WorldWideScience

Sample records for prepared interactive classroom

  1. Increasing Positive Interactive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotcher, Elaine; Doremus, Richard R.

    1973-01-01

    The question examined in this study was as follows: do teachers increase their positive classroom interactive behaviors as a result of training in systematic classroom observation techniques? (Authors/JA)

  2. Analysing language classrooms through classroom interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Gündüz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research study focuses on teacher-student and student-student interaction, which are considered very important aspects of classroom life. There has been a growth of interest in the analysis of teacher language and interaction in language classrooms and many (e.g. Ellis, 1994; Tsui, 2001 believe that classroom interaction is one of the major variables affecting SLA in formal settings. This study aims to give some insight into classroom interaction and how this interaction shapes L2 learning and teaching in Turkey and England. Systematic classroom observation along with the field notes taken to record observations is the main research method in this study used to describe and examine interaction patterns and to measure learner production in secondary classes in Turkey and England. The participants are foreign language teachers and non-native speaking students. Over a month, more than 50 lessons were observed in the secondary schools in both Turkey and England at two levels (13-14 and 14-15 year age group. In Turkey, English classes were observed whereas in England, the observation was conducted in German and French classes. English is taught as a foreign language in Turkey; German and French are also taught as a foreign language in England. The findings of this research study are expected to provide a better understanding of instructional practices and procedures in L2 classrooms. The results of this research study, however, should be seen as suggestive rather than conclusive since they are derived from a relatively small sample.

  3. Interaction in English Classroom Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晶

    2009-01-01

    This essay mainly elaborates on the interaction in English classroom teaching.It highlights the indispensable role interaction should play in teaching process.and give out a series of methods on how to promote the application of this strategy.

  4. Increasing Positive Interactive Classroom Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotcher, Elaine; Doremus, Richard R.

    During the spring of 1972 training workshops for 88 elementary and secondary teachers of the Great Neck Public Schools held to examine four hypotheses: 1) workshops in training teachers to observe classroom behavior would significantly increase these same teachers' positive classroom interactive behaviors consisting of teacher, pupil-pupil,…

  5. Efficient Interaction in English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董红叶

    2013-01-01

    Lack of communicative competence will result in failure to efficiently interact with others and also weaken linguistic competence. This paper shows the importance of interaction through analyzing Klashen’s input hypothesis,emotional factors,lat⁃er Wittgenstein’s linguistic philosophy,selectivity and dynamics of languages. Different interaction activities are used in different teaching methods. A teacher needs to face all the challenges so as to find the most efficient way to teach in a language classroom.

  6. Electronically Enhanced Classroom Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Stephen; Cargill, Julie; Cutts, Quintin

    A design rationale for introducing electronic equipment (a group response system) for student interaction in lecture theaters is presented, linking the instructional design to theory. The effectiveness of the equipment for learning depends mostly on what pedagogic method is employed. Various alternative types are introduced, including: assessment;…

  7. Interactions between Child Types and Classroom Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; Kendall, Arthur J.

    Research is described which explores the hypothesis that different classroom situations may be optimal for different individuals. The approach used cluster analysis to identify student and classroom "types" whose interactions were then examined in an analysis of variance framework. About 1,300 fourth graders from 50 classrooms were involved in the…

  8. Teacher Talk and EFL Classroom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程东岳

    2014-01-01

    Teacher talk and teacher-student classroom interaction have always been the central issue among the various classroom researches. Teacher talk is undoubtedly important in EFL (English as a foreign language) classroom in China. This paper attempts to discuss the features of teacher talk in EFL classroom, mainly of NNS (non-native speaker) teachers and the implications and suggestions of how to make teacher talk more appropriate and stimulative.

  9. How Coursebook Teaching Materials Facilitate English Classroom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卉

    2013-01-01

    As classroom interaction forms the basis of any interactive language classroom, it is thus very important and valuable for language teacher to investigate. And This article attempts to account for how the teaching materials facilitate classroom interac-tion.

  10. The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Seedhouse

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a summary of some of the key ideas of Seedhouse (2004. The study applies Conversation Analysis (CA methodology to an extensive and varied database of language lessons from around the world and attempts to answer the question ‘How is L2 classroom interaction organised?’ The main thesis is that there is a reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction in the L2 classroom. This means that there is a two-way, mutually dependent relationship. Furthermore, this relationship is the foundation of the organisation of interaction in L2 classrooms. The omnipresent and unique feature of the L2 classroom is this reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction. So whoever is taking part in L2 classroom interaction and whatever the particular activity during which the interactants are speaking the L2, they are always displaying to one another their analyses of the current state of the evolving relationship between pedagogy and interaction and acting on the basis of these analyses. So interaction in the L2 classroom is based on the relationship between pedagogy and interaction. Interactants are constantly analysing this relationship and displaying their analyses in their talk. An example of data analysis is provided, including discussion of socially distributed cognition and learning.

  11. Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Kelly Hall

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Há muito tempo, a área de aprendizagem de uma segunda língua ou língua estrangeira interessa-se pelo papel que a interação possui no aprendizado de língua. Recentemente, pesquisas sobre interação e aprendizado de línguas estão se voltando para uma perspectiva sociocultural, que incorpora percepções teóricas e descobertas de disciplinas tradicionalmente consideradas fora dos limites da área. O objetivo deste trabalho é informar sobre as mais recentes pesquisas nessa área. Após fornecer uma breve visão geral da mais tradicional perspectiva da função da interação no aprendizado de línguas, estudos recentes sobre interação entre professor-aluno e sobre o aprendizado de segunda língua e língua estrangeira que utilizam uma perspectiva sociocultural são revisados. O artigo finaliza com uma discussão sobre implicações para ensino de língua em salas-de-aula e sugestões para pesquisas futuras. The field of second and foreign language learning has long been interested in the role that interaction plays in language learning. Recently, research on interaction and language learning has begun to move toward a sociocultural perspective, which incorporates theoretical insights and findings from disciplines traditionally considered outside the field’s main purview. The aim of this paper is to report on some of these most recent undertakings in the field. After first providing a brief overview of the more traditional perspective of the role of interaction in language learning, several recent studies on teacher-student interaction and second and foreign language learning that take a sociocultural perspective are reviewed. The article concludes with a discussion on implications for language classrooms and suggestions for future research.

  12. REPAIR MECHANISM IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents practical research on repair mechanismand its four repair trajectories in FL classroom interaction. Thisshows that it is effective and efficient in assisting FL learners todevelop their communicative competence and understand theprocess of language acquisition. Repair strategies that are ofgreat value to FL teachers in FL classroom teaching are also ex-pounded.

  13. The Multivoiced Classroom: Interactions of Writing and Classroom Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysthe, Olga

    1996-01-01

    Presents a description and qualitative case study of three high school classrooms, in two of which the teachers actively elicited student dialog and thereby improved writing. Draws on M. Bakhtin, R. Rommetveit and Y. M. Lotman to suggest that a combination of writing and dialogue (spoken interaction) lead to more chances to learn than either…

  14. How to Apply Communicative and Interactive Teaching Method to English Major Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁燕

    2015-01-01

    #%This paper focuses on introducing communicative and interactive teaching method (abbreviation: CITM).It points out definitely that under the condition of applying CITM,the English major classroom wil receive more achievement.The key way to push forward CITM is the transformation of the role of the teachers,whereas the objective-oriented course preparation and suitable organization of the classroom can effectively support the implementation of a communicative and interactive classroom.

  15. Interactive Aphra: Skyping Behn into your Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Wanko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Beginning by asking how teachers manage the presence of the author in their literature classrooms, this article describes the classroom experiment of interviewing Karen Eterovich, an actor who portrays Aphra Behn, using Skype. It describes the planning and scripting processes, explains the particular interests of this group of students, and assesses the final activity. Questions arose about topics for the interview, appropriate ways for Behn to respond, and the need for a script. The pedagogical opportunities for preparing students as interviewers and of expanding their understanding of performance, historical reenactment, and the construct of the author are discussed. Possible extensions of this technique for other types of classes are suggested.

  16. A Review of Classroom Interaction in Second Language Acquisition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红艳

    2016-01-01

    Interest in classroom interaction has grown steadily both at home and abroad since the 1940s. From the second language acquisition perspective, classroom interaction has the Input Hypothesis, the Interaction Hypothesis and the Output Hypothesis as theory foundation. As to the current state of college English classroom interaction in China, it is still far from satisfaction. Teachers, students and the society should make their efforts to produce more effective classroom interaction.

  17. Teachers' Preparation Needs for Integrating Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Barcus C.

    2013-01-01

    School districts across the country are charged with preparing the next generation for competing in a global economy and have spent billions of dollars on technology acquisition and Internet use. However, teachers do not feel prepared to integrate technology in the classroom. To prepare teachers for technology integration, the most common approach…

  18. Teachers' Preparation Needs for Integrating Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Barcus C.

    2013-01-01

    School districts across the country are charged with preparing the next generation for competing in a global economy and have spent billions of dollars on technology acquisition and Internet use. However, teachers do not feel prepared to integrate technology in the classroom. To prepare teachers for technology integration, the most common approach…

  19. How do medical students prepare for flipped classrooms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM; de Kleijn, R.A.M.; ten Cate, TJ; van Rijen, HVM; Westerveld, HE

    A flipped classroom, an approach abandoning traditional lectures and having students come together to apply acquired knowledge, requires students to come to class well prepared. The nature of this preparation is currently being debated. Watching web lectures as a preparation has typically been

  20. From interaction to interaction: Exploring shared resources constructed through and mediating classroom science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaowei

    Recent reform documents and science education literature emphasize the importance of scientific argumentation as a discourse and practice of science that should be supported in school science learning. Much of this literature focuses on the structure of argument, whether for assessing the quality of argument or designing instructional scaffolds. This study challenges the narrowness of this research paradigm and argues for the necessity of examining students' argumentative practices as rooted in the complex, evolving system of the classroom. Employing a sociocultural-historical lens of activity theory (Engestrom, 1987, 1999), discourse analysis is employed to explore how a high school biology class continuously builds affordances and constraints for argumentation practices through interactions. The ways in which argumentation occurs, including the nature of teacher and student participation, are influenced by learning goals, classroom norms, teacher-student relationships and epistemological stances constructed through a class' interactive history. Based on such findings, science education should consider promoting classroom scientific argumentation as a long-term process, requiring supportive resources that develop through continuous classroom interactions. Moreover, in order to understand affordances that support disciplinary learning in classroom, we need to look beyond just disciplinary interactions. This work has implications for classroom research on argumentation and teacher education, specifically, the preparation of teachers for secondary science teaching.

  1. The interactive learning toolkit: technology and the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoff, Brian; Tucker, Laura

    2011-04-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) and Just-in-Time-Teaching (JiTT) have been shown to increase both students' conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills. However, the time investment for the instructor to prepare appropriate conceptual questions and manage student JiTT responses is one of the main implementation hurdles. To overcome this we have developed the Interactive Learning Toolkit (ILT), a course management system specifically designed to support PI and JiTT. We are working to integrate the ILT with a fully interactive classroom system where students can use their laptops and smartphones to respond to ConcepTests in class. The goal is to use technology to engage students in conceptual thinking both in and out of the classroom.

  2. The Interactive Learning Toolkit: supporting interactive classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.; McCauley, V.; Mazur, E.

    2004-05-01

    Research-based interactive learning techniques have dramatically improved student understanding. We have created the 'Interactive Learning Toolkit' (ILT), a web-based learning management system, to help implement two such pedagogies: Just in Time Teaching and Peer Instruction. Our main goal in developing this toolkit is to save the instructor time and effort and to use technology to facilitate the interaction between the students and the instructor (and between students themselves). After a brief review of both pedagogies, we will demonstrate the many exciting new features of the ILT. We will show how technology can not only implement, but also supplement and improve these pedagogies. We would like acknowdge grants from NSF and DEAS, Harvard University

  3. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and cultural…

  4. Involving Collaborative Interaction in EFL Classroom from Sociocultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艺

    2016-01-01

    According to Vygotsky's theory of sociocultural theory (SCT), language use, classroom activity, and classroom structure are the primary means of mediation. In English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, SCT provides a framework for teachers to involve collaborative interaction and constructive classroom approaches to support students ' development. By involving collaborative interaction, language teachers use it as a tool to reform the teaching mode, stimulating students ' potential ability, and assessing the improvement in students' learning experience.

  5. Exclusively visual analysis of classroom group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data only—without audio—as when using both visual and audio data to code. Also, interrater reliability is high when comparing use of visual and audio data to visual-only data. We see a small bias to code interactions as group discussion when visual and audio data are used compared with video-only data. This work establishes that meaningful educational observation can be made through visual information alone. Further, it suggests that after initial work to create a coding scheme and validate it in each environment, computer-automated visual coding could drastically increase the breadth of qualitative studies and allow for meaningful educational analysis on a far greater scale.

  6. Interactive Dynamics of Imagination in a Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilppö, Jaakko; Rajala, Antti; Zittoun, Tania; Kumpulainen, Kristiina; Lipponen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a conceptual framework for researching the dynamics of imagination in science classroom interactions. While educational interest in imagination has recently increased, prior research has not adequately accounted for how imagination is realized in and through classroom interactions, nor has it created a framework for its…

  7. From a Distance: Student Voices from the Interactive Video Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Lynnea; Bozik, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Observations and interviews of community college students taking a class via interactive video revealed six primary themes of students' concerns and perceptions. Results indicate that further exploration is needed in classroom climate, apprehension, interaction, feedback, and learning styles. (AEF)

  8. Involving Collaborative Interaction in EFL Classroom from Sociocultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艺

    2016-01-01

    According to Vygotsky's theory of sociocultural theory(SCT),language use,classroom activity,and classroom structure are the primary means of mediation.In English as a Foreign Language(EFL)classroom,SCT provides a framework for teachers to involve collaborative interaction and constructive classroom approaches to support students'development.By involving collaborative interaction,language teachers use it as a tool to reform the teaching mode,stimulating students'potential ability,and assessing the improvement in students'learning experience.

  9. "Intercultural Communication" in classroom : For the active interaction in "intercultural classroom"

    OpenAIRE

    三枝, 理香

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the factors affecting the active exchange of opinions among students from different cultural background within a classroom setting. When Asian and Western students gather in one classroom, utterance tends to be dominated by the Western students. As interaction through utterance has great importance to the learning outcome of the whole class, every student should be encouraged to participate actively in a classroom discussion. A case study was conducted to investigate the f...

  10. Two Urban Elementary Science Classrooms: The Interplay between Student Interactions and Classroom Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanpierre, Bobby J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present findings from a case study of two urban elementary teachers' classroom management practices and students' interactions during science instruction. The two teachers had antithetical (i.e., one intrinsic, the other authoritarian) classroom management styles, yet substantial negative student classroom…

  11. Application of Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis (CCDA) in Analyzing Classroom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Sima; Ketabi, Saeed; Tavakoli, Mansoor; Sadeghi, Moslem

    2012-01-01

    As an area of classroom research, Interaction Analysis developed from the need and desire to investigate the process of classroom teaching and learning in terms of action-reaction between individuals and their socio-cultural context (Biddle, 1967). However, sole reliance on quantitative techniques could be problematic, since they conceal more than…

  12. Behavior and Classroom Management: Are Teacher Preparation Programs Really Preparing Our Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Andrea; McKenna, John William; Haring, Christa D.

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that many teachers are underprepared for the behaviors that their students may bring to the classroom, resulting in challenges to teaching and learning. The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior management content included in preservice teacher preparation programs for general education and special education teachers.…

  13. Students' Oral Contributions to Classroom Verbal Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkin, Michael J.

    This review of the literature related to research on oral communication in the classroom pursues two issues: the types of oral contributions students make and whether those types are related to school achievement. In considering research on oral communication in classrooms, the paper looks at information that considers whether the communication…

  14. Exclusively Visual Analysis of Classroom Group Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data…

  15. Interactive dynamics of imagination in a science classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hilppö, Jaakko Antero; Rajala, Antti; Zittoun, Tania; Kumpulainen, Kristiina; Lipponen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a conceptual framework for researching the dynamics of imagination in science classroom interactions. While educational interest in imagination has recently increased, prior research has not adequately accounted for how imagination is realized in and through classroom interactions, nor has it created a framework for its empirical investigation. Drawing on a theory of imagination situated in cultural psychology (Zittoun et al., 2013; Zittoun & Gillespie, 2016), we p...

