WorldWideScience

Sample records for preparing doctoral students

  1. Preparing students to be doctors: introduction of a sub-internship program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robb, W B

    2011-04-05

    Preparing graduates for the transformation from medical student to doctor provides medical schools with a real challenge. Medical educators advocate a process of graduated delegation of responsibility in the clinical years of medical school. This is best exemplified in the North American system of sub-internship programmes; an educational approach which European medical schools have been slow to adopt. This study reports on the introduction of an intensive two-week surgical sub-internship for final medical year students. "Sub-interns" were asked to complete pre and post sub-internship online questionnaires assessing their readiness to perform clinical and practical skills, attitudes towards the program, and how well it prepared students for internship. Forty-nine students completed a questionnaire pre sub-internship and 47 completed the post-questionnaire. Student confidence towards practical and clinical skills and their first day at work increased over the two weeks. Mean Iikert scores for all 6 practical and clinical skills improved post sub-internship. The introduction of a surgical sub-internship is timely and welcomed by medical students. Its development helps bridge the gap in responsibilities between medical student and doctor.

  2. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation......-reported gains from coaching show that doctoral students experience coaching as an effective method to support the doctoral study process. This study also provides preliminary empirical evidence that coaching of doctoral students can facilitate the doctoral study process so that the doctoral students experience...... an enhanced feeling of progress and that they can change their study behaviour in a positive direction. The study discusses the difference between coaching and supervision, for instance power imbalances and contrary to earlier research into coaching of doctoral students this study indicates that coaching can...

  3. Tomorrow Belongs to Those Who Prepare for It Today: Gerontology Doctoral Students Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Carr, Dawn C.; Reynolds, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    This research seeks to examine the characteristics and goals of students enrolled in gerontology doctoral education. The authors seek to identify the unique characteristics of scholars enrolled in the interdisciplinary study of aging and elicit discussion on the ways in which these scholars will contribute to the growth and development of the…

  4. Tomorrow Belongs to Those Who Prepare for It Today: Gerontology Doctoral Students Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Carr, Dawn C.; Reynolds, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    This research seeks to examine the characteristics and goals of students enrolled in gerontology doctoral education. The authors seek to identify the unique characteristics of scholars enrolled in the interdisciplinary study of aging and elicit discussion on the ways in which these scholars will contribute to the growth and development of the…

  5. Faculty needs, doctoral preparation, and the future of teacher preparation programs in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Johnson, Harold; Antia, Shirin D

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to obtain and analyze data on the need for, and desired characteristics of, faculty in deaf education at American institutions of higher education (IHEs), and to assess the present and projected status of doctoral-level teacher preparation programs in deaf education at American IHEs. Program directors and coordinators provided information on current and projected faculty openings, the number of active doctoral students, faculty research interests, program strengths, and needs in the field. Results indicated a pending shortage due to faculty retirements and a paucity of doctoral-level graduates. Most faculty listed literacy and language as a primary research interest as well as a program strength. The ability to generate new knowledge through research was found to be less desirable for future faculty than teaching ability. Suggestions for improving doctoral preparation and moving the field to evidence-based practices are provided.

  6. Preparing for an Academic Career Workshops: Resources for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, R. W.; MacDonald, R.

    2004-12-01

    The professional development program, "On the Cutting Edge", offers annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Goals are to prepare participants to become more effective teachers, stronger candidates for academic positions, and more aware of the realities of academic jobs. Insights that participants especially hope to gain from these workshops include feedback on the application process, especially an understanding of how search committees work; the different realities of balancing teaching, research, and personal life in a range of academic institutions; and expectations for tenure. The ten-person leadership team represents, by design, a wide range of academic career paths and institutions, and provides approximately 1:6 leader: participant ratio. Specific sessions include research on learning, an introduction to course and lab design, effective teaching and assessment strategies, developing a teaching statement, time management and early career faculty success, and moving research forward into new settings. Optional workshop sessions and discussions include the following topics: dual-career couples; families and careers; teaching portfolios; effective negotiation strategies; tenure and promotion; effective field trips; getting started in undergraduate research; opportunities in K-12 education; career options beyond faculty positions. Highlights of the workshop are faculty panel discussions about career paths and the academic job search. By workshop end, participants complete a goal setting and action planning activity. Two years of evaluation data suggest our goals are being met. Participants particularly appreciate the practical ideas and the opportunity to interact with, and learn from, a diverse leadership team and other participants.

  7. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  8. Students' Reflections on the Relevance and Quality of Highly Ranked Doctoral Programs in Educational Administration: Beacons of Leadership Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, John R.; Torres, Mario S., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The manner by which colleges and universities prepare school leaders in doctoral programs is being called into question. One report is stirring much controversy for its unflattering portrayal of administrator preparation programs. In a 2005 report entitled "Educating School Leaders," former Columbia University president Art Levine characterizes…

  9. Doctoral Students' Conceptions of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Rod

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I report a study of the conceptions of research held by a sample of doctoral students at an Australian research-intensive university. I take a unique approach by using metaphor analysis to study the students' conceptions. The students in this study were recruited for an on-line survey in which they answered questions relating to…

  10. Literature Reviews: Advising Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available information has created new opportunities and challenges for today's research students. Academic and public libraries have developed sophisticated electronic databases to better manage knowledge to make it more accessible to researchers. Literature reviews are a major challenge for doctoral students. The focus of…

  11. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  12. Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor KidsHealth > For Parents > Preparing Your Child for Visits ... vital to making an informed diagnosis. Choose a Doctor Who Relates Well to Kids Because your doctor ...

  13. An Initiative to Facilitate Practitioner Doctoral Students to Present at AERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The education doctorate is the most commonly awarded doctorate in academia. In preparation for developing and executing a piece of original research like a dissertation, doctoral students are required to take coursework in research and statistics. These courses can be considered part of a core set of competencies that doctoral students are…

  14. The Gritty: Grit and Non-traditional Doctoral Student Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted M. Cross

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As higher education is changing to reach larger numbers of students via online modalities, the issue of student attrition and other measures of student success become increasingly important. While research has focused largely on undergraduate online students, less has been done in the area of online non-traditional doctoral student success, particularly from the student trait perspective. The concept of grit, passion and persistence for long-term goals, has been identified as an important element of the successful attainment of long-term goals. As doctoral education is a long-term goal the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of doctoral student grit scores on student success. Success was measured by examining current student GPA and other factors. Significant relationships were found between grit and current student GPA, grit and the average number of hours students spent on their program of study weekly, and grit and age. The results of this research maybe important for informing how doctoral education is structured and how students might be better prepared for doctoral work.

  15. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  16. A Glance at Doctoral Preparation through Websites: How Do Education Policy Studies Programs Advertise Opportunities for Students to Engage with the Policymaking Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-Genovese, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Every year, potential graduate students hunt through websites and promotional materials searching for the perfect program to fit their needs. The search requires time and patience, especially for those future scholars who seek a doctoral program in Education Policy Studies (EPS) with a focus on interacting with the policymaking process. The…

  17. Creating a "Third Space" in the Context of a University-School Partnership: Supporting Teacher Action Research and the Research Preparation of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhar, Joanne; Niesz, Tricia; Brossmann, Jeanette; Koebley, Sarah; O'Brien, Katherine; Loe, David; Black, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the Education Works Personalization Project was to facilitate teams of teacher action researchers whose goal was to personalize their teaching with the support of university partners including doctoral students in education. The subsequent apprentice-like research experience within this university-school partnership provided an…

  18. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  19. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  20. Research Advice for Today's Online Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Highlights ways for doctoral students to conduct an effective literature review. Discusses the problem formulation stage; conducting an effective literature review and the benefits of a literature review; an example of literature review material; and tips for writing a literature review. (AEF)

  1. Challenges to the Doctoral Journey: A Case of Female Doctoral Students from Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bireda, Asamenew Demessie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate some challenges female doctoral students experience in their doctoral journey. The study used a qualitative design and structured interviews. The theoretical framework that guided the study was that of Urie Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic theory. A purposely selected sample of five female doctoral students from the…

  2. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  3. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  4. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  5. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  6. The views of doctors in their first year of medical practice on the lasting impact of a preparation for house officer course they undertook as final year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders John H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK General Medical Council recommends that medical students have the opportunity of shadowing the outgoing new doctor whose post they will soon undertake. At the University of Nottingham the two-week shadowing period was preceded by two weeks of lectures/seminars wherein students followed sessions on topics such as common medical/surgical emergencies, contracts, time management, surviving the first two years of clinical practice, careers advice and so on. The present study aimed to gain a better knowledge and understanding of the lasting impact of a four-week preparation course for new Foundation Year 1 doctors [F1 s - interns]. The objectives chosen to achieve this aim were: 1/ to determine the extent to which the lecture/seminar course and shadowing period achieved their stated aim of smoothing the transition from life as a medical student to work as a new doctor; 2/ to evaluate perceptions of the importance of various forms of knowledge in easing the transition between medical student and new doctor Method In the spring of 2007, 90 graduates from Nottingham were randomly selected and then emailed a link to a short, online survey of quantitative and qualitative questions. Of these 76 responded. Analysis of quantitative data was carried out using SPSS 16.0 and employed McNemar's test. Analysis of the qualitative data was carried out using the constant comparative method. Results Only 31% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the lecture/seminar part of the course prepared them well for their first FY1 post; 14% agreed that during their first job they drew on the knowledge gained during the lecture/seminar course; 94% strongly agreed or agreed that the shadowing part of the course was more useful than the lecture/seminar part. Experiential knowledge gained in the shadowing was the most highly valued, followed by procedural knowledge with propositional knowledge coming far behind. Conclusions Our study shows that

  7. Student assistantships: bridging the gap between student and doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crossley JGM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available James GM Crossley,1,2 Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt1 1University of Sheffield School of Medicine, Sheffield, 2Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Chesterfield, UK Abstract: In 2009, the General Medical Council UK (GMC published its updated guidance on medical education for the UK medical schools – Tomorrow's Doctors 2009. The Council recommended that the UK medical schools introduce, for the first time, a clinical placement in which a senior medical student, “assisting a junior doctor and under supervision, undertakes most of the duties of an F1 doctor”. In the UK, an F1 doctor is a postgraduation year 1 (PGY1 doctor. This new kind of placement was called a student assistantship. The recommendation was considered necessary because conventional UK clinical placements rarely provided medical students with opportunities to take responsibility for patients – even under supervision. This is in spite of good evidence that higher levels of learning, and the acquisition of essential clinical and nontechnical skills, depend on students participating in health care delivery and gradually assuming responsibility under supervision. This review discusses the gap between student and doctor, and the impact of the student assistantship policy. Early evaluation indicates substantial variation in the clarity of purpose, setting, length, and scope of existing assistantships. In particular, few models are explicit on the most critical issue: exactly how the student participates in care and how supervision is deployed to optimize learning and patient safety. Surveys indicate that these issues are central to students' perceptions of the assistantship. They know when they have experienced real responsibility and when they have not. This lack of clarity and variation has limited the impact of student assistantships. We also consider other important approaches to bridging the gap between student and doctor. These include supporting the

  8. Professional Identity Development of Counselor Education Doctoral Students: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Dodie; Bell, Hope; Super, John T.; Jacobson, Lamerial; Fox, Jesse; DePue, M. Kristina; Christmas, Chris; Young, Mark E.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2013-01-01

    The professional identity of a counselor educator develops primarily during the individual's doctoral preparation program. This study employed consensual qualitative research methodology to examine the phenomenon of professional identity development in counselor education doctoral students (CEDS) in a cohort model. Cross-sectional focus groups…

  9. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  10. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  11. Student Mobility and Doctoral Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehoole, Chika Trevor

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses doctoral education programmes in South Africa with a particular focus on student mobility. It investigates pull and push factors as a conceptual framework, arguing that the patterns of student mobility in doctoral education programmes in South Africa follow the patterns of international student mobility elsewhere, which are…

  12. Students' Research Self-Efficacy during Online Doctoral Research Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Beate; Hoffman-Kipp, Peter; Lynn, Laura; Weltzer-Ward, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This study will explore student skill development and research self-efficacy as related to online doctoral students' first core research course experience. Findings from this study will be used to inform instructors in effective ways to support doctoral students during their early research experiences. This support will ensure that online graduate…

  13. Doctoral Advising or Mentoring? Effects on Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which doctoral advisors provided mentoring to their students and if mentor support influenced doctoral student outcomes. Survey results from 477 respondents, across disciplines at two universities, indicated that most students believed mentoring was important and over half of them received mentoring support…

  14. Part-Time Doctoral Student Socialization through Peer Mentorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Lisa S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the socialization (Weidman, Twale, & Stein, 2001) experiences of part-time doctoral students as a result of peer mentorship in one college. Part-time doctoral students are identified as students who are maintaining full-time employment or obligations outside of the university. The…

  15. A Model for the Supervisor-Doctoral Student Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainhard, Tim; van der Rijst, Roeland; van Tartwijk, Jan; Wubbels, Theo

    2009-01-01

    The supervisor-doctoral student interpersonal relationship is important for the success of a PhD-project. Therefore, information about doctoral students' perceptions of their relationship with their supervisor can be useful for providing detailed feedback to supervisors aiming at improving the quality of their supervision. This paper describes the…

  16. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  17. Professional Identity Development of Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollarhide, Colette T.; Gibson, Donna M.; Moss, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors used grounded theory to explore professional identity transitions for 23 counselor education doctoral students in a cross-section sample based on nodal points in their programs. The transformational tasks that doctoral students face involve integration of multiple identities, evolution of confidence and legitimacy, and acceptance of…

  18. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  19. First Doctoral student assembly and poster session at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Presently, 130 doctoral students at CERN do their research on “technical” subjects such as magnets and cryogenics, beam and detector physics, computing and vacuum, among others.   Student present  their scientific achievements at the first doctoral student assembly. To present their scientific achievements and to bring together the students with CERN supervisors and CERN’s management was the main objective of the first doctoral student assembly and poster session, held June 30. The photograph shows about half of those who presented posters, all in their second year of assignment, and ready to attach their work to the panels. Another aim of the assembly was to discuss the outcome of the anonymous questionnaire and to gain feedback for the improvement of the doctoral student program. While there is vast overall satisfaction, improvements should aim at strengthening the links between students, CERN supervisors, and university professors. With 24 posters prese...

  20. The "Write" Skills and More: A Thesis Writing Group for Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Therese

    2009-01-01

    Writing groups facilitate the development of research students' written communication skills, which are critical for the competent preparation of theses and publications. This paper describes a Thesis Writing Group for social science doctoral students. Participants indicated that the group not only served a practical role, providing an impetus for…

  1. A View from within: How Doctoral Students in Educational Administration Develop Research Knowledge and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Militello, Matthew; Piert, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on experiences of doctoral students in educational administration at a time when the effectiveness of programs preparing practitioners and academics in this field are being questioned. Concerns related to how students in educational administration developed knowledge about research and identity as researchers were closely…

  2. The "Write" Skills and More: A Thesis Writing Group for Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Therese

    2009-01-01

    Writing groups facilitate the development of research students' written communication skills, which are critical for the competent preparation of theses and publications. This paper describes a Thesis Writing Group for social science doctoral students. Participants indicated that the group not only served a practical role, providing an impetus for…

  3. Professional socialization of students enrolled in an online doctor of philosophy program in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Linda M

    2014-10-01

    A descriptive online survey design was used to describe professional socialization of students enrolled in an online Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program in nursing. Twenty-six (48%) of 54 students participated by completing the Doctoral Student Socialization Questionnaire. Activities associated with four of the six dimensions of professional socialization, including student-peer interactions, supportive faculty environment, collegiality, and student scholarly encouragement, were prevalent in the analysis. Activities associated with student-faculty interactions and preparation in scholarly activities were evident but were not prevalent. Students in an online PhD program in nursing can be socialized to the graduate school environment, as well as to their future role in an academic setting. Although challenging in the online environment, faculty need to promote activities related to student-faculty interactions and preparation in scholarly activities.

  4. Systematic Preparation for Teaching in a Nursing Doctor of Philosophy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Ruth; Degenhardt, Marguerite; Engstrom, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    Lack of preparation for the faculty role, particularly for teaching, has long been an area of concern in graduate nursing education. This article describes a systematic approach to preparing students in a doctor of philosophy (PhD) program for their future roles as nurse educators. All PhD students at Rush University are required to take a nursing education course that contains four modules: the teacher, learner, and learning environment; the basics of curriculum and course design; evaluation of the learner, course, program, and institution; and the new faculty member. Students also complete a practicum in the course. Students are interviewed before the course begins and complete a self-assessment of their teaching experiences. Based on their learning needs, students are enrolled in the course for variable credit. The course has received excellent evaluations since its inception. The success of this course demonstrates that an education course can be an essential component of the nursing PhD curriculum.

  5. Preparation For Medical School via an Intensive Summer Program for Future Doctors: A Pilot Study of Student Confidence and Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, David W.; Ray, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    A medical school conducted a summer pre-matriculation program. The program provided basic sciences content comparable to first year medical student instruction along with clinical and other learning experiences. The study purpose was to examine self-confidence levels and reasoning skills of a single cohort of students. We examined the association…

  6. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  7. The hundredth Gentner Doctoral Student has started at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2016-01-01

    Almost ten years after the start of the programme in 2007, the hundredth Gentner Doctoral Student started his PhD at CERN.   The hundredth Gentner Doctoral Student, Christian Zimmer, in front of the AEgIS detector in the AD hall, where he will spend a significant portion of the next 3 years. In 2007, the German Gentner Doctoral Student Programme was established at CERN, named in honour of the celebrated nuclear physicist Wolfgang Gentner, President of the CERN Council from 1972-74. On 1 July 2016, the 100th Gentner Doctoral Student, Christian Zimmer, started his PhD at CERN, where he will work on setting up the sympathetic laser cooling of antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment. CERN’s Doctoral Student Programme has been running for many years, with 200 students currently enrolled. The Gentner programme is fully integrated into the general CERN Doctoral Student Programme, but is entirely funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The programme sponsors 30 to 40...

  8. Doctoral student receives grant to analyze housing choice voucher

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2005-01-01

    Kimberly Mitchell, of Blacksburg, Va., a second-year doctoral student in Virginia Tech's College of Architecture and Urban Studies Environmental Design and Planning Program, has been awarded an Early Doctoral Student Research Grant by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Mitchell's research, "Whose Choice Is It Really? An Analysis of Property Owner and Manager Characteristics and Their Impact on Housing Choice Voucher Acceptance," will investigate the impact of individu...

  9. Awareness of basic life support among medical, dental, nursing students and doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanta Chandrasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the awareness of Basic Life Support (BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges. A cross-sectional study was conducted by assessing responses to 20 selected basic questions regarding BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges. After excluding the incomplete response forms the data was analysed on 1,054 responders. The results were analysed using an answer key prepared with the use of the Advanced Cardiac Life Support manual. Out of 1,054 responders 345 were medical students, 75 were medical interns, 19 were dental students, 59 were dental interns, 105 were homeopathy interns, 319 were nursing students, 72 were doctors, 29 were dentists, 25 were nursing faculty and six were homeopathy doctors. No one among them had complete knowledge of BLS. Only two out of 1054 (0.19% had secured 80 - 89% marks, 10 out of 1054 (0.95% had secured 70 - 79% marks, 40 of 1054 (4.08% had secured 60 - 69% marks and 105 of 1054 (9.96% had secured 50 - 59% marks. A majority of them, that is, 894 (84.82% had secured less than 50% marks. Awareness of BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges is very poor.

  10. A Case Study of Teaching Social Responsibility to Doctoral Students in the Climate Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsen, Tom; Antia, Avan N.; Glessmer, Mirjam Sophia

    2013-01-01

    The need to make young scientists aware of their social responsibilities is widely acknowledged, although the question of how to actually do it has so far gained limited attention. A 2-day workshop entitled “Prepared for social responsibility?” attended by doctoral students from multiple...... climate science meets the public sphere (e.g., to identify and balance legitimate perspectives on particular types of geo-engineering), and is an example of how to include social responsibility in doctoral education. The paper describes the workshop from the three different perspectives of the authors...... disciplines in climate science, was targeted at the perceived needs of the participants and employed a format that took them through three stages of ethics education: sensitization, information and empowerment. The workshop aimed at preparing doctoral students to manage ethical dilemmas that emerge when...

  11. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  12. Response: Training Doctoral Students to Be Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to begin framing doctoral training for a science of social work. This process starts by examining two seemingly simple questions: "What is a social work scientist?" and "How do we train social work scientists?" In answering the first question, some basic assumptions and concepts about what constitutes a "social work…

  13. Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

    2012-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings.

  14. Ethical Issues in Mentoring Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Anna; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues abound in any relationship that is defined by differences between the parties in rank, status, and power. Such is the case in the relationship between a doctoral student in clinical psychology and his or her mentor. In this article, we examine several potential areas of ethical concern within the mentor-student relationship. We…

  15. Joint Supervision Practices in Doctoral Education--A Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahenius, Katja; Ikävalko, Heini

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of students' experiences of joint supervision practices and supervisors' professional work in doctoral education in one department of a Finnish university. A qualitative methodology was used to explore students' experiences of joint supervision practices and an inductive protocol was used to analyse the data gathered…

  16. Ethical Issues in Mentoring Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Anna; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues abound in any relationship that is defined by differences between the parties in rank, status, and power. Such is the case in the relationship between a doctoral student in clinical psychology and his or her mentor. In this article, we examine several potential areas of ethical concern within the mentor-student relationship. We…

  17. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Faculty-Doctoral Student Coauthorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michelle A.; Timmerman, Briana Crotwell; Feldon, David F.; Strickland, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Using faculty narratives, this study identifies factors affecting the occurrence of faculty-doctoral student coauthorship. Norms of the discipline, resources, faculty goals for students, faculty goals for themselves, and institutional expectations emerged as dominant factors. Each factor is explored separately and as part of an interlocking…

  18. Doctoral Student Learning Patterns: Learning about Active Knowledge Creation or Passive Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral studies are about learning to create new knowledge and to become a researcher. Yet surprisingly little is known about the individual learning patterns of doctoral students. The study aims to explore learning patterns among natural science doctoral students. The participants included 19 doctoral students from a top-level natural science…

  19. The "new normal": Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Rebekah; Hutto, Tamara; MacBeth, Cora; Newstetter, Wendy; McCarty, Nael A; Melkers, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic) are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE), and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests.

  20. The “new normal”: Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Rebekah; Hutto, Tamara; MacBeth, Cora; Newstetter, Wendy; McCarty, Nael A.

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic) are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE), and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests. PMID:28542304

  1. (un) Disciplining the nurse writer: doctoral nursing students' perspective on writing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Maureen M; Walker, Madeline; Scaia, Margaret; Smith, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we offer a perspective into how Canadian doctoral nursing students' writing capacity is mentored and, as a result, we argue is disciplined. We do this by sharing our own disciplinary and interdisciplinary experiences of writing with, for and about nurses. We locate our experiences within a broader discourse that suggests doctoral (nursing) students be prepared as stewards of the (nursing) discipline. We draw attention to tensions and effects of writing within (nursing) disciplinary boundaries. We argue that traditional approaches to developing nurses' writing capacity in doctoral programs both shepherds and excludes emerging scholarly voices, and we present some examples to illustrate this dual role. We ask our nurse colleagues to consider for whom nurses write, offering an argument that nurses' writing must ultimately improve patient care and thus would benefit from multiple voices in writing.

  2. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international......A. Friesel. Preparing Students for Globalization Working with International Teams with Projects // Electronics and Electrical Engineering. - Kaunas: Technologija, 2019. - No. 6(102). - P. 111-114. This paper summarizes the activities, contents and overall outcomes of our experiences...... with international students studying at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering (in short - IHK); in particular students coming for one semester exchange program under Erasmus-programme. IHK's participation in EU-supported programmes like EIE-Surveyor and ELLEIEC, both ERASMUS thematic networks, have...

  3. The Role of Self-Regulation in Doctoral Students' Status of All but Dissertation (ABD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Martha J.; Salisbury-Glennon, Jill D.

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral student enrollment and study require significant resources such as faculty time, student time, and funding. However, doctoral student attrition is a serious problem nationwide, especially at the dissertation level. When doctoral students do not complete their dissertations, their potential contributions to society are substantially…

  4. Variables Impacting Dispositional Empathy in Doctoral Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Amelia C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore variables impacting dispositional empathy in doctoral psychology students. While there is a great deal of research regarding empathy in practicing psychologists and mental health professionals, little is known about empathy in psychology trainees. This is especially surprising given the importance of…

  5. Chinese Overseas Doctoral Student Narratives of Intercultural Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lily; Edwards, Viv

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore how Chinese overseas doctoral students adjust to a different academic, social and cultural environment, using Giddens' theoretical framework of self-identity. The findings indicate the participants proactively used various coping strategies in meeting challenges and adapting to new social environments. Continuity and…

  6. The Value of Teaching Preparation during Doctoral Studies: An Example of a Teaching Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jeffrey D.; Powers, Joelle; Thompson, Aaron M.; Rutten-Turner, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    For doctoral students who seek faculty appointments in academic settings upon graduation, it is imperative those students have access to quality mentoring, direct instruction, and experiential opportunities to apply effective teaching methods during their training. Currently, some doctoral programs are beginning to develop teaching practicums…

  7. Views of junior doctors about whether their medical school prepared them well for work: questionnaire surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Kathryn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition from medical student to junior doctor in postgraduate training is a critical stage in career progression. We report junior doctors' views about the extent to which their medical school prepared them for their work in clinical practice. Methods Postal questionnaires were used to survey the medical graduates of 1999, 2000, 2002 and 2005, from all UK medical schools, one year after graduation, and graduates of 2000, 2002 and 2005 three years after graduation. Summary statistics, chi-squared tests, and binary logistic regression were used to analyse the results. The main outcome measure was the level of agreement that medical school had prepared the responder well for work. Results Response rate was 63.7% (11610/18216 in year one and 60.2% (8427/13997 in year three. One year after graduation, 36.3% (95% CI: 34.6, 38.0 of 1999/2000 graduates, 50.3% (48.5, 52.2 of 2002 graduates, and 58.2% (56.5, 59.9 of 2005 graduates agreed their medical school had prepared them well. Conversely, in year three agreement fell from 48.9% (47.1, 50.7 to 38.0% (36.0, 40.0 to 28.0% (26.2, 29.7. Combining cohorts at year one, percentages who agreed that they had been well prepared ranged from 82% (95% CI: 79-87 at the medical school with the highest level of agreement to 30% (25-35 at the lowest. At year three the range was 70% to 27%. Ethnicity and sex were partial predictors of doctors' level of agreement; following adjustment for them, substantial differences between schools remained. In years one and three, 30% and 34% of doctors specified that feeling unprepared had been a serious or medium-sized problem for them (only 3% in each year regarded it as serious. Conclusions The vast knowledge base of clinical practice makes full preparation impossible. Our statement about feeling prepared is simple yet discriminating and identified some substantial differences between medical schools. Medical schools need feedback from graduates about

  8. Doctors being up there and we being down here: a metaphorical analysis of talk about student/doctor-patient relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E; Knight, Lynn V; Wilkinson, Clare E

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the metaphorical conceptualisations of student/doctor-patient relationships, as articulated by multiple stakeholders in healthcare. Eight focus group discussions with 19 patients, 13 medical students and 15 medical educators (comprising doctors, other healthcare professionals and non-clinical academics) were conducted in England and we subjected our transcribed and audiotaped data to a secondary level of data analysis i.e. systematic metaphor analysis. The analysis revealed six over-arching metaphors associated with the target domain of student/doctor-patient relationships i.e. STUDENT/DOCTOR-PATIENT RELATIONSHIPS AS WAR, HIERARCHY, DOCTOR-CENTREDNESS, MARKET, MACHINE and THEATRE. All of the metaphors (except theatre) emphasised the oppositional quality of student/doctor-patient relationships. Three of the source domains emerging from our empirical data (i.e. hierarchy, doctor-centredness, and market) relate to metaphors already employed in the non-empirical literature to discuss doctor-patient relationships (e.g. paternalism, patient-centredness, and consumerism). The three remaining source domains (i.e. war, machine and theatre) were novel in their conceptualisation of student/doctor-patient relationships, albeit that they have been reported in previous empirical literature to describe other target domains. In this paper, we discuss each of these metaphors and their associated entailments, including those found in our data and those absent from our data. We also differentiate between the unconscious use of metaphorical linguistic expressions by our participants and those serving a rhetorical function. Although analysing metaphoric talk is not without its difficulties, the construction of metaphoric models can help social researchers better understand how individuals conceptualise and construct student/doctor-patient relationships.

  9. The Moderating Effect of Personality Traits on Advisor Relationships in Predicting Doctoral Student Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosh, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    Personality affects relationships. During the doctoral education, the second most important factor in degree completion, after financial support, is the student-advisor relationship. Approximately half of doctoral students do not finish their degrees. While it is known mentors have a profound impact on the success of doctoral students, the effect…

  10. A case study of teaching social responsibility to doctoral students in the climate sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børsen, Tom; Antia, Avan N; Glessmer, Mirjam Sophia

    2013-12-01

    The need to make young scientists aware of their social responsibilities is widely acknowledged, although the question of how to actually do it has so far gained limited attention. A 2-day workshop entitled "Prepared for social responsibility?" attended by doctoral students from multiple disciplines in climate science, was targeted at the perceived needs of the participants and employed a format that took them through three stages of ethics education: sensitization, information and empowerment. The workshop aimed at preparing doctoral students to manage ethical dilemmas that emerge when climate science meets the public sphere (e.g., to identify and balance legitimate perspectives on particular types of geo-engineering), and is an example of how to include social responsibility in doctoral education. The paper describes the workshop from the three different perspectives of the authors: the course teacher, the head of the graduate school, and a graduate student. The elements that contributed to the success of the workshop, and thus make it an example to follow, are (1) the involvement of participating students, (2) the introduction of external expertise and role models in climate science, and (3) a workshop design that focused on ethical analyses of examples from the climate sciences.

  11. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part...... of an introduction course for new doctoral students. This study showed how the course provides an effective way build supervisee agency and strengthening supervisory relationships through clarification and alignment of expectations and sharing goals about doctoral studies. From the other angle the research...

  12. The Influence of Protege-Mentor Relationships and Social Networks on Women Doctoral Students' Academic Career Aspirations in Physical Sciences and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Physical sciences and engineering doctoral programs serve as the most important conduit through which future academics are trained and prepared in these disciplines. This study examined women doctoral students' protege-mentor relationships in Physical sciences and engineering programs. Particularly, the study examined the influence of such…

  13. The Influence of Protege-Mentor Relationships and Social Networks on Women Doctoral Students' Academic Career Aspirations in Physical Sciences and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Physical sciences and engineering doctoral programs serve as the most important conduit through which future academics are trained and prepared in these disciplines. This study examined women doctoral students' protege-mentor relationships in Physical sciences and engineering programs. Particularly, the study examined the influence of such…

  14. Learning to Be Researchers in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy: The Perspectives of Doctoral Students and Early Career Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Michalis; Enright, Eimear; Hogan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Numerous academics have argued that if a field is to progress, attention needs to be paid to how future generations of researchers are being prepared. To date, data generated on research training in physical education and sport pedagogy (PESP) have primarily focused on students undertaking doctoral programmes with a formal coursework component,…

  15. Scientific dishonesty--questionnaire to doctoral students in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilstun, Tore; Löfmark, Rurik; Lundqvist, Anita

    2010-05-01

    'Scientific dishonesty' implies the fabrication, falsification or plagiarism in proposing, performing or reviewing research or in reporting research results. A questionnaire was given to postgraduate students at the medical faculties in Sweden who attended a course in research ethics during the academic year 2008/2009 and 58% answered (range 29%-100%). Less than one-third of the respondents wrote that they had heard about scientific dishonesty in the previous 12 months. Pressure, concerning in what order the author should be mentioned, was reported by about 1 in 10 students. We suggest that all departments conducting research should have a written policy about acceptable research behaviour and that all doctoral students should be informed of the content of this policy. Participants in the research groups concerned should also be required to analyse published articles about scientific dishonesty and critically discuss what could be done about unethical conduct.

  16. Framing Doctoral Education for a Science of Social Work: Positioning Students for the Scientific Career, Promoting Scholars for the Academy, Propagating Scientists of the Profession, and Preparing Stewards of the Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena

    2014-01-01

    Social work education grounded in social work practice has been recently challenged to examine the role of science in its history, core constructs and domains, philosophical underpinnings, and graduate curriculum. Doctoral education has been added to the scrutiny at the recent Science in Social Work Roundtable in Doctoral Education. Based on Lev…

  17. Working at the Interface: Indigenous Students' Experience of Undertaking Doctoral Studies in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Elizabeth; Grant, Barbara; Middleton, Sue; Irwin, Kathie; Williams, Les R. Tumoana

    2011-01-01

    Maori (indigenous) doctoral students in Aotearoa New Zealand face challenges not usually experienced by other doctoral candidates. We draw on data from in-depth interviews with 38 Maori doctoral candidates and argue that because of the tensions between academic disciplinary knowledge frameworks and knowledge drawn from te ao Maori (the Maori…

  18. Exploring research cultures through internationalization at home for doctoral students in Hong Kong and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris; Carlson, Elisabeth; Kwong, Enid E Y; Idvall, Ewa; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-09-08

    Cultural skills are fundamental to developing global academic scholars. Internationalization at home can facilitate the acquisition of these skills without students having to go abroad. However, research on the effect of internationalization of higher education is scarce, despite apparent benefits to incorporating cultural sensitivity in research. Further, little is known about the role information and communication technology plays. In this pilot study, we describe the experience of doctoral students with an internationalization-at-home program, and its impact on developing an understanding about different research cultures. Eight doctoral nursing students from Sweden and Hong Kong participated in five webinars as "critical friends". The study followed a descriptive, qualitative design. The results demonstrated that students observed cultural differences in others' research training programs. However, while cultural differences reinforced friendship among local peers, they challenged engagement with critical friends. Challenges led to the perception of one another not as critical friends but as "distant" friends. We discuss the possible reasons for these outcomes, and emphasize a need to nurture connectivity and common goals. This would prepare students to identify, translate, and recognize cultural differences to help develop knowledge of diverse research cultures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Clinical nurses' perceptions and expectations of the role of doctorally-prepared nurses: a qualitative study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad-Ali; Jasper, Melanie; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Nurses with doctorates are increasing in number throughout the world, yet the multitude of roles they play following graduation is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe clinical nurses' perceptions and expectations of the role of doctorally-prepared nurses in Iran. A qualitative study, using a content analysis approach was conducted with 43 clinical nurses chosen using a purposive sampling strategy. Oral, semi-structured and written interviews were used to generate data. During data analysis, three main themes emerged; "advantages of the doctoral degree", "clarification of doctorally-prepared nurses' role in clinical practice", and "unmet expectations of doctorally-prepared nurses". An understanding of the expectations of nurses on the role of doctorally-prepared nurses is needed to improve the collaboration between clinical nurses and doctorally-prepared nurses; remove misunderstandings on the abilities and skills of doctorally-prepared nurses; incorporate the expectations into doctoral education in order to facilitate their collaboration; and also remove the theory and practice gap through the utilisation of doctorally-prepared nurses' knowledge and skills in practice.

