontaneous conception, adoption or IVF. One patient moved away with conception status unconfirmed. The overall rate of embryo abandonment was 11\\/1159 (< 1%) in this IVF population. Pre-IVF counselling minimises, but does not totally eliminate, the problem of abandoned embryos. As the number of abandoned embryos from IVF accumulates, their fate urgently requires clarification. We propose that clinicians develop a policy consistent with relevant Irish Constitutional provisions to address this medical dilemma.

  17. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina O. Igboin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  19. Nucleolar re-activation is delayed in mouse embryos cloned from two different cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarcova, Olga; Dinnyes, A.; Polgar, Z.

    2009-01-01

    displayed early NPBs transformation. In conclusion, despite normal onset of EGA in cloned embryos, activation of functional nucleoli was one cell cycle delayed in NT embryos. NT-MEF embryos displayed normal targeting but delayed activation of nucleolar proteins. Contrary, in NT-HM1 embryos, both......Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare embryonic genome activation (EGA) in mouse embryos of different origin using nucleolus as a marker. Early and late 2-cell and late 4-cell stage embryos, prepared by in vitro fertilization (IVF), parthenogenetic activation (PG), and nuclear transfer...... ofmouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and mouse HM1 emryonic stem cells (HM1), were processed for autoradiography following 3H-uridine incubation (transcriptional activity), transmission electron microscopy (ultrastructure) and immunofluorescence (nucleolar proteins; upstream binding factor, UBF...

  20. Expression image data of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines - GETDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us GETDB Expression image... data of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines Data detail Data name Expression image da...ta of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines Description of data contents 3,075 expression image data by develo...pmental stages. - Expression image in imaginal disc - Expression image in embryo - Fluorescence expression image... in GFP-dyed larva - Expression image in adult The image file is provided in the JPEG format. The file n

  1. Viability of bovine demi embryo after splitting of fresh and frozen thawed embryo derived from in vitro embryo production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Imron

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In vivo embryo production was limited by number of donor, wide variability respond due to superovulation program and also immunoactifity of superovulation hormone (FSH. Splitting technology could be an alternative to increase the number of transferrable embryos into recipien cows. Splitting is done with cutting embryo becoming two equal pieces (called demi embrio base on ICM orientation. The objective of this research was to determine the viability of demi embryo obtained from embryo splitting of fresh and frozen thawed embryo. The results showed that demi embryos which performed blastocoel reexpansion 3 hours after embryo splitting using fresh and frozen thawed embryos were 76.9 and 76.2% respectively. Base on existention of inner cell mass (ICM, the number of demi embryos developed with ICM from fresh and frozen thawed embryos were not significantly different (90.6 and 85.7% respectively. The cell number of demi embryo from fresh embryos splitting was not different compared with those from frozen thawed embryos (36.1 and 35.9 respectively. These finding indicated that embryo splitting can be applied to frozen thawed embryos with certain condition as well as fresh embryos.

  2. Exploring Autophagy in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Lőrincz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a catabolic process in eukaryotic cells promoting bulk or selective degradation of cellular components within lysosomes. In recent decades, several model systems were utilized to dissect the molecular machinery of autophagy and to identify the impact of this cellular “self-eating” process on various physiological and pathological processes. Here we briefly discuss the advantages and limitations of using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a popular model in cell and developmental biology, to apprehend the main pathway of autophagy in a complete animal.

  3. Drosophila as a genetic and cellular model for studies on axonal growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitington Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most fascinating processes during nervous system development is the establishment of stereotypic neuronal networks. An essential step in this process is the outgrowth and precise navigation (pathfinding of axons and dendrites towards their synaptic partner cells. This phenomenon was first described more than a century ago and, over the past decades, increasing insights have been gained into the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating neuronal growth and navigation. Progress in this area has been greatly assisted by the use of simple and genetically tractable invertebrate model systems, such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This review is dedicated to Drosophila as a genetic and cellular model to study axonal growth and demonstrates how it can and has been used for this research. We describe the various cellular systems of Drosophila used for such studies, insights into axonal growth cones and their cytoskeletal dynamics, and summarise identified molecular signalling pathways required for growth cone navigation, with particular focus on pathfinding decisions in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila embryos. These Drosophila-specific aspects are viewed in the general context of our current knowledge about neuronal growth.

  4. Efficient and Specific Modifications of the Drosophila Genome by Means of an Easy TALEN Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyong Liu; Bo Zhang; Wu-Min Deng; Renjie Jiao; Changqing Li; Zhongsheng Yu; Peng Huang; Honggang Wu; Chuanxian Wei; Nannan Zhu; Yan Shen; Yixu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Technology development has always been one of the forces driving breakthroughs in biomedical research.Since the time of Thomas Morgan,Drosophilists have,step by step,developed powerful genetic tools for manipulating and functionally dissecting the Drosophila genome,but room for improving these technologies and developing new techniques is still large,especially today as biologists start to study systematically the functional genomics of different model organisms,including humans,in a high-throughput manner.Here,we report,for the first time in Drosophila,a rapid,easy,and highly specific method for modifying the Drosophila genome at a very high efficiency by means of an improved transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) strategy.We took advantage of the very recently developed "unit assembly" strategy to assemble two pairs of specific TALENs designed to modify the yellow gene (on the sex chromosome) and a novel autosomal gene.The mRNAs of TALENs were subsequently injected into Drosophila embryos.From 31.2% of the injected Fo fertile flies,we detected inheritable modification involving the yellow gene.The entire process from construction of specific TALENs to detection of inheritable modifications can be accomplished within one month.The potential applications of this TALEN-mediated genome modification method in Drosophila are discussed.

  5. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Droso...

  6. Identification of a novel Drosophila gene, beltless, using injectable embryonic and adult RNA interference (RNAi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manev Hari

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is a process triggered by a double-stranded RNA that leads to targeted down-regulation/silencing of gene expression and can be used for functional genomics; i.e. loss-of-function studies. Here we report on the use of RNAi in the identification of a developmentally important novel Drosophila (fruit fly gene (corresponding to a putative gene CG5652/GM06434, that we named beltless based on an embryonic loss-of-function phenotype. Results Beltless mRNA is expressed in all developmental stages except in 0–6 h embryos. In situ RT-PCR localized beltless mRNA in the ventral cord and brain of late stage embryos and in the nervous system, ovaries, and the accessory glands of adult flies. RNAi was induced by injection of short (22 bp beltless double-stranded RNAs into embryos or into adult flies. Embryonic RNAi altered cuticular phenotypes ranging from partially-formed to missing denticle belts (thus beltless of the abdominal segments A2–A4. Embryonic beltless RNAi was lethal. Adult RNAi resulted in the shrinkage of the ovaries by half and reduced the number of eggs laid. We also examined Df(1RK4 flies in which deletion removes 16 genes, including beltless. In some embryos, we observed cuticular abnormalities similar to our findings with beltless RNAi. After differentiating Df(1RK4 embryos into those with visible denticle belts and those missing denticle belts, we assayed the presence of beltless mRNA; no beltless mRNA was detectable in embryos with missing denticle belts. Conclusions We have identified a developmentally important novel Drosophila gene, beltless, which has been characterized in loss-of-function studies using RNA interference. The putative beltless protein shares homologies with the C. elegans nose resistant to fluoxetine (NRF NRF-6 gene, as well as with several uncharacterized C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster genes, some with prominent acyltransferase domains. Future studies should

  7. SUMOylation in Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J. Courey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO, an ~90 amino acid ubiquitin-like protein, is highly conserved throughout the eukaryotic domain. Like ubiquitin, SUMO is covalently attached to lysine side chains in a large number of target proteins. In contrast to ubiquitin, SUMO does not have a direct role in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, like ubiquitin, SUMO does modulate protein function in a variety of other ways. This includes effects on protein conformation, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions. Significant insight into the in vivo role of SUMOylation has been provided by studies in Drosophila that combine genetic manipulation, proteomic, and biochemical analysis. Such studies have revealed that the SUMO conjugation pathway regulates a wide variety of critical cellular and developmental processes, including chromatin/chromosome function, eggshell patterning, embryonic pattern formation, metamorphosis, larval and pupal development, neurogenesis, development of the innate immune system, and apoptosis. This review discusses our current understanding of the diverse roles for SUMO in Drosophila development.

  8. CELLULAR LOCALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF pygo DURING DROSOPHILA DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINXin-da; LINXin-hua; CHENGJia-an

    2003-01-01

    Wg/Wnt signaling is a key signaling pathway in Drosophila. Many genes involved in Wingless(wg) signal transduction pathway downstream of Wg, or it'' s vertebrate Wg homologue Wnt, have been identified.Transduction of the Wg signal downstream of Wg is mediated by nuclear TCF/LEF-1, through association with Ar-madillo (Arm)/β-catenin. Pygopus (pygo) is a new identified component in this pathway . Cellular localization experiment showed that pygo was expressed specifically in the nucleus. The expression profile of pygo in embryos was examined using in situ hybridization. Although pygo expressed ubiquitously in the embryos, it expressed at relatively high level in pre-blastoderm embryos which indicate a high degree of maternally provided message, fol-lowed by a low level of ubiquitous zygotic expression. This continues into larval tissues (including wing disc, eye disc and leg disc), where pygo appears to be expressed at low level. Comparison of pygo expression levels, in the wing disc, eye disc and leg disc, showed pygo expression level in the wing disc pouch and leg disc were rela-tive higher.

  9. Physical influences on embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, D C; Rowlett, K; Simkiss, K

    1987-01-01

    There is a critical period between 3 and 7 days of incubation when the absence of turning in eggs of the domestic fowl leads to increased mortality and decreased embryo growth. This critical period coincides with the time of subembryonic fluid formation, and it is suggested that the absence of turning leads to the presence of unstirred layer effects in fluid secretion. This fluid deficiency persists throughout the subsequent development of the embryo. Experiments on shell-less culture systems support this interpretation in preference to other explanations of embryo death in unturned eggs, which usually refer to chorion adhesion to shell membranes.

  10. New techniques on embryo manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribá, M J; Valbuena, D; Remohí, J; Pellicer, A; Simón, C

    2002-01-01

    For many years, experience has been accumulated on embryo and gamete manipulation in livestock animals. The present work is a review of these techniques and their possible application in human embryology in specific cases. It is possible to manipulate gametes at different levels, producing paternal or maternal haploid embryos (hemicloning), using different techniques including nuclear transfer. At the embryonic stage, considering practical, ethical and legal issues, techniques will be reviewed that include cloning and embryo splitting at the cleavage stage, morula, or blastocyst stage.

  11. 多囊卵巢综合征患者再次冻融胚胎移植内膜准备方案策略%Endometrial preparation scheme of the second frozen-thawed embryo transplantation in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娟辉; 孔欣; 侯哲; 张守波; 胡丹丹

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of the ovulation induction with letrozole (LE) and pretreatment of endometrial preparation in the second frozen - thawed embryo transplantation in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) on endometrial preparation and clinical pregnancy rate. Methods: Twenty - six patients with PCOS and unsuccessful frozen embryo transplantation in the hospital received o-vulation induction with letrozole as endometrial preparation, while hysteroscopy was conducted for diagnosis and treatment among the patients with abnormal uterine cavity . Dilation therapy was carried out for these difficult transplantation patients, and the uterine stimulation was applied for the second transplantation. The effect of frozen - thawed embryo transplantation was observed. Results: The level of estradiol was (326 ±229) pg/ml on the induced ovulation day, which was statistically significantly higher than that during the last hormone replacement period (P 0. 05) . Three patients with uterine polyp after excision of cervical polyp and two patients with difficult transplantation after uterine dilation got pregnancy successfully. The pregnancy rate was 53. 84%. Conclusion: For the patients with PCOS and unsuccessful frozen embryo transplantation, the induction of ovulation with letrozole, uterine and cervical pretreatment at the second transplantation is necessary for improving the transplantation success rate.%目的:探讨来曲唑促排卵及移植前预处理对多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)患者再次冻融胚胎移植内膜准备及妊娠成功率的影响.方法:对尚有冷冻胚胎的26例PCOS初次冻融胚胎移植妊娠失败患者,应用来曲唑促排卵法作为子宫内膜准备方法,并对宫腔异常者行宫腔镜检查及治疗,对移植困难者行扩宫治疗,再次移植前常规行宫腔刺激,观察冷冻复苏移植的效果.结果:诱发排卵日E2平均水平为(326±229) pg/ml,较前次激素替代周期E2值增

  12. Non-surgical embryo transfer in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeleger, W.

    1999-01-01

    Embryo transfer in pigs has been performed surgically for a long time. However, a less invasive, non-surgical, procedure of embryo transfer could be a valuable tool for research (to study embryo survival and embryo-uterus interactions) and practical applications (export, prevention of

  13. Accurate and Phenol Free DNA Sexing of Day 30 Porcine Embryos by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanes, Milena S; Tsoi, Stephen C M; Dyck, Michael K

    2016-02-14

    Research into prenatal programming in the pig has shown that the sex of the developing embryo or fetus can influence the developmental outcome. Therefore, the ability to determine an embryo's sex is necessary in many experiments particularly regarding early development. The present protocol demonstrates an inexpensive, rapid and non-toxic preparation of pig genomic DNA for use with PCR. Day 30 embryos must be humanely collected according to the guidelines established by Institutional Animal Policy and Welfare Committees for the present protocol. The preparation of the whole embryo for this PCR based sexing technique simply involves grinding the frozen embryo to a fine powder using a pre-chilled mortar and pestle. PCR-quality DNA is released from a small amount of embryo powder by applying a hot incubation in an alkaline lysis reagent. Next, the DNA solution is mixed with neutralization buffer and used directly for PCR. Two primer pairs are generated to detect specific sex determining region of the Y- chromosome (SRY) and ZFX region of the X- chromosome with high accuracy and specificity. The same protocol can be applied to other elongated embryos (Day 10 to Day 14) earlier than Day 30. Also, this protocol can be carried with 96-welled plates when screening a large number of embryos, making it feasible for automation and high-throughput sex typing.

  14. Sterol requirements in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida de Carvalho, Maria Joao

    2009-01-01

    Sterol is an abundant component of eukaryotic cell membranes and is thought to influence membrane properties such as permeability, fluidity and microdomain formation. Drosophila is an excellent model system in which to study functional requirements for membrane sterol because, although it does not synthesize sterol, it nevertheless requires sterols to complete development. Moreover, Drosophila normally incorporates sterols into cell membranes. Thus, dietary sterol depletion can be used to ...

  15. twin of eyeless, a second Pax-6 gene of Drosophila, acts upstream of eyeless in the control of eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, T; Halder, G; Kloter, U; Souabni, A; Gehring, W J; Busslinger, M

    1999-03-01

    The Drosophila Pax-6 gene eyeless (ey) plays a key role in eye development. Here we show tht Drosophila contains a second Pax-6 gene, twin of eyeless (toy), due to a duplication during insect evolution. Toy is more similar to vertebrate Pax-6 proteins than Ey with regard to overall sequence conservation, DNA-binding function, and early expression in the embryo, toy and ey share a similar expression pattern in the developing visual system, and targeted expression of Toy, like Ey, induces the formation of ectopic eyes. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates, however, that Toy functions upstream of ey by directly regulating the eye-specific enhancer of ey. Toy is therefore required for initiation of ey expression in the embryo and acts through Ey to activate the eye developmental program.

  16. Phaseolus immature embryo rescue technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Pascal; Toussaint, André; Mergeai, Guy; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Predominant among the production constraints of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris are infestation of Ascochyta blight, Bean Golden Mosaic virus (BGMV), and Bean Fly. Interbreeding with Phaseolus -coccineus L. and/or Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm has been shown to provide P. vulgaris with greater resistance to these diseases. For interspecific crosses to be successful, it is important to use P. coccineus and P. polyanthus as female parents; this prevents rapid reversal to the recurrent parent P. vulgaris. Although incompatibility barriers are post-zygotic, early hybrid embryo abortion limits the success of F1 crosses. While rescue techniques for globular and early heart-shaped embryos have improved in recent years, -success in hybridization remains very low. In this study, we describe six steps that allowed us to rescue 2-day-old P. vulgaris embryos using a pod culture technique. Our methods consisted of (i) pod culture, (ii) extraction and culture of immature embryos, (iii) dehydration of embryos, (iv) germination of embryos, (v) rooting of developed shoots, and (vi) hardening of plantlets.

  17. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity.

  18. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory.

  19. Lessons from Embryos: Haeckel's Embryo Drawings, Evolution, and Secondary Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, developmental biologist Michael Richardson compared his research team's embryo photographs to Ernst Haeckel's 1874 embryo drawings and called Haeckel's work "noncredible". "Science" soon published "Haeckel's Embryos: Fraud Rediscovered," and Richardson's comments further reinvigorated criticism of Haeckel by…

  20. Lessons from Embryos: Haeckel's Embryo Drawings, Evolution, and Secondary Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, developmental biologist Michael Richardson compared his research team's embryo photographs to Ernst Haeckel's 1874 embryo drawings and called Haeckel's work "noncredible". "Science" soon published "Haeckel's Embryos: Fraud Rediscovered," and Richardson's comments further reinvigorated criticism of Haeckel by…

  1. Drosophila laminins act as key regulators of basement membrane assembly and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Jose M; Torgler, Catherine N; Molnar, Cristina; Tepass, Ulrich; López-Varea, Ana; Brown, Nicholas H; de Celis, Jose F; Martín-Bermudo, Maria D

    2009-12-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric molecules found in all basement membranes. In mammals, they have been involved in diverse developmental processes, from gastrulation to tissue maintenance. The Drosophila genome encodes two laminin alpha chains, one beta and one Gamma, which form two distinct laminin trimers. So far, only mutations affecting one or other trimer have been analysed. In order to study embryonic development in the complete absence of laminins, we mutated the gene encoding the sole laminin beta chain in Drosophila, LanB1, so that no trimers can be made. We show that LanB1 mutant embryos develop until the end of embryogenesis. Electron microscopy analysis of mutant embryos reveals that the basement membranes are absent and the remaining extracellular material appears disorganised and diffuse. Accordingly, abnormal accumulation of major basement membrane components, such as Collagen IV and Perlecan, is observed in mutant tissues. In addition, we show that elimination of LanB1 prevents the normal morphogenesis of most organs and tissues, including the gut, trachea, muscles and nervous system. In spite of the above structural roles for laminins, our results unravel novel functions in cell adhesion, migration and rearrangement. We propose that while an early function of laminins in gastrulation is not conserved in Drosophila and mammals, their function in basement membrane assembly and organogenesis seems to be maintained throughout evolution.

  2. Microsatellite repeat instability fuels evolution of embryonic enhancers in Hawaiian Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Andrew; Stroebele, Elizabeth; Erives, Albert

    2014-01-01

    For ∼30 million years, the eggs of Hawaiian Drosophila were laid in ever-changing environments caused by high rates of island formation. The associated diversification of the size and developmental rate of the syncytial fly embryo would have altered morphogenic gradients, thus necessitating frequent evolutionary compensation of transcriptional responses. We investigate the consequences these radiations had on transcriptional enhancers patterning the embryo to see whether their pattern of molecular evolution is different from non-Hawaiian species. We identify and functionally assay in transgenic D. melanogaster the Neurogenic Ectoderm Enhancers from two different Hawaiian Drosophila groups: (i) the picture wing group, and (ii) the modified mouthparts group. We find that the binding sites in this set of well-characterized enhancers are footprinted by diverse microsatellite repeat (MSR) sequences. We further show that Hawaiian embryonic enhancers in general are enriched in MSR relative to both Hawaiian non-embryonic enhancers and non-Hawaiian embryonic enhancers. We propose embryonic enhancers are sensitive to Activator spacing because they often serve as assembly scaffolds for the aggregation of transcription factor activator complexes. Furthermore, as most indels are produced by microsatellite repeat slippage, enhancers from Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, which experience dynamic evolutionary pressures, would become grossly enriched in MSR content.

  3. A vertex model of Drosophila ventral furrow formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Spahn

    Full Text Available Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is an outstanding model system to study the mechanisms involved in large-scale tissue rearrangements. Ventral cells accumulate myosin at their apical sides and, while being tightly coupled to each other via apical adherens junctions, execute actomyosin contractions that lead to reduction of their apical cell surface. Thereby, a band of constricted cells along the ventral epithelium emerges which will form a tissue indentation along the ventral midline (the ventral furrow. Here we adopt a 2D vertex model to simulate ventral furrow formation in a surface view allowing easy comparison with confocal live-recordings. We show that in order to reproduce furrow morphology seen in vivo, a gradient of contractility must be assumed in the ventral epithelium which renders cells more contractile the closer they lie to the ventral midline. The model predicts previous experimental findings, such as the gain of eccentric morphology of constricting cells and an incremental fashion of apical cell area reduction. Analysis of the model suggests that this incremental area reduction is caused by the dynamical interplay of cell elasticity and stochastic contractility as well as by the opposing forces from contracting neighbour cells. We underpin results from the model through in vivo analysis of ventral furrow formation in wildtype and twi mutant embryos. Our results show that ventral furrow formation can be accomplished as a "tug-of-war" between stochastically contracting, mechanically coupled cells and may require less rigorous regulation than previously thought.For the developmental biologist it is a fascinating question how cells can coordinate major tissue movements during embryonic development. The so-called ventral furrow of the Drosophila embryo is a well-studied example of such a process when cells from a ventral band, spanning nearly the entire length of the embryo, undergo dramatic shape change by contracting their

  4. Passive cellular microrheology in developing fruit fly embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Sarah; Ma, Xiaoyan; Lawrence, Stacey; Hutson, M. Shane

    2012-02-01

    The development of fruit fly (Drosophila) embryos involves spatial and temporal regulation of cellular mechanical properties. These properties can be probed in vivo using laser hole drilling experiments; however, this technique only infers relative forces. Conversion to absolute forces requires measurement of cellular viscoelastic properties. Here, we use passive microrheology of fluorescently labeled cell membranes to measure the viscoelastic properties of amnioserosa cells. These dynamic epithelial cells play an important mechanical role during two developmental stages: germ band retraction and dorsal closure. Passive microrheology in this system is confounded by active contractions in the cytoskeleton. Thus, the fruit fly embryos are transiently anesthetized with CO2, halting active cellular movements, leaving only passive Brownian motion. The power spectra of these fluctuations are well fit by a Lorentzian -- as expected for Brownian motion -- and allow us to extract cellular viscoelastic parameters at different developmental stages. These measured parameters inform previous hole-drilling experiments and provide inputs for quantitative computational models of fruit fly embryonic development.

  5. Embryo density may affect embryo quality during in vitro culture in a microwell group culture dish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Adam; Kaszas, Zita; Murber, Akos; Rigo, Janos; Urbancsek, Janos; Fancsovits, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Culturing embryos in groups is a common practice in mammalian embryology. Since the introduction of different microwell dishes, it is possible to identify oocytes or embryos individually. As embryo density (embryo-to-volume ratio) may affect the development and viability of the embryos, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different embryo densities on embryo quality. Data of 1337 embryos from 228 in vitro fertilization treatment cycles were retrospectively analyzed. Embryos were cultured in a 25 μl microdrop in a microwell group culture dish containing 9 microwells. Three density groups were defined: Group 1 with 2-4 (6.3-12.5 μl/embryo), Group 2 with 5-6 (4.2-5.0 μl/embryo), and Group 3 with 7-9 (2.8-3.6 μl/embryo) embryos. Proportion of good quality embryos was higher in Group 2 on both days (D2: 18.9 vs. 31.5 vs. 24.7%; p Culturing 5-6 embryos together in a culture volume of 25 μl may benefit embryo quality. As low egg number, position, and distance of the embryos may influence embryo quality, results should be interpreted with caution.

  6. A cellular automaton model for neurogenesis in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Pascal O.; Chopard, Bastien; Preiss, Anette; Ramsden, Jeremy J.

    1998-07-01

    A cellular automaton (CA) is constructed for the formation of the central nervous system of the Drosophila embryo. This is an experimentally well-studied system in which complex interactions between neighbouring cells appear to drive their differentiation into different types. It appears that all the cells initially have the potential to become neuroblasts, and all strive to this end, but those which differentiate first block their as yet undifferentiated neighbours from doing so. The CA makes use of observational evidence for a lateral inhibition mechanism involving signalling products S of the ‘proneural’ or neuralizing genes. The key concept of the model is that cells are continuously producing S, but the production rate is lowered by inhibitory signals received from neighbouring cells which have advanced further along the developmental pathway. Comparison with experimental data shows that it well accounts for the observed proportion of neuroectodermal cells delaminating as neuroblasts.

  7. DeadEasy caspase: automatic counting of apoptotic cells in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel G Forero

    Full Text Available Development, cancer, neurodegenerative and demyelinating diseases, injury, and stem cell manipulations are characterised by alterations in cell number. Research into development, disease, and the effects of drugs require cell number counts. These are generally indirect estimates, because counting cells in an animal or organ is paradoxically difficult, as well as being tedious and unmanageable. Drosophila is a powerful model organism used to investigate the genetic bases of development and disease. There are Drosophila models for multiple neurodegenerative diseases, characterised by an increase in cell death. However, a fast, reliable, and accurate way to count the number of dying cells in vivo is not available. Here, we present a method based on image filtering and mathematical morphology techniques, to count automatically the number of dying cells in intact fruit-fly embryos. We call the resulting programme DeadEasy Caspase. It has been validated for Drosophila and we present examples of its power to address biological questions. Quantification is automatic, accurate, objective, and very fast. DeadEasy Caspase will be freely available as an ImageJ plug-in, and it can be modified for use in other sample types. It is of interest to the Drosophila and wider biomedical communities. DeadEasy Caspase is a powerful tool for the analysis of cell survival and cell death in development and in disease, such as neurodegenerative diseases and ageing. Combined with the power of Drosophila genetics, DeadEasy expands the tools that enable the use of Drosophila to analyse gene function, model disease and test drugs in the intact nervous system and whole animal.

  8. What is the preimplantation embryo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krones, Tanja; Schlüter, Elmar; Neuwohner, Elke; El Ansari, Susan; Wissner, Thomas; Richter, Gerd

    2006-07-01

    We present results from our 'bioethical field studies', which explore and compare the views of experts, patients and the general public on the beginning of human life and the status of the preimplantation embryo in Germany. Using a qualitative and quantitative multi-method approach, we found crucial differences in the categorization of the beginning of human life within the expert group (representative samples of human geneticists n=104, ethicists n=168, midwives n=294, obstetricians n=147, paediatricians n=166), and between expert and lay samples (IVF couples n=108, high genetic risk couples n=324, general population n=1017). The majority of lay respondents as well as paediatricians and obstetricians chose nidation, the moment when the implantation of the fertilized egg into the uterus takes place, as the crucial boundary that marks the beginning of human life, whereas the majority of (female) human geneticists, ethicists and midwives voted for conception as the decisive point in time. The views of all groups on the status of the preimplantation embryo differed from the assumptions underlying German legislation (Embryo Protection Act). Religiousness and religious affiliation, gender, attitudes towards disabled people, post-material values and a present desire for a child were identified as independent factors influencing attitudes towards the preimplantation embryo in the population sample. The results are discussed within a broader philosophical and social science perspective of constructivism versus essentialism, proposing a truly interdisciplinary approach to such bioethical core issues as new reproductive technologies and the status of the preimplantation embryo.

  9. The TALE transcription factor homothorax functions to assemble heterochromatin during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Zaballos

    Full Text Available We have previously identified Homothorax (Hth as an important factor for the correct assembly of the pericentromeric heterochromatin during the first fast syncytial divisions of the Drosophila embryo. Here we have extended our studies to later stages of embryonic development. We were able to show that hth mutants exhibit a drastic overall reduction in the tri-methylation of H3 in Lys9, with no reduction of the previous di-methylation. One phenotypic outcome of such a reduction is a genome instability visualized by the many DNA breaks observed in the mutant nuclei. Moreover, loss of Hth leads to the opening of closed heterochromatic regions, including the rDNA genomic region. Our data show that the satellite repeats get transcribed in wild type embryos and that this transcription depends on the presence of Hth, which binds to them as well as to the rDNA region. This work indicates that there is an important role of transcription of non-coding RNAs for constitutive heterochromatin assembly in the Drosophila embryo, and suggests that Hth plays an important role in this process.

  10. The TALE transcription factor homothorax functions to assemble heterochromatin during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaballos, Miguel Angel; Cantero, Walter; Azpiazu, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified Homothorax (Hth) as an important factor for the correct assembly of the pericentromeric heterochromatin during the first fast syncytial divisions of the Drosophila embryo. Here we have extended our studies to later stages of embryonic development. We were able to show that hth mutants exhibit a drastic overall reduction in the tri-methylation of H3 in Lys9, with no reduction of the previous di-methylation. One phenotypic outcome of such a reduction is a genome instability visualized by the many DNA breaks observed in the mutant nuclei. Moreover, loss of Hth leads to the opening of closed heterochromatic regions, including the rDNA genomic region. Our data show that the satellite repeats get transcribed in wild type embryos and that this transcription depends on the presence of Hth, which binds to them as well as to the rDNA region. This work indicates that there is an important role of transcription of non-coding RNAs for constitutive heterochromatin assembly in the Drosophila embryo, and suggests that Hth plays an important role in this process.

  11. A Tribolium castaneum whole-embryo culture protocol for studying the molecular mechanisms and morphogenetic movements involved in insect development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaya, Constanza C; Saavedra, Patricio E; Cepeda, Rodrigo E; Nuñez, Viviana A; Sarrazin, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    The development of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is more representative of arthropods than the evolutionarily derived fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, Tribolium is becoming an emerging organism model for studying the evolution of the mechanisms that control embryonic development in arthropods. In this regard, diverse genetic and molecular tools are currently available for Tribolium, as well as imaging and embryonic techniques. Recently, we developed a method for culturing embryos in order to study specific stages during Tribolium development. In this report, we present a detailed and "easy-to-follow" protocol for embryo handling and dissection, extending the use of whole-embryo culture to functional analysis by performing in vivo pharmacological manipulations. This experimental accessibility allowed us to study the relevance of microtubules in axis elongation, using nocodazole and taxol drugs to interfere with microtubule networks, followed by length measurement analysis. Additionally, we demonstrated that embryo handling had no effect on the development of Tribolium embryos, and we checked viability after dissection and bisection and during incubation using propidium iodide. The embryo culture protocol we describe here can be applied to study diverse developmental processes in Tribolium. We expect that this protocol can be adapted and applied to other arthropods.

  12. Embryo yield in dairy cattle after superovulation with Folltropin or Pluset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, M; Taponen, J

    2017-01-15

    Two commercial FSH products were compared in a retrospective study on 3990 commercial superovulations and embryo recoveries in dairy heifers and cows. In addition, the 56-day nonreturn rate of 19,400 embryos produced with these two preparations was analyzed. Embryo collections were performed during a 16-year period from donors of Holstein and Ayrshire breeds. Folltropin (Vetoquinol S.A., Lure cedex, France) group (Group F) consisted of 2592 superovulations, of which 80% were performed on heifers and 20% on cows, and Pluset (Laboratorios Calier, S.A., Barcelona, Spain) group (Group P) of 1398 treatments, of which 66% and 34% were on heifers and cows, respectively. Total number of recovered structures, number of transferable embryos, and the proportion of unfertilized ova (UFO) and degenerated embryos were analyzed. Distribution of embryos into quality grades (1-3) and developmental stages (4-9) according to the IETS classification guidelines and means for each collection were evaluated. The proportion of low-responders having fewer than five corpora lutea and yielding fewer than five embryos or ova was investigated for each treatment. Group P yielded 1.1 recovered structures more than Group F (P superovulated with Folltropin or Pluset. It was concluded that equal numbers of transferable embryos and pregnancies can be achieved with Folltropin and Pluset. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A simple TALEN-based protocol for efficient genome-editing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Ferreira, Irene R S; Schnorrer, Frank

    2014-08-15

    Drosophila is a well-established genetic model organism: thousands of point mutations, deficiencies or transposon insertions are available from stock centres. However, to date, it is still difficult to modify a specific gene locus in a defined manner. A potential solution is the application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), which have been used successfully to mutate genes in various model organisms. TALENs are constructed by fusion of TALE proteins to the endonuclease FokI, resulting in artificial, sequence-specific endonucleases. They induce double strand breaks, which are either repaired by error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology directed repair (HDR). We developed a simple TALEN-based protocol to mutate any gene of interest in Drosophila within approximately 2 months. We inject mRNA coding for two TALEN pairs targeting the same gene into embryos, employ T7 endonuclease I screening of pooled F1 flies to identify mutations and generate a stable mutant stock in the F3 generation. We illustrate the efficacy of our strategy by mutating CG11617, a previously uncharacterized putative transcription factor with an unknown function in Drosophila. This demonstrates that TALENs are a reliable and efficient strategy to mutate any gene of interest in Drosophila.

  14. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons.

  15. Cell adhesion in embryo morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vanessa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-02-01

    Visualizing and analyzing shape changes at various scales, ranging from single molecules to whole organisms, are essential for understanding complex morphogenetic processes, such as early embryonic development. Embryo morphogenesis relies on the interplay between different tissues, the properties of which are again determined by the interaction between their constituent cells. Cell interactions, on the other hand, are controlled by various molecules, such as signaling and adhesion molecules, which in order to exert their functions need to be spatiotemporally organized within and between the interacting cells. In this review, we will focus on the role of cell adhesion functioning at different scales to organize cell, tissue and embryo morphogenesis. We will specifically ask how the subcellular distribution of adhesion molecules controls the formation of cell-cell contacts, how cell-cell contacts determine tissue shape, and how tissue interactions regulate embryo morphogenesis.

  16. The same oleosin isoforms are present in oil bodies of rice embryo and aleurone layer while caleosin exists only in those of the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-Huang; Chyan, Chia-Lin; Jiang, Pei-Luen; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Tzen, Jason T C

    2012-11-01

    Oil bodies of similar sizes were observed in the cells of embryo and aleurone layer of rice seeds, and remained their structural integrity in vitro after isolation. Comparably, two abundant oleosin isoforms were found in both preparations of oil bodies isolated from the embryo and the aleurone layer. Immunological detection and mass spectrometric analyses indicated that the two oleosin isoforms, termed oleosin-H and oleosin-L, in the embryo and those in the aleurone layer were identical proteins encoded by the same genes (BAF12898.1 and BAF15387.1 for oleosin-H and oleosin-L, respectively). In contrast, one caleosin was found in oil bodies isolated from the embryo but not those isolated from the aleurone layer. Immunological staining of rice seeds confirms that oleosin is present in both embryo and aleurone layer while caleosin exists only in embryo. Caleosin extracted from oil bodies of rice embryo migrated faster on SDS-PAGE in the presence of Ca(2+), in a manner identical to caleosin extracted from sesame oil bodies. Similar to other known monocot caleosins, the rice caleosin possesses an N-terminal appendix that is absent in dicotyledonous caleosins.

  17. Control of dendritic morphogenesis by Trio in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Shivalkar

    Full Text Available Abl tyrosine kinase and its effectors among the Rho family of GTPases each act to control dendritic morphogenesis in Drosophila. It has not been established, however, which of the many GTPase regulators in the cell link these signaling molecules in the dendrite. In axons, the bifunctional guanine exchange factor, Trio, is an essential link between the Abl tyrosine kinase signaling pathway and Rho GTPases, particularly Rac, allowing these systems to act coordinately to control actin organization. In dendritic morphogenesis, however, Abl and Rac have contrary rather than reinforcing effects, raising the question of whether Trio is involved, and if so, whether it acts through Rac, Rho or both. We now find that Trio is expressed in sensory neurons of the Drosophila embryo and regulates their dendritic arborization. trio mutants display a reduction in dendritic branching and increase in average branch length, whereas over-expression of trio has the opposite effect. We further show that it is the Rac GEF domain of Trio, and not its Rho GEF domain that is primarily responsible for the dendritic function of Trio. Thus, Trio shapes the complexity of dendritic arbors and does so in a way that mimics the effects of its target, Rac.

  18. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting by ‘ends-out’ homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR. PMID:24154526

  19. In amnio MRI of mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Roberts

    Full Text Available Mouse embryo imaging is conventionally carried out on ex vivo embryos excised from the amniotic sac, omitting vital structures and abnormalities external to the body. Here, we present an in amnio MR imaging methodology in which the mouse embryo is retained in the amniotic sac and demonstrate how important embryonic structures can be visualised in 3D with high spatial resolution (100 µm/px. To illustrate the utility of in amnio imaging, we subsequently apply the technique to examine abnormal mouse embryos with abdominal wall defects. Mouse embryos at E17.5 were imaged and compared, including three normal phenotype embryos, an abnormal embryo with a clear exomphalos defect, and one with a suspected gastroschisis phenotype. Embryos were excised from the mother ensuring the amnion remained intact and stereo microscopy was performed. Embryos were next embedded in agarose for 3D, high resolution MRI on a 9.4T scanner. Identification of the abnormal embryo phenotypes was not possible using stereo microscopy or conventional ex vivo MRI. Using in amnio MRI, we determined that the abnormal embryos had an exomphalos phenotype with varying severities. In amnio MRI is ideally suited to investigate the complex relationship between embryo and amnion, together with screening for other abnormalities located outside of the mouse embryo, providing a valuable complement to histology and existing imaging methods available to the phenotyping community.