  16. Representation of Teachers’ Identity in EFL Classroom Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meinarni Susilowati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This sociocultural linguistic study aimed investigating the teachers’ identity representation in their classroom interactions. This study was conducted by considering the significant roles the teachers played in orchestrating classroom activities which involved the accumulation of the teachers’ efforts, values and beliefs. The findings revealed that the teachers exposed their identity in differentways for both different roles and local positioning which were culturally, socially, politically, and religiously constructed. The teachers also perceived their identity which could be clustered into four broad areas which showed their understanding and the significant functions of their identity representation. Some pedagogical implications were derived from these findings Key Words: teachers’ identity representation, classroom interactions

  17. Preparing Special Education Mentors Using Classroom Artifacts as a Vehicle for Learning about Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Katz, Michelle; Hughes, Marie Tejero

    2008-01-01

    The authors examine a project that focuses on preparing special educators to mentor pre-service teachers throughout their preparation program, instead of mostly at the end of their program. Through use of classroom literacy artifacts, mentors are prepared in how to guide novices as they transition through coursework and into classroom practice.…

  18. PIC. Profile of Interaction in the Classroom. A Quick Feedback of Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Ellen

    The Profile of Interaction in the Classroom (PIC) is a short-cut method of interaction analysis that can provide the quick feedback essential to effective supervision of instruction. And because the PIC contains a record of all the behaviors that occurred in the classroom, as well as the sequence, the data may be used to build a traditional…

  19. Collaboration and Social Interaction in English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCosta, Meredith; Clifton, Jennifer; Roen, Duane

    2010-01-01

    English language arts classrooms are especially rich sites for both explicit and implicit collaborations among those who inhabit those spaces. In these venues, Bakhtinian "heteroglot voices" (Bakhtin 278) saturate the oral and written discourse that students produce as they engage in discussions and as they write in a wide variety of genres,…

  20. Accommodating Twitter: Communication Accommodation Theory and Classroom Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcha, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Research finds that student effectiveness can be related to how well a student interacts and communicates in the classroom, supporting the notion that student-student interaction is important (Frymier, 2005; Poulou, 2009). According to Sidelinger and Booth-Butterfield (2010), student-student connectedness (defined as "a supportive and…

  1. Preparing Future Teachers for Inclusion Classrooms Using Virtual World Role-Play Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirliss, Danielle Salomone

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs are exploring opportunities to better prepare pre-service teachers for the realities of managing inclusion classrooms. The ability to manage a classroom while meeting the learning needs of all students is critical to the success of a teacher. Research suggests that a teacher's positive attitudes toward inclusion and…

  2. CLASSROOM INTERACTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF EMPOWERMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcom Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available What is the practical pedagogic value of the zone of proximal development? How might we draw from the writings of Vygotsky and Leontiev with regard to understanding the process of children and young people’s development as socialized intellectual beings? This article applies cultural-historical theory to classroom activity in order to reveal the potential for dynamic change in subjectivity, agency, cooperation and collaboration. After a detailed theoretical contextualization which links primary sources and the cultural-historical tradition to learning and development through classroom activity, an incident in a lesson is discussed and situated in its wider narrative of practical experimentation, diagnosis and implementation. http://dx.doi.org/10.14572/nuances.v26i1.3815

  3. Some Issues in Analyzing Classroom Interaction: An Interview with Deborah Poole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, David

    1996-01-01

    Explores the research paradigms found useful by Dr. Poole in her research of classroom discourse as well as her insights into cross-cultural classroom interaction and the differences between first and second language classrooms. She discusses the need for close interactional study of English-as-a-Second- Language classrooms as well as non-English…

  4. The Interactive Lecture: Teaching and Learning Technologies for Large Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Conventional lectures in large classrooms are connected to fundamental didactic problems due to a lack of interactivity and feedback opportunities. In an interactive lecture each student is equipped with a light-weight, mobile device that can be used to interact with the lecturer during the lesson, thus creating an additional channel of communication. These devices support new teaching and learning paradigms such as participatory simulations. In this paper, we present our experiences with the...

  5. Classroom Interaction in Regular and Special Education Middle Primary Classrooms in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukmak, Samir

    2010-01-01

    Samir Dukmak is an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education in the Faculty of Education at the United Arab Emirates University. The research reported in this article investigated the frequency, types of and reasons for student-initiated interactions in both regular and special education classrooms in the United Arab Emirates…

  6. Multimodal Transcription of Video: Examining Interaction in Early Years Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Video is an increasingly popular data collection tool for those undertaking social research, offering a temporal, sequential, fine-grained record which is durable, malleable and sharable. These characteristics make video a valuable resource for researching Early Years classrooms, particularly with regard to the study of children's interaction in…

  7. Researching Classroom Interaction in the light of social justice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof.Dr. Petra Ponte; Nicolina Montesano-Montessori

    2010-01-01

    A research into classroom interaction (behaviour and communication) between teachers and pupils in the light of social justice. The research is based on the concern that educational praxis, defined as 'practice which implies a conscious awareness of the practitioners that their actions are morally

  8. Fostering Computer-Mediated L2 Interaction beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrs, Keith

    2012-01-01

    In language learning contexts a primary concern is how to maximise target language interaction both inside and outside of the classroom. With the development of digital technologies, the proliferation of language learning applications, and an increased awareness of how technology can assist in language education, educators are being presented with…

  9. Promoting Interactive Learning: A Classroom Exercise to Explore Foraging Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Ellen S.; Rowe, Graham; Mikhaylov, Natalie S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a classroom exercise to allow students to explore foraging strategies in higher vertebrates. The exercise includes an initial interactive session in which students act as predators and are guided through foraging simulations, and a subsequent student-led session where classmates are employed as experimental subjects. Students rated the…

  10. Interactive Multimedia Learning: Innovating Classroom Education in a Malaysian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Fui-Theng; Neo, Mai

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted at INTI International University, and aimed at enhancing the quality of classroom learning for University students with three important emphases: Gagne's instructional model, multimedia, and student-centred learning. An Interactive Learning Module (ILM) was developed as the core component in forming the…

  11. Promoting Interactive Learning: A Classroom Exercise to Explore Foraging Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Ellen S.; Rowe, Graham; Mikhaylov, Natalie S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a classroom exercise to allow students to explore foraging strategies in higher vertebrates. The exercise includes an initial interactive session in which students act as predators and are guided through foraging simulations, and a subsequent student-led session where classmates are employed as experimental subjects. Students rated the…

  12. Establishing Mathematics for Teaching within Classroom Interactions in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryve, Andreas; Nilsson, Per; Mason, John

    2012-01-01

    Teacher educators' processes of establishing "mathematics for teaching" in teacher education programs have been recognized as an important area for further research. In this study, we examine how two teacher educators establish and make explicit features of mathematics for teaching within classroom interactions. The study shows how the…

  13. Classroom Interactions in a Cooperative Translation Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui chuan Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade, translation learning has become one of the main foci for university language students in Taiwan. However, many studies have shown that translation teachers tend to adopt traditional teaching methods without considering class dynamics and student interactions. This paper therefore looks into the interactions in the researcher’s designed cooperative translation task, the Cooperative Translation Task, to see how these interactions helped or hindered students’ translation learning. A small class of 25 translation students and two translation teachers were participants. Videotaping and interviews were conducted in order to investigate the interaction modes and student participants’ perspectives toward each interaction mode. Six interaction modes were found in this task: within group, between group, translator group and comment-giver group, instructor and students, guest teacher and students, and instructor and guest teacher. Based on the results and participants’ responses, suggested teaching guidelines are provided.

  14. Review of Social Interaction and L2 Classroom Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    taster sessions over foreign language classrooms in monolingual contexts to English as an Additional Language settings in a multilingual context. This variety of settings allows him to examine a range of verbal and non-verbal features of classroom interaction, for example how code-switching is used...... in multilingual settings, and what the role of multimodal (such as gestures and gaze) and epistemic (for instance claims of insufficient knowledge and epistemic status checks) resources employed by students and teachers is. The book is structured in three sections: survey (Chapters 2 and 3), analysis (Chapters 4...

  15. Promoting Self-Expression in Classroom Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Self-expression is a key concept for sociological studies on childhood since it is the cue for children's self-socialization and agency. Hence promoting children's agency and social participation requires their self-expression to be facilitated in their interaction with adults. The analysis in this article of a set of interactions in Italian…

  16. Interactive radio: distance education in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The Honduran Association for Socioeconomic Growth and Development (AVANCE) in conjunction with the U.S. Agency for International Development's Radio Learning Project has developed and promoted programs for radio that encourage interactive learning in Latin America. The Second Interamerican Conference on Interactive Radio was recently held in Tela, Honduras where educators and participants came to attend workshops on scriptwriting, instructional design, community support and other related topics. The participants had the opportunity to study the second generation of interactive radio. Beginning in 1973, Nicaragua began an interactive radio program written for early grade mathematics students. Currently, Honduras is marketing a mathematics program entitled, La Familia de los Numeros," or the Family of Numbers to other countries. In Bolivia, an organization called, "Fe y Alegria," or Faith and Happiness is broadcasting educational programs through the use of interactive radio. In Ecuador, testing has begun to study the viability of interactive radio for their educational system, and in Costa Rica, replication of Honduras' "Familia de los Numeros" has begun. Teachers have noted an improved grasp of subject matter and better attentiveness through the use of interactive radio programs. The programs present 30 minutes of mathematics information and 30 minutes of language information. For each grade, 170 programs have been developed.

  17. The C3 Framework: Evaluating Classroom Response System Interactions in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fies, Carmen; Marshall, Jill

    2008-10-01

    The larger the classroom, the more likely is it that communications consist of a one-way flow from the instructor to students. Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) are frequently hailed as technologies capable of improving communications by opening the space for dialogic engagement; yet, a causal relationship is not documented in the literature. The data reported on here stem from a mixed methodology study and provide insights into motivations for CRS use and enacted CRS use across disciplines, as well as student and instructor perceptions of the tool's effects on teaching and learning. From these data emerged a framework of interaction (the C3 Framework) that situates CRS use from both the instructors' and learners' perspectives. The framework consists of an interdependent relationship between Concerns, Centeredness, and Control of discourse. Although this study took place in university classrooms, the C3 Framework presented here applies across educational settings.

  18. Special Education Teacher Preparation in Classroom Management: Implications for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Regina M.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Special education teachers' skills with classroom organization and behavior management affect the emergence and persistence of behavior problems as well as the success of inclusive practice for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Adequate special education teacher preparation and strong classroom organization and behavior…

  19. Classroom Observation Criteria and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Richard O.

    Classroom observation is an integral part of teacher preparation. The observer must enter the classroom with a frame-of-reference: knowledge of the teacher's goals and objectives, awareness of the climate of the classroom, and knowledge of the discipline. Observation forms to objectively record classroom interaction, assess the learning climate,…

  20. Examining classroom interactions related to difference in students' science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zady, Madelon F.; Portes, Pedro R.; Ochs, V. Dan

    2003-01-01

    The current study examines the cognitive supports that underlie achievement in science by using a cultural historical framework (L. S. Vygotsky (1934/1986), Thought and Language, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.) and the activity setting (AS) construct (R. G. Tharp & R. Gallimore (1988), Rousing minds to life: Teaching, learning and schooling in social context, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, MA.) with its five features: personnel, motivations, scripts, task demands, and beliefs. Observations were made of the classrooms of seventh-grade science students, 32 of whom had participated in a prior achievement-related parent-child interaction or home study (P. R. Portes, M. F. Zady, & R. M. Dunham (1998), Journal of Genetic Psychology, 159, 163-178). The results of a quantitative analysis of classroom interaction showed two features of the AS: personnel and scripts. The qualitative field analysis generated four emergent phenomena related to the features of the AS that appeared to influence student opportunity for conceptual development. The emergent phenomenon were science activities, the building of learning, meaning in lessons, and the conflict over control. Lastly, the results of the two-part classroom study were compared to those of the home science AS of high and low achievers. Mismatches in the AS features in the science classroom may constrain the opportunity to learn. Educational implications are discussed.

  1. Promoting Interaction through Blogging in Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Muge

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the university students' perception on integration of blogging in EFL classes. In this study, the participants were first year university students (n=103) who created their group blogs in order to share their blog entries during their oral communication classes. Students interacted with their peers via blogs simply by…

  2. Implementing Digital Interactive Textbooks in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gary R.

    Digital interactive textbooks represent a major step forward in the quest to integrate technology into instructional methodology. Because this technology is new, virtually no research has been done as to the response of teachers to this innovation. The purpose of this study was to understand the process of change in relation to implementing these digital interactive textbooks in science classrooms at the high school level. The conceptual framework was based on Senge's theory of organizational change, Rogers' theory of the diffusion of innovations, and Davis' research regarding factors involved in technology acceptance. Participants included 7 science teachers and 2 administrators who were members of a professional learning community at a Title I high school in the southeastern region of the United States. A case study design was used to collect data from teacher and administrator interviews and observations of instructional activities in the classroom and professional learning community meetings. Data were coded, categorized, and analyzed for common themes. Results indicated that the digital interactive textbook was met with teacher apprehension and anxiety regarding the transition from teacher-led to student-led instruction, and this apprehension manifested in resistance. During the course of the study, educators found that the digital interactive textbook engaged students and was demonstrated to be a successful tool of instruction. The study is important because educators will develop a better understanding of how to implement technology innovations in the classroom that minimize teacher resistance to instructional change.

  3. Variety and Preparation Are Keys to Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patience

    2007-01-01

    Elementary music teachers walk a thin line between encouraging enthusiasm and allowing Cat in the Hat mayhem in the classroom. A teacher is not doing his or her job if the students are not experiencing excitement with music, but they can't do their job when the classroom becomes a playground. In this article, the author discusses the importance of…

  4. Investigating Pedagogical Techniques in Classroom Interactions at a CELTA Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Shidur

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the similarities and dissimilarities of using pedagogical techniques in classroom interactions, taken place whilst teaching a known language and an unknown language in a CELTA training classroom context. For this purpose, the classroom interactions in unknown and known languages were analysed according to the qualitative…

  5. Sociocultural Theory on Interaction between Teachers and Learners in a Second Language Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers an overview of theoretical ideas and recent empirical research by referring to the interactive communi⁃cation between teachers and learners in a second language classroom. Both the interaction of teacher-centered classroom and learn⁃er-centered classroom are reviewed within the context of sociocultural theory. The paper attempts to indicate the better effect of language learning can be achieved by complementing one another in the classroom of teacher-centeredness and learner-centered⁃ness.

  6. Gendered Teacher–Student Interactions in English Language Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Hassaskhah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Being and becoming is the ultimate objective of any educational enterprise, including language teaching. However, research results indicate seemingly unjustified differences between how females and males are treated by EFL (English as a Foreign Language teachers. The overall aim of this study is to illustrate, analyze, and discuss aspects of gender bias and gender awareness in teacher–student interaction in the Iranian college context. To this end, teacher–student interactions of 20 English teachers and 500 students were investigated from the perspective of gender theory. The data were obtained via classroom observations, a seating chart and the audio-recording of all classroom interactions during the study. The findings, obtained from the quantitative descriptive statistics and chi-square methods, as well as the qualitative analysis by way of open and selective coding, uncovered that there were significant differences in the quantity and quality of the interaction for females and males in almost all categories of interaction. The study also revealed teachers’ perception of “gender,” the problems they associate with gender, and the attitudes they have to gender issues. Apparently, while positive incentives are able to facilitate learner growth, the presence of any negative barrier such as gender bias is likely to hinder development. This has implications for teachers, and faculty members who favor healthy and gender-neutral educational climate.

  7. CORRECTIVE FEEDBACKS INTERACTION IN CLT-ADOPTED CLASSROOMS

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    Ayu Liskinasih

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This case study aimed to examine corrective feedback (CF pattern in the interactions of Indonesian EFL (English as Foreign Language classrooms (a speaking and a grammar classrooms which adopt CLT (Communicative Language Teaching. Two lecturers and twenty undergraduate English department students of an A-class university in Indonesia were involved as research participants. The findings revealed that the lecturers employed all types of CF to treat all types of errors. Explicit corrections were dominant in Speaking class as well as other explicit CF; whereas reformulations and prompt were equally distributed. Elicitation was dominant in Grammar class as well as other prompts; meanwhile, explicit and implicit CFs had similar proportion. The lecturers’ preferences were based on their beliefs on how their students learn foreign language and some factors such as the importance of CF to the instructional focus of the lesson, the possibility to generate student’s uptake, and also their empathetic values about students’ current language development. It was concluded that the provisions of CF in EFL classrooms reflect the application of CLT.

  8. Introduction of interactive learning into French university physics classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Rudolph

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a project to introduce interactive learning strategies (ILS to physics classes at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, one of the leading science universities in France. In Spring 2012, instructors in two large introductory classes, first-year, second-semester mechanics, and second-year introductory electricity and magnetism, enrolling approximately 500 and 250 students, respectively, introduced ILS into some, but not all, of the sections of each class. The specific ILS utilized were think-pair-share questions and Peer Instruction in the main lecture classrooms, and University of Washington Tutorials for Introductory Physics in recitation sections. Pre- and postinstruction assessments [Force Concept Inventory (FCI and Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM, respectively] were given, along with a series of demographic questions. Since not all lecture or recitation sections in these classes used ILS, we were able to compare the results of the FCI and CSEM between interactive and noninteractive classes taught simultaneously with the same curriculum. We also analyzed final exam results, as well as the results of student and instructor attitude surveys between classes. In our analysis, we argue that multiple linear regression modeling is superior to other common analysis tools, including normalized gain. Our results show that ILS are effective at improving student learning by all measures used: research-validated concept inventories and final exam scores, on both conceptual and traditional problem-solving questions. Multiple linear regression analysis reveals that interactivity in the classroom is a significant predictor of student learning, showing a similar or stronger relationship with student learning than such ascribed characteristics as parents’ education, and achieved characteristics such as grade point average and hours studied per week. Analysis of student and instructor attitudes shows that both groups believe

  9. Virtual Interactive Classroom: A New Technology for Distance Learning Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, David W.; Babula, Maria

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Interactive Classroom (VIC) allows Internet users, specifically students, to remotely control and access data from scientific equipment. This is a significant advantage to school systems that cannot afford experimental equipment, have Internet access, and are seeking to improve science and math scores with current resources. A VIC Development Lab was established at Lewis to demonstrate that scientific equipment can be controlled by remote users over the Internet. Current projects include a wind tunnel, a room camera, a science table, and a microscope.