  20. Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    and construction. Health Sciences – Thinking about medical school? Join us in this workshop to discuss how doctors diagnose and treat diseases...science educators’ academy: Benefits of inquiry- based teaching for educators and their students. Manuscript in preparation. Kuehler, C. P., Marle, P. D...Henry, R. M. (2012). CSI- chocolate science investigation and the case of the recipe rip-off: Using forensic science to engage students. Manuscript

  1. Preparing Emerging Doctoral Scholars for Transdisciplinary Research: A Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Susan Patricia; Nurius, Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    Research models that bridge disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries are increasingly common as funders and the public push for effective responses to pressing social problems. Although social work is inherently an integrative discipline, there is growing recognition of the need to better prepare emerging scholars for sophisticated…

  2. Arab doctors, evolving society and corruption: a medical student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2015-01-01

    Doctors, especially junior doctors, face immense pressure in their day-to-day work. As a result, the rates of depression and anxiety are particularly high in this demanding profession. The pressure, which is compounded by constantly being under societal scrutiny, can unfortunately drive the doctor to breaking point. However, we can help doctors deal with these pressures in a more meaningful way if we make them aware of their wider environment (within a social paradigm) and the implications of their actions.

  3. "Views from the Nano Edge": Women on Doctoral Preparation Programmes in Selected African Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the conceptual views of "critical mass", alongside micro experiences, of women, at a practice level, on a doctoral preparation programme which was implemented within the South African Development Community (SADC) and Ethiopian contexts. At the strategising level of policies, insufficient attention has been paid to the…

  4. Peer Support in Negotiating Multiple Relationships within Supervision among Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Amanda J.; Pimpleton, Asher; Stinchfield, Tracy; Stevens, Heath; Othman, Nor Asma

    2013-01-01

    Counselor education doctoral students (CEDSs), like other doctoral students, need assistance and support to ensure their self-care. One area markedly affecting self-care is one's relationships with others. The purpose of this article is to examine the multiple relationships involved within CEDSs supervision, the potential areas to utilize peer…

  5. Career Aspirations and Perceived Level of Preparedness among Marriage and Family Therapy Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John K.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of marriage and family therapy (MFT) doctoral students in programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE). MFT doctoral students (N = 82) from across the United States responded to a web-based survey that focused on career aspirations, training opportunities,…

  6. Supervisor as Supervisee: Factors that Influence Doctoral Students' Self-Efficacy as Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melodie Henson

    2009-01-01

    There have been many studies on supervising counselors-in-training; few researchers, however, have empirically examined the experiences of doctoral students as they train to become supervisors. More specifically, little is known about what factors influence the self-efficacy of doctoral students as supervisors-in-training while they work in the…

  7. The Gown and the Korowai: Maori Doctoral Students and the Spatial Organisation of Academic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sue; McKinley, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on 38 student interviews carried out in the course of the team research project "Teaching and Learning in the Supervision of Maori Doctoral Students". Maori doctoral thesis work takes place in the intersections between the Maori (tribal) world of identifications and obligations, the organisational and epistemological…

  8. Explaining Doctoral Students' Relational Maintenance with Their Advisor: A Psychosocial Development Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Zachary W.; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how psychosocial development affects doctoral students' relationship and communication with their advisor. Chickering and Reisser's vectors of psychosocial development were examined in the doctoral context to understand how students preserve communicatively satisfying relationships with their advisor through the use of…

  9. International Doctoral Science and Engineering Students: Impact on Cohorts' Career Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xuhong

    2013-01-01

    As more international doctoral students flow into science and engineering departments in American research universities, a marked shift on the demographic composition of doctoral student bodies has been witnessed. Using a dataset combining a survey of science and engineering department chairs with the latest department evaluation information, this…

  10. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  11. How Do Interaction Experiences Influence Doctoral Students' Academic Pursuits in Biomedical Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Chakraverty, Devasmita; Jeffe, Donna B.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Wathington, Heather D.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated how doctoral students reported their personal and professional interaction experiences that they believed might facilitate or impede their academic pursuits in biomedical research. We collected 19 in-depth interviews with doctoral students in biomedical research from eight universities, and we based…

  12. The Effect of Labor Market Conditions and Financial Aid on Doctoral Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampaw, Frimpomaa D.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-three percent of doctoral students never complete their degree. This dropout is the highest among graduate and professional degree programs. Previous cross sectional studies of doctoral students' retention show the importance of financial aid in predicting degree completion. The studies however, do not estimate the labor market's effect on…

  13. Exploring Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students' Attitudes towards Adults with Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundon, Chandra R.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether clinical psychology doctoral students hold uniquely stigmatizing views of adults with substance use disorders (SUDs) compared to adults with other clinical disorders. Through the use of clinical vignettes and attitudinal measures, three hypotheses investigated clinical psychology doctoral students' attitudes…

  14. Explaining Doctoral Students' Relational Maintenance with Their Advisor: A Psychosocial Development Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Zachary W.; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how psychosocial development affects doctoral students' relationship and communication with their advisor. Chickering and Reisser's vectors of psychosocial development were examined in the doctoral context to understand how students preserve communicatively satisfying relationships with their advisor through the use of…

  15. Student Satisfaction with Graduate Supervision in Doctoral Programs Primarily Delivered in Distance Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, Elizabeth Anne; Bolliger, Doris U.; Halupa, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    There are no universal, precise, or explicit criteria for completing a doctoral degree successfully. Researchers and practitioners have pointed out how difficult and time consuming the supervision of graduate student research can be. When students in doctoral programs complete their degrees via distance delivery, supervision of graduate students…

  16. The Gown and the Korowai: Maori Doctoral Students and the Spatial Organisation of Academic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sue; McKinley, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on 38 student interviews carried out in the course of the team research project "Teaching and Learning in the Supervision of Maori Doctoral Students". Maori doctoral thesis work takes place in the intersections between the Maori (tribal) world of identifications and obligations, the organisational and epistemological…

  17. Doctoral Sojourn Experiences of Adapted Physical Education Students from Asian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explain Asian international doctoral students' sojourn experiences into Adapted Physical Education (APE) programs at two universities. The participants were six doctoral students from Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea. This case study was conceptualized within sojourner theory (Siu, 1952). The data…

  18. Exploring Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students' Attitudes towards Adults with Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundon, Chandra R.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether clinical psychology doctoral students hold uniquely stigmatizing views of adults with substance use disorders (SUDs) compared to adults with other clinical disorders. Through the use of clinical vignettes and attitudinal measures, three hypotheses investigated clinical psychology doctoral students'…

  19. Learning through Experience: The Transition from Doctoral Student to Social Work Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The researchers conducted an exploratory study using grounded theory qualitative research methods to examine experiences of social work doctoral students as they learned to teach ("N"?=?14). A core category, "learning through experience," representing a basic social process, was identified. The doctoral students experienced…

  20. The Critical Policy Discourse Analysis Frame: Helping Doctoral Students Engage with the Educational Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue of increasing significance in the context of taught educational doctorates and argues that this may have wider applicability for doctoral students across a range of social science disciplines. It identifies the need to engage with policy analysis as a key element of such programmes and attempts to address students'…

  1. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  2. How Do Interaction Experiences Influence Doctoral Students' Academic Pursuits in Biomedical Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Chakraverty, Devasmita; Jeffe, Donna B.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Wathington, Heather D.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated how doctoral students reported their personal and professional interaction experiences that they believed might facilitate or impede their academic pursuits in biomedical research. We collected 19 in-depth interviews with doctoral students in biomedical research from eight universities, and we based…

  3. The Critical Policy Discourse Analysis Frame: Helping Doctoral Students Engage with the Educational Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue of increasing significance in the context of taught educational doctorates and argues that this may have wider applicability for doctoral students across a range of social science disciplines. It identifies the need to engage with policy analysis as a key element of such programmes and attempts to address students'…

  4. Ethics in the Supervisory Relationship: Supervisors' and Doctoral Students' Dilemmas in the Natural and Behavioural Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfström, Erika; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of ethical issues in supervision among doctoral students and supervisors. The nature of ethical issues identified by doctoral students (n = 28) and their supervisors (n = 14) is explored and the degree of fit and misfit between their perceptions in two cases representing the natural and behavioural sciences is…

  5. A Different Kind of Animal: Liminal Experiences of Social Work Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gail; Cronley, Courtney; Smith, Kenneth Scott

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that social and academic integration is a vital factor in doctoral student retention. This paper describes findings from a qualitative study which explored the experiences of a cohort of social work doctoral students during the first year in their programme of study. We used the anthropological concept of liminality which…

  6. CERN welcomes its first doctoral students from Morocco

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    This year marks the start of a new phase between CERN and Morocco with the arrival of the first two Moroccan students.   Mohamed Gouighri and Sara Boutouil, the first two Moroccan students at CERN. Thanks to the efforts of a small group of Moroccan academics, Morocco has been participating in the LHC programme for over ten years. About ten Moroccan physicists are members of the ATLAS collaboration, which comprises over 2000 physicists and 165 research institutes from 37 different countries. The arrival of the first Moroccan doctoral students at CERN was the logical next step. The new programme is the result of a multi-party agreement between CERN, the Sharing Knowledge Foundation, the Moroccan universities participating in the LHC programme and the Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology. Mohamed Gouighri is the first Moroccan to obtain a scholarship to study at CERN, which is being funded by the Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology. He has been studying physics at the Faculty of S...

  7. Preparing Student Mobility through Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, Marta; Jeanneau, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, going to a foreign country has become all the more significant for Higher Education (HE) students, as concepts such as internationalisation and intercultural competencies have gained a more prominent role in HE. For students to fully benefit from this experience, it is paramount to prepare them for their stay in a foreign country…

  8. Preparing Students for Studying Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    This study is situated in the fields of language education, study abroad (SA) and intercultural communication. The interest in SA is increasing on the part of students, administrators, educators, and business companies for the learning opportunities that it offers. However, SA students are not always prepared to maximize their learning…

  9. First doctoral student assembly and poster session at CERN with participation from the CERN directorate.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    To present their scientific achievements and to bring together the students with CERN supervisors and CERN’s management was the main objective of the first doctoral student assembly and poster session, held June 30.

  10. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Research Survival Skills: Preparing a Master's Thesis, Field Project or Doctoral Dissertation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedron, Nadine A.; Evans, Susan B.

    This paper is intended to give graduate level special education students (and others) a structure to facilitate completion of a field study/thesis for a master's degree or a dissertation for the doctorate. First, a format for a dissertation/thesis proposal is suggested and guidelines are offered for development of the proposal. The importance of a…

  12. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international...... semesters demonstrates the success of this form of education. Equally, the growing number of projects coming from industry demonstrates their positive interest in these kinds of skills for their future employees. Bibl. 6, tabl. 1 (in English; abstracts in English, Russian and Lithuanian)....

  13. The Meaning of Money in the Socialization of Science and Engineering Doctoral Students: Nurturing the Next Generation of Academic Capitalists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelenyi, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Based on ethnographic interviews with 48 doctoral students and 22 faculty members in science and engineering, this study examines the ways in which doctoral students and faculty make market, symbolic, and social meaning of the presence or absence of money in doctoral student socialization and of funding from governmental and industrial sources.…

  14. Predictors of Timely Doctoral Student Completions by Type of Attendance: The Utility of a Pragmatic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Neumann, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Federal government changes to the funding of doctoral students have focused the attention of university management on their completion rates. The aims of this paper are to inform the allocation of institutional resources in a manner that improves the likelihood of timely doctoral completions and to highlight a process that can also be used for…

  15. Mentor-Mentee Interaction and Laboratory Social Environment: Do They Matter in Doctoral Students' Publication Productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynalvez, Marcus Antonius; Ynalvez, Ruby A.; Ramírez, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    We explored the social shaping of science at the micro-level reality of face-to-face interaction in one of the traditional places for scientific activities--the scientific lab. We specifically examined how doctoral students' perception of their: (i) interaction with doctoral mentors (MMI) and (ii) lab social environment (LSE) influenced…

  16. Research Degrees in Information and Communication Technology (ICT): Why so Few Doctoral Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Cally; Jayatilaka, Asangi; Ranasinghe, Damith; McCulloch, Alistair; Calder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A "knowledge society" relies on a workforce with high-level skills in Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Continuing development of ICT will arise partly from research undertaken by doctoral graduates. However, compared to other cognate disciplines, ICT has relatively few students taking up doctoral studies. This article…

  17. Linking Adverbials in Academic Writing on Applied Linguistics by Chinese Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The present paper reports an investigation into the use of linking adverbials in the academic writing of Chinese doctoral students. The learner corpus used in the present study is composed of 20 applied linguistics doctoral dissertations. We also compiled a control corpus of 120 published articles in six international journals of applied…

  18. Writing tasks performed by doctor of pharmacy students during clerkship rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Eric H; Waite, Nancy M; Briceland, Laurie L

    2002-01-01

    The range of writing tasks undertaken by students during doctor of pharmacy clerkship rotations was studied. Data collection involved a review between August and November 1998 of writing samples selected by postbaccalaureate Pharm. D. students at Albany College of Pharmacy for inclusion in their required writing portfolios. The first 200 samples (accounted for by 35 students each submitting two documents for each of three clerkship rotations) were reviewed. Of these, 198 were coded to identify the four rhetorical components of clerkship location, document type, intended audience, and rhetorical purpose. Institutional sites served as the clerkship location for 164 (82.8%) of the 198 documents analyzed. The documents were placed in 28 categories; 5 of these accounted for 126 (63.6%) of the documents: 45 inservice presentations, 32 summaries, 18 patient case write-ups, 16 formulary reviews, and 15 newsletters. Students wrote most frequently to health care providers (34.8%), other pharmacists (32.3%), and teachers (16.7%), with the most frequent rhetorical purposes being informing (73.2%) and demonstrating (14.6%). Analysis of writing samples prepared by pharmacy students during clerkship rotations revealed a variety of clerkship sites, document types, audiences, and rhetorical purposes.

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Research Underway Plain Language Talking to Your Doctor Preparing for Your Medical Appointment (4:37) Understanding ... sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health ...

  20. Practical advice to support mid-career doctoral students in nursing: some considerations for academic supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra; Cleary, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Mid-career students who undertake doctoral studies have often achieved standing and success in their careers and may already hold quite senior leadership positions in the profession. In view of this, mid-career students may struggle with the transition to student, particularly if they have not studied for a number of years and have multiple pressures on their time. Supervisors on the other hand, operate within cultures of performance based indicators, and are under pressure to facilitate timely student completions. While students must take ultimate responsibility for their doctoral work, it is possible for supervisors to identify problems early, and offer practical solutions to assist mid-career students overcome their problems, and facilitate optimal engagement. In this paper we highlight some of the challenges this vulnerable student group can present, and identify some practical strategies supervisors can suggest to assist in the timely and successful completion of doctorate degrees.

  1. Career choices and what influences Nepali medical students and young doctors: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayes, Bruce W; Shakya, Rabina

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to understand medical career choices and the factors that influence medical students' and young doctors' career choices in Nepal and to understand what would encourage them...

  2. The image ofan ideal psychiatrist inthe eyes of medical students, patients and doctors involved inpsychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Margulska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to determine differences in the image of ideal psychiatrist (IIP among patients, doctors involved in psychiatric care and medical students and also between individuals with different work experience (doctors vs. students. The psychiatrist’s personality seems an important factor in supporting therapeutic process; therefore it is worth searching for the patient’s needs. Materials and methods: Three groups participated in the study: patients of the psychiatric units, medical students of 6th year and psychiatrists. The Gough and Heilbrun ACL (Adjective Check List – based on Mur‑ ray’s theory of needs – was used to assess IIP. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences among patients, doctors and students involving five scales: Nurturance, Aggression, Change, Succorance and Deference. Patients had lower scores on Change scale than doctors and higher scores on the Nurturance, Succurance and Deference than stu‑ dents. Psychiatrists had higher scores on Nurturance and Deference scale and lower score on Aggression scale than students. Conclusions: The findings showed differences in the expectations of patients compared to those of students and doctors. The most significant difference that was observed involved the Change. It may indicate that patients prefer order, conventional approach and stability in psychiatrist’s personality traits more commonly than doctors. Study findings suggest that work experience has impact on IIP: with increasing work experience, opinion about IIP comes closer to patients’ expectations.

  3. The Impact of Student Life Stress on Health Related Quality of Life Among Doctor of Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupchup, Gireesh V.; Borrego, Matthew E.; Konduri, Niranjan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between student-life stress and health related quality of life (HRQOL) among Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students. Data were collected for 166 students in the first three years of a Pharm.D. curriculum. Student-Life Stress Inventory scores were significantly negatively correlated to mental…

  4. The cultural construction of interdisciplinarity: Doctoral student socialization in an interdisciplinary neuroscience program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri A.

    Using the methodologies of individual and group interviews, observation, and document analysis, this dissertation examines the experiences of doctoral students enrolled in an interdisciplinary neuroscience program. A framework drawn from theories of organizational socialization is employed to understand the influence of an interdisciplinary program on doctoral student socialization. While abundant previous literature exists in regards to the socialization of doctoral students, such literature largely concentrates the disciplinary experience. The escalating import of globalization and shifting fiscal realities place new demands on Ph.D. programs and doctoral students to work as part of collaborative research teams, produce interdisciplinary knowledge, and integrate theory and practice. The increasing influence of such factors requires a new focus on interdisciplinarity and the changing Ph.D. The goal of this dissertation is to expand the existing framework of socialization by documenting the influence of such obstacles on knowledge acquisition, identity development, and professional investment. This study focuses on how interdisciplinary identities are constructed by doctoral students through individual interaction with the social environment and cultural context. Particular attention is given to the structural and cultural obstacles that doctoral students must negotiate as they navigate an interdisciplinary program. The study expands on the previous literature regarding doctoral student socialization by focusing on identity development, specifically a student's symbolic identity as a neuroscientist, a student's disciplinary identity (related to her professional background and undergraduate experiences), and a multi-disciplinary identity that allows for connections across disciplinary boundaries. In contrast to the traditional concepts of identity which focus on boundaries and differences as an inherent part of self-definition, the structure of identity advanced

  5. Leveraging Sociocultural Theory to Create a Mentorship Program for Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosslin, Matt; Wakefield, Jenny S.; Bennette, Phyllis; Black, James William, III

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a proposed doctoral student connections program that is based on sociocultural theory. It is designed to assist new students with starting their educational journey. This program is designed to leverage social interactions, peer mentorship, personal reflection, purposeful planning, and existing resources to assist students in…

  6. Building Scholarly Writers: Student Perspectives on Peer Review in a Doctoral Writing Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Margaret Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Peer review was used as a primary pedagogical tool in a scholarly writing course for social work doctoral students. To gauge student response to peer review and learning as a result of peer review, the instructor used narrative analysis to organize student comments into themes. Themes identified included initial trepidation, "no pain, no…

  7. Nesting doctoral students in collaborative North–South partnerships for health systems research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetla Loukanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The European Union (EU supports North–South Partnerships and collaborative research projects through its Framework Programmes and Horizon 2020. There is limited research on how such projects can be harnessed to provide a structured platform for doctoral level studies as a way of strengthening health system research capacity in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the challenges of, and facilitating factors for, ‘nesting’ doctoral students in North–South collaborative research projects. The term nesting refers to the embedding of the processes of recruiting, supervising, and coordinating doctoral students in the overall research plan and processes. Design: This cross-sectional qualitative study was undertaken by the EU-funded QUALMAT Project. A questionnaire was implemented with doctoral students, supervisors, and country principal investigators (PIs, and content analysis was undertaken. Results: Completed questionnaires were received from nine doctoral students, six supervisors, and three country PIs (86% responses rate. The doctoral students from SSA described high expectations about the input they would receive (administrative support, equipment, training, supervision. This contrasted with the expectations of the supervisors for proactivity and self-management on the part of the students. The rationale for candidate selection, and understandings of the purpose of the doctoral students in the project were areas of considerable divergence. There were some challenges associated with the use of the country PIs as co-supervisors. Doctoral student progress was at times impeded by delays in the release of funding instalments from the EU. The paper provides a checklist of essential requirements and a set of recommendations for effective nesting of doctoral students in joint North–South projects. Conclusion: There are considerable challenges to the effective nesting of doctoral students within

  8. Supporting Students' Preparation for the Viva: Their Pre-Conceptions and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the pre-conceptions of doctoral students about the final examination, the viva voce and hence there is a shortage of evidence to underpin activities designed to prepare them for this experience. The present paper, which is based upon data from a wide range of focus groups of pre-viva students, seeks to…

  9. Reframing Doctoral Programs: A Program of Human Inquiry for Doctoral Students and Faculty Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, R. Neal

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the Program of Human Inquiry as a framework for joint student-faculty portfolios by graduate students and faculty advisors. The program consists of four components: (1) acknowledgment of what one brings to graduate studies; (2) a plan of study, (3) a record of rigorous negotiated "avenues of inquiry," and (4) ongoing discussion of values…

  10. Training Humanities Doctoral Students in Collaborative and Digital Multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslin, Astrid; Slocombe, Will

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the pedagogic rationale, didactic design and implications of an AHRC-funded doctoral training scheme in collaborative and digital multimedia in the humanities. In the second part of this article we discuss three areas of provision that were identified as particularly significant and/or controversial. These include (1) desktop…

  11. Team Modes and Power: Supervision of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Margaret J.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, team supervision in doctoral studies is widely practised across Australian universities. The interpretation of 'team' is broad and there is evidence of experimentation with supervisory models. This paper elaborates upon a taxonomy of team modes and power forms based on a recent qualitative study across universities in a number of states…

  12. A Relational Approach to Mentoring Women Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammel, Jo Ann; Rutstein-Riley, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Our study examines the relationships of six dyads of women advisors and advisees in one doctoral program to understand power, context, and personal transformation. We found that mentoring is context specific and power dynamics range from equitable to hierarchical. This article explores the connection between relational cultural theory and…

  13. Team Modes and Power: Supervision of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Margaret J.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, team supervision in doctoral studies is widely practised across Australian universities. The interpretation of 'team' is broad and there is evidence of experimentation with supervisory models. This paper elaborates upon a taxonomy of team modes and power forms based on a recent qualitative study across universities in a number of states…

  14. CONSTRUCTION OF THE SYSTEM TO JUDGE SUPREVISOR-DOCTORAL STUDENT INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAVORA, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of interaction between a supervisor and doctoral students brings important consequences for research purposes, for supervisor´s evaluation, and for a feedback to a supervisor. In this paper we introduce a descriptive instrument, Inventory of Supervisor Activities, which makes it possible to rate the supervisor´s activities. The instrument concentrates on supervisor´s activities during interaction with a student in three phases of the doctoral studies: before enrolment of the student, during the study and after completion of the study. The system covers 100 activities, which are hierarchically organized, and which make it possible to obtain a rather complex portrayal of the interaction of the supervisor with the doctoral student.

  15. "Tell Me What to Do" vs. "Guide Me through It": Feedback Experiences of International Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Linda Y.

    2011-01-01

    Despite increasing attention to the challenges of supervising international doctoral students, little research has been conducted to examine supervisory feedback practice with international students and its impact on the thesis writing process. This exploratory qualitative study seeks to fill the gap and contribute to understanding the feedback…

  16. The Path to Graduation: A Model Interactive Web Site Design Supporting Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Johnson, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This 2-phase mixed method study assessed 2nd-year doctoral students' and dissertation students' perceptions of the current Graduate School of Education dissertation support Web site, with implications for designing a model dissertation support Web site. Methods. Phase 1 collected quantitative and qualitative data through an…

  17. A Success Story: Recruiting & Retaining Underrepresented Minority Doctoral Students in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, William M.

    2006-01-01

    There are various ways to succeed in recruiting and retaining underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral students; but key to them all is the creation of real student-faculty relationships, which demonstrate by example that diversity and excellence can and should coexist. This cannot be delegated or done indirectly, and no amount of outreach, campus…

  18. Becoming an Interdisciplinary Scientist: An Analysis of Students' Experiences in Three Computer Science Doctoral Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatrava Moreno, María del Carmen; Danowitz, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify how and why doctoral students do interdisciplinary research. A mixed-methods approach utilising bibliometric analysis of the publications of 195 students identified those who had published interdisciplinary research. This objective measurement of the interdisciplinarity, applying the Rao-Stirling index to Web…

  19. An Investigation of Taiwanese Doctoral Students' Academic Writing at a U.S. University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Li-hua

    2011-01-01

    The United States has always been the top choice of Taiwanese university students who want to study abroad. Consequently, English writing is especially vital for doctoral dissertation; insufficient research deals with academic writing of such students, despite its importance to their success. This paper aims to fill the gap by analyzing the course…

  20. Relational Mentoring of Doctoral Social Work Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Sheriff, Fariyal; Berry Edwards, Janice; Orme, Julie

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the distinctive mentoring experiences of social work doctoral students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). With a philosophical emphasis on social justice, self-determination, racial identity and pride, and social integration, social work faculty at HBCUs mentor African American and other students in PhD…

  1. Mentoring Educational Leadership Doctoral Students: Using Methodological Diversification to Examine Gender and Identity Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Anjale D.; Mansfield, Katherine Cumings; Lee, Pei-Ling; Young, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    An essential component to learning and teaching in educational leadership is mentoring graduate students for successful transition to K-12 and higher education positions. This study integrates quantitative and qualitative datasets to examine doctoral students' experiences with mentoring from macro and micro perspectives. Findings show that…

  2. "Tell Me What to Do" vs. "Guide Me through It": Feedback Experiences of International Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Linda Y.

    2011-01-01

    Despite increasing attention to the challenges of supervising international doctoral students, little research has been conducted to examine supervisory feedback practice with international students and its impact on the thesis writing process. This exploratory qualitative study seeks to fill the gap and contribute to understanding the feedback…

  3. Faculty Best Practices to Support Students in the "Virtual Doctoral Land"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2017-01-01

    Online students face numerous challenges in successfully completing doctoral programmes. The aim of this article is to explore the best practices that can be employed by faculty to support students in achieving this. It also seeks to categorize and identify the best practices emerging from literature into themes. An exploratory research method was…

  4. Promoting Doctoral Students' Research Self-Efficacy: Combining Academic Guidance with Autonomy Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overall, Nickola C.; Deane, Kelsey L.; Peterson, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    A diverse sample of doctoral students completed an on-line questionnaire assessing their supervisors' academic, personal and autonomy support and their research self-efficacy. The more task-related help and personal support students received, the more positively they evaluated their supervision. The degree to which supervisors encouraged students…

  5. The Path to Graduation: A Model Interactive Web Site Design Supporting Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Johnson, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This 2-phase mixed method study assessed 2nd-year doctoral students' and dissertation students' perceptions of the current Graduate School of Education dissertation support Web site, with implications for designing a model dissertation support Web site. Methods. Phase 1 collected quantitative and qualitative data through an…

  6. The Methodological Socialization of Social Science Doctoral Students in China and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.; Zheng, Mi; Sun, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study reports findings from a comparative analysis of the methodological socialization of doctoral students in the social sciences at two universities: one in China and one in the USA. Relying primarily on theories of organizational socialization, the study focuses on formal and informal processes students report as part of…

  7. A Different Slant on Cohorts: Perceptions of Professors and Special Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Caridad H.; Moores-Abdool, Whitney; Donet, Dolores Vazquez

    2008-01-01

    To improve student completion rates in higher education, faculty are using cohort educational models (CEM); however, very few studies were found regarding CEMs effects in educating culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) doctoral students in the field of special education. This study investigated two questions: (a) Are there differences for…

  8. Perceptions of Special Education Professors and Culturally Linguistically Diverse Doctoral Students on Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Caridad H.; Moores-Abdool, Whitney; Vazquez Donet, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore the perceptions related to cohort education models (CEMs) of special education professors and doctoral students at a Carnegie-designated research extensive university in a multicultural, urban area in the southeastern United States. Three themes emerged: (a) Organizational efficiency of CEMs and benefits to student learning…

  9. Animal Research Practices and Doctoral Student Identity Development in a Scientific Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri

    2009-01-01

    This article examines doctoral student identity development in regard to engagement with research practices. Using animal research as a contextual lens, it considers how students develop an identity congruent to their perception of the community which facilitates their social and cognitive activities. The shared, interpretive understanding among…

  10. Rolling with the Punches: Examining the Socialization Experiences of Kinesiology Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jared A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An increasing body of literature examines the socialization experiences of graduate students on a myriad of topics across academic disciplines. However, relatively absent from these discussions are the perspectives of kinesiology doctoral students. Using Weidman, Twale, and Stein's framework for graduate and professional student…

  11. Pediatric dentistry clinical education venues evaluation by pre and post-doctoral students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimstein, E; Mayes, A; Mittal, Hc

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate dental students' perspectives about pre- and post-doctoral pediatric dentistry education venues. Surveys with visual analog scales (from 0 to 100) measuring the educational contribution of pediatric dentistry venues were conducted. The pre-doctoral venues included a 3rd year university twilight clinic (UTC), a 3rd year urban community based clinic (CBC) and 4th year mobile clinics (MCs). The post-doctoral venues included treatment of children under general anesthesia, oral sedations, a regular clinic (no sedations), seminars, journal club, case conferences and studding for the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Analyses of variance between the scores indicated that the 3rd year CBC score (68.2 ± 4.5) was statistically significant higher (p= .007) than the one for the 3rd year UTC score (44.9 ± 6.1). The 4th year students' MCs score (61.4 ± 4.0) was statistically significant higher than their retrospective scores for the 3rd year CBC (56.4 ± 4.4) or UTC (42.2 ± 4.9) scores (p= .03 and .004 respectively). Among the didactic or clinical post-doctoral venues, the regular clinic and the seminars received the highest scores (84.3 ± 1.7 and 71.6 ± 2.8 respectively). pre-doctoral community-based clinical education and post-doctoral regular university based clinic are considered by students to provide the main contribution to pediatric dental education.

  12. Reflections on Doctoral Supervision: Drawing from the Experiences of Students with Additional Learning Needs in Two Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Bethan

    2015-01-01

    Supervision is an essential part of doctoral study, consisting of relationship and process aspects, underpinned by a range of values. To date there has been limited research specifically about disabled doctoral students' experiences of supervision. This paper draws on qualitative, narrative interviews about doctoral supervision with disabled…

  13. "A steep learning curve": junior doctor perspectives on the transition from medical student to the health-care workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, Nancy; Tan, Zachary; Turner, Jane

    2017-05-26

    The transition from medical student to hospital-based first year junior doctor (termed "intern" in Australia) is known to be challenging, and recent changes in clinical learning environments may reduce graduate preparedness for the intern workplace. Although manageable challenges and transitions are a stimulus to learning, levels of burnout in junior medical colleagues are concerning. In order to prepare and support medical graduates, educators need to understand contemporary junior doctor perspectives on this transition. Final-year University of Queensland medical students recruited junior doctors working in diverse hospital settings, and videorecorded individual semi-structured interviews about their transition from medical student to working as a junior doctor. Two clinical academics (NS and JT) and an intern (ZT) independently conducted a descriptive analysis of interview transcripts, and identified preliminary emerging concepts and themes, before reaching agreement by consensus on the major overarching themes. Three key themes emerged from the analysis of 15 interviews: internship as a "steep learning curve"; relationships and team; and seeking help. Participants described the intern transition as physically, mentally and emotionally exhausting. They learned to manage long days, administrative and clinical tasks, frequent interruptions and time pressures; identify priorities; deal with criticism without compromising key relationships; communicate succinctly; understand team roles (including their own status within hospital hierarchies); and negotiate conflict. Participants reported a drop in self-confidence, and difficulty maintaining self-care and social relationships. Although participants emphasised the importance of escalating concerns and seeking help to manage patients, they appeared more reluctant to seek help for personal issues and reported a number of barriers to doing so. Findings may assist educators in refining their intern preparation and intern

  14. Perceived Benefits of Mobile Learning Devices for Doctoral Students in a School of Allied Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, J James; Gendron, T; Kupstas, P; Tartaglia, A; Will, L

    2015-01-01

    Graduate students increasingly use personal electronic devices for learning but little is known about how they evaluate their benefits as mobile learning devices (MLDs). This study surveyed students in a hybrid distance education doctoral (PhD) program about their perceptions of the benefits of MLDs. Overall, the study found a range of opinions about the value of MLDs with about one-half of respondents finding benefits. Respondents emphasized that the MLDs improved motivation and productivity and that they were helpful in reviewing course-casts of on-campus sessions. Continued research is needed on doctoral education in general and the increasing use of innovations such as MLDs.