  20. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  1. Xenopus BTBD6 and its Drosophila homologue lute are required for neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Frédéric J; Moers, Virginie; Yan, Jiekun; Souopgui, Jacob; Quan, Xiao-Jiang; De Geest, Natalie; Kricha, Sadia; Hassan, Bassem A; Bellefroid, Eric J

    2008-11-01

    BBP proteins constitute a subclass of CUL3 interacting BTB proteins whose in vivo function remains unknown. Here, we show that the Xenopus BBP gene BTBD6 and the single Drosophila homologue of mammalian BBP genes lute are strongly expressed in the developing nervous system. In Xenopus, BTBD6 expression responds positively to proneural and negatively to neurogenic gene overexpression. Knockdown of BTBD6 in Xenopus or loss of Drosophila lute result in embryos with strong defects in late neuronal markers and strongly reduced and disorganized axons while early neural development is unaffected. XBTBD6 knockdown in Xenopus also affects muscle development. Together, these data indicate that BTBD6/lute is required for proper embryogenesis and plays an essential evolutionary conserved role during neuronal development.

  2. From the Eye to the Brain: Development of the Drosophila Visual System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nériec, Nathalie; Desplan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    How stem cells produce the huge diversity of neurons that form the visual system, and how these cells are assembled in neural circuits are a critical question in developmental neurobiology. Investigations in Drosophila have led to the discovery of several basic principles of neural patterning. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the field by describing the development of the Drosophila visual system, from the embryo to the adult and from the gross anatomy to the cellular level. We then explore the general molecular mechanisms identified that might apply to other neural structures in flies or in vertebrates. Finally, we discuss the major challenges that remain to be addressed in the field. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Two-photon fluorescence imaging and femtosecond laser microsurgery to study drosophila dorsal closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayil K. N., Anisha; Pereira, Andrea; Mathew, Manoj; Artigas, David; Martín Blanco, Enrique; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2008-02-01

    Dorsal closure is a key morphogenic process that occurs at the last stages of Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis. It involves a well coordinated rearrangement and movement of tissues that resemble epithelial wound healing in mammals. The cell dynamics and intracellular signaling pathways that accompany hole closure are expected to be similar during would healing providing a model system to study epithelial healing. Here we demonstrate the use of two-photon fluorescence microscope together with femtosecond laser ablation to examine the epithelial wound healing during embryonic dorsal closure. By using tightly focused NIR femtosecond pulses of subnanojoule energy we are able to produce highly confined microsurgery on the epithelial cells of a developing embryo. We observed that drosophila epidermis heals from the laser wounds with increased activity of actin near the wound edges.

  4. Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for generating and detecting mutations of any gene in Drosophila melanogaster through the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated. We show that injection of RNA into the Drosophila embryo can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in up to 88% of injected flies. These mutations can be transmitted through the germline to make stable lines. Our system provides at least a 10-fold improvement in efficiency over previously published reports, enabling wider application of this technique. We also describe a simple and highly sensitive method of detecting mutations in the target gene by high-resolution melt analysis and discuss how the new technology enables the study of gene function.

  5. Evolutionary Techniques for Image Processing a Large Dataset of Early Drosophila Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Holloway

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how genetic networks act in embryonic development requires a detailed and statistically significant dataset integrating diverse observational results. The fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster is used as a model organism for studying developmental genetics. In recent years, several laboratories have systematically gathered confocal microscopy images of patterns of activity (expression for genes governing early Drosophila development. Due to both the high variability between fruit fly embryos and diverse sources of observational errors, some new nontrivial procedures for processing and integrating the raw observations are required. Here we describe processing techniques based on genetic algorithms and discuss their efficacy in decreasing observational errors and illuminating the natural variability in gene expression patterns. The specific developmental problem studied is anteroposterior specification of the body plan.

  6. Drosophila models for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marcos; Cagan, Ross L

    2006-02-01

    Drosophila is a model system for cancer research. Investigation with fruit flies has facilitated a number of important recent discoveries in the field: the hippo signaling pathway, which coordinates cell proliferation and death to achieve normal tissue size; 'social' behaviors of cells, including cell competition and apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation, that help ensure normal tissue size; and a growing understanding of how oncogenes and tumor suppressors cooperate to achieve tumor growth and metastasis in situ. In the future, Drosophila models can be extended beyond basic research in the search for human therapeutics.

  7. Future aspects of micromanipualtion with embryos for

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embryo micromanipulation techniques and their potential genetic impact in dairy cattle ... bovine embryos and the subsequent transfer of halfembryos has reached a .... (e) to provide synchronously developing pronuclear srage ova for nuclear ...

  8. Embryo splitting: a role in infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C

    2001-01-01

    Embryo splitting may be used to increase the potential fertility of couples requiring IVF. Using cattle as a model, it is possible to increase pregnancy rates from 70% per transfer of good quality in-vivo-produced embryos, to 110% by transferring the two demi-embryos resulting from the bisection of one embryo. The 30-40% greater chance of conception would reduce costs for the government, health authorities and patients, and reduce stress, time and complications for women having IVF treatment. Embryo splitting may also provide donor embryos for infertile couples that cannot conceive naturally or with IVF. The shortage of children for adoption and donor embryos may be overcome by the production of demi-embryos.

  9. A conserved developmental patterning network produces quantitatively different output in multiple species of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, Charless C; Eckenrode, Kelly B; Bragdon, Meghan D; Meyer, Miriah; Wunderlich, Zeba; Simirenko, Lisa; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Keränen, Soile V E; Henriquez, Clara; Knowles, David W; Biggin, Mark D; Eisen, Michael B; DePace, Angela H

    2011-10-01

    Differences in the level, timing, or location of gene expression can contribute to alternative phenotypes at the molecular and organismal level. Understanding the origins of expression differences is complicated by the fact that organismal morphology and gene regulatory networks could potentially vary even between closely related species. To assess the scope of such changes, we used high-resolution imaging methods to measure mRNA expression in blastoderm embryos of Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila pseudoobscura and assembled these data into cellular resolution atlases, where expression levels for 13 genes in the segmentation network are averaged into species-specific, cellular resolution morphological frameworks. We demonstrate that the blastoderm embryos of these species differ in their morphology in terms of size, shape, and number of nuclei. We present an approach to compare cellular gene expression patterns between species, while accounting for varying embryo morphology, and apply it to our data and an equivalent dataset for Drosophila melanogaster. Our analysis reveals that all individual genes differ quantitatively in their spatio-temporal expression patterns between these species, primarily in terms of their relative position and dynamics. Despite many small quantitative differences, cellular gene expression profiles for the whole set of genes examined are largely similar. This suggests that cell types at this stage of development are conserved, though they can differ in their relative position by up to 3-4 cell widths and in their relative proportion between species by as much as 5-fold. Quantitative differences in the dynamics and relative level of a subset of genes between corresponding cell types may reflect altered regulatory functions between species. Our results emphasize that transcriptional networks can diverge over short evolutionary timescales and that even small changes can lead to distinct output in terms of the placement and number of

  10. A conserved developmental patterning network produces quantitatively different output in multiple species of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charless C Fowlkes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the level, timing, or location of gene expression can contribute to alternative phenotypes at the molecular and organismal level. Understanding the origins of expression differences is complicated by the fact that organismal morphology and gene regulatory networks could potentially vary even between closely related species. To assess the scope of such changes, we used high-resolution imaging methods to measure mRNA expression in blastoderm embryos of Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila pseudoobscura and assembled these data into cellular resolution atlases, where expression levels for 13 genes in the segmentation network are averaged into species-specific, cellular resolution morphological frameworks. We demonstrate that the blastoderm embryos of these species differ in their morphology in terms of size, shape, and number of nuclei. We present an approach to compare cellular gene expression patterns between species, while accounting for varying embryo morphology, and apply it to our data and an equivalent dataset for Drosophila melanogaster. Our analysis reveals that all individual genes differ quantitatively in their spatio-temporal expression patterns between these species, primarily in terms of their relative position and dynamics. Despite many small quantitative differences, cellular gene expression profiles for the whole set of genes examined are largely similar. This suggests that cell types at this stage of development are conserved, though they can differ in their relative position by up to 3-4 cell widths and in their relative proportion between species by as much as 5-fold. Quantitative differences in the dynamics and relative level of a subset of genes between corresponding cell types may reflect altered regulatory functions between species. Our results emphasize that transcriptional networks can diverge over short evolutionary timescales and that even small changes can lead to distinct output in terms of the placement and

  11. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis of early male and female Bactrocera jarvisi embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jennifer L; Riegler, Markus; Gilchrist, A Stuart; Shearman, Deborah C A; Frommer, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Developing embryos are provided with maternal RNA transcripts and proteins, but transcription from the zygotic nuclei must be activated to control continuing embryonic development. Transcripts are generated at different stages of early development, and those involved in sex determination and cellularisation are some of the earliest to be activated. The male sex in tephritid fruit flies is determined by the presence of a Y chromosome, and it is believed that a transcript from the Y-chromosome sets in motion a cascade that determines male development, as part of the greater maternal to zygotic transition (MTZ). Here we investigate the poly(A+) transcriptome in early male and female embryos of the horticultural pest Bactrocera jarvisi (Diptera: Tephritidae). Bactrocera jarvisi embryos were collected over two pre-blastoderm time periods, 2-3h and 3-5h after egg laying. Embryos were individually sexed using a Y-chromosome marker, allowing the sex-specific poly(A+) transcriptome of single-sex embryo pools to be deep-sequenced and assembled de novo. Transcripts for sixteen sex-determination and two cellularisation gene homologues of Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae) were identified in early embryos of B. jarvisi, including transcripts highly upregulated prior to cellularisation. No strong candidates for transcripts derived solely from the Y chromosome were recovered from the poly(A+) fraction. Bactrocera jarvisi provides an excellent model for embryonic studies due to available Y-chromosome markers and the compact time frame for zygotic transcription and the sex-determined state. Our data contribute fundamental information to sex-determination research, and provide candidates for the sourcing of gene promoters for transgenic pest-management strategies of tephritid fruit flies.

  12. Embryo growth in mature celery seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorn, van der P.

    1989-01-01

    Germination of celery seeds is slow, due to the need for embryo growth before radicle protrusion can occur. Germination rate was correlated with embryo growth rate. Celery seeds with different embryo growth rates were obtained with fluid density separation of a seed lot. Low density seeds g

  13. Embryo temperature during incubation: practice and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, A.

    2008-01-01

    (Key words: incubation, embryo temperature, embryonic development, heat production, heat loss) Until recently, all incubator studies were performed using a constant machine temperature (MT). But it is embryo temperature (ET) that is of importance to the embryo, and not MT. In practice, MT is often

  14. Improving embryo quality in assisted reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to improve embryo quality in assisted reproductive technologies by gaining more insight into human preimplantation embryo development and by improving in vitro culture conditions. To do so, we investigated an intriguing feature of the human preimplantation embryo, i.e. it

  15. Embryo growth in mature celery seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorn, van der P.

    1989-01-01

    Germination of celery seeds is slow, due to the need for embryo growth before radicle protrusion can occur. Germination rate was correlated with embryo growth rate. Celery seeds with different embryo growth rates were obtained with fluid density separation of a seed lot. Low density seeds

  16. Myc localizes to histone locus bodies during replication in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Daneshvar

    Full Text Available Myc is an important protein at the center of multiple pathways required for growth and proliferation in animals. The absence of Myc is lethal in flies and mice, and its over-production is a potent inducer of over-proliferation and cancer. Myc protein is localized to the nucleus where it executes its many functions, however the specific sub-nuclear localization of Myc has rarely been reported. The work we describe here began with an observation of unexpected, punctate spots of Myc protein in certain regions of Drosophila embryos. We investigated the identity of these puncta and demonstrate that Myc is co-localized with coilin, a marker for sub-nuclear organelles known as Cajal Bodies (CBs, in embryos, larvae and ovaries. Using antibodies specific for U7 snRNP component Lsm11, we show that the majority of Myc and coilin co-localization occurs in Histone Locus Bodies (HLBs, the sites of histone mRNA transcription and processing. Furthermore, Myc localizes to HLBs only during replication in mitotic and endocycling cells, suggesting that its role there relates to replication-dependent canonical histone gene transcription. These results provide evidence that sub-nuclear localization of Myc is cell-cycle dependent and potentially important for histone mRNA production and processing.

  17. zen and the art of phenotypic maintenance: canalization of embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin-Smyth, Jackie; Ferguson, Edwin L

    2014-01-01

    We recently uncovered a novel genetic mechanism that generates the phenotypic uniformity, or canalization, of BMP signaling and cell fate specification during patterning of the dorsal-ventral (D/V) axis in D. melanogaster embryos. We went on to show that other wild-type Drosophila species lack this canalizing genetic circuitry and, consequently, have non-robust D/V patterning. In this review, we propose molecular mechanisms that may give rise to stereotyped BMP signaling, and we identify an additional species that could have decanalized D/V patterning. Extension of these analyses could in turn help explain why canalization is not a universal necessity for species survival.

  18. Cloning and expression of Xenopus Prickle, an orthologue of a Drosophila planar cell polarity gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallingford, John B; Goto, Toshiyasu; Keller, Ray; Harland, Richard M

    2002-08-01

    We have cloned Xenopus orthologues of the Drosophila planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Prickle. Xenopus Prickle (XPk) is expressed in tissues at the dorsal midline during gastrulation and early neurulation. XPk is later expressed in a segmental pattern in the presomitic mesoderm and then in recently formed somites. XPk is also expressed in the tailbud, pronephric duct, retina, and the otic vesicle. The complex expression pattern of XPk suggests that PCP signaling is used in a diverse array of developmental processes in vertebrate embryos.

  19. An epidermal barrier wound repair pathway in Drosophila is mediated by grainy head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Kimberly A; Pearson, Joseph C; McGinnis, William

    2005-04-15

    We used wounded Drosophila embryos to define an evolutionarily conserved pathway for repairing the epidermal surface barrier. This pathway includes a wound response enhancer from the Ddc gene that requires grainy head (grh) function and binding sites for the Grh transcription factor. At the signaling level, tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities are induced in epidermal cells near wounds, and activated ERK is required for a robust wound response. The conservation of this Grh-dependent pathway suggests that the repair of insect cuticle and mammal skin is controlled by an ancient, shared control system for constructing and healing the animal body surface barrier.

  20. Influence of carbon nanotube length on toxicity to zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jinping Cheng,1,2 Shuk Han Cheng11Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 2State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: There is currently a large difference of opinion in nanotoxicology studies of nanomaterials. There is concern about why some studies have indicated that there is strong toxicity, while others have not. In this study, the length of carbon nanotubes greatly affected their toxicity in zebrafish embryos. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were sonicated in a nitric acid solution for 24 hours and 48 hours. The modified MWCNTs were tested in early developing zebrafish embryo. MWCNTs prepared with the longer sonication time resulted in severe developmental toxicity; however, the shorter sonication time did not induce any obvious toxicity in the tested developing zebrafish embryos. The cellular and molecular changes of the affected zebrafish embryos were studied and the observed phenotypes scored. This study suggests that length plays an important role in the in vivo toxicity of functionalized CNTs. This study will help in furthering the understanding on current differences in toxicity studies of nanomaterials.Keywords: length, carbon nanotubes, sonication, developmental toxicity, zebrafish

  1. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  2. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  3. Effects of mutations at the stambh A locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Kumar; Minu Joseph; Shanti Chandrashekaran

    2001-08-01

    We report novel findings on the cytogenetic location, functional complexity and maternal and germline roles of the stambh A locus of Drosophila melanogaster. stmA is localized to polytene bands 44D1.2 on 2R. stmA mutations are of two types: temperature-sensitive (ts) adult and larval paralytic or unconditional embryonic or larval lethal. Twelve alleles reported in this study fall into two intragenic complementing groups suggesting that stmA is a complex locus with more than one functional domain. Some unconditional embryonic lethal alleles show a ‘neurogenic’ phenotype of cuticle loss accompanied by neural hypertrophy. It is shown that embryos of ts paralytic alleles also show mild neural hypertrophy at permissive temperatures while short exposure to heat induces severe cuticle loss in these embryos. stmA exerts a maternal influence over heat-induced cuticle loss. Unconditional embryonic lethal alleles of stmA are also germline lethal.

  4. 自然周期准备内膜在子宫内膜异位症患者冻融胚胎移植中的结局分析%Efficacy of natural cycle endometrial preparation for frozen-thawed embryo transfer in patients with endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭海燕; 汪云; 陈秋菊; 匡延平

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the efficacy of natural cycle (NC) endometrial preparation for frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) in women with endometriosis (EMS).Methods:A retrospective study was carried out in women with EMS,including 120 cycles with stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ EMS (group A);233 cycles with stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ EMS (group B);300 cycles with tubal factor infertility (group C).In group B,42 patients received 47 cycles and had endometrial cyst recurrence (group D) after laparoscopic treatment.All groups were prepared for FET using a NC protocol.Results:The implantation rate (group A:32.4%,group B:36.0%,group C:30.4%,P=-0.169),the pregnancy rate (group A:43.3%,group B:50.2%,group C:45.3%,P=0.381),and the live-birth rate (group A:35.83%,group B:39.91%,group C:39.0%,P=0.587) were similar.No differences were observed in ongoing pregnancy rate,miscarriage rate,and pregnancy complication rate,independently from severity of EMS.No congenital birth defects were found.When high-quality embryos were transferred,pregnancy outcomes were not affected by active endometrial cyst.Conclusion:There was no difference in pregnancy outcomes between EMS patients received NC endometrial preparation and patients with tubal infertility,which were not affected by the stage of EMS.The pregnancy outcomes were not affected by active endometrial cyst.%目的:研究以自然周期作为子宫内膜准备方式对子宫内膜异位症(EMS)患者冻融胚胎移植(FET)妊娠结局的影响.方法:回顾性分析EMS患者353个FET周期,按EMS严重程度分组,A组:Ⅰ~Ⅱ期,120个周期;B组:Ⅲ~Ⅳ期,233个周期;另将B组中囊肿复发的47个周期设为D组;而将输卵管因素不孕患者的300个FET周期纳入为对照组(C组),比较A、B、C组患者自然周期准备内膜的妊娠结局.结果:A、B、C组患者的种植率、活产率、继续妊娠率、流产率、妊娠期并发症率无统计学差异(P>0.05),且妊娠结局与EMS的分期无关.A、B、C组均没有

  5. Transcriptional control in embryonic Drosophila midline guidance assessed through a whole genome approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomancak Pavel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the development of the Drosophila central nervous system the process of midline crossing is orchestrated by a number of guidance receptors and ligands. Many key axon guidance molecules have been identified in both invertebrates and vertebrates, but the transcriptional regulation of growth cone guidance remains largely unknown. It is established that translational regulation plays a role in midline crossing, and there are indications that transcriptional regulation is also involved. To investigate this issue, we conducted a genome-wide study of transcription in Drosophila embryos using wild type and a number of well-characterized Drosophila guidance mutants and transgenics. We also analyzed a previously published microarray time course of Drosophila embryonic development with an axon guidance focus. Results Using hopach, a novel clustering method which is well suited to microarray data analysis, we identified groups of genes with similar expression patterns across guidance mutants and transgenics. We then systematically characterized the resulting clusters with respect to their relevance to axon guidance using two complementary controlled vocabularies: the Gene Ontology (GO and anatomical annotations of the Atlas of Pattern of Gene Expression (APoGE in situ hybridization database. The analysis indicates that regulation of gene expression does play a role in the process of axon guidance in Drosophila. We also find a strong link between axon guidance and hemocyte migration, a result that agrees with mounting evidence that axon guidance molecules are co-opted in vertebrate vascularization. Cell cyclin activity in the context of axon guidance is also suggested from our array data. RNA and protein expression patterns of cell cyclins in axon guidance mutants and transgenics support this possible link. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the regulation of axon guidance in vivo.

  6. Oocyte and embryonic cytoskeletal defects caused by mutations in the Drosophila swallow gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Stephenson, Edwin C

    2002-06-01

    The maternal effect gene swallow ( swa) of Drosophila is required for bicoid and htsN4 mRNA localization during oogenesis. Swallow is also required for additional, poorly understood, functions in early embryogenesis. We have examined the cytoskeleton in swa mutant oocytes and embryos by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Mid- and late-stage swaoocytes have defective cytoplasmic actin networks. Stage-10 oocytes have solid actin clumps and hollow actin spheres in the subcortical layer, and late-stage oocytes have uniformly distributed hollow actin spheres in the subcortical layer and in deeper cytoplasm. Swa preblastoderm embryos have uneven and irregularly distributed actin at the cortex, and defective subcortical actin networks that contain hollow and solid spheres. In swa syncytial blastoderm embryos, the abnormal actin cytoskeleton is associated with defects in nuclear distribution, migration and cleavage. Actin cytoskeletal defects correlate with spindle defects, suggesting that the abnormal organization of the actin cytoskeleton allows interaction of mitotic spindles, which induces defective nuclear divisions and loss of nuclei from the surface of the embryo.

  7. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  8. Drosophila as a model for antiviral immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanna; Valanne; Mika; Rmet

    2010-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used to study numerous biological processes including immune response.Flies are naturally infected with more than twenty RNA viruses making it a valid model organism to study host-pathogen interactions during viral infections.The Drosophila antiviral immunity includes RNA interference,activation of the JAK/STAT and other signaling cascades and other mechanisms such as autophagy and interactions with other microorganisms.Here we review Drosophila as an immunological research model as well as recent advances in the field ofDrosophila antiviral immunity.

  9. Non-invasive long-term fluorescence live imaging of Tribolium castaneum embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, Frederic; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2014-06-01

    Insect development has contributed significantly to our understanding of metazoan development. However, most information has been obtained by analyzing a single species, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Embryonic development of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum differs fundamentally from that of Drosophila in aspects such as short-germ development, embryonic leg development, extensive extra-embryonic membrane formation and non-involuted head development. Although Tribolium has become the second most important insect model organism, previous live imaging attempts have addressed only specific questions and no long-term live imaging data of Tribolium embryogenesis have been available. By combining light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy with a novel mounting method, we achieved complete, continuous and non-invasive fluorescence live imaging of Tribolium embryogenesis at high spatiotemporal resolution. The embryos survived the 2-day or longer imaging process, developed into adults and produced fertile progeny. Our data document all morphogenetic processes from the rearrangement of the uniform blastoderm to the onset of regular muscular movement in the same embryo and in four orientations, contributing significantly to the understanding of Tribolium development. Furthermore, we created a comprehensive chronological table of Tribolium embryogenesis, integrating most previous work and providing a reference for future studies. Based on our observations, we provide evidence that serosa window closure and serosa opening, although deferred by more than 1 day, are linked. All our long-term imaging datasets are available as a resource for the community. Tribolium is only the second insect species, after Drosophila, for which non-invasive long-term fluorescence live imaging has been achieved.

  10. Enhance beef cattle improvement by embryo biotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B; Zan, L

    2012-10-01

    Embryo biotechnology has become one of the prominent high businesses worldwide. This technology has evolved through three major changes, that is, traditional embryo transfer (in vivo embryo production by donor superovulation), in vitro embryo production by ovum pick up with in vitro fertilization and notably current cloning technique by somatic cell nuclear transfer and transgenic animal production. Embryo biotechnology has widely been used in dairy and beef cattle industry and commercial bovine embryo transfer has become a large international business. Currently, many developed biotechnologies during the period from early oocyte stage to pre-implantation embryos can be used to create new animal breeds and accelerate genetic progression. Based on recent advances in embryo biotechnologies and authors current studies, this review will focus on a description of the application of this technology to beef cattle improvement and discuss how to use this technology to accelerate beef cattle breeding and production. The main topics of this presentation include the following: (i) how to increase calf production numbers from gametes including sperm and oocyte; (ii) multiple ovulation and embryo transfer breeding schemes; (iii) in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasm sperm injection in bovine; (iv) pronuclear development and transgenic animals; (v) sex selection from sperm and embryos; (vi) cloning and androgenesis; (vii) blastocyst development and embryonic stem cells; (viii) preservation of beef cattle genetic resources; and (ix) conclusions. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Aberrant DNA methylation in cloned ovine embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; HOU Jian; LEI TingHua; BAI JiaHua; GUAN Hong; AN XiaoRong

    2008-01-01

    By using the approach of immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine (5MeC), the present study detected the DNA methylation patterns of cloned ovine embryos. The em-bryos derived from in vitro fertilization were also examined for reference purpose. The results showed that: (1) during the pre-implantation development, cloned embryos displayed a similar demethylation profile to the fertilized embryos; that is, the methylation level decreased to the lowest at 8-cell stage, and then increased again at morulae stage. However, methylation level was obviously higher in cloned embryos than in stage-matched fertilized embryos, especially at 8-cell stage and afterwards; (2) at blastocyst stage, the methylation pattern in cloned embryos was different from that in fertilized em-bryos. In cloned blastocyst, inner cell mass (ICM) exhibited a comparable level to trophectoderm cells (TE), while in in-vitro fertilized blastocyst the methylation level of ICM was lower than that of TE, which is not consistent with that reported by other authors. These results indicate that DNA methylation is abnormally reprogrammed in cloned embryos, implying that aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming may be one of the factors causing cloned embryos developmental failure.

  12. Embryo donation in Iran: an ethical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Leila; Bagheri, Alireza

    2013-12-01

    Iran is the only Muslim country that has legislation on embryo donation, adopted in 2003. With an estimated 10-15% of couples in the country that are infertile, there are not any legal or religious barriers that prohibit an infertile couple from taking advantage of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs). Although all forms of ARTs available in Iran have been legitimized by religious authorities, there is a lack of legislation in all ARTs except embryo donation. By highlighting ethical issues in embryo donation, the paper presents a critical review of the Act of Embryo Donation in Iran. The paper argues that the Act does not provide enough safeguards for the future child and assurance for the safety of the donated embryos. It also does not restrict embryo donation to surplus embryos from infertile couples and is silent about the number of embryos that could be donated by each couple as well as the number of recipients for donated embryos by a couple. The Act is also silent about the issues of genetic linkage (nasab) and heritage which are challenging issues, especially in a conservative Islamic society. As a result, the future child may not inherit from their birth parents, as it is not required by the Act, or from the genetically related parents under the anonymity policy. Finally there is no standard national protocol or guidelines to evaluate the safety of the donated embryos. The paper concludes that despite its benefits, the Act lacks clarity, and it is subject to misunderstanding and confusion.

  13. Unraveling the genetic complexity of Drosophila stardust during photoreceptor morphogenesis and prevention of light-induced degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandra; Bulgakova, Natalia A; Grawe, Ferdi; Johnson, Kevin; Knust, Elisabeth

    2007-08-01

    Drosophila Stardust, a membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK), recruits the transmembrane protein Crumbs and the cytoplasmic proteins DPATJ and DLin-7 into an apically localized protein scaffold. This evolutionarily conserved complex is required for epithelial cell polarity in Drosophila embryos and mammalian cells in culture. In addition, mutations in Drosophila crumbs and DPATJ impair morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) and result in light-dependent retinal degeneration. Here we show that stardust is a genetically complex locus. While all alleles tested perturb epithelial cell polarity in the embryo, only a subset of them affects morphogenesis of PRCs or induces light-dependent retinal degeneration. Alleles retaining particular postembryonic functions still express some Stardust protein in pupal and/or adult eyes. The phenotypic complexity is reflected by the expression of distinct splice variants at different developmental stages. All proteins expressed in the retina contain the PSD95, Discs Large, ZO-1 (PDZ), Src homology 3 (SH3), and guanylate kinase (GUK) domain, but lack a large region in the N terminus encoded by one exon. These results suggest that Stardust-based protein scaffolds are dynamic, which is not only mediated by multiple interaction partners, but in addition by various forms of the Stardust protein itself.

  14. Efficient genetic method for establishing Drosophila cell lines unlocks the potential to create lines of specific genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Amanda; Mitra, Sayan; Truesdell, Sharon; Paul, Litty; Chen, Ting; Butchar, Jonathan P; Justiniano, Steven

    2008-08-01

    Analysis of cells in culture has made substantial contributions to biological research. The versatility and scale of in vitro manipulation and new applications such as high-throughput gene silencing screens ensure the continued importance of cell-culture studies. In comparison to mammalian systems, Drosophila cell culture is underdeveloped, primarily because there is no general genetic method for deriving new cell lines. Here we found expression of the conserved oncogene Ras(V12) (a constitutively activated form of Ras) profoundly influences the development of primary cultures derived from embryos. The cultures become confluent in about three weeks and can be passaged with great success. The lines have undergone more than 90 population doublings and therefore constitute continuous cell lines. Most lines are composed of spindle-shaped cells of mesodermal type. We tested the use of the method for deriving Drosophila cell lines of a specific genotype by establishing cultures from embryos in which the warts (wts) tumor suppressor gene was targeted. We successfully created several cell lines and found that these differ from controls because they are primarily polyploid. This phenotype likely reflects the known role for the mammalian wts counterparts in the tetraploidy checkpoint. We conclude that expression of Ras(V12) is a powerful genetic mechanism to promote proliferation in Drosophila primary culture cells and serves as an efficient means to generate continuous cell lines of a given genotype.

  15. Efficient genetic method for establishing Drosophila cell lines unlocks the potential to create lines of specific genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Simcox

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of cells in culture has made substantial contributions to biological research. The versatility and scale of in vitro manipulation and new applications such as high-throughput gene silencing screens ensure the continued importance of cell-culture studies. In comparison to mammalian systems, Drosophila cell culture is underdeveloped, primarily because there is no general genetic method for deriving new cell lines. Here we found expression of the conserved oncogene Ras(V12 (a constitutively activated form of Ras profoundly influences the development of primary cultures derived from embryos. The cultures become confluent in about three weeks and can be passaged with great success. The lines have undergone more than 90 population doublings and therefore constitute continuous cell lines. Most lines are composed of spindle-shaped cells of mesodermal type. We tested the use of the method for deriving Drosophila cell lines of a specific genotype by establishing cultures from embryos in which the warts (wts tumor suppressor gene was targeted. We successfully created several cell lines and found that these differ from controls because they are primarily polyploid. This phenotype likely reflects the known role for the mammalian wts counterparts in the tetraploidy checkpoint. We conclude that expression of Ras(V12 is a powerful genetic mechanism to promote proliferation in Drosophila primary culture cells and serves as an efficient means to generate continuous cell lines of a given genotype.

  16. Early developing pig embryos mediate their own environment in the maternal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Almiñana

    Full Text Available The maternal tract plays a critical role in the success of early embryonic development providing an optimal environment for establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Preparation of this environment requires an intimate dialogue between the embryo and her mother. However, many intriguing aspects remain unknown in this unique communication system. To advance our understanding of the process by which a blastocyst is accepted by the endometrium and better address the clinical challenges of infertility and pregnancy failure, it is imperative to decipher this complex molecular dialogue. The objective of the present work is to define the local response of the maternal tract towards the embryo during the earliest stages of pregnancy. We used a novel in vivo experimental model that eliminated genetic variability and individual differences, followed by Affymetrix microarray to identify the signals involved in this embryo-maternal dialogue. Using laparoscopic insemination one oviduct of a sow was inseminated with spermatozoa and the contralateral oviduct was injected with diluent. This model allowed us to obtain samples from the oviduct and the tip of the uterine horn containing either embryos or oocytes from the same sow. Microarray analysis showed that most of the transcripts differentially expressed were down-regulated in the uterine horn in response to blastocysts when compared to oocytes. Many of the transcripts altered in response to the embryo in the uterine horn were related to the immune system. We used an in silico mathematical model to demonstrate the role of the embryo as a modulator of the immune system. This model revealed that relatively modest changes induced by the presence of the embryo could modulate the maternal immune response. These findings suggested that the presence of the embryo might regulate the immune system in the maternal tract to allow the refractory uterus to tolerate the embryo and support its development.

  17. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-06-06

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  18. Drosophila's view on insect vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Alexander

    2009-01-13

    Within the last 400 million years, insects have radiated into at least a million species, accounting for more than half of all known living organisms: they are the most successful group in the animal kingdom, found in almost all environments of the planet, ranging in body size from a mere 0.1 mm up to half a meter. Their eyes, together with the respective parts of the nervous system dedicated to the processing of visual information, have long been the subject of intense investigation but, with the exception of some very basic reflexes, it is still not possible to link an insect's visual input to its behavioral output. Fortunately for the field, the fruit fly Drosophila is an insect, too. This genetic workhorse holds great promise for the insect vision field, offering the possibility of recording, suppressing or stimulating any single neuron in its nervous system. Here, I shall give a brief synopsis of what we currently know about insect vision, describe the genetic toolset available in Drosophila and give some recent examples of how the application of these tools have furthered our understanding of color and motion vision in Drosophila.

  19. Nucleolar remodeling in nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurincik, Jozef; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2007-01-01

    the developmental potential of embryos originating from varied nuclear transfer protocols. In bovine in vivo developed embryos, functional ribosome-synthesizing nucleoli become structurally distinct toward the end of the 4th post-fertilization cell cycle. In embryonic cell nuclear transfer embryos, fully developed...... nucleoli are not apparent until the 5th cell cycle, whereas in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos the functional nucleoli emerge already during the 3rd cell cycle. Intergeneric reconstructed embryos produced by the fusion of bovine differentiated somatic cell to a nonactivated ovine cytoplast fail...... is completed toward the end of the 4th cell cycle. A substantial proportion of bovine embryos produced by nuclear transfer of embryonic or somatic cells to bovine ooplasts display aberrations in protein localization in one or more blastomers. This information is indicative of underlying aberrations in genomic...

  20. Nucleolar remodeling in nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurincik, Jozef; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2007-01-01

    nucleoli are not apparent until the 5th cell cycle, whereas in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos the functional nucleoli emerge already during the 3rd cell cycle. Intergeneric reconstructed embryos produced by the fusion of bovine differentiated somatic cell to a nonactivated ovine cytoplast fail...... the developmental potential of embryos originating from varied nuclear transfer protocols. In bovine in vivo developed embryos, functional ribosome-synthesizing nucleoli become structurally distinct toward the end of the 4th post-fertilization cell cycle. In embryonic cell nuclear transfer embryos, fully developed...... is completed toward the end of the 4th cell cycle. A substantial proportion of bovine embryos produced by nuclear transfer of embryonic or somatic cells to bovine ooplasts display aberrations in protein localization in one or more blastomers. This information is indicative of underlying aberrations in genomic...

  1. Nucleolar remodeling in nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurincik, Jozef; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2007-01-01

    nucleoli are not apparent until the 5th cell cycle, whereas in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos the functional nucleoli emerge already during the 3rd cell cycle. Intergeneric reconstructed embryos produced by the fusion of bovine differentiated somatic cell to a nonactivated ovine cytoplast fail...... the developmental potential of embryos originating from varied nuclear transfer protocols. In bovine in vivo developed embryos, functional ribosome-synthesizing nucleoli become structurally distinct toward the end of the 4th post-fertilization cell cycle. In embryonic cell nuclear transfer embryos, fully developed...... is completed toward the end of the 4th cell cycle. A substantial proportion of bovine embryos produced by nuclear transfer of embryonic or somatic cells to bovine ooplasts display aberrations in protein localization in one or more blastomers. This information is indicative of underlying aberrations in genomic...

  2. Divergent actions of long noncoding RNAs on X-chromosome remodelling in mammals and Drosophila achieve the same end result: dosage compensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhash C. Lakhotia

    2015-12-01

    Organisms with heterochromatic sex chromosomes need to compensate for differences in dosages of the sex chromosome-linked genes that have somatic functions. In-depth cytological and subsequent biochemical and molecular studies on dosage compensation started with Mary F. Lyon’s proposal in early 1960s that the Barr body in female mammalian somatic cells represented one of the randomly inactivated and heterochromatinized X chromosomes. In contrast, Drosophila was soon shown to achieve dosage compensation through hypertranscription of single X in male whose chromatin remains more open. Identification of proteins that remodel chromatin either to cause one of the two X chromosomes in somatic cells of very early female mammalian embryos to become condensed and inactive or to remodel the single X in male Drosophila embryos to a more open state for hypertranscription provided important insights into the underlying cellular epigenetic processes. However, the most striking and unexpected discoveries were the identification of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), X- inactive specific transcript (Xist) in mammals and roX1/2 in Drosophila, which were essential for achieving the contrasting chromatin organizations but leading to similar end result in terms of dosage compensation of X-linked genes in females and males. An overview of the processes of X inactivation or hyperactivation in mammals and Drosophila, respectively, and the roles played by Xist, roX1/2 and other lncRNAs in these events is presented.

  3. A software tool to model genetic regulatory networks. Applications to the modeling of threshold phenomena and of spatial patterning in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Dilão

    Full Text Available We present a general methodology in order to build mathematical models of genetic regulatory networks. This approach is based on the mass action law and on the Jacob and Monod operon model. The mathematical models are built symbolically by the Mathematica software package GeneticNetworks. This package accepts as input the interaction graphs of the transcriptional activators and repressors of a biological process and, as output, gives the mathematical model in the form of a system of ordinary differential equations. All the relevant biological parameters are chosen automatically by the software. Within this framework, we show that concentration dependent threshold effects in biology emerge from the catalytic properties of genes and its associated conservation laws. We apply this methodology to the segment patterning in Drosophila early development and we calibrate the genetic transcriptional network responsible for the patterning of the gap gene proteins Hunchback and Knirps, along the antero-posterior axis of the Drosophila embryo. In this approach, the zygotically produced proteins Hunchback and Knirps do not diffuse along the antero-posterior axis of the embryo of Drosophila, developing a spatial pattern due to concentration dependent thresholds. This shows that patterning at the gap genes stage can be explained by the concentration gradients along the embryo of the transcriptional regulators.