  10. Practices for Social Interaction in the Language-Learning Classroom: Disengagements from Dyadic Task Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellermann, John; Cole, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Using conversation analysis and situated learning theory, in this paper we analyze the peer dyadic interactions of one adult learner of English in class periods 16 months apart. The analyses in the paper present microgenetic and longitudinal perspectives on the learner's increasing participation in his classroom communities of practice. The focus…

  11. AN ANALYSIS OF IRF (INITIATION-RESPONSE-FEEDBACK ON CLASSROOM INTERACTION IN EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Rustandi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the reflection of IRF (Initiation-Response-Feedback in speaking class and investigating the dominant sequence among I, R and F. IRF is a pattern of classroom interaction found by Sinclair and Coulthard in 1975 that stands for teacher initiation, students’ response and feedback by teacher. Initiation is the movement in which teacher initiates an interaction to get the response of the students, then teacher gives feedback to the students’ response. To obtain the data, the researcher conducted classroom observation in speaking class in one university in West Java. The result showed that student response becomes the dominant sequence of IRF in speaking class. Furthermore, it is recommended that the teachers should maintain the effectiveness of classroom interaction and give much opportunity to the students to take role in classroom verbal interaction through reflecting the IRF pattern in teaching learning process particularly in speaking classroom. Keywords: IRF, classroom interaction, speaking class

  12. Scientist-teacher interactions: Catalysts for developing transformational classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Robbie Von

    Professional development leading to standards-based teaching practices in U.S. schools is a remarkably subtle and lengthy process. Research indicates that there are many effective tools for teaching through inquiry available to teachers (Lawson, Abraham, & Renner, 1989), but also that teachers continue to present traditional positivistic views of science (Hashweh, 1985; Maor & Taylor, 1995; Zucker, Young, & Luczak, 1996) and appear to view constructivism as a "method" of teaching rather than a way of thinking about learning (Tobin, Tippins, & Gallard, 1984). Teachers are expected to create enriched environments where students can develop the thinking skills of scientists (Roth & Roychoudhury, 1993) but the majority of teachers have never experienced such environments; the involvement of scientists in science education is encouraged by the NRC, AAAS, and NSTA. Teachers and students are expected to act as coresearchers, where negotiation, debate, consensus, and reflection are key. It is believed that scientist and teachers interacting as co-researchers could assist teachers in developing attitudes of freedom in exploration: the essence of science and a mindset that constructivism is a referent, or tool for critical reflection (Tobin, Tippins & Gallard, 1994). This study seeks to identify aspects of scientist-teacher interactions in the field that could serve as catalysts for developing transformational classrooms. Multiple data sources were collected for this study: audiotapes and transcripts of laboratory interactions and informal interviews, written narratives from applications and funding documents, field notes, and personal communications. Data were simultaneously collected, analyzed and coded as a perpetual review of the literature was conducted as in the grounded theory methodology defined by Glaser (1967) and later by Strauss & Corbin (1990). Findings indicate all four teachers valued field experiences in personal ways, developed new understandings of

  13. The forest as a classroom: preparing for mental health practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Marthe Lyngås; Ruud, Ireen; Grov, Ellen Karine

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive effects of physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention, in treatment of mental illnesses are well documented. Mental health practice for nursing students highlights the important connection between physical activities and mental health. This study aims to examine the outcome from nursing students’ participation using The forest as a classroom. Students’ collaboration by problem solving, theoretical discussions and performance of activities in the forest serv...

  14. Interaction in the English classroom; an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Abarca, Marianella

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es describir el tipo de interacción que ocurrió en una clase de Inglés en un colegio p��blico de zona rural en Costa Rica. Se presentan algunos principios teóricos relacionados con la interacción en la clase de idioma. Se utilizó el método etnográfico del paradigma cualitativo para llevar a cabo este estudio. Entre las técnicas e instrumentos utilizados están la observación no participante, el uso de un cuestionario, entrevistas, y diarios personales. Se utilizó la triangulación para validar las interpretaciones, recomendaciones, y los resultados de este estudio. Se concluye que la interacción entre profesor-estudiante y estudiante-estudiante está basada en un modelo de pregunta-respuesta en donde el profesor regula y limita la participación de los estudiantes mediante el uso de diferentes activities las cuales no estimulan un aprendizaje significativo. Los estudiantes están motivados en aprender Inglés, sin embargo existen pocos espacios para interactuar. La participación de los estudiantes es pasiva y limitada, la mayor parte del tiempo escuchan, repiten, preguntan, y responden. Los estudiantes utilizan el idioma Español para comunicarse e interactuar entre ellos. El estudio sugiere variar las actividades que se llevan a cabo en la clase para mejorar el aprendizaje de los estudiantes. The main purpose of this article is to describe the interaction process that took place in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom at a public high school in the province of Alajuela, Costa Rica. This article examines some theoretical background knowledge in regards to the interaction in the language classroom. The ethnographic method, which belongs to the qualitative paradigm, was used to conduct this study. Some of the techniques and the instruments used were the non-participant observations, the use of a questionnaire, interviews, and personal diaries. Triangulation was applied in order to make

  15. Interactive radio in the classroom: ten years of proven success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoof, M

    1985-01-01

    Interactive instructional radio programming is an innovative, inexpensive, and highly effective educational tool. In interactive radio programming, lessons are provided by a radio instructor, but unlike other radio education programs, the instructor prompts responses from the radio audience, provides pauses for audience responses, and then supplies the correct response to the prompt. The lessons are generally supervised by a classroom teacher, and the students respond to the radio prompts either orally or in writing. The lessons encourage student participation, and the programs frequently require more than 100 audience responses for each 1/2 hour of radio programing. The US Agency for International Development's Office of Education in the Bureau for Science and Technology researched and developed the tool during the last 10 years, and conducted highly successful experimental projects with it in Kenya, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. In September 1984 a conference, jointly sponsored by the agency and Kenya's Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology, was held in Nairobi to demonstrate the new tool and to encourage other countries to utilize the approach. Participants visited rural classrooms in Kenya where they had an opportunity to observe how the technique was being successfully used in Kenya's Radio Language Arts Project. In view of the successful results attained in the experimental projects of the 3 countries noted above, the conference participants recommended that the technique should immediately be integrated into the national curricula of these countries, and that the approach should be more widely used in other countries. They noted that the technique is especially appropriate for use in primary schools and in nonformal adult education programs and that the tool is especially useful for teaching mathematics and second languages. They recommended that educators in developing countries develop interactive instructional radio programs, evaluate

  16. CD-ROM Multimodal Affordances: Classroom Interaction Perspectives in the Malaysian English Literacy Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Sheena; Yaacob, Aizan

    2009-01-01

    CD-ROM affordances are explored in this article through participation in classroom interaction. CD-ROMs for shared reading of animated stories and language work were introduced to all Malaysian primary schools in 2003 for the Year 1 English Literacy Hour. We present classroom interaction extracts that show how the same CD-ROMs offer different…

  17. Effects of Class Size and Attendance Policy on University Classroom Interaction in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yin; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Classroom interaction experience is one of the main parts of students' learning lives. However, surprisingly little research has investigated students' perceptions of classroom interaction with different attendance policies across different class sizes in the higher education system. To elucidate the effects of class size and attendance policy on…

  18. In or Out of the Pumpkin Shell? Sex Role Differentiation in Classroom Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Pamela J.

    A review of research on sex role differentiation in classroom interaction reveals that women are marginalized from education by its content and by the classroom interactional processes. Sex-role stereotyping exists in curriculum materials at all educational levels, with textbooks more likely to portray boys in active roles and girls in passive…

  19. Teacher/Student Classroom Interaction in Vocational Education. A Sex Bias/Sex Stereotyping Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omvig, Clayton P.

    A study examined teacher-student interaction in Kentucky's secondary and postsecondary vocational education classrooms. It investigated whether sex bias or inequities were present and what might explain such differences. A literature review focused on studies conducted at different grade levels with relation to sex bias and classroom interactions.…

  20. Emotion Work and Affective Stance in the Mathematics Classroom: The Case of IRE Sequences in Finnish Classroom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tainio, Liisa; Laine, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Although according to the Finnish curriculum the learning environment in mathematics lessons should promote supportive interaction, Finnish pupils' attitudes toward and self-beliefs regarding mathematics deteriorate during basic education. This article investigates emotion work in teacher-student interaction in Finnish mathematics classrooms; the…

  1. Introduction of interactive learning into French university physics classrooms

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Alexander L; Joyce, Michael; Vignolles, Hélène; Consiglio, David

    2013-01-01

    We report on a project to introduce interactive learning strategies (ILS) to physics classes at the Universit\\'e Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), one of the leading science universities in France. In Spring 2012, instructors in two large introductory classes, first-year, second-semester mechanics, and second-year introductory E&M, enrolling approximately 500 and 250 students respectively, introduced ILS into some sections of each class. The specific ILS utilized were Think-Pair-Share questions and Peer Instruction in the main lecture classrooms, and UW Tutorials for Introductory Physics in recitation sections. Pre- and post-instruction assessments (FCI and CSEM respectively) were given, along with a series of demographics questions. We were able to compare the results of the FCI and CSEM between interactive and non-interactive classes taught simultaneously with the same curriculum. We also analyzed final exam results, as well as the results of student and instructor attitude surveys between classes. In our a...

  2. What factors facilitate the engagement with flipped classrooms used in the preparation for postgraduate medical membership examinations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesurasa A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amrita Jesurasa, Kelly Mackenzie, Hannah Jordan, Elizabeth C Goyder School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, Regent Court, Sheffield, UK Background: The “flipped classroom,” a pedagogical model where typical lecture and homework elements are reversed, is being advocated in medical education to support the teaching of a large curriculum. However, research into the use of this model in postgraduate medical education, which requires the application of acquired knowledge, is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators to engagement with the flipped classroom model in preparation for the written element of postgraduate membership examinations. Methods: Three focus groups (n=14 were held between February and June 2016. Participants were drawn from a membership examination preparation course, run by the University of Sheffield. Two of the groups (n=10 involved “students” (public health registrars while the other focus group (n=4 was held with “tutors” (experienced registrars and consultants. The focus groups were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were thematically analyzed by using both predetermined and emergent themes. Results: Key themes that emerged from the data included variation in learning and teaching styles of individuals as well as the feasibility and flexibility of the overall course design. However, management of students’ expectations was found to be the fundamental factor, which underpinned the engagement. Conclusion: The complex interaction of factors affecting engagement in this study highlights the need to consider the appropriateness of the flipped classroom model. However, this must be balanced by the potential benefits of the approach for delivering a large curriculum. Recognizing the central importance of managing expectations at the outset would be useful when considering this model in postgraduate medical education. Keywords

  3. L2 Classroom Interaction: A Sociocultural Theoretical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    武田, 礼子

    2015-01-01

    本稿は,社会文化理論から見た外国語学習における教室内相互行為を考察する。まず,学習者の認知的発達が社会的かつ文化的に形成されると論じるヴィゴツキーの社会文化理論の4つの概念である媒介,最近接発達領域,足場掛け,ランゲージングについて論じる。次に社会文化理論からみた外国語学習における相互行為の先行研究を紹介する。ここでは上級者主導の相互行為,異なる母語の学習者間の相互行為,また一人の学習者における自己内省による相互行為を含む。それらの研究を通して学習者間の相互行為の潜在的可能性を考察し,学習の機会を最大限に生かすための提案をする。This article reviews studies on classroom interaction in the L2 classroom from a sociocultural theoretical perspective. These studies posit that a person’s cognitive development is socially and culturally created. The paper first ...

  4. Graduate students teaching elementary earth science through interactive classroom lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, T. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Jawin, E. R.; Robinson, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2005, graduate students in the Brown University Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Studies have volunteered to teach science to second-grade students at Vartan Gregorian Elementary School in Providence, RI. Initially developed to bring science into classrooms where it was not explicitly included in the curriculum, the graduate student-run program today incorporates the Providence Public Schools Grade 2 science curriculum into weekly, interactive sessions that engage the students in hypothesis-driven science. We will describe the program structure, its integration into the Providence Public Schools curriculum, and 3 example lessons relevant to geology. Lessons are structured to develop the students' ability to share and incorporate others' ideas through written and oral communication. The volunteers explain the basics of the topic and engage the students with introductory questions. The students use this knowledge to develop a hypothesis about the upcoming experiment, recording it in their "Science Notebooks." The students record their observations during the demonstration and discuss the results as a group. The process culminates in the students using their own words to summarize what they learned. Activities of particular interest to educators in geoscience are called "Volcanoes!", "The "Liquid Race," and "Phases of the Moon." The "Volcanoes!" lesson explores explosive vs. effusive volcanism using two simulated volcanoes: one explosive, using Mentos and Diet Coke, and one effusive, using vinegar and baking soda (in model volcanoes that the students construct in teams). In "Liquid Race," which explores viscosity and can be integrated into the "Volcanoes!" lesson, the students connect viscosity to flow speed by racing liquids down a ramp. "Phases of the Moon" teaches the students why the Moon has phases, using ball and stick models, and the terminology of the lunar phases using cream-filled cookies (e.g., Oreos). These lessons, among many others

  5. Observations of Effective Teacher-Student Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Predicting Student Achievement with the Classroom Assessment Scoring System--Secondary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joseph; Gregory, Anne; Mikami, Amori; Lun, Janetta; Hamre, Bridget; Pianta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel modeling techniques were used with a sample of 643 students enrolled in 37 secondary school classrooms to predict future student achievement (controlling for baseline achievement) from observed teacher interactions with students in the classroom, coded using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System--Secondary. After accounting for prior…

  6. BEEBOARD: FROM WIIMOTE TO INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD APPLICATION FOR CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Yulianto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and learning process is the main factor in education. The use of whiteboard and marker while teaching is an essential media for delivering knowledge from a lecturer to students. In another side, it can cost in daily operation such as making marker dried because of capped-off, easily smudged and some whiteboard (for projector screen is difficult to be clean if written. The objective is to design and develop an interactive whiteboard application based on multimedia concept to support effective and interactive learning process in classroom. The system is connected to a WiiMote device via Bluetooth and a projector. The methodology is literature study, observation and system design using Unified Modeling Language (UML approach. An application that can capture image, record sound and video while teaching process. The system is tested and focused on main teaching activities such as writing (drawing, erasing, capturing and recording. All these functionalities can run very well, but need several improvement for next version.

  7. Enhancing the online learning experience using virtual interactive classrooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie, Andrew; Beverley, Ewens; Sian, Maslin-Prothero

    2015-01-01

    ...: 130 undergraduate, 14 postgraduate. Interventions: Classroom options were introduced into two online units, incorporating blended learning approaches and promoting active participation in learning...

  8. Bilingual Identity Negotiation in Practice: Teacher Pedagogy and Classroom Interaction in a Bilingual Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how teachers in a bilingual education programme see their pedagogies and interactions influencing student connection to the languages of the bilingual programme. The teacher perception of the classroom is explored because the classroom is one of the principal settings in which the students negotiate their bilingual identities.…

  9. The Efficacy of Interactive Video for Teaching Basic Classroom Management Skills to Pre-Service Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbaugh, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the effects of an interactive video computer-aided simulation program on instructing preservice education majors in classroom management issues. Topics include student achievement, class rank, stages of concern, computer anxiety, learning modality, the Classroom Management Achievement Test, and student reactions.…

  10. Examining Opportunities for the Development of Interacting Identities within Pre-Service Teacher Education Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    In any pre-service mathematics teacher education classroom, multiple identities are co-constructed simultaneously through the practices in which such classrooms engage. These multiple identities, which are interrelated and in constant interaction, include becoming a teacher of mathematics, becoming learners of mathematics, becoming learners of…

  11. High School Students' Attitudes and Experiences in EFL Classrooms Equipped with Interactive Whiteboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Turgay; Okatan, Semih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine ninth grade EFL students' experiences and attitudes towards classrooms equipped with interactive whiteboards (IWB). The data were collected with a questionnaire about attitudes towards IWB use in EFL classes, and observations from three different classrooms in three different high schools. The study…

  12. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  13. Before Student Teaching: How Undergraduate Students in Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Programs Describe Their Early Classroom-Based Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Christine; La Paro, Karen M.; Johnson, Amy V.

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-based experiences, alternatively known as practica, are an integral component of undergraduate teacher preparation programs, which provide students essential opportunities to apply knowledge in practice. Though much is known about student teaching, much less is known about students' earlier classroom-based experiences. This…

  14. Origin of the Species: An Epistemological Tale of Classroom Management Theory and the Evolution of a Teacher Preparation Course Syllabus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Nichole L.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation dually explores the topics of classroom management theory as it occurs in teacher preparation programs in American colleges of education and of curriculum syllabus design of undergraduate education classes teaching such. It begins with the classroom management and teaching pedagogical knowledges gained through my experience as a…

  15. Beyond the classroom: nurse leader preparation and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Formal academic education and experience as a nurse are established preparation for the chief nurse executive (CNE) or upcoming nurse leaders. This article proposes that the nurse leader must build on these fundamentals through self-discipline, lifelong learning, and practice. Three critical ingredients are discussed to guide the nurse leader on a life/career for the CNE and the nurse leader at every level. These include fostering relationships, feeding intellectual curiosity, and engaging in self-care practices. These indispensable ingredients of the successful nurse leader serve as an augmentation to formal education and experience for the nurse aspiring to reach the CNE level and beyond as well as for the current CNE mentoring future leaders.

  16. The Use of a Web-Based Classroom Interaction System in Introductory Physics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Corpuz, Ma. Aileen A.; Rosalez, Rolando

    2010-10-01

    A web-based interaction system was used in algebra-based and calculus-based physics classes to enhance students' classroom interaction. The interactive teaching approach primarily incorporated elements of Mazur's Peer Instruction and Interactive Lecture Demonstration. In our implementation, students used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to interact with their instructor during lecture and classroom demonstration. In this paper, we document the perceptions and attitudes of algebra-based and calculus-based physics students towards the interactive teaching approach and likewise present data on how this approach affected students' performance on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI).