  15. 'It gives you an understanding you can't get from any book.' The relationship between medical students' and doctors' personal illness experiences and their performance: a qualitative and quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Katherine; Cave, Judith; McManus, I Chris; Dacre, Jane E

    2007-01-01

    Background Anecdotes abound about doctors' personal illness experiences and the effect they have on their empathy and care of patients. We formally investigated the relationship between doctors' and medical students' personal illness experiences, their examination results, preparedness for clinical practice, learning and professional attitudes and behaviour towards patients. Methods Newly-qualified UK doctors in 2005 (n = 2062/4784), and two cohorts of students at one London medical school (n = 640/749) participated in the quantitative arm of the study. 37 Consultants, 1 Specialist Registrar, 2 Clinical Skills Tutors and 25 newly-qualified doctors participated in the qualitative arm. Newly-qualified doctors and medical students reported their personal illness experiences in a questionnaire. Doctors' experiences were correlated with self-reported preparedness for their new clinical jobs. Students' experiences were correlated with their examination results, and self-reported anxiety and depression. Interviews with clinical teachers, newly-qualified doctors and senior doctors qualitatively investigated how personal illness experiences affect learning, professional attitudes, and behaviour. Results 85.5% of newly-qualified doctors and 54.4% of medical students reported personal illness experiences. Newly-qualified doctors who had been ill felt less prepared for starting work (p personal illness experiences helped them empathise and communicate with patients. Medical students with more life experience were perceived as more mature, empathetic, and better learners; but illness at medical school was recognised to impede learning. Conclusion The majority of the medical students and newly qualified doctors we studied reported personal illness experiences, and these experiences were associated with lower undergraduate examination results, higher anxiety, and lower preparedness. However reflection on such experiences may have improved professional attitudes such as empathy

  16. Forging an identity: Four science doctoral students in a collaborative partnership with K--12 science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinsky, Martin G.

    2006-12-01

    A primary conflict regarding the identity of science education is the competition between those emphasizing science aspects of science education versus those who emphasize the education. I examine a National Science Foundation funded program at "Southern State University" (pseudonym) known as the GK-12 Project that placed science doctoral students into K-12 classrooms, where they worked with practicing science teachers. My research question was: How do GK-12 Fellows forge an identity through their experiences as both teachers and doctoral students? I used the "hermeneutic dialectic circle", a process whereby I interviewed each stakeholder in turn, and conducted member checks. My primary sources were interviews, and my primary subjects were four Fellows. One of the Fellows, Jose, left the program after one year. The other three in my study, Wanda, Rebecca, and Nathan, remained for all three years. The starting point for their learning was admitting what they did not know. These three learned about science outside of their fields because they learned how to learn. They also took an interest in and enacted making connections to students. In negotiating two cultures, the Fellows achieved heightened awareness of the SSU science culture's current practices in college science teaching, particularly the problems. They noted the ineffectiveness of the didactic delivery style and the lack of formative assessment. These three Fellows manifested rational and pluralistic worldviews. Because of his frames that were derived from growing up under an authoritarian government in Cuba, Jose experienced the program differently than the other three Fellows. For Jose, his identity as a scientist and as an educator remained more static, as he identified more with the authoritarian outlook on education espoused in SSU's science departments. The science culture at SSU is centered in the authoritarian value structure sees a need for a "fixing" of education, to improve "poorly prepared

  17. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nav nav, .header-9#header-section #main-nav, #overlay-menu nav, #mobile-menu, #one-page-nav li . ... editorial staff Home Your Health Resources Doctor Visit Preparation Choosing a Family Doctor Choosing a Family Doctor ...

  18. 'It gives you an understanding you can't get from any book.' The relationship between medical students' and doctors' personal illness experiences and their performance: a qualitative and quantitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacre Jane E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anecdotes abound about doctors' personal illness experiences and the effect they have on their empathy and care of patients. We formally investigated the relationship between doctors' and medical students' personal illness experiences, their examination results, preparedness for clinical practice, learning and professional attitudes and behaviour towards patients. Methods Newly-qualified UK doctors in 2005 (n = 2062/4784, and two cohorts of students at one London medical school (n = 640/749 participated in the quantitative arm of the study. 37 Consultants, 1 Specialist Registrar, 2 Clinical Skills Tutors and 25 newly-qualified doctors participated in the qualitative arm. Newly-qualified doctors and medical students reported their personal illness experiences in a questionnaire. Doctors' experiences were correlated with self-reported preparedness for their new clinical jobs. Students' experiences were correlated with their examination results, and self-reported anxiety and depression. Interviews with clinical teachers, newly-qualified doctors and senior doctors qualitatively investigated how personal illness experiences affect learning, professional attitudes, and behaviour. Results 85.5% of newly-qualified doctors and 54.4% of medical students reported personal illness experiences. Newly-qualified doctors who had been ill felt less prepared for starting work (p Conclusion The majority of the medical students and newly qualified doctors we studied reported personal illness experiences, and these experiences were associated with lower undergraduate examination results, higher anxiety, and lower preparedness. However reflection on such experiences may have improved professional attitudes such as empathy and compassion for patients. Future research is warranted in this area.

  19. Waiting for the Expert to Arrive: Using a Community of Practice to Develop the Scholarly Identity of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Karie; Putman, Paul; Adkisson, Anthony; Kriner, Bridget; Monaghan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the identity of doctoral students in their quest to become scholars. The research question asked: What impact did a Community of Practice have on the doctoral students? The findings illustrated that on the journey the participants struggled to integrate multiple identities and roles. They also refined their…

  20. Scholarly Capacities, Habits of Mind, and Dispositions: Case Studies of Education Doctoral Students in a Dissertation Proposal Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Dana Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The completion of a formal proposal for a dissertation research project is a standard requirement as a prelude to the process of conducting research and writing a doctoral dissertation for students who complete a doctoral degree in most academic fields including all the branches of the field of education. Many students satisfactorily complete…

  1. Pushing too Little, Praising too Much? Intercultural Misunderstandings between a Chinese Doctoral Student and a Dutch Supervisor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yanjuan; van Veen, Klaas; Corda, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    To understand the challenges and their causes in interactions between Western supervisors and international doctoral students, we conducted a self-study of our experiences as a Chinese international student and her Dutch supervisor during her doctoral research project. We found the supervisor and th

  2. Pushing too Little, Praising too Much? Intercultural Misunderstandings between a Chinese Doctoral Student and a Dutch Supervisor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yanjuan; van Veen, Klaas; Corda, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    To understand the challenges and their causes in interactions between Western supervisors and international doctoral students, we conducted a self-study of our experiences as a Chinese international student and her Dutch supervisor during her doctoral research project. We found the supervisor and th

  3. Doctoral Students in Music Education: Occupational Identity, Career Intent and Commitment, and Confidence for Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine music education doctoral students' shifting occupational identity beliefs, career intent and commitment, and overall confidence for teaching in higher education. A total of 124 music education doctoral students, enrolled at 29 institutions of higher education in the United States, completed a onetime,…

  4. Business Professional Doctoral Programs: Student Motivations, Educational Process, and Graduate Career Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis J. Grabowski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging body of research on business professional doctoral programs has focused primarily on the programs’ composition and management, offering limited insight into students’ motivations and the impact the degree has on graduates and their careers. However, understanding these student motivations and career impacts is valuable for several reasons. In addition to helping future candidates assess various programs and the business professional doctoral degree itself, it can help enrolled students maximize their academic experience and help administrators improve these programs so that they better meet students’ personal and professional expectations. To bridge this research gap, this study pursued a mixed-methods approach to glean insights into why people pursue professional doctorates in business, the ultimate personal and professional outcomes of students, and the educational process producing those outcomes. The study revealed that most students entered these programs with a desire for personal or professional transformation, including the possibility of entering academia or a new industry. Moreover, the vast majority of program graduates believed they had experienced such a transformation, often in both professional and personal ways. Further, while important to personal growth, alumni perceived that certain program elements—such as the student networks they created and non-research related coursework—had little to no effect upon their career and viewed their research and the research process as far more important to their professional development. Based upon these findings, the researchers propose a comprehensive process model to explain the personal and professional factors and outcomes for graduates of business professional doctoral programs. They also suggest practical steps that students and administrators can take to improve the business professional doctoral educational experience.

  5. Student Perceptions of Satisfaction and Anxiety in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Doris U.; Halupa, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-four students in an online health education doctoral program taking the first course in the program over one year (four quarters) were surveyed in regards to their computer, Internet, and online course anxiety, and overall course satisfaction. An 18-item anxiety tool with domains in computer, Internet, and online learning was administered…

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Cultural Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Burnout in Doctorate of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, D. Michelle.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational study used standard multiple regression to determine if there was a relationship between the factors of cultural intelligence (metacognitive CQ, cognitive CQ, motivational CQ, and behavioral CQ) and transformational leadership in doctoral students. This study also sought to determine the best predictor of burnout by using a…

  7. Students' Perspectives on Problem-Based Learning in a Transitional Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Helene M.; Buccieri, Kathleen M.; Wessel, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Doctor of physical therapy (DPT) graduates are expected to be competent in professional behaviors, communication, critical inquiry, clinical decision making, and evidence-based practice. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experience of students enrolled in a single, problem-based learning (PBL) course within a conventional…

  8. Exploring the Relationship between Cultural Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Burnout in Doctorate of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, D. Michelle.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational study used standard multiple regression to determine if there was a relationship between the factors of cultural intelligence (metacognitive CQ, cognitive CQ, motivational CQ, and behavioral CQ) and transformational leadership in doctoral students. This study also sought to determine the best predictor of burnout by using a…

  9. A Qualitative Study of Challenges Faced by International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education Supervision Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoo Jin; Woo, Hongryun; Henfield, Malik S.

    2014-01-01

    Using consensual qualitative research methodology, this study examines the challenges doctoral-level international students encountered in counselor education programs, during supervisor training, specifically. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants and revealed a variety of difficulties. Despite the wide variability in…

  10. Factors Contributing to Perceived Stress among Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kentya C.; Olotu, Busuyi S.; Thach, Andrew V.; Roberts, Rochelle; Davis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to report on perceived stress levels, identify its contributing factors, and evaluate the association between perceived stress and usage of university resources to cope with stress among a cross-section of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. Methods: Perceived stress was measured via a web-based survey of…

  11. Creativity and Learning in the Virtual Sphere: Perspectives from Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Thalia M.; Swaminathan, Raji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the perspectives of doctoral students on creativity and learning in the virtual environment. The researchers investigated the following central research question: to what extent is creative thinking fostered in virtual environments? In addition, the paper also examined how creativity is practiced in…

  12. Applying Sociocultural Theory to Teaching Statistics for Doctoral Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogro-Wilson, Cristina; Reeves, Michael G.; Charter, Mollie Lazar

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of two doctoral-level multivariate statistics courses utilizing sociocultural theory, an integrative pedagogical framework. In the first course, the implementation of sociocultural theory helps to support the students through a rigorous introduction to statistics. The second course involves students…

  13. Advising Master's Students Pursuing Doctoral Study: A Survey of Counselor Educators and Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Corrine R.; Hartig, Nadine; Bodenhorn, Nancy; Farmer, Laura B.; Ghoston, Michelle R.; Graham, Jasmine; Lile, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    This study explored what faculty members are recommending to counselor education master's students regarding post-master's experience when considering doctoral studies and what the current faculty hiring preferences are in reference to the amount of post-master's experience needed. Advisors in counselor education master's programs encounter these…

  14. Mentoring the Next Generation of Faculty: Supporting Academic Career Aspirations among Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Nicola; Malley, Janet; Stewart, Abigail J.

    2016-01-01

    We know little about the role of faculty mentoring in the development of interest in pursuing an academic career among doctoral students. Drawing on Social Cognitive Career Theory, this study examined the relationships between different kinds of mentoring (instrumental, psychosocial, and sponsorship) and academic career self-efficacy, interests,…

  15. Factors Contributing to Perceived Stress among Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kentya C.; Olotu, Busuyi S.; Thach, Andrew V.; Roberts, Rochelle; Davis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to report on perceived stress levels, identify its contributing factors, and evaluate the association between perceived stress and usage of university resources to cope with stress among a cross-section of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. Methods: Perceived stress was measured via a web-based survey of…

  16. Multicultural Training of Clinical and Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students: Ideals vs. Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bryana F. C.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA), which is the advocating body for the field of psychology, emphasizes the importance of multicultural competencies for researchers and clinicians (APA, 2003; 2010). Graduate students are the field's future professionals. The multicultural training of doctoral level clinical and counseling…

  17. A Qualitative Study of Challenges Faced by International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education Supervision Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoo Jin; Woo, Hongryun; Henfield, Malik S.

    2014-01-01

    Using consensual qualitative research methodology, this study examines the challenges doctoral-level international students encountered in counselor education programs, during supervisor training, specifically. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants and revealed a variety of difficulties. Despite the wide variability in…

  18. Supervisee Incompatibility and Its Influence on Triadic Supervision: An Examination of Doctoral Student Supervisors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Serge F.; Lawson, Gerard; Rodriguez, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore supervisors' experiences of supervisee incompatibility in triadic supervision. In-depth interviews were completed with 9 doctoral student supervisors in a counselor education program, and a whole-text analysis generated 3 categories. Supervisee incompatibility took a wide variety of forms and negatively…

  19. International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education: Coping Strategies in Supervision Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Jang, Yoo Jin; Henfield, Malik S.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores 8 international doctoral students' perceptions of coping strategies used in supervision training in counselor education programs. Using human agency as a conceptual framework, the authors found 3 categories: (a) personal and professional self-directed strategies as personal agency, (b) support and care from mentors as proxy…

  20. Multicultural Training of Clinical and Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students: Ideals vs. Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bryana F. C.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA), which is the advocating body for the field of psychology, emphasizes the importance of multicultural competencies for researchers and clinicians (APA, 2003; 2010). Graduate students are the field's future professionals. The multicultural training of doctoral level clinical and counseling…

  1. Doctoral Students' Experiences with Pedagogies of the Home, Pedagogies of Love, and Mentoring in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Jennifer; Lee, Taneisha; Limes-Taylor Henderson, Kelly; Mason, Amber; Outler, Anthony; Rodriguez Jackson, Justina; Washington, Rosalyn; Whitaker-Lea, Laura

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a group of nontraditional and/or doctoral students of color and our advisor discuss how the advisor-advisee mentoring relationship has positively affected our experiences within academia. The mentoring relationship, cultivated within a group mentoring model, was integral to our acclimation of the hidden culture of our doctoral…

  2. A Multi-Year Evaluation of Student Perceptions of University and Special Education Doctoral Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundeen, Todd; Vince Garland, Krista M.; Wienke, Wilfred D.

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions of usability and navigability contribute substantially to initial impressions of university and program websites. A survey was administered to graduate students in special education at four intervals between 2006 and 2014 to determine their perceptions of university and special education doctoral program websites. For this article,…

  3. Post-Graduation Plans of International Science and Engineering Doctoral Students Attending U.S. Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, Dorothy N.; Adamuti-Trache, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the post-graduation plans of international science and engineering doctoral students at a public research-intensive university, and the extent to which graduate school experiences influence post-graduation plans. The study is grounded in Tinto's Integration Model as well as Berry's Acculturation Model. Study findings highlight…

  4. Publication Trends of Doctoral Students in Three Fields from 1965-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wade M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the publication rates of successful doctoral students in the fields of analytical chemistry, experimental psychology, and American literature. Data analysis, including linear regression analysis, revealed differences in publication rates and in solo authorship that mirrored differences between the fields as a…

  5. "I Heard It through the Grapevine": Doctoral Student Socialization in Chemistry and History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Susan K.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty doctoral students in the disciplines of chemistry and history were interviewed to better understand the socialization processes that influence their success and how these processes differ by year in the degree program and disciplinary culture. Five major themes emerged describing these socialization processes and how they facilitate or…

  6. Open Access Theses in Institutional Repositories: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Kate Valentine; Liew, Chern Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: We examine doctoral students' awareness of and attitudes to open access forms of publication. Levels of awareness of open access and the concept of institutional repositories, publishing behaviour and perceptions of benefits and risks of open access publishing were explored. Method: Qualitative and quantitative data were collected…

  7. A Multi-Year Evaluation of Student Perceptions of University and Special Education Doctoral Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundeen, Todd; Vince Garland, Krista M.; Wienke, Wilfred D.

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions of usability and navigability contribute substantially to initial impressions of university and program websites. A survey was administered to graduate students in special education at four intervals between 2006 and 2014 to determine their perceptions of university and special education doctoral program websites. For this article,…

  8. Experiential Workshop with Educational Leadership Doctoral Students: Managing Affective Reactions to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Leigh; Jara, Teresa; Sever, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Managing change processes, resistance to change, and organizational members' emotional reactions to change are crucial skills for future educational leaders to learn. Our case study is based on a workshop conducted using two experiential exercises to facilitate current educational leadership doctoral students' reflections on their own reactions to…

  9. Publishing Time-Frame Evaluation for Doctoral Students in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrada Elena URDA-CÎMPEAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The first objective of the study was to compute the time to completion and publication of original scientific publications for medical doctoral students in the UK. A second objective was to evaluate if PhD theses format (monograph or publication-based can influence the time to completion and publication of original scientific publications. We assessed a small sample of free full text medical doctoral theses from universities in the United Kingdom (mostly from the University of Manchester, which have produced at least 2 original scientific publications by the end of the doctoral studies. The time elapsed between 2 consecutive publications from the same thesis was considered an approximation of the time to completion and publication of the second publication. In the case of prospective theses, the median time to completion and publication of original scientific publications from medical doctoral theses was 10.17 months. We found that there was a statistically significant difference between the time (to completion and publication medians of the publications from traditional theses format and of the publications from publication-based theses format. Time to completion and publication of original scientific publications for medical doctoral students needs to be further evaluated on a larger scale, based on more theses from several medical faculties in the UK.

  10. [Doctoral thesis projects for medical students? Retrospective estimation of the fraction of successfully completed medical doctoral thesis projects at Witten/Herdecke University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Janna; Schaper, Katharina; Krummenauer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The German "Dr med" plays a specific role in doctoral thesis settings since students may start the underlying doctoral project during their studies at medical school. If a Medical Faculty principally encourages this approach, then it should support the students in performing the respective projects as efficiently as possible. Consequently, it must be ensured that students are able to implement and complete a doctoral project in parallel to their studies. As a characteristic efficiency feature of these "Dr med" initiatives, the proportion of doctoral projects successfully completed shortly after graduating from medical school is proposed and illustrated. The proposed characteristic can be estimated by the time period between the state examination (date of completion of the qualifying medical examination) and the doctoral examination. Completion of the doctoral project "during their medical studies" was then characterised by a doctoral examination no later than 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination. To illustrate the estimation and interpretation of this characteristic, it was retrospectively estimated on the basis of the full sample of all doctorates successfully completed between July 2009 and June 2012 at the Department of Human Medicine at the Faculty of Health of the University of Witten/Herdecke. During the period of investigation defined, a total number of 56 doctoral examinations were documented, 30 % of which were completed within 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination (95% confidence interval 19 to 44 %). The median duration between state and doctoral examination was 27 months. The proportion of doctoral projects completed parallel to the medical studies increased during the investigation period from 14 % in the first year (July 2009 till June 2010) to 40 % in the third year (July 2011 till June 2012). Only about a third of all "Dr med" projects at the Witten/Herdecke Faculty of Health were completed during or close to

  11. The Dissertation House Model: Doctoral Student Experiences Coping and Writing in a Shared Knowledge Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Veale, Wendy Y; Tull, Renetta G; Rutledge, Janet C; Joseph, Lenisa N

    2016-01-01

    The problem of PhD attrition, especially at the dissertation-writing stage, is not solely related to mentoring, departments, or disciplines; it is a problem that affects the entire institution. As such, solutions require collaborative efforts for student success. Building on Yeatman's master-apprentice model, which assumes mastering disciplinary writing in singular advisor-student contexts, and Burnett's collaborative cohort model, which introduced doctoral dissertation supervision in a collaborative-learning environment with several faculty mentors in a single discipline, the Dissertation House model (DHM) introduces a model of doctoral dissertation supervision that involves multiple mentors across several disciplines. On the basis of more than 200 students' reflections, we find that challenges in completing the dissertation extend beyond departmental and disciplinary boundaries. The DHM's multidisciplinary approach preserves the traditional master-apprentice relationship between faculty and students within academic departments while providing an additional support mechanism through interdisciplinary collaborative cohorts. Using Thoits's coping assistance theory and data from DH students over a 10-year period, the DHM incorporates Hoadley's concept of knowledge communities to establish a successful dissertation-writing intervention for graduate students across doctoral programs. Using propensity score analysis, we provide in this study an empirical assessment of the benefits and efficacy of the DHM.

  12. Student and faculty perceptions of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynor, Lena M; Barrickman, Ashleigh Landis; Stamatakis, Mary K; Elliott, David P

    2013-10-14

    To describe students' and faculty members' perceptions of the impact of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Second- and third-year pharmacy students and faculty members completed an anonymous survey instrument regarding their perceptions of lecture recording with 2 classroom lecture capture software programs, Camtasia Studio and Wimba Classroom. Most students (82%) responded that Camtasia was very helpful and almost half (49%) responded that Wimba Classroom was helpful (plecture recordings beneficial, and they use the recordings primarily to review the lecture. While faculty members reported concerns with decreased attendance, few students reported using recordings as an alternative to class attendance.

  13. Role Stress and Strain among Nondoctorally Prepared Undergraduate Faculty in a School of Nursing with a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Judy Wright; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative study looked at role stress in 11 nondoctorally prepared undergraduate nursing faculty in a southern university school of nursing with a doctoral program. Faculty reported that role stress and strain affect both their teaching and their decisions to remain in academia. (JOW)

  14. On to the 'rough ground': introducing doctoral students to philosophical perspectives on knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehg, Ellen; SmithBattle, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Doctoral programmes in nursing are charged with developing the next generation of nurse scholars, scientists, and healthcare leaders. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) endorses the inclusion of philosophy of science content in research-focused doctoral programmes. Because a philosophy course circumscribed to the natural or social sciences does not address the broad forms of knowledge that are relevant to nursing practice, we have developed and co-taught a course on the philosophy of knowledge that introduces students to competing claims regarding the nature of knowledge, truth, and rationality. In addressing broad themes related to science and knowledge of the body, health and illness, and ethics, the course equips students to tread the rough and shifting ground of nursing scholarship and practice. Providing doctoral students with this philosophical footing is intended to give future scholars, researchers, and healthcare leaders the intellectual skills to critically reflect on knowledge claims, to challenge the hegemony of science, and to recognize the disciplinary forms of knowledge that are left out or trivialized. Our pedagogical approach to knowledge development does not denigrate scientific knowledge, but elevates forms of inquiry and notions of clinical knowledge that are too often marginalized in doctoral education and the academy in general.

  15. Performing Masculinity: Considering Gender in Doctoral Student Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2011-01-01

    The author's purpose in this article is to understand the ways in which socialization to a discipline might be gendered. How might socialization teach students not just the skills, but the gendered values that are equated with success in a discipline? This article begins with a review of the socialization literature before turning to a definition…

  16. Teaching Congestive Heart Failure to Doctor of Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a lecture given to pharmacy students that emphasizes the pathophysiologic mechanisms causing congestive heart failure and the effects of drugs on these mechanisms. The approach shows the importance of drug therapy in this disorder and how this knowledge can improve patient care. An appendix provides a case study. (GLR)

  17. Student Preparation for the International Environmental Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Meehan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have strategies for exposing students to international experiences, but little is reported on their implementation. One example of an implemented activity is the multidisciplinary research project for undergraduate environment students, at RMIT University, that both prepares students to work in the environment profession and…

  18. Predictors of doctoral student success in professional psychology: characteristics of students, programs, and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James M; Kim, Yang-Hyang

    2011-04-01

    In the face of the rising number of doctoral recipients in professional psychology, many have voiced concerns about the quality of nontraditional training programs. Past research suggests that, on a variety of outcomes, graduates from clinical PhD programs outperform graduates from clinical PsyD and, to a lesser extent, counseling PhD programs. We examine an aggregate archival dataset to determine whether student or university characteristics account for the differences in outcomes among programs. The data show meaningful differences in the outcomes of clinical PhD, PsyD, and counseling PhD programs. Furthermore, graduates from research-intensive universities perform better on the psychology licensure exam and are more likely to become American Board of Professional Psychology diplomates. The available data support the notion that the ability to conduct research is an essential component of graduate education. In this light, PsyD programs represent a unique opportunity to train students in the types of evaluation and outcomes assessments used by practicing psychologists. We discuss implications for graduate-level training in professional psychology. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Empirical research on implementation of full English teaching mode in the professional courses of the engineering doctoral students

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yunxia; Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Under the historical background of increasingly close international exchanges, the international education trend becomes increasingly apparent. The doctoral students’ education is the highest part of the higher education. The improvement of the doctoral students’ ability to use English for academic research is increasingly important. Taking full English course of the doctoral students in the School of Control Science and Engineering of Tongji University as example, this paper explores the res...

  20. An Examination of Doctoral Preparation Information in the United States: A Content Analysis of Counselor Education Doctoral Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Mulit, Cynthia J.; Visalli, Kelsea M.

    2016-01-01

    Counselor Education (CE) program websites play a role in program fit by helping prospective students learn about the profession, search for programs and apply for admission. Using the 2014 "ACA Code of Ethics'" nine categories of orientation content as its framework, this study explored the information provided on the 63…

  1. Designing and implementing a physiology course for a new doctoral occupational therapy program with student feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E; Ikiugu, Moses N

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the Occupational Therapy Department requested a custom-designed medical physiology course for the students in the new occupational therapy doctoral program. The first author, a physiologist with extensive experience in teaching both undergraduate preprofessional and medical students in human physiology, was recruited to design and implement the course. The course was designed to be consistent with the constructivist philosophy that guides the occupational therapy curriculum. The course was offered for the first time during fall/spring 2015/2016 and included both first- and second-year occupational therapy doctoral students. A number of anonymous assessment tools were used to evaluate students' perceptions regarding the effectiveness of various pedagogies used in the course in enhancing their learning. A summative course assessment survey with comments was used at the end of the course. This paper describes the model of course design and the student feedback, which generated some suggestions for improvement of the course. This approach in designing a new course for a new disciplinary group of students should be helpful to other faculty involved in developing courses for health career programs populated by students with variable physiology backgrounds and different educational needs. The final relevant feedback from the course would be to have the students evaluate the usefulness of the course to their future careers immediately following their certification examinations in a year or two and during their subsequent clinical experiences; however, that information will likely be more difficult to obtain. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Past Negative Time Perspective as a Predictor of Grade Point Average in Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat J. Precin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Time perspective is a fundamental dimension in psychological time, dividing human experiences into past, present, and future. Time perspective influences individuals’ functioning in all occupations, including education. Previous research has examined the relationship between time perspective and academic outcomes, but the same research has not been done, to date, with occupational therapy doctoral students. This quantitative, cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between time perspective and academic success in occupational therapy doctoral students across the United States. Data from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI and grade point averages (GPAs were collected from 50 participants via surveymonkey.com. Past Negative time perspective statistically predicted GPA in the negative direction (p = .001 for students in pre-professional OTD programs, but did not predict GPA for post-professional students. Age, gender, and learning environment did not significantly influence the prediction of GPA in either group. The method and results of this study demonstrate that the ZTPI, an instrument used in the field of psychology, may have value in the profession of occupational therapy and occupational therapy doctoral programs.

  3. Preparing Students for Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Richard; Peterson, Amelia; Weinstein, Emily

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aspects in our lives is learning how to have mutual, caring romantic relationships. Yet while schools and many other industries in this country devote tremendous attention and resources to preparing the young for work, they do remarkably little to prepare them for generous, self-respecting sex and love. Educators and…

  4. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald J.; Grossman, Pamela L.; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, whereas others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  5. Attitudes of medical students in Lahore, Pakistan towards the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waqas; Krupat, Edward; Asma, Yumna; Fatima, Noor-E-; Attique, Rayan; Mahmood, Umar; Waqas, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background. A good doctor-patient relationship is the centre stone of modern medicine. Patients are getting increasingly aware about exercising their autonomy and thus modern medicine cannot deliver all its advances to the patients if a good doctor-patient relationship is not established. We initiated this study with the aim to assess the leaning of medical students, who are the future physicians, towards either a doctor-centered or a patient-centered care, and to explore the effects of personal attributes on care such as gender, academic year, etc. Materials & Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between July and Sep 2013. CMH Lahore Medical and Dental College Ethical Review Committee approved the study questionnaire. The study population consisted of 1,181 medical students in years 1-5 from two medical colleges. The English version of Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) was used to assess attitudes of medical students towards doctor-patient relationship. PPOS yields a mean score range of 1-6, where 1 signifies tendency towards a doctor centered relationship and 6 signifies patient-centered relationship. The relationship between PPOS scores and individual characteristics like gender, academic year etc. were examined by multiple regression. Results. A total of 783 students formed the final sample (response rate = 92%). Mean PPOS score of the entire sample was 3.40 (± .49 S.D.). Mean sharing sub-scale score was 3.18 (± 0.62 S.D. Mean caring sub-scale score was 3.63 (± 0.56 S.D.). Characteristics associated with most patient-centered attitudes were advanced academic year, having a clinical rotation, foreign background and studying in a private college. Gender, having doctor parents, relationship and residence status had no bearing on the attitudes (p > 0.05). Conclusion. Despite ongoing debate and the emphasis on a patient-centered curriculum, our study suggests that the current curriculum and its teachings are not producing the results they

  6. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Recording in a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrickman, Ashleigh Landis; Stamatakis, Mary K.; Elliott, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the impact of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Methods. Second- and third-year pharmacy students and faculty members completed an anonymous survey instrument regarding their perceptions of lecture recording with 2 classroom lecture capture software programs, Camtasia Studio and Wimba Classroom. Results. Most students (82%) responded that Camtasia was very helpful and almost half (49%) responded that Wimba Classroom was helpful (pstudents reported being more likely to miss a class that was recorded; however, few students (10%) reported using recordings as a substitute for attending class. The most common concern of faculty members was decreased student attendance (27%). Conclusion. Pharmacy students consider lecture recordings beneficial, and they use the recordings primarily to review the lecture. While faculty members reported concerns with decreased attendance, few students reported using recordings as an alternative to class attendance. PMID:24159206

  7. Preparing Students for the Electronic Cottage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Sally L.; Burdin, Joel

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on Alvin Toffler's "electronic cottage" concept as a way of helping counselors become aware of futuristic thinking patterns, changing work roles and patterns in society, and techniques for preparing students for these changes. (Author/ABB)

  8. An Informed Look at Doctoral Vivas (Oral Examinations) in the Preparation of Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Charles R., III; Robertson, Derek L.

    2012-01-01

    Viva voce is the Latin expression traditionally used to refer to doctoral oral examinations. Viva voce, or simply viva, examinations are a standard requirement for doctoral candidacy and degree completion in many counselor education programs. Despite the prevalent use of vivas as an assessment and learning tool, the counselor education literature…

  9. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  10. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  11. Supervisory needs of research doctoral students in a university teaching hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Patrina Hy; Oldmeadow, Wendy; Jones, Cheryl A

    2012-10-01

    Teaching hospitals affiliated with universities are now common sites for research higher degree supervision. We hypothesised that the hospital environment poses unique challenges to supervision compared with the traditional university research institute setting. This study aimed to identify and rank important supervision issues in a clinical setting from the students' perspective. Using the Delphi method to explore issues and facilitate consensus, small group discussions were conducted with 10 research doctoral students from a tertiary teaching hospital. We identified supervision issues that are unique to the hospital-based context. These include the demands placed on supervisors combining clinical and supervisory roles, the challenges of academic medical/scientific writing and career issues for students who are already established in their professions. Other issues identified, common to all doctoral students, include differing expectations between students and supervisors (with students wanting support for their career plans, training in research skills and increasing autonomy and responsibility), supervisor access, quality and frequency of meetings, lack of training in writing and dealing with conflicts. Our research identified that postgraduate students of supervisors who combine clinical and supervisory roles report significant issues with supervision, some of which are unique to the clinical setting. Clinician researchers who supervise postgraduate students need to balance clinical and supervisory responsibilities, identify and negotiate student expectations early in candidature and provide career counselling to students who are already highly experienced. Furthermore, clinician supervisors should undertake postgraduate supervisor training programme tailored to the hospital setting to better support their students. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of

  12. Role of personality in medical students' initial intention to become rural doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael P; Eley, Diann; Lampe, Lisa; Coulston, Carissa M; Malhli, Gin S; Wilson, Ian; Kelly, Brian; Talley, Nicholas J; Owen, Cathy; Corrigan, Gerry; Griffin, Barbara; Humphreys, John; Alba, Beatrice; Stagg, Pamela

    2013-04-01

    Recent efforts to redress the deficit of rural medical practitioners have considered the problem of recruitment and retention of rural doctors as one of influencing individuals' career choices. Exposure to rural medical environments during basic medical training is one long-standing example of an initiative aimed in this direction and there is some evidence that it is effective. This study sought to determine whether or not various domains of personality are related to medical students' attitude to practising as rural doctors after graduation. The sample comprised 914 students commencing medical studies in Australian universities. They were recruited as part of the Medical Schools Outcomes Database project and indicated intended location of future medical practice. Seven Australian basic medical training programs. All students completed the NEO five-factor index (NEO-FFI) and Adjective Checklist (ACL) personality instruments. A preference for a rural practice location was associated with a combination of six domains of personality. The probability of rural preference was greater with higher scores on openness to experience, agreeableness and self-confidence but lower with higher scores on extraversion, autonomy and intraception. Taken together these six domains of personality provide useful although imperfect discrimination between students with a rural versus urban location preference. After controlling for student age the associations with extraversion and agreeableness failed to reach statistical significance. While personality does not fully explain medical students' attitude towards practicing as a rural doctor, the data suggest it is an important factor and that some individuals may be better suited to a rural medical career than others. Considering personality along with other characteristics of the individual might allow targeted 'marketing' of rural practice. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  13. Development of a patient-doctor communication skills model for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Young-Mee

    2010-09-01

    Communication is a core clinical skill that can be taught and learned. The authors intended to develop a patient-doctor communication model for teaching and assessing undergraduate medical students in Korea. To develop a model, literature reviews and an iterative process of discussion between faculty members of a communication skills course for second year medical students were conducted. The authors extracted common communication skill competencies by comparing the Kalamazoo Consensus Statement, SEGUE framework communication skills, the Calgary Cambridge Observation Guides, and previous communication skills lists that have been used by the authors. The content validity, with regard to clinical importance and feasibility, was surveyed by both faculty physicians and students. The first version of the model consisted of 36 items under 7 categories: initiating the session (8 items), building a relationship (6), gathering information (8), understanding a patient's perspectives (4), sharing information (4), reaching an agreement (3), and closing the session (3). It was used as a guide for both students and teachers in an actual communication skills course. At the end of the course, student performance was assessed using two 7-minute standardized patient interviews with a 34-item checklist. This assessment tool was modified from the first version of the model to reflect the case specificity of the scenarios. A patient-doctor communication model, which can be taught to those with limited patient care experience, was finally developed. We recommended a patient-doctor communication skills model that can be used for teaching and evaluating preclinical and clinical students. Further studies are needed to verify its validity and reliability.