  4. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  5. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  6. Evaluation of Bovine Embryo Biopsy Techniques according to Their Ability to Preserve Embryo Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cenariu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to evaluate three embryo biopsy techniques used for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD in cattle and to recommend the least invasive one for current use, especially when PGD is followed by embryo cryopreservation. Three hundred bovine embryos were biopsied by either one of the needle, aspiration or microblade method, and then checked for viability by freezing/thawing and transplantation to recipient cows. The number of pregnancies obtained after the transfer of biopsied frozen/thawed embryos was assessed 30 days later using ultrasounds. The results were significantly different between the three biopsy methods: the pregnancy rate was of 57% in cows that received embryos biopsied by needle, 43% in cows that received embryos biopsied by aspiration, and 31% in cows that received embryos biopsied by microblade. Choosing an adequate biopsy method is therefore of great importance in embryos that will undergo subsequent cryopreservation, as it significantly influences their viability after thawing.

  7. Embryo forming cells in carrot suspension cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Toonen, M.A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Somatic cells of many plant species can be cultured in vitro and induced to form embryos that are able to develop into mature plants. This process, termed somatic embryogenesis, was originally described in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Somatic embryos develop through the same characteristic morphological stages, i.e. the globular-, heartand torpedo-stage respectively, as their zygotic counterparts. Due to the different cellular origin of somatic embryos, it is less clear to what extent the earli...

  8. Facial Transplants in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Jacox, Laura A.; Dickinson, Amanda J.; Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial birth defects occur in 1 out of every 700 live births, but etiology is rarely known due to limited understanding of craniofacial development. To identify where signaling pathways and tissues act during patterning of the developing face, a 'face transplant' technique has been developed in embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. A region of presumptive facial tissue (the "Extreme Anterior Domain" (EAD)) is removed from a donor embryo at tailbud stage, and transplanted to a host embryo ...

  9. Positive and negative regulation of Gli activity by Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Maurya

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations of Kif7, the vertebrate orthologue of the Drosophila Hh pathway component Costal2, cause defects in the limbs and neural tubes of mice, attributable to ectopic expression of Hh target genes. While this implies a functional conservation of Cos2 and Kif7 between flies and vertebrates, the association of Kif7 with the primary cilium, an organelle absent from most Drosophila cells, suggests their mechanisms of action may have diverged. Here, using mutant alleles induced by Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated targeted mutagenesis, we show that in zebrafish, Kif7 acts principally to suppress the activity of the Gli1 transcription factor. Notably, we find that endogenous Kif7 protein accumulates not only in the primary cilium, as previously observed in mammalian cells, but also in cytoplasmic puncta that disperse in response to Hh pathway activation. Moreover, we show that Drosophila Costal2 can substitute for Kif7, suggesting a conserved mode of action of the two proteins. We show that Kif7 interacts with both Gli1 and Gli2a and suggest that it functions to sequester Gli proteins in the cytoplasm, in a manner analogous to the regulation of Ci by Cos2 in Drosophila. We also show that zebrafish Kif7 potentiates Gli2a activity by promoting its dissociation from the Suppressor of Fused (Sufu protein and present evidence that it mediates a Smo dependent modification of the full length form of Gli2a. Surprisingly, the function of Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo appears restricted principally to mesodermal derivatives, its inactivation having little effect on neural tube patterning, even when Sufu protein levels are depleted. Remarkably, zebrafish lacking all Kif7 function are viable, in contrast to the peri-natal lethality of mouse kif7 mutants but similar to some Acrocallosal or Joubert syndrome patients who are homozygous for loss of function KIF7 alleles.

  10. Positive and negative regulation of Gli activity by Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Ashish Kumar; Ben, Jin; Zhao, Zhonghua; Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Niah, Weixin; Ng, Ashley Shu Mei; Iyu, Audrey; Yu, Weimiao; Elworthy, Stone; van Eeden, Fredericus J M; Ingham, Philip William

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of Kif7, the vertebrate orthologue of the Drosophila Hh pathway component Costal2, cause defects in the limbs and neural tubes of mice, attributable to ectopic expression of Hh target genes. While this implies a functional conservation of Cos2 and Kif7 between flies and vertebrates, the association of Kif7 with the primary cilium, an organelle absent from most Drosophila cells, suggests their mechanisms of action may have diverged. Here, using mutant alleles induced by Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated targeted mutagenesis, we show that in zebrafish, Kif7 acts principally to suppress the activity of the Gli1 transcription factor. Notably, we find that endogenous Kif7 protein accumulates not only in the primary cilium, as previously observed in mammalian cells, but also in cytoplasmic puncta that disperse in response to Hh pathway activation. Moreover, we show that Drosophila Costal2 can substitute for Kif7, suggesting a conserved mode of action of the two proteins. We show that Kif7 interacts with both Gli1 and Gli2a and suggest that it functions to sequester Gli proteins in the cytoplasm, in a manner analogous to the regulation of Ci by Cos2 in Drosophila. We also show that zebrafish Kif7 potentiates Gli2a activity by promoting its dissociation from the Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) protein and present evidence that it mediates a Smo dependent modification of the full length form of Gli2a. Surprisingly, the function of Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo appears restricted principally to mesodermal derivatives, its inactivation having little effect on neural tube patterning, even when Sufu protein levels are depleted. Remarkably, zebrafish lacking all Kif7 function are viable, in contrast to the peri-natal lethality of mouse kif7 mutants but similar to some Acrocallosal or Joubert syndrome patients who are homozygous for loss of function KIF7 alleles.

  11. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The embryo collection unit. 98.16... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  12. Generation and developmental characteristics of porcine tetraploid embryos and tetraploid/diploid chimeric embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Shi, Yongqian; Xie, Bingteng; Jiao, Mingxia; Huang, Tianqing; Guo, Shimeng; Hu, Kui; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize electrofusion conditions for generating porcine tetraploid (4n) embryos and produce tetraploid/diploid (4n/2n) chimeric embryos. Different electric field intensities were tested and 2 direct current (DC) pulses of 0.9 kV/cm for 30 μs was selected as the optimum condition for electrofusion of 2-cell embryos to produce 4n embryos. The fusion rate of 2-cell embryos and the development rate to blastocyst of presumably 4n embryos, reached 85.4% and 28.5%, respectively. 68.18% of the fused embryos were found to be 4n as demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Although the number of blastomeres in 4n blastocysts was significantly lower than in 2n blastocysts (P0.05), suggesting that the blastocyst forming capacity in 4n embryos is similar to those in 2n embryos. Moreover, 4n/2n chimeric embryos were obtained by aggregation of 4n and 2n embryos. We found that the developmental rate and cell number of blastocysts of 4-cell (4n)/4-cell (2n) chimeric embryos were significantly higher than those of 2-cell (4n)/4-cell (2n), 4-cell (4n)/8-cell (2n), 4-cell (4n)/2-cell (2n) chimeric embryos (P<0.05). Consistent with mouse chimeras, the majority of 4n cells contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), while the 2n cells are mainly present in the inner cell mass (ICM) of porcine 4n/2n chimeric embryos. Our study established a feasible and efficient approach to produce porcine 4n embryos and 4n/2n chimeric embryos.

  13. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  14. Transmission OF Campylobacter coli in chicken embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Daise Aparecida; Fonseca, Belchiolina Beatriz; de Melo, Roberta Torres; Felipe, Gutembergue da Silva; da Silva, Paulo Lourenço; Mendonça, Eliane Pereira; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Beletti, Marcelo Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is an important species involved in human cases of enteritis, and chickens are carriers of the pathogen mainly in developing country. The current study aimed to evaluate the transmission of C. coli and its pathogenic effects in chicken embryos. Breeder hens were inoculated intra-esophageally with C. coli isolated from chickens, and their eggs and embryos were analyzed for the presence of bacteria using real-time PCR and plate culture. The viability of embryos was verified. In parallel, SPF eggs were inoculated with C. coli in the air sac; after incubation, the embryos were submitted to the same analysis as the embryos from breeder hens. In embryos and fertile eggs from breeder hens, the bacterium was only identified by molecular methods; in the SPF eggs, however, the bacterium was detected by both techniques. The results showed no relationship between embryo mortality and positivity for C. coli in the embryos from breeder hens. However, the presence of bacteria is a cause of precocious mortality for SPF embryos. This study revealed that although the vertical transmission is a possible event, the bacteria can not grow in embryonic field samples. PMID:24031861

  15. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Filip; Pineda, Lane Manalili; Hotowy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the quantity and quality of nutrients stored in the egg might not be optimal for the fast rate of chicken embryo development in modern broilers, and embryos could be supplemented with nutrients by in ovo injection. Recent experiments showed that in ovo feeding reduces...... broiler eggs was randomly divided into a Control group without injection and injected groups with hydrocolloids of Nano-Ag, ATP or a complex of Nano-Ag and ATP (Nano-Ag/ATP). The embryos were evaluated on day 20 of incubation. The results indicate that the application of ATP to chicken embryos increases...

  16. Transmission of Campylobacter coli in chicken embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daise Aparecida Rossi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter coli is an important species involved in human cases of enteritis, and chickens are carriers of the pathogen mainly in developing country. The current study aimed to evaluate the transmission of C. coli and its pathogenic effects in chicken embryos. Breeder hens were inoculated intra-esophageally with C. coli isolated from chickens, and their eggs and embryos were analyzed for the presence of bacteria using real-time PCR and plate culture. The viability of embryos was verified. In parallel, SPF eggs were inoculated with C. coli in the air sac; after incubation, the embryos were submitted to the same analysis as the embryos from breeder hens. In embryos and fertile eggs from breeder hens, the bacterium was only identified by molecular methods; in the SPF eggs, however, the bacterium was detected by both techniques. The results showed no relationship between embryo mortality and positivity for C. coli in the embryos from breeder hens. However, the presence of bacteria is a cause of precocious mortality for SPF embryos. This study revealed that although the vertical transmission is a possible event, the bacteria can not grow in embryonic field samples.

  17. Jeb/Alk signalling regulates the Lame duck GLI family transcription factor in the Drosophila visceral mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popichenko, Dmitry; Hugosson, Fredrik; Sjögren, Camilla; Dogru, Murat; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Wolfstetter, Georg; Schönherr, Christina; Fallah, Mahsa; Hallberg, Bengt; Nguyen, Hanh; Palmer, Ruth H

    2013-08-01

    The Jelly belly (Jeb)/Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk) signalling pathway regulates myoblast fusion in the circular visceral mesoderm (VM) of Drosophila embryos via specification of founder cells. However, only a limited number of target molecules for this pathway are described. We have investigated the role of the Lame Duck (Lmd) transcription factor in VM development in relationship to Jeb/Alk signal transduction. We show that Alk signalling negatively regulates Lmd activity post-transcriptionally through the MEK/MAPK (ERK) cascade resulting in a relocalisation of Lmd protein from the nucleus to cytoplasm. It has previously been shown that downregulation of Lmd protein is necessary for the correct specification of founder cells. In the visceral mesoderm of lmd mutant embryos, fusion-competent myoblasts seem to be converted to 'founder-like' cells that are still able to build a gut musculature even in the absence of fusion. The ability of Alk signalling to downregulate Lmd protein requires the N-terminal 140 amino acids, as a Lmd(141-866) mutant remains nuclear in the presence of active ALK and is able to drive robust expression of the Lmd downstream target Vrp1 in the developing VM. Our results suggest that Lmd is a target of Jeb/Alk signalling in the VM of Drosophila embryos.

  18. Receptor-type guanylyl cyclase Gyc76C is required for development of the Drosophila embryonic somatic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unisha Patel

    2012-04-01

    Guanylyl cyclases mediate a number of physiological processes, including smooth muscle function and axonal guidance. Here, we report a novel role for Drosophila receptor-type guanylyl cyclase at 76C, Gyc76C, in development of the embryonic somatic muscle. In embryos lacking function of Gyc76C or the downstream cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK, DG1, patterning of the somatic body wall muscles was abnormal with ventral and lateral muscle groups showing the most severe defects. In contrast, specification and elongation of the dorsal oblique and dorsal acute muscles of gyc76C mutant embryos was normal, and instead, these muscles showed defects in proper formation of the myotendinous junctions (MTJs. During MTJ formation in gyc76C and pkg21D mutant embryos, the βPS integrin subunit failed to localize to the MTJs and instead was found in discrete puncta within the myotubes. Tissue-specific rescue experiments showed that gyc76C function is required in the muscle for proper patterning and βPS integrin localization at the MTJ. These studies provide the first evidence for a requirement for Gyc76C and DG1 in Drosophila somatic muscle development, and suggest a role in transport and/or retention of integrin receptor subunits at the developing MTJs.

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah gene: a novel gene with ancient functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Araújo

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth, has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila, a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general.

  20. Germline progenitors escape the widespread phenomenon of homolog pairing during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Joyce

    Full Text Available Homolog pairing, which plays a critical role in meiosis, poses a potential risk if it occurs in inappropriate tissues or between nonallelic sites, as it can lead to changes in gene expression, chromosome entanglements, and loss-of-heterozygosity due to mitotic recombination. This is particularly true in Drosophila, which supports organismal-wide pairing throughout development. Discovered over a century ago, such extensive pairing has led to the perception that germline pairing in the adult gonad is an extension of the pairing established during embryogenesis and, therefore, differs from the mechanism utilized in most species to initiate pairing specifically in the germline. Here, we show that, contrary to long-standing assumptions, Drosophila meiotic pairing in the gonad is not an extension of pairing established during embryogenesis. Instead, we find that homologous chromosomes are unpaired in primordial germ cells from the moment the germline can be distinguished from the soma in the embryo and remain unpaired even in the germline stem cells of the adult gonad. We further establish that pairing originates immediately after the stem cell stage. This pairing occurs well before the initiation of meiosis and, strikingly, continues through the several mitotic divisions preceding meiosis. These discoveries indicate that the spatial organization of the Drosophila genome differs between the germline and the soma from the earliest moments of development and thus argue that homolog pairing in the germline is an active process as versus a passive continuation of pairing established during embryogenesis.

  1. Coordinated cell-shape changes control epithelial movement in zebrafish and Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppen, Mathias; Fernández, Beatriz García; Carvalho, Lara; Jacinto, Antonio; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-07-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis depends on coordinated changes in cell shape, a process that is still poorly understood. During zebrafish epiboly and Drosophila dorsal closure, cell-shape changes at the epithelial margin are of critical importance. Here evidence is provided for a conserved mechanism of local actin and myosin 2 recruitment during theses events. It was found that during epiboly of the zebrafish embryo, the movement of the outer epithelium (enveloping layer) over the yolk cell surface involves the constriction of marginal cells. This process depends on the recruitment of actin and myosin 2 within the yolk cytoplasm along the margin of the enveloping layer. Actin and myosin 2 recruitment within the yolk cytoplasm requires the Ste20-like kinase Msn1, an orthologue of Drosophila Misshapen. Similarly, in Drosophila, actin and myosin 2 localization and cell constriction at the margin of the epidermis mediate dorsal closure and are controlled by Misshapen. Thus, this study has characterized a conserved mechanism underlying coordinated cell-shape changes during epithelial morphogenesis.

  2. Neurl4 contributes to germ cell formation and integrity in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs form at the posterior pole of the Drosophila embryo, and then migrate to their final destination in the gonad where they will produce eggs or sperm. Studies of the different stages in this process, including assembly of germ plasm in the oocyte during oogenesis, specification of a subset of syncytial embryonic nuclei as PGCs, and migration, have been informed by genetic analyses. Mutants have defined steps in the process, and the identities of the affected genes have suggested biochemical mechanisms. Here we describe a novel PGC phenotype. When Neurl4 activity is reduced, newly formed PGCs frequently adopt irregular shapes and appear to bud off vesicles. PGC number is also reduced, an effect exacerbated by a separate role for Neurl4 in germ plasm formation during oogenesis. Like its mammalian homolog, Drosophila Neurl4 protein is concentrated in centrosomes and downregulates centrosomal protein CP110. Reducing CP110 activity suppresses the abnormal PGC morphology of Neurl4 mutants. These results extend prior analyses of Neurl4 in cultured cells, revealing a heightened requirement for Neurl4 in germ-line cells in Drosophila.

  3. Variability in protein quality used for embryo culture: embryotoxicity of the stabilizer octanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Phoebe H; Charlesworth, M Cristine; Benson, Linda; Walker, David L; Fredrickson, Jolene R; Morbeck, Dean E

    2013-08-01

    To screen human serum albumin (HSA) preparations for toxicity and investigate causes of variation. Experimental laboratory study. University-based laboratory. FVB and CF1 mice crossed to create embryos used in experiments. Mouse embryo assay performed with 5% or 15% HSA (100 mg/mL albumin) from three samples from three separate manufacturers (A, B, C). Blastocyst rates calculated at 96 hours of culture (experiments repeated in triplicate). The HSA preparations were desalted to remove stabilizers added during HSA processing, then mass spectrometry was used to determine the relative variation in stabilizer concentrations; the effect of the stabilizer octanoic acid on embryo development was tested. At 5% HSA, all samples had blastocyst rates ≥ 70%; at 15% HSA, the blastocyst rates for samples B and C were culture should be monitored and limited. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of different zwitterionic buffers and PBS used for out-of-incubator procedures during standard in vitro embryo production on development, morphology and gene expression of bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palasz, A T; Breña, P Beltrán; De la Fuente, J; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the zwitterionic buffers HEPES, TES and MOPS and of PBS used for out-of-incubator procedures during standard in vitro embryo production on bovine oocytes and embryo development, morphology and on the expression patterns of eight selected genes: Fgf-4, Lama1, Ube2a, Gsta4, Il6, Sod1, Prss11 and Hspb1, was evaluated. All buffers were prepared at a concentration of 10 mM in TALP medium, with the exception of PBS. The total time of oocyte/embryo exposure to each buffer was approximately 41 min. The cleavage rates and number of embryos that developed to > or =8 cells at day 4 were no different among the buffers tested, however, more blastocysts developed at day 7, 8 and 9 in HEPES and MOPS treatments than in PBS and TES (Pbuffers in total and apoptotic cell number was found. Except for Hspb1 and Ube2a genes, the levels of expression of the six remaining transcripts were higher in in vivo than in in vitro embryos irrespective of buffer used (PHEPES treatments (Pbuffers (Pbuffer tested but was lower in in vitro than in in vivo derived embryos. Expression of both Sod1 and Prss11 genes in MOPS were at the level of the in vivo embryos. These results showed that the choice of buffer and short exposure time of approximately 41 min, affects mRNA expression of in vitro produced bovine embryos.

  5. Hypoxia transiently sequesters mps1 and polo to collagenase-sensitive filaments in Drosophila prometaphase oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D Gilliland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protein kinases Mps1 and Polo, which are required for proper cell cycle regulation in meiosis and mitosis, localize to numerous ooplasmic filaments during prometaphase in Drosophila oocytes. These filaments first appear throughout the oocyte at the end of prophase and are disassembled after egg activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed here that Mps1 and Polo proteins undergo dynamic and reversible localization to static ooplasmic filaments as part of an oocyte-specific response to hypoxia. The observation that Mps1- and Polo-associated filaments reappear in the same locations through multiple cycles of oxygen deprivation demonstrates that underlying structural components of the filaments must still be present during normoxic conditions. Using immuno-electron microscopy, we observed triple-helical binding of Mps1 to numerous electron-dense filaments, with the gold label wrapped around the outside of the filaments like a garland. In addition, we showed that in live oocytes the relocalization of Mps1 and Polo to filaments is sensitive to injection of collagenase, suggesting that the structural components of the filaments are composed of collagen-like fibrils. However, the collagen-like genes we have been able to test so far (vkg and CG42453 did not appear to be associated with the filaments, demonstrating that the collagenase-sensitive component of the filaments is one of a number of other Drosophila proteins bearing a collagenase cleavage site. Finally, as hypoxia is known to cause Mps1 protein to accumulate at kinetochores in syncytial embryos, we also show that GFP-Polo accumulates at both kinetochores and centrosomes in hypoxic syncytial embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings identify both a novel cellular structure (the ooplasmic filaments as well as a new localization pattern for Mps1 and Polo and demonstrate that hypoxia affects Polo localization in Drosophila.

  6. Large-scale discovery of promoter motifs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Down

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the repertoire of transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs that form the building blocks of promoters and other regulatory elements. Identifying these experimentally is very laborious, and the number of TFBMs discovered remains relatively small, especially when compared with the hundreds of transcription factor genes predicted in metazoan genomes. We have used a recently developed statistical motif discovery approach, NestedMICA, to detect candidate TFBMs from a large set of Drosophila melanogaster promoter regions. Of the 120 motifs inferred in our initial analysis, 25 were statistically significant matches to previously reported motifs, while 87 appeared to be novel. Analysis of sequence conservation and motif positioning suggested that the great majority of these discovered motifs are predictive of functional elements in the genome. Many motifs showed associations with specific patterns of gene expression in the D. melanogaster embryo, and we were able to obtain confident annotation of expression patterns for 25 of our motifs, including eight of the novel motifs. The motifs are available through Tiffin, a new database of DNA sequence motifs. We have discovered many new motifs that are overrepresented in D. melanogaster promoter regions, and offer several independent lines of evidence that these are novel TFBMs. Our motif dictionary provides a solid foundation for further investigation of regulatory elements in Drosophila, and demonstrates techniques that should be applicable in other species. We suggest that further improvements in computational motif discovery should narrow the gap between the set of known motifs and the total number of transcription factors in metazoan genomes.

  7. Evolution of dosage compensation in Diptera: the gene maleless implements dosage compensation in Drosophila (Brachycera suborder) but its homolog in Sciara (Nematocera suborder) appears to play no role in dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M F; Esteban, M R; Doñoro, C; Goday, C; Sánchez, L

    2000-12-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster and in Sciara ocellaris dosage compensation occurs by hypertranscription of the single male X chromosome. This article reports the cloning and characterization in S. ocellaris of the gene homologous to maleless (mle) of D. melanogaster, which implements dosage compensation. The Sciara mle gene produces a single transcript, encoding a helicase, which is present in both male and female larvae and adults and in testes and ovaries. Both Sciara and Drosophila MLE proteins are highly conserved. The affinity-purified antibody to D. melanogaster MLE recognizes the S. ocellaris MLE protein. In contrast to Drosophila polytene chromosomes, where MLE is preferentially associated with the male X chromosome, in Sciara MLE is found associated with all chromosomes. Anti-MLE staining of Drosophila postblastoderm male embryos revealed a single nuclear dot, whereas Sciara male and female embryos present multiple intranuclear staining spots. This expression pattern in Sciara is also observed before blastoderm stage, when dosage compensation is not yet set up. The affinity-purified antibodies against D. melanogaster MSL1, MSL3, and MOF proteins involved in dosage compensation also revealed no differences in the staining pattern between the X chromosome and the autosomes in both Sciara males and females. These results lead us to propose that different proteins in Drosophila and Sciara would implement dosage compensation.

  8. A Drosophila melanogaster cell line (S2) facilitates post-genome functional analysis of receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, Paula R; Sattelle, David B

    2002-11-01

    The complete sequencing of the genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster offers the prospect of detailed functional analysis of the extensive gene families in this genetic model organism. Comprehensive functional analysis of family members is facilitated by access to a robust, stable and inducible expression system in a fly cell line. Here we show how the Schneider S2 cell line, derived from the Drosophila embryo, provides such an expression system, with the bonus that radioligand binding studies, second messenger assays, ion imaging, patch-clamp electrophysiology and gene silencing can readily be applied. Drosophila is also ideal for the study of new control strategies for insect pests since the receptors and ion channels that many new animal health drugs and crop protection chemicals target can be expressed in this cell line. In addition, many useful orthologues of human disease genes are emerging from the Drosophila genome and the study of their functions and interactions is another area for postgenome applications of S2 cell lines.

  9. From action potential to contraction: neural control and excitation-contraction coupling in larval muscles of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Samantha; Zordan, Mauro A; Magnabosco, Anna; Reggiani, Carlo; Megighian, Aram

    2009-10-01

    The neuromuscular system of Drosophila melanogaster has been studied for many years for its relative simplicity and because of the genetic and molecular versatilities. Three main types of striated muscles are present in this dipteran: fibrillar muscles, tubular muscles and supercontractile muscles. The visceral muscles in adult flies and the body wall segmental muscles in embryos and larvae belong to the group of supercontractile muscles. Larval body wall muscles have been the object of detailed studies as a model for neuromuscular junction function but have received much less attention with respect to their mechanical properties and to the control of contraction. In this review we wish to assess available information on the physiology of the Drosophila larval muscular system. Our aim is to establish whether this system has the requisites to be considered a good model in which to perform a functional characterization of Drosophila genes, with a known muscular expression, as well as Drosophila homologs of human genes, the dysfunction of which, is known to be associated with human hereditary muscle pathologies.

  10. Drosophila embryogenesis scales uniformly across temperature in developmentally diverse species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G Kuntz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Temperature affects both the timing and outcome of animal development, but the detailed effects of temperature on the progress of early development have been poorly characterized. To determine the impact of temperature on the order and timing of events during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis, we used time-lapse imaging to track the progress of embryos from shortly after egg laying through hatching at seven precisely maintained temperatures between 17.5 °C and 32.5 °C. We employed a combination of automated and manual annotation to determine when 36 milestones occurred in each embryo. D. melanogaster embryogenesis takes [Formula: see text]33 hours at 17.5 °C, and accelerates with increasing temperature to a low of 16 hours at 27.5 °C, above which embryogenesis slows slightly. Remarkably, while the total time of embryogenesis varies over two fold, the relative timing of events from cellularization through hatching is constant across temperatures. To further explore the relationship between temperature and embryogenesis, we expanded our analysis to cover ten additional Drosophila species of varying climatic origins. Six of these species, like D. melanogaster, are of tropical origin, and embryogenesis time at different temperatures was similar for them all. D. mojavensis, a sub-tropical fly, develops slower than the tropical species at lower temperatures, while D. virilis, a temperate fly, exhibits slower development at all temperatures. The alpine sister species D. persimilis and D. pseudoobscura develop as rapidly as tropical flies at cooler temperatures, but exhibit diminished acceleration above 22.5 °C and have drastically slowed development by 30 °C. Despite ranging from 13 hours for D. erecta at 30 °C to 46 hours for D. virilis at 17.5 °C, the relative timing of events from cellularization through hatching is constant across all species and temperatures examined here, suggesting the existence of a previously unrecognized timer

  11. Knee joint morphogenesis of the quail (Coturnix japonica) embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Bahador; Talebhemat, Mahdokht; Hashemnia, Shadi; Shojaeepour, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Knee joint development and its morphogenetic events have been studied in human, chicken and other animal models and differences have been found in the pattern of the knee joint morphogenesis among the studied species. According to the small number of studies which have focused on the chronology of knee morphogenesis, a "morphogenetic timely pattern" is hard to suggest. Quail is an animal model for which there is no information about knee joint morphogenesis. This study was planned to define the time table of the knee joint structures formation in this bird. For this purpose embryonated Japanese quail eggs were incubated for 3 to 12 days. Embryos were removed from their eggs every twelve hours and staged according to Ainsworth et al. The hind limbs of the embryos at the stages 17 to 41 were dissected and 6 μm thick slides were prepared from their knee region. The time of appearance of menisci, ligaments, articular cavity and other knee joint components were identified in the quail embryo. During quail knee morphogenesis we observed the appearance of a three layered interzone, femorotibial cavitation and long bone ossification earlier than in chicken. A hypothesis is presented on the differential role of the flexor and extensor muscles of the knee joint on embryonic knee development in birds as compared with humans.

  12. The Drosophila Myc gene, diminutive, is a positive regulator of the Sex-lethal establishment promoter, Sxl-Pe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappes, Gretchen; Deshpande, Girish; Mulvey, Brett B.; Horabin, Jamila I.; Schedl, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The binary switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls sexual identity in Drosophila. When activated, Sxl imposes female identity, whereas male identity ensues by default when the gene is off. The decision to activate Sxl is controlled by an X chromosome counting system that regulates the Sxl establishment promoter, Sxl-Pe. The counting system depends upon the twofold difference in the gene dose of a series of X-linked transcription factors or numerators. Because of this difference in dose, early female embryos express twice the amount of these transcription factors, and the cumulative action of these transcription factors turns on Sxl-Pe. Here we show that the Drosophila Myc gene diminutive is an X-linked numerator. PMID:21220321

  13. Sulfated glycan present in the EDTA extract of Hemicentrotus embryos (mid-gastrula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, K; Terayama, H

    1983-06-01

    Light microscopical observations of the Alcian blue-stained gastrulae of Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus together with the scanning electron microscopical observations of the embryos revealed the presence of highly acidic glycans in the invaginating archenteron (inside surface), the surrounding of secondary mesenchyme cells (pseudopodial protrusions and filamentous structures) and the hyaline layer. In the embryos grown in sulfate-free sea water and thus with arrested gastrulation it was found that the dye stainability in the above regions was markedly reduced. The glycosaminoglycan fraction prepared from the whole embryos (mid-gastrulae) was found to contain various kinds of acidic glycans as analysed by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Among these glycan components, the "F" component was mainly recovered in the EDTA extract of the embryos, and was shown to be specifically deleted in the embryos grown in sulfate-free sea water, suggesting that the "F" component may be related to the Alcian blue-stainable material in Hemicentrotus embryos. The component "F" was found to consist of sulfated fucan and acid mucopolysaccharide (unidentified) chains, which are probably linked to a common peptide core, forming macromolecules with larger than 10(6) molecular weights.

  14. The follicular endocrine environment in stimulated cycles of women with endometriosis: steroid levels and embryo quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, A; Valbuena, D; Bauset, C; Albert, C; Bonilla-Musoles, F; Remohí, J; Simón, C

    1998-06-01

    To assess the endocrine milieu in follicles of stimulated cycles comparing women with and without endometriosis. Steroids were measured in follicular fluid (FF) and in in vitro culture of granulosa-luteal cells, and this status was related to the quality of the embryos obtained after IVF. Case-control study. IVF program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Twenty-four women with laparoscopically documented endometriosis and 26 controls undergoing IVF. Individual follicular aspiration, oocyte isolation, FF storage, and preparation of luteinized granulosa cells for culture; oocyte insemination and embryo cleavage in standard IVF. Serum (day of ovum pickup) and FF measurements of estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and androstenedione. Secretion of progesterone was measured in the cell-conditioned medium. Results were compared between patients with endometriosis and controls, as well as between oocytes that yielded embryos of different quality. Levels of progesterone in the FF increased with the severity of the disease, whereas testosterone accumulation in the FF decreased with the severity of the disease. An increase in progesterone accumulation in vitro was observed in basal and hCG-induced granulosa cell cultures. No difference was observed in terms of embryo quality, and no steroid marker was able to identify follicles with oocytes that displayed embryos of good or bad quality under the inverted microscope. The data show differences in the steroidogenesis of follicles from stimulated women with and without endometriosis. These changes indicate good endocrine health but are not predictive of embryo quality.

  15. In Vivo Characterization of Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Microbubble Spectroscopy in a Chicken Embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Faez (Telli); I. Skachkov (Ilya); M. Versluis (Michel); K. Kooiman (Klazina); N. de Jong (Nico)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe dynamics of coated microbubbles was studied in an in vivo model. Biotinylated lipid-coated microbubbles were prepared in-house and were injected into a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model on the fifth day of incubation. The microbubbles, ranging between 1.0 and 3.5 μm i

  16. In Vivo Characterization of Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Microbubble Spectroscopy in a Chicken Embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faez, T.; Skachkov, I.; Versluis, M.; Kooiman, K.; Jong, de N.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of coated microbubbles was studied in an in vivo model. Biotinylated lipid-coated microbubbles were prepared in-house and were injected into a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model on the fifth day of incubation. The microbubbles, ranging between 1.0 and 3.5 μm in diameter,

  17. Whole-mount three-dimensional imaging of internally localized immunostained cells within mouse embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Yokomizo (Tomomasa); T. Yamada-Inagawa (Tomoko); A.D. Yzaguirre (Amanda); M.J. Chen (Michael); N.A. Speck (Nancy); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe describe a three-dimensional (3D) confocal imaging technique to characterize and enumerate rare, newly emerging hematopoietic cells located within the vasculature of whole-mount preparations of mouse embryos. However, the methodology is broadly applicable for examining the development

  18. Generating chimeric zebrafish embryos by transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Hilary A; Carmany-Rampey, Amanda; Moens, Cecilia

    2009-07-17

    One of the most powerful tools used to gain insight into complex developmental processes is the analysis of chimeric embryos. A chimera is defined as an organism that contains cells from more than one animal; mosaics are one type of chimera in which cells from more than one genotype are mixed, usually wild-type and mutant. In the zebrafish, chimeras can be readily made by transplantation of cells from a donor embryo into a host embryo at the appropriate embryonic stage. Labeled donor cells are generated by injection of a lineage marker, such as a fluorescent dye, into the one-cell stage embryo. Labeled donor cells are removed from donor embryos and introduced into unlabeled host embryos using an oil-controlled glass pipette mounted on either a compound or dissecting microscope. Donor cells can in some cases be targeted to a specific region or tissue of the developing blastula or gastrula stage host embryo by choosing a transplantation site in the host embryo based on well-established fate maps.

  19. Identification and characterization of pyrokinin and CAPA peptides, and corresponding GPCRs from spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Kim, A Young; Koh, Youngho

    2017-01-07

    The family of FXPRLamide peptides serves as a major insect hormone. It is characterized by a core active amino acid sequence conserved at the C-terminal ends, and provides various physiological roles across the Insecta. In this study we identified and characterized pyrokinin (PK) and CAPA cDNAs encoding two FXPRLamide peptides, pyrokinin and CAPA-DH (diapause hormone), and two corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii. Expressions of PK and CAPA mRNAs were differentially observed during all life stages except the embryo, and the detection of CAPA transcription was relatively strong compared with the PK gene in SWD. Both D. suzukii pyrokinin receptor (DrosuPKr) and CAPA-DH receptor (DrosuCAPA-DHr) were functionally expressed and confirmed through binding to PK and DH peptides. Differential expression of two GPCRs occurred during all life stages; a strong transcription of DrosuPKr was observed in the 3rd instar. DrosuCAPA-DHr was clearly expressed from the embryo to the larva, but not detected in the adult. Gene regulation during the life stages was not synchronized between ligand and receptor. For example, SWD CAPA mRNA has been up-regulated in the adult while CAPA-DHr was down-regulated. The difference could be from the CAPA mRNA translating multiple peptides including CAPA-DH and two CAPA-PVK (periviscerokinin) peptides to act on different receptors. Comparing the genes of SWD PK, CAPA, PKr and CAPA-DHr to four corresponding genes of D. melanogaster, SWD CAPA and the receptor are more similar to D. melanogaster than PK and the receptor. These data suggest that the CAPA gene could be evolutionally more conserved to have a common biological role in insects. In addition, the effect of Kozak sequences was investigated by the expression of the GPCRs with or without Kozak sequences in Sf9 insect cells. The Kozak sequenced PK receptor was significantly less active than the original (= no Kozak sequenced

  20. Supplement of autologous ooplasm into porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos does not alter embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W-J; Lee, J-H; Jeon, R-H; Jang, S-J; Lee, S-C; Park, J-S; Lee, S-L; King, W-A; Rho, G-J

    2017-02-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered as the technique in which a somatic cell is introduced into an enucleated oocyte to make a cloned animal. However, it is unavoidable to lose a small amount of the ooplasm during enucleation step during SCNT procedure. The present study was aimed to uncover whether the supplement of autologous ooplasm could ameliorate the oocyte competence so as to improve low efficiency of embryo development in porcine SCNT. Autologous ooplasm-transferred (AOT) embryos were generated by the supplementation with autologous ooplasm into SCNT embryos. They were comparatively evaluated with respect to embryo developmental potential, the number of apoptotic body formation and gene expression including embryonic lineage differentiation, apoptosis, epigenetics and mitochondrial activity in comparison with parthenogenetic, in vitro-fertilized (IVF) and SCNT embryos. Although AOT embryos showed perfect fusion of autologous donor ooplasm with recipient SCNT embryos, the supplement of autologous ooplasm could not ameliorate embryo developmental potential in regard to the rate of blastocyst formation, total cell number and the number of apoptotic body. Furthermore, overall gene expression of AOT embryos was presented with no significant alterations in comparison with that of SCNT embryos. Taken together, the results of AOT demonstrated inability to make relevant values improved from the level of SCNT embryos to their IVF counterparts.

  1. A Chick Embryo in-Vitro Model of Knee Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward K. Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this feasibility study, a mechanically loaded in-vitro tissue culture model of joint morphogenesis using the isolated lower extremity of the 8 day old chick embryo was developed to assess the effects of mechanical loading on joint morphogenesis. Methods: The developed in-vitro system allows controlled flexion and extension of the chick embryonic knee with a range of motion of 20 degrees from a resting position of 90-100 degrees of flexion. Joint morphogenesis at 2, 3, 4 and 7 days of culture was assessed by histology and micro MRI in 4 specimen types: undisturbed in-ovo control embryos, in-ovo paralyzed embryos, in-vitro unloaded limb cultures, and in-vitro loaded limb cultures. Relative glycosaminoglycan (GAG concentration across the joint was assessed with an MRI technique referred to as dGEMRIC (delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage where T1 is proportional to glycosaminoglycan concentration. Results: Average T1 over the entire tissue image for the normal control (IC knee was 480 msec; for the 4 day loaded specimen average T1 was 354 msec; and for the 7 day loaded specimens T1 was 393 msec. The 4 day unloaded specimen had an average T1 of 279 msec while the 7 day unloaded specimen had an average T1 of 224 msec. The higher T1 values in loaded than unloaded specimens suggest that more glycosaminoglycan is produced in the loaded culture than in the unloaded preparation. Conclusion: Isolated limb tissue cultures under flexion-extension load can be viable and exhibit more progression of joint differentiation and glycosaminoglycan production than similarly cultured but unloaded specimens. However, when compared with controls consisting of intact undisturbed embryos in-ovo , the isolated loaded limbs in culture do not demonstrate equivalent amounts of absolute growth or joint differentiation.