  17. The C[superscript 3] Framework: Evaluating Classroom Response System Interactions in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fies, Carmen; Marshall, Jill

    2008-01-01

    The larger the classroom, the more likely is it that communications consist of a one-way flow from the instructor to students. Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) are frequently hailed as technologies capable of improving communications by opening the space for dialogic engagement; yet, a causal relationship is not documented in the literature. The…

  18. Teacher-Student Interactions in Desegregated Classrooms in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeyar, Saloshna; Killen, Roy

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the state of desegregation and integration in South African schools 11 years after the demise of Apartheid. Three classrooms in three desegregating schools with different histories and race profiles were visited. Overall, each classroom was visited on 10 occasions over a period of 2 weeks. Direct observation was the main data…

  19. Fostering Creativity in Tablet-Based Interactive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Park, Ji Hyeon; Yoo, Sungae; Kim, Hyeoncheol

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to examine the effects of an instructional model that leverages innovative technologies in the classroom to cultivate collaboration that improves students' comprehension, fosters their creativity, and enables them to better express and communicate their ideas through drawing. This discussion focuses on classroom interaction…

  20. Students' Social Positioning in the Language Classroom: Implications for Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Kidd, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines some findings of a three-month investigation into the effects of students' interpersonal relationships on communication in two EFL classrooms in a Japanese university. Data was collected to identify and describe the various social subgroups that existed within the classes, and samples of classroom discourse were then analysed…

  1. Beyond the classroom to coaching: preparing new nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCampli, Pamela; Kirby, Karen K; Baldwin, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Few would question that frontline nurse managers are critical to the success of any organization. They are the key interface with patients, nursing staff, medical staff, other clinical and ancillary staff, and administration. This makes the role one of the most difficult and one of the most important in any healthcare setting. Despite the importance of the role, many new managers receive little, if any, formal preparation. While hospitals are starting to send nurse managers to formal educational programs, the new manager receives little benefit if they do not have help putting it into practice. Even when there is a preceptor, chances are that new managers are still not getting what they need. Preceptors have multiple demands on their time and little, if any, formal preceptor training. One hospital that has successfully tackled this issue is Bryn Mawr Hospital, a Main Line Health System Magnet-designated hospital in suburban Philadelphia. Bryn Mawr Hospital engaged an experienced nurse executive to coach new nurse managers for 4 months on site. While participants agree face-to-face coaching is the most important component of this program, they also say having a seasoned coach gives them the confidence to ask questions they would not have felt comfortable exploring otherwise.

  2. Personal Characteristics of Teachers and their Oral Interactions in Further Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, A.; Wilkinson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships between teacher characteristics (N=30 inservice teachers) and verbal interactions in the classroom. Characteristics examined included teacher lecture, training, intelligence, attitude, extraversion, and neuroticism. Other factors examined included teacher accepting behavior, teacher rejection of responses, teacher-student…

  3. The Ulwazi Concept: Virtual interactive and collaborative classrooms of the Future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Beyers, R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ulwazi concept is based on the digital inclusion of geographically separated classrooms being linked by broadband radio connections to enable virtual interactive and collaborative lessons using SMART technologies. What started out as a simple...

  4. Use of swivel desks and aisle space to promote interaction in mid-sized college classrooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Henshaw

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional designs for most mid-sized college classrooms discourage 1 face-to-face interaction among students, 2 instructor movement in the classroom, and 3 efficient transitions between different kinds of learning activities. An experimental classroom piloted during Spring Semester 2011 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill uses clusters of stationary desks that swivel 360-degrees and aisle space to address these challenges. The findings from a study involving ten courses taught in the room suggest that there is a need for designs that not only promote quality interactions but also facilitate movement between small group work, class discussion, and lecture.

  5. Inquiry in interaction: How local adaptations of curricula shape classroom communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-11-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be consequential for learning. The participants in this study include two teachers who are implementing a new environmental science program, Global Learning through Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), and interacting with 54 children in an urban middle school. Both qualitative and quantitative data are analyzed and presented. To gain a better understanding of the inquiry teaching within classroom communities, we compare and contrast the discourse and interactions of the two teachers during three parallel environmental science lessons. The focus of our analysis includes (1) how the community identifies the object or goal of its activity; and (2) how the rights, rules, and roles for members are established and inhabited in interaction. Quantitative analyses of student pre- and posttests suggest greater learning for students in one classroom over the other, providing support for the influence of the classroom community and interactional choices of the teacher on student learning. Implications of the findings from this study are discussed in the context of curricular design, professional development, and educational reform. ? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 41: 905-935, 2004.

  6. Teacher-Student Interaction in Contemporary Science Classrooms: Is Participation Still a Question of Gender?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Nina; Sørensen, Helene; Karlsson, Karl Göran

    2016-01-01

    We show that boys still have a greater access to the space for interaction in science classrooms, which is unexpected since in Sweden today girls perform better in these subjects than boys. Results from video-recorded verbal communication, referred to here as "interaction," show that the distribution of teacher-student interaction in the…

  7. The Documentation of Kindergarten Children's Interactional Competency in an Informal Context of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Janet K.

    The interactional competence of 12 kindergarten children was studied through naturalistic research of their sociodramatic play in a classroom context. Data were collected by both videotape and trained observers. Contextual and interactional information was analyzed according to an Interactional Competency Checklist (ICC) designed by the author.…

  8. Micro-PIC. A Simple Form of the Profile of Interaction in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Joan

    The Profile of Interaction in the Classroom (PIC) is a feedback method of interaction analysis, based on the Flanders System, created for supervisors of pre-service and in-service teacher education. The Micro-PIC is an abbreviated simplified form for analysis of shorter periods of interaction, particularly in microteaching. The Micro-PIC…

  9. Main and interaction effects of metallic toxins on classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, M; Cossairt, A; Moon, C; Errera, J; MacNeel, A; Peak, R; Ray, J; Schroeder, C

    1985-06-01

    This study investigated the relationships of metal levels and metal combinations to children's classroom behavior. Hair-metal concentrations of lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium, and aluminum were determined in 80 randomly selected elementary-age children, who were also rated by their classroom teacher on the Walker Problem Behavior Identification Checklist (WPBIC). Parents were interviewed to control for confounding variables that may have affected behavioral development. Regression analysis indicated that the set of metals was significantly related to increased scores on four of the five WPBIC subscales and on the total scale, with lead being a major contributor to four of the six dependent measures. Metal combinations were significantly related to increased scores on the WPBIC subscales measuring acting-out, disturbed peer relations, and immaturity, and on the total scale. A continuing reexamination of metal poisoning concentrations is needed because metal levels and metal combinations previously thought harmless may be associated with nonadaptive classroom behavior.

  10. Competitiveness, cooperation, and strategic interaction. A classroom experiment on oligopoly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Martínez, José Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We run a classroom experiment on oligopoly with students enrolled on basic and medium level microeconomics courses. Students compete in a symmetric quantity setting environment. The experiment runs over an entire academic semester and is divided into 20 one-week rounds. We want to explore whether the effect of knowledge and social interaction between players modifies the cooperative and competitive behavior observed in similar experiments run in a lab. Our hypothesis is that players are socially influenced. Hence, individuals adjust behavior in a dynamic way aimed at maximizing profits, but also according to social pressures. Overall, we obtain different learning processes across academic levels and also slightly different behavior from that predicted by economic theory. We argue that students’ utility function depends not only on profit levels but also on social relationships. Moreover, we believe that the effect of reputation plays an important role in our framework.

    Hemos llevado a cabo un experimento oligopolístico en el aula con estudiantes pertenecientes a los niveles básico y medio de la asignatura de microeconomía. Los estudiantes compitieron en un mercado donde todos tenían la misma función de costes ofreciendo cantidades de un bien en cada ronda. El experimento tuvo lugar durante un semestre académico completo y fue dividido en 20 rondas de una semana. Se quiere investigar si el efecto del aprendizaje y de la interacción social entre los jugadores modifica el comportamiento competitivo y cooperativo observado en experimentos similares llevados a cabo en un laboratorio. Nuestra hipótesis es que los jugadores están socialmente influenciados. Así pues, los individuos adecúan su comportamiento dinámicamente con el objetivo de maximizar beneficios pero también en concordancia con las presiones sociales. En general, se han observado diferentes procesos de aprendizaje por niveles académicos así como peque

  11. Explanation, Argumentation and Dialogic Interactions in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Orlando G., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    As a responsive article to Miranda Rocksén's paper "The many roles of "explanation" in science education: a case study," this paper aims to emphasize the importance of the two central themes of her paper: dialogic approaches in science education and the role of explanations in science classrooms. I start discussing the concepts…

  12. Explanation, Argumentation and Dialogic Interactions in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Orlando G., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    As a responsive article to Miranda Rocksén's paper "The many roles of "explanation" in science education: a case study," this paper aims to emphasize the importance of the two central themes of her paper: dialogic approaches in science education and the role of explanations in science classrooms. I start discussing the concepts…

  13. Reformulation as a Measure of Student Expression in Classroom Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, James J.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates teacher reformulation of student talk in order to determine the manner in which teachers affect student meaning and expression. Findings indicate that reformulation is a device used by teachers to control classroom dialog and that teachers disproportionately perform the language functions most commonly associated with higher-order…

  14. Interactive Language Teaching in the Intensive English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TianAiguo

    2004-01-01

    In the traditional intensive English classroom, the teacher plays the dominant role; he is the lecturer who is interested in presenting language items, the organizer of teaching and learning activities, and the assessor of learners' performance.Students are usually bench-bound listeners. They watch the teacher explaining language points and giving samples, take

  15. The GALAXY Classroom: An Interactive, Thematic Approach to Literacy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewison, Mitzi

    The GALAXY Classroom, developed as a nation-wide reform effort, was designed to make a significant positive difference in the educational lives of elementary school students who have traditionally been labeled "at-risk." As part of a 2-year demonstration and research phase, 39 elementary schools across the United States (and one school…

  16. Preparing participants for intergenerational interaction training for success

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Melissa; Mcguire, Francis A

    2013-01-01

    Preparing Participants for Intergenerational Interaction: Training for Success examines established intergenerational programs and provides the training methods necessary for activity directors or practitioners to start a similar program. This book contains exercises that will help you train colleagues and volunteers for these specific programs and includes criteria for activity evaluations. Preparing Participants for Intergenerational Interaction will help you implement programs that enable older adults to build friendships, pass down their skills and knowledge to adolescents, and provide youths with positive role models. Discussing the factors that often limit the interaction of older adults with youths, this text stresses the importance of conveying information and history to younger generations. You will learn why the exchange between different generations is crucial to society and to the improvement of the community in which you live. Preparing Participants for Intergenerational Interaction provides you ...

  17. Explanation, argumentation and dialogic interactions in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Orlando G.

    2016-04-01

    As a responsive article to Miranda Rocksén's paper "The many roles of `explanation' in science education: a case study", this paper aims to emphasize the importance of the two central themes of her paper: dialogic approaches in science education and the role of explanations in science classrooms. I start discussing the concepts of dialogue and dialogism in science classrooms contexts. Dialogism is discussed as the basic tenet from which Rocksén developed her research design and methods. In turn, dialogues in science classrooms may be considered as a particular type of discourse that allows the students' culture, mostly based on everyday knowledge, and the science school culture, related to scientific knowledge and language to be interwoven. I argue that in school, science teachers are always committed to the resolution of differences according to a scientific position for the knowledge to be constructed. Thus, the institution of schooling constrains the ways in which dialogue can be conducted in the classrooms, as the scientific perspective will be always, beforehand, the reference for the conclusions to be reached. The second theme developed here, in dialogue with Rocksén, is about explanations in science classrooms. Based on Jean Paul Bronckart (Atividade de linguagem, textos e discursos: por um interacionismo sócio-discursivo, Educ, São Paulo, 1999), the differences and relationship between explanation and argumentation as communicative acts are re-discussed as well its practical consequences to science teaching. Finally, some epistemological questions are raised about the status of scientific explanations in relation to non-scientific ones.

  18. Explanation, argumentation and dialogic interactions in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Orlando G.

    2016-12-01

    As a responsive article to Miranda Rocksén's paper "The many roles of `explanation' in science education: a case study", this paper aims to emphasize the importance of the two central themes of her paper: dialogic approaches in science education and the role of explanations in science classrooms. I start discussing the concepts of dialogue and dialogism in science classrooms contexts. Dialogism is discussed as the basic tenet from which Rocksén developed her research design and methods. In turn, dialogues in science classrooms may be considered as a particular type of discourse that allows the students' culture, mostly based on everyday knowledge, and the science school culture, related to scientific knowledge and language to be interwoven. I argue that in school, science teachers are always committed to the resolution of differences according to a scientific position for the knowledge to be constructed. Thus, the institution of schooling constrains the ways in which dialogue can be conducted in the classrooms, as the scientific perspective will be always, beforehand, the reference for the conclusions to be reached. The second theme developed here, in dialogue with Rocksén, is about explanations in science classrooms. Based on Jean Paul Bronckart (Atividade de linguagem, textos e discursos: por um interacionismo sócio-discursivo, Educ, São Paulo, 1999), the differences and relationship between explanation and argumentation as communicative acts are re-discussed as well its practical consequences to science teaching. Finally, some epistemological questions are raised about the status of scientific explanations in relation to non-scientific ones.

  19. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  20. A Description of the Impact of Multimedia Anchored Instruction on Classroom Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Candyce Williams; Rieth, Herbert J.; Kinzer, Charles K.; Colburn, Linda K.; Peter, Jeanne

    1999-01-01

    A study explored effects of a multimedia-based anchored instruction intervention on student/teacher interactions in a social studies classroom with 19 eighth graders, 9 with mild disabilities. Overall, instruction became more interactive as observational and interview data indicated a twofold increase in the number of daily student/teacher…

  1. Interactive Alignment of Multisyllabic Stress Patterns in a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimovich, Pavel; McDonough, Kim; Foote, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the occurrence of stress pattern alignment during peer interaction in a second language (L2) classroom. Interactive alignment is a sociocognitive phenomenon in which interlocutors reuse each other's expressions, structures, and pronunciation patterns during conversation. Students (N = 41) enrolled in a…

  2. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  3. Social Interactions in Preschool Classrooms and the Development of Young Children's Conceptions of the Personal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Smetana, Judith G.

    1999-01-01

    Two studies examined preschool teacher and child interactions regarding personal, moral, and socioconventional issues in the classroom and the development of personal concepts. Findings suggested that in both judgments and social interactions, teachers and children identified a personal domain in which children can and should make choices about…

  4. Group Interaction and Learning in the Mathematics Laboratory and the Regular Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.

    This study investigated the relationships among student and group characteristics, group interaction, and achievement in cooperative small groups. Seventy-seven students in two junior high school mathematics classrooms learned a two-week unit on exponents and scientific notation in mixed-ability or uniform-ability groups. Interaction in the groups…

  5. A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF CLASSROOM DYNAMICS ON STUDENTS' SOCIAL INTERACTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN KENYA

    OpenAIRE

    Mercy Ngugi; Ruth W. Thinguri

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was a critical analysis of the impact of classroom dynamics on students’ social interaction in secondary schools in Kenya. Most of the Kenyan secondary schools are faced with the challenge of overcrowding in the classrooms thus unsuited to providing a positive classroom atmosphere hence limited leaner-teacher contact. The critical analysis was to establish and address issues and strategies that must be implemented to create a positive classroom atmosphere where learne...

  6. Teaching Through Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Revisiting the Factor Structure and Practical Application of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Christopher A; Hamre, Bridget K; Allen, Joseph P; Bell, Courtney A; Gitomer, Drew H; Pianta, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Valid measurement of how students' experiences in secondary school classrooms lead to gains in learning requires a developmental approach to conceptualizing classroom processes. This article presents a potentially useful theoretical model, the Teaching Through Interactions framework, which posits teacher-student interactions as a central driver for student learning and that teacher-student interactions can be organized into three major domains. Results from 1,482 classrooms provide evidence for distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains of teacher-student interaction. It also appears that a three-factor structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacher-student classroom interactions, and that the three-domain structure is generalizable from 6th through 12th grade. Implications for practitioners, stakeholders, and researchers are discussed.

  7. Teaching Through Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Revisiting the Factor Structure and Practical Application of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System–Secondary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Christopher A.; Hamre, Bridget K.; Allen, Joseph P.; Bell, Courtney A.; Gitomer, Drew H.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Valid measurement of how students’ experiences in secondary school classrooms lead to gains in learning requires a developmental approach to conceptualizing classroom processes. This article presents a potentially useful theoretical model, the Teaching Through Interactions framework, which posits teacher-student interactions as a central driver for student learning and that teacher-student interactions can be organized into three major domains. Results from 1,482 classrooms provide evidence for distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains of teacher-student interaction. It also appears that a three-factor structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacher-student classroom interactions, and that the three-domain structure is generalizable from 6th through 12th grade. Implications for practitioners, stakeholders, and researchers are discussed.

  8. Classroom learning and achievement: how the complexity of classroom interaction impacts students' learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschuweit, Sören; Bernholt, Sascha; Brückmann, Maja

    2016-05-01

    Background: Complexity models have provided a suitable framework in various domains to assess students' educational achievement. Complexity is often used as the analytical focus when regarding learning outcomes, i.e. when analyzing written tests or problem-centered interviews. Numerous studies reveal negative correlations between the complexity of a task and the probability of a student solving it. Purpose: Thus far, few detailed investigations explore the importance of complexity in actual classroom lessons. Moreover, the few efforts made so far revealed inconsistencies. Hence, the present study sheds light on the influence the complexity of students' and teachers' class contributions have on students' learning outcomes. Sample: Videos of 10 German 8th grade physics courses covering three consecutive lessons on two topics each (electricity, mechanics) have been analyzed. The sample includes 10 teachers and 290 students. Design and methods: Students' and teachers' verbal contributions were coded manual-based according to the level of complexity. Additionally, pre-post testing of knowledge in electricity and mechanics was applied to assess the students' learning gain. ANOVA analysis was used to characterize the influence of the complexity on the learning gain. Results: Results indicate that the mean level of complexity in classroom contributions explains a large portion of variance in post-test results on class level. Despite this overarching trend, taking classroom activities into account as well reveals even more fine-grained patterns, leading to more specific relations between the complexity in the classroom and students' achievement. Conclusions: In conclusion, we argue for more reflected teaching approaches intended to gradually increase class complexity to foster students' level of competency.