  14. Smartphone and medical related App use among medical students and junior doctors in the United Kingdom (UK: a regional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne Karl Frederick

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smartphone usage has spread to many settings including that of healthcare with numerous potential and realised benefits. The ability to download custom-built software applications (apps has created a new wealth of clinical resources available to healthcare staff, providing evidence-based decisional tools to reduce medical errors. Previous literature has examined how smartphones can be utilised by both medical student and doctor populations, to enhance educational and workplace activities, with the potential to improve overall patient care. However, this literature has not examined smartphone acceptance and patterns of medical app usage within the student and junior doctor populations. Methods An online survey of medical student and foundation level junior doctor cohorts was undertaken within one United Kingdom healthcare region. Participants were asked whether they owned a Smartphone and if they used apps on their Smartphones to support their education and practice activities. Frequency of use and type of app used was also investigated. Open response questions explored participants’ views on apps that were desired or recommended and the characteristics of apps that were useful. Results 257 medical students and 131 junior doctors responded, equating to a response rate of 15.0% and 21.8% respectively. 79.0% (n=203/257 of medical students and 74.8% (n=98/131 of junior doctors owned a smartphone, with 56.6% (n=115/203 of students and 68.4% (n=67/98 of doctors owning an iPhone. The majority of students and doctors owned 1–5 medical related applications, with very few owning more than 10, and iPhone owners significantly more likely to own apps (Chi sq, p Conclusions This study found a high level of smartphone ownership and usage among medical students and junior doctors. Both groups endorse the development of more apps to support their education and clinical practice.

  15. "Why Has My World Become More Confusing than It Used to Be?" Professional Doctoral Students Reflect on the Development of Their Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Stephen; Lord, Janet; Parr, Elizabeth; Sharkey, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on research into the experience of professional doctoral students and is written by the students themselves. We, the authors, are currently studying for the Doctorate in Education at the University of Manchester, UK. We place our work in the context of recent empirical research into the development of doctoral student…

  16. Faculty Mentors' Perspectives on E-Mentoring Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Nancy; Jacobs, Karen; Ryan, Cathryn

    2016-12-01

    E-mentoring is a viable option for mentoring students in occupational therapy educational programs. The objective of this study was to investigate faculty perspectives of faculty-to-student e-mentoring in an online post-professional doctor of occupational therapy program. In a retrospective mixed-method design, nine faculty members described features and outcomes of e-mentoring 48 doctoral students. Online survey results were analysed quantitatively for descriptive statistics; transcripts from structured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that successful, satisfactory e-mentoring is student-centered, flexible, frequent, academically and psychosocially supportive; faculty members must be skilled in adapting e-mentoring to the needs and objectives of each mentee; e-mentoring provides opportunities for faculty members and students to achieve academic and professional objectives and growth. The findings suggest that implementation of e-mentoring may be a useful model in other occupational therapy programs. There is a need for future studies with broader participant pool, observable measures of e-mentoring, standardized measures of satisfaction and success and comparison between e-mentoring with and without web camera. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of the learning outcome achieved by a nursing research seminar course for doctoral students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Meei-Fang; Chen, Yueh-Chih

    2008-06-01

    Educational evaluation is a priority policy of the Ministry of Education and student learning outcome is an important criterion used in educational evaluation work. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the learning outcome of a newly developed course for doctoral students entitled, Nursing Research Seminar. The course was one semester in length and required students to attend 2 hours of class per week. Student learning outcome was evaluated based on the level of understanding students had of course objectives. The six objectives of this course were: evaluating and integrating research papers; enhancing critical thinking skills; gaining an in-depth understanding of the literature related to topics of interest; enhancing ability to construct research proposals; guiding student dissertation work; and refining critical research skills. Data were collected from the responses provided by 25 students on a 5-point Likert-type evaluation form based on course objectives filled out during the last class of the semester. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were adopted. Results showed: (1) The average post-course score (24.76 +/- 2.89) was significantly higher than the pre-course score (18.40 +/- 5.52); (2) Students realized significant improvements in all six objectives at the end of the course; (3) There were statistically significant differences in improvement scores in all six objectives for students in different years of their doctoral program; (4) The lower the year in the program, the higher the improvement scores for each course objective; (5) The two objectives of the six that saw the most significant improvements were "gaining an in-depth understanding of the literature related to topics of interest", and "enhancing critical thinking skills". Because of the small sample size, conclusions drawn from this study should be treated as tentative. Findings provide preliminary information supporting the importance and necessity of offering the Nursing Research

  18. Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies.

  19. When hope and fear collide: Expectations and experiences of first-year doctoral students in the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. Sean

    Although there is a significant body of research on the process of undergraduate education and retention, much less research exists as it relates to the doctoral experience, which is intended to be transformational in nature. At each stage of the process students are presented with a unique set of challenges and experiences that must be negotiated and mastered. However, we know very little about entering students' expectations, beliefs, goals, and identities, and how these may or may not change over time within a doctoral program. Utilizing a framework built upon socialization theory and cognitive-ecological theory, this dissertation examines the expectations that incoming doctoral students have about their programs as well as the actual experiences that these students have during their first year. Interviews were conducted with twelve students from the departments of Botany, Chemistry, and Physics prior to matriculation into their respective doctoral programs. These initial interviews provided information about students' expectations. Interviews were then conducted approximately every six to eight weeks to assess students' perceptions about their actual experiences throughout their first year. The findings of this study showed that new doctoral students tend to have uninformed and naive expectations about their programs. In addition, many of the specific policies or procedures necessary for navigation through a doctoral program were unknown to the students. While few differences existed in terms of students' expectations based on gender or discipline, there were significant differences in how international students described their expectations compared to American students. The two primary differences between American and international students revolved around the role of faculty members and the language barrier. It is clear that the first year of doctoral study is indeed a year of transition. The nature and clarity of the expectations associated with the role of

  20. Forming of valeological and recreational students' culture (Analysis of literature sources and doctor and pedagogical oversight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytzev V.P.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article are expounded basic principles on forming of health of students in the context of valeological and active rest measures. Dany of determination of healthy appearance lives and active rest, directed on renewal, strengthening and maintainance of health. Many program developments are presented on making healthy of man with that a student could to make the own adequate program of making healthy. Concept methodology of active rest for the use of literary sources is expounded and in practical vital functions. Scientists, teachers and doctors of Ukraine and Russia, which worked and work on the problem of health of man and active rest measures, are transferred. An author is offer the general own program of making healthy of student, including eight sections, and also second program of making healthy of student, consisting of nine sections, which having a psychotherapy orientation

  1. Die Organisation der Promovierendenvertretung (ProV in der Tiermedizin [The organisation of internet-based representation for doctoral students (ProV in veterinary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaudien, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Doctoral studies in veterinary medicine represent the so-called “third part” of education in the field of veterinary medicine. During the preparation of a doctoral thesis, a graduate student should acquire skills for performing scientific work on an independent basis. Today, networks exist throughout Europe, including Germany, to support and connect doctoral students in most subject fields. However, specific support for performing a thesis in the field of veterinary medicine is not among these support networks. Therefore, specialized representation for doctoral students named ProV was founded at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, in 2003. As a first step, this specialized representative network aimed to achieve a better flow of information and connection among doctoral students within the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover. Moreover, additional steps to implement this network for use by other veterinary faculties throughout Germany have been undertaken. It is hoped that enhancing organization of doctoral students and easing the flow of information will ultimately contribute to improving the quality of doctoral theses in the field of veterinary medicine. [german] Die Promotionszeit stellt für viele Veterinärmediziner den so genannten dritten Teil der tiermedizinischen Ausbildung dar. Wie in anderen Fachbereichen auch, werden in dieser Phase Fähigkeiten zum vertieften selbstständigen wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten erworben. Deutschland- und europaweit sind bereits fachübergreifende Strukturen vorhanden, die Promovierende während dieser Zeit unterstützen und vernetzen sollen. Die Besonderheiten, die eine tiermedizinische Promotion mit sich bringt, werden dabei allerdings nicht berücksichtigt. An der Stiftung Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover (TiHo ist seit 2003 die Promovierendenvertretung ProV aktiv, die neben Informationsveranstaltungen über die Dissertation auch den Kontakt der Promovierenden

  2. The Impact of Community for Part-Time Doctoral Students: How Relationships in the Academic Department Affect Student Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zahl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the ways that part-time Ph.D. students develop community within the academic department and how a sense of community is related to persistence. This study included 12 participants (ten students and two program chairs in two academic departments at one urban research institution. This qualitative study followed a descriptive case study design and provided three levels of data: the institution is the bounded system; the academic departments are the cases; and the participants are embedded cases. Positive relationships with peers and faculty served as a source of encouragement and supported persistence, particularly during challenging semesters and later phases of the doctoral program. However, it was often difficult for the participants to develop and/or maintain relationships, due to limited proximity, limited access to faculty, and changing cohorts. Participants did not consider full-time doctoral students to be part of their community, due to perceived differences between part-time and full-time students. The participants also perceived that faculty catered to full-time students and preferred to conduct research with them rather than part-time students.

  3. Smartphone and medical related App use among medical students and junior doctors in the United Kingdom (UK): a regional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Smartphone usage has spread to many settings including that of healthcare with numerous potential and realised benefits. The ability to download custom-built software applications (apps) has created a new wealth of clinical resources available to healthcare staff, providing evidence-based decisional tools to reduce medical errors. Previous literature has examined how smartphones can be utilised by both medical student and doctor populations, to enhance educational and workplace activities, with the potential to improve overall patient care. However, this literature has not examined smartphone acceptance and patterns of medical app usage within the student and junior doctor populations. Methods An online survey of medical student and foundation level junior doctor cohorts was undertaken within one United Kingdom healthcare region. Participants were asked whether they owned a Smartphone and if they used apps on their Smartphones to support their education and practice activities. Frequency of use and type of app used was also investigated. Open response questions explored participants’ views on apps that were desired or recommended and the characteristics of apps that were useful. Results 257 medical students and 131 junior doctors responded, equating to a response rate of 15.0% and 21.8% respectively. 79.0% (n=203/257) of medical students and 74.8% (n=98/131) of junior doctors owned a smartphone, with 56.6% (n=115/203) of students and 68.4% (n=67/98) of doctors owning an iPhone. The majority of students and doctors owned 1–5 medical related applications, with very few owning more than 10, and iPhone owners significantly more likely to own apps (Chi sq, papp usage of several times a day. Over 24hours apps were used for between 1–30 minutes for students and 1–20 minutes for doctors, students used disease diagnosis/management and drug reference apps, with doctors favouring clinical score/calculator apps. Conclusions This study found a high level of

  4. Why Should We Use Online Research Methods? Four Doctoral Health Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Jennifer; Harris, Jane; Mackay, Sean; Maxwell, Clare

    2017-07-01

    The growth of the Internet has led to an increase in researchers utilizing online methods. Online communities such as forums, blogs, and video platforms are particularly useful for research involving populations that are Internet savvy, seldom heard or discussing sensitive or illicit behavior. Drawing upon the experiences of four doctoral health students who are using online methods, this article discusses the value and benefits of conducting online research as well as the limitations and difficulties encountered. Consideration is given to the methodological and ethical implications of online research. Our own research leads us to reflect on participants' perceptions of what is public, preserving anonymity and protecting participants from harm.

  5. 'A world of difference': a qualitative study of medical students' views on professionalism and the 'good doctor'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Briand, Beatriz; Auret, Kirsten; Johnson, Paula; Playford, Denese

    2014-04-12

    The importance of professional behaviour has been emphasized in medical school curricula. However, the lack of consensus on what constitutes professionalism poses a challenge to medical educators, who often resort to a negative model of assessment based on the identification of unacceptable behaviour. This paper presents results from a study exploring medical students' views on professionalism, and reports on students' constructs of the 'good' and the 'professional' doctor. Data for this qualitative study were collected through focus groups conducted with medical students from one Western Australian university over a period of four years. Students were recruited through unit coordinators and invited to participate in a focus group. De-identified socio-demographic data were obtained through a brief questionnaire. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to inductive thematic analysis. A total of 49 medical students took part in 13 focus groups. Differences between students' understandings of the 'good' and 'professional' doctor were observed. Being competent, a good communicator and a good teacher were the main characteristics of the 'good' doctor. Professionalism was strongly associated with the adoption of a professional persona; following a code of practice and professional guidelines, and treating others with respect were also associated with the 'professional' doctor. Students felt more connected to the notion of the 'good' doctor, and perceived professionalism as an external and imposed construct. When both constructs were seen as acting in opposition, students tended to forgo professionalism in favour of becoming a 'good' doctor.Results suggest that the teaching of professionalism should incorporate more formal reflection on the complexities of medical practice, allowing students and educators to openly explore and articulate any perceived tensions between what is formally taught and what is being observed in clinical practice.

  6. [Jageillonian University medical students' relationship to awarding of the doctorate degree in all medical sciences in the period between wars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolski, S

    1997-01-01

    The Academic Schools Act of 1920 and the Ordinance of 1924 pertaining to doctorates provided that one could earn the degree only having submitted a disseration. The Austrian Act which was in force up to that moment had allowed to receive the degree without writing a thesis. Protests voiced by medical students extended validity of the Act. The Jagiellonian University medicals played an important role in delaying the Ordinance coming into force. Protesting against the newest regulations they organized public meetings, wrote memorials and filled petitions. The Jagiellonian University Faculty of Medicine granted doctorates without dissertation up to the end of December 1932. However some doctorates were granted even after that term.

  7. Training MSSW Students for Military Social Work Practice and Doctoral Students in Military Resilience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMars, Tyler; Bolton, Kristin; Maleku, Arati; Smith-Osborne, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    The demand for social workers with military-related practice and research experience exceeds the current supply. To advance military social work education, we developed an interlevel master's of science in social work (MSSW) field practicum and doctoral research practicum that provides military social work field experiences and contributes to…

  8. Mentor-mentee interaction and laboratory social environment: Do they matter in doctoral students' publication productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynalvez, Marcus Antonius; Ynalvez, Ruby A; Ramírez, Enrique

    2016-09-26

    We explored the social shaping of science at the micro-level reality of face-to-face interaction in one of the traditional places for scientific activities-the scientific lab. We specifically examined how doctoral students' perception of their: (i) interaction with doctoral mentors (MMI) and (ii) lab social environment (LSE) influenced productivity. Construed as the production of peer-reviewed articles, we measured productivity using total number of articles (TOTAL), number of articles with impact factor greater than or equal to 4.00 (IFGE4), and number of first-authored articles (NFA). Via face-to-face interviews, we obtained data from n = 210 molecular biology Ph.D. students in selected universities in Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan. Additional productivity data (NFA) were obtained from online bibliometric databases. To summarize the original 13 MMI and 13 LSE semantic-differential items which we used to measure students' perceptions, principal component (PC) analyses were performed. The results were smaller sets of 4 MMI PCs and 4 LSE PCs. To identify which PCs influenced publication counts, we performed Poisson regression analyses. Although perceived MMI was not linked to productivity, perceived LSE was linked: Students who perceived their LSE as intellectually stimulating reported high levels of productivity in both TOTAL and IFGE4, but not in NFA. Our findings not only highlight how students' perception of their training environment factors in the production of scientific output, our findings also carry important implications for improving mentoring programs in science. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2016.

  9. Information Competence of Doctoral Students in Information Science in Spain and Latin America: A Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Maria; Fernandez-Ramos, Andres; Sanchez, Gerardo; Meneses, Grizly

    2013-01-01

    The study was carried out with students of official doctoral programs of Information Science in four universities in Spain and Latin America with the purpose of finding out, through self-assessments, student perceptions of their own information competence. A survey was designed to determine self-perceptions of knowledge, skills and attitudes…

  10. Disciplinary Enculturation Experiences of Five East Asian Doctoral Students in US-Based Second Language Studies Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seonhee

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the non-discursive aspects of the disciplinary enculturation experiences of five international doctoral students from East Asia in three Second Language studies graduate programmes in the United States. Based largely on interview data, this study examined how students participate in their graduate discourse communities and…

  11. Professional Identity, Professional Associations, and Recruitment: Perspectives of Current Doctoral Students and Recent Graduates of Rehabilitation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alison; Phillips, Brian; Manninen-Luse, Melissa; Irizarry, Lesley O.; Hylton, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of the perceptions of current doctoral students and recent graduates from rehabilitation counseling and rehabilitation psychology programs on professional identity, professional associations, and recruitment. These three issues were selected based on the likelihood that students and recent graduates…

  12. Values in Science: Making Sense of Biology Doctoral Students' Critical Examination of a Deterministic Claim in a Media Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendran, Aswathy; Chunawala, Sugra

    2015-01-01

    Several educators have emphasized that students need to understand science as a human endeavor that is not value free. In the exploratory study reported here, we investigated how doctoral students of biology understand the intersection of values and science in the context of genetic determinism. Deterministic research claims have been critiqued…

  13. I'm a Poet? International Doctoral Students at a U.S. University Participate in a Creative Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Jill; Ning Chang, Lynn Chih

    2012-01-01

    What happens when international doctoral students participate in a creative writing workshop? Very often, students at our large midwestern U.S. university enter classes having learned English in their native countries with a heavy emphasis on only skills and grammar. They have not had the chance to play with language, to express themselves through…

  14. Perceived stress and fatigue among students in a doctor of chiropractic training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Vosko, Andrew M; Brash, Marissa; Ph, Dr; Philips, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    High levels of stress and fatigue are associated with decreased academic success, well-being, and quality of life. The objective of this research was to quantify levels of perceived stress and fatigue among chiropractic students to identify sources of and student coping mechanisms for perceived stress and fatigue and to identify the relationship between students' perceived stress and fatigue. A survey comprised of the Perceived Stress Scale, the Undergraduate Sources of Stress Survey, and the Piper Fatigue Scale was administered to chiropractic students in their 2nd, 5th, and 8th trimesters of doctoral study. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, 1-way analysis of variance, and linear correlation tests. Students reported having moderate to high levels of stress and fatigue, with higher levels of stress and fatigue seen in women than in men. A nonsignificant difference among stress scores and a significant difference among fatigue scores were observed based on program term. Levels of stress predicted levels of fatigue, and stress was strongly correlated with psychological health, relationships with family members, mood, and need for learning accommodations. Fatigue was strongly correlated with psychological health, academic demands, and conflicts between studies and other activities. There are differences in the reporting of perceived stress and fatigue levels in this chiropractic student population based on gender. The correlation between fatigue and stress also suggests that measures that may alleviate one may likely affect the other.

  15. Improving Doctoral Success by Matching PhD Students with Supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antònia Darder

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect of the effective supervision of PhD research is the supervisor-student relationship. This interaction is affected by the characteristics and needs of students and institutional conditions, as well as the skills, attitudes, and roles of supervisors and their supervisory styles. When supervision is carried out at a distance, it entails an additional challenge, mainly concerning interaction. The purpose of this study is to improve the research process, supervision, and design of virtual environments in order to support this supervision. The study identifies the supervisory relationships that affect doctoral research conducted at a distance from the student’s academic institution. It also describes how students and their supervisors perceived the characteristics of supervision and the skills and attitudes students perceived in and expected from their supervisors. For data collection, semistructured interviews were used. The results indicate important differences between supervisors’ perceptions concerning their own role and students’ needs regarding supervision, and they demonstrate the importance of attending to student needs and, on the part of supervisors, exercising responsibility in the development of research competencies in students, as is the case of independence of criteria and autonomy.

  16. Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B R

    1991-01-01

    A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, ...

  17. Antibiotic prescribing in DR Congo: a knowledge, attitude and practice survey among medical doctors and students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Thriemer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Antibiotic resistance (ABR particularly hits resource poor countries, and is fuelled by irrational antibiotic (AB prescribing. We surveyed knowledge, attitudes and practices of AB prescribing among medical students and doctors in Kisangani, DR Congo. METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: A total of 184 questionnaires were completed (response rate 94.4%. Knowledge about AB was low (mean score 4.9/8 points, as was the estimation of local resistance rates of S. Typhi and Klebsiella spp.(correct by 42.5% and 6.9% of respondents respectively. ABR was recognized as a problem though less in their own practice (67.4% than nation- or worldwide (92.9% and 85.5%, p<.0001. Confidence in AB prescribing was high (88.6% and students consulted more frequently colleagues than medical doctors when prescribing (25.4% versus 11.6%, p= 0.19. Sources of AB prescribing included pharmaceutical companies (73.9%, antibiotic guidelines (66.3%, university courses (63.6%, internet-sites (45.7% and WHO guidelines (26.6%. Only 30.4% and 16.3% respondents perceived AB procured through the central procurement and local pharmacies as of good quality. Local AB guidelines and courses about AB prescribing are welcomed (73.4% and 98.8% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This data shows the need for interventions that support rational AB prescribing.

  18. Using human simulation to prepare physical therapy students for acute care clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Nicki J; Panzarella, Karen J; Melzer, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The acute care setting requires a unique skill set for all health care providers, including Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. This study explores high-fidelity human simulation (HFHS) training in a DPT education program to achieve learning objectives specific to preparation of DPT students for acute care clinical practice. Twenty-three DPT students participated in a HFHS acute care experience, provided feedback about the learning experience, and completed a survey regarding preparedness for clinical practice. Student feedback was interpreted to gain content validity of the learning experience, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey results. In this pilot study, students identified four learning objectives met during the simulation experience: interprofessional communication, preparation of the treatment environment, patient safety, and discharge planning. Following the experience, 91.5% of the students reported more confidence in interprofessional communication, and 67% were more knowledgeable in discharge disposition. All students agreed that simulations should be part of the curriculum, and 95.2% reported simulation valuable in preparation for clinical practice. As a result of HFHS training in the DPT program, students' educational objectives were met, and simulation was deemed valuable in integrating prior learning and providing an enhanced understanding of the acute care setting. The findings support continued investigation of the effectiveness of simulation to prepare DPT students for acute care clinical practice.

  19. Identity Development and Mentoring in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leigh A.; Burns, Leslie D.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Leigh Hall and Leslie Burns use theories of identity to understand mentoring relationships between faculty members and doctoral students who are being prepared as educational researchers. They suggest that becoming a professional researcher requires students to negotiate new identities and reconceptualize themselves both as people…

  20. Towards “Operating Within” the Field: Doctoral Students’ Views of Supervisors’ Discipline Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gube

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper considers the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise in doctoral learning from a student perspective. Background:\tDoctoral students need to develop expertise in a particular field of study. In this context, developing expertise requires doctoral students to master disciplinary knowledge, conventions and scholarship under the guidance of supervisors. Methodology\t: The study draws on a mixed-method approach, using an online survey and semi-structured interviews conducted with doctoral students. Contribution: The paper brings to the fore the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise on doctoral students’ research progress. Findings: The survey data suggest that doctoral students nominate their supervisors on the basis of their discipline expertise. They also view supervisors’ expertise as key to the development of ‘insider’ knowledge of their doctoral research. Recommendations for Practitioners: Supervisors play a pivotal role in helping doctoral students overcome intellectual barriers by imparting their discipline knowledge as well as balancing satisfactory doctoral completion rate and high quality student experience. Impact on Society\t: Doctoral supervision equips doctoral students with the right arsenal to be able to competently operate within their field and prepares them for their future research or professional career that demands a high level of discipline expertise. Future Research:\tThe scope of the findings leaves open a discussion about the experiences of doctoral students matched with non-discipline expert supervisory teams; for example, the extent of the mismatch and its ramifications.

  1. Preparing practice scholars: teaching knowledge application in the Doctor of Nursing Practice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Budd, Geraldine M; Courtney, Maureen R; Neiheisel, Mary B; Hammersla, Margaret; Carlson, Elizabeth D

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the scholarship role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and the associated knowledge and skills required for success. There are excellent competencies provided by national organizations that present guidelines for design and application of this practice scholar's contributions. Although evidence-based research translation is known to be essential for the DNP scholar, a consensus does not exist about the required research knowledge and skill levels that are needed. A model was developed to depict the scholarship roles of the DNP and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). This model indicates both DNP and PhD scholars are alike in their enactment of active scholarship but have different areas of expertise. They are different in their major roles that lead to the development of practice science; the DNP is the expert in knowledge application while the PhD is the expert in knowledge generation. A nurse practice scholar needs to have a fundamental and strong understanding of research design and interpretation in order to appraise and implement research-based evidence into practice and conduct clinical projects. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Doctoral Advisor-Advisee Pairing in STEM Fields: Selection Criteria and Impact of Faculty, Student and Departmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simy Joy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the doctoral programs in places where students are paired with advisors at the time of admission itself, most US programs require the students to choose their advisors, and the advisors to formally accept the students as advisees. Little research has been done to understand how students and faculty approach this mutual selection and pairing process. This paper examines this process in STEM departments (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, with specific focus on factors influencing the decisions. Based on focus groups and interviews of doctoral students and faculty from STEM departments in an American university, we identify criteria applied by students and faculty in making their choices. Students were found to assess faculty on available funding, area of research, personality, ability to graduate students fast, and career prospects for students, and faculty to assess students on their qualifications/credentials and perceived ability to contribute to research. We also found that this mutual assessment was not objective, but influenced by perceptions associated with faculty gender and career stage, and student nationality. In the end, whether students and faculty were actually paired with persons of their choice depended on departmental factors including prevalent pairing practices, restrictions on student numbers per faculty, and reward structure. We discuss implications of the findings for research and practice.

  3. Preparing Graduate Students as Science Communicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K.; Gutstein, J.

    2012-12-01

    Our presentation introduces our interdisciplinary curriculum that teaches graduate students at our R-1 university to translate their research to general audiences. We also discuss the challenges we have faced and strategies we have employed to broaden graduate education at our campus to include preparation in science communication. Our "Translating Research beyond Academia" curriculum consists of three separate thematically based courses taught over the academic year: Education and Community Outreach, Science Communication and Writing, Communicating with Policy- and Decision-makers. Course goals are to provide professional development training so that graduate students become more capable professionals prepared for careers inside and outside academia while increasing the public understanding of science and technology. Open to graduate students of any discipline, each course meets weekly for two hours; students receive academic credit through a co-sponsoring graduate program. Students learn effective strategies for communicating research and academic knowledge with the media, the general public, youth, stakeholders, and decision- and policy-makers. Courses combine presentations from university and regional experts with hands-on work sessions aimed towards creating effective communications, outreach and policy plans, broader impacts statements, press releases, blogs, and policy briefs. A final presentation and reflections are required. Students may opt for further training through seminars tailored to student need. Initial results of our analyses of student evaluations and work indicate that students appreciate the interdisciplinary, problem-based approach and the low-risk opportunities for learning professional development skills and for exploring non-academic employment. Several students have initiated engaged work in their disciplines, and several have secured employment in campus science communication positions. Two have changed career plans as a direct result of

  4. Understanding Doctoral Nursing Students' Experiences of Blended Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami Sigaroudi, Abdolhossein; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht Nasabadi, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    The concept of blended learning in the field of nursing and medicine has been accepted. Blended learning has been extensively used thanks to the development of communication technologies and the availability of Internet services. Meanwhile, experiences-based research, by all accounts, can help the expansion of such a learning modality. Therefore, this study was designed to explain nursing doctoral students' experiences of blended learning. To attain this goal, a descriptive phenomenology method was used to illustrate experiences as they are experienced by the participants in the study. With regard to the nature of the investigated phenomena and the existing methods for the inductive analysis, Colaizzi's method of data analysis was used. The findings of the study led to the discovery of three main themes: "failure", "synergy" and "specific interaction". Each of the themes has been further divided into some sub-themes.

  5. Tackling complex problems, building evidence for practice, and educating doctoral nursing students to manage the tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C

    2013-01-01

    The mandate for evidence-based practice (EBP) arose in response to, among other catalysts, several Institute of Medicine reports beginning in the late 1990s. At the same time, the National Institutes of Health and others have recognized that the most complex, important, and challenging problems, termed "wicked problems," are inherently transdisciplinary and require thinking beyond the limits of existing theories. When nursing students are prepared for EBP, they operate within a fairly stable set of assumptions and they exercise a past orientation. Wicked problem-solving occurs within a context that is characterized as dynamic and ambiguous and requires a future orientation to imagine potential solutions to questions of "what if?" Both skills, EBP, and wicked problem-solving, are essential within the discipline of nursing. Students at all levels need to understand when each scientific approach is required. PhD students must be prepared to participate in wicked problem-solving.

  6. The Impact of Supply and Demand on Doctorates in Physical Education Teacher Education: The Future of the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Barbara Ann; Lund, Jackie; O'Neil, Kason

    2016-01-01

    Quality preparation of doctoral students is a key to the survival of physical education teacher education. Past research has revealed a shortage of students graduating with a doctoral degree in physical education and a general reluctance of teachers to leave their jobs to pursue an advanced degree. As the number of universities preparing new…

  7. The Impact of Supply and Demand on Doctorates in Physical Education Teacher Education: The Future of the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Barbara Ann; Lund, Jackie; O'Neil, Kason

    2016-01-01

    Quality preparation of doctoral students is a key to the survival of physical education teacher education. Past research has revealed a shortage of students graduating with a doctoral degree in physical education and a general reluctance of teachers to leave their jobs to pursue an advanced degree. As the number of universities preparing new…

  8. How Doctoral Students and Graduates Describe Facilitating Experiences and Strategies for Their Thesis Writing Learning Process: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odena, Oscar; Burgess, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    This study considered the sources of facilitating experiences and strategies for thesis writing from doctoral students and graduates (N = 30). The sample was balanced between science and social science knowledge areas, with equal numbers of English as Second Language (ESL) participants in both groups. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used…

  9. The Four Ps of Publishing: Demystifying Publishing in Peer-Reviewed Journals for Social Work Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Windsor, Liliane Cambraia

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the field of social work has placed substantial value on social work research. As a result, publishing has become an important aspect of contributing to the social work field. While encouragement for faculty to publish may vary across settings, publication has not traditionally been expected of doctoral students. The purpose of…

  10. An Approach for Doctoral Students Conducting Context-Specific Review of Literature in IT, ICT, and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Gabriella; Curró, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Since 1980s the rate of technological change has been phenomenal, creating an impact on the information-seeking behaviors of doctoral students and other researchers. When searching the three fields of Information Technology (IT), Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and Educational Technology (EdTech), it is like opening a Pandora's…

  11. Mentoring from Different Social Spheres: How Can Multiple Mentors Help in Doctoral Student Success in Ed.D Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Tarae; Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students leave their programs early due to lack of mentoring relationships needed to support degree completion and success. However, how mentoring contributes to Ed.D degree completion is not widely studied. In this qualitative narrative study, we sought to explore how multiple mentoring relationships reduced attrition in an Ed.D program.…

  12. How Doctoral Students and Graduates Describe Facilitating Experiences and Strategies for Their Thesis Writing Learning Process: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odena, Oscar; Burgess, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    This study considered the sources of facilitating experiences and strategies for thesis writing from doctoral students and graduates (N = 30). The sample was balanced between science and social science knowledge areas, with equal numbers of English as Second Language (ESL) participants in both groups. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used…

  13. The Public Good and Academic Capitalism: Science and Engineering Doctoral Students and Faculty on the Boundary of Knowledge Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Katalin; Bresonis, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the research-related experiences of 48 doctoral students and 22 faculty in science and engineering fields at three research universities, with specific emphasis on the intersection of the public good and academic capitalism. Identifying an expansive, intersecting organizational space between the public good and academic…

  14. Advisory Relationship as a Moderator between Research Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Productivity among Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Patty Beyrong; Woo, Hongryun; Bang, Na Mi

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between research self-efficacy, motivation, and productivity, as well as advisory relationship as a moderator, among 190 counselor education doctoral students. Research self-efficacy and motivation predicted productivity. Advisory relationship moderated the relationship between intrinsic and failure avoidance…

  15. Theory in the Service of Practice: Theories in Action Research Dissertations Written by Students in Education Doctorate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambo, Debby

    2014-01-01

    Educational leaders are enrolling in second-generation education doctorate (EdD) programs because these are allowing them to remain in the field as they pursue their degree and perform action research within their workplace. As part of degree requirements, students in these programs are challenged to cross the theory-to-practice divide. However,…

  16. An Approach for Doctoral Students Conducting Context-Specific Review of Literature in IT, ICT, and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Gabriella; Curró, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Since 1980s the rate of technological change has been phenomenal, creating an impact on the information-seeking behaviors of doctoral students and other researchers. When searching the three fields of Information Technology (IT), Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and Educational Technology (EdTech), it is like opening a Pandora's…

  17. An Exploration of the Scientific Writing Experience of Nonnative English-Speaking Doctoral Supervisors and Students Using a Phenomenographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Dean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonnative English-speaking scholars and trainees are increasingly submitting their work to English journals. The study’s aim was to describe their experiences regarding scientific writing in English using a qualitative phenomenographic approach. Two focus groups (5 doctoral supervisors and 13 students were conducted. Participants were nonnative English-speakers in a Swedish health sciences faculty. Group discussion focused on scientific writing in English, specifically, rewards, challenges, facilitators, and barriers. Participants were asked about their needs for related educational supports. Inductive phenomenographic analysis included extraction of referential (phenomenon as a whole and structural (phenomenon parts aspects of the transcription data. Doctoral supervisors and students viewed English scientific writing as challenging but worthwhile. Both groups viewed mastering English scientific writing as necessary but each struggles with the process differently. Supervisors viewed it as a long-term professional responsibility (generating knowledge, networking, and promotion eligibility. Alternatively, doctoral students viewed its importance in the short term (learning publication skills. Both groups acknowledged they would benefit from personalized feedback on writing style/format, but in distinct ways. Nonnative English-speaking doctoral supervisors and students in Sweden may benefit from on-going writing educational supports. Editors/reviewers need to increase awareness of the challenges of international contributors and maximize the formative constructiveness of their reviews.