  2. Migration and Growth of Protoplanetary Embryos I: Convergence of Embryos in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N C; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    According to the core-accretion scenario, planets form in protostellar disks through the condensation of dust, coagulation of planetesimals, and emergence of protoplanetary embryos. At a few AU in a minimum mass nebula, embryos' growth is quenched by dynamical isolation due to the depletion of planetesimals in their feeding zone. However, embryos with masses ($M_p$) in the range of a few Earth masses ($M_\\oplus$) migrate toward a transition radius between the inner viscously heated and outer irradiated regions of their natal disk. Their limiting isolation mass increases with the planetesimals surface density. When $M_p > 10 M_\\oplus$, embryos efficiently accrete gas and evolve into cores of gas giants. We use numerical simulation to show that, despite streamline interference, convergent embryos essentially retain the strength of non-interacting embryos' Lindblad and corotation torque by their natal disks. In disks with modest surface density (or equivalently accretion rates), embryos capture each other in the...

  3. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A. Apostolopoulou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances.

  4. Embryo culture and rapid propagation of Syringa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li; DAI Li-min; SU Bao-ling

    2003-01-01

    Embryo of lilacs (Syringa L) culture in vitro and the rapid propagation were studied. The orthogonal experiments, including the selection of basal medium, embryo age and other factors such as sugar, benzyladenine (BA), naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and glutamine (Gln), were carried out. The results indicated that the optimal medium for embryo culture was Monnier medium supplemented with NAA (0.001 mg@L-1), BA (0.1 mg@L-1), sugar (50 g@L-1), and Gln (400 mg@L-1), with a germination rate of 91.7% at least; the optimal embryo age was 50 d; and Gln had significant effects on the germination rate of embryo. Moreover, the optimal medium for subculture was MS+BA (2 mg@L-1)+NAA (0.001 mg@L-1)+Gln (0.5 mg@L-1), with the propagation coefficient of 3.6 at least.

  5. Nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaňka, Jiří; Smith, Steven Dale; Soloy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    (nonactivated) or S phase (activated) cytoplasts. Control embryos were fixed at the two-, four-, early eight- and late eight-cell stages; nuclear transfer embryos were fixed at 1 and 3 hr post fusion and at the two-, four-, and eight-cell stages. Control embryos possessed a nucleolar precursor body throughout...... at 1 hr after fusion and, by 3 hr after fusion, it was restored again. At this time, the reticulated fibrillo-granular nucleolus had an almost round shape. The nucleolar precursor body seen in the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryos consisted of intermingled filamentous components and secondary...... time intervals after fusion. In the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryo, the originally reticulated nucleolus of the donor blastomere had changed into a typical nucleolar precursor body consisting of a homogeneous fibrillar structure. A primary vacuole appeared in the four-cell stage nuclear...

  6. Nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaňka, Jiří; Smith, Steven Dale; Soloy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    (nonactivated) or S phase (activated) cytoplasts. Control embryos were fixed at the two-, four-, early eight- and late eight-cell stages; nuclear transfer embryos were fixed at 1 and 3 hr post fusion and at the two-, four-, and eight-cell stages. Control embryos possessed a nucleolar precursor body throughout...... at 1 hr after fusion and, by 3 hr after fusion, it was restored again. At this time, the reticulated fibrillo-granular nucleolus had an almost round shape. The nucleolar precursor body seen in the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryos consisted of intermingled filamentous components and secondary...... time intervals after fusion. In the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryo, the originally reticulated nucleolus of the donor blastomere had changed into a typical nucleolar precursor body consisting of a homogeneous fibrillar structure. A primary vacuole appeared in the four-cell stage nuclear...

  7. Potential of human twin embryos generated by embryo splitting in assisted reproduction and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noli, Laila; Ogilvie, Caroline; Khalaf, Yacoub; Ilic, Dusko

    2017-03-01

    Embryo splitting or twinning has been widely used in veterinary medicine over 20 years to generate monozygotic twins with desirable genetic characteristics. The first human embryo splitting, reported in 1993, triggered fierce ethical debate on human embryo cloning. Since Dolly the sheep was born in 1997, the international community has acknowledged the complexity of the moral arguments related to this research and has expressed concerns about the potential for reproductive cloning in humans. A number of countries have formulated bans either through laws, decrees or official statements. However, in general, these laws specifically define cloning as an embryo that is generated via nuclear transfer (NT) and do not mention embryo splitting. Only the UK includes under cloning both embryo splitting and NT in the same legislation. On the contrary, the Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine does not have a major ethical objection to transferring two or more artificially created embryos with the same genome with the aim of producing a single pregnancy, stating that 'since embryo splitting has the potential to improve the efficacy of IVF treatments for infertility, research to investigate the technique is ethically acceptable'. Embryo splitting has been introduced successfully to the veterinary medicine several decades ago and today is a part of standard practice. We present here an overview of embryo splitting experiments in humans and non-human primates and discuss the potential of this technology in assisted reproduction and research. A comprehensive literature search was carried out using PUBMED and Google Scholar databases to identify studies on embryo splitting in humans and non-human primates. 'Embryo splitting' and 'embryo twinning' were used as the keywords, alone or in combination with other search phrases relevant to the topics of biology of preimplantation embryos. A very limited number of studies have been conducted in humans and non

  8. Undernutrition affects embryo quality of superovulated ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecia, J A; Forcada, F; Palacín, I; Sánchez-Prieto, L; Sosa, C; Fernández-Foren, A; Meikle, A

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of undernutrition on embryo production and quality in superovulated sheep, 45 ewes were allocated into two groups to be fed diets that provided 1.5 (control, C; n = 20) or 0.5 (low nutrition, L; n = 25) times daily requirements for maintenance, from oestrous synchronization with intravaginal sponges to embryo collection. Embryos were collected 7 days after the onset of oestrus (day 0). Low nutrition resulted in lower live weight and body condition at embryo collection (P < 0.05). Diet (P < 0.01) and day of sampling (P < 0.001) significantly affected plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and insulin concentrations. Plasma leptin concentrations decreased on day 7 only in L ewes. A significant effect of dietary treatment (P < 0.05) and day (P < 0.0001) was observed on plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations. The number of recovered oocytes and embryos did not differ between the groups (L: 15.4 ± 0.4; C: 12.4 ± 0.4). Recovery rate was lower (P < 0.05) in the L (60%) than in the C group (73%). The total number of embryos and number of viable-transferable embryos (5.0 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.3 embryos, respectively) of the L group were lower (P < 0.1) when compared with controls (8.4 ± 0.4 and 6.2 ± 0.4 embryos, respectively). Undernutrition during the period of superovulation and early embryonic development reduced total and viable number of embryos. These effects might be mediated by disruption of endocrine homeostasis, oviduct environment and/or oocyte quality.

  9. [Scientific ethics and frozen embryos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, C Y

    2001-05-01

    Scientific Ethics is the theory and praxis of decisions. Philosophical Ethics is presented as the theory and praxis of the good. As the good differs among cultures, Philosophical Ethics is dependent on the endo-cultural good conception. The decision (included that one of adhesion or not to a world vision) depends on neuro-psychic specific factors: i) cognitive factors that include mostly the knowledge of the alternatives and their consequences and the ideological or religious conception of good in relation to the alternatives; ii) affective factors that make alternatives pleasant, unpleasant or neutral, attractive, repulsive or neutral; iii) emotional factors that associate to alternatives anger, peace or neutrality, sadness, happiness or neutrality; iv) value factors that assign importance, triviality or neutrality to alternatives, or assign them significance, irrelevancy or neutrality. There are unspecific factors such as the psychic energy, desire or others. Mixed factors such as attitude, motivation, intention and others. Scientific Ethics deals with the mind as a materio-energetic process which is different from the soul, eggs and embryos of any species are full individuals of that species, because, they have initiated a copy of their genome that specify, give autonomy and define them as individuals. For Scientific Ethics to leave frozen embryos like that for ever, to defrost and get rid of them or to use their cells for science are synonymous of killing them. To defrost them to use their cells as stem cells for somatic cell therapy or to implant them into uteri to continue their development is to maintain alive their cells, but only the implantation allows their maintenance as individuals, thus, being the only compatible with the Christian ethics. The compatibility of these alternatives with other ethics is discussed.

  10. Factors influencing the outcome of embryo freezing and thawing program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶英辉; 金帆; 徐晨明; 邢兰凤

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that might influence the succ ess of an embryo freezing and thawing program. Method: The relationship betwee n the pregnancy rate in 73 cycles of embryo freezing and thawing program and the following factors was analyzed: maternal age, E2 level at the time of HCG trigg er, embryo storage time, number of thawed embryos transferred, presence of spons oring embryos and intact embryos. And the survival rate of thawed embryos with d ifferent morphology, cell stage and storage time was evaluated. Result: Tra nsfer with three or more than three thawed embryos resulted in pregnancy rates o f 38.5% and 35.7%, respectively, compared with 5.3% for transfer of fewer th an t hree embryos. The presence of sponsoring embryos and intact embryos significantl y increases pregnancy rate in embryo freezing and thawing program. No other fact or examined had any effect on pregnancy outcome. The survival rate of good morph ology embryos was higher than poor ones, but was not influenced by cell stage an d storage time. Conclusion: Embryo morphology before freezing, number of thaw ed embryos transferred and the presence of intact embryos are important to the o utcome of embryo freezing and thawing program.

  11. Use of purified FSH and LH for embryo production, cryopreservation by conventional freezing or vitrification and transfer of embryos in dairy ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Martemucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments were carried out with the aim of evaluating the efficiency of techniques of in vivo production, storageand transfer of embryos in dairy sheep. Experiment I - For embryo production, thirty-one ewes were synchronized withFGA (vaginal sponges, 40 mg, 9 d and PGF2α (ICI; 50 μg, 7th d, and subdivided into three groups corresponding to thefollowing superovulatory treatments over 3 days with purified gonadotrophic preparations: A control, FSH/LH ratio = 1(250 IU p-FSH : 250 UI p-LH; B FSH/LH ratio = 2 (250 IU p-FSH : 125 IU p-LH and daily FSH/LH ratio of 3.4 – 1.7 –0.8 in the 3 days of treatment, respectively; C FSH/LH ratio = 2 (250 IU p-FSH : 125 IU p-LH and daily FSH/LH ratioof 5.0 – 1.0 – 0.3. On the 7th day after oestrus and mating, ovarian response and embryo production were evaluated.Experiment II – Three freezing methods were evaluated based upon post-thaw embryo quality: CF conventional slowfreezing by 1.5 M ethylene glycol (EG; V-1 one-step vitrification based on exposure of the embryos to one solution (EG7.15 M + ficoll 2.5 mM; V-3 vitrification in three steps, corresponding to three solutions at increasing concentration ofglycerol (GLY and EG (GLY 1.4 M; GLY 3.4 M + EG 1.4 M; GLY 4.6 M + EG 3.4 M. V-1 and V-3 frozen embryos weredirectly plunged in liquid nitrogen. At thawing, embryo viability was evaluated on the basis of morphological features.Experiment III – For embryo transfer, a total of 26 recipient ewes were synchronized with donors. On the 7th d fromoestrus, 11 recipient ewes received fresh embryos (Group FE – control and 15 recipients received vitrified-thawedembryos (Group VTE. Each recipient received 2 embryos. Superovulatory treatment B significantly advanced the onsetof oestrus compared to the control (27.3 vs 34.7 h; P10.8. Transferable embryos in Group B (7.2 resulted similar to Group A (5.3 and significantly (Pcompared to Group C (3.2. V3-method resulted in the highest (PCF- and V1-methods

  12. Comparison of clinical outcomes between fresh embryo transfers and frozen-thawed embryo transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chunjuan; Shu, Defeng; Zhao, Xiaojie; Gao, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Advances in embryo culture technology and cryopreservation have led to a shift in in vitro fertilization (IVF) from early fresh or frozen-thawed cleavage embryo transfer to fresh or frozen-thawed blastocyst stage transfer. To compare the clinical outcomes of fresh embryo transfers and frozen-thawed embryo transfers. In this retrospective case control study, patients undergoing IVF cycles from January 2012 to December 2012 were enrolled in Assisted Reproduction of Wuhan Union Hospital were enrolled. A total of 1891 cycle contains 1150 fresh embryo transfers and 741 frozen-thawed embryo transfers were studied. All data were transferred directly to SPSS 18 and analyzed. Clinical pregnancy rates of fresh cleavage-stage embryo transfers compared with fresh blastocyst transfers, frozen-thawed cleavage-stage embryo transfers, post thaw cleavage-stage extended blastocyst culture transfers and frozen-thawed blastocyst transfers were 52.7%, 35.88%, 35.29%, 47.75%, 59.8% in patients under 35 years of ages and 41.24%, 26.92%, 11.32%, 46.15%, 55.8% in patients older than 35 years old, respectively. The multiple pregnancy rates, abortion rates and ectopic pregnancy rates did not differ significantly among the five groups. The clinical pregnancy rates were not different significantly between fresh cleavage-stage embryo transfers and fresh blastocyst transfers. But the clinical pregnancy rate of frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer was the highest among fresh/frozen-thawed embryo transfers.

  13. Cellular resolution models for even skipped regulation in the entire Drosophila embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Ilsley, Garth R; Fisher, Jasmin; Apweiler, Rolf; Angela H. DePace; Nicholas M Luscombe

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest The transcription of genes into messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules is one of the most important processes in biology, but our present understanding of this process is largely qualitative. Molecules such as transcription factors and regions of DNA other than the region that codes for the mRNA are known to interact with each other to influence the onset of transcription, and also the rate at which it occurs. However, given the cellular concentrations of transcription factors in a devel...

  14. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  15. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne O. Miles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  16. Drosophila Cajal bodies: accessories not included

    OpenAIRE

    Matera, A. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear sites of small ribonucleoprotein (RNP) remodeling and maturation. A recent study describes the discovery of the Drosophila Cajal body, revealing some interesting insights into the subnuclear organization of RNA processing machineries among different species.

  17. Behavioral modification in choice process of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Shunpeng; (王顺鹏); TANG; Shiming; (唐世明); LI; Yan; (李; 岩); GUO; Aike; (郭爱克)

    2003-01-01

    In visual operant conditioning of Drosophila at the flight simulator, only motor output of flies--yaw torque--is recorded, which is involved in the conditioning process. The current study used a newly-designed data analysis method to study the torque distribution of Drosophila. Modification of torque distribution represents the effects of operant conditioning on flies' behavioral mode. Earlier works[10] showed that, when facing contradictory visual cues, flies could make choices based upon the relative weightiness of different cues, and it was demonstrated that mushroom bodies might play an important role in such choice behavior. The new "torque-position map" method was used to explore the CS-US associative learning and choice behavior in Drosophila from the aspect of its behavioral mode. Finally, this work also discussed various possible neural bases involved in visual associative learning, choice processing and modification processing of the behavioral mode in the visual operant conditioning of Drosophila.

  18. Lipid metabolism in Drosophila: development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Liu; Xun Huang

    2013-01-01

    Proteins,nucleic acids,and lipids are three major components of the cell.Despite a few basic metabolic pathways,we know very little about lipids,compared with the explosion of knowledge about proteins and nucleic acids.How many different forms of lipids are there? What are the in vivo functions of individual lipid? How does lipid metabolism contribute to normal development and human health? Many of these questions remain unanswered.For over a century,the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a model organism to study basic biological questions.In recent years,increasing evidences proved that Drosophila models are highly valuable for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis researches.Some recent progresses of lipid metabolic regulation during Drosophila development and in Drosophila models of human diseases will be discussed in this review.

  19. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Wayne O; Dyson, Nicholas J; Walker, James A

    2011-11-01

    Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  20. On the Morphology of the Drosophila Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rotstein

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster represents an easily amenable genetic model whose analysis at different levels, i.e., from single molecules up to functional anatomy, has provided new insights into general aspects of cardiogenesis, heart physiology and cardiac aging, to name a few examples. In recent years, the Drosophila heart has also attracted the attention of researchers in the field of biomedicine. This development is mainly due to the fact that several genes causing human heart disease are also present in Drosophila, where they play the same or similar roles in heart development, maintenance or physiology as their respective counterparts in humans. This review will attempt to briefly introduce the anatomy of the Drosophila circulatory system and then focus on the different cell types and non-cellular tissue that constitute the heart.

  1. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon M Lee

    Full Text Available The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  2. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon M; Rodrigues, Francisco F; Yu, Cao Guo; Swan, Michael; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs) to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  3. Distinct functional specificities are associated with protein isoforms encoded by the Drosophila dorsal-ventral patterning gene pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhu, Xianjun; Stevens, Leslie M; Stein, David

    2009-08-01

    Spatially regulated transcription of the pipe gene in ventral cells of the Drosophila ovary follicle cell epithelium is a key event that specifies progeny embryo dorsal-ventral (DV) polarity. pipe encodes ten putative protein isoforms, all of which exhibit similarity to vertebrate glycosaminoglycan-modifying enzymes. Expression of one of the isoforms, Pipe-ST2, in follicle cells has previously been shown to be essential for DV patterning. pipe is also expressed in the embryonic salivary gland and its expression there is required for normal viability. Here, we show that in addition to Pipe-ST2, seven of the other Pipe isoforms are expressed in the ovary, whereas all Pipe isoforms are abundantly expressed in the embryo. Of the ten isoforms, only Pipe-ST2 can restore ventral and lateral pattern elements to the progeny of otherwise pipe-null mutant females. By contrast, three Pipe isoforms, but not Pipe-ST2, support the production of a novel pipe-dependent epitope present in the embryonic salivary gland. These data indicate that differences in functional specificity, and presumably enzymatic specificity, are associated with several of the Pipe isoforms. In addition, we show that uniform expression of the Pipe-ST2 isoform in the follicle cell layer of females otherwise lacking pipe expression leads to the formation of embryos with a DV axis that is appropriately oriented with respect to the intrinsic polarity of the eggshell. This suggests the existence of a second mechanism that polarizes the Drosophila embryo, in addition to the ventrally restricted transcription of the pipe gene.

  4. Biofluid Flow Simulations of Embryo Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, W. P.; Ding, D. L.

    2011-09-01

    The investigation of the fluid flow for embryo transfer (ET) procedure may find the way to increase the success rate of the assisted reproductive technologies. In this paper, the transferred liquid flow in the uterine cavity during ET procedure is simulated by a two dimensional multiphase flow model, and the discrete phase model is adopted to trace the embryo motion. Through the investigation on the transferred liquid outline and the track of each embryo in ET cases with different parameters, we summarize the effect of transferred liquid viscosity and distance between catheter tip and uterine fundus. According to the numerical results, we recommend the optimizing standard to perform the ET procedure.

  5. Moral qualms, future persons, and embryo research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David Martin

    2008-05-01

    Many people have moral qualms about embryo research, feeling that embryos must deserve some kind of protection, if not so much as is afforded to persons. This paper will show that these qualms serve to camouflage motives that are really prudential, at the cost of also obscuring the real ethical issues at play in the debate concerning embryo research and therapeutic cloning. This in turn leads to fallacious use of the Actions/Omissions Distinction and ultimately neglects the duties that we have towards future persons.

  6. Association between Number of Formed Embryos, Embryo Morphology and Clinical Pregnancy Rate after Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Caroline Mantovani da; Giorgi, Vanessa Silvestre Innocenti; Coelho Neto, Marcela Alencar; Martins, Wellington de Paula; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Navarro, Paula Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Infertility has a high prevalence in the general population, affecting ∼ 5 to 15% of couples in reproductive age. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) include in vitro manipulation of gametes and embryos and are an important treatment indicated to these couples. It is well accepted that the implantation rate is positively influenced by the morphology of transferred embryos. However, we question if, apart from the assessment of embryo morphology, the number of produced embryos per cycle is also related to pregnancy rates in the first fresh transfer cycle. Purpose To evaluate the clinical pregnancy rate according to the number of formed embryos and the transfer of top quality embryos (TQEs). Methods In a retrospective cohort study, between January 2011 and December 2012, we evaluated women who underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), aged < 40 years, and with at least 1 formed embryo fresh transferred in cleavage stage. These women were stratified into 3 groups according to the number of formed embryos (1 embryo, 2-3 and ≥ 4 embryos). Each group was divided into 2 subgroups according to the presence or not of at least 1 transferred TQE (1 with TQE; 1 without TQE; 2-3 with TQE, 2-3 without TQE; ≥ 4 with TQE; ≥ 4 without TQE). The clinical pregnancy rates were compared in each subgroup based on the presence or absence of at least one transferred TQE. Results During the study period, 636 women had at least one embryo to be transferred in the first fresh cycle (17.8% had 1 formed embryo [32.7% with TQE versus 67.3% without TQE], 42.1% of women had 2-3 formed embryos [55.6% with TQE versus 44.4% without TQE], and 40.1% of patients had ≥ 4 formed embryos [73.7% with TQE versus 26.3% without TQE]). The clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the subgroup with ≥ 4 formed embryos with at least 1 transfered TQE (45.2%) compared with the subgroup without TQE (28.4%). Conclusions Having at

  7. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Michael; Gao, Guo-Jie; Thomas, Jeffrey; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity.

  8. Progress in understanding the Drosophila dnc locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighorn, A; Qiu, Y; Davis, R L

    1994-05-01

    The genetic dissection of learning and memory in Drosophila is two decades old. Recently, a great deal of progress has been made towards isolating new mutants as well as towards a better understanding of the originally isolated ones. This paper reviews the recent developments in the understanding of the structure and function of the gene identified by the first and best-characterized of these mutants, the Drosophila dunce mutant.

  9. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabli...

  10. Factors influencing the outcome of embryo freezing and Ihawing program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶英辉; 金帆; 徐晨明; 邢兰凤

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that might influence the sucess of an ernbryo freezing and thawing program.Method: The relationship between the pregnancy rate in 73 cycles of embryo freezing and thewing program and the following factors was analyzed;matermal age,E2 level at the time of HCG trigger,embryo storage time,number of thawed embryos transferred,presence of sponsoring embryos and intact embryos.And the suvival rate of thawed embryos with different morphology,cell stage and storage time was evaluated.Result:Transfer with three of more than three thawed embryos resulted in pragnancy rates of 38.5% and 35.7%,respectively.compared with 5.3% for transfer of fewer than three embryos.The presence of sponsoring embryos and intact embryos significantly incresses pregnancy rate in embryo freezing and thawing program .No other factor examined had any effect on pregnancy outcome.The survival rate of good morphology embryos was higher than poor ones,but was not influenced by cell stage and storage time.Conclusion:Embryo morphology before freezing , number of thawed embryos transferred and the presence of intact embryos are important to the outcome of embryo freezing and thawing program.

  11. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...

  12. The Role of AMPK in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnett, Sarah E; Brenman, Jay E

    2016-01-01

    In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, mono-allelic expression of AMPK-α, -β, and -γ yields a single heterotrimeric energy sensor that regulates cellular and whole-body energetic homeostasis. The genetic simplicity of Drosophila, with only a single gene for each subunit, makes the fruit fly an appealing organism for elucidating the effects of AMPK mutations on signaling pathways and phenotypes. In addition, Drosophila presents researchers with an opportunity to use straightforward genetic approaches to elucidate metabolic signaling pathways that contain a level of complexity similar to that observed in mammalian pathways. Just as in mammals, however, the regulatory realm of AMPK function extends beyond metabolic rates and lipid metabolism. Indeed, experiments using Drosophila have shown that AMPK may exert protective effects with regard to life span and neurodegeneration. This chapter addresses a few of the research areas in which Drosophila has been used to elucidate the physiological functions of AMPK. In doing so, this chapter provides a primer for basic Drosophila nomenclature, thereby eliminating a communication barrier that persists for AMPK researchers trained in mammalian genetics.

  13. Characterization of Autophagic Responses in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Kumar, S; Denton, D

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying autophagy during animal development due to the availability of genetic reagents and opportunity for in vivo cell biological analysis. The regulation and mechanism of autophagy are highly evolutionarily conserved and the role of autophagy has been characterized during various stages of Drosophila development as well as following starvation. Studies in Drosophila have revealed novel insights into the role of distinct components of the autophagy machinery. This chapter describes protocols for examining autophagy during Drosophila development. A crucial step in the induction of autophagy is the incorporation of Atg8a into the autophagosome. This can be measured as autophagic puncta using live fluorescent imaging, immunostaining, or immunoblot analysis of LC3/Atg8a processing. The level of autophagy can also be examined using other specific components of the autophagy pathway as markers detected by immunofluorescent imaging. Based on the distinct morphology of autophagy, it can also be examined by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, one of the advantages of using Drosophila as a model is the ability to undertake genetic analysis of individual components of the autophagy machinery. Current approaches that can be used to monitor autophagy, including the overall flux and individual steps in Drosophila melanogaster, will be discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thanh Men

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity.

  15. The Drosophila Medea gene is required downstream of dpp and encodes a functional homolog of human Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J B; Podos, S D; Keith, K; Simpson, S L; Ferguson, E L

    1998-04-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-beta superfamily member decapentaplegic (dpp) acts as an extracellular morphogen to pattern the embryonic ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo. To identify components of the dpp signaling pathway, we screened for mutations that act as dominant maternal enhancers of a weak allele of the dpp target gene zerknŁllt. In this screen, we recovered new alleles of the Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea genes. Phenotypic analysis of the new Medea mutations indicates that Medea, like Mad, is required for both embryonic and imaginal disc patterning. Genetic analysis suggests that Medea may have two independently mutable functions in patterning the embryonic ectoderm. Complete elimination of maternal and zygotic Medea activity in the early embryo results in a ventralized phenotype identical to that of null dpp mutants, indicating that Medea is required for all dpp-dependent signaling in embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Injection of mRNAs encoding DPP or a constitutively activated form of the DPP receptor, Thick veins, into embryos lacking all Medea activity failed to induce formation of any dorsal cell fates, demonstrating that Medea acts downstream of the thick veins receptor. We cloned Medea and found that it encodes a protein with striking sequence similarity to human SMAD4. Moreover, injection of human SMAD4 mRNA into embryos lacking all Medea activity conferred phenotypic rescue of the dorsal-ventral pattern, demonstrating conservation of function between the two gene products.

  16. Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: drosophilidae), trapped with combinations of wines and vinegars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field trapping experiments evaluated wine and vinegar baits for spotted wing drosophila flies, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), and assessed variance in biat attractiveness with wit type, vinegar type, and bait age. A mixture of apple cider vinegar and a Merlot wine attracted more flies than a mixtur...

  17. Molecular neurobiology of Drosophila taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Erica Gene; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila is a powerful model in which to study the molecular and cellular basis of taste coding. Flies sense tastants via populations of taste neurons that are activated by compounds of distinct categories. The past few years have borne witness to studies that define the properties of taste neurons, identifying functionally distinct classes of sweet and bitter taste neurons that express unique subsets of gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, as well as water, salt, and pheromone sensing neurons that express members of the pickpocket (ppk) or ionotropic receptor (Ir) families. There has also been significant progress in terms of understanding how tastant information is processed and conveyed to higher brain centers, and modulated by prior dietary experience or starvation.

  18. Splitting and biopsy for bovine embryo sexing under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R F; Forell, F; Oliveira, A T; Rodrigues, J L

    2001-12-01

    Improvements on embryo micromanipulation techniques led to the use of embryo bisection technology in commercial embryo transfer programs, and made possible the direct genetic analysis of preimplantation bovine embryos by biopsy. For example, aspiration and microsection, allow bovine embryos sexing by detection of male-specific Y-chromosome in a sample of embryonic cells. We report on the application of the methodologies of splitting and biopsy of bovine embryos in field conditions, and on the results of embryo sex determination by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pregnancy rates achieved with fresh bisected or biopsied embryos (50 to 60%) were similar to the fresh intact embryos (55 to 61%). The PCR protocol used for embryo sexing showed 92% to 94% of efficiency and 90 to 100% of accuracy. These results demonstrate these procedures are suitable for use in field conditions.

  19. Bovine in vitro embryo production : An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Suthar

    Full Text Available Dairy industry perfected the application of the first reproductive biotechnology, i.e. artificial insemination (AI - a great success story and also remains the user of embryo transfer technology (ETT. In addition, recently the researchers taking interest to embraced the field of Transvaginal OocyteRecovery (TVOR and in vitro production (IVEP of embryos. IVF provides the starting point for the generation of reproductive material for a number of advanced reproduction techniques including sperm microinjection and nuclear transfer (cloning. In several countries commercial IVF facilities are already being employed by cattle ET operators. Various research groups have reported on modification of TVOR technique to give greater efficiency. Much research is still needed in domestic animal (Especially Indian species on mechanisms controlling embryo development and on development of totally in vitro system for embryo culture. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 478-479`

  20. Hybrids of sugar pine by embryo culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. C. Stone; J. W. Duffield

    1950-01-01

    A modified embryo culture technique was used to facilitate germination of seed obtained after pollinating sugar pine with pollen from blister rust- resistant Armand and Korean pines. Resulting seedlings appear to be hybrids.

  1. Steroidal alkaloid toxicity to fish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L; Kocan, R M

    1993-02-01

    Embryos of two species of fish were evaluated for their suitability as model systems for steroidal alkaloid toxicity, the Japanese rice fish, medaka (Oryzius latipes) and the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Additionally, the equine neurotoxic sesquiterpene lactone repin, was also tested. A PROBIT program was used to evaluate the EC1, EC50 and EC99 as well as the associated confidence limits. The steroidal alkaloids tested were the Solanum potato glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, the aglyclones solanidine and solasodine and the Veratrum alkaloid, jervine. Embryo mortality, likely due to structural or functional abnormalities in the early development stages of the embryo, were the only response observed in both species. The rainbow trout exhibited a toxic response to chaconine, solasidine, repin and solanine but the medaka embryos were only affected by the compounds, chaconine and solanine. Rainbow trout may indeed serve as a good lower vertebrate model for studying the toxicity of steroidal alkaloids.

  2. Assessment of aneuploidy in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos by chromosome painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougier, N.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Plachot, M. [Hospital Necker, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The poor quality of chromosome preparations often observed after fixation of oocytes and embryos did not usually allow accurate identification of chromosomes involved in non-disjunctions. We, therefore, used chromosome painting to determine the incidence of abnormalities for chromosomes 1 and 7. A total of 50 oocytes inseminated for IVF and showing no signs of fertilization as well as 37 diploid embryos donated for research were fixed according to the Dyban`s technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was carried out using whole chromosome painting DNA probes specific for human chromosome 1 and 7. The incidence of aneuploidy was 28%, 10% and 60% for metaphase II, polar body and sperm chromosomes, respectively. The high incidence of aneuploidy observed in sperm prematurely condensed sperm chromosomes is due to the fact that usually far less than 23 sperm chromatids are observed, maybe as a consequence of incomplete chromosome condensation. Thirty seven embryos were analyzed with the same probes. 48% of early embryos were either monosomic 1 or 7 or mosaics comprising blastomeres with 1, 2 or 3 signals. Thus, 8 among the 11 abnormal embryos had hypodiploid cells (25 to 37 chromosomes) indicating either an artefactual loss of chromosomes or a complex anomaly of nuclear division (maltinucleated blastomeres, abnormal migration of chromosomes at anaphase). We therefore calculated a {open_quotes}corrected{close_quotes} incidence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 1 or 7 in early embryos: 18%. 86% of the blastocysts showed mosaicism 2n/3 or 4n as a consequence of the formation of the syncitiotrophoblast. To conclude, chromosome painting is an efficient method to accurately identify chromosomes involved in aneuploidy. This technique should allow us to evaluate the incidence of non-disjunction for all chromosome pairs. Our results confirm the high incidence of chromosome abnormalities occurring as a consequence of meiotic or mitotic non-disjunctions in human oocytes and embryos.

  3. The fate of the mosaic embryo : chromosomal constitution and development of Day 4, 5 and 8 human embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Margarida Avo; Teklenburg, Gijs; Macklon, Nick S.; Van Opstal, Diane; Schuring-Blom, G. Heleen; Krijtenburg, Pieter-Jaap; de Vreeden-Elbertse, Johanna; Fauser, Bart C.; Baart, Esther B.

    2010-01-01

    Post-zygotic chromosome segregation errors are very common in human embryos after in vitro fertilization, resulting in mosaic embryos. However, the significance of mosaicism for the developmental potential of early embryos is unknown. We assessed chromosomal constitution and development of embryos f

  4. Embryo disposition and the new death scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellison, David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the IVF clinic - a place designed principally for the production and implantation of embryos - scientists and IVF recipients are faced with decisions regarding the disposition of frozen embryos. At this time there are hundred of thousands of cryopreserved embryos awaiting such determinations. They may be thawed for transfer to the woman herself, they may be donated for research or for use by other infertile couples, they may remain in frozen storage, or they may variously be discarded by being allowed to 'succumb', or 'perish'. Where the choice is discard, some IVF clients have chosen to formalise the process through ceremony. A new language is emerging in response to the desires of the would-be-parents who might wish to characterise the discard experience as a ‘good death’. This article examines the procedure known as ‘compassionate transfer’ where the embryo to be discarded is placed in the woman’s vagina where it is clear that it will not develop further. An alternate method has the embryo transferred in the usual manner but without the benefit of fertility-enhancing hormones at a point in the cycle unreceptive to implantation. The embryo destined for disposal is thus removed from the realm of technological possibility and ‘returned’ to the female body for a homely death. While debates continue about whether or not embryos constitute life, new practices are developing in response to the emotional experience of embryo discard. We argue that compassionate transfer is a death scene taking shape. In this article, we take the measure of this new death scene’s fabrication, and consider the form, significance, and legal complexity of its ceremonies.

  5. Culture systems: embryo culture and monozygotic twinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of monozygotic twinning in pregnancies achieved with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) is significantly higher than spontaneously conceived pregnancies. The factors associated with ART that predispose the embryos to splitting are not well-characterized. Assisted hatching and extended embryo culture are two ART laboratory methods that have been risk factors for monozygotic twinning. The methods and strategies that may be employed to avoid monozygotic twinning are discussed in this chapter.

  6. Zebrafish embryo model of Bartonella henselae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K; Anderson, Burt

    2014-10-01

    Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)(y1) zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis.

  7. Manipulation and imaging of Kryptolebias marmoratus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourabit, Sulayman; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2012-12-01

    The self-fertilizing mangrove killifish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, is an upcoming model species for a range of biological disciplines. To further establish this model in the field of developmental biology, we examined several techniques for embryonic manipulation and for imaging that can be used in an array of experimental designs. These methodological approaches can be divided into two categories: handling of embryos with and without their chorionic membrane. Embryos still enclosed in their chorion can be manipulated using an agarose bed or a methyl cellulose system, holding them in place and allowing their rotation to more specific angles and positions. Using these methods, we demonstrate microinjection of embryos and monitoring of fluorescent yolk syncytial nuclei (YSN) using both stereo and compound microscopes. For higher magnification imaging using compound microscopes as well as time-lapse analyses, embryos were dechorionated and embedded in low-melting-point agarose. To demonstrate this embedding technique, we further examined fluorescent YSN and also analyzed the yolk surface of K. marmoratus embryos. The latter was observed to provide an excellent imaging platform for study of the behavior and morphology of cells during embryonic development, for various types of cells. Our data demonstrate that K. marmoratus is an excellent model species for research in developmental biology, as methodological approaches for the manipulation and imaging of embryos are efficient and readily available.

  8. Type II cytokeratin gene expression is indicative of early cell differentiation in the chick embryo

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    Charlebois, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    Embryonic development in vertebrates appears to involve a series of inductive tissue interactions that lead to regional specializations, which eventually become elaborated in the basic body plan of the embryo. The inductive interactions leading to early regionalization of the embryo are often particularly difficult to evaluate because of the absence of available morphological or biochemical evidence that such events have occurred. In the 36 hour chick embryo, the regional subdivision of the early ectoderm is evidence by a marked lens-forming bias in the head ectoderm, which is absent in the presumptive dorsal epidermis of the trunk region. As a strategy for isolating genes whose differential expression might reflect this regional subdivision, a cDNA library from 36 hour embryos was prepared and screened for differential hybridization to ({sup 32}P)cDNA probes synthesized using template RNA isolated from 36 hour head ectoderm and trunk ectoderm. A cDNA clone (T4) was isolated which hybridizes to transcripts present at much higher levels in trunk ectoderm than in head ectoderm. Partial nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of this clone indicate that it represents a gene encoding a type II cytokeratin. The distribution of transcripts complementary to the T4 probe was evaluated in early embryos using RNA gel blot analysis and in situ hybridization to tissue sections.