  9. Moral beings and becomings : children's moral practices in classroom peer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Kreeta

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates children’s social and moral practices as they appear in everyday classroom peer interaction. Its focus is on the relations between children’s interaction and moral understandings in situ. Juxtaposing the most archetypal ways of addressing and investigating morality in mainstream educational psychology, this study approaches morality is as it handled and man- aged as part of everyday intersubjective interaction. Ethnomethodological approaches alongside wi...

  10. Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children’s interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions. PMID:25717282

  11. Learners' Multimodal Displays of Willingness to Participate in Classroom Interaction in the L2 and CLIL Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evnitskaya, Natalia; Berger, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on recent conversation-analytic and socio-interactionist research on students' participation in L1 and L2 classroom interaction in teacher-fronted activities, this paper makes a step further by presenting an exploratory study of students' displays of willingness to participate (WTP) in classroom interaction and pedagogical activities…

  12. Pedagogical Gestures as Interactional Resources for Teaching and Learning Tense and Aspect in the ESL Grammar Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yumi; Dobs, Abby Mueller

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the functions of gesture in teaching and learning grammar in the context of second language (L2) classroom interactions. The data consisted of video-recorded interactions from a beginner- and an advanced-level grammar classroom in an intensive English program at a U.S. university. The sequences of talk-in-interaction…

  13. Pedagogical Gestures as Interactional Resources for Teaching and Learning Tense and Aspect in the ESL Grammar Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yumi; Dobs, Abby Mueller

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the functions of gesture in teaching and learning grammar in the context of second language (L2) classroom interactions. The data consisted of video-recorded interactions from a beginner- and an advanced-level grammar classroom in an intensive English program at a U.S. university. The sequences of talk-in-interaction…

  14. Tracing Growth of Teachers' Classroom Interactions with Representations of Functions in the Connected Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian Lee

    The purpose of this study is to create an empirically based theoretic model of change of the use and treatment of representations of functions with the use of Connected Classroom Technology (CCT) using data previously collected for the Classroom Connectivity in Promoting Mathematics and Science Achievement (CCMS) project. Qualitative analysis of videotapes of three algebra teachers' instruction focused on different categories thought to influence teaching representations with technology: representations, discourse, technology, and decisions. Models for rating teachers low, medium, or high for each of these categories were created using a priori codes and grounded methodology. A cross case analysis was conducted after the completion of the case studies by comparing and contrasting the three cases. Data revealed that teachers' decisions shifted to incorporate the difference in student ideas/representations made visible by the CCT into their instruction and ultimately altered their orientation to mathematics teaching. The shift in orientation seemed to lead to the teachers' growth with regards to representations, discourse, and technology.

  15. Classroom Interactions, Dyadic Teacher-Child Relationships, and Self-Regulation in Socially Disadvantaged Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadima, Joana; Verschueren, Karine; Leal, Teresa; Guedes, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of the classroom climate and dyadic teacher-child relationships as predictors of self-regulation in a sample of socially disadvantaged preschool children (N = 206; 52 % boys). Children's self-regulation was observed in preschool at the beginning and at the end of the school year. At the middle of the preschool year, classroom observations of interactions were conducted by trained observers and teachers rated the quality of dyadic teacher-child relationships. Results from multilevel analyses revealed that teacher-child closeness predicted improvements in observed self-regulation skills. Children showed larger gains in self-regulation when they experienced closer teacher-child relationships. Moreover, a moderating effect between classroom instructional quality and observed self-regulation was found such that children with low initial self-regulation skills benefit the most from classrooms with higher classroom quality. Findings have implications for understanding the role of classroom social processes on the development of self-regulation.

  16. Analysis of Learning Achievement and Teacher-Student Interactions in Flipped and Conventional Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Wu, Yu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of two different teaching methods on learning effectiveness. OpenCourseWare was integrated into the flipped classroom model (experimental group) and distance learning (control group). Learning effectiveness encompassed learning achievement, teacher-student interactions, and learning satisfaction.…

  17. Classroom Response Systems for Implementing "Interactive Inquiry" in Large Organic Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Richard W.; Caughran, Joel A.; Sauers, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed "sequence response applications" for classroom response systems (CRSs) that allow instructors to engage and actively involve students in the learning process, probe for common misconceptions regarding lecture material, and increase interaction between instructors and students. "Guided inquiry" and…

  18. Talk or Chat? Chatroom and Spoken Interaction in a Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano-Bunce, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study comparing chatroom and face-to-face oral interaction for the purposes of language learning in a tertiary classroom in the United Arab Emirates. It uses transcripts analysed for Language Related Episodes, collaborative dialogues, thought to be externally observable examples of noticing in action. The analysis is…

  19. Examining Gender Differences in Attitudes toward Interactive Classroom Communications Systems (ICCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robin H.

    2009-01-01

    An interactive classroom communication system (ICCS) involves the use of remote devices that permit all students in a class to respond to multiple choice questions displayed on a LCD projector. After responses are clicked in, the results are instantly aggregated and displayed in chart form. The purpose of this study was to examine gender…

  20. Development of an Innovative Interactive Virtual Classroom System for K-12 Education Using Google App Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, Frackson; Zhu, Mengxia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a Simulation-based interactive Virtual ClassRoom web system (SVCR: www.vclasie.com) powered by the state-of-the-art cloud computing technology from Google SVCR integrates popular free open-source math, science and engineering simulations and provides functions such as secure user access control and management of courses,…

  1. Play Time/Social Time: Organizing Your Classroom To Build Interaction Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Samuel L.; McConnell, Scott R.; Ostrosky, Michaelene; Peterson, Carla; Skellenger, Annette; Spicuzza, Richard; Chandler, Lynette K.; McEvoy, Mary A.

    This curriculum guide provides classroom organizational guidelines, activities, and lesson plans to promote social interaction and the development of social competence in preschool children with disabilities or at risk for developmental problems or delays. The program is designed to include peers who are either developing normally or have higher…

  2. An Interactive Classroom Activity Demonstrating Reaction Mechanisms and Rate-Determining Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Laura D.; Keller, Steven W.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive classroom activity that includes two-step reaction of unwrapping and eating chocolate candies is described which brings not only the reaction intermediate, but also the reactants and products into macroscopic view. The qualitative activation barriers of both steps can be adjusted independently.

  3. Peer Interaction and Writing Development in a Social Studies High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Peer review can be a valuable tool in the writing development of high school sophomores. Specifically, this research study explores the use of peer review to improve writing skills and to build content knowledge in a social studies high school classroom through the use of peer interaction. The problem in social studies high school instruction is…

  4. Developing Interactional Competence by Using TV Series in "English as an Additional Language" Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Olcay

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses a combined methodology to analyse the conversations in supplementary audio-visual materials to be implemented in language teaching classrooms in order to enhance the Interactional Competence (IC) of the learners. Based on a corpus of 90.000 words (Coupling Corpus), the author tries to reveal the potentials of using TV series in …

  5. Using the Interactive Whiteboard to Resource Continuity and Support Multimodal Teaching in a Primary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, J.; Littleton, K.; Twiner, A.; Staarman, J. K.; Mercer, N.

    2008-01-01

    All communication is inherently multimodal, and understandings of science need to be multidimensional. The interactive whiteboard offers a range of potential benefits to the primary science classroom in terms of relative ease of integration of a number of presentational and ICT functions, which, taken together, offers new opportunities for…

  6. Cultural Differences, Nonverbal Regulation, and Classroom Interaction: Sociolinguistic Interference in American Indian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Paul E.; Greenbaum, Susan D.

    1983-01-01

    Various studies of interaction between teachers and American Indian students indicate that nonverbal behaviors interfere with classroom communication and educational performance. American Indian children exhibit such behaviors as less talking, low voice tones, and averted gaze during conservations. These behaviors seem to hinder students in the…

  7. Classroom Interaction in Private Schools Serving Low-Income Families in Hyderabad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Hardman, Frank; Tooley, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of classroom interaction and discourse in privately-funded schools serving low-income families in Hyderabad, India. In common with other developing countries, India has seen a proliferation of such schools and yet little systematic study has been made of them. One hundred and thirty eight lessons were analysed using a…

  8. The Interactional Management of Claims of Insufficient Knowledge in English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Olcay; Walsh, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This paper primarily investigates the interactional unfolding and management of "claims of insufficient knowledge" (Beach and Metzger 1997) in two English language classrooms from a multi-modal, conversation-analytic perspective. The analyses draw on a close, micro-analytic account of sequential organisation of talk as well as on various…

  9. Competence for Democracy: Participation and Decision-Making in Classroom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzel, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    In this keynote address given at the International Association for Citizenship, Social and Economics Education (IACSEE) Conference in July 2015, Sabine Manzel focused on participation and decision-making as key competences for democracy. She analysed with standardized videography how both of these competences are realized in classroom interaction.

  10. Classroom Interaction Strategies Employed by English Teachers at Lower Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryati, Nunung

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a study on teachers' use of interaction strategies in English Language Teaching (ELT) in lower secondary level of education. The study involved eighteen teachers from Lower Secondary Schools in Malang, East Java. Classroom observation was selected as a method in this study by utilizing Self Evaluation Teacher Talk (SETT) as…

  11. Implementing Tasks with Interactive Technologies in Classroom Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Towards a Developmental Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Shona; Alexander, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Classroom foreign language teachers using technology in task-based language teaching (TBLT) may experience pedagogical regression during technological development (Fullan, 2001), and fail to transform pedagogy because tools like interactive whiteboards (IWBs) support traditional as well as newer approaches (Avvisati et al., 2013). IWB-supported…

  12. Competence for Democracy: Participation and Decision-Making in Classroom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzel, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    In this keynote address given at the International Association for Citizenship, Social and Economics Education (IACSEE) Conference in July 2015, Sabine Manzel focused on participation and decision-making as key competences for democracy. She analysed with standardized videography how both of these competences are realized in classroom interaction.

  13. Application of Scaffolding Theory to Higher Vocational Students Class-room Interaction in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗晗

    2013-01-01

      Scaffolding theory is one of the mature teaching methods of constructivism model . The effective interaction between teachers and students is one characteristic of scaffold teaching. This paper aims at combining scaffolding theory with classroom in⁃teraction in teaching higher vocational students English to help students arouse interest and enhance their comprehensive ability in English learning.

  14. Talk or Chat? Chatroom and Spoken Interaction in a Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano-Bunce, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study comparing chatroom and face-to-face oral interaction for the purposes of language learning in a tertiary classroom in the United Arab Emirates. It uses transcripts analysed for Language Related Episodes, collaborative dialogues, thought to be externally observable examples of noticing in action. The analysis is…

  15. Researching Classroom Interaction in the light of social justice. : [paper presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesano-Montessori, Nicolina; Ponte, Petra

    2010-01-01

    A research into classroom interaction (behaviour and communication) between teachers and pupils in the light of social justice. The research is based on the concern that educational praxis, defined as 'practice which implies a conscious awareness of the practitioners that their actions are morally c

  16. Teachers' Beliefs and Their Intention to Use Interactive Simulations in Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriek, Jeanne; Stols, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    In this pilot study, we sought to examine the influence of the beliefs of Grade 10 to 12 physical science teachers on their intended and actual usage of interactive simulations (Physics Education Technology, or PhET) in their classrooms. A combination of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Technology Acceptance Model and the Innovation Diffusion…

  17. High quality interaction in the classroom: a focus for professional learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, R.; de Blauw, A.

    2008-01-01

    Oral language education is important throughout primary school for the development of language and learning. Yet in today's educational practice this core principle is neglected and classroom interactions lack quality. Teachers know that supporting students to participate actively in learning is imp

  18. Promoting Speaking Proficiency through Motivation and Interaction: The Study Abroad and Classroom Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how motivation and interaction shape the speaking proficiency of study abroad (SA) and classroom or at home (AH) language learners. The author administered a motivation questionnaire, language contact profile, and pretest and posttest simulated oral proficiency interview. The data reveal that SA and AH students had similar…

  19. Knowledge Construction, Meaning-Making and Interaction in CLIL Science Classroom Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evnitskaya, Natalia; Morton, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on Wenger's model of community of practice to present preliminary findings on how processes of negotiation of meaning and identity formation occur in knowledge construction, meaning-making and interaction in two secondary Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) science classrooms. It uses a multimodal conversation analysis…

  20. A Case Based Analysis Preparation Strategy for Use in a Classroom Management for Inclusive Settings Course: Preliminary Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, William J.; Cohen, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Case based instruction (CBI) is a pedagogical option in teacher preparation growing in application but short on practical means to implement the method. This paper presents an analysis strategy and questions developed to help teacher trainees focus on classroom management issues embedded in a set of "real" cases. An analysis of teacher candidate…

  1. Interaction Design and Science Discovery Learning in the Future Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Kluge

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on theories of interaction design as they relate to science discovery learning. Media analysis, inquiry structure and relations between the generation of hypothesis and experimentation in theories of science discovery learning are considered in relation to approaches in interaction design. Two examples from use of interactive models for inquiry learning illustrate the discussion. The studies show that students require time to experiment with models to use them as resources, and that experimentation needs some structure elements to be productive. The interactive models need to invite action and allow for different kinds of use.

  2. Nurse educators and student nurse neophytes’ perceptions of good interaction in the classroom setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friddah R. Mathevula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The first session of interaction in the classroom often sets an atmosphere for the entire period of learning. In terms of nurse educator and student nurse neophyte relations, good interaction is essential in helping students to recognise their own responsibilities and to respond positively during the learning process. The purpose of this study was to determine the nurse educators’ and student nurse neophytes’ perceptions of good interaction in the classroom setting. The study attempted to answer the following specific question: ‘What do nurse educators and student nurse neophytes regard as examples of good interaction in the classroom setting?’ The accessible population in this study were all student nurse neophytes registered with the University of Venda for the Baccalaureus Curationis, and nurse educators responsible for teaching first-year student nurses in this programme. The study used probability stratified random sampling to obtain two heterogeneous groups of student participants. Forty first-year student nurses were divided into homogenous subsets of 15 male and 25 female students. A random sampling was conducted to arrive at 10 male and 15 female students. The sampling method relating to nurse educators was purposive sampling. Focus groups were used to interview students using individual in-depth interviews to gather data from nurse educators. Coding was used to organise the data collected during the interviews. The study revealed that nurse educators and student nurse neophytes concur that the ethical behaviours influencing good interaction are respect and support, good communication, honesty and openness. Age, gender and cultural background were also factors. The participants further indicated that good interaction has benefits such as improved co-operation levels, the enhancement of learning, the improvement of pass rates, and a reduction in dropout rates. In conclusion, there is a need for nurse educators and student nurses

  3. The Individualized Classroom Assessment Scoring System (inCLASS): Preliminary Reliability and Validity of a System for Observing Preschoolers' Competence in Classroom Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Jason T; Booren, Leslie M; Lima, Olivia K; Luckner, Amy E; Pianta, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the Individualized Classroom Assessment Scoring System (inCLASS), an observation tool that targets children's interactions in preschool classrooms with teachers, peers, and tasks. In particular, initial evidence is reported of the extent to which the inCLASS meets the following psychometric criteria: inter-rater reliability, normal distributions and adequate range, construct validity, and criterion-related validity. These initial findings suggest that the inCLASS has the potential to provide an authentic, contextualized assessment of young children's classroom behaviors. Future directions for research with the inCLASS are discussed.

  4. Interactive Classroom Graphics--Simulating Non-Linear Arrhenius Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zion, M.; Hoz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes two simulation programs using an interactive graphic display terminal that were developed for a course in physical organic chemistry. Demonstrates the energetic conditions that give rise to deviations from linearity in the Arrhenius equation. (CS)

  5. Student Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in a Biology Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Stavreva Veselinovska, Snezana; Kirova, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to design interactive teaching strategies with Interactive White Boards (IWB) and examine their effectiveness in teaching biology. Following the trend of integrating the IWB in teaching, in this study we tried to stress the advantages of IWB to provide better and effective teaching of biology in schools. The research was conducted with students from third year in two secondary schools in Stip. Students were divided into two groups. IWB-group (n = 35) – which used ...

  6. Classroom Interaction in the English Department Speaking Class at State University of Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Kasim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study involved the teacher and students who were taking Speaking II class at the English Department of State University of Malang. The data was collected by conducting a non-participant observation, recording, and interview. Based on the analysis, the present study reveals that classroom interaction (CI is the realization of a lesson plan which is organized in patterns of CI. There are five patterns of CI identified. The most dominant pattern is student-student (S-S CI. Nine interactional strategies are used by the teacher and ten by the students. Speaking II class can be facilitated by implementing certain classroom procedures. The students communicative ability is described in terms of the frequency of use of the interactional strategies throughout the semester.

  7. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  8. Virtual Classrooms: Educational Opportunity through Two-Way Interactive Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Vicki M.; Christianson, J. Scott

    This book describes in non-technical language how a small school can greatly expand its course offerings by forming a two-way interactive television (I-TV) network with surrounding school districts. I-TV is the linkage of 3 to 10 school districts over fiber optic, coaxial cable, or dedicated copper telephone lines which enables participating…

  9. THE INTERACTIVE USE OF VIDEO IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Video in language teaching offers exciting possi-bilities to train learners’communicative competence.This article introduces five different techniques in us-ing video in the language class so as to bring about in-teraction between video,students and teacher.