  18. The Public Good and Academic Capitalism: Science and Engineering Doctoral Students and Faculty on the Boundary of Knowledge Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Katalin; Bresonis, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the research-related experiences of 48 doctoral students and 22 faculty in science and engineering fields at three research universities, with specific emphasis on the intersection of the public good and academic capitalism. Identifying an expansive, intersecting organizational space between the public good and academic…

  19. Finding the right doctoral thesis – an innovative research fair for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of research, as promoted by the framework, is widely acknowledged. Many medical students in Germany work on a research project as part of their doctoral thesis whilst still going to medical school. However, a significant amount of projects are abandoned unfinished, which leads to substantial wastage of resources. One reason for this is an information deficit concerning undergraduate research projects.Project description: To counteract this, we introduced an annual event at LMU Munich called with more than 600 visitors each year. It combines medical convention and research fair including keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions as well as an exhibition of research groups and institutes. is a peer-to-peer event organized by a team of 40 students. Results: A needs analysis before its implementation underlined the information deficit as a possible cause for the high rate of abandoned projects. In the annual evaluation, visitors of rate the event with an average grade of 2.1 on a six-level Likert scale (n=558, SD=1.06, with "1=very good", "6=poor". They stated to now feel better informed about the topic and regarded visiting as a worthwhile investment of time.Discussion: Students are generally satisfied with the event and feel better informed after visiting . However, many students never visit DoktaMed for various reasons. A possible improvement would be to present a greater number of clinical studies in addition to the laboratory work that focuses on now.Conclusion: Evaluation after six years of is very promising. Visitors seem to be better informed. Nevertheless there is space for improvement in order to get more students and more faculty members involved. More studies are needed to assess long-term effects.

  20. Inhaled medication for asthma management: evaluation of how asthma patients, medical students, and doctors use the different devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz Janaína Barbosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma results from a combination of three essential features: airflow obstruction, hyperresponsiveness of airways to endogenous or exogenous stimuli and inflammation. Inadequacy of the techniques to use different inhalation devices is one of the causes of therapeutic failure. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate how 20 medical students, 36 resident physicians of Internal Medicine/Pediatrics, and 40 asthma patients used three devices for inhalation therapy containing placebo. All patients were followed at the Pulmonary Outpatient Service of Botucatu Medical School and had been using inhaled medication for at least six months. The following devices were evaluated: metered dose inhalers (MDI, dry powder inhalers (DPI, and MDI attached to a spacer device. A single observer applied a protocol containing the main steps necessary to obtain a good inhaler technique to follow and grade the use of different devices. Health care professionals tested all three devices and patients tested only the device being used on their management. MDI was the device best known by doctors and patients. MDI use was associated with errors related to the coordination between inspiration and device activation. Failure to exhale completely before inhalation of the powder was the most frequent error observed with DPI use. In summary, patients did not receive precise instruction on how to use inhaled medication and health care professionals were not well prepared to adequately teach their patients.

  1. Simulation training for the frontline--realistic preparation for role 1 doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, S J; Howell, M; Simpson, R

    2010-06-01

    Simulation in Healthcare is gaining popularity worldwide. Recently it has been decided that there should be a simulation component to pre-deployment training for doctors destined for Role 1. Little is known about the challenges, workload, case mix and non-technical issues that face medical personnel working out of a Forward Operating Base. To examine this further, a workshop was convened with subject matter experts and simulation trainers. Common themes identified were concerning pre-deployment issues, team working, evaluation prior to transfer, equipment, communication and specific clinical issues. Six scenarios were developed over the course of the day that included desired learning objectives in form of technical and nontechnical skills. There are many aspects of team resource management or non-technical skills already researched that can be transferred directly into a Role 1 healthcare setting. Simulation offers the chance to provide training in a safe and controlled environment and can potentially ensure specific defined learning outcomes are achieved. This article reports the first steps in the process of providing this new type of training and discusses the faculty requirements, the available methods of delivery and specific issues surrounding fidelity.

  2. Awareness of ionizing radiation exposure among junior doctors and senior medical students in radiological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelhia, Elfatih

    2017-03-01

    The awareness and knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure in radiological investigations among junior doctors and medical students were studied. The participants were year four to year six senior medical students enrolled at University of Dammam and interns in King Fahad University Hospital. The survey consisted of 22 questions designed online using the software 'QuestionPro' licensed to the University of Dammam. 100 hard copies were also distributed manually and collected. A total of 221 (88.5%) questionnaires were completed. 213 participants viewed, 151 started and 128 (84.7%) completed online. 93% of the distributed samples were completed. Overall knowledge was poor; 44% and 19% of the respondents thought incorrectly that MRI and ultrasound emit ionizing radiation, respectively. Respondents (92%; n  =  203) underestimated the dose of abdominal spiral computed tomography (CT) and 4% thought no ionizing radiation involved in CT. 59% of respondents underestimated the radiation doses in nuclear medicine; bone scan 87%, PET/CT scan 67%, thyroid isotope scan 45% and PET scan 36%. 47% of the subjects had attended formal lectures, tutorials or workshops on radiation protection while 53% (n  =  119) had not. For future education the majority stated they would prefer tutorials or workshops (42.3%) or problem-based learning/case studies (32.4%), while web-based modules would be their last choice (8.1%).

  3. Preparing Community College Leaders: The AACC Core Competencies for Effective Leadership & Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Delores E.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States face shortages of leaders prepared to assume administrative positions in the 21st century. To respond to this shortage, graduate programs are emerging with a specific emphasis on community college leadership; other graduate programs offer broader curricula focused on educational leadership, policy, or higher…

  4. Preparing Community College Leaders: The AACC Core Competencies for Effective Leadership & Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Delores E.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States face shortages of leaders prepared to assume administrative positions in the 21st century. To respond to this shortage, graduate programs are emerging with a specific emphasis on community college leadership; other graduate programs offer broader curricula focused on educational leadership, policy, or higher…

  5. How do medical students prepare for flipped classrooms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM; de Kleijn, R.A.M.; ten Cate, TJ; van Rijen, HVM; Westerveld, HE

    A flipped classroom, an approach abandoning traditional lectures and having students come together to apply acquired knowledge, requires students to come to class well prepared. The nature of this preparation is currently being debated. Watching web lectures as a preparation has typically been

  6. Scientific dishonesty—a nationwide survey of doctoral students in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The knowledge of scientific dishonesty is scarce and heterogeneous. Therefore this study investigates the experiences with and the attitudes towards various forms of scientific dishonesty among PhD-students at the medical faculties of all Norwegian universities. Method Anonymous questionnaire distributed to all post graduate students attending introductory PhD-courses at all medical faculties in Norway in 2010/2011. Descriptive statistics. Results 189 of 262 questionnaires were returned (72.1%. 65% of the respondents had not, during the last year, heard or read about researchers who committed scientific dishonesty. One respondent had experienced pressure to fabricate and to falsify data, and one had experienced pressure to plagiarize data. On average 60% of the respondents were uncertain whether their department had a written policy concerning scientific conduct. About 11% of the respondents had experienced unethical pressure concerning the order of authors during the last 12 months. 10% did not find it inappropriate to report experimental data without having conducted the experiment and 38% did not find it inappropriate to try a variety of different methods of analysis to find a statistically significant result. 13% agreed that it is acceptable to selectively omit contradictory results to expedite publication and 10% found it acceptable to falsify or fabricate data to expedite publication, if they were confident of their findings. 79% agreed that they would be willing to report misconduct to a responsible official. Conclusion Although there is less scientific dishonesty reported in Norway than in other countries, dishonesty is not unknown to doctoral students. Some forms of scientific misconduct are considered to be acceptable by a significant minority. There was little awareness of relevant policies for scientific conduct, but a high level of willingness to report misconduct.

  7. Medical Specialty Choice and Related Factors of Brazilian Medical Students and Recent Doctors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Correia Lima de Souza

    Full Text Available Choosing a medical specialty is an important, complex, and not fully understood process. The present study investigated the factors that are related to choosing and rejecting medical specialties in a group of students and recent medical doctors.A cross-sectional survey of 1,223 medical students and doctors was performed in Brazil in 2012. A standardized literature-based questionnaire was applied that gathered preferable or rejected specialties, and asked questions about extracurricular experiences and the influence of 14 factors on a Likert-type scale from 0 to 4. Specialties were grouped according to lifestyle categories: controllable and uncontrollable, which were subdivided into primary care, internal medicine, and surgical specialties. Notably, the time period of rejection was usually earlier than the time period of intended choice (p < 0.0001, χ(2 = 107.2. The choice mainly occurred during the internship period in medical school (n = 466; 38.7%. An overall large frequency of participation in extracurricular activities was observed (n = 1,184; 95.8%, which were highly associated with the respective medical area. Orthopedic surgery had the highest correlation with participation in specialty-specific organized groups (OR = 59.9, 95% CI = 21.6-166.3 and psychiatry was correlated with participation in research groups (OR = 18.0, 95% CI = 9.0-36.2. With regard to influential factors in controllable lifestyle specialties, "financial reason" (mean score ± standard deviation: 2.8 ± 1.0; median = 3 and "personal time" (3.1 ± 1.3; median = 4 were important factors. In primary care, these factors were less important (1.7 ± 1.3 and 1.7 ± 1.5, respectively; median = 2 for both, and higher scores were observed for "curricular internship" (3.2 ± 1.1, median = 4 and "social commitment" (2.6 ± 1.3, median = 3.The present findings provide important insights into developing strategies to stimulate interest in specialties based on the needs of the

  8. The effects of networks on U.S. institution selection by foreign doctoral students in science and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyildiz, Zeynep Esra

    The United States has been a very attractive destination for foreign Science and Engineering (S&E) graduate students and postdoctoral scholars for a considerable period of time. Several studies have documented significant contributions of foreign students and foreign scientists in S&E. These contributions in turn foster economic development. Recent studies suggest, however, that the U.S. is losing its dominance in attracting foreign talent. Increased competition outside the U.S. contributes to the change as do changes in visa regulations. Despite the important role of foreign doctoral students in the U.S., relatively little is known about factors influencing their decision to attend an institution. One factor that is rarely explored is the effect of networks on institution selection. Through their networks, students learn about application procedures, studying at an institution, housing opportunities, general culture and people. In doing this, they draw both on the experience of the alumni as well as the support of current students and faculty at their target institution. Thus, networks can play an important role in where foreign doctoral students actually end up studying. This study aims to provide both qualitative and quantitative information about the role networks play in foreign doctoral students' institution selection. This three-part study utilizes different methodologies: (1) focus group interviews conducted with Turkish doctoral students at the Georgia Institute of Technology; (2) a web study of research laboratories in science and engineering; and (3) the estimation of Random Utility Model (RUM) of institution selection. These three components build on each other, in addition to the individual contributions that they make. Together they provide an in-depth and comprehensive analysis of the role of networks. The results from guided focus group interviews indicate that students, alumni, faculty and local community of the same nationality influence

  9. Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods : Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results : The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion : No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course.

  10. Health Issues in Medical Students: How We Need To Take Care of Our Future Generation Doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apichat Sinthubua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical profession is one of the most coveted professions in the society. During the medical course, individuals are subjected to much stress and hardships. Many fail to cope up and quit the course or even land up in substance abuse. A major cause of concern is the health of any medico. On few occasion the disease may be imaginative in nature whereas at other times it may be actually present. There is a need to differentiate between two. At many occasions, there are illnesses which are a cause of worry for both parents and administration. The health of every single budding doctor is important as entrance to medical course is an intellectual superior individual it incurs heavy expenses on the part of the administration and we cannot afford to compromise on such a potential asset to the society. We performed an extensive search of literature such as Pubmed, Scopus and Google for obtaining necessary articles for this short narrative mini review. Search terms included: “medical”, students”, “illnesses”, disease.” The present review is first of its kind which aims to discuss the medical illness and various diseases affecting the medicos during their professional career. The results of the review may help in better planning in terms of taking care of the health of medical students

  11. What does it means to be a critical scholar? A metalogue between science education doctoral students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cian, Heidi; Dsouza, Nikeetha; Lyons, Renee; Alston, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This manuscript is written in response to Lydia Burke and Jesse Bazzul's article Locating a space of criticality as new scholars in science education. As doctoral students finding our place in the culture of science education, we respond by discussing our journeys towards the development of a scholarly identity, with particular focus on whether or how we see ourselves as critical scholars. Since each of us authoring this paper has a different perspective, a metalogue format is utilized to ensure all of our voices and journeys are represented. We use the Burke and Bazzul article as a platform for conversations about challenges faced for emerging scholars in the field of science education and explore how we see our role in responding to these challenges. Specifically, we discuss the barriers to publication, dissemination of research to practitioners, and how to approach these problems from a grounding in critical theory. As a result of our conversations, we conclude that there is a need to reshape the field of science education to invite more unorthodox research perspectives, methodologies, and publication formats. To do so, the issues we explore require a continued conversation between emerging scholars, practicing researchers, and practicing educators.

  12. What does it means to be a critical scholar? A metalogue between science education doctoral students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cian, Heidi; Dsouza, Nikeetha; Lyons, Renee; Alston, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This manuscript is written in response to Lydia Burke and Jesse Bazzul's article Locating a space of criticality as new scholars in science education. As doctoral students finding our place in the culture of science education, we respond by discussing our journeys towards the development of a scholarly identity, with particular focus on whether or how we see ourselves as critical scholars. Since each of us authoring this paper has a different perspective, a metalogue format is utilized to ensure all of our voices and journeys are represented. We use the Burke and Bazzul article as a platform for conversations about challenges faced for emerging scholars in the field of science education and explore how we see our role in responding to these challenges. Specifically, we discuss the barriers to publication, dissemination of research to practitioners, and how to approach these problems from a grounding in critical theory. As a result of our conversations, we conclude that there is a need to reshape the field of science education to invite more unorthodox research perspectives, methodologies, and publication formats. To do so, the issues we explore require a continued conversation between emerging scholars, practicing researchers, and practicing educators.

  13. Mentoring Matters: An Exploratory Survey of Educational Leadership Doctoral Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Anjalé D.; Mansfield, Katherine Cumings; Lee, Pei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research on quantitative differences between men and women's experiences in doctoral programs. We aim to fill that gap by sharing findings from a web-based exploratory survey of perceived gender differences on quality mentoring in educational leadership doctoral programs. According to survey results, there is limited…

  14. The Training of "Triple Helix Workers"? Doctoral Students in University-Industry-Government Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thune, Taran

    2010-01-01

    Changes in knowledge production, increasing interaction between government, universities and industry, and changes in labor markets for doctoral degree holders are forces that have spurred a debate about the organization of doctoral education and the competencies graduates need to master to work as scientists and researchers in a triple helix…

  15. Student feedback about The Skeptic Doctor, a module on pharmaceutical promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravi Shankar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical promotion is an integral part of modern medical practice. Surveys show that medical students have a positive attitude towards promotion. Pharmaceutical promotion is not adequately taught in medical schools. A module based on the manual produced by Health Action International was conducted for second year medical students at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal. Student feedback on various aspects of the module was obtained using a semi-structured questionnaire. Eighty-six of the 100 students (86% provided feedback about the module. Forty-five (52.3% were female and 39 (45.3% were male. Participant feedback about the module was positive. Small group work and role plays were appreciated, and the ratings of the module and the manual were satisfactory. Respondents felt pharmaceutical promotion will play an important role in their future practice and that the module prepared them to respond appropriately to promotion and select and use medicines properly. The module further developed on issues covered during pharmacology practical and majority felt the module was of relevance to Nepal. Students appreciated the module though there were suggestions for improvement. The module should be considered during the years of clinical training (third and fourth years and internship and in other medical schools.

  16. Daddy, Can We Play Beatles Rock Band? The Lived Experiences of a Married Student with Children in a Cohort-Based Education Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand more clearly the lived experiences of married doctoral students with children who are enrolled in a cohort-based program. Attempting to maintain a strong family relationship, balance a career, enroll in a doctoral program, and provide for a family is an avalanche of emotion and pressure on all members…

  17. Daddy, Can We Play Beatles Rock Band? The Lived Experiences of a Married Student with Children in a Cohort-Based Education Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand more clearly the lived experiences of married doctoral students with children who are enrolled in a cohort-based program. Attempting to maintain a strong family relationship, balance a career, enroll in a doctoral program, and provide for a family is an avalanche of emotion and pressure on all members…

  18. Preparing Today's Nursing Students for Tomorrow's Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Federal directives, nursing and nursing education associations, as well as accrediting bodies emphasize the importance of integrating health information technology and EHRs into nursing practice. Additionally, informatics is a required competency of baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing education's efforts to enhance students' learning in the area of electronic documentation is at its peak. The goal of enabling nurses to make healthcare safer, more effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable can only be achieved if a variety of technologies are clearly integrated into nursing education. Therefore, some schools have developed educational innovations to incorporate academic EHRs. As the mental health setting is unique, extraordinary attention has to be provided during the education of electronic documentation. Nursing education efforts must focus on interventions that provide resources that enhance the participant's knowledge and skills related to electronic documentation in a variety of clinical settings. Additionally, implementing academic EHRs in clinical settings offers nursing educators an opportunity to note the benefits. The state of nursing education depends on the accessibility to utilize academic EHRs in the nursing curriculum within the clinical setting to effectively prepare students for real-word practice.

  19. A survey of how and why medical students and junior doctors choose a career in ENT surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, M; Mandavia, R; Syed, I; Qureshi, A; Hettige, R; Wong, B Y W; Saeed, S; Cartledge, J

    2016-11-01

    To ascertain determinants of an interest in a career in ENT surgery through a survey of medical students and junior doctors. A survey was administered, comprising Likert scales, forced response and single option questions, and free text responses, at five different courses or events for those interested in a career in ENT. The survey had an 87 per cent response rate; respondents consisted of 43 applicants for national selection, 15 foundation doctors and 23 medical students. The most important factors that encourage ENT as a career included: the variety of operative procedures, work-life balance, inherent interest in this clinical area and inspirational senior role models. Exposure to ENT in undergraduate or post-graduate training is critical in deciding to pursue this specialty. It is important to promote those aspects of ENT surgery that attract people to it, and to argue for greater exposure to ENT during undergraduate and post-graduate training.

  20. How medical doctors and students should use Social Media: a review of the main guidelines for proposing practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Miguel Angel; Leis, Angela; Mayer, Alex; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Social Media has grown exponentially and in the last few years there has been an increasing use amongst medical doctors and students. There is intense debate about the complexities of ensuring medical professionalism in the digital age and especially on using open and massive online services. The objectives of this paper are: first, to gather the main recommendations on using Social Media platforms and websites by medical doctors and students, which are proposed by several international organizations, institutions and universities of reference and second, to propose a set of practical recommendations, based on the comparison of the statements and items of the guidelines, in order to find agreements and differences among them and select the most common and practical items stated. A Decalogue of good practices has been drawn up, pointing out the most important aspects that should be considered, highlighting the relevance of maintaining professional behavior in these environments, taking into account the advantages and drawbacks when using them.

  1. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  2. Teaching Statistics to Doctoral Students with Lonergan's Insight-Based Critical Realism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Gwozdz, Wencke

    2014-01-01

    The authors report on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a doctoral level intensive quantitative methods course featuring an integrated orientation to, and practicum in, statistics competence for qualitative researchers. A feature of this integrated approach is the inclusive point...

  3. Effects of CLIL on EAP Learners: Based on Sample Analysis of Doctoral Students of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guizhen Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Europe most studies of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL focus on language knowledge and language skills and most studies of CLIL are carried out in primary schools and secondary schools. As for the implementation of CLIL in China, most studies are done theoretically and are carried out among undergraduates. CLIL is mainly applied in the teaching and learning of general English rather than in the teaching and learning of English for Academic Purpose (EAP. In order to have a better understanding of the effect of CLIL on EAP learners, a sample analysis is undertaken among doctoral students of science. Two kinds of instruments are adopted in this paper to conduct both quantitative and qualitative study, including two questionnaires and a series of classroom observations. The study obtains the following findings: Firstly, as CLIL is effective due to its dual-focus, it is possible to implement CLIL in EAP teaching and learning. Secondly, class activities such as group work, pair work, class presentations as well as task-based course activities such as translation, paper writing, paper analysis and rewriting practice play an important role in motivating the participants to integrate discipline content and language. Besides, the four factors of CLIL which include content, communication, culture and cognition are attached great importance to by learners. Finally, the increasing ability to integrate content and language as well as the thinking patterns and cultural awareness in EAP writing greatly contributes to the participants’ further academic researches. Keywords: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL; English for Academic Purpose (EAP; effect of CLIL

  4. Roles of Principals in the Preparing Students to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Bingul, Murat

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the impacts of school leaders on the school curriculums of preparing students to life. Even if the school leaders and teachers are expert in their area related to the functions of the schools, it seems that schools are failing in the preparation of the students to life. The school leaders may play an important role to…

  5. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  6. In Their Words: Student Preparation and Perspectives on US Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    US universities are admitting higher percentages of international students, bringing into focus concerns with how to best support them once they are at the university. However, less attention has been paid to the preparation they undertake before matriculation. This study looks at how students are prepared before arrival and how this preparation…

  7. Do Medical Students' Narrative Representations of "The Good Doctor" Change Over Time? Comparing Humanism Essays From a National Contest in 1999 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Pooja C; King, Brandy; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Brett-MacLean, Pamela; Dinardo, Perry; Frankel, Richard M

    2017-04-01

    To explore medical students' conceptions of "the good doctor" at two points in time separated by 14 years. The authors conducted qualitative analysis of narrative-based essays. Following a constant comparative method, an emergent relational coding scheme was developed which the authors used to characterize 110 essays submitted to the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Essay Contest in 1999 (n = 50) and 2013 (n = 60) in response to the prompt, "Who is the good doctor?" The authors identified five relational themes as guiding the day-to-day work and lives of physicians: doctor-patient, doctor-self, doctor-learner, doctor-colleague, and doctor-system/society/profession. The authors noted a highly similar distribution of primary and secondary relational themes for essays from 1999 and 2013. The majority of the essays emphasized the centrality of the doctor-patient relationship. Student essays focused little on teamwork, systems innovation, or technology use-all important developments in contemporary medicine. Medical students' narrative reflections are increasingly used as rich sources of information about the lived experience of medical education. The findings reported here suggest that medical students understand the "good doctor" as a relational being, with an enduring emphasis on the doctor-patient relationship. Medical education would benefit from including an emphasis on the relational aspects of medicine. Future research should focus on relational learning as a pedagogical approach that may support the formation of caring, effective physicians embedded in a complex array of relationships within clinical, community, and larger societal contexts.

  8. Midwives' and doctors' perceptions of their preparation for and practice in managing the perineum in the second stage of labour: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Christine E; Lau, Rosalind; Biro, Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    to identify the perceptions of midwives and doctors at Monash Women's regarding their educational preparation and practices used for perineal management during the second stage of labour. anonymous cross-sectional semi-structured questionnaire ('The survey'). the three maternity hospitals that form Monash Women's Maternity Services, Monash Health, Victoria, Australia. midwives and doctors attending births at one or more of the three Monash Women's maternity hospitals. a semi-structured questionnaire was developed, drawing on key concepts from experts and peer-reviewed literature. surveys were returned by 17 doctors and 69 midwives (37% response rate, from the 230 surveys sent). Midwives and doctors described a number of techniques they would use to reduce the risk of perineal trauma, for example, hands on the fetal head/perineum (11.8% of doctors, 61% of midwives), the use of warm compresses (45% of midwives) and maternal education and guidance with pushing (49.3% of midwives). When presented with a series of specific obstetric situations, respondents indicated that they would variably practice hands on the perineum during second stage labour, hands off and episiotomy. The majority of respondents indicated that they agreed or strongly agreed that an episiotomy should sometimes be performed (midwives 97%, doctors 100%). All the doctors had training in diagnosing severe perineal trauma involving anal sphincter injury (ASI), with 77% noting that they felt very confident with this. By contrast, 71% of the midwives reported that they had received training in diagnosing ASI and only 16% of these reported that they were very confident in this diagnosis. All doctors were trained in perineal repair, compared with 65% of midwives. Doctors were more likely to indicate that they were very confident in perineal repair (88%) than the midwives (44%). Most respondents were not familiar with the rates of perineal trauma either within their workplace or across Australia. Midwives

  9. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral j...

  10. An Exploration of the Relationship between Psychological Capital and Depression among First-Year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Dorothy J; Lyons, Sean T; Conlon, Peter D

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the impact of psychological capital on depressive symptoms among Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) students (n=84) over their first two semesters of studies. Our results indicated elevated rates of depression in both the first and second semesters relative to published norms. Using the typology developed by Hafen, Reisbig, White, and Rush (2008), students were classified as either "adaptive" (i.e., improving depressive symptomatology from semester to semester) or "struggling" (i.e., worsening depressive symptomatology from semester to semester). All four components of psychological capital (i.e., self-esteem, optimism, hope, and resilience) were positively associated with adaptive response to depression. These results are significant, as the components of psychological capital can be learned and strengthened through deliberate interventions, providing tangible guidance for students, faculty, and health professionals in their efforts to improve student wellness.

  11. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E. C.; Laursen, J. B.; Kling, J.; Cortes, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2012–2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, “Internationalization at Home ”, offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in Engli...

  12. University Preparation for Native American Students: Theory and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Jeanna; Chiste, Katherine Beaty

    1986-01-01

    Describes a summer program at the University of Lethbridge designed to improve the retention and graduation rates of Native American students, most of whom are adult reentry students with incomplete secondary school preparation; covers program theory, cultural background, staffing, student screening, curriculum, and outcomes. (JHZ)

  13. Preparing Students for After-College Life: The Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelli K.

    2012-01-01

    Historical context informs the work of student affairs professionals and others in higher education in striking the right balance in helping prepare students for life after college, but significant new pressures face students, their mentors, and educational institutions today. This chapter discusses the contexts that shape the work of student…

  14. John Swales as Mentor: The View from the Doctoral Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebs, Margaret; Fredrickson, Kirstin M.; Hyon, Sunny; Samraj, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Four of linguist John Swales's former doctoral students narrate their experiences with his mentoring style. Four important areas for mentoring are discussed: beginning the research process; analysis and writing; preparation for academic career; and the relationship between advisor and student. Narratives reveal both the complexity of the graduate…

  15. Preparing Students for College... and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; Mero, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    In many ways, Roxbury Preparatory Charter School is typical of Boston's Mission Hill area: the student body is composed entirely of students of color, most of whom live in single-parent households. More than 68% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals. What is not typical is that for the fourth consecutive year, Roxbury Prep, which…

  16. Help Students Prepare for High School Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Christopher; Connor, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety! Stress! Fear! Everyone lives in a time of escalating accountability in terms of state, district, and city-wide examinations that measure student growth in the acquisition of skills and content area knowledge. All students feel increased pressure to constantly demonstrate improved levels of academic performance. For students with cognitive…

  17. Online Discussion Assignments Improve Students' Class Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T.

    2010-01-01

    To increase the number of students who read the text before class and to promote student interaction centering on text material, I developed an online discussion assignment as a required component of a cognitive psychology course. Across 2 studies, this assignment had a limited effect on examination performance, but students completing online…

  18. A Research Elective Course on Dietary Supplements to Engage Doctor of Pharmacy Students in Primary Literature Evaluation and Scholarly Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Gunaseelan, Simi; Khan, Seher A

    2015-12-01

    To develop and implement a research elective course to enhance skills of pharmacy students on primary literature evaluation and evidence-based practice on dietary supplements and generate scholarly publications. A 2 credit hour independent research elective course was designed and implemented in the third-year doctor of pharmacy curriculum. The course involved student-led research activities that included formulating research project, reviewing of primary literature, collection and evaluation of data, and writing of review articles for publication in peer-reviewed journals. An online survey was administered to evaluate students' perceptions of the course. Students successfully completed the course. The course resulted in peer-reviewed publications through student-faculty collaboration. Pharmacy students enrolled in the elective course perceived that the course helped them enhance their analytical reasoning, critical thinking and drug-literature evaluation skills, gain evidence-based knowledge, and apply the knowledge into practice during their advanced pharmacy practice experiences community pharmacy rotations. The course provided opportunity to the pharmacy students to not only critically search and evaluate the literature but also publish in peer-reviewed journals. Other pharmacy schools/colleges can adopt this course model to create opportunities for student-faculty collaborations toward scholarly accomplishments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Formation of a Virtual Professional Learning Community in a Combined Local and Distance Doctoral Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Lance; Branch, Gracie; Moore, George

    2008-01-01

    A phenomenological study was conducted with a group of doctoral students preparing to be technology leaders. Students and faculty participated in weekend-intensive course work in which the faculty and some students attended classes on campus, and another group of students attended classes through distance technologies. Using some of these very…

  20. The Genre of Instructor Feedback in Doctoral Programs: A Corpus Linguistic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kelley Jo; Henry, Patricia; Vinella, Michael; Wells, Steve; Shaw, Melanie; Miller, James

    2015-01-01

    Providing transparent written feedback to doctoral students is essential to the learning process and preparation for the capstone. The purpose of this study was to conduct a qualitative exploration of faculty feedback on benchmark written assignments across multiple, online doctoral programs. The Corpus for this analysis included 236 doctoral…

  1. [On the way to becoming an MD (Dr. med.): What kind of support do doctoral students need? Part 1: Survey and development of a program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, Monika; Paulitsch, Michael A; Broermann, Marischa; Klingebiel, Thomas; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, medical doctorates are regularly criticized for their insufficient quality. In order to improve the quality of doctorates and to support doctoral candidates, a department-wide doctoral research program was established at the Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main in 2011 taking into account the practical needs of doctoral students at the School of Medicine. The program development proceeded in several steps: in the first step (2009/2010), a pilot study with eleven doctoral candidates was carried out at the Institute of General Practice. Their ratings of the perceived relevance and their own knowledge of 15 topics of scientific work were used to identify a provisional need for support. Subsequently an interdisciplinary panel of experts established the program throughout the faculty. Since its implementation, a requirements analysis in the form of questionnaires has been continuously carried out in order to assess the doctoral students' prior knowledge and their preferences expressed. At the same time, systematic searches for support programs in other medical fields have been conducted throughout Germany on several occasions. On the basis of the pilot study, the research results and the expert panel discussions the following topics were found to be particularly relevant: principles of good scientific practice, literature search, reference management, organization and structure of a doctoral thesis, formatting of Word documents, clinical epidemiology and data management. A specific, stepwise development process was used to design a concept for the faculty of medicine that pays close attention to the knowledge and interests of doctoral candidates. The establishment of the doctoral research program in Frankfurt and the results of its evaluation are presented in a second article (Paulitsch et al., 2016).

  2. Medical Student and Junior Doctors' Tolerance of Ambiguity: Development of a New Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jason; Roberts, Martin; Monrouxe, Lynn; Mattick, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The practice of medicine involves inherent ambiguity, arising from limitations of knowledge, diagnostic problems, complexities of treatment and outcome and unpredictability of patient response. Research into doctors' tolerance of ambiguity is hampered by poor conceptual clarity and inadequate measurement scales. We aimed to create and pilot a…

  3. Degree Progress of Women Doctoral Students: Factors that Constrain, Facilitate, and Differentiate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michelle A.; Ford, Martin E.; Thompson, Candace M.