  9. Maternal depletion of Piwi, a component of the RNAi system, impacts heterochromatin formation in Drosophila.

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    Tingting Gu

    Full Text Available A persistent question in epigenetics is how heterochromatin is targeted for assembly at specific domains, and how that chromatin state is faithfully transmitted. Stable heterochromatin is necessary to silence transposable elements (TEs and maintain genome integrity. Both the RNAi system and heterochromatin components HP1 (Swi6 and H3K9me2/3 are required for initial establishment of heterochromatin structures in S. pombe. Here we utilize both loss of function alleles and the newly developed Drosophila melanogaster transgenic shRNA lines to deplete proteins of interest at specific development stages to dissect their roles in heterochromatin assembly in early zygotes and in maintenance of the silencing chromatin state during development. Using reporters subject to Position Effect Variegation (PEV, we find that depletion of key proteins in the early embryo can lead to loss of silencing assayed at adult stages. The piRNA component Piwi is required in the early embryo for reporter silencing in non-gonadal somatic cells, but knock-down during larval stages has no impact. This implies that Piwi is involved in targeting HP1a when heterochromatin is established at the late blastoderm stage and possibly also during embryogenesis, but that the silent chromatin state created is transmitted through cell division independent of the piRNA system. In contrast, heterochromatin structural protein HP1a is required for both initial heterochromatin assembly and the following mitotic inheritance. HP1a profiles in piwi mutant animals confirm that Piwi depletion leads to decreased HP1a levels in pericentric heterochromatin, particularly in TEs. The results suggest that the major role of the piRNA system in assembly of heterochromatin in non-gonadal somatic cells occurs in the early embryo during heterochromatin formation, and further demonstrate that failure of heterochromatin formation in the early embryo impacts the phenotype of the adult.

  10. Human embryo twinning with applications in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illmensee, Karl; Levanduski, Mike; Vidali, Andrea; Husami, Nabil; Goudas, Vasilios T

    2010-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of human embryo twinning by blastomere biopsy at different early embryonic stages (splitting efficiency) and to determine the in vitro developmental capacity of twinned human embryos (developmental efficiency). Randomized comparative study. Private IVF centers. Couples undergoing IVF donating triploid embryos. Embryos at the 2- to 5- and 6- to 8-cell stage were split into twin embryos. Half the number of blastomeres from donor embryos were removed and inserted into recipient empty zonae pellucidae. After embryo splitting, donor and recipient embryos were cultured in vitro. Development of twinned embryos to the blastocyst stage. The number of developing embryos obtained after splitting could be increased in comparison with the number of embryos available before splitting at the 6- to 8-cell stage but not at the 2- to 5-cell stage (splitting efficiency). Splitting of 6- to 8-cell embryos yielded superior rates of twin embryos developing to blastocysts (developmental efficiency). Twinning success was related to the superior morphological quality of embryos used for splitting. This is the first report on twinned human embryos developing to blastocysts. This study exhibits the potential for novel applications in human assisted reproduction. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have revealed the...15-Apr-2009 14-Apr-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila The...Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila Report Title Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have

  12. Miniaturized embryo array for automated trapping, immobilization and microperfusion of zebrafish embryos.

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    Jin Akagi

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio has recently emerged as a powerful experimental model in drug discovery and environmental toxicology. Drug discovery screens performed on zebrafish embryos mirror with a high level of accuracy the tests usually performed on mammalian animal models, and fish embryo toxicity assay (FET is one of the most promising alternative approaches to acute ecotoxicity testing with adult fish. Notwithstanding this, automated in-situ analysis of zebrafish embryos is still deeply in its infancy. This is mostly due to the inherent limitations of conventional techniques and the fact that metazoan organisms are not easily susceptible to laboratory automation. In this work, we describe the development of an innovative miniaturized chip-based device for the in-situ analysis of zebrafish embryos. We present evidence that automatic, hydrodynamic positioning, trapping and long-term immobilization of single embryos inside the microfluidic chips can be combined with time-lapse imaging to provide real-time developmental analysis. Our platform, fabricated using biocompatible polymer molding technology, enables rapid trapping of embryos in low shear stress zones, uniform drug microperfusion and high-resolution imaging without the need of manual embryo handling at various developmental stages. The device provides a highly controllable fluidic microenvironment and post-analysis eleuthero-embryo stage recovery. Throughout the incubation, the position of individual embryos is registered. Importantly, we also for first time show that microfluidic embryo array technology can be effectively used for the analysis of anti-angiogenic compounds using transgenic zebrafish line (fli1a:EGFP. The work provides a new rationale for rapid and automated manipulation and analysis of developing zebrafish embryos at a large scale.

  13. Embryo quality and transcervical technique are not the limiting factors in donkey embryo transfer outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzani, D; Rota, A; Crisci, A; Kindahl, H; Govoni, N; Camillo, F

    2012-02-01

    Embryo transfer (ET) in the donkey resulted in a very low recipient pregnancy rates. The aim of these studies was to investigate if nonsurgical transfer techniques or donkey embryo quality affect donkey recipient pregnancy failure. In Study 1, the impact of transfer technique was investigated by evaluating if cervical catheterization is associated with prostaglandin release and suppression of luteal function and if donkey recipients would become pregnant after nonsurgical transfer of horse embryos. Four jennies, from 5 to 8 d after ovulation, were submitted to a sham transcervical ET and to evaluation of PGFM and progesterone plasma concentrations. Five 8 d horse embryos were nonsurgically transferred into synchronized donkey recipients (HD). Cervical stimulation caused a transient PGF(2α) release in two of four jennies in the absence of a significant decrease in progesterone plasma concentration. All transferred horse embryos resulted in pregnancies in the jenny recipients. In Study 2, donkey embryo viability was investigated by 1.2 meters, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining of 10 embryos and by the transfer of 6 and 12 donkey embryos in synchronized mare (DH) and donkey (DD) recipients, respectively, of known fertility. The estimated proportion of dead cells in DAPI stained embryos was 0.9% (range 0-3.9%) and below what is considered normal (20%) for horse embryos. Three of six and six of 12 of the DH and DD ETs, respectively resulted in pregnancies at 14 and 25 d (50%), a higher pregnancy rate than previously reported after DD ET. The overall results of this study suggest that the transcervical technique for ET and donkey embryo viability are not the reasons for the low pregnancy rates that have previously been described in donkey recipients, and that nonsurgical ET in donkeys can result in acceptable results.

  14. Molecular evolution of Drosophila cuticular protein genes.

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    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Several multigene families have been described that together encode scores of structural cuticular proteins in Drosophila, although the functional significance of this diversity remains to be explored. Here I investigate the evolutionary histories of several multigene families (CPR, Tweedle, CPLCG, and CPF/CPFL that vary in age, size, and sequence complexity, using sequenced Drosophila genomes and mosquito outgroups. My objective is to describe the rates and mechanisms of 'cuticle-ome' divergence, in order to identify conserved and rapidly evolving elements. I also investigate potential examples of interlocus gene conversion and concerted evolution within these families during Drosophila evolution. The absolute rate of change in gene number (per million years is an order of magnitude lower for cuticular protein families within Drosophila than it is among Drosophila and the two mosquito taxa, implying that major transitions in the cuticle proteome have occurred at higher taxonomic levels. Several hotspots of intergenic conversion and/or gene turnover were identified, e.g. some gene pairs have independently undergone intergenic conversion within different lineages. Some gene conversion hotspots were characterized by conversion tracts initiating near nucleotide repeats within coding regions, and similar repeats were found within concertedly evolving cuticular protein genes in Anopheles gambiae. Rates of amino-acid substitution were generally severalfold higher along the branch connecting the Sophophora and Drosophila species groups, and 13 genes have Ka/Ks significantly greater than one along this branch, indicating adaptive divergence. Insect cuticular proteins appear to be a source of adaptive evolution within genera and, at higher taxonomic levels, subject to periods of gene-family expansion and contraction followed by quiescence. However, this relative stasis is belied by hotspots of molecular evolution, particularly concerted evolution, during

  15. mars and tousled-like kinase act in parallel to ensure chromosome fidelity in Drosophila

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    Huang Hsiao-Yu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein (HURP and Tousled-Like Kinase (TLK transcripts are found in hepatocellular carcinoma. HURP overexpression induces anchorage-independent growth of 293-T cells and enhances a rough-eye phenotype resulting from tlk overexpression in Drosophila. In addition, both HURP and Mars, a Drosophila HURP sequence homologue, promote polymerization of mitotic spindles. Thus, the genetic interaction of mars with tlk might be required for accurate chromosome segregation. Methods To reveal whether chromosome fidelity was decreased, the frequency of gynandromorphy, an individual with both male and female characteristics, and of non-disjunction were measured in the progeny from parents with reduced mars and/or tlk activities and analyzed by Student's t-test. To show that the genetic interaction between mars and tlk is epistatic or parallel, a cytological analysis of embryos with either reduced or increased activities of mars and/or tlk was used to reveal defects in mitotic-spindle morphology and chromosome segregation. Results A significant but small fraction of the progeny from parents with reduced mars activity showed gynandromorphy and non-disjunction. Results of cytological analysis revealed that the decrease in chromosome fidelity was a result of delayed polymerization of the mitotic spindle, which led to asynchronous chromosome segregation in embryos that had reduced mars activity. By removing one copy of tousled-like kinase (tlk from flies with reduced mars activity, chromosome fidelity was further reduced. This was indicated by an increased in the non-disjunction rate and more severe asynchrony. However, the morphology of the mitotic spindles in the embryos at metaphase where both gene activities were reduced was similar to that in mars embryos. Furthermore, tlk overexpression did not affect the morphology of the mitotic spindles and the cellular localization of Mars protein. Conclusion

  16. Mutations in Drosophila Greatwall/Scant reveal its roles in mitosis and meiosis and interdependence with Polo kinase.

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    Vincent Archambault

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Polo is a conserved kinase that coordinates many events of mitosis and meiosis, but how it is regulated remains unclear. Drosophila females having only one wild-type allele of the polo kinase gene and the dominant Scant mutation produce embryos in which one of the centrosomes detaches from the nuclear envelope in late prophase. We show that Scant creates a hyperactive form of Greatwall (Gwl with altered specificity in vitro, another protein kinase recently implicated in mitotic entry in Drosophila and Xenopus. Excess Gwl activity in embryos causes developmental failure that can be rescued by increasing maternal Polo dosage, indicating that coordination between the two mitotic kinases is crucial for mitotic progression. Revertant alleles of Scant that restore fertility to polo-Scant heterozygous females are recessive alleles or deficiencies of gwl; they show chromatin condensation defects and anaphase bridges in larval neuroblasts. One recessive mutant allele specifically disrupts a Gwl isoform strongly expressed during vitellogenesis. Females hemizygous for this allele are sterile, and their oocytes fail to arrest in metaphase I of meiosis; both homologues and sister chromatids separate on elongated meiotic spindles with little or no segregation. This allelic series of gwl mutants highlights the multiple roles of Gwl in both mitotic and meiotic progression. Our results indicate that Gwl activity antagonizes Polo and thus identify an important regulatory interaction of the cell cycle.

  17. The Drosophila Transcription Factors Tinman and Pannier Activate and Collaborate with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 to Promote Heart Cell Fate.

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    TyAnna L Lovato

    Full Text Available Expression of the MADS domain transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2 is regulated by numerous and overlapping enhancers which tightly control its transcription in the mesoderm. To understand how Mef2 expression is controlled in the heart, we identified a late stage Mef2 cardiac enhancer that is active in all heart cells beginning at stage 14 of embryonic development. This enhancer is regulated by the NK-homeodomain transcription factor Tinman, and the GATA transcription factor Pannier through both direct and indirect interactions with the enhancer. Since Tinman, Pannier and MEF2 are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, and since their vertebrate homologs can convert mouse fibroblast cells to cardiomyocytes in different activator cocktails, we tested whether over-expression of these three factors in vivo could ectopically activate known cardiac marker genes. We found that mesodermal over-expression of Tinman and Pannier resulted in approximately 20% of embryos with ectopic Hand and Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur expression. By adding MEF2 alongside Tinman and Pannier, a dramatic expansion in the expression of Hand and Sur was observed in almost all embryos analyzed. Two additional cardiac markers were also expanded in their expression. Our results demonstrate the ability to initiate ectopic cardiac fate in vivo by the combination of only three members of the conserved Drosophila cardiac transcription network, and provide an opportunity for this genetic model system to be used to dissect the mechanisms of cardiac specification.

  18. Uracil-containing DNA in Drosophila: stability, stage-specific accumulation, and developmental involvement.

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    Villő Muha

    Full Text Available Base-excision repair and control of nucleotide pools safe-guard against permanent uracil accumulation in DNA relying on two key enzymes: uracil-DNA glycosylase and dUTPase. Lack of the major uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG gene from the fruit fly genome and dUTPase from fruit fly larvae prompted the hypotheses that i uracil may accumulate in Drosophila genomic DNA where it may be well tolerated, and ii this accumulation may affect development. Here we show that i Drosophila melanogaster tolerates high levels of uracil in DNA; ii such DNA is correctly interpreted in cell culture and embryo; and iii under physiological spatio-temporal control, DNA from fruit fly larvae, pupae, and imago contain greatly elevated levels of uracil (200-2,000 uracil/million bases, quantified using a novel real-time PCR-based assay. Uracil is accumulated in genomic DNA of larval tissues during larval development, whereas DNA from imaginal tissues contains much less uracil. Upon pupation and metamorphosis, uracil content in DNA is significantly decreased. We propose that the observed developmental pattern of uracil-DNA is due to the lack of the key repair enzyme UNG from the Drosophila genome together with down-regulation of dUTPase in larval tissues. In agreement, we show that dUTPase silencing increases the uracil content in DNA of imaginal tissues and induces strong lethality at the early pupal stages, indicating that tolerance of highly uracil-substituted DNA is also stage-specific. Silencing of dUTPase perturbs the physiological pattern of uracil-DNA accumulation in Drosophila and leads to a strongly lethal phenotype in early pupal stages. These findings suggest a novel role of uracil-containing DNA in Drosophila development and metamorphosis and present a novel example for developmental effects of dUTPase silencing in multicellular eukaryotes. Importantly, we also show lack of the UNG gene in all available genomes of other Holometabola insects, indicating a potentially

  19. Live imaging of Drosophila gonad formation reveals roles for Six4 in regulating germline and somatic cell migration

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    Jarman Andrew P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement of cells, either as amoeboid individuals or in organised groups, is a key feature of organ formation. Both modes of migration occur during Drosophila embryonic gonad development, which therefore provides a paradigm for understanding the contribution of these processes to organ morphogenesis. Gonads of Drosophila are formed from three distinct cell types: primordial germ cells (PGCs, somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, and in males, male-specific somatic gonadal precursors (msSGPs. These originate in distinct locations and migrate to associate in two intermingled clusters which then compact to form the spherical primitive gonads. PGC movements are well studied, but much less is known of the migratory events and other interactions undergone by their somatic partners. These appear to move in organised groups like, for example, lateral line cells in zebra fish or Drosophila ovarian border cells. Results We have used time-lapse fluorescence imaging to characterise gonadal cell behaviour in wild type and mutant embryos. We show that the homeodomain transcription factor Six4 is required for the migration of the PGCs and the msSGPs towards the SGPs. We have identified a likely cause of this in the case of PGCs as we have found that Six4 is required for expression of Hmgcr which codes for HMGCoA reductase and is necessary for attraction of PGCs by SGPs. Six4 affects msSGP migration by a different pathway as these move normally in Hmgcr mutant embryos. Additionally, embryos lacking fully functional Six4 show a novel phenotype in which the SGPs, which originate in distinct clusters, fail to coalesce to form unified gonads. Conclusion Our work establishes the Drosophila gonad as a model system for the analysis of coordinated cell migrations and morphogenesis using live imaging and demonstrates that Six4 is a key regulator of somatic cell function during gonadogenesis. Our data suggest that the initial association of SGP clusters

  20. A simplified and efficient germline-specific CRISPR/Cas9 system for Drosophila genomic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebo, Zachary L; Lee, Han B; Peng, Ying; Guo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) has recently emerged as an efficient and simple tool for site-specific engineering of eukaryotic genomes. To improve its applications in Drosophila genome engineering, we simplified the standard two-component CRISPR/Cas9 system by generating a stable transgenic fly line expressing the Cas9 endonuclease in the germline (Vasa-Cas9 line). By injecting vectors expressing engineered target-specific guide RNAs into Vasa-Cas9 fly embryos, mutations were generated from site-specific DNA cleavages and efficiently transmitted into progenies. Because Cas9 endonuclease is the universal component of the type II CRISPR/Cas9 system, site-specific genomic engineering based on this improved platform can be achieved with lower complexity and toxicity, greater consistency, and excellent versatility.

  1. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeman, Michael T; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-01-01

    Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa.

  2. Identification of maverick, a novel member of the TGF-beta superfamily in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M; Parker, L; Arora, K

    2000-07-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of structurally related ligands regulates essential signaling pathways that control many aspects of cell behavior in organisms across the phylogenetic spectrum. Here we report the identification of maverick (mav), a gene that encodes a new member of the TGF-beta superfamily in Drosophila. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparison suggest that Mav cannot be easily assigned to any one sub-family, since it is equally related to BMP, activin and TGF-beta ligands. mav maps to the fourth chromosome and is expressed throughout development. In situ hybridization experiments reveal the presence of maternally derived mav transcript in precellular blastoderm embryos. Later in development, mav is expressed in a dynamic pattern in the developing gut, both in endodermal and visceral mesodermal cells. In adult females, high levels of mav mRNA are present in late stage egg chambers.

  3. emc has a role in dorsal appendage fate formation in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadia, Sofia; Tzolovsky, George; Zhao, Debiao; Leaper, Kevin; Clyde, Dorothy; Taylor, Paul; Asscher, Eva; Kirk, Graeme; Bownes, Mary

    2005-09-01

    extramacrochaetae (emc) functions during many developmental processes in Drosophila, such as sensory organ formation, sex determination, wing vein differentiation, regulation of eye photoreceptor differentiation, cell proliferation and development of the Malpighian tubules, trachea and muscles in the embryo. It encodes a Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factor that negatively regulates bHLH proteins. We show here that emc mRNA and protein are present throughout oogenesis in a dynamic expression pattern and that emc is involved in the regulation of chorionic appendage formation during late oogenesis. Expression of sense and antisense emc constructs as well as emc follicle cell clones leads to eggs with shorter, thicker dorsal appendages that are closer together at base than in the wild type. We demonstrate that emc lies downstream of fs(1)K10, gurken and EGFR in the Grk/EGFR signalling pathway and that it participates in controlling Broad-Complex expression at late stages of oogenesis.

  4. Dorsal closure in Drosophila: cells cannot get out of the tight spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2009-12-01

    Dorsal closure (DC), the closure of a hole in the dorsal epidermis of Drosophila embryos by the joining of opposing epithelial cell sheets, has been used as a model process to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying epithelial spreading and wound healing. Recent studies have provided novel insights into how different tissues function cooperatively in this process. Specifically, they demonstrate a critical function of the epidermis surrounding the hole in modulating the behavior of the amnioserosa cells inside. These findings shed light not only on the mechanisms by which the behavior of different tissues is coordinated during DC, but also on the general mechanisms by which tissues interact to trigger global morphogenesis, an essential but yet poorly explored aspect of embryogenesis.

  5. SWATH-MS data of Drosophila melanogaster proteome dynamics during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Bertrand; Korona, Dagmara; Nightingale, Daniel J H; Russell, Steven; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2016-12-01

    Embryogenesis is one of the most important processes in the life of an animal. During this dynamic process, progressive cell division and cellular differentiation are accompanied by significant changes in protein expression at the level of the proteome. However, very few studies to date have described the dynamics of the proteome during the early development of an embryo in any organism. In this dataset, we monitor changes in protein expression across a timecourse of more than 20 h of Drosophila melanogaster embryonic development. Mass-spectrometry data were produced using a SWATH acquisition mode on a Sciex Triple-TOF 6600. A spectral library built in-house was used to analyse these data and more than 1950 proteins were quantified at each embryonic timepoint. The files presented here are a permanent digital map and can be reanalysed to test against new hypotheses. The data have been deposited with the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD0031078.

  6. Functions and Mechanisms of Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Arno J. Müller

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signalling via growth factors plays an important role in controlling cell differentiation and cell movements during the development of multicellular animals. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF signalling induces changes in cellular behaviour allowing cells in the embryo to move, to survive, to divide or to differentiate. Several examples argue that FGF signalling is used in multi-step morphogenetic processes to achieve and maintain a transitional state of the cells required for the control of cell fate. In the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, FGF signalling via the receptor tyrosine kinases Heartless (Htl and Breathless (Btl is particularly well studied. These FGF receptors affect gene expression, cell shape and cell–cell interactions during mesoderm layer formation, caudal visceral muscle (CVM formation, tracheal morphogenesis and glia differentiation. Here, we will address the current knowledge of the biological functions of FGF signalling in the fly on the tissue, at a cellular and molecular level.

  7. Meanings of the embryo in Japan: narratives of IVF experience and embryo ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, M.; Sleeboom-Faulkner, M.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the sociocultural meanings of the embryo implied in the narratives of 58 women who have undergone in vitro fertilisation in Japan over a period from 2006 to 2008. We argue that a lack of sufficient analysis of the sociocultural meanings of the embryo result in a situation where

  8. Meanings of the embryo in Japan: narratives of IVF experience and embryo ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masae; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2011-03-01

    This article explores the sociocultural meanings of the embryo implied in the narratives of 58 women who have undergone in vitro fertilisation in Japan over a period from 2006 to 2008. We argue that a lack of sufficient analysis of the sociocultural meanings of the embryo result in a situation where the use of reproductive technologies in Japan advances without reflecting upon the voices of women and couples that use them. Additionally, we argue that the often-heard view that pre-implantation genetic diagnosis causes less pain to women and couples than selective abortion in which foetuses are discarded, should be reviewed in the light of the new empirical evidence offered in this article. Furthermore, this article shows that the view often expounded by Japanese scientists that in Japan the cultural meanings attached to the embryo are insignificant, is incorrect. Consequently, the argument that Japan has no need for an active national debate on the status of embryos should be questioned. Though agreeing with some feminist views on the embryo debate, this article is also critical of feminist views that discuss embryo donation in terms of the loss of ownership of the embryo and the alienation of the embryo due to commodification. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Meanings of the embryo in Japan: narratives of IVF experience and embryo ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, M.; Sleeboom-Faulkner, M.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the sociocultural meanings of the embryo implied in the narratives of 58 women who have undergone in vitro fertilisation in Japan over a period from 2006 to 2008. We argue that a lack of sufficient analysis of the sociocultural meanings of the embryo result in a situation where

  10. Comparison of the major malformation rate of children conceived from cryopreserved embryos and fresh embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-zhen; QIAO Jie; CHI Hong-bin; CHEN Xin-na; LIU Ping; MA Cai-hong

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryopreserved embryo transfer has become indispensable in reproductive technology. More and more children are conceived from frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET). The risk of birth defects associated with frozen-thawed embryo transfer has been evaluated and conflict results are obtained. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of major malformations in children conceived from cryopreserved embryos with that of children from fresh embryos. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on children conceived from frozen-thawed embryos and fresh embryos between January 2005 and December 2008 at the Reproduction Center of the Third Hospital, Peking University.The major malformation rates were compared between two groups for all children, as well as singletons or twins,separately. The frequencies of different subtypes of malformations classified according to different organ system were also compared.Results Thirty-four of 3125 children from cryopreserved embryos had a major malformation. The malformation rate was 1.09%, which was comparable to that for children after fresh embryos transfer (1.53%(55/3604), OR:0.71, 95% CI; 0.46-1.09). The malformation rate was also similar when the analysis was limited to children from cryopreserved embryos resulted from in vitro fertilization (IVF)(1.39%)and fresh IVF(1.3%). However, children from cryopreserved embryos resulted from intracytoplasmic sperm injections (ICSI) had much lower malformation rate than from fresh ICSI(0.63% vs.1.83%, OR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.16-0.75). No difference was found in the incidence of major malformations in singletons from cryo ICSI (0.73%) and fresh ICS1(1.9%), or from cryo IVF(1.49%) and fresh IVF(1.67%). Similar malformation rate was found in multiples from cryo ICSI(0.52%) and fresh ICSI(1.76%), or cryo IVF(1.30%) and fresh IVF(0.90%). The distribution and risk of the subtype of malformations, such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neural tube, urogenital, rnusculoskeletal and facial

  11. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  12. Development of interspecies cloned embryos in yak and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masao; Otoi, Takeshige; Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Agung, Budiyanto; Sambuu, Rentsenkhand; Suzuki, Tatsuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Interspecies nuclear transfer (NT) could be an alternative to replicate animals when supply of recipient oocytes is limited or in vitro embryo production systems are incomplete. In the present study, embryonic development was assessed following interspecies NT of donor cumulus cells derived from yak and dog into the recipient ooplasm of domestic cow. The percentages of fusion and subsequent embryo development to the eight-cell stage of interspecies NT embryos were comparable to those of intraspecies NT embryos (cow-cow NT embryos). The percentage of development to blastocysts was significantly lower (p dog-cow NT embryos, only one embryo (0.4%) developed to the blastocyst stage. These results indicate that interspecies NT embryos possess equally developmental competence to the eight-cell stage as intraspecies NT embryos, but the development to blastocysts is very low when dog somatic cells are used as the donor nuclei.

  13. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  14. Cryopreservation of manipulated embryos: tackling the double jeopardy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnyes, A; Nedambale, T L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide information to researchers and practitioners concerning the reasons for the altered viability and the medium- and long-term consequences of cryopreservation of manipulated mammalian embryos. Embryo manipulation is defined herein as the act or process of manipulating mammalian embryos, including superovulation, AI, IVM, IVF, in vitro culture, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo biopsy or splitting, somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning, the production of sexed embryos (by sperm sexing), embryo cryopreservation, embryo transfer or the creation of genetically modified (transgenic) embryos. With advances in manipulation technologies, the application of embryo manipulation will become more frequent; the proper prevention and management of the resulting alterations will be crucial in establishing an economically viable animal breeding technology.

  15. The Drosophila SRF homolog is expressed in a subset of tracheal cells and maps within a genomic region required for tracheal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M; Montagne, J; Walldorf, U; Groppe, J; Kloter, U; LaRosa, M; Gehring, W J

    1994-04-01

    The Drosophila homolog of the vertebrate serum response factor (SRF) was isolated by low stringency hybridization. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the Drosophila SRF homolog (DSRF) codes for a protein that displays 93% sequence identity with human SRF in the MADS domain, the region required for DNA binding, dimerization and interaction with accessory factors. The DSRF gene is expressed during several phases of embryonic development. In the egg, both the RNA and the protein are maternal in origin and slowly decrease in amount during gastrulation. After germ band retraction, high levels of zygotic expression are observed in a distinct subset of peripheral tracheal cells distributed throughout the embryo. Many of these cells are at the tip of tracheal branches and are in direct contact with the target tissues. The DSRF gene was mapped to position 60C on the second chromosome, and overlapping deficiencies which remove the gene were identified. Analysis of tracheal development in embryos carrying these deletions revealed a degeneration of most of the major branches of the tracheal system. Although the initial migration of tracheal cells was not affected in those deficient embryos, many tracheal cells appeared not to maintain their correct position and continued to migrate. Thus, the DSRF gene might play a role in the proper formation and maintenance of the trachea.

  16. 31 Flavors of Drosophila Rab proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Schulze, Karen L.; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Suyama, Kaye; Wang, Stream; Fish, Matthew; Acar, Melih; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, HugoJ.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2007-04-03

    Rab proteins are small GTPases that play important roles intransport of vesicle cargo and recruitment, association of motor andother proteins with vesicles, and docking and fusion of vesicles atdefined locations. In vertebrates, more than 75 Rab genes have beenidentified, some of which have been intensively studied for their rolesin endosome and synaptic vesicle trafficking. Recent studies of thefunctions of certain Rab proteins have revealed specific roles inmediating developmental signal transduction. We have begun a systematicgenetic study of the 33 Rab genes in Drosophila. Most of the fly proteinsare clearly related to specific vertebrate proteins. We report here thecreation of a set of transgenic fly lines that allow spatially andtemporally regulated expression of Drosophila Rab proteins. We generatedfluorescent protein-tagged wild-type, dominant-negative, andconstitutively active forms of 31 Drosophila Rab proteins. We describeDrosophila Rab expression patterns during embryogenesis, the subcellularlocalization of some Rab proteins, and comparisons of the localization ofwild-type, dominant-negative, and constitutively active forms of selectedRab proteins. The high evolutionary conservation and low redundancy ofDrosophila Rab proteins make these transgenic lines a useful toolkit forinvestigating Rab functions in vivo.

  17. Comparison of human and Drosophila atlastin GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuyun; Hu, Xiaoyu; Bian, Xin; Liu, Xinqi; Hu, Junjie

    2015-02-01

    Formation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network requires homotypic membrane fusion, which involves a class of atlastin (ATL) GTPases. Purified Drosophila ATL is capable of mediating vesicle fusion in vitro, but such activity has not been reported for any other ATLs. Here, we determined the preliminary crystal structure of the cytosolic segment of Drosophila ATL in a GDP-bound state. The structure reveals a GTPase domain dimer with the subsequent three-helix bundles associating with their own GTPase domains and pointing in opposite directions. This conformation is similar to that of human ATL1, to which GDP and high concentrations of inorganic phosphate, but not GDP only, were included. Drosophila ATL restored ER morphology defects in mammalian cells lacking ATLs, and measurements of nucleotide-dependent dimerization and GTPase activity were comparable for Drosophila ATL and human ATL1. However, purified and reconstituted human ATL1 exhibited no in vitro fusion activity. When the cytosolic segment of human ATL1 was connected to the transmembrane (TM) region and C-terminal tail (CT) of Drosophila ATL, the chimera still exhibited no fusion activity, though its GTPase activity was normal. These results suggest that GDP-bound ATLs may adopt multiple conformations and the in vitro fusion activity of ATL cannot be achieved by a simple collection of functional domains.

  18. Patients' Attitudes towards the Surplus Frozen Embryos in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Assisted reproductive techniques have been used in China for more than 20 years. This study investigates the attitudes of surplus embryo holders towards embryos storage and donation for medical research. Methods. A total of 363 couples who had completed in vitro fertilization (IVF treatment and had already had biological children but who still had frozen embryos in storage were invited to participate. Interviews were conducted by clinics in a narrative style. Results. Family size was the major reason for participants’ (discontinuation of embryo storage; moreover, the moral status of embryos was an important factor for couples choosing embryo storage, while the storage fee was an important factor for couples choosing embryo disposal. Most couples discontinued the storage of their embryos once their children were older than 3 years. In our study, 58.8% of the couples preferred to dispose of surplus embryos rather than donate them to research, citing a lack of information and distrust in science as significant reasons for their decision. Conclusions. Interviews regarding frozen embryos, including patients’ expectations for embryo storage and information to assist them with decisions regarding embryo disposal, are beneficial for policies addressing embryo disposition and embryo donation in China.

  19. Ribbon regulates morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland through transcriptional activation and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Lee, Joslynn S; Wells, Michael B; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Slattery, Matthew; Andrew, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors affect spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression often regulating multiple aspects of tissue morphogenesis, including cell-type specification, cell proliferation, cell death, cell polarity, cell shape, cell arrangement and cell migration. In this work, we describe a distinct role for Ribbon (Rib) in controlling cell shape/volume increases during elongation of the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). Notably, the morphogenetic changes in rib mutants occurred without effects on general SG cell attributes such as specification, proliferation and apoptosis. Moreover, the changes in cell shape/volume in rib mutants occurred without compromising epithelial-specific morphological attributes such as apicobasal polarity and junctional integrity. To identify the genes regulated by Rib, we performed ChIP-seq analysis in embryos driving expression of GFP-tagged Rib specifically in the SGs. To learn if the Rib binding sites identified in the ChIP-seq analysis were linked to changes in gene expression, we performed microarray analysis comparing RNA samples from age-matched wild-type and rib null embryos. From the superposed ChIP-seq and microarray gene expression data, we identified 60 genomic sites bound by Rib likely to regulate SG-specific gene expression. We confirmed several of the identified Rib targets by qRT-pCR and/or in situ hybridization. Our results indicate that Rib regulates cell growth and tissue shape in the Drosophila salivary gland via a diverse array of targets through both transcriptional activation and repression. Furthermore, our results suggest that autoregulation of rib expression may be a key component of the SG morphogenetic gene network.

  20. On the role of the MAGUK proteins encoded by Drosophila varicose during embryonic and postembryonic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grawe Ferdi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs form a family of scaffolding proteins, which are often associated with cellular junctions, such as the vertebrate tight junction, the Drosophila septate junction or the neuromuscular junction. Their capacity to serve as platforms for organising larger protein assemblies results from the presence of several protein-protein interaction domains. They often appear in different variants suggesting that they also mediate dynamic changes in the composition of the complexes. Results Here we show by electron microscopic analysis that Drosophila embryos lacking varicose function fail to develop septate junctions in the tracheae and the epidermis. In the embryo and in imaginal discs varicose expresses two protein isoforms, which belong to the MAGUK family. The two isoforms can be distinguished by the presence or absence of two L27 domains and are differentially affected in different varicose alleles. While the short isoform is essential for viability, the long isoform seems to have a supportive function. Varicose proteins co-localise with Neurexin IV in pleated septate junctions and are necessary, but not sufficient for its recruitment. The two proteins interact in vitro by the PDZ domain of Varicose and the four C-terminal amino acids of Neurexin IV. Postembryonic reduction of varicose function by expressing double-stranded RNA affects pattern formation and morphogenesis of the wing and the development of normal-shaped and -sized eyes. Conclusion Expression of two Varicose isoforms in embryonic epithelia and imaginal discs suggests that the composition of Varicose-mediated protein scaffolds at septate junctions is dynamic, which may have important implications for the modulation of their function.

  1. Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility is associated with decreased Hira expression in male Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolbachia are obligate endosymbiotic bacteria that infect numerous species of arthropods and nematodes. Wolbachia can induce several reproductive phenotypes in their insect hosts including feminization, male-killing, parthenogenesis and cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI. CI is the most common phenotype and occurs when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females resulting in no or very low numbers of viable offspring. However, matings between males and females infected with the same strain of Wolbachia result in viable progeny. Despite substantial scientific effort, the molecular mechanisms underlying CI are currently unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression studies were undertaken in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans which display differential levels of CI using quantitative RT-PCR. We show that Hira expression is correlated with the induction of CI and occurs in a sex-specific manner. Hira expression is significantly lower in males which induce strong CI when compared to males inducing no CI or Wolbachia-uninfected males. A reduction in Hira expression is also observed in 1-day-old males that induce stronger CI compared to 5-day-old males that induce weak or no CI. In addition, Hira mutated D. melanogaster males mated to uninfected females result in significantly decreased hatch rates comparing with uninfected crosses. Interestingly, wMel-infected females may rescue the hatch rates. An obvious CI phenotype with chromatin bridges are observed in the early embryo resulting from Hira mutant fertilization, which strongly mimics the defects associated with CI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest Wolbachia-induced CI in Drosophila occurs due to a reduction in Hira expression in Wolbachia-infected males leading to detrimental effects on sperm fertility resulting in embryo lethality. These results may help determine the underlying mechanism of CI and provide further insight in to the important role

  2. Bovine pretransfer endometrium and embryo transcriptome fingerprints as predictors of pregnancy success after embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Hölker, Michael; Rings, Franca; Ghanem, Nasser; Ulas-Cinar, Mehmet; Peippo, Jaana; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2010-07-07

    Aberrant gene expression in the uterine endometrium and embryo has been the major causes of pregnancy failure in cattle. However, selecting cows having adequate endometrial receptivity and embryos of better developmental competence based on the gene expression pattern has been a greater challenge. To investigate whether pretransfer endometrial and embryo gene expression pattern has a direct relation with upcoming pregnancy success, we performed a global endometrial and embryo transcriptome analysis using endometrial and embryo biopsy technology and the pregnancy outcome information. For this, endometrial samples were collected from Simmental heifers at day 7 and 14 of the estrous cycle, one cycle prior to embryo transfer. In the next cycle, blastocyst stage embryos were transferred to recipients at day 7 of the estrous cycle after taking 30-40% of the blastocyst as a biopsy for transcriptome analysis. The results revealed that at day 7 of the estrous cycle, the endometrial gene expression pattern of heifers whose pregnancy resulting in calf delivery was significantly different compared with those resulting in no pregnancy. These differences were accompanied by qualitative and quantitative alteration of major biological process and molecular pathways. However, the transcriptome difference was minimal between the two groups of animals at day 14 of the estrous cycle. Similarly, the transcriptome analysis between embryos biopsies that resulted in calf delivery and those resulted in no pregnancy revealed a total of 70 differentially expressed genes. Among these, the transcript levels of 32 genes including SPAG17, PF6, UBE2D3P, DFNB31, AMD1, DTNBP1, and ARL8B were higher in embryo biopsies resulting in calf delivery. Therefore, the present study highlights the potential of pretransfer endometrial and embryo gene expression patterns as predictors of pregnancy success in cattle.