  10. Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Interactive Writing. Classroom Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Justina; Wiley, Barbara Joan

    1999-01-01

    Interactive writing is a term coined by a research group of faculty members from the Ohio State University and teachers from the Columbus Public Schools. The group examined Moira McKenzie's (1985) work in shared writing and adopted the approach as having power in helping children understand the writing process. They varied the approach with a…

  11. Galatea in the Classroom: The Distribution of Teacher-Pupil Interaction and Its Relationship to Class-Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, William C.

    If what is known about selective processes of perception is coupled with awareness of the extremely rapid pace of classroom interaction, the classroom setting becomes one in which differential teacher expectations are likely to be formed and maintained. In fact, research findings reveal the power of teacher expectations: high teacher expectations…

  12. An anthropological exploration of identity and social interaction in a multi-ethnic classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Barley, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on research findings from an ethnography conducted with young children (exploring notions of difference, identity and patterns of interaction, this study uncovers how four and five year-olds conceptualise and operationalise identity in a multi-ethnic Early Years classroom in the North of England. Situated in a particular local context, the study provides an indepth insight into the experiences of a diverse group of children from North and Sub-Saharan African countries who have come to...

  13. Effective Use of Interactive Learning Modules in Classroom Study in Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Jamwal, Goldee

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is spending substantial resources to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States. The ultimate goal of these programs is to produce students with a better knowledge of math and science and who are more likely to pursue careers in STEM fields. Interactive learning modules can be used in the classroom environment for effective learning. This study examines the learning preferences of Logan High School (...

  14. Effective use of Interactive Learning Modules in Classroom Study for Computer Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jamwal, Goldee

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is spending substantial resources to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States. The ultimate goal of these programs is to produce students with a better knowledge of math and science and who are more likely to pursue careers in STEM fields. Interactive learning modules can be used in the classroom environment for effective learning. This study examines the learning preferences of Logan High School (...

  15. The Intersection of Inquiry-Based Science and Language: Preparing Teachers for ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia; Smith, Kathy Horak; Groulx, Judy; Nettles, Jenesta

    2014-08-01

    As teacher educators, we are tasked with preparing prospective teachers to enter a field that has undergone significant changes in student population and policy since we were K-12 teachers. With the emphasis placed on connections, mathematics integration, and communication by the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve in Next generation science standards, 2012), more research is needed on how teachers can accomplish this integration (Bunch in Rev Res Educ 37:298-341, 2013; Lee et al. in Educ Res 42(4):223-233, 2013). Science teacher educators, in response to the NGSS, recognize that it is necessary for pre-service and in-service teachers to know more about how instructional strategies in language and science can complement one another. Our purpose in this study was to explore a model of integration that can be used in classrooms. To do this, we examined the change in science content knowledge and academic vocabulary for English language learners (ELLs) as they engaged in inquiry-based science experience utilizing the 5R Instructional Model. Two units, erosion and wind turbines, were developed using the 5R Instructional Model and taught during two different years in a summer school program for ELLs. We analyzed data from interviews to assess change in conceptual understanding and science academic vocabulary over the 60 h of instruction. The statistics show a clear trend of growth supporting our claim that ELLs did construct more sophisticated understanding of the topics and use more language to communicate their knowledge. As science teacher educators seek ways to prepare elementary teachers to help preK-12 students to learn science and develop the language of science, the 5R Instructional Model is one pathway.

  16. A Study of Corrective Feedback and Learner's Uptake in Classroom Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Esmaeili

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to examine corrective feedback and learner uptake in classroom interactions. Inspired by Lyster and Ranta’s corrective feedback framework (1997, this study intends to describe and analyze the patterns of corrective feedback utilized by Iranian teachers, and learners' uptake and the repair of those errors. To this aim, 400 minutes of classroom interaction from three elementary EFL classes which comprised 29 EFL learners were audiotaped and transcribed. The learners were within age range of 16-29 and were native speakers of Turkish language. The teachers were within 26-31 age range and had 3-4 years experience of teaching and hold MA degree in TOEFL. Analysis of data constituted the frequency of six different feedback types used by three teachers, in addition distribution of learners' uptake following each feedback type. The findings indicated that among six corrective feedback types, recast was the most frequent feedback utilized by teachers although it did not lead to high amount of learner uptake. Metalinguistic feedback, elicitation and clarification request led to higher level of uptake. It was also found that explicit feedback was more effective than implicit feedback in promoting learner uptake. Keywords: Corrective Feedback, Learner Uptake, Classroom Interaction, EFL Teachers, EFL Learners

  17. Becoming "Spanish Learners": Identity and Interaction among Multilingual Children in a Spanish-English Dual Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ramón Antonio; Durán, Leah; Hikida, Michiko

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the interactional co-construction of identities among two first-grade students learning Spanish as a third language in a Spanish-English dual language classroom. Drawing on ethnographic and interactional data, the article focuses on a single interaction between these two "Spanish learners" and two of their…

  18. Teacher Classroom Behaviour Management Preparation in Undergraduate Primary Education in Australia: A Web-Based Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sue C.; Stephensen, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Classroom behaviour management is an essential skill required by all teacher graduates to facilitate instruction in curriculum content. This article describes the classroom behaviour management (CBM) content on offer in Australian undergraduate primary education programs. To date, no nationwide studies exist that report the CBM instruction on…

  19. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as measured by exam scores, when the course is converted to a more active flipped format. The context is a physical chemistry course catering to life science majors in which approximately half of the lecture material is placed online and in-class problem-solving activities are increased, while total class time is reduced. We find that exam performance significantly improves by nearly 12% in the flipped-format course, due in part to students interacting with course material in a more timely and accurate manner. We also find that the positive effects of the flipped class are most pronounced for students with lower grade point averages and for female students.

  20. POLITENESS STRATEGIES IN TEACHER-STUDENT INTERACTION IN AN EFL CLASSROOM CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senowarsito Senowarsito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores politeness strategies used by teacher and students in two 90-minute English lessons in a senior high school. The data were video-recorded from two different classroom settings where English is the object and the medium of teaching learning process. The analysis is based on Brown and Levinson‘s politeness strategies. The result shows that teacher and students basically employed positive, negative, and bald on- record strategies. Teacher and students’ perception on social distance, the age difference, institutional setting, power, and the limitation of the linguistic ability of the students has contributed to the different choices of polite- ness strategies. The students tend to use some interpersonal function markers. Linguistic expressions that are used in classroom interaction are addressing, encouraging, thanking, apologizing, and leave–taking.

  1. Teaching assistant-student interactions in a modified SCALE-UP classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBeck, George; Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    In the spring term of 2010, Oregon State University (OSU) began using a SCALE-UP style classroom in the instruction of the introductory calculus-based physics series. Instruction in this classroom was conducted in weekly two-hour sessions facilitated by the primary professor and either two graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) or a graduate teaching assistant and an undergraduate learning assistant (LA). During the course of instruction, two of the eight tables in the room were audio and video recorded. We examine the practices of the GTAs in interacting with the students through both qualitative and quantitative analyses of these recordings. Quantitatively, significant differences are seen between the most experienced GTA and the rest. A major difference in confidence is also observed in the qualitative analysis of this GTA compared to a less experienced GTA.

  2. Motivating Lessons: A Classroom-Oriented Investigation of the Effects of Content-Based Instruction on EFL Young Learners' Motivated Behaviours and Classroom Verbal Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuei-Min

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of content-based language instruction (CBLI) on EFL young learners' motivated behaviours, namely attention, engagement, and eager volunteering, and classroom verbal interaction. Situational factors play vital roles in shaping language learners' motivation particularly in EFL contexts. While many private schools…

  3. Social interactions of students with disabilities who use augmentative and alternative communication in inclusive classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Carter, Erik W; Sisco, Lynn G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the naturally occurring social interactions for students with disabilities who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in general education classrooms. We observed 16 students who used AAC and received services under the categories of autism or intellectual disability. Participants primarily interacted with their support personnel and infrequently conversed with peers despite often being in close proximity. Few interaction episodes were initiated by students who used AAC, and initiations to peers and adults appeared to serve somewhat different functions. Students with disabilities relied more heavily on facial expressions and gestures than on the use of their AAC devices. Recommendations for promoting interaction opportunities among students are offered, and future research directions are suggested.

  4. Estradiol-progesterone interaction during the preparation of vaginal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Saleh I; Khidr, Sayed H; Ahmed, Sayed M; Jackanicz, Theodore M; Nash, Harold A

    2003-02-01

    An unexpected enhanced release, in vitro, of estradiol (E2) was observed on the preparation of vaginal rings containing E2 and progesterone (P) in a silicone elastomer. The present work deals with exploring the reason(s) behind this enhanced E2 release. The effect of the ring design (i.e., putting P and E2 in the same compartment or in adjacent or separate compartments) was studied. The effects of the curing temperature as well as the curing time were also investigated. The possible interaction(s) between P and E2 on simple heating of their mixtures was investigated using infrared (IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Also, the dissolution behavior of P, E2, and their mixture before and after heating was studied. The ring design, with respect to the position of the steroid layer(s), affected the release of P and E2 from the vaginal rings. Curing the rings at higher temperatures (>/=140 degrees C) for >/=30 min resulted in an enhanced release of the steroids, especially E2. The IR, DSC, phase diagram, and NMR results indicate that an interaction between P and E2, leading to the formation of a molecular complex, took place. It was concluded that putting P and E2 in the same compartment and curing by heating at a high temperature and for an extended time promoted this kind of interaction. The greater hydrophobicity of the interaction product, relative to that of E2, was considered the main reason behind the enhanced in vitro release of E2 from the vaginal rings.

  5. Observing the interactive qualities of L2 instructional practices in ESL and FSL classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zuniga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Discourse features that promote the generation of interactionally modified input and output, such as negotiation for meaning, have been shown to significantly enhance second language acquisition. Research has also identified several characteristics of instructional practices that render them more or less propitious to the generation of these discourse features. While various classroom observation studies have successfully measured the communicative orientation of classroom environments, most of the indicators of interactivity analyzed in those studies were obtained through micro-level discourse analyses and not through macro-level analyses of task-related factors shown to directly influence the interactivity of instructional practices. Such a macro-level scale has potential practical implications for teachers and administrators seeking an efficient tool for assessing and improving the interactivity afforded by a given curriculum. The objective of the present study was therefore to develop macro-level scale to determine the extent to which teachers of French and English as a second language use interaction-friendly instructional practices. Using an observation scheme designed to code data on factors shown to influence interactivity, 63 hours of FSL and ESL classes from secondary schools in the Montreal area were observed and analyzed. Results indicate clear differences between the two groups. While both ESL and FSL classes were less teacher-centered than those observed in previous studies, they were still rated as not-very-interactive. Target language differences showed that the FSL classes were more teacher-centered and characterized by fewer interaction-friendly tasks and activities than the ESL classes. Task characteristics, reasons for ESL and FSL differences and recommendations for improvement are discussed.

  6. Sanitation in classroom and food preparation areas in child-care facilities in North Carolina and South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgenent, Kelly C; Cates, Sheryl C; Fraser, Angela; Chapman, Benjamin; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 60% of U.S. children aged five and younger spend time in child-care settings. Such environments increase the risk of diarrheal disease, including diseases caused by enteric pathogens. To describe adherence to sanitation standards in classrooms and food preparation areas in child-care facilities, the authors conducted site visits in 40 North Carolina and South Carolina child-care facilities. Audits in up to two classrooms (rooms providing care for infants and toddlers) and the kitchen were performed using a form similar to a regulatory inspection form. Audit data were used to calculate indices to describe adherence to sanitation standards and were based on state environmental health regulations for child-care centers, the Food and Drug Administration's Food Code 2009, and guidance from food safety experts. Most facilities participating in the authors' study adhered to sanitation standards within the classroom; however, deficiencies with regard to sanitation in food preparation areas and refrigerator operating temperatures were noted. These results provide insight into possible risk factors for enteric disease transmission in child-care facilities.

  7. Students' Positioning in the Classroom: a Study of Teacher-Student Interactions in a Socioscientific Issue Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossér, Ulrika; Lindahl, Mats

    2017-07-01

    The integration of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education calls for emphasizing dialogic classroom practices that include students' views together with multiple sources of knowledge and diverse perspectives on the issues. Such classroom practices aim to empower students to participate in decision-making on SSI. This can be accomplished by enhancing their independence as learners and positioning them as legitimate participants in societal discussions. However, this is a complex task for science teachers. In this study, we introduce positioning theory as a lens to analyse classroom discourse on SSI in order to enhance our knowledge of the manners by which teachers' interactions with students make available or promote different positions for the students, that is, different parts for the students to play as participants, when dealing with SSI in the classroom. Transcripts of interactions between one teacher and six student groups, recorded during two lessons, were analysed with respect to the positioning of the students as participants in the classroom, and in relation to the SSI under consideration. The results show that the teacher-student interactions made available contrasting student positions. The students were positioned by the teacher or positioned themselves as independent learners or as dependent on the teacher. Furthermore, the students were positioned as affected by the issue but as spectators to public negotiations of the issue. Knowledge about the manner in which teacher-student interactions can function to position students seems important for dialogic classroom practices and the promotion of student positions that sustain the pursuit of intended educational outcomes.

  8. Teachers' beliefs and their intention to use interactive simulations in their classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Kriek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this pilot study, we sought to examine the influence of the beliefs of Grade 10 to 12 physical science teachers on their intended and actual usage of interactive simulations (Physics Education Technology, or PhET in their classrooms. A combination of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Technology Acceptance Model and the Innovation Diffusion Theory was used to examine the influence of teachers' attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control on their intention to use simulations in their classrooms. Using regression and factor analyses, it was found that beliefs about the perceived usefulness and the pedagogical compatibility of PhET have a significant effect on teachers' attitude towards the use of the simulations in their classrooms. The expectations of the teachers' colleagues contribute to the subjective norm of these teachers. The regression and partial correlation result also highlights the importance of teachers' general technology proficiency. Although we were not able to confirm a direct link between attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and the teachers' behaviour intention we show the influence of behaviour intention on the actual use of the simulations with an accuracy of 70.83%.

  9. Using Virtual Laboratories as Interactive Textbooks: Studies on Blended Learning in Biotechnology Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Sasidharakurup

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Virtual laboratories, an ICT-based initiative, is a new venture that is becoming more prevalent in universities for improving classroom education. With geographically remote and economically constrained institutes in India as the focus, we developed web-based virtual labs for virtualizing the wet-lab techniques and experiments with the aid of graphics favoured animations, mathematical simulators and remote triggered experimentations. In this paper, we analysed perceived usefulness of Biotechnology virtual labs amongst student groups and its role in improving the student’s performance when introduced as a learning tool in a blended classroom scenario. A pedagogical survey, via workshops and online feedback, was carried out among 600 university-level students and 100 remote users of various Indian universities. Comparing learning groups on usage of blended learning approach against a control group (traditional classroom methods and an experimental group (teacher-mediated virtual labs, our studies indicate augmented academic performance among students in blended environments. Findings also indicated usage of remotely-triggered labs aided enhancing interaction-based lab education enabling anytime-anywhere student participation scenarios.

  10. Professional Vision of Classroom Management and Learning Support in Science Classrooms--Does Professional Vision Differ across General and Content-Specific Classroom Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensky, Mirjam; Gold, Bernadette; Holdynski, Manfred; Möller, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the internal structure of professional vision of in-service teachers and student teachers with respect to classroom management and learning support in primary science lessons. Classroom management (including monitoring, managing momentum, and rules and routines) and learning support (including cognitive activation…

  11. Professional Vision of Classroom Management and Learning Support in Science Classrooms--Does Professional Vision Differ across General and Content-Specific Classroom Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensky, Mirjam; Gold, Bernadette; Holdynski, Manfred; Möller, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the internal structure of professional vision of in-service teachers and student teachers with respect to classroom management and learning support in primary science lessons. Classroom management (including monitoring, managing momentum, and rules and routines) and learning support (including cognitive activation…

  12. Interactive Whiteboard Use in High-Tech Science Classrooms: Patterns of Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rena Stroud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Interactive whiteboard (IWB use has been associated with increased student motivation, engagement, and achievement, though many studies ignore the role of the teacher in effecting those positive changes. The current study followed the practice of 28 high school science teachers as they integrated the IWB into their regular classroom activities. The extent of teachers’ adoption and integration fell along a continuum, from the technologically confident “early adopter” to the low-use “resistant adopter.” Patterns of use are explored by extracting data from representative teachers’ practice. Science-specific benefits of IWB use, barriers to integration, and lessons learned for professional development are discussed.

  13. Using State Space Grids to analyze the dynamics of teacher-student interactions in foreign language classrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Nienke; de Bot, Cornelis; van de Grift, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Many scholars have stressed the importance of the role of interaction in the language learning process (Kramsch, 1986; Van Lier, 1996; Ellis, 2000; Walsh, 2011). However, studies on classroom interaction between foreign language (FL) teachers and a group of FL learners are rare, because they are

  14. Social Interaction and Participation of Hearing Impaired Students in the Regular Classroom Setting : The Case of Four Hearing Impaired Students in Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia.

    OpenAIRE

    Habte, Nitsuh Belachew

    2008-01-01

    This study is carried out in the classroom and out of classroom at one of the school in the Amhara Regional State in Debre Markos. The purpose of the study is to investigate the social interaction and participation of hearing impaired students with their teachers and hearing peers in the regular classroom setting in different teaching learning activities. Out of classroom in extra-curricular activities, guidance and counseling, sport and play during break time are also investigated in this st...