    2004-01-01

    Using survey and qualitative data, this study identified emergent themes that remain consistent across or differentiate among reports of women earning their doctoral degree relatively quickly ("early-finishers") and those taking considerably longer ("late-finishers"). Emergent themes included commitment to timely degree completion, faculty…

  4. Doctoral Student Attrition in the STEM Fields: An Exploratory Event History Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Joe L., II; Gardner, Susan; Powers, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    The STEM fields, otherwise known as the Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics areas, have become the focus of multiple studies and funding initiatives in recent years. Despite these efforts, lingering concerns exist about who enters, who is retained, and who completes the doctorate in STEM fields. This study utilizes discrete-time…

  5. Supervision Provided to Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students: A Black and White Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgett, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The number of Indigenous Australians completing doctoral qualifications is disparately below their non-Indigenous contemporaries. Whilst there has been a steady increase in Indigenous completions in recent years, significant work remains to redress the imbalance. Supervision has been identified as a primary influencer of the likely success of…

  6. Helping Doctoral Students Teach: Transitioning to Early Career Academia through Cognitive Apprenticeship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Dominique A.; Cathcart, Abby; Neale, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral training is strongly focused on honing research skills at the expense of developing teaching competency. As a result, emerging academics are unprepared for the pedagogical requirements of their early-career academic roles. Employing an action research approach, this study investigates the effectiveness of a competency-based teaching…

  7. Supervision Provided to Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students: A Black and White Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgett, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The number of Indigenous Australians completing doctoral qualifications is disparately below their non-Indigenous contemporaries. Whilst there has been a steady increase in Indigenous completions in recent years, significant work remains to redress the imbalance. Supervision has been identified as a primary influencer of the likely success of…

  8. Factors Affecting the Enrollment and Persistence of African-American Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Susan E.; Chepyator-Thomson, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    A survey was sent to 106 African American doctoral recipients in sport and exercise science disciplines. Of these, 74, or 69.8% responded. Data analysis indicated that most respondents were extrinsically motivated to enroll. Persistence was influenced by institutional factors like financial aid and academic support services. (SM)

  9. [The German academic degree "Dr. med." is better than its reputation. Results of a questionnaire of doctoral students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, R; Park, D-H; Paulmann, V

    2012-11-01

    Recently there were mostly emotional debates about the scientific background and relevance of the German academic title "Dr. med.", while objective data are scarce. When submitting their doctoral thesis at the Medical School of Hannover students were asked anonymously about the type, topic, duration, quality of supervision as well as frequency and type of publication of the results. 180 doctoral candidates (62% women) participated in the study. The supervision was graded as good by the majority of students. The duration working on the thesis was equivalent to 47 weeks of a full time employment. There was some negative influence in participating in lectures and courses. Nearly all participants (98%) would recommend younger students to work on a dissertation as they had done themselves in parallel to the curriculum. The ability of how to interprete scientific data was assumed to be positively influenced. About two thirds stated that the results had been published in original articles at the time of submitting the thesis. More data from other medical faculties are needed to document the relevance of the medical dissertation to replace the emotional by a more rational debate. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. 医学生医患沟通能力培养探析%Strengthening the cultivation of doctor-patient communication skills of medical students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宇玲; 赵良君

    2011-01-01

    It is of great importance to construct harmonious doctor-patient relationship by strengthening the cultivation of communication skills of medical students. The authors expound the necessity of cultivating doctor-patient communication skills in medical universities. In the meantime,the authors analyze the cause of inability of doctor-patient communication . And some methods were explored to improve the doctor-patient communication skills of medical students with the analysis of educational situation of communication skills.%加强医学生医患沟通技能的培养,对于营造和谐的医患关系至关重要.本文阐述了医患沟通能力培养的必要性,分析了医学生医患沟通能力欠缺的原因,探讨了加强医患沟通能力培养的对策.

  11. Training the intern: The value of a pre-intern year in preparing students for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Anna; Fancourt, Nicholas; Robinson, Elizabeth; Wilkinson, Tim; Bagg, Warwick

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical and professional development that occurs during a New Zealand trainee intern year in preparation for the first house officer role. A quantitative questionnaire was distributed to all trainee interns (year 6) and year 5 medical students in New Zealand at the end of the 2007 academic year. This survey assessed self-reported competency and performance across clinical, professional and role development domains. Response rate was 65% (457/702). Compared to year 5 students, trainee interns reported significantly greater competence and performance levels across all three domains. The greatest improvement occurred in the independent performance of procedural skills (trainee interns: 77%, year 5: 35%, p interns: 94%, year 5: 56%, p intern year, 92% of students felt prepared to be a junior doctor, versus only 53% at the end of their 5th year (p intern year is important in preparing graduates for the intern role. The year affords increased responsibility and practical experience, whilst retaining an educational focus, facilitating the move from competence towards performance. Preparedness for practice was substantially higher following the New Zealand trainee intern year than has been reported with other pre-intern placements.

  12. Oregon Students Help Prepare Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Tom

    1973-01-01

    Describes a field-biology research project conducted at Coos Bay, Oregon by high school students attending the summer sessions at Terramar Field Science Facility during the summer of 1972. Discusses the value of this type of environmental survey for both the students and the community. (JR)

  13. Community Colleges: Preparing Students for Diverse Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    Postgraduation outcomes for community college students are complex. In addition to traditional job placement and earnings information, transferring to a 4-year institution is a positive first-destination outcome. Furthermore, community college students may have education and career goals that do not include earning a degree. Community college…

  14. Student USMLE Step One Preparation and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    This study investigated factors associated with medical students performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step One examination. The USMLE Step One emphasizes basic mechanisms and principles that are typically covered in the first 2 years of medical school. The study examined the relationship among student performance…

  15. Are Teacher and Principal Candidates Prepared to Address Student Cyberbullying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Bonner, Jessica L.; Styron, Jennifer L.; Bridgeforth, James; Martin, Cecelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the preparation of teacher and principal candidates to address problems created in K-12 settings as a result of cyberbullying. Participants included teacher and principal preparation students. Findings indicated that respondents were familiar with the most common forms of cyberbullying and its impact on…

  16. Influences to post-graduation career aspirations and attainment in STEM doctoral candidates and recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Deborah S.

    As the realities of the academic job market have forced some PhD recipients to accept less-preferable position types, there has been increasing concerns that these students are not prepared for their careers, especially in STEM fields. However, aside from the labor market, few studies have explored the influences on career aspiration and attainment among doctoral degree holders. This study utilized the socialization theory framework to identify aspects of the doctoral education process that are predictive of the likelihood of certain career aspirations among science and engineering doctoral candidates and career attainment among STEM doctoral recipients by utilizing nationally representative datasets: The National Research Council's Assessment of Research Doctorate Programs student questionnaire and the National Science Foundation's Survey of Earned Doctorates. This study identified field of study, research productivity rank of doctoral programs, primary type of finding doctoral students received, level of satisfaction with research experiences, and their sense of belonging within their doctoral program as factors that predict the likelihood of certain career aspirations compared with a career in education. Doctoral candidates' background characteristics that were significant predictors of career aspirations were gender, marital status, dependent status, race, age, and citizenship status. Further, this study identified participant's field of study, the Carnegie Rank of institutions attended, primary type of funding received, length of time to PhD, gender, marital status, dependent status, race, citizenship stats, and age as factors that predict the likelihood of the career outcomes investigated in this study, including doctoral recipients' employment field and primary work activity.

  17. Summer Technical Students 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    About 100 technical and doctoral students arrive each year, undergraduates and post-graduates who are preparing diploma or doctoral theses in applied science and technology. They spend up to two years at the Laboratory, as technical students as part of their formal training for a recognised degree or its equivalent.

  18. Understanding and perceptions of final-year Doctor of Pharmacy students about generic medicines in Karachi, Pakistan: a quantitative insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshed SQ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shazia Qasim Jamshed,1 Mohamad Izham Mohamad Ibrahim,2 Mohamad Azmi Hassali,3 Adheed Khalid Sharrad,4 Asrul Akmal Shafie,3 Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar5 1Pharmacy Practice, Kulliyyah of Pharmacy, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuantan Campus, Pahang, Malaysia; 2College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 3Discipline of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Penang, Malaysia; 4College of Pharmacy, University of Basra, Basra, Iraq; 5School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand General objective: To evaluate the understanding and perceptions of generic medicines among final-year Doctor of Pharmacy students in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: A 23-item survey instrument that included a question on the bioequivalence limits and Likert-type scale questions regarding the understanding and perceptions of generic medicines among the students was executed. Cronbach’s alpha was found to be 0.62. Results: Responses were obtained from 236 final-year Doctor of Pharmacy students (n=85 from a publicly funded institute; n=151 from a privately funded institute. When comparing a brand-name medicine to a generic medicine, pharmacy students scored poorly on bioequivalence limits. More than 80% of the students incorrectly answered that all the products that are rated as generic equivalents are therapeutically equivalent to each other (P<0.04. Half of the students agreed that a generic medicine is bioequivalent to the brand-name medicine (P<0.001. With regard to quality, effectiveness, and safety, more than 75% of the students disagreed that generic medicines are of inferior quality and are less effective than brand-name medicines (P<0.001. More than 50% of the students disagreed that generic medicines produce more side effects than brand-name medicines (P<0.001. Conclusion: The current study identified a positive perception toward generic medicines but also gaps in

  19. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  20. Intercultural Preparation for Future Mobile Students: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, Ana; Golubeva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Higher education (HE) student mobility offers the opportunity to acquire, among other things, intercultural experience. Nevertheless, it is crucial to prepare students and give them the tools to reflect on their experiences before, during and after study abroad. In this pedagogical paper, we present and discuss "Perceptions of self and…

  1. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  2. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  3. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  4. Teaching dual-process diagnostic reasoning to doctor of nursing practice students: problem-based learning and the illness script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Catherine O; Fowler, Terri; Kennedy, Sally

    2014-11-01

    Accelerating the development of diagnostic reasoning skills for nurse practitioner students is high on the wish list of many faculty. The purpose of this article is to describe how the teaching strategy of problem-based learning (PBL) that drills the hypothetico-deductive or analytic reasoning process when combined with an assignment that fosters pattern recognition (a nonanalytic process) teaches and reinforces the dual process of diagnostic reasoning. In an online Doctor of Nursing Practice program, four PBL cases that start with the same symptom unfold over 2 weeks. These four cases follow different paths as they unfold leading to different diagnoses. Culminating each PBL case, a unique assignment called an illness script was developed to foster the development of pattern recognition. When combined with hypothetico-deductive reasoning drilled during the PBL case, students experience the dual process approach to diagnostic reasoning used by clinicians.

  5. [The happy doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Christel M P; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Descriptive, questionnaire-based. To study what makes doctors and medical students happy: Descriptive, questionnaire-based. Descriptive, questionnaire-based. For the purposes of this study, doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire in the summer of 2012. They were presented with questions enquiring into general characteristics and into happiness. We asked them to define happiness, and to describe their happiest moments. The results were interpreted with the aid of simple statistics. 401 doctors, registrars and medical students took part in the study. 41% of the respondents were male and 59% female. Average age was 40 years. Students, GPs, anaesthesiologists and internists were the best represented. On average, the participants gave their 'happiness' a score of 7.6. The younger doctors ( 48 years (7.8), which also explains the relatively low scores for students (7.1). GPs were the happiest, with an average score of 7.9, closely followed by the 'other doctors', with an average score of 7.8, and the medical specialists (7.6). Within the specialties, bearing in mind that the low numbers means that results should be interpreted with some caution, the doctors with 'minority specialties' were the happiest, followed by internists and the supporting specialties. Psychiatrists and surgical colleagues can be found at the bottom of the list. The determinants 'love and relationships' and 'family' contribute the most to feeling happy. Older doctors are happier than younger doctors and GPs are generally happier than medical specialists. The determinants 'love and relationships' and family' are the most important for doctors' happiness.

  6. The Graduate Experience of Mexican International Students in US Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Gloria Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Although extensive research on the experience of international students in American higher education exists, little research has been done on international students from Latin America. Latin American students represent the second largest group of international students in the United States by world region after Asia (Institute of International…

  7. 博士生培养过程中师生互动关系研究——基于博士研究生的视角%Supervisor-Doctoral Student Interaction Research in the Process of Doctoral training- Based on the Perspective of Doctoral Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓平; 梅红

    2012-01-01

    以全国博士质量调查结果为基础,借鉴国外师生互动关系研究、导师人际行为模型的思想,利用西安高校博士生调查数据,分析了博士生怎样看待导师对其的指导,并从学生的视角分析了体验到的不同师生互动关系对其科研创新能力的影响。结果显示:导师与博士生互动关系处于“高度合作+一定程度强势指导”和“高度合作+一定程度尊重学生观点和意见”时.更有利于博士生科研能力、创新能力的培养,有利于推进博士生的科研和学位论文进展。%This paper is based on the Chinese Doctoral Quality findings in 2007. Thinking to the research of foreign supervisor-doctoral student interaction and the model for interpersonal supervisor behavior, the paper analyzed the information about doctoral student's perceptions of their relationship with their supervisor can be useful for providing detailed feedback to supervisor aiming at improving the training quality. The results showed: when the supervisor-doctoral student interactive relationship in a "high degree of cooperation + certain extent the strong guidance, friendly helps" or "a high degree of cooperation + certain degree of respect and understand for student views and opinions", it is more conducive to the doctoral research and innovation ability, this interpersonal style also is conducive to promoting the progress of the doctoral student research and dissertation.

  8. Perfection of physical preparation of students by facilities of boxing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylovskiy O.V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The question of physical preparedness of students of the unspecialized institutes of higher of I-IV of courses is considered. Offered and grounded idea of the use of facilities of boxing in form educational trainings employments. They are used for perfection of physical preparation of students as an alternative to the lessons on physical education. For the students of experimental group more considerable increase of indexes of physical preparedness is marked by comparison to a control group.

  9. The Lived Experience of Masters-Prepared Academic Nurse Educators Decision-Making Process for Pursuing Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing professionals represent one of the largest groups of healthcare professions in the United States. Nurses who educate in academic institutions across the states require higher education. Many nurse educators have completed master's level education and are considering obtaining doctoral education for various reasons. This study explored…

  10. Student Stress in a Three-Year Doctor of Pharmacy Program Using a Mastery Learning Educational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Lara J.; Frick, Jacob L.; Coffman, Renee E.; Dey, Surajit

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify stress and stress-relieving mechanisms among second-year pharmacy students in a 3-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program using a Mastery Learning Educational Model and to compare findings with those from a 4-year program. Methods Second-year PharmD students in a 3-year program were asked to complete a series of questionnaires including the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) regarding stress and stress-relieving activities. Results The average PSS score for the 3-year PharmD cohort was significantly higher than the score of demographically similar students enrolled in a 4-year PharmD program (P = 0.04). There were significant differences between the 2 groups’ scores on 5 items on the PSS including how often they: were upset because something happened unexpectedly, felt unable to control important things, felt nervous and stressed, thought about things that had to be accomplished, and were able to control the way they spent their time. The rate of prescription drug misuse among those in the 3-year PharmD program was 11.6%. Conclusions Students in a 3-year PharmD program with a unique educational model experienced more stress than students in a traditional 4-year PharmD program. PMID:21769140

  11. (Academic) preparation of/for students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Engstrøm, Emma; Sandermann, Weibke

    of both cases include the methodological empirical approach, emphasis on the process of ‘othering’, ethnocentrism and ethno- racial representations. The first case deals with pre-departure preparation inspired by MUD (memory, understanding and doing) principles, while the second deals with the ongoing in...

  12. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  13. Preparing Students for the AP Economics Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Sally; Ashmead, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The first step in teaching-to-understand economics is not teaching "the rules," but working with fundamental economic models from the outset. Many of the concepts in economics are illustrated through models. Students must: (1) be able to draw these models; (2) understand the assumptions of the models; and (3) use the models for analysis.…

  14. Instructional Innovations: Preparing Students for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Norman

    1994-01-01

    Forward-looking educators are teaching students to be flexible, creative thinkers by using cooperative learning, authentic assessments, interdisciplinary units taught to heterogeneous groups. Principals should facilitate appropriate staff development, build master planning schedule providing for team planning periods, allow staff members to attend…

  15. Undergraduate Accounting Students: Prepared for the Workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers-Clark, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore and investigate student perceptions as to what generic skills they considered were important for accountants and to what extent these skills were developed by their programme of study. Design/methodology/approach: Data gathered from 357 UK undergraduate accounting degree graduates were used to develop insights…

  16. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  17. Library Research Instruction for Doctor of Ministry Students: Outcomes of Instruction Provided by a Theological Librarian and by a Program Faculty Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Kamilos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At some seminaries the question of who is more effective teaching library research is an open question.  There are two camps of thought: (1 that the program faculty member is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is intimately engaged in the subject of the course(s, or (2 that the theological librarian is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is more familiar with the scope of resources that are available, as well as how to obtain “hard to get” resources.   What began as a librarian’s interest in determining the extent to which Doctor of Ministry (DMin students begin their research using Google, resulted in the development of a survey.  Given the interesting results returned from the first survey in fall of 2008, the survey was conducted again in the fall of 2011.  The results of the comparative data led to the discovery of some useful data that will be used to adjust future instruction sessions for DMin students.  The results of the surveys indicated that the instruction provided by the theological librarian was more effective as students were more prepared to obtain and use resources most likely to provide the best information for course projects. Additionally, following the instruction of library research skills by the librarian (2011 survey, DMin students were more likely to begin the search process for information resources using university provided catalogs and databases than what was reported in the 2008 survey. The responses to the two surveys piqued interest regarding both eBook use during the research process and the reduction of research frustration to be addressed in a follow-up survey to be given in 2014, results of which we hope to report in a future article.

  18. From Doctoral Student To Faculty Member: PhD. Project Alumni’s Evaluation Of Their Preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill N. Schwartz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to the important issues regarding diversity in business schools and corporate America, the KPMG Foundation established the PhD Project. The PhD Project helps business professionals and recent college graduates earn doctoral degrees in business disciplines and join business school faculty. While the PhD Project has helped increase the number of minority faculty members in business schools, it may be helpful to gather insights from the recent PhD alumni who have received support from the PhD Project. Our study examines attitudes about preparedness of PhD Project alums for their first faculty position after completing their PhD program. Results show that PhD Project alumni and majority PhD alumni (alumni not associated with the PhD Project felt they were prepared for their first faculty position, but they were not significantly different in their evaluation in most respects. However, to our surprise, majority PhD alumni felt they were better prepared for research than PhD Project alumni. This difference was significant and further analyses showed that younger faculty and those in the ethnic majority were better prepared for research. Both groups considered themselves well prepared for research and teaching. Neither group was as optimistic about being prepared for service responsibilities and the academic climate or politics of an academic career. Our findings show that the PhD Project is necessary to help ensure that minority faculty members are adequately prepared for research and their academic careers.

  19. Chinese Doctoral Student Socialization in the United States: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wendan; Collins, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Although international students annually contribute billions of dollars to the US economy, meaningful intercultural interaction between international students, peers, and faculty is often missing at US host campuses. Feelings of isolation, loneliness, and alienation are pervasive among international students at US campuses; these feelings can…

  20. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  1. The art of science education: Preparing graduate students of the 21st century to teach chemistry and physics in college and university settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, Terri

    This study examined the attitudes of a selected sample of Chemistry and Physics faculty and doctoral students to determine their perceived value (PV) of incorporating Teaching Methodology (TM) courses into program curricula to prepare graduates to teach in higher education. Barnes (1984) and Rosensitto (1999) determined professors' perceived need for graduate students to prepare for careers in academe. Barnes investigated professors of PhD students from several academic disciplines. Rosensitto included professors of PhD and Masters programs. This study included doctoral students, focusing on Chemistry and Physics PhD programs. The purposes of this study were to establish the percent of sample Chemistry and Physics PhD programs offering TM; to determine the PV of faculty (PV-F) and doctoral students (PV-S) for incorporating TM into the doctoral programs; to determine if there was a significant difference between PV-F and PV-S; and to identify respondents' opinions of best practices and suggestions for ways to incorporate TM into doctoral program curricula. The sample programs were analyzed to determine the percent of PhD programs offering TM; on-line surveys were used to gather data from faculty and doctoral students. Of the sampled programs, more Physics (21.7%) than Chemistry (14.8%) offer TM. The average PV-F was higher for programs offering TM than for those that do not, higher for Physics than for Chemistry, and higher for tenured than for non-tenured faculty. The average PV-S was higher for Physics than for Chemistry, and higher for programs that do not offer TM than for those that do. The average PV-S was higher for students planning to teach than for those planning to go into research or industry. This study looked at faculty and student responses to items on the Likert portion of the surveys. While the average PV-S (3.47) was significantly higher than PV-F (3.27), students and faculty had a remarkable similarity to the pattern for the responses to each of

  2. Facets of imagery in academic and professional achievements: A study of three doctoral students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letty Chan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the inception of the L2 motivational self system (Dörnyei, 2005, which operationalises motivation as a function of learners’ future identities, the field of L2 motivation has seen a growing interest in mental imagery. Numerous studies have examined the role of a future self-guide, that is, the ideal L2 self, and have confirmed it to be powerful for explaining learner motivation (e.g., Csizér & Lukács, 2010; Dörnyei & Ushioda, 2009; however, few studies have explored how mental imagery, a key dimension of the ideal L2 self (Dörnyei & Chan, 2013, can manifest itself in actual motivated behaviour. Using in-depth interviews, the present study aims to explore the motivational capacity of the natural use of mental imagery in three doctoral candidates studying at a British university. The main research focuses on examining how imagery was employed to stimulate the participants’ L2 learning and their doctoral research as well as career choice. This paper proposes a conceptual framework of types, functions, and conditions of imagery in academic and professional achievements based on the data obtained. It reveals an intriguing array of imagery types, functions, and conditions, which shape the achievement of the individuals’ desired goals. Recommendations and implications for future research on imagery use in SLA are also discussed.

  3. Self-reported comfort treating severe mental illnesses among pre-doctoral graduate students in clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Benjamin; Romeo, Katy Harper; Olbert, Charles M; Penn, David L

    2014-12-01

    One possible explanation for the dearth of psychologists working in severe mental illness (SMI) areas is a lack of training opportunities. Recent studies have shown that while training opportunities have increased, there remain fewer resources available for SMI training compared to other disorders. Examines whether students express discomfort working with this population and whether they are satisfied with their level of training in SMI. One-hundred sixty-nine students currently enrolled in doctoral programs in clinical psychology in the United States and Canada were surveyed for their comfort treating and satisfaction with training related to a number of disorders. RESULTS indicate that students are significantly less comfortable treating and finding a referral for a patient with schizophrenia as well as dissatisfied with their current training in SMI and desirous of more training. Regression analyses showed that dissatisfaction with training predicted a desire for more training; however, discomfort in treating people with SMI did not predict a desire for more training in this sample. This pattern generally held across disorders. Our results suggest general discomfort among students surveyed in treating SMI compared to other disorders.

  4. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  5. PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF STUDENTS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

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    A. G. Hentonen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem and the essence of training students for inclusive education in terms of higher education. The implementation of inclusive education is seen in several ways: the traditional school attendance by students with disabilities, learning at home and distance learning. The need for a barrier-free environment in the educational institutions represented by the basic requirements for the training of students for inclusion, providing mastery of pedagogical knowledge, promoting the development of creativity, the ability to generate new ideas, the implementation of a humanistic position that is based on ownership, dialogue, understanding and acceptance of the child with special abilities for granted. Competence approach is the methodological basis of training future teachers to work with children in the conditions of inclusive education. On the basis of this approach, the article presents a set of competencies that can successfully carry out the work with children and families in the conditions of inclusive education. The main competence of professional readiness of students for Inclusive Educ ation: monitoring,  diagnostic and informative.  Mon itoring competence involves tracking the process of training and education of children in inclusive education. Diagnostic ability to work with this category of   children   and   their   parents.   The   content   knowledge  of  the  problems  of  training  and  educ ation, understanding of the content of inclusive ed ucation, acquisition of knowledge and skills in wor king with children with special needs.

  6. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  7. Perspectives of Patients, Doctors and Medical Students at a Public University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro Regarding Tuberculosis and Therapeutic Adherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth da Trindade de Andrade

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO identifies 8.7 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB annually around the world. The unfavorable outcomes of TB treatment prevent the achievement of the WHO's cure target.To evaluate existing intersections in the conceptions relative to the knowledge of TB, the experience of the illness and the treatment.Doctors, medical students and patients were selected from a public university in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2011 to 2013. The data were obtained by semi-structured individual and focus group interviews, participant observation and a field journal. The inclusion of patients was interrupted due to saturation, and the inclusion of doctors and medical students stopped due to exhaustion. The theoretical background included symbolic Interactionism, and the analysis used rounded Theory. The analysis prioritized the actions/interactions axis.Twenty-three patients with pulmonary TB, seven doctors and 15 medical students were included. In the interviews, themes such as stigma, self-segregation, and difficulties in assistance emerged, in addition to defense mechanisms such as denial, rationalization, isolation and other mental mechanisms, including guilt, accountability and concealment of the disease. Aspects related to the assistance strategy, the social support network, bonding with the healthcare staff and the doctor-patient relationship were highlighted as adherence enablers. Doctors and students recommended an expansion of the theoretical and practical instruction on TB during medical students' education. The existence of health programs and policies was mentioned as a potential enabler of adherence.The main concepts identified were the stigma, self-segregation, guilt, responsibility, concealment and emotional repercussions. In relation to the facilitation of therapeutic adherence, the concepts identified were the bonds with healthcare staff, the doctor-patient relationship, assistance and educational health

  8. Understanding Doctoral Nursing Students' Experiences of Blended Learning: A Qualitative Study

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    Abdolhossein Emami Sigaroudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of blended learning in the field of nursing and medicine has been accepted. Blended learning has been extensively used thanks to the development of communication technologies and the availability of Internet services. Meanwhile, experiences-based research, by all accounts, can help the expansion of such a learning modality. Therefore, this study was designed to explain nursing doctoral students’ experiences of blended learning. To attain this goal, a descriptive phenomenology method was used to illustrate experiences as they are experienced by the participants in the study. With regard to the nature of the investigated phenomena and the existing methods for the inductive analysis, Colaizzi’s method of data analysis was used. The findings of the study led to the discovery of three main themes: "failure", "synergy" and "specific interaction". Each of the themes has been further divided into some sub-themes.

  9. Students and Institutions Protecting Whiteness as Property: A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Student Affairs Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study is based on interviews with White students graduating from a student affairs preparation program as well as a literature review of whiteness in education. Applying "critical race theory," the author examined the ways that students and institutions protected whiteness. Institutions and those within them concerned with equity must have…

  10. Preparing Vietnamese student teachers for teaching with a student-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Dekker, R.; Goedhart, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Vietnamese curriculum reform which trends toward a student-centered approach requires Vietnamese teacher educators to prepare student teachers for teaching using this approach. In this article, we present a case study of three Vietnamese student teachers working in groups in a methods course to

  11. The Impact Factor: Measuring Student Professional Growth in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Dawson, Kara

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the impact of an online Ed.D. in educational technology based on data collected from students at regular intervals during the program. It documents how students who were working professionals applied learning from the program within their practice, enculturated into the educational technology community, and grew…

  12. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development......This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  13. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  14. Prevalence of self-reported nonmedical use of prescription stimulants in North Carolina Doctor of Pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volger, Emily J; McLendon, Amber N; Fuller, Stephen H; Herring, Charles T

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, associated factors, and opinions regarding nonmedical use of prescription stimulants (NMUPS) in Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. An electronic survey was distributed to professional year 1 through 4 for students at 2 schools of pharmacy (public and private) in North Carolina. The survey was available for 3 weeks. Descriptive statistics (proportion of responders plus 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were used to describe the primary objective. Of the 1043 surveys distributed, 407 were completed giving a 39% response rate. The results indicated that 9% (95% CI: 6.44-11.93) of PharmD students acknowledge NMUPS at least once during their pharmacy education. Additionally, 3% (95% CI: 1.90-5.45) acknowledge NMUPS at least once during the current pharmacy school year (past 5 months). Nonmedical prescription stimulant users were 9 times more likely to participate in NMUPS prior to pharmacy school (P risk of abuse of prescription drug stimulants, which requires further research and attention. Additionally, there was a clear upward trend in the prevalence of NMUPS, and this misuse was associated with other detrimental behaviors.

  15. The experience of international doctoral education in nursing: an exploratory survey of staff and international nursing students in a British university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin

    2007-07-01

    As part of the internationalization of higher education, increasing numbers of international doctoral students are coming to study in British nursing schools. This paper reports on a small-scale exploratory survey that sought to investigate the educational experiences of these students and their supervisors in one British School of Nursing. Both staff and students saw great value in international education. However both groups identified the need for greater support to facilitate adjustment in a number of areas, including: understanding the PhD process, studying in a second language, working within a different academic culture, managing the supervision relationship, and finding a sense of community. This was a small study, but the findings confirm key issues identified in the limited available literature. Recommendations include staff training and the development of additional in-puts for students. Future research should include qualitative, longitudinal and multi-site studies to more thoroughly assess the process and outcomes of international doctoral education in nursing.

  16. Thesis and Dissertation Writing: Preparing ESL Students for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program created to assist students of English as a Second Language in their preparation for thesis and dissertation writing by focusing on the thesis proposal as an important part of that process. Notes that they often experience difficulty meeting the demands of the kind of writing required at this level and often are unaware of the…

  17. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. D. C.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; van Beukelen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from conve

  18. Thesis and Dissertation Writing: Preparing ESL Students for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program created to assist students of English as a Second Language in their preparation for thesis and dissertation writing by focusing on the thesis proposal as an important part of that process. Notes that they often experience difficulty meeting the demands of the kind of writing required at this level and often are unaware of the…

  19. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  20. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. D. C.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; van Beukelen, P.

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from

  1. Preparing Students for Higher Education: The Role of Proactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertshuis, Susan; Jung, Moon; Cooper-Thomas, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Proactivity is important to individual success, particularly where individuals face significant obstacles and where formal support may be lacking or difficult to access. The study tracks mature students over a one-semester university preparation course designed for returners to learning. Measures of proactivity included proactive personality,…

  2. Inside the Minds of Doctoral Students: Investigating Challenges in Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeola Bamgboje

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a report on a qualitative investigation into the challenges and solutions for Information Systems PhD candidature in Australia by conducting a three-phase research process. Information Systems doctoral theses approved within the past 10 years in Australia were identified in three areas of research, using structured evidence-based search and review methods. This was followed by two focus groups. The first focus group provided a forum where participants engaged and contributed by sharing and reflecting on experiences during their candidature. The data generated was thematically analyzed. The second focus group provided a forum to compare, contrast, and combine findings from the first focus group and the theses review. This was then conceptually organized into a SWOT framework for discussion. The findings imply that there is a need, not only for an inclusive candidature research pathway now provided by most Australian universities, but also an integrated research and personal support pathway. The investigation resulted in defining a conceptual framework of value in Australia and internationally, which acknowledges and bridges the academic-practice gap, offering a considerable step for future PhD candidature investment.

  3. Transdisciplinarity and Translation: Preparing Social Work Doctoral Students for High Impact Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurius, Paula S.; Kemp, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary research models are becoming increasingly transdisciplinary (TD), multilevel, community-connected, and bent on expediting the movement of research to impact. This requires not only fresh thinking about the science of social work but an educational architecture that fosters both cross-disciplinary understanding of complex underlying…

  4. Missed connections: A case study of the social networks of physics doctoral students in a single department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaub, Alexis Victoria

    Gender disparity is an issue among the many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Although many previous studies examine gender issues in STEM as an aggregate discipline, there are unique issues to each of the fields that are considered STEM fields. Some fields, such as physics, have fewer women graduating with degrees than other fields. This suggests that women's experiences vary by STEM field. The majority of previous research also examines gender and other disparities at either the nationwide or individual level. This project entailed social network analysis through survey and interview data to examine a single physics department's doctoral students in order to provide a comprehensive look at student social experiences. In addition to examining gender, other demographic variables were studied to see if the results are truly associated with gender; these variables include race/ethnicity, year in program, student type, relationship status, research type, undergraduate institute, and subfield. Data were examined to determine if there are relationships to social connections and outcome variables such as persistence in completing the degree and the time to degree. Data collected on faculty were used to rank faculty members; data such as h-indices and number of students graduate over the past 5 years were collected. Fifty-five (55) of 110 possible participants completed the survey; forty-three are male, and twelve are female. Twenty-eight of the fifty-five survey participants were interview; twenty-three are male, and five are female. Findings for peer networks include that peer networks are established during the first year and do not change drastically as one progresses in the program. Geographic location within the campus affects socializing with peers. Connections to fellow students are not necessarily reciprocated; the maximum percentage of reciprocated connections is 60%. The number of connections one has varies by network purpose

  5. Attitude of fourth year Doctor of Pharmacy students towards pharmacy profession and their career preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Saad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Fourth year students believed that pharmacy education and practice affect the health care system. Their favorite career areas were clinical pharmacy, industrial pharmacy, and hospital pharmacy. Personal interest was the most important factor involved in this selection. Most of them were interested in pharmacy-related research activities.