  3. Sex and the single embryo: early deveiopment in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Falaguerra, Andrea; Siciliano, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M; Scolari, Francesca; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Franz, Gerald; Malacrida, Anna R; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2010-01-26

    In embryos the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MTZ) integrates post-transcriptional regulation of maternal transcripts with transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this event are being clarified in Drosophila melanogaster, little is know about the embryogenic processes in other insect species. The recent publication of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from embryos of the global pest species Ceratitis capitata (medfly) has enabled the investigation of embryogenesis in this species and has allowed a comparison of the embryogenic processes in these two related dipteran species, C. capitata and D. melanogaster, that shared a common ancestor 80-100 mya. Using a novel PCR-based sexing method, which takes advantage of a putative LTR retrotransposon MITE insertion on the medfly Y chromosome, the transcriptomes of individual early male and female embryos were analysed using RT-PCR. This study is focused on two crucial aspects of the onset of embryonic development: sex determination and cellular blastoderm formation. Together with the three known medfly genes (Cctransformer, Cctransformer2 and Ccdoublesex), the expression patterns of other medfly genes that are similar to the D. melanogaster sex-determination genes (sisterlessA, groucho, deadpan, Sex-lethal, female lethal d, sans fille and intersex) and four cellular blastoderm formation genes (Rho1, spaghetti squash, slow-as-molasses and serendipity-alpha) were analyzed, allowing us to sketch a preliminary outline of the embryonic process in the medfly. Furthermore, a putative homologue of the Zelda gene has been considered, which in D. melanogaster encodes a DNA-binding factor responsible for the maternal-to-zygotic transition. Our novel sexing method facilitates the study of i) when the MTZ transition occurs in males and females of C. capitata, ii) when and how the maternal information of "female-development" is reprogrammed in the embryos and iii) similarities and

  4. Sex and the single embryo: early deveopment in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharopoulou Antigone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In embryos the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MTZ integrates post-transcriptional regulation of maternal transcripts with transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this event are being clarified in Drosophila melanogaster, little is know about the embryogenic processes in other insect species. The recent publication of expressed sequence tags (ESTs from embryos of the global pest species Ceratitis capitata (medfly has enabled the investigation of embryogenesis in this species and has allowed a comparison of the embryogenic processes in these two related dipteran species, C. capitata and D. melanogaster, that shared a common ancestor 80-100 mya. Results Using a novel PCR-based sexing method, which takes advantage of a putative LTR retrotransposon MITE insertion on the medfly Y chromosome, the transcriptomes of individual early male and female embryos were analysed using RT-PCR. This study is focused on two crucial aspects of the onset of embryonic development: sex determination and cellular blastoderm formation. Together with the three known medfly genes (Cctransformer, Cctransformer2 and Ccdoublesex, the expression patterns of other medfly genes that are similar to the D. melanogaster sex-determination genes (sisterlessA, groucho, deadpan, Sex-lethal, female lethal d, sans fille and intersex and four cellular blastoderm formation genes (Rho1, spaghetti squash, slow-as-molasses and serendipity-α were analyzed, allowing us to sketch a preliminary outline of the embryonic process in the medfly. Furthermore, a putative homologue of the Zelda gene has been considered, which in D. melanogaster encodes a DNA-binding factor responsible for the maternal-to-zygotic transition. Conclusions Our novel sexing method facilitates the study of i when the MTZ transition occurs in males and females of C. capitata, ii when and how the maternal information of "female-development" is

  5. Sex and the single embryo: early deveopment in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In embryos the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MTZ) integrates post-transcriptional regulation of maternal transcripts with transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this event are being clarified in Drosophila melanogaster, little is know about the embryogenic processes in other insect species. The recent publication of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from embryos of the global pest species Ceratitis capitata (medfly) has enabled the investigation of embryogenesis in this species and has allowed a comparison of the embryogenic processes in these two related dipteran species, C. capitata and D. melanogaster, that shared a common ancestor 80-100 mya. Results Using a novel PCR-based sexing method, which takes advantage of a putative LTR retrotransposon MITE insertion on the medfly Y chromosome, the transcriptomes of individual early male and female embryos were analysed using RT-PCR. This study is focused on two crucial aspects of the onset of embryonic development: sex determination and cellular blastoderm formation. Together with the three known medfly genes (Cctransformer, Cctransformer2 and Ccdoublesex), the expression patterns of other medfly genes that are similar to the D. melanogaster sex-determination genes (sisterlessA, groucho, deadpan, Sex-lethal, female lethal d, sans fille and intersex) and four cellular blastoderm formation genes (Rho1, spaghetti squash, slow-as-molasses and serendipity-α) were analyzed, allowing us to sketch a preliminary outline of the embryonic process in the medfly. Furthermore, a putative homologue of the Zelda gene has been considered, which in D. melanogaster encodes a DNA-binding factor responsible for the maternal-to-zygotic transition. Conclusions Our novel sexing method facilitates the study of i) when the MTZ transition occurs in males and females of C. capitata, ii) when and how the maternal information of "female-development" is reprogrammed in the embryos

  6. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  7. Biosensors for detecting stress in developing embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Saini, Avishkar; McLennan, Hanna J.; Pullen, Benjamin J.; Schartner, Erik P.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-12-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) cause DNA damage and defective function in sperm and also affects the developmental competence of embryos. It is therefore critical to monitor ROS in sperm, oocytes and developing embryos. In particular, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a ROS important to normal cell function and signalling as well as its role in oxidative stress. Here we report the development of a fluorescent sensor for H2O2 using carboxyperoxyfluor-1 (CPF1) in solution and attached to a glass slide or multi-mode optical fibre. CPF1 increases in fluorescence upon reaction with H2O2 to non-invasively detect H2O2 near developing embryos. These probes are constructed by immobilising CPF1 to the optical fibre tip a polyacrylamide layer. Also reported is a new dual optical fibre sensor for detecting both H2O2 and pH that is functional at biologically concentrations of H2O2 and can sense pH to 0.1 units. This research shows promise for the use of optical fibre sensors for monitoring the health of developing embryos. Furthermore, these sensors are applicable for use beyond embryos such as detecting stress in endothelial cells involved in cardiovascular dysfunction.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in periimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Marek; Gye, Myung Chan

    2015-03-01

    Stress coping mechanisms are critical to minimize or overcome damage caused by ever changing environmental conditions. They are designed to promote cell survival. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway is mobilized in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins, ultimately in order to regain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Various elements of coping responses to ER stress including Perk, Ask1, Bip, Chop, Gadd34, Ire1, Atf4, Atf6, and Xbp1 have been identified and were found to be inducible in oocytes and preimplantation embryos, suggesting that, as a normal part of the cellular adaptive mechanism, these coping responses, including the UPR, play a pivotal role in the development of preimplantation embryos. As such, the UPR-associated molecules and pathways may become useful markers for the potential diagnosis of stress conditions for preimplantation embryos. After implantation, ER stress-induced coping responses become physiologically important for a normal decidual response, placentation, and early organogenesis. Attenuation of ER stress coping responses by tauroursodeoxycholate and salubrinal was effective for prevention of cell death of cultured embryos. Further elucidation of new and relevant ER stress coping responses in periimplantation embryos might contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of normal development of embryonic development and potentiation of embryonic development in vitro.

  9. Gene structure of Drosophila diaphorase-1: diversity of transcripts in adult males and females, in different organs and at different stages of development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavlina M. Ivanova; Boris H. Dunkov; Kiril H. Ralchev

    2008-08-01

    The gene EG:22E5.5 or CG4199 (accession number O77266, Q9W529) from Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) was found using the partial amino acid sequences of three tryptic peptides obtained from purified Drosophila virilis diaphorase-1. This gene is located on the X chromosome at position 2C9–2C10. The structure of the gene reveals three exons and two long introns. Using BDGP, we found six transcripts in this gene. The difference between these transcripts is in their 5′ ends; the 3′ ends of the six transcripts are identical. Thirty-four ESTs from different cDNA libraries were found, most of them from Schneider L2 cell culture (SH) cDNA library. The transcripts are represented at very low level in the cells of different organs and at different stages of Drosophila development. Using RT-PCR, we obtained five of these transcripts in cDNA samples from female adult flies. However, we could not find any of them in cDNA samples from male adult flies. Moreover, we obtained only the third transcript (CG4199-RC) in the sample of testis from adult flies and the fourth transcript (CG4199-RD) in an embryo sample. None of the other five transcripts were found in the samples of different organs and in the samples obtained at different stages of Drosophila development.

  10. Protein complex of Drosophila ATRX/XNP and HP1a is required for the formation of pericentric beta-heterochromatin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Alexander V; Konev, Alexander Y; Vershilova, Elena; Fyodorov, Dmitry V

    2010-05-14

    ATRX belongs to the family of SWI2/SNF2-like ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling molecular motor proteins. Mutations of the human ATRX gene result in a severe genetic disorder termed X-linked alpha-thalassemia mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome. Here we perform biochemical and genetic analyses of the Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of ATRX. The loss of function allele of the Drosophila ATRX/XNP gene is semilethal. Drosophila ATRX is expressed throughout development in two isoforms, p185 and p125. ATRX185 and ATRX125 form distinct multisubunit complexes in fly embryo. The ATRX185 complex comprises p185 and heterochromatin protein HP1a. Consistently, ATRX185 but not ATRX125 is highly concentrated in pericentric beta-heterochromatin of the X chromosome in larval cells. HP1a strongly stimulates biochemical activities of ATRX185 in vitro. Conversely, ATRX185 is required for HP1a deposition in pericentric beta-heterochromatin of the X chromosome. The loss of function allele of the ATRX/XNP gene and mutant allele that does not express p185 are strong suppressors of position effect variegation. These results provide evidence for essential biological functions of Drosophila ATRX in vivo and establish ATRX as a major determinant of pericentric beta-heterochromatin identity.

  11. In vitro culture of individual mouse preimplantation embryos: the role of embryo density, microwells, oxygen, timing and conditioned media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Rebecca L; Gardner, David K

    2017-02-15

    Single embryo culture is suboptimal compared with group culture, but necessary for embryo monitoring, and culture systems should be improved for single embryos. Pronucleate mouse embryos were used to assess the effect of culture conditions on single embryo development. Single culture either before or after compaction reduced cell numbers (112.2 ± 3.1; 110.2 ± 3.5) compared with group culture throughout (127.0 ± 3.4; P media volume from 20 µl to 2 µl increased blastocyst cell numbers in single embryos cultured in 5% oxygen (84.4 ± 3.2 versus 97.8 ± 2.8; P media to single embryos increased hatching rate and blastocyst cell number (91.5 ± 4.7 versus 113.1 ± 4.4; P media volume and microwells influence single embryo development; and embryo-conditioned media may substitute for group culture.

  12. Ensconsin/Map7 promotes microtubule growth and centrosome separation in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaud, Emmanuel; Caous, Renaud; Pascal, Aude; Bazile, Franck; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Huet, Sébastien; Poirier, Guy G; Chrétien, Denis; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Giet, Régis

    2014-03-31

    The mitotic spindle is crucial to achieve segregation of sister chromatids. To identify new mitotic spindle assembly regulators, we isolated 855 microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) from Drosophila melanogaster mitotic or interphasic embryos. Using RNAi, we screened 96 poorly characterized genes in the Drosophila central nervous system to establish their possible role during spindle assembly. We found that Ensconsin/MAP7 mutant neuroblasts display shorter metaphase spindles, a defect caused by a reduced microtubule polymerization rate and enhanced by centrosome ablation. In agreement with a direct effect in regulating spindle length, Ensconsin overexpression triggered an increase in spindle length in S2 cells, whereas purified Ensconsin stimulated microtubule polymerization in vitro. Interestingly, ensc-null mutant flies also display defective centrosome separation and positioning during interphase, a phenotype also detected in kinesin-1 mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ensconsin cooperates with its binding partner Kinesin-1 during interphase to trigger centrosome separation. In addition, Ensconsin promotes microtubule polymerization during mitosis to control spindle length independent of Kinesin-1.

  13. A new level of plasticity: Drosophila smooth-like testes muscles compensate failure of myoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckwa, Jessica; Fritzen, Katharina; Buttgereit, Detlev; Rothenbusch-Fender, Silke; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2016-01-15

    The testis of Drosophila resembles an individual testis tubule of mammals. Both are surrounded by a sheath of smooth muscles, which in Drosophila are multinuclear and originate from a pool of myoblasts that are set aside in the embryo and accumulate on the genital disc later in development. These muscle stem cells start to differentiate early during metamorphosis and give rise to all muscles of the inner male reproductive system. Shortly before the genital disc and the developing testes connect, multinuclear nascent myotubes appear on the anterior tips of the seminal vesicles. Here, we show that adhesion molecules are distinctly localized on the seminal vesicles; founder cell (FC)-like myoblasts express Dumbfounded (Duf) and Roughest (Rst), and fusion-competent myoblast (FCM)-like cells mainly express Sticks and stones (Sns). The smooth but multinuclear myotubes of the testes arose by myoblast fusion. RNAi-mediated attenuation of Sns or both Duf and Rst severely reduced the number of nuclei in the testes muscles. Duf and Rst probably act independently in this context. Despite reduced fusion in all of these RNAi-treated animals, myotubes migrated onto the testes, testes were shaped and coiled, muscle filaments were arranged as in the wild type and spermatogenesis proceeded normally. Hence, the testes muscles compensate for fusion defects so that the myofibres encircling the adult testes are indistinguishable from those of the wild type and male fertility is guaranteed.

  14. A'-form RNA helices are required for cytoplasmic mRNA transport in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Simon L; Ringel, Inbal; Ish-Horowicz, David; Lukavsky, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    Microtubule-based mRNA transport is widely used to restrict protein expression to specific regions in the cell and has important roles in defining cell polarity and axis determination as well as in neuronal function. However, the structural basis of recognition of cis-acting mRNA localization signals by motor complexes is poorly understood. We have used NMR spectroscopy to describe the first tertiary structure to our knowledge of an RNA element responsible for mRNA transport. The Drosophila melanogaster fs(1)K10 signal, which mediates transport by the dynein motor, forms a stem loop with two double-stranded RNA helices adopting an unusual A'-form conformation with widened major grooves reminiscent of those in B-form DNA. Structure determination of four mutant RNAs and extensive functional assays in Drosophila embryos indicate that the two spatially registered A'-form helices represent critical recognition sites for the transport machinery. Our study provides insights into the basis for RNA cargo recognition and reveals a key biological function encoded by A'-form RNA conformation.

  15. A′-form RNA helices drive microtubule-based mRNA transport in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Simon L.; Ringel, Inbal; Ish-Horowicz, David; Lukavsky, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Microtubule-based mRNA transport is widely used to restrict protein expression to specific regions in the cell, and has important roles in defining cell polarity, axis determination and for neuronal function. However, the structural basis of recognition of cis-acting mRNA localization signals by motor complexes is poorly understood. We have used NMR spectroscopy to describe the first tertiary structure of an RNA element responsible for mRNA transport. The Drosophila fs(1)K10 signal, which mediates transport by the dynein motor, forms a stem-loop with two double-stranded RNA helices adopting an unusual A′-form conformation with widened, major grooves reminiscent of those in B-form DNA. Structure determination of four mutant RNAs and extensive functional assays in Drosophila embryos indicate that the two spatially registered A′-form helices represent critical recognition sites for the transport machinery. Our study provides important insights into the basis for RNA cargo recognition and reveals a key biological function encoded by A′-form RNA conformation. PMID:20473315

  16. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics. PMID:22366651

  17. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

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    Yiwen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila.

  18. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

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    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  19. ATM is required for telomere maintenance and chromosome stability during Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elizabeth; Tiong, Stanley; Pedersen, Michael; Homola, Ellen; Royou, Anne; Fasulo, Barbara; Siriaco, Giorgia; Campbell, Shelagh D

    2004-08-10

    ATM is a large, multifunctional protein kinase that regulates responses required for surviving DNA damage: including DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell cycle checkpoints. Here, we show that Drosophila ATM function is essential for normal adult development. Extensive, inappropriate apoptosis occurs in proliferating atm mutant tissues, and in clonally derived atm mutant embryos, frequent mitotic defects were seen. At a cellular level, spontaneous telomere fusions and other chromosomal abnormalities are common in atm larval neuroblasts, suggesting a conserved and essential role for dATM in the maintenance of normal telomeres and chromosome stability. Evidence from other systems supports the idea that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair functions of ATM kinases promote telomere maintenance by inhibition of illegitimate recombination or fusion events between the legitimate ends of chromosomes and spontaneous DSBs. Drosophila will be an excellent model system for investigating how these ATM-dependent chromosome structural maintenance functions are deployed during development. Because neurons appear to be particularly sensitive to loss of ATM in both flies and humans, this system should be particularly useful for identifying cell-specific factors that influence sensitivity to loss of dATM and are relevant for understanding the human disease, ataxia-telangiectasia.

  20. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  1. The maternal JAK/STAT pathway of Drosophila regulates embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning

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    Lopes E.S.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of NFkappaB plays a pivotal role in many cellular processes such as inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. In Drosophila, nuclear translocation of the NFkappaB-related transcription factor Dorsal is spatially regulated in order to subdivide the embryo into three primary dorsal-ventral (DV domains: the ventral presumptive mesoderm, the lateral neuroectoderm and the dorsal ectoderm. Ventral activation of the Toll receptor induces degradation of the IkappaB-related inhibitor Cactus, liberating Dorsal for nuclear translocation. In addition, other pathways have been suggested to regulate Dorsal. Signaling through the maternal BMP member Decapentaplegic (Dpp inhibits Dorsal translocation along a pathway parallel to and independent of Toll. In the present study, we show for the first time that the maternal JAK/STAT pathway also regulates embryonic DV patterning. Null alleles of loci coding for elements of the JAK/STAT pathway, hopscotch (hop, marelle (mrl and zimp (zimp, modify zygotic expression along the DV axis. Genetic analysis suggests that the JAK kinase Hop, most similar to vertebrate JAK2, may modify signals downstream of Dpp. In addition, an activated form of Hop results in increased levels of Cactus and Dorsal proteins, modifying the Dorsal/Cactus ratio and consequently DV patterning. These results indicate that different maternal signals mediated by the Toll, BMP and JAK/STAT pathways may converge to regulate NFkappaB activity in Drosophila.

  2. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2012-11-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics.

  3. The presence of a sponsoring embryo in a batch of poor quality thawed embryos significantly increases pregnancy and implantation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, A; Kol, S; Wayner, V; Vertman, D; Manor, D; Itskovitz-Eldor, J

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate quantitatively the effect of one good-quality (sponsoring) embryo in a batch of low-quality thawed embryos on the implantation and pregnancy rates (PR). Retrospective analysis of data. Tertiary care center IVF clinic affiliated with a university medical school. Between March 1988 and April 1995, 392 IVF patients underwent a total of 440 thawing and ET cycles of 1,436 multicellular embryos. Implantation, clinical pregnancy, and multiple pregnancy rates. In the absence of sponsoring embryos in the thawed batch of embryos, a PR of 9.8% with an implantation rate of 3.1% was achieved. In the presence of a single sponsoring embryo, the PR nearly doubled (18.2%), with a significantly higher implantation rate of 7.0%. Only singleton pregnancies were achieved in the absence of sponsoring embryos compared with 21.7% multiple pregnancies in the single sponsoring embryo group. The presence of a sponsoring embryo in a batch of poor quality thawed embryos is an important factor that significantly increased pregnancy and implantation rates. The optimal strategy for planning batches of multicellular frozen embryos is to include at least one sponsoring embryo in each batch when possible. We speculate that the sponsoring embryo may favorably influence the chances of low-quality embryos to undergo successful implantation.

  4. Gene expression variations during Drosophila metamorphosis in real and simulated gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, R.; Leandro-García, L. J.; Benguría, A.; Herranz, R.; Zeballos, A.; Gassert, G.; van Loon, J. J.; Medina, F. J.

    Establishing the extent and significance of the effects of the exposure to microgravity of complex living organisms is a critical piece of information if the long-term exploration of near-by planets involving human beings is going to take place in the Future As a first step in this direction we have started to look into the patterns of gene expression during Drosophila development in real and simulated microgravity using microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from samples exposed to different environmental conditions In these experiments we used Affymetrix chips version 1 0 containing probes for more than 14 000 genes almost the complete Drosophila genome 55 of which are tagged with some molecular or functional designation while 45 are still waiting to be identified in functional terms The real microgravity exposure was imposed on the samples during the crew exchanging Soyuz 8 Mission to the ISS in October 2003 when after 11 days in Microgravity the Spanish-born astronaut Pedro Duque returned in the Soyuz 7 capsule carrying the experiments prepared by our Team Due to the constraints in the current ISS experiments in these Missions we limited the stages explored in our experiment to the developmental processes occurring during Drosophila metamorphosis As the experimental conditions at the launch site Baikonour were fairly limited we prepared the experiment in Madrid Toulouse and transp o rted the samples at 15 C in a temperature controlled container to slow down the developmental process a

  5. COPI vesicle transport is a common requirement for tube expansion in Drosophila.

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    Satish Arcot Jayaram

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tube expansion defects like stenoses and atresias cause devastating human diseases. Luminal expansion during organogenesis begins to be elucidated in several systems but we still lack a mechanistic view of the process in many organs. The Drosophila tracheal respiratory system provides an amenable model to study tube size regulation. In the trachea, COPII anterograde transport of luminal proteins is required for extracellular matrix assembly and the concurrent tube expansion. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified and analyzed Drosophila COPI retrograde transport mutants with narrow tracheal tubes. gammaCOP mutants fail to efficiently secrete luminal components and assemble the luminal chitinous matrix during tracheal tube expansion. Likewise, tube extension is defective in salivary glands, where it also coincides with a failure in the luminal deposition and assembly of a distinct, transient intraluminal matrix. Drosophila gammaCOP colocalizes with cis-Golgi markers and in gammaCOP mutant embryos the ER and Golgi structures are severely disrupted. Analysis of gammaCOP and Sar1 double mutants suggests that bidirectional ER-Golgi traffic maintains the ER and Golgi compartments and is required for secretion and assembly of luminal matrixes during tube expansion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the function of COPI components in organ morphogenesis and highlight the common role of apical secretion and assembly of transient organotypic matrices in tube expansion. Intraluminal matrices have been detected in the notochord of ascidians and zebrafish COPI mutants show defects in notochord expansion. Thus, the programmed deposition and growth of distinct luminal molds may provide distending forces during tube expansion in diverse organs.

  6. Characterization of the Drosophila ortholog of the human Usher Syndrome type 1G protein sans.

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    Fabio Demontis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Usher syndrome (USH is the most frequent deaf-blindness hereditary disease in humans. Deafness is attributed to the disorganization of stereocilia in the inner ear. USH1, the most severe subtype, is associated with mutations in genes encoding myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, and sans. Myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, and protocadherin 15 physically interact in vitro and localize to stereocilia tips in vivo, indicating that they form functional complexes. Sans, in contrast, localizes to vesicle-like structures beneath the apical membrane of stereocilia-displaying hair cells. How mutations in sans result in deafness and blindness is not well understood. Orthologs of myosin VIIa and protocadherin 15 have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster and their genetic analysis has identified essential roles in auditory perception and microvilli morphogenesis, respectively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have identified and characterized the Drosophila ortholog of human sans. Drosophila Sans is expressed in tubular organs of the embryo, in lens-secreting cone cells of the adult eye, and in microvilli-displaying follicle cells during oogenesis. Sans mutants are viable, fertile, and mutant follicle cells appear to form microvilli, indicating that Sans is dispensable for fly development and microvilli morphogenesis in the follicle epithelium. In follicle cells, Sans protein localizes, similar to its vertebrate ortholog, to intracellular punctate structures, which we have identified as early endosomes associated with the syntaxin Avalanche. CONCLUSIONS: Our work is consistent with an evolutionary conserved function of Sans in vesicle trafficking. Furthermore it provides a significant basis for further understanding of the role of this Usher syndrome ortholog in development and disease.

  7. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

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    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  8. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila.

  9. Natural selection drives Drosophila immune system evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenke, Todd A; Begun, David J

    2003-08-01

    Evidence from disparate sources suggests that natural selection may often play a role in the evolution of host immune system proteins. However, there have been few attempts to make general population genetic inferences on the basis of analysis of several immune-system-related genes from a single species. Here we present DNA polymorphism and divergence data from 34 genes thought to function in the innate immune system of Drosophila simulans and compare these data to those from 28 nonimmunity genes sequenced from the same lines. Several statistics, including average K(A)/K(S) ratio, average silent heterozygosity, and average haplotype diversity, significantly differ between the immunity and nonimmunity genes, suggesting an important role for directional selection in immune system protein evolution. In contrast to data from mammalian immunoglobulins and other proteins, we find no strong evidence for the selective maintenance of protein diversity in Drosophila immune system proteins. This may be a consequence of Drosophila's generalized innate immune response.

  10. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human.

  11. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand T; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C; Tokuda, Joshua M; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W; Crane, Brian R

    2013-12-17

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation.

  12. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii.

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    Revadi, Santosh; Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Dekker, Teun; Becher, Paul G

    2015-03-09

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly's reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools.

  13. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daenzer, J M I; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2017-01-01

    The galactosemias are a family of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from impaired function of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Type I, or classic galactosemia, results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type II galactosemia results from profound deficiency of galactokinase, the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type III galactosemia results from partial deficiency of UDP galactose 4'-epimerase, the third enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Although at least classic galactosemia has been recognized clinically for more than 100 years, and detectable by newborn screening for more than 50 years, all three galactosemias remain poorly understood. Early detection and dietary restriction of galactose prevent neonatal lethality, but many affected infants grow to experience a broad range of developmental and other disabilities. To date, there is no intervention known that prevents or reverses these long-term complications. Drosophila melanogaster provides a genetically and biochemically facile model for these conditions, enabling studies that address mechanism and open the door for novel approaches to intervention.

  14. Development of a new clinically applicable device for embryo evaluation which measures embryo oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Hiroki; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Shiga, Naomi; Takahashi, Aiko; Ihara, Motomasa; Ishibashi, Masumi; Nishimoto, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Zen; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro; Igarashi, Hideki; Takahashi, Toshifumi; Fukui, Atsushi; Suganuma, Ryota; Tachibana, Masahito; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2016-10-01

    Does a new system-the chip-sensing embryo respiration monitoring system (CERMs)-enable evaluation of embryo viability for potential application in a clinical IVF setting? The system enabled the oxygen consumption rate of spheroids, bovine embryos and frozen-thawed human embryos to be measured, and this rate corresponded to the developmental potential of embryos. To date, no reliable and clinically suitable objective evaluation methods for embryos are available, which circumvent the differences in inter-observer subjective view. Existing systems such as the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) technique, which enables the measurement of oxygen consumption rate in embryos, need improvement in usability before they can be applied to a clinical setting. This is a prospective original research study. The feasibility of measuring the oxygen consumption rate was assessed using CERMs for 9 spheroids, 9 bovine embryos and 30 redundant frozen-thawed human embryos. The endpoints for the study were whether CERMs could detect a dissolved oxygen gradient with high sensitivity, had comparable accuracy to the SECM measuring system with improved usability, and could predict the development of an embryo to a blastocyst by measuring the oxygen consumption rate. The relationship between the oxygen consumption rate and standard morphological evaluation was also examined. We developed a new CERMs, which enables the oxygen consumption rate to be measured automatically using an electrochemical method. The device was initially used for measuring a dissolved oxygen concentration gradient in order to calculate oxygen consumption rate using nine spheroids. Next, we evaluated data correlation between the CERMs and the SECM measuring systems using nine bovine embryos. Finally, the oxygen consumption rates of 30 human embryos, which were frozen-thawed on 2nd day after fertilization, were measured by CERMs at 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after thawing with standard morphological evaluation

  15. Accuracy of a combined score of zygote and embryo morphology for selecting the best embryos for IVF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-li QIAN; Ying-hui YE; Chen-ming XU; Fan JIN; He-feng HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the accuracy of a scoring system combining zygote and embryo morphology in predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization(IVF)treatment.Methods:In a study group,117 consecutive IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI) cycles with embryo transfer were carried out and 312 embryos were scored Using a combmed scoring system(CSS)of zygote and embryo morphology before transplantation.In a control group,a total of 420 IVF or ICSI cycles were carried out and 1176 embryos were scored using a cumulative embryo score(CES).The effects of the combined scoring system on the embryo implantation rate and pregnancy rate per cycle were analyzed.Results:Using the combined scoring system,the embryo implantation rate(27.6%)and the clinical pregnancy rate(48.7%)were significantly higher than those in the control group(20.8%and 38.6%,respectively).Also,the implantation rate of embryos scoring≥70 (38.5%:82 sacs/213 embryos)was significantly higher (P<0.001)than that of embryos scoring<70(4%:4 sacs/99 embryos).The pregnancy rate of patients with embryos scoring≥70 using the combined scoring system(66.7%)Was significantly higher(P<0.001)than that of patients with embryos scoring≥20 using the cumulative embryo score(59.0%).Conclusion:The results suggest that selecting embryos with a high Score(≥70)using the combined scoring system could inerease the implantation rate and pregnancy rate,and that using a scoring system combining assessments of human zygotes and pre-implantation embryos might predict IVF outcomes more accurately than using a cumulafive embryo score.

  16. Arrested human embryos are more likely to have abnormal chromosomes than developing embryos from women of advanced maternal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shu-Tao; Liang, Li-Feng; Xian, Ye-Xing; Liu, Jian-Qiao; Wang, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy is one of the major factors that result in low efficiency in human infertility treatment by in vitro fertilization (IVF). The development of DNA microarray technology allows for aneuploidy screening by analyzing all 23 pairs of chromosomes in human embryos. All chromosome screening for aneuploidy is more accurate than partial chromosome screening, as errors can occur in any chromosome. Currently, chromosome screening for aneuploidy is performed in developing embryos, mainly blastocysts. It has not been performed in arrested embryos and/or compared between developing embryos and arrested embryos from the same IVF cycle. The present study was designed to examine all chromosomes in blastocysts and arrested embryos from the same cycle in patients of advanced maternal ages. Embryos were produced by routine IVF procedures. A total of 90 embryos (45 blastocysts and 45 arrested embryos) from 17 patients were biopsied and analyzed by the Agilent DNA array platform. It was found that 50% of the embryos developed to blastocyst stage; however, only 15.6% of the embryos (both blastocyst and arrested) were euploid, and most (84.4%) of the embryos had chromosomal abnormalities. Further analysis indicated that 28.9% of blastocysts were euploid and 71.1% were aneuploid. By contrast, only one (2.2%) arrested embryo was euploid while others (97.8%) were aneuploid. The prevalence of multiple chromosomal abnormalities in the aneuploid embryos was also higher in the arrested embryos than in the blastocysts. These results indicate that high proportions of human embryos from patients of advanced maternal age are aneuploid, and the arrested embryos are more likely to have abnormal chromosomes than developing embryos.

  17. Efficacy of in vitro embryo transfer in lactating dairy cows using fresh or vitrified embryos produced in a novel embryo culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, J; Bonilla, L; Hansen, P J

    2010-11-01

    Objectives were to determine whether pregnancy success could be improved in lactating cows with timed embryo transfer when embryos were produced in vitro using a medium designed to enhance embryo development and survival after cryopreservation. In experiment 1, embryos (n=569 to 922) were cultured in either modified synthetic oviduct fluid or a serum-free medium, Block-Bonilla-Hansen-7 (BBH7). Development to the blastocyst stage was recorded at d 7, and selected blastocysts (n=79 to 114) were vitrified using open pulled straws. Culture of embryos in BBH7 increased development to the blastocyst stage (41.9±2.0 vs. 14.7±2.0%) and advanced blastocyst stages (expanded, hatching, hatched; 31.1±1.3 vs. 6.4±1.3%) at d 7 and resulted in higher hatching rates at 24h postwarming compared with embryos cultured in modified synthetic oviduct fluid (59.0±0.5 vs. 26.7±0.5%). In experiment 2, embryos were produced using X-sorted semen and cultured in BBH7. At d 7 after insemination, embryos were transferred fresh or following vitrification. Lactating Holstein cows were either subjected to timed artificial insemination (TAI) on the day of presumptive ovulation or used as embryo recipients 7 d later. Embryo recipients received an embryo if a corpus luteum was present. The percentage of cows pregnant at d 32, 46, and 76 of gestation was higher among cows that received fresh embryos compared with TAI cows or cows that received vitrified embryos. At d 76, for example, the proportion and percentage pregnant was 47/150 (31.3%) for cows subjected to TAI, 48/95 (50.5%) for cows receiving fresh embryos, and 39/141 (27.7%) for cows receiving a vitrified embryo. No difference was observed in the percentage of cows pregnant among TAI cows and those that received vitrified embryos. There was a service or transfer number × treatment interaction because differences in pregnancy rate between embryo transfer recipients and cows bred by TAI were greater for cows with more than 3 services or

  18. Constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of Tan protein in brain and epidermis of Ceratitis capitata and of Drosophila melanogaster wild-type and tan mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M M; Sabio, G; Badaracco, A; Quesada-Allué, L A

    2011-09-01

    The present report shows a partial biochemical characterization and life cycle expression of N-β-alanyldopamine hydrolase (Tan protein) in Ceratitis capitata and Drosophila melanogaster. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-β-alanyldopamine (NBAD), the main tanning precursor of insect brown cuticles. It also plays an important role in the metabolism of brain neurotransmitters, recycling dopamine and histamine. In contrast to NBAD-synthase, Tan is expressed constitutively in epidermis and does not respond directly to microbial challenge. Immunodetection experiments showed the novel localization of NBAD-hydrolase in the embryo central neural system and in different regions of the adult brain, in addition to optic lobes. We sequenced and characterized Drosophila mutants tan¹ and tan³. The latter appears to be a mutant with normal expression in neural tissue but weak one in epidermis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Human embryos in the original position?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSilvestro, Russell

    2005-06-01

    Two different discussions in John Rawls' A Theory of Justice lead naturally to a rather conservative position on the moral status of the human embryo. When discussing paternalism, he claims that the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves in case they end up as incapacitated or undeveloped human beings when the veil of ignorance is lifted. Since human embryos are examples of such beings, the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves from their embryonic stages onward. When discussing the basis of equality, Rawls claims that the parties in the original position would guarantee basic rights for all those with the capacity to take part in this original position. To guarantee the basic rights of infants and young children, he goes on to interpret this capacity as a "potentiality that is ordinarily realized in due course." Since human embryos have this potentiality, they too should have basic rights.

  20. Wide crossing in lentil through embryo rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, Richard; Ruiz, Maria L

    2011-01-01

    Lentil seeds have provided an appreciated source of protein, carbohydrates and fibre to the diet of humans since the dawn of agriculture. Low amounts of variation have been detected in the cultivated lentil germplasm collections. Interspecific crosses allow for the introgression of important alleles of agricultural interest from wild species, such as the resistance or tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Interspecific crosses within the genus Lens generally abort and embryo rescue techniques are necessary to recover hybrids. The in vitro culture procedure to rescue interspecific hybrids of Lens consists of at least four different stages: (1) in ovulo embryo culture (2), embryo culture, (3) plantlet development and finally, (4) the gradual habituation to ex vitro conditions of the recovered interspecific hybrid plantlets. In this chapter, the approach to rescue interspecific hybrids in the genus Lens is outlined.

  1. Calcium imaging in the Drosophila olfactory system with a genetic indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Cory M; Wong, Allan M; Flores, Jorge; Wang, Jing W

    2013-11-01

    Insects show sophisticated odor-mediated behaviors controlled by an olfactory system that is genetically and anatomically simpler than that of vertebrates, providing an attractive system to investigate the mechanistic link between behavior and odor perception. Advances in neuroscience have been facilitated by modern optical imaging technologies--both in instrumentation and in probe design--that permit the visualization of functional neural circuits. Imaging calcium activity in genetically defined populations of neurons provides an important tool for investigating the function of neural circuits. This article describes a two-photon imaging system for monitoring neural activity in the Drosophila antennal lobe. Odor-evoked calcium activity is followed by measuring the specific expression of the calcium-sensitive green fluorescent protein G-CaMP in Drosophila antennae-brain preparations.

  2. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  3. Developing a Drosophila Model of Schwannomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    found to associate with RasV12;scrib–/– tumors and to reduce tumor growth in scrib–/– animals (Pastor- Pareja et al., 2008). The Drosophila genome...2006). Loss of cell polarity drives tumor growth and invasion through JNK activation in Drosophila. Curr. Biol. 16, 1139-1146. Igaki, T., Pastor- Pareja ...genome. Nat. Genet. 36, 288-292. Pastor- Pareja , J. C., Wu, M. and Xu. T. (2008). An innate immune response of blood cells to tumors and tissue damage in

  4. Quantitative dynamics and increased variability of segmentation gene expression in the Drosophila Krüppel and knirps mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkova, Svetlana; Golubkova, Elena; Manu; Panok, Lena; Mamon, Lyudmila; Reinitz, John; Samsonova, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Here we characterize the response of the Drosophila segmentation system to mutations in two gap genes, Kr and kni, in the form of single or double homozygotes and single heterozygotes. Segmentation gene expression in these genotypes was quantitatively monitored with cellular resolution in space and 6.5 to 13min resolution in time. As is the case with wild type, we found that gene expression domains in the posterior portion of the embryo shift to the anterior over time. In certain cases, such as the gt posterior domain in Kr mutants, the shifts are significantly larger than is seen in wild type embryos. We also investigated the effects of Kr and kni on the variability of gene expression. Mutations often produce variable phenotypes, and it is well known that the cuticular phenotype of Kr mutants is variable. We sought to understand the molecular basis of this effect. We find that throughout cycle 14A the relative levels of eve and ftz expression in stripes 2 and 3 are variable among individual embryos. Moreover, in Kr and kni mutants, unlike wild type, the variability in positioning of the posterior Hb domain and eve stripe 7 is not decreased or filtered with time. The posterior Gt domain in Kr mutants is highly variable at early times, but this variability decreases when this domain shifts in the anterior direction to the position of the neighboring Kni domain. In contrast to these findings, positional variability throughout the embryo does not decrease over time in double Kr;kni mutants. In heterozygotes the early expression patterns of segmentation genes resemble patterns seen in homozygous mutants but by the onset of gastrulation they become similar to the wild type patterns. Finally, we note that gene expression levels are reduced in Kr and kni mutant embryos and have a tendency to decrease over time. This is a surprising result in view of the role that mutual repression is thought to play in the gap gene system.