  15. Writing Intensive Undergraduate Field Camp and Education: Expanding the Classroom and Preparing Students for the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, M. T.; McGehee, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    There has always been a strong perception within the geoscience community that a capstone field course was the pinnacle of an undergraduate geoscience degree. Such a course draws from the student's accumulated knowledge base, using information from multiple sub-disciplines to solve "real-world" problems. Since 2006, there has been a 92% increase in students attending field camps (Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2014 - AGI). But, the number of field camps has significantly declined. In 1995, 35% of geoscience departments offered a summer field course but by 2006 that number had dropped to 15% (Status Report on Geoscience Summer Field Camps - AGI) and since 2009, the number of field camps listed in the Geology.com directory has dropped from 100 to about 75. This decline is despite the fact that 88% of industry professionals believe fieldwork should "be an integral and required part of undergraduate programs" (Petcovic, et al., 2014). In 2012, in order to meet the growing needs of industry and better prepare our students, Texas A&M University-Kingsville developed an in-house, unique set of field courses that expand the limits of the classroom. We have two required courses. One is similar to a traditional field camp except that it contains a writing intensive component. The six-credit course runs for seven weeks. Prior to camp, students are required to write an introduction (geologic history section) on the study area. We spend two weeks in the field, mapping daily (Big Bend National Park), and then return to Kingsville. Students then have two weeks to finish a fully referenced paper, including their edited introduction, methods, observations, interpretations, discussion and conclusions and once complete, they begin the introduction for the next area. This is another two-week field session, in central Texas. After this, we return the first paper which has been edited for content by geoscience faculty and for grammar by an English instructor. Students spend the next

  16. Understanding an Elementary School Teachers' Journey of Using Technology in the Classroom from Sand Table to Interactive Whiteboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ersoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to understand an elementary teachers’ experiences about using interactive whiteboard (IWB in the classroom. Narrative inquiry were adopted to conduct the study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the teacher and analysed through narrative analysis. In the study, two major stories emerged. The first story was about the characteristics and difficulties of being an innovative and transformative teacher. In the second story, the use of technology in the classroom were cited. Second story consisted of such sub-stories as changing student profiles, teaching-learning process, measurement and evaluation process, infrastructural adequacy, stakeholder interaction, facilitator role of the technology and challenges of using IWB in the classroom. In all these stories, the examples and advantages of effective use of IWB in the classroom were explained. We can have the following suggestions from the words of the classroom teacher who has been using various technological tools in his classroom for about 40 years, including 10-year IWB use: Teachers should be open-minded for innovation in the sense of professional development, consider the interests of students, reduce the prejudice about the use of technology, utilize the processes that increase and facilitate the learning.

  17. Interactions between preparations containing female sex hormones and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabłocka-Słowińska, Katarzyna; Jawna, Katarzyna; Grajeta, Halina; Biernat, Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of premenopausal women use contraception whereas postmenopausal women use hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This long-term hormone therapy poses a high risk of interactions with dietary supplements. Taking estrogens at the same time as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), biologically-active compounds of glycine soja, Ginkgo biloba or Pimpinella anisum, may distort the final effect of the hormone agent. On the other hand, estrogen therapy coupled with melatonin or retinol supplementation may lead to an increased level of dietary supplements in the serum as studies have proved a concomitant beneficial effect of HRT and vitamin E supplementation on lipid profiles. In turn, taking preparations containing St John's wort during hormone therapy may lead to a reduction in hormone concentrations in serum and debilitation of the pharmacological effect. It results from the inductive effect of the biologically-active compounds of St John's wort on the metabolism of hormones as a result of the enhanced activity of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4.

  18. Prereferral Intervention Practices of Regular Classroom Teachers: Implications for Regular and Special Education Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joyceanne; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This survey of 201 regular education teachers found that the most frequently used prereferral strategies used to facilitate classroom adjustment and achievement were consultation with other professionals, parent conferences, and behavior management techniques. Elementary teachers implemented more strategies than secondary-level teachers.…

  19. Preparing Special Educators for Collaboration in the Classroom: Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton-Jones, Bethany M.; Vail, Cynthia O.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms and programs continues to be a focus in the international field of special education. In the USA where the history of inclusion is over three decades old, current special educator's professional standards clearly expect that certified special educators will enter the field…

  20. Preparation for Life: How the Montessori Classroom Facilitates the Development of Executive Function Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Leanne; Sulak, Tracey N.; Bagby, Janet; Diaz, Cathy; Thompson, LaNette W.

    2013-01-01

    Educational philosophy in elementary and secondary schools has often centered on creating a "product," full of content knowledge and basic skills (Bagby, 2002). However, no longer is academic achievement in the classroom considered the sole gauge of lifelong success. Meltzer (2010) suggested that the development of executive functioning skills…

  1. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S.; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as…

  2. Classroom Management

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be...

  3. Utilizing the PREPaRE Model When Multiple Classrooms Witness a Traumatic Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Lisa J.; Rittle, Carrie; Roberts, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an account of how the Charleston County School District responded to an event by utilizing the PREPaRE model (Brock, et al., 2009). The acronym, PREPaRE, refers to a range of crisis response activities: P (prevent and prepare for psychological trauma), R (reaffirm physical health and perceptions of security and safety), E…

  4. Interactive Whiteboards and All That Jazz: Analysing Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Howard; Beauchamp, Gary; Jones, Sonia; Kennewell, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The term "orchestration", has been used to describe the teacher's role in activity settings incorporating interactive technologies. This musical analogy suggests pre-planned manipulation of events to generate "performance" leading to learning. However, in two recent projects we have observed how effective teaching and learning…

  5. Examining the Effect of Class Size on Classroom Engagement and Teacher-Pupil Interaction: Differences in Relation to Pupil Prior Attainment and Primary vs. Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Peter; Bassett, Paul; Brown, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that we need to know more about effects of class size on classroom interactions and pupil behavior. This paper extends research by comparing effects on pupil classroom engagement and teacher-pupil interaction, and examining if effects vary by pupil attainment level and between primary and secondary schools. Systematic…

  6. Examining the Effect of Class Size on Classroom Engagement and Teacher-Pupil Interaction: Differences in Relation to Pupil Prior Attainment and Primary vs. Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Peter; Bassett, Paul; Brown, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that we need to know more about effects of class size on classroom interactions and pupil behavior. This paper extends research by comparing effects on pupil classroom engagement and teacher-pupil interaction, and examining if effects vary by pupil attainment level and between primary and secondary schools. Systematic…

  7. Science Informational Trade Books: An Exploration of Text-based Practices and Interactions in a First-grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Virginia A.

    Although scholars have long advocated the use of informational texts in the primary grades, gaps and inconsistencies in research have produced conflicting reports on how teachers used these texts in the primary curriculum, and how primary students dealt with them during instruction and on their own (e.g., Saul & Dieckman, 2005). Thus, to add to research on informational texts in the primary grades, the purpose of this study was to examine: (a) a first-grade teacher's use of science informational trade books (SITBs) in her classroom, (b) the ways students responded to her instruction, and (c) how students interacted with these texts. My study was guided by a sociocultural perspective (e.g., Bakhtin, 1981; Vygotsky, 1978), providing me a lens to examine participants during naturally occurring social practices in the classroom, mediated by language and other symbolic tools. Data were collected by means of 28 observations, 6 semi-structured interviews, 21 unstructured interviews, and 26 documents over the course of 10 weeks. Three themes generated from the data to provide insight into the teacher's and students' practices and interactions with SITBs. First, the first-grade teacher used SITBs as teaching tools during guided conversations around the text to scaffold students' understanding of specialized vocabulary, science concepts, and text features. Her instruction with SITBs included shared reading lessons, interactive read-alouds and learning activities during two literacy/science units. However, there was limited use of SITBs during the rest of her reading program, in which she demonstrated a preference for narrative. Second, students responded to instruction by participating in guided conversations around the text, in which they used prior knowledge, shared ideas, and visual representations (e.g., illustrations, diagrams, labels, and captions) to actively make meaning of the text. Third, students interacted with SITBs on their own to make sense of science, in

  8. Using classroom communication systems to support interaction and discussion in large class settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T. Boyle

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching methods that promote interaction and discussion are known to benefit learning. However, large class sizes make it difficult to implement these methods. Research from the United States has shown that an electronic classroom communication system (CCS can be used to support active discussion in large lecture classes. This investigation extends that research and it evaluates students' and teachers' experiences of CCS technology in the context of two different modes of discussion – peer-group and classwide discussion. With CCS technology, students' answers to multiple-choice concept tests are collated in real time with the class results fed back as a histogram. This information serves as the trigger for each mode of discussion. This paper explores the unique contribution of CCS technology, the relative strengths of peer- and class-wide discussion and some practical implementation issues.

  9. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Interactive Laser Disc and Classroom Video Tape for Safety Instruction of General Motors Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, James; Wagner, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Describes evaluation that assessed the effectiveness of the Interactive Laser Disc System (ILDS) Training Program in comparison with classroom instruction with videotape for training of General Motors workers. Topics discussed include achievement test, attitude scales, opinion surveys, user preference questionnaires, interviews, and variables that…

  10. Read-Alouds in Kindergarten Classrooms: A Moment-by-Moment Approach to Analyzing Teacher-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascareño, Mayra; Deunk, Marjolein I.; Snow, Catherine E.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore teacher-child interaction in 24 whole-class read-aloud sessions in Chilean kindergarten classrooms serving children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Fifteen sessions focused on story meaning, and nine focused on language coding/decoding. We coded teacher and child turns for their function (i.e., teacher…

  11. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a study conducted to investigate teachers' and students' perceptions of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom and to find out differences of perceptions according to some variables such as gender, level of English proficiency, hours of weekly IWB use,…

  12. Teachers’ interpretations of their classroom interactions in terms of their pupils’ best interest : A perspective from continental European pedagogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, Carlos Alberto van

    2013-01-01

    This thesis comprises four closely related interpretative studies and set out to answer the compound question: ‘How do teachers interpret their classroom interactions in terms of their pupils’ best interest?’ Two empirical studies were conducted. The first study addressed the sub question: ‘How do t

  13. Collaborate, Engage, and Interact in Online Learning: Successes with Wikis and Synchronous Virtual Classrooms at Athens State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Lisa Logan; Cowan, Wendy; Herring, Susan D.; Wilkes, William

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide faculty with creative ways to use tools such as wikis and synchronous virtual classrooms to build a sense of community within their distance classes. A review of the literature provides an understanding of the many significant benefits of including collaboration, engagement, and interaction in e-learning…

  14. Teacher-student interaction in contemporary science classrooms: is participation still a question of gender?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Nina; Sørensen, Helene; Göran Karlsson, Karl

    2016-07-01

    We show that boys still have a greater access to the space for interaction in science classrooms, which is unexpected since in Sweden today girls perform better in these subjects than boys. Results from video-recorded verbal communication, referred to here as interaction, show that the distribution of teacher-student interaction in the final year of lower secondary school follows the same patterns as in the 1980s. The interaction space for all kinds of talk continues to be distributed according to the two-thirds rule for communication in science classrooms as described by previous research. We also show that the overall interaction space in science classrooms has increased for both boys and girls when talk about science alone is considered. Another finding which follows old patterns is that male teachers still address boys more often than girls. This holds true both for general talk and for talk about science. If a more even distribution of teacher-student interaction is desirable, these results once again need to be considered. More research needs to be undertaken before the association between girls' attitudes and interest in science in terms of future career choice and the opportunity to participate in teacher-student interaction is more clearly understood. Research conducted at Mid Sweden University, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.

  15. Brain-to-Brain Synchrony Tracks Real-World Dynamic Group Interactions in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikker, Suzanne; Wan, Lu; Davidesco, Ido; Kaggen, Lisa; Oostrik, Matthias; McClintock, James; Rowland, Jess; Michalareas, Georgios; Van Bavel, Jay J; Ding, Mingzhou; Poeppel, David

    2017-05-08

    The human brain has evolved for group living [1]. Yet we know so little about how it supports dynamic group interactions that the study of real-world social exchanges has been dubbed the "dark matter of social neuroscience" [2]. Recently, various studies have begun to approach this question by comparing brain responses of multiple individuals during a variety of (semi-naturalistic) tasks [3-15]. These experiments reveal how stimulus properties [13], individual differences [14], and contextual factors [15] may underpin similarities and differences in neural activity across people. However, most studies to date suffer from various limitations: they often lack direct face-to-face interaction between participants, are typically limited to dyads, do not investigate social dynamics across time, and, crucially, they rarely study social behavior under naturalistic circumstances. Here we extend such experimentation drastically, beyond dyads and beyond laboratory walls, to identify neural markers of group engagement during dynamic real-world group interactions. We used portable electroencephalogram (EEG) to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of 12 high school students over the course of a semester (11 classes) during regular classroom activities (Figures 1A-1C; Supplemental Experimental Procedures, section S1). A novel analysis technique to assess group-based neural coherence demonstrates that the extent to which brain activity is synchronized across students predicts both student class engagement and social dynamics. This suggests that brain-to-brain synchrony is a possible neural marker for dynamic social interactions, likely driven by shared attention mechanisms. This study validates a promising new method to investigate the neuroscience of group interactions in ecologically natural settings. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Teachers of young children (3-5 years old and their interaction with pupils: approaching positive classroom management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryni Paraskevopoulou

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the social and emotional development of children between three to five years old, the factors that affect their in-school behaviour and strategies for positive teacher classroom management. It is suggested that teachers need to reflect upon children’s development in order for an effective classroom management to be achieved. Aspects of teachers’ expectations about interaction between children and teachers will also be exemplified. Literature research was employed as a method to explore the relevant issues.

  17. Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Peggy; Warde, Beverly; Rody, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Given federal mandates, public school districts have adopted inclusive practices with the expectation that general education teachers can accommodate students with disabilities. For teacher preparation programs to prepare future teachers for this reality, it is important to understand the composition of a "typical" general education…

  18. Preparing Early Childhood Educators for the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms and Communities of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Amy; Kennedy, Adam; Lees, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recent Illinois state policies call for mandatory preparation of early childhood educators to address the needs of the large and growing population of young English language learners. University-based early childhood teacher preparation programs across Illinois have responded by integrating content related to cultural and linguistic diversity into…

  19. Positive interaction patterns in teacher-pupil dyads : a baseline study of three examples of teacher-pupil quality interactions in one classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Margvelashvili, Nino

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this study was to depict and construct the meaning of teacher-pupil interactions in a preliminary grade classroom in Georgian school. By trying to understand the most significant phenomenon for child’s social-emotional and cognitive development, the emphasis were made only on positive interaction sequences founded on a resource-based communication and mediation approach, developed by Norwegian scholars Henning Rye and Karsten Hundeide. The particularity of the study was to ge...

  20. Classroom processes and positive youth development: conceptualizing, measuring, and improving the capacity of interactions between teachers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianta, Robert C; Hamre, Bridget K

    2009-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC) statement and description of features of settings that have value for positive youth development have been of great importance in shifting discourse toward creating programs that capitalize on youth motivations toward competence and connections with others. This assets-based approach to promote development is consistent with the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) framework for measuring and improving the quality of teacher-student interactions in classroom settings. This chapter highlights the similarities between the CLASS and NRC systems and describes the CLASS as a tool for standardized measurement and improvement of classrooms and their effects on children. It argues that the next important steps to be taken in extending the CLASS and NRC frameworks involve reengineering assessments of teacher and classroom quality and professional development around observations of teachers' performance. This might include using observations in policies regarding teacher quality or a "highly effective teacher" that may emanate from the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind and moving away from a course or workshop mode of professional development to one that ties supports directly to teachers' practices in classroom settings.

  1. Peer interactions and academic engagement of youth with developmental disabilities in inclusive middle and high school classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W; Sisco, Lynn G; Brown, Lissa; Brickham, Dana; Al-Khabbaz, Zainab A

    2008-11-01

    We examined the peer interactions and academic engagement of 23 middle and high school students with developmental disabilities within inclusive academic and elective classrooms. The extent to which students with and without disabilities interacted socially was highly variable and influenced by instructional format, the proximity of general and special educators, and curricular area. Peer interactions occurred more often within small group instructional formats, when students were not receiving direct support from a paraprofessional or special educator, and in elective courses. Academic engagement also varied, with higher levels evidenced during one-to-one or small group instruction and when in proximity of general or special educators. Implications for designing effective support strategies for students with autism and/or intellectual disability within general education classrooms are discussed.

  2. Space Weather Monitors -- Preparing to Distribute Scientific Devices and Classroom Materials Worldwide for the IHY 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Burress, B.

    2006-05-01

    Stanford's Solar Center, in conjunction with the Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory and local educators, have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitors that students around the world can use to track solar-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, our Monitors have been designated for deployment to 191 countries for the International Heliophysical Year, 2007. In partnership with Chabot Space and Science Center, we are designing and developing classroom and educator support materials to accompany distribution of the monitors worldwide. Earth's ionosphere reacts strongly to the intense x-ray and ultraviolet radiation released by the Sun during solar events and by lightning during thunderstorms. Students anywhere in the world can directly monitor and track these sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) by using a VLF radio receiver to monitor the signal strength from distant VLF transmitters and noting unusual changes as the waves bounce off the ionosphere. High school students "buy in" to the project by building their own antenna, a simple structure costing little and taking a couple hours to assemble. Data collection and analysis are handled by a local PC. Stanford is providing a centralized data repository where students and researchers can exchange and discuss data. Chabot Space & Science Center is an innovative teaching and learning center focusing on astronomy and the space sciences. Formed as a Joint Powers Agency with the City of Oakland (California), the Oakland Unified School District, the East Bay Regional Park District, and in collaboration with the Eastbay Astronomical Society, Chabot addresses the critical issue of broad access to the specialized information and facilities needed to improve K-12 science education and public science literacy. Up to 2,000 K-12 teachers annually take part in Chabot's professional

  3. An Inquiry "Warm-Up" Activity: Preparing Students for an Active Classroom Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active learning community that engages in inquiry activities will employ strategies and structures that students from traditional classrooms may find unfamiliar or uncomfortable. These include group work, voicing questions, shifting from one part of an activity to another (and sometimes shifting groups at the same time), presenting informally to the group, and many others. In addition, the role of the instructor as facilitator rather than teacher may not be familiar to students. As inquiry activities become incorporated into the regular classroom curriculum at Maui Community College (through collaboration with the Professional Development Program as part of the Akamai Workforce Initiative), a need emerged to give students a "warm-up" early in the semester to help them practice these participation structures. This activity was designed to be used on the very first day of class, to be easy and accessible to students, and to give them practice with these features of inquiry activities that they would see again throughout the semester. In addition, the activity introduces the engineering technology concepts of requirements, trade-offs, and limitations. It is important to note that this activity is not in and of itself an inquiry activity; in fact the content and processes featured in the activity are not particularly challenging nor are they the main focus. Instead, this is a "warm-up" for inquiry, so that students gain some comfort with the unconventional features of inquiry activities. The particular activity presented is for 20-30 students in a ˜90 minute lab period, and highlights different imaging technologies of cameras; however, it is easily adaptable to other requirements, to different technology, or other needs.