  6. Connecting Practice, Theory and Method: Supporting Professional Doctoral Students in Developing Conceptual Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Antonenko, Pavlo

    2014-01-01

    From an instrumental view, conceptual frameworks that are carefully assembled from existing literature in Educational Technology and related disciplines can help students structure all aspects of inquiry. In this article we detail how the development of a conceptual framework that connects theory, practice and method is scaffolded and facilitated…

  7. Persistence Motivations of Chinese Doctoral Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study explored what motivated 6 Chinese international students to complete a PhD in science, technology, engineering, and math fields in the United States despite perceived dissatisfaction. This study was grounded in the value-expectancy achievement motivation theory and incorporated a Confucian cultural lens to understand motivation. Four…

  8. Using Live Tissue Laboratories to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Doctor of Physical Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. Allen; Noonan, Ann Cassidy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the use of animal laboratories has decreased in medical and basic science programs due to lack of trained faculty members, student concerns about animal welfare, and the increased availability of inexpensive alternatives such as computer simulations and videos. Animal laboratories, however, have several advantages over alternative forms…

  9. The Dissertation Examination: Identifying Critical Factors in the Success of Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil; Trudgett, Michelle; Page, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous Australians represent 2.2% of the working age population, yet account for only 1.4% of all university enrolments. In relation to higher degree research students, Indigenous Australians account for 1.1% of enrolments, but only 0.8% of all higher degree research completions. This paper reports on findings that emerged from an Australian…

  10. Persistence Motivations of Chinese Doctoral Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study explored what motivated 6 Chinese international students to complete a PhD in science, technology, engineering, and math fields in the United States despite perceived dissatisfaction. This study was grounded in the value-expectancy achievement motivation theory and incorporated a Confucian cultural lens to understand motivation. Four…

  11. Preparing Fourth-Year Medical Students to Teach During Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Richard J; Bardach, Naomi S; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Gillum, Leslie A; Haber, Lawrence A; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet S

    2006-01-01

    Interns are expected to teach medical students, yet there is little formal training in medical school to prepare them for this role. To enhance the teaching skills of our graduating students we initiated a 4-hour “teaching to teach” course as part of the end of the fourth-year curriculum. Course evaluations demonstrate that students strongly support this program (overall ratings 2000 to 2005: mean = 4.4 [scale 1 to 5], n = 224). When 2004 course participants were surveyed during the last month of their internship, 84%“agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “The teaching to teach course helped prepare me for my role as a teacher during internship” (2005: mean 4.2 [scale 1 to 5], n = 45, response rate 60%). A course preparing fourth-year students to teach during internship is both feasible and reproducible, with a minimal commitment of faculty and resident time. Participants identify it as an important addition to their education and as useful during internship. PMID:16704402

  12. Research experiences and mentoring practices in selected east Asian graduate programs: predictors of research productivity among doctoral students in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynalvez, Ruby; Garza-Gongora, Claudia; Ynalvez, Marcus Antonius; Hara, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Although doctoral mentors recognize the benefits of providing quality advisement and close guidance, those of sharing project management responsibilities with mentees are still not well recognized. We observed that mentees, who have the opportunity to co-manage projects, generate more written output. Here we examine the link between research productivity, doctoral mentoring practices (DMP), and doctoral research experiences (DRE) of mentees in programs in the non-West. Inspired by previous findings that early career productivity is a strong predictor of later productivity, we examine the research productivity of 210 molecular biology doctoral students in selected programs in Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan. Using principal component (PC) analysis, we derive two sets of PCs: one set from 15 DMP and another set from 16 DRE items. We model research productivity using Poisson and negative-binomial regression models with these sets as predictors. Our findings suggest a need to re-think extant practices and to allocate resources toward professional career development in training future scientists. We contend that doctoral science training must not only be an occasion for future scientists to learn scientific and technical skills, but it must also be the opportunity to experience, to acquire, and to hone research management skills.

  13. Teaching dementia care to physical therapy doctoral students: A multimodal experiential learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorio, Anne K; Gore, Jane B; Warthen, Lindsey; Housley, Stephen N; Burgess, Elisabeth O

    2017-01-01

    As the population aged 65 and older grows, it becomes imperative for health care providers to expand their knowledge regarding geriatric conditions and concerns. Dementia is a devastating degenerative disease process that is affecting millions of individuals in the United States, with significant economic and emotional burden on family and caregivers. The need for further dementia education in physical therapy school is essential to improve attitudes and treatment that affect patient outcomes and quality of care. This physical therapy program implemented a 12-hour multimodal experiential learning module designed to educate their students on the challenges associated with dementia to increase knowledge and confidence when treating these patients. The results of this study showed statistically significant improvements in overall confidence and knowledge of treating patients with dementia. The study finds the addition of experiential learning to traditional didactic coursework improves students' reported confidence in working with patients with dementia and understanding the challenges associated with treating patients with dementia.

  14. Commentary: doctors without boundaries: the ethics of teacher-student relationships in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mello, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Possessed of both instinct and intellect, physician teachers are required to be respectful exemplars of professionalism and interpersonal ethics in all environments, be it the hospital, classroom, or outside the educational setting. Sometimes, even while protecting the sanctity of the teacher-student relationship, they may surreptitiously find themselves in the throes of consensual intimacy, boundary violations, student exploitation, or other negative interpersonal and/or departmental dynamics. One may question how an academic can consistently resolve this tension and summon the temperance, humility, charity, and restraint needed to subdue lust, pride, abuse, and incontinence in the workplace. One important answer may lie in an improved understanding of the moral necessity of social cooperation, fairness, reciprocity, and respect that is constitutive of the physician-teacher role. Although normative expectations and duties have been outlined in extant codes of ethics and conduct within academic medicine, to date, few training programs currently teach faculty and residents about the ethics of appropriate pedagogic and intimate relations between teaching staff and students, interns, residents, researchers, and other trainees. This essay highlights examples from history, literature, and medical ethics as one small step toward filling this void.

  15. Evolution of Doctoral Education in Pakistan: Challenges and Successes of Doctoral Students of Education in a Public Sector University of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Nelofer

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a part of the findings from a larger study undertaken to explore the experience of graduate students in education in Pakistan. Analysis of a smaller slice of data collected from students who were enrolled in the PhD and MPhil programmes of the Department of Education in a large public sector university in Northern Pakistan was…

  16. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles....... Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  17. The Role of Educators in Preparing the Confident Graduate Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geri Dickey, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With large numbers of non-BSW graduates gravitating toward MSW programs of study, BSWs must demonstrate their ability to handle the rigor of graduate school in order to remain competitive in the classroom and field. This study utilized an online survey of MSW students (N=107 from four different universities to examine how well students believe their particular undergraduate degree program prepared them to meet the academic demands of the MSW programs. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed and results indicate BSW graduates feel more prepared than non-BSWs to complete their MSW program. The exception for BSWs was found in areas of research and statistics when compared specifically to those with psychology bachelor degrees.

  18. Integrated approach in the development of competencies valeological students - medical doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostafijchuk Y.F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the scientific - methodical sources. We prove the feasibility of using an integrative approach in the training of future health professionals. Scientists are perspectives on the essence of the concept of integration, their position relative to integrative learning in higher education. Integrative learning is seen as a new educational technology. The basic components of the integration of modern science: Interscience synthesis, synthesis of methodological, social synthesis. It is found that an integrative technology is based on the principles of integrative and personal - oriented education. Reveals the main ways of implementing these principles: the design of interdisciplinary integration, the identification of the same type of interdisciplinary topics; orientation training content on the personality of the student, the formation integrity valeological knowledge and practical skills (in the context valeological behavior. Lit their own opinions of the authors on the formation valeological competence of students of medical colleges in the integration environment. Predicted the final result of this process - a methodological willingness of future health professionals to use valeological component in professional activities.

  19. Preparing Business Language Students to Meet Employer Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Lear, Darcy

    2012-01-01

    Situated within the growing body of work on languages for specific purposes and community service-learning, this article explores the place of specific professional skills in the business language curriculum. It argues that the integration of explicit curricular content related to professional correspondence (emails, letter of recommendation requests, and cover letter content) will better prepare students for the work place without compromising the rigor of the traditional humanities discipli...

  20. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  1. Self-Efficacy and Preparation of Scholarly Writing: Online Doctoral Coursework to Comprehensive Examination--a Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sonya C.

    2013-01-01

    Writing is seldom explicitly taught, most specifically, in academic and scholarly writing. Therefore, this mixed methods correlational phenomenology research study explored the correlation between self-efficacy perception and course room preparation for the comprehensive examination, APA standards in the course room, APA standards evaluation for…

  2. Doctor Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments. PMID:23346518

  3. Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Begeny, Suzanne

    2010-03-01

    As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education.

  4. Disscuss Treatise on Febrile Disease about the doctoral students, master students,undergraduate students the three-level teaching%《伤寒论》博硕本三级教学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金东明

    2016-01-01

    中医经典《伤寒论》的博士、硕士、本科教学、临床与研究工作,从中医药高校教学角度应分为三级教学。在教学内容和方法上提倡:本科重基础,使学生接受与理解,教师讲授为主、学生自学为辅;硕士重提高,使学生掌握与活用,学生自学为主、教师讲授为辅;博士重创新,使学生提高自主创新、原始创新能力,教师提供思路、学生结合专业创新。目前国内外同类研究报道尚属首次。%Teaching,clinical and research experience,teaching content and method on:undergraduate students attaches grate importance to the basic,make students accept and understand,the teacher teaching is given priority, studentsˊ self-study is complementary;Master’s pay attention to improve,make the students master and flexibility in the use of,Give priority to students self-study,Teaching is complementary;Doctoral student emphasize Innovation,let the students improve the ability of independent innovation and original innovation,teacher provides ideas,the students combined with professional innovation . Angle from the medical college teaching system for the first time to explore the treatise on febrile disease about the doctoral students,master students,undergraduate students the three-level teaching;There is no similar studies reported at domestic and foreign.

  5. Going to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Doctor KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Doctor A ... it's time to meet the doctor. continue Hello, Doctor The doctor will come in and say hello, ...

  6. Competencies for master and doctoral students in epidemiology: what is important, what is unimportant, and where is there room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner Huber, Larissa R; Fennie, Kristopher; Patterson, Holly

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, members of the American College of Epidemiology's Education Committee began work on a project to facilitate discussion on identifying domains and core competencies for epidemiologic training at the master and doctoral levels. Two online surveys were created and participants (N = 183; n = 147 [established epidemiologists] and n = 36 [recent graduates]) rated the importance of 19 domains and 66 competencies. A total of 17 competencies were viewed as important or very important for individuals earning various master- or doctoral-level degrees in epidemiology, whereas eight competencies were reported as being unimportant for all individuals earning graduate degrees in epidemiology. Twenty additional competencies were viewed as important or very important only for individuals receiving doctoral training. In addition, recent master-level graduates identified nine domains in which they felt less prepared, and recent doctoral-level graduates identified two such domains. Additional research is warranted to ensure that all epidemiologists receive sufficient training in identified areas.

  7. The Internationalization of Doctoral Social Work Education: Learning from a Partnership in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice K. Johnson Butterfield

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to internationalize doctoral education by working abroad? What does it mean to internationalize doctoral education in one’s home country? This article offers a perspective based on the Social Work Education in Ethiopia Partnership, which established Ethiopia’s first-ever master’s degree in social work in 2004. To ensure sustainability of the MSW program, a doctoral program in Social Work and Social Development was launched in 2006. This article describes the development and research base of the doctoral program. Beginning in the first semester, teams of doctoral students join with poor communities in action research.Overall, these efforts lead to an emerging model of university-based development. Through engaged action research, faculty and students use human capital resources and the educational process to function as “development actors.” Some ideas for internationalizing doctoral education are offered. Deans and directors in the United States and Canada are challenged to expand doctoral education within a developing country and to prepare doctoral students to include international perspectives in their teaching and research.

  8. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  9. Preparing minority undergraduate students for successful science careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akundi, Murty

    2008-03-01

    Xavier University of Louisiana is well known for being number one in graduating the most minority students in physical and biological sciences. The reason for this success is built on the concept of Standards with Sympathy in the Sciences (Triple S). This is an outgrowth of over twenty years of planning and development by the Xavier science faculty to devise a program for preparing and retaining students in the sciences and engineering. Xavier has been successfully conducting for over ten years, Summer Science Academy (SSA) for middle and high school students; Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars and Howard Hughes Biomedical programs for in-coming freshmen. Recently, through a grant from NSF, we have developed the Experiential Problem-solving and Analytical Reasoning (EPsAR) summer bridge program for in-coming freshmen who were given conditional admission to the university (i.e., those students who scored below the acceptable range for placement into degree mathematics courses). In this program, EPsAR participants will be engaged in problem-solving and critical thinking activities for eight hours per day, five days per week, for six weeks. Additionally, an interdisciplinary approach is taken to convey the mathematical skills learned to relate to physics, chemistry, biology, and computer science. Sixty-six students have participated in the last two years in the EPsAR program. During the first year 23 of 28 students successfully bi-passed the algebra review course and were placed into a degree credit course in mathematics. In the second year, thirty-one (31) of the 38 were advanced to a higher-level mathematics course. Twenty-three (23) out of 38 went on to degree credit math course. To retain students in the sciences peer tutoring in all the science disciplines are made available to students throughout the day for 5 days per week. Faculty and students are available to give guidance to the needed students. The University has established a

  10. Communication with Your Family and Your Doctor about Your Wishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SUBSCRIBE Be Prepared Share this! Home » Be Prepared Communication With Your Family And Your Doctor About Your ... and address these difficult questions: 1. Why is communication with your family and doctor so important? Talking ...

  11. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  12. An Exploration of Darkness within Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    In doctoral education, the formal structures include the Graduate School system, PhD courses, and supervision contracts, etc. Doctoral education also takes place on informal and tacit levels, where doctoral students learn about the institutional regulations, the research field, academic craftsman...

  13. Preparing students for graduate study: an eLearning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintz, Christine; Posey, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the development and preliminary evaluation of an eLearning program intended to provide incoming nursing students with the basic knowledge, skills and abilities needed to succeed in graduate-level, online coursework. Using Mayer's principles (2008) for the effective design of multimedia instruction, an open-access, self-directed, online program was developed. The Graduate School Boot Camp includes five online modules focused on learning strategies and time management, academic writing, technology, research, and library skills. To motivate and engage learners, the program integrates a fun, graphical sports theme with audiovisual presentations, examples, demonstrations and practice exercises. Learners begin with a self-assessment based on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire or MSLQ (Pintrich et al., 1993). To assess change in knowledge levels before and after completing the program, learners take a pre-test and post-test. Preliminary findings indicate that the students found the information relevant and useful. They enjoyed the self-paced, multimedia format, and liked the option to return to specific content later. This innovative program offers a way to prepare students proactively, and may prove useful in identifying students at risk and connecting them with the appropriate resources to facilitate successful program completion.

  14. ``Physics and the girly girl—there is a contradiction somewhere'': doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Allison J.

    2014-06-01

    Doctoral physics students have stories about what kinds of actions, behaviours and ways of doing physics allow individuals to be recognized as physicists. Viewing a physics department as a case study, and individual participants as embedded cases, this study used a sociocultural approach to examine the ways doctoral students construct these stories about becoming physicists. Through observations, photo-elicitation, and life history interviews, eleven men and women shared stories about their experiences with physics, and the contexts that have enabled or constrained their trajectories into doctoral physics. The results of this study revealed the salience of recognition in the constitution of physicist identities; but how recognition was achieved often entailed the reproduction or reworking of persistent discourses of gender norms. Various interchangeable forms of competence (technical, analytical, and academic) emerged as assets that can be used to achieve recognition in this physics community. However, competence was not the only means by which one might be recognized as a physicist. Contributing to the possibility for recognition was the performance of stereotypical Discourses for physicist that relied on traditional gender norms for the field. The results demonstrated that achieving recognition as a competent physicist often involved a complex negotiation of gender roles and the practice of physics.

  15. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  16. Digital Curation and Doctoral Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Abbott

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article considers digital curation in doctoral study and the role of the doctoral supervisor and institution in facilitating students’ acquisition of digital curation skills, including some of the potentially problematic expectations of the supervisory relationship with regards to digital curation. Research took the form of an analysis of the current digital curation training landscape, focussing on doctoral study and supervision. This was followed by a survey (n=116 investigating attitudes towards importance, expertise, and responsibilities regarding digital curation. This research confirms that digital curation is considered to be very important within doctoral study but that doctoral supervisors and particularly students consider themselves to be largely unskilled at curation tasks. It provides a detailed picture of curation activity within doctoral study and identifies the areas of most concern. A detailed analysis demonstrates that most of the responsibility for curation is thought to lie with students and that institutions are perceived to have very low responsibility and that individuals tend to over-assign responsibility to themselves. Finally, the research identifies which types of support system for curation are most used and makes suggestions for ways in which students, supervisors, institutions, and others can effectively and efficiently address problematic areas and improve digital curation within doctoral study.

  17. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice.

  18. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  19. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  20. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  1. From student to steward: the Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience at Georgetown University as a case study in professional development during doctoral training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Ullrich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A key facet of professional development is the formation of professional identity. At its most basic level, professional identity for a scientist centers on mastery of a discipline and the development of research skills during doctoral training. To develop a broader understanding of professional identity in the context of doctoral training, the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID ran a multi-institutional study from 2001 to 2005. A key outcome of the CID was the development of the concept of ‘stewards of the discipline’. The Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience (IPN at Georgetown University participated in CID from 2003 to 2005. Here, we describe the IPN and highlight the programmatic developments resulting from participation in the CID. In particular, we emphasize programmatic activities that are designed to promote professional skills in parallel with scientific development. We describe activities in the domains of leadership, communication, teaching, public outreach, ethics, collaboration, and mentorship. Finally, we provide data that demonstrate that traditional metrics of academic success are not adversely affected by the inclusion of professional development activities in the curricula. By incorporating these seven ‘professional development’ activities into the required coursework and dissertation research experience, the IPN motivates students to become stewards of the discipline.

  2. From student to steward: the Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience at Georgetown University as a case study in professional development during doctoral training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Lauren; Dumanis, Sonya B; Evans, Tanya M; Jeannotte, Alexis M; Leonard, Carrie; Rozzi, Summer J; Taylor, Caitlin M; Gale, Karen; Kanwal, Jagmeet S; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A; Wolfe, Barry B; Forcelli, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    A key facet of professional development is the formation of professional identity. At its most basic level, professional identity for a scientist centers on mastery of a discipline and the development of research skills during doctoral training. To develop a broader understanding of professional identity in the context of doctoral training, the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID) ran a multi-institutional study from 2001 to 2005. A key outcome of the CID was the development of the concept of 'stewards of the discipline'. The Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience (IPN) at Georgetown University participated in CID from 2003 to 2005. Here, we describe the IPN and highlight the programmatic developments resulting from participation in the CID. In particular, we emphasize programmatic activities that are designed to promote professional skills in parallel with scientific development. We describe activities in the domains of leadership, communication, teaching, public outreach, ethics, collaboration, and mentorship. Finally, we provide data that demonstrate that traditional metrics of academic success are not adversely affected by the inclusion of professional development activities in the curricula. By incorporating these seven 'professional development' activities into the required coursework and dissertation research experience, the IPN motivates students to become stewards of the discipline.

  3. An Imperative for Leadership Preparation Programs: Preparing Future Leaders to Meet the Needs of Students, Schools, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the structure, philosophy, and curriculum of educational leadership preparation programs and the importance of preparing schools leaders to address the unique needs of students and communities. In particular, it will address how programs can be enhanced by integrating organizational research and philosophies from educational,…

  4. Use of Individual Feedback during Human Gross Anatomy Course for Enhancing Professional Behaviors in Doctor of Physical Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdas, James W.; Krause, David A.; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Rindflesch, Aaron B.; Hollman, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical professionals and public consumers expect that new physical therapy graduates possess cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills required to provide safe and high-quality care to patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if a repertoire of ten professional behaviors assessed at the beginning of doctorate of physical therapy…

  5. The Wanderer, the Chameleon, and the Warrior: Experiences of Doctoral Students of Color Developing a Research Identity in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Piert, Joyce; Militello, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors use their personal narratives and collaborative portraits as methods to shed light on the complexities of developing a research identity while journeying through a doctoral program. Using the metaphors of a wanderer, a chameleon, and a warrior, their narratives represent portraits of experiences faced by doctoral…

  6. A collaboration of student nurse coaches and students with mental illnesses in a college preparation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nancye L

    2010-01-01

    With refined diagnostic tools, earlier recognition, new pharmacological and other treatment modalities, individuals living with mental illnesses are able to experience considerable recovery. Some individuals require support and guidance to build confidence and to manage in everyday situations. Previous to their illness, many had been functioning and able to meet their needs in most aspects of their lives, including academics, but, following illness, lacked confidence or skill to continue their education. This pilot program was designed to socialize students with a mental illness to life at college. To develop the pilot concept, college departments including nursing faculty and community mental health personnel collaborated together. Potential students attended informational sessions where those interested, applied for entry into the pilot. Each student was paired with a coach, a third year nursing student, with whom they established and evaluated goals geared towards registering independently in a college course the following semester. Evaluation of the program was measured in terms of attendance, registration in a college course for the following semester or job readiness, and focus group evaluation sessions. By the end of the semester, 12 of the 13 students completed the program. With support and guidance of their coaches, students gained confidence, developed a social support network and learned skills needed to be able to navigate the college system. This type of college preparation program is effective in assisting students with mental illness to access college courses and it is recommended that there be further similar programs offered as an orientation at the college level for students with mental illness in preparation for their registration and attendance at college. To minimize cost factors and gain administrative support, practitioners wishing to replicate this study would do well to consider sources of funding, as well as resource personal or volunteers

  7. Learning Doctor-Patient Communication – Evaluating the effectiveness of the communication training course at Leipzig University from the students' point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cämmerer, Jana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: At the University of Leipzig, the requirements of the Licensing Regulations for Doctors (Approbationsordnung für Ärzte for the practical training of communication skills are actively implemented by a two-semester communication course. During this course, student tutors impart the basics of interpersonal as well as selected aspects of doctor-patient communication using interactive training methods. This article reports on the effect the training has on the self-assessed communication skills of the medicine students.Methods: The students’ self-perceived communication skills were assessed, both at the beginning and after the completion of the first and second course semesters using questionnaires related to the course’s learning goals. Pre-post comparisons were then carried out. 142 students (of 163 students in total participated in the survey at the start of the course, of which 117 completed the T2-questionnaire at the end of the first course semester. Only the 84 students who also completed the questionnaires in the second course semester were included in the statistical analysis. These responses were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics.Results: The comparison of the self-assessments between the four measurement points showed that statistically significant learning progress for all assessed communication skills had taken place from the point of view of the students. The largest changes between measurements, and therefore the greatest learning progress, could be seen in knowledge related skills.Conclusion: From the students’ point of view the communication training contributes significantly to the acquisition of communication skills. The results suggest that this “hands-on” course concept is suited to successfully enhance the students’ communication skills. The course concept should therefore be retained for both the course in its current form as well as for any extension of the course into the

  8. Preparing College Students to Teach an Environmental Problem Solving Curriculum to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    An NSF-funded project-based program was implemented by Clarkson University in 2000 to increase the interest and knowledge of middle school students in science, math and technology through the solution of an environmental problem that is relevant to their local school community. Clarkson students developed curricula for 7th and 8th grade science and technology classes and then worked with the middle school students throughout the year to reduce to transform solid waste into healthy soil for plant growth. The solution to this problem provided a vehicle to teach fundamental science and math content as well as the process of doing science and solving problems. Placing college science and engineering students in the classroom proved to be a great mechanism for engaging students in science topics and providing mentoring experiences that differ greatly from those that a practicing professional can provide. It is clear, however, that the students must be well prepared for this experience to maximize the benefits of university - school district partnership programs. The objective of this presentation will be to describe the training program that has been developed to prepare Clarkson students to work effectively in middle school classrooms. The Clarkson students are trained for their classroom experiences during the summer before they enter the classroom. They receive three credits for the training, curriculum development, and teaching efforts. It is expected that the students have the necessary background in science and technology to teach themselves the content and environmental relevance of the problem they will be teaching. Lectures and workshops focus on how to transform this knowledge into a project-based curriculum that meets the needs of the teachers, while also exciting the students. Lecture/workshops include: team work; components of an effective class and teacher; project planning and management; problem solving process; inquiry based learning, deductive

  9. Evaluation Of Investments In Science, Technology And Innovation: Applying Scientific and Technical Human Capital Framework For Assessment of Doctoral Students In Cooperative Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonchuk, Olena

    other students' outcomes by employing data from a matched sample of S&E doctoral students trained at the Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers, I/UCRCs (N=173), and doctoral students from the same universities and disciplines who were trained more traditionally (N=87). Two exploratory path models demonstrate the important role of availability of network resources and proxy for mobilizing them on students' perceived career preparedness and satisfaction with their training. Study 2 is a case study of one I/UCRC's whole social network. The researcher attempts to provide a better understanding of the embeddedness components of students' social capital in their I/UCRC network. The case study has significant limitations in that findings cannot be generalized to the population of I/UCRC students. Nevertheless, findings are interesting for the one I/UCRC. The students scored significantly higher on preparedness when they had higher out-degree centrality, indicator of how much they reach out to other center's personnel. Also, a visual representation of the whole I/UCRC social network could be used to understand better students' embeddedness. Both studies show that social capital is a very hard concept to measure mainly because of its different dimensions. Nevertheless, they also show that social capital is a useful tool for comparing students' outcomes in different STI programs. A focus on students and social capital is one of the ways the S&T human capital model can be applied in evaluation of the STI programs. Such focus provides a considerable contrast to linear STI metrics that focus on long-term outcomes and often exclude students all together. It is important to provide information about the human side of science in its current state including students' graduate training, experiences and social networks. In addition, inclusion of students provides a view into the future - an opportunity to look at science of tomorrow as the same students will be part of the

  10. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Students' Selection of a Doctoral Program to Attend From Those Offering Admission: The Case of Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Donald A.; Wanat, Stan; Gonzalez, Mariaelena

    Most graduate training programs in the biomedical sciences try to attract qualified candidates from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups; however, some universities have more success than others in enrolling students to whom admission is offered. In order to better understand how students select the school they will attend from those offering admission, we studied the experience of two cohorts of applicants to a doctoral program in the biomedical sciences at Stanford University. Based on interviews with 59 students, we conclude that students use different criteria in deciding the schools to which they will apply than they do in selecting the school they will attend from those offering admission. While we found striking consistency across racial and ethnic groups in the criteria used in selecting schools for application, we found clear differences in the factors affecting the choice of school to attend. Especially for Latino and African American students, the perceived quality of the interpersonal environment and a sense of inclusion were key determinants in selecting the school to attend. In this regard, Latino students found the environment at Stanford more welcoming than African American students did.

  11. A cognitive behavioral course for at-risk senior nursing students preparing to take the NCLEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Susan G; Mastorovich, Melissa L; Liberto, Terri L; Gerwick, Michele

    2010-01-01

    For some nursing students, the stress of preparing for and taking the NCLEX can lead to maladaptive behaviors such as poor test performance and inadequate preparation. A different approach to NCLEX preparation for at-risk seniors is described. A 3-credit course that combines cognitive behavioral techniques, metacognitive strategies, test-taking strategies, and simulated NCLEX experience with practice questions is presented. Students also develop an individualized plan of preparation from graduation until they take the NCLEX.

  12. Sensitising intern doctors to ethical issues in a doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nilima D; Mehta, Ritambhara Y; Dave, Kamlesh R

    2017-01-01

    There is a felt need in India to influence the ethical behaviour of doctors by giving students formal education in ethics in medical colleges. Since internship is the interface between learning and independent practice, it is important to sensitise intern doctors to ethical issues in a doctor-patient relationship at this stage.

  13. Baccalaureate Origins of Doctorate Recipients in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alfred E.

    1984-01-01

    Franklin and Marshall College has ranked 867 private undergraduate institutions according to the number of students who received their doctorates between 1920 and 1980. A study of institutions ranked in the top 101 in terms of the number of students who subsequently received a doctorate in chemistry is reported. (MLW)

  14. The Agile Approach with Doctoral Dissertation Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengberg, Lars Göran Wallgren

    2015-01-01

    Several research findings conclude that many doctoral students fail to complete their studies within the allowable time frame, in part because of problems related to the research and supervision process. Surveys show that most doctoral students are generally satisfied with their dissertation supervision. However, these surveys also reveal some…

  15. Social Work Science and Identity Formation for Doctoral Scholars within Intellectual Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor Barak, Michàlle E.; Brekke, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Three themes are central to preparing doctoral students for the professoriate: identity formation, scientific integration, and intellectual communities. In this article, we argue that these three themes are not separate pillars but interlocking circles. Our main thesis is that (1) social work must develop into a distinct integrative scientific…

  16. The Scholars We Need: Preparing Transdisciplinary Professionals by Leveraging the Scholarship of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniels, Melissa; Skogsberg, Erik

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we call for immediate action to prepare more dynamic transdisciplinary professionals by leveraging the scholarship of practice. Transdisciplinary refers to contexts both inside and outside of the academy where today's doctoral students will work.

  17. Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter considers how doctoral education, particularly in applied settings such as education, social work, counseling, and health care, could be reimagined if it was organized around the idea and process of critical reflection: of helping students to better understand how power operates in educational environments and how students' sense of…

  18. Utilizing Team Debate to Increase Student Abilities for Mentoring and Critical Appraisal of Global Health Care in Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Naomi; Farnum, Karen; Beauchesne, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Although graduates of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs are expected to demonstrate competence in advanced clinical scholarship, mentoring, and leadership, little is published about how team debate on a global health care topic supports DNP student learning and skill development. This article reports on an illuminative evaluation of DNP student learning experiences of team debate in the context of a 2-week international school program in Ireland. A focused illuminative evaluation approach involving a cohort of seven DNP students, who had participated in an international school team debate, was used. Data were collected using a Web-based qualitative questionnaire designed to elicit in-depth reflective accounts of DNP students' learning experiences. Content analysis revealed that team debate on a global health care topic enhanced learning in relation to fostering critical thinking and critical appraisal skills; encouraging teamwork; providing opportunities for mentoring, relationship building, and socialization into profession; and, from the DNP student perspective, increasing knowledge and global understanding of health care. This evaluation provides insights for nurse educators into the benefits of introducing team debate as a group activity to enhancing scholarly inquiry and mentoring skills of DNP students. Further research to evaluate team debate in other nurse education programs is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D.

  20. Statistics teaching in medical school: opinions of practising doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Susan; Price, Gill M; Swift, Louise; Shepstone, Lee; Leinster, Sam J

    2010-11-04

    The General Medical Council expects UK medical graduates to gain some statistical knowledge during their undergraduate education; but provides no specific guidance as to amount, content or teaching method. Published work on statistics teaching for medical undergraduates has been dominated by medical statisticians, with little input from the doctors who will actually be using this knowledge and these skills after graduation. Furthermore, doctor's statistical training needs may have changed due to advances in information technology and the increasing importance of evidence-based medicine. Thus there exists a need to investigate the views of practising medical doctors as to the statistical training required for undergraduate medical students, based on their own use of these skills in daily practice. A questionnaire was designed to investigate doctors' views about undergraduate training in statistics and the need for these skills in daily practice, with a view to informing future teaching. The questionnaire was emailed to all clinicians with a link to the University of East Anglia Medical School. Open ended questions were included to elicit doctors' opinions about both their own undergraduate training in statistics and recommendations for the training of current medical students. Content analysis was performed by two of the authors to systematically categorize and describe all the responses provided by participants. 130 doctors responded, including both hospital consultants and general practitioners. The findings indicated that most had not recognised the value of their undergraduate teaching in statistics and probability at the time, but had subsequently found the skills relevant to their career. Suggestions for improving undergraduate teaching in these areas included referring to actual research and ensuring relevance to, and integration with, clinical practice. Grounding the teaching of statistics in the context of real research studies and including examples of

  1. Statistics teaching in medical school: Opinions of practising doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepstone Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The General Medical Council expects UK medical graduates to gain some statistical knowledge during their undergraduate education; but provides no specific guidance as to amount, content or teaching method. Published work on statistics teaching for medical undergraduates has been dominated by medical statisticians, with little input from the doctors who will actually be using this knowledge and these skills after graduation. Furthermore, doctor's statistical training needs may have changed due to advances in information technology and the increasing importance of evidence-based medicine. Thus there exists a need to investigate the views of practising medical doctors as to the statistical training required for undergraduate medical students, based on their own use of these skills in daily practice. Methods A questionnaire was designed to investigate doctors' views about undergraduate training in statistics and the need for these skills in daily practice, with a view to informing future teaching. The questionnaire was emailed to all clinicians with a link to the University of East Anglia Medical School. Open ended questions were included to elicit doctors' opinions about both their own undergraduate training in statistics and recommendations for the training of current medical students. Content analysis was performed by two of the authors to systematically categorise and describe all the responses provided by participants. Results 130 doctors responded, including both hospital consultants and general practitioners. The findings indicated that most had not recognised the value of their undergraduate teaching in statistics and probability at the time, but had subsequently found the skills relevant to their career. Suggestions for improving undergraduate teaching in these areas included referring to actual research and ensuring relevance to, and integration with, clinical practice. Conclusions Grounding the teaching of statistics

  2. The Integrate Student Portal: Online Resources to Prepare Students for the Workforce of a Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Manduca, C. A.; Egger, A. E.; Macdonald, H.

    2014-12-01

    The InTeGrate Student Portal is a suite of web pages that utilize InTeGrate resources to support student success by providing undergraduates with tools and information necessary to be proactive in their career choices and development. Drawn from various InTeGrate workshops and programming, the Portal organizes these resources to illuminate a variety of career opportunities and pathways to both traditional and non-traditional jobs that support a sustainable future. Informed from a variety of sources including employers, practitioners, faculty, students, reports, and articles, the pages explore five facets: (1) sustainability across the disciplines, (2) workforce preparation, (3) professional communication, (4) teaching and teaching careers, and (5) the future of green research and technology. The first three facets explore how sustainability is integrated across disciplines and how sustainability and 'green' jobs are available in a wide range of traditional and non-traditional workplaces within and beyond science. They provide students guidance in preparing for this sustainability workforce, including where to learn about jobs and how to pursue them, advice for strengthening their job applications, and how to build a set of skills that employers seek. This advice encompasses classroom skills as well as those acquired and strengthened as part of extracurricular or workplace experiences. The fourth facet, aimed at teaching assistants with little or no experience as well as at students who are interested in pursuing teaching as a career, provides information and resources about teaching. The fifth facet explores future directions of technology and the need for innovations in the workforce of the future to address sustainability issues. We seek your input and invite you to explore the Portal at: serc.carleton.edu/integrate/students/

  3. Before Student Teaching: How Undergraduate Students in Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Programs Describe Their Early Classroom-Based Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Christine; La Paro, Karen M.; Johnson, Amy V.

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-based experiences, alternatively known as practica, are an integral component of undergraduate teacher preparation programs, which provide students essential opportunities to apply knowledge in practice. Though much is known about student teaching, much less is known about students' earlier classroom-based experiences. This…

  4. In what ways do the experiences of students in PhD programs in the molecular biosciences foster knowledge transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Amy C.