  5. Laser confers less embryo exposure than acid tyrode for embryo biopsy in preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles: a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Marcelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We compared two methods of zona pellucida drilling. 213 embryos were biopsied with acid Tyrode. Each biopsy took 3 minutes and the entire procedure ~29 minutes. 5% of blastomeres lysed, 49% of embryos became blastocyst and 36% of patients became pregnant. 229 embryos were biopsied with laser. Each biopsy took 30 seconds and the entire procedure ~7 minutes. 2.5% of blastomeres lysed, 50.6% of embryos became blastocyst and 47% of patients became pregnant. We can conclude that laser can be used for embryo biopsy. Reduction of embryo exposure and of removed blastomeres is associated with increased blastocysts available for transfer and a better clinical outcome.

  6. Embryo aggregation does not improve the development of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Andrés; De Stéfano, Adrián; Jarazo, Javier; Buemo, Carla; Karlanian, Florencia; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-09-01

    The low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) makes it necessary to investigate new strategies to improve embryonic developmental competence. Embryo aggregation has been successfully applied to improve cloning efficiency in mammals, but it remains unclear whether it could also be beneficial for iSCNT. In this study, we first compared the effect of embryo aggregation over in vitro development and blastocyst quality of porcine, bovine, and feline zona-free (ZF) parthenogenetic (PA) embryos to test the effects of embryo aggregation on species that were later used as enucleated oocytes donors in our iSCNT study. We then assessed whether embryo aggregation could improve the in vitro development of ZF equine iSCNT embryos after reconstruction with porcine, bovine, and feline ooplasm. Bovine- and porcine-aggregated PA blastocysts had significantly larger diameters compared with nonaggregated embryos. On the other hand, feline- and bovine-aggregated PA embryos had higher blastocyst cell number. Embryo aggregation of equine-equine SCNT was found to be beneficial for embryo development as we have previously reported, but the aggregation of three ZF reconstructed embryos did not improve embryo developmental rates on iSCNT. In vitro embryo development of nonaggregated iSCNT was predominantly arrested around the stage when transcriptional activation of the embryonic genome is reported to start on the embryo of the donor species. Nevertheless, independent of embryo aggregation, equine blastocyst-like structures could be obtained in our study using domestic feline-enucleated oocytes. Taken together, these results reported that embryo aggregation enhance in vitro PA embryo development and embryo quality but effects vary depending on the species. Embryo aggregation also improves, as expected, the in vitro embryo development of equine-equine SCNT embryos; however, we did not observe positive effects on equine iSCNT embryo development. Among oocytes

  7. RECYCLING OF CATHETER FOR EMBRYO RECOVERY: A TOOL FOR COSTS REDUCTION IN EQUINE EMBRYO TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lopes Gusmao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The embryo transfer is becoming a widespread practice.Most embryos are collected from spontaneous single ovulatingmares and result in 50% of embryo recovery, increasing the costsof production. To illustrate, the price of a catheter for embryosrecovery range from US$ 194.00 to US$ 250.00 (R$ 350.00 to R$450.00. Therefore, the aim of this work was to verify if catheterwith damaged balloon can be recuperated and reused withoutaltering its efficiency. For this study, two groups were used: acontrol group (GI, n=10, on which the nonsurgical recovery of theembryos of mares was performed with the catheter with originalballoon; and another group (GII, n=20, in which a restored catheterwas utilized. The mares of GI had an embryo recovery rate of60%, and GII mares had an embryo recovery rate of 55%. Therewas not statistical difference between groups I and II (P>0.05.Considering that the material used to restore the catheter costsUS$16.66 (R$30.00, this data show that the recuperation of thecatheters for embryo recovery in mares may reduce costs withoutcompromising the rates of embryo recovery.

  8. Arabidopsis mitochondrial protein slow embryo development1 is essential for embryo development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yan; Liu, Chunying; Lu, Wenwen; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen, E-mail: sodmergn@pku.edu.cn

    2016-05-27

    The plant seeds formation are crucial parts in reproductive process in seed plants as well as food source for humans. Proper embryo development ensure viable seed formation. Here, we showed an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant slow embryo development1 (sed1) which exhibited retarded embryogenesis, led to aborted seeds. Embryo without SED1 developed slower compared to normal one and could be recognized at early globular stage by its white appearance. In later development stage, storage accumulated poorly with less protein and lipid body production. In vitro culture did not rescue albino embryo. SED1 encoded a protein targeted to mitochondria. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that mitochondria developed abnormally, and more strikingly plastid failed to construct grana in time in sed1/sed1 embryo. These data indicated that SED1 is indispensable for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis, and the mitochondria may be involved in the regulation of many aspects of seed development. -- Highlights: •Arabidopsis SED1 is essential for embryo development. •The sed1 embryo accumulates less storage and has abnormal ultrastructure. •SED1 localizes to the mitochondrion.

  9. Polyamines metabolically labeled two cellular proteins in fibroblasts isolated from chick embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.Y.; Dou, Q.P.

    1987-05-01

    A hypusine-containing protein (Mw=18,000) has been reported to be present in all mammalian cells examined. The formation of the unusual amino acid residue in this 18,000-dalton protein is due to a posttranslational modification of lysine residue by spermidine. To search for an abundant source for the purification of this protein, they have examined possible existence of this protein in chick embryos using metabolical labeling method. Metabolical labeling of chick embryo fibroblasts prepared from the Day 11 embryos by (2,3-TH)putrescine resulted in two prominently labeled protein bands as shown by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. The apparent molecular weights of the labeled proteins were 20,000- and 18,000-daltons. Two-dimensional gel analysis indicated that the 20,000-dalton protein had a pI of 5.5 and the 18,000-dalton protein exhibited isoform structures with pI values ranging from 4.6 to 5.1. Peptide map analysis showed that the 18,000-dalton protein from chick embryos was identical to the 18,000-dalton protein isolated from mouse neuroblastoma cells. The purification procedure that they have developed for mouse neuroblastoma 18,000-dalton protein was found to be also applicable in isolating the 18,000-dalton protein from chick embryos. Both the 18,000- and the 20,000-dalton proteins in chick embryos were enriched after Cibacron-Blue column and omega-diaminooctyl-agarose column chromatography.

  10. The plasma membrane proteome of germinating barley embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hynek, Radovan; Svensson, Birte; Jensen, O.N.

    2009-01-01

    was used to reduce soluble protein contamination and enrich for hydrophobic proteins. Sixty-one proteins in 14 SDS-PAGE bands were identified by LC-MS/MS and database searches. The identifications provide new insight into the plasma membrane functions in seed germination.......Cereal seed germination involves a complex coordination between different seed tissues. Plasma membranes must play crucial roles in coordination and execution of germination; however, very little is known about seed plasma membrane proteomes due to limited tissue amounts combined...... with amphiphilicity and low abundance of membrane proteins. A fraction enriched in plasma membranes was prepared from embryos dissected from 18 h germinated barley seeds using aqueous two-phase partitioning. Reversed-phase chromatography on C-4 resin performed in micro-spin columns with stepwise elution by 2-propanol...

  11. Receptor-Type Guanylyl Cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) Regulates De Novo Lumen Formation during Drosophila Tracheal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Unisha

    2016-01-01

    Lumen formation and maintenance are important for the development and function of essential organs such as the lung, kidney and vasculature. In the Drosophila embryonic trachea, lumena form de novo to connect the different tracheal branches into an interconnected network of tubes. Here, we identify a novel role for the receptor type guanylyl cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) in de novo lumen formation in the Drosophila trachea. We show that in embryos mutant for gyc76C or its downsteam effector protein kinase G (PKG) 1, tracheal lumena are disconnected. Dorsal trunk (DT) cells of gyc76C mutant embryos migrate to contact each other and complete the initial steps of lumen formation, such as the accumulation of E-cadherin (E-cad) and formation of an actin track at the site of lumen formation. However, the actin track and E-cad contact site of gyc76C mutant embryos did not mature to become a new lumen and DT lumena did not fuse. We also observed failure of the luminal protein Vermiform to be secreted into the site of new lumen formation in gyc76C mutant trachea. These DT lumen formation defects were accompanied by altered localization of the Arf-like 3 GTPase (Arl3), a known regulator of vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-membrane fusion. In addition to the DT lumen defect, lumena of gyc76C mutant terminal cells were shorter compared to wild-type cells. These studies show that Gyc76C and downstream PKG-dependent signaling regulate de novo lumen formation in the tracheal DT and terminal cells, most likely by affecting Arl3-mediated luminal secretion. PMID:27642749

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies that Recognize Proteins Unique to Somatic Embryos of Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    For enzyme immunoassay (EIA), 6 M urea extracts of the lyophilized tissues were prepared (-., personal communication), their protein content was...of hybridoma supernates on EIA plates coated with 6 M urea extracts (1 mg protein/well) of lyophilized callus cells (A), somatic embryo cells (B), and...101Ali reacts with denatured proteins that were identified as LHCP by their apparent molecular weight and reaction with rabbit antisera to maize LHCP

  13. Lipoxins: A Novel Regulator in Embryo Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation is essential for mammalian pregnancy, which involves intricate cross-talk between the blastocyst and the maternal endometrium. Recent advances have identified various molecules crucial to implantation and endometrial receptivity, including leukemia inhibitory factor, calcitonin, and homeobox A10. There is a close relationship between implantation and inflammation. Lipoxins, important in the resolution of inflammation, may be a potential regulator in implantation. Here we discuss the hypothesis that lipoxins may work as a novel regulator in embryo implantation and the possible molecular mechanisms.

  14. To transfer fresh or thawed embryos?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja

    2012-01-01

    and cons of FER versus fresh-embryo transfer with regard to both single-cycle and cumulative pregnancy and delivery rates. The review discusses the obvious advantages of FER: minimizing the proportion of pharmacological and surgical treatments, and lowering the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome...... and multiple pregnancies, thereby increasing the safety for mother and child. Finally the article describes the accumulating literature on perinatal and long-term child outcome after transfer of frozen/thawed embryos, including a discussion on the concerns regarding cryo techniques and their possible roles...

  15. Novel level of signalling control in the JAK/STAT pathway revealed by in situ visualisation of protein-protein interaction during Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; Hu, Nan; Hombría, James Castelli-Gair

    2003-07-01

    It is commonly accepted that activation of most signalling pathways is induced by ligand receptor dimerisation. This belief has been challenged for some vertebrate cytokine receptors of the JAK/STAT pathway. Here we study whether DOME, the Drosophila receptor of the JAK/STAT pathway, can dimerise and if the dimerisation is ligand-dependent. To analyse DOME homo-dimerisation, we have applied a beta-gal complementation technique that allows the detection of protein interactions in situ. This technique has been used previously in cell culture but this is the first time that it has been applied to whole embryos. We show that this technique, which we rename betalue-betalau technique, can be used to detect DOME homo-dimerisation in Drosophila developing embryos. Despite DOME being ubiquitously expressed, dimerisation is developmentally regulated. We investigate the state of DOME dimerisation in the presence or absence of ligand and show that DOME dimerisation is not ligand-induced, indicating that ligand independent cytokine receptor dimerisation is a conserved feature across phyla. We have further analysed the functional significance of ligand-independent receptor dimerisation by comparing the effects of ectopic ligand expression in cells in which the receptor is, or is not, dimerised. We show that ligand expression can only activate STAT downstream targets or affect embryo development in cells in which the receptor is dimerised. These results suggest a model in which ligand-independent dimerisation of the JAK/STAT receptor confers cells with competence to activate the pathway prior to ligand reception. Thus, competence to induce the JAK/STAT signalling pathway in Drosophila can be regulated by controlling receptor dimerisation prior to ligand binding. These results reveal a novel level of JAK/STAT signalling regulation that could also apply to vertebrates.

  16. INFECTIVITY OF METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE IN GRASS SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing embryos of the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, were exposed to Metarhizium anisopliae conidiospores. Attachment of conidiospores was often followed by germination and outgrowth on embryo surface. Penetration of the embryonic envelopes by M. anisopliae allow...

  17. INFECTIVITY OF METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE IN GRASS SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing embryos of the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, were exposed to Metarhizium anisopliae conidiospores. Attachment of conidiospores was often followed by germination and outgrowth on embryo surface. Penetration of the embryonic envelopes by M. anisopliae allow...

  18. Third Party Reproduction: Sperm, Egg, and Embryo Donation and Surrogacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... third-party reproduction” refers to the use of eggs , sperm , or embryos that have been donated by a ... the requisite screening and testing required of all egg and sperm donors. For embryos that are created specifically for ...

  19. Cryopreservation of embryos and oocytes in human assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, János; Kanyó, Katalin; Kriston, Rita; Somoskői, Bence; Cseh, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Both sperm and embryo cryopreservation have become routine procedures in human assisted reproduction and oocyte cryopreservation is being introduced into clinical practice and is getting more and more widely used. Embryo cryopreservation has decreased the number of fresh embryo transfers and maximized the effectiveness of the IVF cycle. The data shows that women who had transfers of fresh and frozen embryos obtained 8% additional births by using their cryopreserved embryos. Oocyte cryopreservation offers more advantages compared to embryo freezing, such as fertility preservation in women at risk of losing fertility due to oncological treatment or chronic disease, egg donation, and postponing childbirth, and eliminates religious and/or other ethical, legal, and moral concerns of embryo freezing. In this review, the basic principles, methodology, and practical experiences as well as safety and other aspects concerning slow cooling and ultrarapid cooling (vitrification) of human embryos and oocytes are summarized.

  20. Efficient Reproduction of Cynomolgus Monkey Using Pronuclear Embryo Transfer Technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qiang Sun; Juan Dong; Wenting Yang; Yujuan Jin; Mingying Yang; Yan Wang; Philip L. Wang; Yinghe Hu; Joe Z. Tsien

    2008-01-01

    ..., often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates...

  1. Using fertile couples as embryo donors: An ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Leila; Omani Samani, Reza

    2014-03-01

    The use of donated embryos has offered hope for infertile couples who have no other means to have children. In Iran, fertility centers use fertile couples as embryo donors. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of this procedure will be discussed. We conclude that embryo-donation should be performed with frozen embryos thus preventing healthy donors from being harmed by fertility drugs. There must be guidelines for choosing the appropriate donor families. In countries where commercial egg donation is acceptable, fertile couples can be procured as embryo donors thus fulfilling the possible shortage of good quality embryos. Using frozen embryos seems to have less ethical, religious and legal problems when compared to the use of fertile embryo donors.

  2. Researchers Put Embryo Development 'On Hold' in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162187.html Researchers Put Embryo Development 'On Hold' in Mice Putting stem cells ... were able to halt development of early mouse embryos for up to a month in the lab ...

  3. Studies of In Vitro Embryo Culture of Guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LiLi Liu; Ki-Young Lee

    2014-01-01

    .... The lecithotrophic strategy of development entails the provisioning of embryos with resources from the maternal yolk deposit rather than from a placenta, it allows the extracorporeal culture of guppy embryo...

  4. Cryopreservation of Embryos and Oocytes in Human Assisted Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Konc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both sperm and embryo cryopreservation have become routine procedures in human assisted reproduction and oocyte cryopreservation is being introduced into clinical practice and is getting more and more widely used. Embryo cryopreservation has decreased the number of fresh embryo transfers and maximized the effectiveness of the IVF cycle. The data shows that women who had transfers of fresh and frozen embryos obtained 8% additional births by using their cryopreserved embryos. Oocyte cryopreservation offers more advantages compared to embryo freezing, such as fertility preservation in women at risk of losing fertility due to oncological treatment or chronic disease, egg donation, and postponing childbirth, and eliminates religious and/or other ethical, legal, and moral concerns of embryo freezing. In this review, the basic principles, methodology, and practical experiences as well as safety and other aspects concerning slow cooling and ultrarapid cooling (vitrification of human embryos and oocytes are summarized.

  5. Scientists Create Part-Human, Part-Pig Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163262.html Scientists Create Part-Human, Part-Pig Embryo One goal of this stem cell research is ... have successfully used human stem cells to create embryos that are part-human, part-pig. Scientists said ...

  6. Impact of early cleaved zygote morphology on embryo development and in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer outcome: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesters, Laëtitia; Prisant, Nadia; Fanchin, Renato; Méndez Lozano, Daniel H; Feyereisen, Estelle; Frydman, René; Tachdjian, Gérard; Frydman, Nelly

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of the first division morphology on embryo development and IVF-embryo transfer outcome. Prospective study. Teaching hospital, France. All zygotes from 201 couples were checked for early cleavage. We defined as "even," early cleaved (EC) zygotes with 2 cells of even size; as "uneven," EC zygotes with 2 cells of uneven size; and as "fragmented," EC zygotes with more than 20% fragmentation rate. Day 2 embryo quality was assessed as "top" embryo or "non-top," with the evaluation of multinucleated blastomeres. None. Day 2 embryo quality, pregnancy and implantation rates. Among EC zygotes, 59.1% were even, 13.0% were uneven, and 27.9% were fragmented. Even EC yielded more "top" embryos and less multinucleated blastomere embryos than uneven EC (77.0% vs. 46.3%) and fragmented EC (77.0% vs. 13.9%). The 125 double embryo transfers that comprised at least one embryo derived from even EC zygote led to higher pregnancy rate (PR) (64.0% vs. 43.4%) and implantation rate (42.0% vs. 27.6%) compared to the 76 double embryo transfers with embryos derived from breakdown or 2PN zygotes. The morphology of the early cleaved zygote is involved in embryo development. Evaluation of this morphology is an effective and valuable method of assessing the embryo quality.

  7. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Schroeder

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross- regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a

  8. Modeling of gap gene expression in Drosophila Kruppel mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Kozlov

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network in Drosophila embryo solves the fundamental problem of embryonic patterning: how to establish a periodic pattern of gene expression, which determines both the positions and the identities of body segments. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in this process. Here we have applied the systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of gap gene Kruppel (Kr on segmentation gene expression. We acquired a large dataset on the expression of gap genes in Kr null mutants and demonstrated that the expression levels of these genes are significantly reduced in the second half of cycle 14A. To explain this novel biological result we applied the gene circuit method which extracts regulatory information from spatial gene expression data. Previous attempts to use this formalism to correctly and quantitatively reproduce gap gene expression in mutants for a trunk gap gene failed, therefore here we constructed a revised model and showed that it correctly reproduces the expression patterns of gap genes in Kr null mutants. We found that the remarkable alteration of gap gene expression patterns in Kr mutants can be explained by the dynamic decrease of activating effect of Cad on a target gene and exclusion of Kr gene from the complex network of gap gene interactions, that makes it possible for other interactions, in particular, between hb and gt, to come into effect. The successful modeling of the quantitative aspects of gap gene expression in mutant for the trunk gap gene Kr is a significant achievement of this work. This result also clearly indicates that the oversimplified representation of transcriptional regulation in the previous models is one of the reasons for unsuccessful attempts of mutant simulations.

  9. The function and regulation of the bHLH gene, cato, in Drosophila neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarman Andrew P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background bHLH transcription factors play many roles in neural development. cousin of atonal (cato encodes one such factor that is expressed widely in the developing sensory nervous system of Drosophila. However, nothing definitive was known of its function owing to the lack of specific mutations. Results We characterised the expression pattern of cato in detail using newly raised antibodies and GFP reporter gene constructs. Expression is predominantly in sensory lineages that depend on the atonal and amos proneural genes. In lineages that depend on the scute proneural gene, cato is expressed later and seems to be particularly associated with the type II neurons. Consistent with this, we find evidence that cato is a direct target gene of Atonal and Amos, but not of Scute. We generated two specific mutations of cato. Mutant embryos show several defects in chordotonal sensory lineages, most notably the duplication of the sensory neuron, which appears to be caused by an extra cell division. In addition, we show that cato is required to form the single chordotonal organ that persists in atonal mutant embryos. Conclusions We conclude that although widely expressed in the developing PNS, cato is expressed and regulated very differently in different sensory lineages. Mutant phenotypes correlate with cato's major expression in the chordotonal sensory lineage. In these cells, we propose that it plays roles in sense organ precursor maintenance and/or identity, and in controlling the number of cell divisions in the neuronal branch of the lineage arising from these precursors.

  10. crumbs and stardust, two genes of Drosophila required for the development of epithelial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, E; Tepass, U; Wodarz, A

    1993-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila genes crumbs and stardust are embryonic lethal and cause a breakdown of ectodermally derived epithelia during organogenesis, leading to formation of irregular cell clusters and extensive cell death in some epithelia. The mutant phenotype develops gradually and affects the various epithelia to different extents. crumbs encodes a large transmembrane protein with 30 EGF-like repeats and four laminin A G-domain-like repeats in its extracellular domain, suggesting its participation in protein-protein interactions. The CRUMBS protein is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of all ectodermally derived epithelia, the tissues affected in crumbs and stardust mutant embryos. The gene function is completely abolished by a crumbs mutation that causes production of a protein with a truncated cytoplasmic domain. Instead of being apically localized as in wild-type, the mutant CRUMBS protein is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm; this occurs before any morphologically detectable cellular phenotype is visible, suggesting that targeting of proteins is affected in crumbs mutant embryos. Later, the protein can be detected on the apical and basolateral membranes. Mutations in stardust produce a phenotype nearly identical to that associated with crumbs mutations, suggesting that both genes are functionally related. Double mutant combinations and gene dosage studies suggest that both genes are part of a common genetic pathway, in which stardust acts downstream of crumbs.

  11. The Drosophila gene Medea demonstrates the requirement for different classes of Smads in dpp signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, P; Maduzia, L L; Wang, H; Finelli, A L; Cho, S H; Smith, M M; Padgett, R W

    1998-04-01

    Signals from transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) ligands are transmitted within the cell by members of the Smad family, which can be grouped into three classes based on sequence similarities. Our previous identification of both class I and II Smads functioning in a single pathway in C. elegans, raised the issue of whether the requirement for Smads derived from different classes is a general feature of TGF-beta signaling. We report here the identification of a new Drosophila class II Smad, Medea, a close homolog of the human tumor-suppressor gene DPC4. Embryos from germline clones of both Medea and Mad (a class I Smad) are ventralized, as are embryos null for the TGF-beta-like ligand decapentaplegic (dpp). Loss of Medea also blocks dpp signaling during later development, suggesting that Medea, like Mad, is universally required for dpp signaling. Furthermore, we show that the necessity for these two closely related, non-redundant Smads, is due to their different signaling properties - upon activation of the Dpp pathway, Mad is required to actively translocate Medea into the nucleus. These results provide a paradigm for, and distinguish between, the requirement for class I and II Smads in Dpp/BMP signaling.

  12. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  13. Spire, an actin nucleation factor, regulates cell division during Drosophila heart development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    Full Text Available The Drosophila dorsal vessel is a beneficial model system for studying the regulation of early heart development. Spire (Spir, an actin-nucleation factor, regulates actin dynamics in many developmental processes, such as cell shape determination, intracellular transport, and locomotion. Through protein expression pattern analysis, we demonstrate that the absence of spir function affects cell division in Myocyte enhancer factor 2-, Tinman (Tin-, Even-skipped- and Seven up (Svp-positive heart cells. In addition, genetic interaction analysis shows that spir functionally interacts with Dorsocross, tin, and pannier to properly specify the cardiac fate. Furthermore, through visualization of double heterozygous embryos, we determines that spir cooperates with CycA for heart cell specification and division. Finally, when comparing the spir mutant phenotype with that of a CycA mutant, the results suggest that most Svp-positive progenitors in spir mutant embryos cannot undergo full cell division at cell cycle 15, and that Tin-positive progenitors are arrested at cell cycle 16 as double-nucleated cells. We conclude that Spir plays a crucial role in controlling dorsal vessel formation and has a function in cell division during heart tube morphogenesis.

  14. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation.

  15. Automated measurement of Drosophila wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezey Jason

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in evolutionary biology and genetics are limited by the rate at which phenotypic information can be acquired. The wings of Drosophila species are a favorable target for automated analysis because of the many interesting questions in evolution and development that can be addressed with them, and because of their simple structure. Results We have developed an automated image analysis system (WINGMACHINE that measures the positions of all the veins and the edges of the wing blade of Drosophilid flies. A video image is obtained with the aid of a simple suction device that immobilizes the wing of a live fly. Low-level processing is used to find the major intersections of the veins. High-level processing then optimizes the fit of an a priori B-spline model of wing shape. WINGMACHINE allows the measurement of 1 wing per minute, including handling, imaging, analysis, and data editing. The repeatabilities of 12 vein intersections averaged 86% in a sample of flies of the same species and sex. Comparison of 2400 wings of 25 Drosophilid species shows that wing shape is quite conservative within the group, but that almost all taxa are diagnosably different from one another. Wing shape retains some phylogenetic structure, although some species have shapes very different from closely related species. The WINGMACHINE system facilitates artificial selection experiments on complex aspects of wing shape. We selected on an index which is a function of 14 separate measurements of each wing. After 14 generations, we achieved a 15 S.D. difference between up and down-selected treatments. Conclusion WINGMACHINE enables rapid, highly repeatable measurements of wings in the family Drosophilidae. Our approach to image analysis may be applicable to a variety of biological objects that can be represented as a framework of connected lines.

  16. Drosophila bitter taste(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eFrench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called bitter. By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induce aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to inhibitory pheromones such as 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different categories of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction

  17. Signaling by Drosophila capa neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Shireen-A; Cabrero, Pablo; Povsic, Manca; Johnston, Natalie R; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T

    2013-07-01

    The capa peptide family, originally identified in the tobacco hawk moth, Manduca sexta, is now known to be present in many insect families, with increasing publications on capa neuropeptides each year. The physiological actions of capa peptides vary depending on the insect species but capa peptides have key myomodulatory and osmoregulatory functions, depending on insect lifestyle, and life stage. Capa peptide signaling is thus critical for fluid homeostasis and survival, making study of this neuropeptide family attractive for novel routes for insect control. In Dipteran species, including the genetically tractable Drosophila melanogaster, capa peptide action is diuretic; via elevation of nitric oxide, cGMP and calcium in the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules. The identification of the capa receptor (capaR) in several insect species has shown this to be a canonical GPCR. In D. melanogaster, ligand-activated capaR activity occurs in a dose-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-12)M. Lower concentrations of capa peptide do not activate capaR, either in adult or larval Malpighian tubules. Use of transgenic flies in which capaR is knocked-down in only Malpighian tubule principal cells demonstrates that capaR modulates tubule fluid secretion rates and in doing so, sets the organismal response to desiccation. Thus, capa regulates a desiccation-responsive pathway in D. melanogaster, linking its role in osmoregulation and fluid homeostasis to environmental response and survival. The conservation of capa action between some Dipteran species suggests that capa's role in desiccation tolerance may not be confined to D. melanogaster.

  18. Cutin fluorescence in early embryos of Pinus and Tsuga

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Szczuka; Irena Gielwanowska

    2014-01-01

    Embryos of Pinus nigra Arnold and Tsuga canadensis Carr. (Pinaceae) at different stages of development were dissected from fresh, unfixed seeds and examined in a fluorescence microscope with 400 nm excitation light. The embryos of the investigated species showed cutin fluorescence after auramine 0 staining. At first the fluorescing cutin layer was formed on the apical part of the embryo with a well developed secondary suspensor, then it extended over the lateral surface of the embryo; the sus...

  19. On the possibility of embryo donation in Hispanic America

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez-Díaz, Jorge Alberto; Médico sexólogo clínico, magíster en bioética. Doctorando en el Programa de Ciencias Sociosanitarias y Humanidades Médicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid- España. Becario del Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT), México.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical studies regarding embryo donation in developed countries show that the most probable action would be to discard surplus embryos and, if they would donate them, the preferred option would be for research, and eventually to other couples. There are not enough studies in Hispanic America about the opinions of those who have participated in assisted reproductive technologies (ART) regarding embryo disposition of surplus embryos. Moreover, there are scarce specific laws regulating ART in...

  20. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: Problems & perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajvi H Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been ′discarded′ or ′spare′ fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. In case a couple does not desire to ′cryopreserve′ their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered ′spare′ or if a couple is no longer in need of the ′cryopreserved′ embryos then these also can be considered as ′spare′. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, "what about ′slightly′ over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to ′discarded′ embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of ′discarding′ embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential ′use′ of ESC derived from the ′abnormal appearing′ embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material.

  1. Research Progress on Technique of Frozen Embryo Transfer in Sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Qiu-sheng; HU Jian-ye; LOU Peng-yan; TAO Jing; XIE Zhao-hui

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduced the research progress on the technique of frozen embryo transfer in sheep, illustrated selection of donors and receptors, superovulation, synchronization of estrus, embryo cryopreservation and embryo transplantation. Frozen embryo transfer in sheep is another breakthrough in the high-quality sheep raising, and this technique in China is in its infancy recommendation stage, but it will be comprehensively popularized in the future.

  2. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: problems & perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajvi H

    2014-11-01

    The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC) lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been 'discarded' or 'spare' fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. in case a couple does not desire to 'cryopreserve' their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered 'spare' or if a couple is no longer in need of the 'cryopreserved' embryos then these also can be considered as 'spare'. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, "what about 'slightly' over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to 'discarded' embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of 'discarding' embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential 'use' of ESC derived from the 'abnormal appearing' embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material.

  3. Effect of zona pellucida on porcine parthenogenetically activated embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Rong; Liu, Ying; Li, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The need for zona pellucida (ZP) during pre-implantation embryo development is still debated. In porcine parthenogenetically activated (PA) embryos, we have previously shown a different distribution in cell numbers on Day 6 blastocysts cultured with or without ZP (Li et al. 2010 Reprod. Fertil. D...... embryos, especially at the timing of embryonic genome activation (5-cell stage). Furthermore, the zona pellucida can benefit the blastocyst formation and cryo-tolerance for PA embryos, perhaps by creating a more stable microenvironement....

  4. Ultrastructural changes in goat interspecies and intraspecies reconstructed early embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Yong; Gheng, Lizi; Zhang, Meiling

    2008-01-01

    The low efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer may be related to the ultrastructural deviations of reconstructed embryos. The present study investigated ultrastructural differences between in vivo-produced and cloned goat embryos, including intra- and interspecies embryos. Goat ear fibroblast...

  5. Correlation between embryo morphology and development and chromosomal complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Embryo development rate and morphological parameter such as degree, type of fragmentation and the symmetry of the blastomeres to a large extent reflect the cytogenetic status of the embryo and thus are important in the selection of embryos with the highest implantation potential.

  6. Sexing Bovine Embryos Using PCR Amplification of Bovine SRY Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾溢滔; 张美兰; 陈美珏; 周霞娣; 黄英; 任兆瑞; 黄淑帧; 胡明信; 吴学清; 高建明; 张斌; 徐慧如

    1994-01-01

    This study analyses the bovine SRY DNA sequence by direct sequencing procedure, followed by the designation of the PCR primers specific for bovine SRY. Using PCR amplification of bovine SRY gene, the embryo sex was determined. The results of the embryo sex identification were confirmed after the embryo transfer and pregnancies.

  7. Direct visualization of replication dynamics in early zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Okochi, Nanami; Hattori, Kaede; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Tamaru, Yutaka; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed DNA replication in early zebrafish embryos. The replicating DNA of whole embryos was labeled with the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and spatial regulation of replication sites was visualized in single embryo-derived cells. The results unveiled uncharacterized replication dynamics during zebrafish early embryogenesis.

  8. Resveratrol prevents nicotine-induced teratogenesis in cultured mouse embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, C.; Yon, J.M.; Jung, A.Y.; Lee, J.G.; Jung, K.Y.; Kang, J.K.; Lee, B.J.; Yun, Y.W.; Nam, S.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine, a major toxic component in tobacco smoke, leads to severe embryonic damage during organogenesis in embryos. We investigated whether resveratrol would positively influence nicotine-induced teratogenesis in mouse embryos (embryonic day 8.5) cultured for 48 h using a whole embryo culture syst

  9. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  10. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  11. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  12. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution s...

  13. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  14. How complexity increases in development: An analysis of the spatial-temporal dynamics of 1218 genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Martínez, Irepan; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2015-09-15

    One of the most apparent phenomena in development is that it starts with something apparently simple and leads to something clearly complex with a specific and functional structure. At the level of gene expression it seems also clear that the embryo becomes progressively compartmentalized over time and space. However, there have not been any systematic attempts to quantify how this occurs. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the compartmentalization and spatial complexity of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster over developmental time by analyzing thousands of gene expression spatial patterns from FlyExpress database. We use three different mathematical measures of compartmentalization of gene expression in space. All these measures show a similar non-linear increase in compartmentalization over time, with the most dramatic change occurring from the maternal to the early gastrula stage. Transcription factors and growth factors showed an earlier compartmentalization. Finally, we partitioned the embryo space in 257 equally sized regions and clustered them depending on their expression similarity, within and between stages. This provides a global overview about the effective degree of differentiation and compartmentalization between body parts at each developmental stage and when and where in the embryo there are more changes, due to signaling or movement.

  15. The endometrial factor in human embryo implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis aimed to explore the role of the endometrium in the implantation process. At present, embryo implantation is the major rate-limiting step for success in fertility treatment. Clinicians have sought to develop clinical interventions aimed at enhancing implantation

  16. Mouse embryo manipulations with OCT guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Monica D.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a three-dimensional, non-invasive optical imaging technique that relies on low-coherence interferometry. OCT has the capability of imaging 2 - 3 mm into tissue, which enables imaging of deeper structures within the embryo with a relatively high spatial resolution (2 - 15μm). Within the past decade, OCT has been increasingly used as a live imaging tool for embryonic cardiovascular research in several animal models. Research in our lab has recently shown that OCT can be used in combination with embryo culture for the visualization of early mammalian cardiovascular development (E7.5 - E10.0). Here, we demonstrate that OCT can be used for the guided microinjection of gold-silica nanoshell suspension into the cardiovascular system in live embryos without deleterious effect. This approach shows a promising application for the OCT guided delivery of contrast agents, viral vectors, therapeutic or pharmacological agents, signaling molecules or dyes to specific organ systems or tissues in live embryos and demonstrates a great potential for gold-silica nanoshells as a contrast agent in embryonic studies.

  17. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Filip; Sawosz, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    factors of chicken embryo pectoral muscles. ND, Gln, and Gln/ND solutions (50 mg/L) were injected into fertilized broiler chicken eggs at the beginning of embryogenesis. Muscle tissue was dissected at day 20 of incubation and analysed for gene expression of FGF2, VEGF-A, and MyoD1. ND and especially Gln...

  18. The endometrial factor in human embryo implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis aimed to explore the role of the endometrium in the implantation process. At present, embryo implantation is the major rate-limiting step for success in fertility treatment. Clinicians have sought to develop clinical interventions aimed at enhancing implantation

  19. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  20. In vitro production of bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroebech, L.; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard

    2015-01-01

    In vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos has become a widespread technology implemented in cattle breeding and production. The implementation of genomic selection and systems biology adds great dimensions to the impact of bovine IVP. The physical procedures included in the IVP process can still...

  1. In vitro production of bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroebech, L.; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard;

    2015-01-01

    In vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos has become a widespread technology implemented in cattle breeding and production. The implementation of genomic selection and systems biology adds great dimensions to the impact of bovine IVP. The physical procedures included in the IVP process can still...

  2. LIF and TNF alpha concentrations in embryo culture media are predictive for embryo implantation in IVF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ursula Zollner; Sonja Bischofs; Irena Lalic; Klaus-Peter Zollner

    2012-01-01

    Objective:There is strong evidence that the cytokines leucemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha are related to embryo development and implantation. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of LIF and TNF alpha in embryo culture media and to assess its relationship to the outcome of in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. Methods:A total of 99 patients were included in this prospective trial and underwent either IVF or ICSI procedure. A total of 865 oocytes were collected. Embryos were cultured in sequential media until day 5. A standardized morphology evaluation of all embryos, including a detailed pronuclear scoring, was performed daily during this period followed by the replacement of one or two selected embryos. Collected embryo culture fluids of days 3 and 5 were analysed for LIF and TNF alpha on days 3 and 5. Results:Mean TNF alpha concentration in culture media on day 3 was 0.54 and 0.37 pg/mL on day 5 and was significantly lower in women conceiving than in not conceiving (0.43 pg/mL versus 0.59 pg/mL on day 3). Mean LIF concentration on day 3 was 31.5 pg/mL and 35.5 pg/mL on day 5 and was significantly higher in women conceiving (56.2 pg/mL versus 22.2 pg/mL on day 3). Conclusions:The results indicate that LIF could have a function in early embryogenesis and as a factor required for embryo implantation. High TNF alpha concentrations seem to be predictive of implantation failure.