    Doctoral training in the molecular biosciences often fails to prepare students for academic and alternate careers. Several studies of doctoral training have reported a need to improve doctoral education; outlining specific criticisms related to the need to broaden the scope of the doctoral degree in order to prepare students for careers. The development of doctoral students' knowledge transfer skills is the key to making this transition. The theory advanced in this study extends the literature on doctoral education related to student experiences that foster the development of knowledge transfer skills. These insights will be a resource for academic leaders as they develop new programs and the re-develop existing ones; to students and graduates as they become leaders in their field; and to mentors, who have a large role in the development of doctoral students. Research conducted for this dissertation led to the development of theory about elements of the doctoral experience that foster the development of knowledge transfer skills in the molecular biosciences. In exploring ways the experiences of students in PhD programs in the molecular biosciences foster knowledge transfer, I was able to develop a framework for understanding these experiences in the context of doctoral programs. Students' experiences are affected by different elements of doctoral education. As they develop identities as researchers and scientists, and transition from novices to experts, students' experiences are shaped by their mentors, peers, programs and departments. Subjects spoke about their experiences in interviews. This study exposed a need to balance support and challenge for doctoral students to allow them to develop the capacity to perform scientific research and act as leaders. The development of knowledge transfer skills within this context is important preparation for students in the molecular biosciences. Doctoral students in this area need to apply their expertise in increasingly

  5. Preparing Students with Disabilities in an Urban School for Success in Supported and Competitive Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Valerie S.

    2010-01-01

    In schools that serve students with varying disabilities, community-based education has become an important element in preparing students for competitive and supported employment. Because of the constant change in demographics and the overall competitiveness of the job market, it is essential that schools are prepared to find ways of infusing…

  6. Preparing Students for College and Career: California Multiple Pathways. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Eric

    2009-01-01

    To prepare students for success in life, the twenty-first-century American high school needs to shift its focus from preparing for college or career to achieving college and career readiness for every student. One of the most comprehensive efforts towards this goal is the "multiple pathways" initiative in California, which is a reform…

  7. Pre-University Prepared Students: A Programme for Facilitating the Transition from Secondary to Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The expectations of first-year students are becoming more widely researched and understood. How to realign perceptions and prepare students for the transition from secondary school to tertiary education is less well considered. This paper presents an account of a pre-university preparation programme embedded in the senior years of secondary…

  8. Preparing for thesis and viva: some practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy-Jane

    2010-01-01

    Presenting a thesis and then undertaking the viva is challenging even for the most experienced of researchers. This paper offers stylistic practicalities, reflects on thesis and viva preparation, and discusses the research regulations and submission requirements of higher education institutions (HEIs). Issues such as the use of the first person, how best to locate research in the professional setting, research regulations and codes of practice are discussed, along with some guiding principles to enable effective viva preparation. It is derived from experience as a doctoral student, supervisor and examiner, and focuses on questions most frequently asked by doctoral students.

  9. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilas, Lisbeth; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Laursen, Jacob Brink

    2016-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. Results The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual......Background From 2012–2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, “Internationalization at Home ”, offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students...... analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional...

  10. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E C; Laursen, J B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: From 2012-2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, "Internationalization at Home ", offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students...... in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. RESULTS: The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual...... analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional...

  11. Reading in Preparation for Writing a PhD Thesis: Case Studies of Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Becky S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents stories of how a group of doctoral students chose the key disciplinary literature that they read in preparation for their thesis-undertaking (RT). The stories were analyzed in light of current understanding of literature reviewing as a situated practice and theory of doctoral education as socio-cognitive apprenticeship. As the…

  12. Reading in Preparation for Writing a PhD Thesis: Case Studies of Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Becky S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents stories of how a group of doctoral students chose the key disciplinary literature that they read in preparation for their thesis-undertaking (RT). The stories were analyzed in light of current understanding of literature reviewing as a situated practice and theory of doctoral education as socio-cognitive apprenticeship. As the…

  13. Small Voices, Big Impact: Preparing Students for Learning and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jennifer L.; McGarry, Lorraine S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, two teachers from a public school in the United States describe their beliefs about the importance of using student voice as a foundation for increasing student efficacy, recognizing student individuality, and addressing curriculum standards. Sharing examples from their classrooms, the authors illustrate how student voice can help…

  14. Achieving fruit, juice, and vegetable recipe preparation goals influences consumption by 4th grade students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski Tom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Including children in food preparation activities has long been recommended as a method to encourage children's consumption, but has not been evaluated. Goal setting is also a common component of behavior change programs. This study assessed the impact of attaining goals to prepare fruit-juice or vegetable recipes on student fruit and vegetable consumption as part of a 10-week fruit and vegetable intervention for fourth grade students. Methods At six of the 10 sessions, students (n = 671 selected a fruit-juice or vegetable recipe to prepare at home before the next session. Students returned parent-signed notes reporting their child's goal attainment. Baseline and post consumption were assessed with up to four days of dietary recalls. Analyses included regression models predicting post consumption from the number of fruit-juice or vegetable recipe preparation goals attained, controlling for baseline consumption. Results In general, girls and Hispanic students achieved the most recipe preparation goals. For students with highest baseline fruit-juice consumption, post fruit-juice consumption was higher by about 1.0 serving for those achieving 2 or 3 fruit-juice recipe preparation goals. Post vegetable consumption was highest for students reporting the highest baseline vegetable consumption and who achieved two or three vegetable recipe preparation goals. In general, recipe goal setting was a useful procedure primarily for those with high baseline consumption. Conclusion This is one of the first reports demonstrating that home recipe preparation was correlated with dietary change among children.

  15. Programmatic-methodical providing of preparation of student commands on basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troyan V.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic directions of perfection of sporting preparation of student team are considered on basketball. The terms of effective education of personality of student are selected. The positive and subzero aspects of forms of physical preparation of sportsmen are rotined. The ways of rational development and use of natural capabilities of sportsman are certain in his professional and public activity. It is presented programmatic-methodical providing of training process of student commands in the institutes of higher of Russia.

  16. Medical Student Use of Facebook to Support Preparation for Anatomy Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D.; Bickerdike, Suzanne R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of Facebook to support students is an emerging area of educational research. This study explored how a Facebook Page could support Year 2 medical (MBChB) students in preparation for summative anatomy assessments and alleviate test anxiety. Overall, Facebook analytics revealed that in total 49 (19.8% of entire cohort) students posted a…

  17. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  18. Teacher Preparation to Deliver Inclusive Services to Students with Disabilities: TQ Connection Issue Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. Inclusion of students with disabilities in general education environments has a long history in special education law;…

  19. A Dual Approach to Fostering Under-Prepared Student Success: Focusing on Doing and Becoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Suzanne C.; Eshbach, Barbara E.; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    A paired course model for under-prepared college students incorporates a dual instructional approach, academic skill building and lifelong learning development, to help students do more academically and become stronger lifelong learners. In a reading support course, students improved their reading skills and applied them directly to the paired…

  20. Using Social Justice Vignettes to Prepare Students for Social Action Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell Storms, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    One of the learning goals for social justice education courses is to prepare students for social action engagement. Teaching students about issues related to social justice is complex. Prior studies have found a positive relationship between student enrollment in social justice education courses and action-oriented outcomes. While these findings…

  1. Linking Theory with Practice: A Longitudinal Analysis of Student Portfolios in Principal Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeppel, Robert; Logan, Joyce P.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation analyses five years of data from student portfolios required as part of a principal preparation programme. Portfolios serve as continuous student progress assessment from programme entry to exit, evaluation of each student's understanding and application of Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) and National…

  2. Assessing and Monitoring Student Progress in an E-Learning Personnel Preparation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyen, Edward L.; Aust, Ronald J.; Bui, Yvonne N.; Isaacson, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-learning in special education personnel preparation focuses on student assessment in e-learning environments. It includes a review of the literature, lessons learned by the authors from assessing student performance in e-learning environments, a literature perspective on electronic portfolios in monitoring student progress, and the…

  3. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  4. Preparing Students for Success in Hybrid Learning Environments with Academic Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel; Dickinson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes institutional and andragogical best practices for preparing students to succeed in hybrid courses through the programming of academic resource centers, offers information on how to create peer support systems for students, and outlines some of the common pitfalls for students encountering a hybrid course for the first time.

  5. Playing to our human strengths to prepare medical students for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We are living in an age where artificial intelligence and astounding technological advances are bringing truly remarkable change to healthcare. Medical knowledge and skills which form the core responsibility of doctors such as making diagnoses may increasingly be delivered by robots. Machines are gradually acquiring human abilities such as deep learning and empathy. What, then is the role of doctors in future healthcare? And what direction should medical schools be taking to prepare their graduates? This article will give an overview of the evolving technological landscape of healthcare and examine the issues undergraduate medical education may have to address. The experience at The University of Hong Kong will serve as a case study featuring several curricular innovations that aim to empower medical graduates with the capabilities to thrive in the future.

  6. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  7. Doctoral Dissertation Supervision: Identification and Evaluation of Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngozi Agu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctoral research supervision is one of the major avenues for sustaining students’ satisfaction with the programme, preparing students to be independent researchers and effectively initiating students into the academic community. This work reports doctoral students’ evaluation of their various supervision models, their satisfaction with these supervision models, and development of research-related skills. The study used a descriptive research design and was guided by three research questions and two hypotheses. A sample of 310 Ph.D. candidates drawn from a federal university in Eastern part of Nigeria was used for this study. The data generated through the questionnaire was analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests. Results show that face-to-face interactive model was not only the most frequently used, but also the most widely adopted in doctoral thesis supervision while ICT-based models were rarely used. Students supervised under face-to-face interactive model reported being more satisfied with dissertation supervision than those operating under face-to-face noninteractive model. However, students supervised under these two models did not differ significantly in their perceived development in research-related skills.

  8. Ready or not? Expectations of faculty and medical students for clinical skills preparation for clerkships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Wenrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preclerkship clinical-skills training has received increasing attention as a foundational preparation for clerkships. Expectations among medical students and faculty regarding the clinical skills and level of skill mastery needed for starting clerkships are unknown. Medical students, faculty teaching in the preclinical setting, and clinical clerkship faculty may have differing expectations of students entering clerkships. If students' expectations differ from faculty expectations, students may experience anxiety. Alternately, congruent expectations among students and faculty may facilitate integrated and seamless student transitions to clerkships. Aims: To assess the congruence of expectations among preclerkship faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students for the clinical skills and appropriate level of clinical-skills preparation needed to begin clerkships. Methods: Investigators surveyed preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students early in their basic clerkships at a North American medical school that focuses on preclerkship clinical-skills development. Survey questions assessed expectations for the appropriate level of preparation in basic and advanced clinical skills for students entering clerkships. Results: Preclinical faculty and students had higher expectations than clerkship faculty for degree of preparation in most basic skills. Students had higher expectations than both faculty groups for advanced skills preparation. Conclusions: Preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students appear to have different expectations of clinical-skills training needed for clerkships. As American medical schools increasingly introduce clinical-skills training prior to clerkships, more attention to alignment, communication, and integration between preclinical and clerkship faculty will be important to establish common curricular agendas and increase integration of student learning. Clarification of skills

  9. Examining the role of service-learning on development of professionalism in doctor of physical therapy students: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Catherine E; Wiegand, Mark R; Brosky, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Service-learning (SL) is a pedagogical tool that has several purported benefits. In the health sciences, we have established an integrated curricular SL thread that includes self-contained course experiences and the provision of pro bono physical therapy services in on- and off-campus Service-Learning Clinics (SLC). SL is integrated across the curriculum through four SL courses. Student provision of pro bono services is the centerpiece of the SL course series with students providing patient management in on- and off-campus clinics. The purpose of this case report is to examine how participation in the off-campus SLC may impact the development of professionalism in a sample of eight students. In this project, student perceptions of the role of the off-campus SLC experiences in the development of professionalism and core values were assessed through three methods: student interviews, completion of the physical therapy Core Values Self-Assessment form, and analysis of student reflection papers. Students reported core values compassion/caring and accountability most frequently in the context of their off-campus SL experiences. Student responses suggest SL is a beneficial learning model in providing a framework to the curricular emphasis on professionalism. While the role of SL in the development of professionalism and core values is not entirely clear, this pedagogical model appears to have a positive impact on the professional education of these students.

  10. StrengthsFinder Signature Themes of Talent in Doctor of Pharmacy Students in Five Midwestern Pharmacy Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Janke, Kristin K.; Farris, Karen B.; Kelley, Katherine A.; Marshall, Vincent D.; Plake, Kimberly S; Scott, Steven A.; Sorensen, Todd D.; Yee, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe student pharmacists’ Signature Themes from the Clifton StrengthsFinder across 5 Midwestern pharmacy institutions and to compare themes by gender, institution, and undergraduate population.

  11. Using Technology To Prepare All Students for Success in Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin

    This paper discusses uses of TI-73 graphing calculators for middle school mathematics students. It indicates that with the appropriate use of the TI-73, students can develop understanding about variables and basic concepts of algebra, and explore mathematical topics. Background on middle school students' difficulties with those subjects is…

  12. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  13. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  14. Preparing Students for Flipped or Team-Based Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Peter; Clark, Michele; Restall, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching methods such as Flipped Learning and Team-Based Learning require students to pre-learn course materials before a teaching session, because classroom exercises rely on students using self-gained knowledge. This is the reverse to "traditional" teaching when course materials are presented during a lecture, and students are…

  15. How does a doctor study other doctors being doctors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Torsten

    The intension of this presentation is to encourage debate on auto-ethnography in medical systems. The empirical starting point will be my present study of how young doctors learn to make decisions about diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient. The study is an ethnographic field study...... involving participant observation and individual interviews with nine newly graduated doctors for a period of 18 months. The background of the ethnographer who is also the author of the present abstract poses a few interesting challenges to the study. I am a doctor doing fieldwork in my own medical culture......, among other doctors, at departments where I have worked. My parents, my sister and my grandfather are doctors. So reflections and experiences concerning medicine and being a doctor are integrated parts of my personal history and identity. Will I be capable of critical reflection on something...

  16. Doutores e doutorandos em enfermagem: motivos do mestrado em outras áreas Doctores y doctorandos en enfermería: motivos para realizar maestrías en otras áreas Nursing doctors and doctoral students: reasons to obtain a master degree in other areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victória Secaf

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Na Pós-Graduação em Enfermagem no Brasil, existem 37 doutores/doutorandos (em Enfermagem que fizeram Mestrado em outra área. Foram obtidos depoimentos de 28 integrantes desse grupo no que se refere aos motivos da escolha, sua inserção no Programa frequentado e as sugestões para outros enfermeiros em idêntica situação à sua e para as Escolas de Enfermagem. A opção, embora determinada por circunstâncias diversas, constituiu uma experiência enriquecedora para os sujeitos e integra a história dos cursos/programas de Pós-Graduação de Enfermagem no país.Existen, en el post grado de Brasil, 37 doctores o alumnos de doctorado en Enfermería que han realizado su Maestría en otra área. Se han obtenido declaraciones de los enfermeros de ese grupo minotitario en lo que se refiere a los motivos de esa elección, a su inserción en el programa frecuentado y a las sugerencias para otros enfermeros que se encuentran en esa misma situación, y a las escuelas de enfermería. La opción, aunque determinada por circunstancias diversas, se constituye una experiencia enriquecedora y hace parte de la historia de los post grado del Brasil.There are in Brazil only 37 nursing doctors and doctoral students who obtained the Master degree in other area. A set of questions - concerning the reasons of the choice, the enrolment in the Program and the suggestions related to the nurses in similar situation and to the Nursing Schools - was mailed to this group. The answers showed that the option, in spite of being determined by several circumstances, sets up a valuable experience and is part of the history of the nursing graduate programs in Brazil.

  17. Successes and challenges in a novel doctoral program in systems agriculture: a case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, D; Topliff, D; Deotte, R

    2010-01-01

    A doctoral program in Systems Agriculture was initiated at West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX, in September, 2003. The stated objective of the program was "..to prepare leaders for the agricultural industry that are trained in a multidisciplinary, research-based curriculum that emphasizes a systems approach to problem solving". The program offers a single doctoral degree in Agriculture and accepts qualified students with a master's or professional degree in agricultural or related disciplines. Courses related to systems methodologies, leadership, agricultural economics, plant and soil science, and animal science are required. Additional program requirements include a systems research project and dissertation, leadership training, and written and oral exams. The program has exceeded enrollment and graduation targets, suggesting interest in this approach to a doctoral degree. Students have entered the program with M.S. backgrounds in education, traditional agricultural disciplines, veterinary medicine, business, and physics. Graduates have gained employment in industry, university teaching and research, government research/administration, and extension. Doctoral student projects in systems agriculture contributed to curriculum changes and to the conceptual framework adopted by a multi-state research group. Designing and teaching courses for students with diverse backgrounds has been challenging. Development of a common understanding of systems agriculture was identified by a third-party program review as an issue for faculty. Development and maintenance of program standards and administrative procedures posed additional challenges. Leadership, administrative support, and timely and continuing program assessment are suggested as necessary components for a nontraditional doctoral program.

  18. Passionate Scholars: Transformative Learning in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Long, Judith; Schapiro, Steven A.; McClintock, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the relationships among student-centered doctoral study for scholar-practitioners, adult development, and transformative learning. In this research study, the authors describe a project that explores an expanded conceptualization of doctoral education that is grounded in an integrative perspective on adult development and on…

  19. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 14314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  20. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement. Working Paper 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  1. Doctors' involvement in torture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonntag, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Doctors from both non-democratic and democratic countries are involved in torture. The majority of doctors involved in torture are doctors at risk. Doctors at risk might compromise their ethical duty towards patients for the following possible reasons: individual factors (such as career, economic...

  2. [Elaboration enrich cereals gruels fast preparation for the students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭkov, V G; Bakumenko, O E; Doronin, A F

    2008-01-01

    Reviews results research on the appraisal actual mode of life and actual nutrition student's in the result established breach consumption organism important food substances - carbo-hydrates, fiber foods, vitamins and mineral substances. Establishment level intellectual, physical loading, bad habits, in the result that at the student's reviews oridin different diseases. Science basis need introduce in the retion student's food substances promoting foudation and preservation health.

  3. Preparing High School Students for the Interdisciplinary Nature of Modern Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Preparing students for the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology will require changes in curriculum, instruction, assessments, and teacher professional development in order to support teaching for conceptual understanding and for making cross-disciplinary connections.

  4. A Cavity Preparation Evaluation System in the Skill Assessment of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Huiru; Jin, Shufeng; Sun, Jianping; Dai, Yanmei

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a computerized, laser-scanning Cavity Preparation Skill Evaluation System (CPSES) with conventional teachers' eye-hand grading assessment of dental students' Class I cavity preparation evaluations. Thirty-eight cavity preparations of lower left first molars made by junior dental students at a dental school in China were tested from September 2013 to November 2014. The outline and retention form, smoothness, depth, wall angulation, and cavity margin index of the preparations were evaluated by CPSES and then by teachers' eye-hand grading. The mean difference in scores for each method was considered, as was the variability of scores within each method. Compared with the teachers' eye-hand grading method, CPSES provided objective evaluation results that had statistically significant differences (pcavity preparation skills and encourage students in their self-paced learning and independent practice.

  5. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    explore the microclimate in an ecological niche of doctoral education. Based on a theoretical definition of microclimate as the emotional atmosphere that ties group members together and affects their actions, we conducted a case study that aimed to describe the key features of the microclimate...... in a successful ecological niche of doctoral education, and the ways in which the microclimate support the doctoral students’ learning. The methods we applied in the case study were based on short-term ethnographic fieldwork. The results reveal four key features of the emotional atmosphere in the microclimate...... successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...

  6. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judie L. Brill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 sources. The search was narrowed to include only doctoral study and mentoring. Research questions of interest were: Why do high attrition rates exist for doctoral students? What are the barriers to retention? What are the benefits of doctoral mentoring? What programs do institutions have in place to reduce attrition? The researchers found a key factor influencing doctoral student retention and success is effective faculty mentorship. In particular, the design of a mentoring and faculty training program to increase retention and provide for success after graduation is important. This research represents a key area of interest in the retention literature, as institutions continue to search for ways to better support students during their doctoral programs and post-graduation. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i2.186

  7. Preparing Students for a Diverse Workplace: Strategies to Improve Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Deana; Dail, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The curriculum for kinesiology students typically includes foundation courses focused on the scientific principles underlying human movement. Modifications for gender, age, and physical ability are also commonly included in these courses. Rarely addressed, however, are students' dispositions toward diverse groups. This article examines several…

  8. Preparation for Computer Usage in Social Work: Student Consumer Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurius, Paula S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of students in a large master's program in social work investigated student training in and experience with computers and attitudes about computer applications for human service activities. The value of the findings in curriculum planning, practica development, computer resources management, and faculty and agency involvement are…

  9. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  10. Reflective Ethical Inquiry: Preparing Students for Life. IDEA Paper #54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualters, Donna M.; McDaniels, Melissa; Cohen, Perrin

    2013-01-01

    Although universities often teach ethics courses, they do not always teach students how to apply ethical course content to ethical dilemmas they encounter on a day-to-day basis. The Awareness-Investigation-Responding (AIR) model of ethical inquiry bridges this gap by scaffolding the reflective process and empowering students to make more caring,…

  11. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  12. How IELTS Preparation Courses Support Students: IELTS and Academic Socialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanxian; Badger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IELTS scores are widely used in combination with academic results as a way of judging whether non-English background students should be admitted to degree-level courses in Anglophone contexts. However, successful study at university requires more than language competence and intellectual ability and international students often seem to start from…

  13. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

  14. One University's Approach to Defining and Supporting Professional Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    The changing market for doctorally prepared workers led one institution to examine its overall approach to defining and supporting professional doctorates. After a review of existing scholarship and internal practices, a white paper was created to capture the various ways that these degrees can be distinguished from the academic doctorate (PhD) at…

  15. Engaging Diverse Students Through International Collaboration and Professional Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feineman, M. D.; Nyblade, A.; Webb, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The AfricaArray-Bushveld REU is a partnership between the Pennsylvania State University and the University of the Witwatersrand. The primary goal is to engage a diverse cohort of students in international scientific collaboration through a program of training, field work, and laboratory and/or computational analysis. At least 50% of the student participants each year are from under-represented minorities. Students spend 2-3 weeks at Penn State, then 3 weeks in South Africa, followed by another 2-3 weeks in the US. The introductory 2-3 week session at Penn State is devoted to ethics and safety training, the human history, culture, and geologic history of South Africa, and Earth Science Literacy. Upon arriving in South Africa, the students are placed into field groups with students, post-docs, and faculty from Wits and other African nations participating in the AfricaArray Geophysics Field School. Each disciplinary group includes at least 1 mentor from the US and 1 from South Africa. Students spend time collecting rock samples for geochemical analysis, installing and servicing seismometers, and/or collecting data from the shallow subsurface using a variety of geophysical techniques. All students attend lectures by faculty at Wits, receive training in proper use and maintenance of scientific instrumentation, and interact with industry representatives. The culmination of this part of the REU is a day of oral presentations, where all students (REU and AfricaArray Geophysics Field School) share their experiences and data. After returning to the US, students engage in geochemical analysis, processing of seismic data, and modeling geophysical data. In addition to faculty mentors, the students work closely with graduate students and post-docs. All participate in mentor-led discussions about future career paths and graduate school options. As a capstone to the REU, each student writes a conference abstract and gives a poster presentation of their research. Each abstract

  16. Educating tomorrow's doctors: A cross sectional survey of emotional intelligence and empathy in medical students of Lahore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Nazish; Awais Aftab, Muhammad; Haider, Imran Ijaz; Farhat, Anam

    2013-05-01

    Medical education in Pakistan traditionally emphasizes physician's biomedical knowledge with less emphasis on interpersonal skills and ability to relate to the patients. This study explored the emotional intelligence & empathy of undergraduate medical students and investigated its relationship with various factors to act as baseline for future work in this area. The Schutte Emotional Intelligence scale and Davis' Interpersonal Reactivity Index in addition to socio demographic questionnaire were administered to first year and final year medical undergraduates of two medical Institutions in Lahore, Pakistan. Data was analyzed by using SPSS 17 version. The overall mean scores for medical students both on emotional intelligence and empathy is significantly lower than that found in previous literature, highlighting that medical students do not appear to fare better than average people in EQ. Women showed statistically significant higher scores on Appraisal of emotions , Regulation of emotions, Empathic concern Scale & Personal distress scale. Comparison of EI & IRI of students according to medical college year did not show any statistical significance. Current medical curriculum and training in Pakistan does not appear to increase EI abilities which are building blocks that may allow students and residents to develop competence. Medical educators in Pakistan should look for ways to incorporate emotional intelligence in medical curriculum which will ultimately contribute towards patient centered practice, patient satisfaction as well as effective communication skills.

  17. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part...... investigates learning opportunities in supervision with multiple supervisors. This was investigated through observations and recording of supervision, and subsequent analysis of transcripts. The analyses used different perspectives on learning; learning as participation, positioning theory and variation theory....... The research illuminates how learning opportunities are created in the interaction through the scientific discussions. It also shows how multiple supervisors can contribute to supervision by providing new perspectives and opinions that have a potential for creating new understandings. The combination...

  18. Preparing Students with Learning Disabilities for Large-Scale Writing Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Colwell, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for teachers to better prepare 3rd through 12th grade students with learning disabilities for large-scale writing assessments. The variation across large-scale writing assessments and the multiple needs of struggling writers indicate the need for test preparation to be embedded within a comprehensive,…

  19. Preparing School Personnel to Assist Students with Life-Threatening Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Genevieve H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of and preparation for life-threatening food allergies will enable school personnel to better respond to students who have severe allergic reactions. Given the high incidence of food-related anaphylaxis in public places, teachers and school personnel should be aware of and prepared to handle severe food allergy reactions. (SM)

  20. Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Peggy; Warde, Beverly; Rody, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Given federal mandates, public school districts have adopted inclusive practices with the expectation that general education teachers can accommodate students with disabilities. For teacher preparation programs to prepare future teachers for this reality, it is important to understand the composition of a "typical" general education…

  1. How Well Does A-Level Mathematics Prepare Students for the Mathematical Demands of Chemistry Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    332 undergraduate chemistry students were surveyed in order to establish whether they had found A-level Mathematics and/or Further Mathematics to be good preparation for their degree. Perceptions of both subjects were found to be positive, with more than 80% of participants describing Mathematics or Further Mathematics as good preparation. In…

  2. The Impact of Preparing Faculty in the Effective Use of Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Mark E.; Matkin, Gina S.; Gambrell, Kem M.; Harding, Heath E.

    2010-01-01

    Companies increasingly rely on teams to improve productivity, and consequently employers expect colleges and universities to prepare graduates to effectively work in teams. To help with this need, instructors must be equipped to prepare students to fully capitalize on the power of teamwork. This study examines the effect of college instructor…

  3. Teaching Students with Disabilities: A Web-Based Examination of Preparation of Preservice Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer; O'Neill, Sue; Carter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    With increasing expectations that preservice teachers will be prepared to teach students with special needs in regular classrooms, it is timely to review relevant units in teacher education courses. Units relevant to special education/inclusion in primary undergraduate teacher preparation courses in Australian tertiary institutions, delivered in…

  4. "See One, Sim One, Do One"- A National Pre-Internship Boot-Camp to Ensure a Safer "Student to Doctor" Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa'ar Minha

    Full Text Available The transition for being a medical student to a full functioning intern is accompanied by considerable stress and sense of unpreparedness. Simulation based workshops were previously reported to be effective in improving the readiness of interns and residents to their daily needed skills but only few programs were implemented on a large scale.A nationally endorsed and mandated pre-internship simulation based workshop is reported. We hypothesized that this intervention will have a meaningful and sustained impact on trainees' perception of their readiness to internship with regard to patient safety and quality of care skills. Main outcome measure was the workshop's contribution to professional training in general and to critical skills and error prevention in particular, as perceived by participants.Between 2004 and 2011, 85 workshops were conducted for a total of 4,172 trainees. Eight-hundred and six of the 2,700 participants approached by e-mail, returned feedback evaluation forms, which were analyzed. Eighty five percent of trainees perceived the workshop as an essential component of their professional training, and 87% agreed it should be mandatory. These ratings peaked during internship and were generally sustained 3 years following the workshop. Contribution to emergency care skills was especially highly ranked (83%.Implementation of a mandatory, simulation-based, pre-internship workshop on a national scale made a significant perceived impact on interns and residents. The sustained impact should encourage adopting this approach to facilitate the student to doctor transition.

  5. Attitudes of Doctor of Pharmacy Students Toward the Application of Social and Administrative Pharmacy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootman, J. Lyle; Johnson, C. Anderson

    1978-01-01

    Comparisons for Minnesota's class of 1977 supported the hypothesis that clinical pharmacy students become more receptive to pharmacy administrations skills and services as they gain clinical experience, especially in consultation services. Comparisons with the class of 1976 failed to support the hypothesis, however. (LBH)

  6. Perceptions of Junior Doctors and Undergraduate Medical Students as Anatomy Teachers: Investigating Distance along the Near-Peer Teaching Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Samuel; Stephens, Jonathan; Andrade, Teu; Davids, Joseph; Powell, Matthew; Border, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Near-peer teaching involves more experienced students acting as tutors and has been widely used in anatomy education. This approach has many advantages for the learner due to the social and cognitive congruence they share with the teacher, however, the influence of distance between the teacher and learner on these congruences has yet to be…

  7. Electronic Clinic Journaling: The Use of Weblogs to Support Evidence-Based Practice in Doctor of Audiology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neldon, Gayle B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a strategy for the provision of high quality health care. The use of journals to document clinical experiences and reflection has been used in speech-language pathology as well as nursing and psychology. This study uses qualitative analysis to study what AuD students learn about evidence-based practice from writing…

  8. Implementation of Protocols to Enable Doctoral Training in Physical and Computational Chemistry of a Blind Graduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkara, Mona S.; Weaver, Michael N.; Gorske, Jim; Bowers, Clifford R.; Merz, Kenneth M., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    There exists a sparse representation of blind and low-vision students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. This is due in part to these individuals being discouraged from pursuing STEM degrees as well as a lack of appropriate adaptive resources in upper level STEM courses and research. Mona Minkara is a rising fifth…

  9. The Interactive Role of Emotional Intelligence, Attachment Style, and Resilience in the Prediction of Time Perception in Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precin, Patricia Jean

    2014-01-01

    The perception of time (the use of temporal categories to conceptualize experiences) affects human behavior. Students' time perspective predicts academic outcomes: those with future orientations tend to have better academic outcomes than those with past or present, according to Zimbardo and Boyd's psychology of time model, and may contribute to…

  10. Attitudes of Doctor of Pharmacy Students Toward the Application of Social and Administrative Pharmacy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootman, J. Lyle; Johnson, C. Anderson

    1978-01-01

    Comparisons for Minnesota's class of 1977 supported the hypothesis that clinical pharmacy students become more receptive to pharmacy administrations skills and services as they gain clinical experience, especially in consultation services. Comparisons with the class of 1976 failed to support the hypothesis, however. (LBH)

  11. Electronic Clinic Journaling: The Use of Weblogs to Support Evidence-Based Practice in Doctor of Audiology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neldon, Gayle B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a strategy for the provision of high quality health care. The use of journals to document clinical experiences and reflection has been used in speech-language pathology as well as nursing and psychology. This study uses qualitative analysis to study what AuD students learn about evidence-based practice from writing…

  12. Sinking or Swimming in the Deep End? Developing Professional Academic Identities as Doctoral Students Chairing Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Hannah; Sutherland-Smith, Wendy; Horwood, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Much of the burden of undergraduate teaching in Australian higher education institutions falls to sessional staff and postgraduate students. These members of staff assume high teaching loads and administrative management responsibilities. This paper explores the perspectives of two female academics in the unique position of being the subject…

  13. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  14. Preparing Graduates for Work in the Creative Industries: A Collaborative Learning Approach for Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of collaborative learning strategies in higher education is growing as educators seek better ways to prepare students for the workplace. In design education, teamwork and creativity are particularly valued; successful collaborative learning depends on knowledge sharing between students, and there is increasing recognition that…

  15. Preparing Attitude Scale to Define Students' Attitudes about Environment, Recycling, Plastic and Plastic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Cagri; Aydinli, Bahattin; Bakar, Fatma; Alboga, Yunus

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce an attitude scale in order to define students? attitudes about environment, recycling, plastics, plastic waste. In this study, 80 attitude sentences according to 5-point Likert-type scale were prepared and applied to 492 students of 6th grade in the Kastamonu city center of Turkey. The scale consists of…

  16. Moving toward a Global Community: An Analysis of the Internationalization of Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Scott Andrew; Lee, Jenny J.; Cantwell, Brendan; McClellan, George; Woodard, Dudley B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Student affairs could potentially play a vital role in the internationalization of colleges and universities, but the extent to which international issues are included in the preparation of future student affairs administrators has remained relatively unknown. As such, a team of researchers sought to investigate the extent of internationalization…

  17. Tour Guide Robots: An Integrated Research and Design Platform to Prepare Engineering and Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting research and design questions occur at the intersections of traditional disciplines, yet most coursework and research programs for undergraduate engineering students are focused on one discipline. This leads to underutilization of the potential in better preparing students through multidisciplinary projects. Identifying this…

  18. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  19. Curriculum Type and Sophomore Students' Preparation Time for the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Boyd F.; Cariaga-Lo, Liza

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen medical students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum reported that on average they spent twice as much time preparing for step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination as did 52 students in the traditional lecture-based curriculum at the same school. Different learning approaches were also employed. (SLD)

  20. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…