  3. Molecular landscape of modified histones in Drosophila heterochromatic genes and euchromatin-heterochromatin transition zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro C Yasuhara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive heterochromatin is enriched in repetitive sequences and histone H3-methylated-at-lysine 9. Both components contribute to heterochromatin's ability to silence euchromatic genes. However, heterochromatin also harbors hundreds of expressed genes in organisms such as Drosophila. Recent studies have provided a detailed picture of sequence organization of D. melanogaster heterochromatin, but how histone modifications are associated with heterochromatic sequences at high resolution has not been described. Here, distributions of modified histones in the vicinity of heterochromatic genes of normal embryos and embryos homozygous for a chromosome rearrangement were characterized using chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome tiling arrays. We found that H3-di-methylated-at-lysine 9 (H3K9me2 was depleted at the 5' ends but enriched throughout transcribed regions of heterochromatic genes. The profile was distinct from that of euchromatic genes and suggests that heterochromatic genes are integrated into, rather than insulated from, the H3K9me2-enriched domain. Moreover, the profile was only subtly affected by a Su(var3-9 null mutation, implicating a histone methyltransferase other than SU(VAR3-9 as responsible for most H3K9me2 associated with heterochromatic genes in embryos. On a chromosomal scale, we observed a sharp transition to the H3K9me2 domain, which coincided with increased retrotransposon density in the euchromatin-heterochromatin (eu-het transition zones on the long chromosome arms. Thus, a certain density of retrotransposons, rather than specific boundary elements, may demarcate Drosophila pericentric heterochromatin. We also demonstrate that a chromosome rearrangement that created a new eu-het junction altered H3K9me2 distribution and induced new euchromatic sites of enrichment as far as several megabases away from the breakpoint. Taken together, the findings argue against simple classification of H3K9me as the definitive signature

  4. Molecular landscape of modified histones in Drosophila heterochromatic genes and euchromatin-heterochromatin transition zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro C Yasuhara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive heterochromatin is enriched in repetitive sequences and histone H3-methylated-at-lysine 9. Both components contribute to heterochromatin's ability to silence euchromatic genes. However, heterochromatin also harbors hundreds of expressed genes in organisms such as Drosophila. Recent studies have provided a detailed picture of sequence organization of D. melanogaster heterochromatin, but how histone modifications are associated with heterochromatic sequences at high resolution has not been described. Here, distributions of modified histones in the vicinity of heterochromatic genes of normal embryos and embryos homozygous for a chromosome rearrangement were characterized using chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome tiling arrays. We found that H3-di-methylated-at-lysine 9 (H3K9me2 was depleted at the 5' ends but enriched throughout transcribed regions of heterochromatic genes. The profile was distinct from that of euchromatic genes and suggests that heterochromatic genes are integrated into, rather than insulated from, the H3K9me2-enriched domain. Moreover, the profile was only subtly affected by a Su(var3-9 null mutation, implicating a histone methyltransferase other than SU(VAR3-9 as responsible for most H3K9me2 associated with heterochromatic genes in embryos. On a chromosomal scale, we observed a sharp transition to the H3K9me2 domain, which coincided with increased retrotransposon density in the euchromatin-heterochromatin (eu-het transition zones on the long chromosome arms. Thus, a certain density of retrotransposons, rather than specific boundary elements, may demarcate Drosophila pericentric heterochromatin. We also demonstrate that a chromosome rearrangement that created a new eu-het junction altered H3K9me2 distribution and induced new euchromatic sites of enrichment as far as several megabases away from the breakpoint. Taken together, the findings argue against simple classification of H3K9me as the definitive signature

  5. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mauricio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Results Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Conclusion Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we

  6. A simple and rapid flow cytometry-based assay to identify a competent embryo prior to embryo transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Pallinger, Eva; Bognar, Zoltan; Bodis, Jozsef; Csabai, Timea; Farkas, Nelli; Godony, Krisztina; Varnagy, Akos; Buzas, Edit; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Multiple pregnancy is a risk for prematurity and preterm birth. The goal of assisted reproduction is to achieve a single pregnancy, by transferring a single embryo. This requires improved methods to identify the competent embryo. Here, we describe such a test, based on flow cytometric determination of the nucleic acid (PI+) containing extracellular vesicle (EV) count in day 5 embryo culture media. 88 women undergoing IVF were included in the study. More than 1 embryos were transferred to most...

  7. Influence of recipient cytoplasm cell stage on transcription in bovine nucleus transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Steven D.; Soloy, Eva; Kanka, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    relies upon maternally derived RNA transcripts up to the 8-cell stage, at which time it begins to transcribe its own RNA. In this experiment, RNA synthesis was detected in nucleus transfer embryos (NTE) and control embryos by pulsing with 3H-uridine, fixation, and autoradiography on semithin sections...... of maturation. Control in-vitro-produced embryos were 3H-uridine-labelled and fixed at the 2-, 4-, early 8-, and late 8-cell stages. NTE were similarly prepared at 1, 3, and 20 hr postfusion and at the 2-, 4-, and 8-cell stages. In the control embryos, RNA synthesis was absent in the 2-, 4-, and early 8-cell...... stages, whereas in all late 8-cell stages, it was present. In NTE from nonactivated (MII phase) cytoplasts, there was a sharp decline in RNA synthesis at 1 hr and 3 hr after fusion and a total absence by 20 hr after fusion. In contrast, NTE from activated (S phase) cytoplasts exhibited continued high...

  8. Extraction of DNA from human embryos after long-term preservation in formalin and Bouin's solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Momoko; Minegishi, Katsura; Komada, Munekazu; Tsuchiya, Maiko; Kameda, Tomomi; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-05-01

    The "Kyoto Collection of Human Embryos" at Kyoto University was begun in 1961. Although morphological analyses of samples in the Kyoto Collection have been performed, these embryos have been considered difficult to genetically analyze because they have been preserved in formalin or Bouin's solution for 20-50 years. Owing to the recent advances in molecular biology, it has become possible to extract DNA from long-term fixed tissues. The purpose of this study was to extract DNA from wet preparations of human embryo samples after long-term preservation in fixing solution. We optimized the DNA extraction protocol to be suitable for tissues that have been damaged by long-term fixation, including DNA-protein crosslinking damage. Diluting Li2 CO3 with 70% ethanol effectively removed picric acid from samples fixed in Bouin's solution. Additionally, 20.0 mg/mL proteinase was valuable to lyse the long-term fixed samples. The extracted DNA was checked with PCR amplification using several sets of primers and sequence analysis. The PCR products included at least 295- and 838-bp amplicons. These results show that the extracted DNA is applicable for genetic analyses, and indicate that old embryos in the Kyoto Collection should be made available for future studies. The protocol described in this study can successfully extract DNA from old specimens and, with improvements, should be applicable in research aiming to understand the molecular mechanisms of human congenital anomalies. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  9. A highly conserved Poc1 protein characterized in embryos of the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica: localization and functional studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Fourrage

    Full Text Available Poc1 (Protein of Centriole 1 proteins are highly conserved WD40 domain-containing centriole components, well characterized in the alga Chlamydomonas, the ciliated protazoan Tetrahymena, the insect Drosophila and in vertebrate cells including Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. Functions and localizations related to the centriole and ciliary axoneme have been demonstrated for Poc1 in a range of species. The vertebrate Poc1 protein has also been reported to show an additional association with mitochondria, including enrichment in the specialized "germ plasm" region of Xenopus oocytes. We have identified and characterized a highly conserved Poc1 protein in the cnidarian Clytia hemisphaerica. Clytia Poc1 mRNA was found to be strongly expressed in eggs and early embryos, showing a punctate perinuclear localization in young oocytes. Fluorescence-tagged Poc1 proteins expressed in developing embryos showed strong localization to centrioles, including basal bodies. Anti-human Poc1 antibodies decorated mitochondria in Clytia, as reported in human cells, but failed to recognise endogenous or fluorescent-tagged Clytia Poc1. Injection of specific morpholino oligonucleotides into Clytia eggs prior to fertilization to repress Poc1 mRNA translation interfered with cell division from the blastula stage, likely corresponding to when neosynthesis normally takes over from maternally supplied protein. Cell cycle lengthening and arrest were observed, phenotypes consistent with an impaired centriolar biogenesis or function. The specificity of the defects could be demonstrated by injection of synthetic Poc1 mRNA, which restored normal development. We conclude that in Clytia embryos, Poc1 has an essentially centriolar localization and function.

  10. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  11. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Penghe; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Tans, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster shares many similarities with vertebrates in heart development. Comparison of heart structural and functional characteristic between male and female Drosophila melanogaster at different developmental stages is helpful to understand heart morphogenesis and function for different genders. And also, it opens up the possibility to uncover the role of sex-related genes in heart development. In this longitudinal study, we cultured and tracked dozens of individually labeled flies throughout their lifecycle. The heart characteristic was measured at different developmental stages during culturing. The gender of each individual fly was determined by adult stage so that the collected data of early stages could be classified to male or female group. We adapted a high-speed optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system with axial and transverse resolution of 2um and 4um, respectively, to perform non-invasive M-mode imaging at a frame rate of 132Hz in Drosophila heart at third instar larva, early pupa and adult stage. Based on those GPU processed M-mode OCM images, we segmented the fly heart region and then quantified the cardiac structural and functional parameters such as heart rate, heart chamber size and so on. Despite large variances of wild type Drosophila in terms of some cardiac characteristic, our results suggest that the heart rate is lower for male flies than for female flies, especially at third instar larva stage. The end diastolic area (EDA) and end systolic area (ESA) of the heart are both slightly larger in female flies than in male flies at larva and adult stage. In summary, we showed gender differences of wild type drosophila in heart functional and structural characteristic.

  12. Genomics of Ecological Adaptation in Cactophilic Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G.; Dias, Guilherme B.; Ruiz, Jeronimo C.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G.; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P.; Kuhn, Gustavo C.S.; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G.; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene–environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  13. Identification of novel Drosophila centromere-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Teresa K; Schade, Georg O M; Schmidt, Andreas; Vetter, Irene; Wirth, Marc; Heun, Patrick; Thomae, Andreas W; Imhof, Axel

    2014-10-01

    Centromeres are chromosomal regions crucial for correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. They are epigenetically defined by centromeric proteins such as the centromere-specific histone H3-variant centromere protein A (CENP-A). In humans, 16 additional proteins have been described to be constitutively associated with centromeres throughout the cell cycle, known as the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN). In contrast, only one additional constitutive centromeric protein is known in Drosophila melanogaster (D.mel), the conserved CCAN member CENP-C. To gain further insights into D.mel centromere composition and biology, we analyzed affinity-purified chromatin prepared from D.mel cell lines expressing green fluorescent protein tagged histone three variants by MS. In addition to already-known centromeric proteins, we identified novel factors that were repeatedly enriched in affinity purification-MS experiments. We analyzed the cellular localization of selected candidates by immunocytochemistry and confirmed localization to the centromere and other genomic regions for ten factors. Furthermore, RNA interference mediated depletion of CG2051, CG14480, and hyperplastic discs, three of our strongest candidates, leads to elevated mitotic defects. Knockdowns of these candidates neither impair the localization of several known kinetochore proteins nor CENP-A(CID) loading, suggesting their involvement in alternative pathways that contribute to proper centromere function. In summary, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteomic composition of Drosophila centromeres. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000758 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000758).

  14. Nonsurgical embryo transfer device compared with surgery for embryo transfer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Kendra H; Hester, James M; Stone, Barbara J; Carrico, Kimberly M; Spear, Brett T; Fath-Goodin, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    The use of a murine nonsurgical embryo transfer (NSET) device had been described previously for the transfer of blastocysts, morulae, DNA-microinjected embryos, and embryonic stem cell-containing embryos to create genetically modified mice. However, physiologic effects of the NSET device and traditional surgical methods had not been compared directly. Here we used electrocardiography and fecal corticosterone levels to monitor pseudopregnant mice that underwent anesthesia only, the NSET procedure with or without anesthesia, or surgery. These procedures were performed without the use of actual embryos, to focus on effects of the procedures themselves rather than on any physiologic effects due to the deposition of embryos. As compared with surgery and anesthesia, the NSET procedure was associated with less fluctuation in cardiac rhythm and lower levels of the stress biomarker fecal corticosterone. These results indicate that use of the NSET device avoids these physi- ological perturbations as well as other disadvantages of surgery (for example, postoperative pain and need for postoperative analgesia) and therefore provides a valuable refinement of existing mouse embryo transfer procedures.

  15. The fate of the mosaic embryo: Chromosomal constitution and development of Day 4, 5 and 8 human embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Santos; G. Teklenburg (Gijs); N.S. Macklon (Nick); D. van Opstal (Diane); G.H. Schuring-Blom (Heleen); P-J. Krijtenburg (Pieter-Jaap); J. de Vreeden-Elbertse (Johanna); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); E.B. Baart (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Post-zygotic chromosome segregation errors are very common in human embryos after in vitro fertilization, resulting in mosaic embryos. However, the significance of mosaicism for the developmental potential of early embryos is unknown. We assessed chromosomal constitution and

  16. Organization and evolution of Drosophila terminin: similarities and differences between Drosophila and human telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Daniela Raffa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi and Ver. These proteins are not conserves outside Drosophilidae and localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  17. Ultrastructural changes in goat interspecies and intraspecies reconstructed early embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Yong; Gheng, Lizi; Zhang, Meiling;

    2008-01-01

    and dispered gradually from the 4-cell period. The nucleolus of GC and GG embryos changed from electron dense to a fibrillo-granular meshwork at the 16-cell stage, showing that nucleus function in the reconstructed embryos was activated. The broken nuclear envelope and multiple nucleoli in one blastomere......- and intraspecies reconstructed embryos have a similar pattern of developmental change to that of in vivo-produced embryos for ZP, rough ER, Gi and nucleolus, but differ for mitochondria, LD, vesicles, nucleus and gap junction development. In particular, the interspecies cloned embryos showed more severe...

  18. Clonal propagation of primate offspring by embryo splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A W; Dominko, T; Luetjens, C M; Neuber, E; Martinovich, C; Hewitson, L; Simerly, C R; Schatten, G P

    2000-01-14

    Primates that are identical in both nuclear and cytoplasmic components have not been produced by current cloning strategies, yet such identicals represent the ideal model for investigations of human diseases. Here, genetically identical nonhuman embryos were produced as twin and larger sets by separation and reaggregation of blastomeres of cleavage-stage embryos. A total of 368 multiples were created by the splitting of 107 rhesus embryos with four pregnancies established after 13 embryo transfers (31% versus 53% in vitro fertilization controls). The birth of Tetra, a healthy female cloned from a quarter of an embryo, proves that this approach can result in live offspring.

  19. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  20. Quantitative imaging of collective cell migration during Drosophila gastrulation: multiphoton microscopy and computational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Supatto, Willy; McMahon, Amy; Fraser, Scott E.; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes imaging and computational tools to collect and analyze live imaging data of embryonic cell migration. Our five-step protocol requires a few weeks to move through embryo preparation and four-dimensional (4D) live imaging using multiphoton microscopy, to 3D cell tracking using image processing, registration of tracking data and their quantitative analysis using computational tools. It uses commercially available equipment and requires expertise in microscopy and progr...

  1. Evaluation of somatic embryos of alfalfa for recombinant protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guohua; Grbic, Vojislava; Ma, Shengwu; Tian, Lining

    2015-02-01

    Somatic embryos of alfalfa can accumulate higher levels of recombinant proteins comparing to vegetative organs. Somatic embryos may be explored as a new system for new protein production for plants. Plants have been explored via genetic engineering as an inexpensive system for recombinant protein production. However, protein expression levels in vegetative tissues have been low, which limits the commercial utilization of plant expression systems. Somatic embryos resemble zygotic embryos in many aspects and may accumulate higher levels of proteins as true seed. In this study, somatic embryo of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was investigated for the expression of recombinant proteins. Three heterologous genes, including the standard scientific reporter uid that codes for β-glucuronidase and two genes of interest: ctb coding for cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), and hIL-13 coding for human interleukin 13, were independently introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic plants carrying these genes. Somatic embryos accumulated approximately twofold more recombinant proteins than vegetative organs including roots, stems, and leaves. The recombinant proteins of CTB and hIL-13 accumulated up to 0.15 and 0.18 % of total soluble protein in alfalfa somatic embryos, respectively. The recombinant proteins expressed in somatic embryos also exhibited biological activities. As somatic embryos can be induced in many plant species and their production can be scaled up via different avenues, somatic embryos may be developed as an efficient expression system for recombinant protein production.

  2. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  3. Turtle embryos move to optimal thermal environments within the egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Teng; Shine, Richard; Du, Wei-Guo

    2013-08-23

    A recent study demonstrated that the embryos of soft-shelled turtles can reposition themselves within their eggs to exploit locally warm conditions. In this paper, we ask whether turtle embryos actively seek out optimal thermal environments for their development, as do post-hatching individuals. Specifically, (i) do reptile embryos move away from dangerously high temperatures as well as towards warm temperatures? and (ii) is such embryonic movement due to active thermoregulation, or (more simply) to passive embryonic repositioning caused by local heat-induced changes in viscosity of fluids within the egg? Our experiments with an emydid turtle (Chinemys reevesii) show that embryos avoid dangerously high temperatures by moving to cooler regions of the egg. The repositioning of embryos is an active rather than passive process: live embryos move towards a heat source, whereas dead ones do not. Overall, our results suggest that behavioural thermoregulation by turtle embryos is genuinely analogous to the thermoregulatory behaviour exhibited by post-hatching ectotherms.

  4. Expression of multiple transgenes from a single construct using viral 2A peptides in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Daniels

    Full Text Available Expression of multiple reporter or effector transgenes in the same cell from a single construct is increasingly necessary in various experimental paradigms. The discovery of short, virus-derived peptide sequences that mediate a ribosome-skipping event enables generation of multiple separate peptide products from one mRNA. Here we describe methods and vectors to facilitate easy production of polycistronic-like sequences utilizing these 2A peptides tailored for expression in Drosophila both in vitro and in vivo. We tested the separation efficiency of different viral 2A peptides in cultured Drosophila cells and in vivo and found that the 2A peptides from porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A and Thosea asigna virus (T2A worked best. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we used the P2A peptide to co-express the red fluorescent protein tdTomato and the genetically-encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5G in larval motorneurons. This technique enabled ratiometric calcium imaging with motion correction allowing us to record synaptic activity at the neuromuscular junction in an intact larval preparation through the cuticle. The tools presented here should greatly facilitate the generation of 2A peptide-mediated expression of multiple transgenes in Drosophila.

  5. In Situ Labeling of Mitochondrial DNA Replication in Drosophila Adult Ovaries by EdU Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2016-10-15

    The mitochondrial genome is inherited exclusively through the maternal line. Understanding of how the mitochondrion and its genome are proliferated and transmitted from one generation to the next through the female oocyte is of fundamental importance. Because of the genetic tractability, and the elegant, ordered simplicity by which oocyte development proceeds, Drosophila oogenesis has become an invaluable system for mitochondrial study. An EdU (5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine) labeling method was utilized to detect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication in Drosophila ovaries. This method is superior to the BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) labeling method in that it allows for good structural preservation and efficient fluorescent dye penetration of whole-mount tissues. Here we describe a detailed protocol for labeling replicating mitochondrial DNA in Drosophila adult ovaries with EdU. Some technical solutions are offered to improve the viability of the ovaries, maintain their health during preparation, and ensure high-quality imaging. Visualization of newly synthesized mtDNA in the ovaries not only reveals the striking temporal and spatial pattern of mtDNA replication through oogenesis, but also allows for simple quantification of mtDNA replication under various genetic and pharmacological perturbations.

  6. Drosophila neural stem cells in brain development and tumor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells in Drosophila, generate the complex neural structure of the central nervous system. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila neuroblast lineages. Deregulation of these mechanisms can lead to severe developmental defects and the formation of malignant brain tumors. Here, the authors review the molecular genetics of Drosophila neuroblasts and discuss some recent advances in stem cell and cancer biology using this model system.

  7. Classical and operant learning in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Eschbach, Claire

    2012-01-01

    In dieser Doktorarbeit studiere ich einige psychologische Aspekte im Verhalten der Drosophila, insbesondere von Drosophila Larven. Nach einer Einleitung, in der ich den wissenschaftlichen Kontext darstelle und die Mechanismen der olfaktorischen Wahrnehmung sowie des klassichen und operanten Lernens beschreibe, stelle ich die verschiedenen Experimente meiner Doktorarbeit vor. Wahrnehmung Das zweite Kapitel behandelt die Art, in der adulte Drosophila zwischen Einzeldüften und Duftgemischen gene...

  8. Embryo toxicitic effects of Ranitidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrallah Zadeh B

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we tried to know something more about the embryotoxicity effects of the doses of 50, 200, 400 mg/kg/day of ranitidine of (H2 antihistaminic agent by intraperitoneal administration on mice. The studies were performed on albino mice kept under specific conditions and a constant dark-light cycle at 24+1C and 55+5% relative humidity. Generally, the animals were acclimatized for four weeks before mating. Two female mice at 12-14 weeks of age were placed overnight with a male of proven fertility. The day on which a vaginal plug was found, was taken as day one of pregnancy. Also the vaginal smear was prepared for further proof. Treatment of pregnant females was started from day 7 and continued up to the 15th day of gestation and then on day 18 they were necropsied for routine teratological observations. The live fetuses were weighed and inspected for gross external abnormalities under a dissecting microscope. Resorption plus dead fetuses less than 6mm of length were designated early death and dead fetuses of more than 6mm of length were consequently called late death. The statistical study was done by student t-test. One-third of the fetuses were fixed in bouin's fluid to detect visceral malformations by the rasor- section technique. There was no significant difference in the frequency of late death between the control groups and the groups given ranitidine. Differences were observed in the number of implantation sites except for 400 mg/kg/day. Data pooled from all experimental groups clearly show that pig tail, deformed cranium, low body weight and skeleton, unshaped external ear and jaw and polydactyly are the most common external abnormalities. Results of this study show the hazards o the ranitidine used during early pregnancy.

  9. armadillo, bazooka, and stardust are critical for early stages in formation of the zonula adherens and maintenance of the polarized blastoderm epithelium in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H A; Wieschaus, E

    1996-07-01

    Cellularization of the Drosophila embryo results in the formation of a cell monolayer with many characteristics of a polarized epithelium. We have used antibodies specific to cellular junctions and nascent plasma membranes to study the formation of the zonula adherens (ZA) in relation to the establishment of basolateral membrane polarity. The same approach was then used as a test system to identify X-linked zygotically active genes required for ZA formation. We show that ZA formation begins during cellularization and that the basolateral membrane domain is established at mid-gastrulation. By creating deficiencies for defined regions of the X chromosome, we have identified genes that are required for the formation of the ZA and the generation of basolateral membrane polarity. We show that embryos mutant for both stardust (sdt) and bazooka (baz) fail to form a ZA. In addition to the failure to establish the ZA, the formation of the monolayered epithelium is disrupted after cellularization, resulting in formation of a multilayered cell sheet by mid-gastrulation. SEM analysis of mutant embryos revealed a conversion of cells exhibiting epithelial characteristics into cells exhibiting mesenchymal characteristics. To investigate how mutations that affect an integral component of the ZA itself influence ZA formation, we examined embryos with reduced maternal and zygotic supply of wild-type Arm protein. These embryos, like embryos mutant for both sdt and baz, exhibit an early disruption of ZA formation. These results suggest that early stages in the assembly of the ZA are critical for the stability of the polarized blastoderm epithelium.

  10. Effects of bovine spermatozoa preparation on embryonic development in vitro

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    Cergolj Marijan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of our research was to examine the ability of density gradient preparation BoviPure® and swim up method on bull sperm separation and in vitro embryo production (IVP systems. Frozen/thawed semen from six Simmental bulls was pooled and treated using both methods. The sperm motility, concentration, membrane activity, membrane integrity and acrosomal status were evaluated and compared before and after sperm processing using BoviPure® and swim up methods. We also evaluated and compared cleavage rates, embryo yield and quality between the methods. There were significant differences (P ®, but not after swim up method. However, there were significant differences for sperm results among those two mentioned methods. A total of 641 oocytes were matured and fertilized in vitro and cultured in SOFaaBSA. The percentage of cleavage (Day 2 and the percentage of hatched embryos (Day 9 were similar for both methods. However, embryo production rate (Day 7 was significantly higher using BoviPure® method (P ® treated sperm displayed higher quality embryos compared to swim up method (P ® method has an enhanced capacity in sperm selection for in vitro embryo production when compared with swim up method. So, we concluded that BoviPure® could be considered as a better alternative to swim up method for separating bull spermatozoa from frozen/thawed semen for IVP of bovine embryos.

  11. Microfluidic EmbryoSort technology: towards in flow analysis, sorting and dispensing of individual vertebrate embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The demand to reduce the numbers of laboratory animals has facilitated the emergence of surrogate models such as tests performed on zebrafish (Danio rerio) or African clawed frog's (Xenopus levis) eggs, embryos and larvae. Those two model organisms are becoming increasingly popular replacements to current adult animal testing in toxicology, ecotoxicology and also in drug discovery. Zebrafish eggs and embryos are particularly attractive for toxicological analysis due their size (diameter 1.6 mm), optical transparency, large numbers generated per fish and very straightforward husbandry. The current bottleneck in using zebrafish embryos for screening purposes is, however, a tedious manual evaluation to confirm the fertilization status and subsequent dispensing of single developing embryos to multitier plates to perform toxicity analysis. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present a proofof- concept design of a continuous flow embryo sorter capable of analyzing, sorting and dispensing objects ranging in size from 1.5 - 2.5 mm. The prototypes were fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. The application of additive manufacturing processes to prototype Lab-on-a-Chip sorters using both fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA) were also explored. The operation of the device was based on a revolving receptacle capable of receiving, holding and positioning single fish embryos for both interrogation and subsequent sorting. The actuation of the revolving receptacle was performed using a DC motor and/or microservo motor. The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers.

  12. In vitro embryo production and embryo transfer in domestic and non-domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C E; Gomez, M C; Dresser, B L

    2006-10-01

    Over a 5-year interval, multiple laparoscopic oocyte retrievals were done in fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus), caracals (Caracal caracal) and domestic cats after ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins. From 21 retrievals in five fishing cats, 579 preovulatory oocytes (mean = 27.6) were recovered and 348 embryos were produced in vitro (mean = 16.6). A total of 452 preovulatory oocytes (mean = 25.1) were recovered from 18 of 24 retrievals in six caracals and 297 (mean = 16.6) embryos were produced. An additional 16 caracal embryos (19%) were produced after in vitro maturation of 83 oocytes, 59 of which came from six retrievals producing only immature oocytes. The presence of corpora lutea at oocyte retrieval occurred in each species (1) at a similar frequency (33%) and (2) more frequently during January through May (11 of 15 retrievals) than during the latter half of the year (4 of 30 retrievals). Of the 12 embryo transfer procedures done in fishing cats, one pregnancy (8%) was obtained and one live kitten born after the auto-transfer of 10 Day-6 embryos. In caracals, a total of 46 Day-4 or Day-5 embryos were auto-transferred to six recipients, one of which delivered two live kittens. Then, 109 caracal embryos were cryopreserved before thawing and transferring to nine recipients (mean = 12.1) on Days 5 or 6. From three pregnancies established (33%), a total of three kittens were born. Two to six gonadotropin treatments/oocyte retrievals were done in domestic cats during 1999 through 2003; an average of 24.9, 23.5, 22.0, 23.1, 23.5 and 40.9 oocytes (P > 0.05) were recovered at the first through the sixth treatment cycles from 138, 138, 97, 49, 22, and seven retrievals, respectively.

  13. Effect of medium variations (zinc supplementation during oocyte maturation, perifertilization pH, and embryo culture protein source) on equine embryo development after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Ho; Gibbons, John R; Canesin, Heloísa S; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2016-10-15

    Prospective studies were conducted to help define procedural factors affecting in vitro embryo production via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of equine oocytes. In experiment 1, use of 10% fetal bovine serum as a protein source in embryo culture medium resulted in a higher blastocyst rate than did use of a combination of 3% fetal bovine serum, 3% equine preovulatory follicular fluid, and 4% human serum substitute (37% vs. 15%, respectively, P zinc supplementation (0, 0.5, 1, or 1.5 μg/mL) during IVM was examined. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocyst development (20%-31%). However, the proportion of blastocysts that developed on Day 7 for the added-zinc treatments was significantly higher than that for the control treatment (45% vs. 8%). In experiment 3, we tested whether use of high-pH medium (pH 8.0-8.4) during ICSI procedures would improve blastocyst rate when sperm with low cleavage rates after ICSI was used. When high-pH conditions were used for sperm preparation and also for the first 2 hours of incubation of injected oocytes after ICSI, the cleavage rate was unaffected but no blastocysts developed (0% vs. 24% for control). When high-pH conditions were used for sperm preparation only, the blastocyst rate was 37%. This was repeated using sperm from a second stallion; there was no significant difference in cleavage or blastocyst rates between sperm preparation in high pH vs. control medium. These findings add to our knowledge of factors affecting in vitro production of equine embryos.

  14. Metabolic inactivation of the circadian transmitter, pigment dispersing factor (PDF), by neprilysin-like peptidases in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, R Elwyn; Johnson, Erik C; Audsley, Neil; Shirras, Alan D

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies have firmly established pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a C-terminally amidated octodecapeptide, as a key neurotransmitter regulating rhythmic circadian locomotory behaviours in adult Drosophila melanogaster. The mechanisms by which PDF functions as a circadian peptide transmitter are not fully understood, however; in particular, nothing is known about the role of extracellular peptidases in terminating PDF signalling at synapses. In this study we show that PDF is susceptible to hydrolysis by neprilysin, an endopeptidase that is enriched in synaptic membranes of mammals and insects. Neprilysin cleaves PDF at the internal Ser7-Leu8 peptide bond to generate PDF1-7 and PDF8-18. Neither of these fragments were able to increase intracellular cAMP levels in HEK293 cells cotransfected with the Drosophila PDF receptor cDNA and a firefly luciferase reporter gene, confirming that such cleavage results in PDF inactivation. The Ser7-Leu8 peptide bond was also the principal cleavage site when PDF was incubated with membranes prepared from heads of adult Drosophila. This endopeptidase activity was inhibited by the neprilysin inhibitors phosphoramidon (IC(50,) 0.15 micromol l(-1)) and thiorphan (IC(50,) 1.2 micromol l(-1)). We propose that cleavage by a member of the Drosophila neprilysin family of endopeptidases is the most likely mechanism for inactivating synaptic PDF and that neprilysin might have an important role in regulating PDF signals within circadian neural circuits.

  15. Effect of Withania somnifera leaf extract on the dietary supplementation in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson’s disease

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    YASIR HASAN SIDDIQUE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of Withania somnifera L. leaf extract was studied on the transgenic Drosophila model flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h-αS in the neurons. The leaf extract was prepared in acetone and was subjected to GC-MS analysis. W. somnifera extract at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 µL/mL was mixed with the diet and the flies were allowed to feed for 24 days. The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content in the brains of transgenic Drosophila. The exposure of extract to PD model flies did not show any significant delay in the loss of climbing ability nor reduced the oxidative stress in the brains of transgenic Drosophila as compared to untreated PD model flies. The results suggest that W. somnifera leaf extract is not potent in reducing the PD symptoms in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson’s disease.

  16. Microspore-derived embryos from Quercus suber anthers mimic zygotic embryos and maintain haploidy in long-term anther culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Maria A; Gomez, Arancha; Sepulveda, Federico; Seguí, José M; Testillano, Pilar S; Manzanera, José A; Risueño, Maria-Carmen

    2003-08-01

    Microspore-derived embryos produced from cork oak anther cultures after long-term incubations (up to 10-12 months) were analysed in order to determine the genetic variability and ploidy level stability, as well as morphology, developmental pattern and cellular organisation. Most of the embryos from long-term anther cultures were haploid (90.7%), corresponding to their microspore origin. The presence of a low percentage of diploid embryos (7.4%) was observed. Microsatellite analysis of haploid embryos, indicated different microspores origins of the same anther. In the diploid embryos, homozygosity for different alleles was detected from anther wall tissues, excluding the possibility of clonal origin. The maintenance of a high proportion of haploid embryos, in long-term anther cultures, is similar in percentage to that reported in embryos originating after 20 days of plating (Bueno et al. 1997). This suggests that no significant alterations in the ploidy level occurred during long incubations (up to 12 months). These results suggest that ploidy changes are rare in this in vitro system, and do not significantly increase during long-term cultures. Microscopical studies of the microspore embryos in various stages revealed a healthy and well developed anatomy with no aberrant or chimeric structures. The general morphology of embryos appearing at different times after plating, looked similar to that of earlier embryos, as well as the zygotic embryos, indicating that they represent high quality material for cork oak breeding.

  17. A simple and rapid flow cytometry-based assay to identify a competent embryo prior to embryo transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallinger, Eva; Bognar, Zoltan; Bodis, Jozsef; Csabai, Timea; Farkas, Nelli; Godony, Krisztina; Varnagy, Akos; Buzas, Edit; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Multiple pregnancy is a risk for prematurity and preterm birth. The goal of assisted reproduction is to achieve a single pregnancy, by transferring a single embryo. This requires improved methods to identify the competent embryo. Here, we describe such a test, based on flow cytometric determination of the nucleic acid (PI+) containing extracellular vesicle (EV) count in day 5 embryo culture media. 88 women undergoing IVF were included in the study. More than 1 embryos were transferred to most patients. In 58 women, the transfer resulted in clinical pregnancy, whereas in 30 women in implantation failure. In 112 culture media of embryos from the “clinical pregnancy” group, the number of PI+ EVs was significantly lower than in those of 49 embryos, from the “implantation failure” group. In 14 women, transfer of a single embryo resulted in a singleton pregnancy, or, transfer of two embryos in twin pregnancy. The culture media of 19 out of the 20 “confirmed competent” embryos contained a lower level of PI+ EVs than the cut off level, suggesting that the competent embryo can indeed be identified by low PI+ EV counts. We developed a noninvasive, simple, inexpensive, quick test, which identifies the embryos that are most likely to implant. PMID:28057937

  18. Reverse engineering the embryo: a graduate course in developmental biology for engineering students at the University of Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard; Melvin, Cameron A

    2003-01-01

    Our desire to educate engineers to be able to understand the component processes of embryogenesis, is driven by the notion that only when principles borrowed from mathematics, fluid mechanics, materials science, etc. are applied to classical problems in developmental biology, will sufficient comprehension be achieved to permit successful understanding and therapeutic manipulation of embryos. As it now stands, biologists seldom possess either skills or interest in those areas of endeavor. Thus, we have determined that it is easier to educate engineers in the principles of developmental biology than to help biologists deal with the complexities of engineering. We describe a graduate course that has been taken, between 1999 and 2002, by 17 engineering students. Our goal is to prepare them to reverse engineer the embryo, i.e., to look at it as an object or process whose construction, albeit self-construction, might be explicable in terms of engineering principles applied at molecular, cellular and whole embryo levels.

  19. Photobiomodulation of early mouse embryo development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridova-Chailakhyan, T. A.; Fakhranurova, L. I.; Simonova, N. B.; Khramov, R. N.; Manokhin, A. A.; Paskevich, S. I.; Chailakhyan, L. M.

    2008-04-01

    The effect of artificial sunlight (AS) from a xenon source and of converted AS with an additional orange-red luminescent (λ MAX=626 nm) component (AS+L) on the development of mouse zygotes was investigated. A plastic screen with a photoluminophore layer was used for production of this orange-red luminescent (L) component. A single short-term (15 min) exposure produced a long-term stable positive effect on early embryo development of mice, which persisted during several days. After exposure to AS+L, a stimulating influence on preimplantation development was observed, in comparison with the control group without AS exposure. The positive effects were as follows: increase in percent of embryos (P <= 0.05) developed to the blastocyst stage (96.2 %) with hatching from the zona pellucida (80.8 %) within 82-96 hours in vitro compared to the control (67.1 % and 28.8 %, respectively).

  20. Effect of transfer of one or two in vitro-produced embryos and post-transfer administration of gonadotropin releasing hormone on pregnancy rates of heat-stressed dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, M; Block, J; Jousan, F D; de Castro e Paula, L A; Brad, A M; Franco, J M; Grisel, F; Monson, R L; Rutledge, J J; Hansen, P J

    2006-07-15

    Pregnancy rates following transfer of an in vitro-produced (IVP) embryo are often lower than those obtained following transfer of an embryo produced by superovulation. The purpose of the current pair of experiments was to examine two strategies for increasing pregnancy rates in heat stressed, dairy recipients receiving an IVP embryo. One method was to transfer two embryos into the uterine horn ipsilateral to the CL, whereas the other method involved injection of GnRH at Day 11 after the anticipated day of ovulation. In Experiment 1, 32 virgin crossbred heifers and 26 lactating crossbred cows were prepared for timed embryo transfer by being subjected to a timed ovulation protocol. Those having a palpable CL were randomly selected to receive one (n = 31 recipients) or two (n = 27 recipients) embryos on Day 7 after anticipated ovulation. At Day 64 of gestation, the pregnancy rate tended to be higher (P = 0.07) for cows than for heifers. Heifers that received one embryo tended to have a higher pregnancy rate than those that received two embryos (41% versus 20%, respectively) while there was no difference in pregnancy rate for cows that received one or two embryos (57% versus 50%, respectively). Pregnancy loss between Day 64 and 127 only occurred for cows that received two embryos (pregnancy rate at Day 127=17%). Between Day 127 and term, one animal (a cow with a single embryo) lost its pregnancy. There was no difference in pregnancy rates at Day 127 or calving rates between cows and heifers, but females that received two embryos had lower Day-127 pregnancy rates and calving rates than females that received one embryo (P cows were synchronized for timed embryo transfer as in Experiment 1. Cows received a single embryo in the uterine horn ipsilateral to the ovary containing the CL and received either 100 microg GnRH or vehicle at Day 11 after anticipated ovulation (i.e. 4 days after embryo transfer). There was no difference in pregnancy rate for cows that received the Gn