  4. The Teacher's Role in Quality Classroom Interactions: Q&A with Dr. Drew Gitomer. REL Mid-Atlantic Teacher Effectiveness Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Drew Gitomer, professor at Rutgers University, shared results from recent studies of classroom observations that helped participants understand both general findings about the qualities of classroom interactions and also the challenges to carrying out valid and reliable observations. This Q&A addressed the questions…

  5. Exploring Middle School Teachers' Perceptions and Applications of a Site-Based, Technology-Related Professional Development Program Focused on Interactive Whiteboards and Classroom Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shreya J.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined five middle school teachers' perceptions of a site-based, technology-related professional development (TRPD) program focused on the interactive whiteboard (IWB) and the classroom response system (CRS) and the practices implemented in the teachers' classrooms as a result of participation in the TRPD…

  6. Pre-Service Teacher Training in Classroom Management: A Review of State Accreditation Policy and Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jennifer; Simonsen, Brandi; Briere, Donald E.; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective classroom management skills are essential for teachers. Unfortunately, many teachers do not receive adequate classroom management training prior to beginning their teaching careers and feel unprepared for the demands of managing student behaviors in their classrooms. In this article, we describe (a) the number of states with state policy…

  7. Pre-Service Teacher Training in Classroom Management: A Review of State Accreditation Policy and Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jennifer; Simonsen, Brandi; Briere, Donald E.; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective classroom management skills are essential for teachers. Unfortunately, many teachers do not receive adequate classroom management training prior to beginning their teaching careers and feel unprepared for the demands of managing student behaviors in their classrooms. In this article, we describe (a) the number of states with state policy…

  8. Bring Workplace Assessment into Business Communication Classrooms: A Proposal to Better Prepare Students for Professional Workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han

    2010-01-01

    To help students better understand and be better prepared for professional workplaces, the author suggests that business communication teachers examine and learn from workplace assessment methods. Throughout the article, the author discusses the rationale behind this proposal, reviews relevant literature, reports interview findings on workplace…

  9. Aiming for Equity: Preparing Mainstream Teachers for Inclusion or Inclusive Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Maria R.; Harper, Candace; de Jong, Ester J.

    2016-01-01

    Mainstream teachers throughout the world are increasingly expected to differentiate instruction for primary-grade students with diverse learning needs, including second or English language learners (ELLs). Does teacher preparation translate into instructional practices for English language development? What do graduates of those programs do…

  10. A Proposed Pedagogical Approach for Preparing Teacher Candidates to Incorporate Academic Language in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Woong; Stallings, Lynn; Kim, Dong Joong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present issues related to prioritizing academic language in teaching performance assessments and to propose a pedagogical approach that prepares middle grades mathematics teacher candidates to teach academic language. Based on our experience with teacher candidates and our knowledge of edTPA standards involving…

  11. Preparing student teachers to integrate ICT in classroom practice: a synthesis of qualitative evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tondeur, J.; van Braak, J.; Guoyuan, S.; Voogt, Joke; Fisser, Petra; Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study reviewed qualitative studies that focused on strategies to prepare pre-service teachers to integrate technology into their lessons. A meta-ethnography approach was utilized to locate, critically appraise, and synthesize the results of these studies. Based on an extensive search in the Web

  12. Bring Workplace Assessment into Business Communication Classrooms: A Proposal to Better Prepare Students for Professional Workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han

    2010-01-01

    To help students better understand and be better prepared for professional workplaces, the author suggests that business communication teachers examine and learn from workplace assessment methods. Throughout the article, the author discusses the rationale behind this proposal, reviews relevant literature, reports interview findings on workplace…

  13. Embedded Formative Assessment and Classroom Process Quality: How Do They Interact in Promoting Science Understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, A. Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment--a well-known teaching practice--and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of…

  14. Culture Clash: Interactions between Afrocultural and Mainstream Cultural Styles in Classrooms Serving African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouland, Karmen; Matthews, Jamaal S.; Byrd, Christy M.; Meyer, Rika M. L.; Rowley, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relation between classroom cultural and achievement-related characteristics and their influence on social outcomes in a sample of 74 fifth grade African American youth (41 girls; 33 boys) ages 10-13 years. Trained observers rated classrooms according to Boykin's (Boykin, Tyler, & Miller, 2005) definition of mainstream…

  15. Mapping Classroom Interactions: A Spatial Approach to Analyzing Patterns of Student Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, Sophia; Cook-Sather, Alison; Hein, Carola

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how mapping patterns of student participation in classroom discussion can both illuminate and complicate the dynamic relationships among identity, physical position in the classroom, student engagement, and course content. It draws on the perspectives of an undergraduate in the role of pedagogical consultant, a faculty member…

  16. Embedded Formative Assessment and Classroom Process Quality: How Do They Interact in Promoting Science Understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, A. Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment--a well-known teaching practice--and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of…

  17. Comparing Interaction and Use of Space in Traditional and Innovative Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura; Long, Avizia Y.; Solon, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Despite myriad changes to language teaching methods over time, university-level classroom spaces have largely remained the same--until now. Recent innovations in classroom space design center on technological advances, include movable furniture and coffee-shop style rooms, and are believed to facilitate language learning in several ways.…

  18. Patterns of Discursive Interactions in Primary Classrooms: An Application of Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Consuelo; Mazzoni, Elvis; Molinari, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether social network analysis (SNA) is a useful method for identifying different discursive patterns in everyday classroom activities. The material analysed came from 20 teacher-led lessons that were video-recorded in small-size classes in Italian public primary schools. SNA was used to measure classroom relations…

  19. Using Tablet PCs in Classroom for Teaching Human-Computer Interaction: An Experience in High Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, André Constantino; Marques, Daniela; de Oliveira, Rodolfo Francisco; Noda, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The use of computers in the teaching and learning process is investigated by many researches and, nowadays, due the available diversity of computing devices, tablets are become popular in classroom too. So what are the advantages and disadvantages to use tablets in classroom? How can we shape the teaching and learning activities to get the best of…

  20. Peer-Assisted Learning and Interactions in Inclusive Music Classrooms: Benefits, Research, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellison, Judith; Brown, Laura; Draper, Ellary

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary music classrooms include a beautiful mosaic of individual children from diverse backgrounds, children who vary considerably in their capabilities, interests, and levels of motivation. Some of the variations we observe are related to social skills and knowledge. The effects of appropriate classroom behavior and positive social…

  1. Improving clicker questions for enhanced learning in the interactive physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, Ertan

    2009-03-01

    Classroom response systems, or clickers, have become widely used in physics classes in the last decade. Physics education research has demonstrated clearly that it is not the clicker as an electronic tool, but the interactive learning that occurs through clickers is what improves student learning. For clickers to work as expected, however, many subtle details need to be addressed. An instructor can start using many questions developed for the purpose of peer instruction. For a particular student population, and for a particular learning environment and constraints of the educational institution, questions used and the instructor's teaching style may need to be altered over time. We will present a systematic way of improving clicker questions and one's own teaching style utilizing data collected during clicker sessions. In addition, by adding a small writing component to some clicker questions, one can simply peek into student reasoning in order to determine preconceptions and misconceptions. Such direct knowledge of student reasoning in one's own class may be very revealing, and help improve learning ultimately.

  2. INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM: THE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS AND THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranice Hoehr Pedrazzi Pozzer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Program for Access to Secondary Education and Employment (Pronatec, created by the federal government has offered, in recent years, training in technical courses at post-secondary level for young people and adults inserted in the educational system and who were attending or finishing high school, including the Youth and Adult Education system (EJA. Thus, some classes of technical courses presented a varied profile of students from teenagers who attend public schools and even older adults who are returning to school after years of absence from the education system. The present study analyzed four groups of students aged between 15 and 63 years. This age difference, how the oldest students use or not technology and the kind of relationship between the students in the classroom raised questions about their relationship on social networks. This network usage by the students significantly influenced the pedagogical practice during the course, considering that the students asked the teacher to use it as a teaching and learning resource. The students transit from reality to virtual world with the naturalness of people who were born inserted in this context of interactions mediated by technology.

  3. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles....... Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  4. Ways to prepare future teachers to teach science in multicultural classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Berry

    2016-06-01

    Roussel De Carvalho uses the notion of superdiversity to draw attention to some of the pedagogical implications of teaching science in multicultural schools in cosmopolitan cities such as London. De Carvalho makes the case that if superdiverse classrooms exist then Science Initial Teacher Education has a role to play in helping future science teachers to become more knowledgeable and reflective about how to teach school students with a range of worldviews and religious beliefs. The aim of this paper is to take that proposition a step further by considering what the aims and content of a session in teacher education might be. The focus is on helping future teachers develop strategies to teach school students to think critically about the nature of science and what it means to have a scientific worldview. The paper draws on data gathered during an interview study with 28 students at five secondary schools in England. The data was analysed to discover students' perceptions of science and their perceptions of the way that science responds to big questions about being human. The findings are used to inform a set of three strategies that teachers could use to help young people progress in their understanding of the nature of science. These strategies together with the conceptual framework that underpins them are used to develop a perspective on what kinds of pedagogical content knowledge teacher education might usefully provide.

  5. On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Altamiro Consolo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a study on classroom interaction in an EFL context in Brazil. The study, of an ethnographic nature, analyses recorded lessons, interviews and questionnaires answered by the students. The social rules governing classroom interaction usually determine an asymmetrical relationship between the teacher and the students, though it may be possible, according to the data obtained, to create an atmosphere of co-operation in which interaction may occur within less asymmetrical verbal patterns. This atmosphere, determined by linguistic, pedagogical, psychological and social factors, favours student language production. The data suggest connections between the students’ views of classroom language learning, their engagement in classroom discourse, and possible implications for (foreign language development. Este artigo relata um estudo sobre interação em sala de aula em um contexto de inglês como língua estrangeira, no Brasil. O estudo, de natureza etnográfica, analisa aulas gravadas, entrevistas e questionários respondidos pelos alunos. As regras sociais que permeiam a interação em sala de aula geralmente determinam uma relação assimétrica entre professor e alunos, embora seja possível, com base nos dados obtidos, criar-se uma atmosfera de cooperação, na qual uma interação caracterizada por padrões verbais menos assimétricos possa ocorrer. Tal atmosfera, determinada por fatores lingüísticos, pedagógicos, psicológicos e sociais, favorece a produção verbal dos alunos. Os dados sugerem relações entre as visões dos alunos sobre aprendizagem de línguas, seu engajamento no discurso de sala de aula e possíveis implicações para o desenvolvimento da competência em língua estrangeira.

  6. Deaf teacher candidates in hearing classrooms: a unique teacher preparation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D S; Lytle, R R

    2000-03-01

    An undergraduate teacher education program at Gallaudet University prepares deaf students in "regular" education. This includes a required full-time internship with hearing students (assisted by sign language interpreters). Graduates then continue in a master's degree program in deaf education, thus acquiring dual certification. Several studies indicate that these deaf candidates progress through the same developmental stages as hearing candidates and that they develop high expectations for deaf learners. Issues related to implementing such a program are discussed.

  7. Third places and the interactive construction of interculturality in the English as foreign/additional language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Gil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that the construction of interculturality in third places is essential for foreign/additional language teaching and learning, this paper aims at discussing how these third places are interactively constructed in real classrooms. In order to achieve that objective, I will first review some theoretical studies that have dealt with the construction of third places and interculturality in the classroom. Then, the methodological procedures will be explained. After that, I will contextualize, analyze and compare some real classroom episodes taken from different studies pointing out their different interactional features. The findings show that the episodes investigated present two types, having either an ‘essentialist cultural orientation’ or an ‘intercultural orientation’. In the former orientation, the episodes cannot be considered third places as culture is an object constructed as an entity in its own right (Liddicoat & Scarino, 2013. On the other hand, in the latter orientation, third places seem to be constructed as teachers and learners are seemingly interactively engaged in the practice of meaning-making by confronting different points of view.

  8. The Effect of Interactive Instruction in the Astro 101 Classroom: Report on a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Consiglio, D.; Schlingman, W. M.; Gonzaga, V.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted a national research study designed to determine the effect of interactive learning strategies on students' conceptual learning in general education astronomy courses (Astro 101). Nearly 4000 students at 31 institutions, (4-year and 2-year) around the country participated in the study. Our results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies independent of institution type or class size, and after controlling for individual student characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all categories of students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program, and Award No. 0847170, a PAARE grant funding the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  9. Classroom assessment of reading comprehension: How are preservice Foundation Phase teachers being prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carisma Nel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of assessment studies in recent years have shown that the educational achievement of learners in South African schools is unacceptably poor. The Department of Education’s systemic evaluations, conducted in Grade 3 (first cycle in 2001, second cycle in 2007 show very low levels of literacy among learners. Reading comprehension and writing scores averaged 39% for the first and 36% for the second cycle. Research indicates that less attention has been given to children’s reading comprehension skills compared to decoding skills. Teacher preparation programmes should provide candidates with a rigorous, research-based curriculum and opportunities to practise a range of predefined skills and knowledge. The demands of competent literacy instruction and assessment, and the training experiences necessary to learn it, have been seriously underestimated by universities. Teacher education programmes should ensure that teachers, amongst other crucial aspects, know how to assess the progress of every student and change instruction when it is not working and also know how to communicate results of assessments to various stakeholders, especially parents. The purpose of this article is to report on the training that pre-service teachers receive, related to reading comprehension assessment practices, within a BEd foundation phase teacher preparation programme.

  10. Assessing Teacher Performance in the Classroom: Pattern Analysis Applied to Interaction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shymansky, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Selected data from a junior high school science assessment study are presented to demonstrate the potential of pattern analysis for teacher evaluation, and to illustrate its superiority over other classroom observation techniques. (CP)

  11. Eliminating interactions between non-neighboring qubits in the preparation of cluster states in quantum molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, G P; Hao, X J; Tu, T; Zhu, Z C; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jie; Tu, Tao; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme to eliminate the effect of non-nearest-neighbor qubits in preparing cluster state with double-dot molecules. As the interaction Hamiltonians between qubits are Ising-model and mutually commute, we can get positive and negative effective interactions between qubits to cancel the effect of non-nearest-neighbor qubits by properly changing the electron charge states of each quantum dot molecule. The total time for the present multi-step cluster state preparation scheme is only doubled for one-dimensional qubit chain and tripled for two-dimensional qubit array comparing with the time of previous protocol leaving out the non-nearest-neighbor interactions.

  12. The influence of fidelity of implementation on teacher-student interaction quality in the context of a randomized controlled trial of the Responsive Classroom approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Larsen, Ross A; Brewer, Alexis J

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect effects between training in the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach, teachers' uptake of RC practices, and teacher-student interaction quality, using a structural equation modeling framework. A total of 24 schools were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. Third- and fourth-grade teachers in treatment schools (n=132) received training in the RC approach, whereas teachers in control schools (n=107) continued "business as usual." Observers rated teachers' fidelity of implementation (FOI) of RC practices 5 times throughout the year using the Classroom Practices Observation Measure. In addition, teachers completed self-report measures of FOI, the Classroom Practices Teacher Survey and Classroom Practices Frequency Survey, at the end of the school year. Teacher-student interactions were rated during classroom observations using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System. Controlling for teachers' grade level and teacher-student interaction quality at pretest, RC training was expected to predict posttest teacher-student interaction quality directly and indirectly through FOI. Results supported only a significant indirect effect, β=0.85, p=.002. Specifically, RC teachers had higher levels of FOI of RC practices, β=1.62, pteacher-student interaction quality, β=0.52, p=.001, R2=.32. Discussion highlights factors contributing to variability in FOI and school administrators roles in supporting FOI. Copyright © 2013 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparing teachers to create a mainstream science classroom conducive to the needs of English-language learners: A feminist action research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gayle; Mast, Colette; Ehlers, Nancy; Franklin, Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    A feminist action research team, which consisted of a science educator, an English-language learner (ELL) educator, a first-year science teacher, and a graduate assistant, set a goal to work together to explore the process a beginning teacher goes through to establish a classroom conducive to the needs of middle-level ELL learners. The guiding questions of the study were answered by gathering a wealth of data over the course of 5 months and taken from the classroom, planning sessions, and researchers and students. These data were collected by observations, semistructured interviews, and written document reviews. The progressive analysis ultimately revealed that: (a) successful strategies a beginning teacher must utilize for teaching middle-level ELL children in a mainstream classroom involve complex structural considerations that are not part of the teacher's preparation; (b) learning increases for all children, but there are differences in learning achievement between ELL and non-ELL children; and (c) student and peer feedback proved to be an effective means of enhancing the growth of a beginning teacher seeking to increase her skills in teaching ELL learners. The experiences and findings from this project have implications for teacher preparation programs committed to preparing educators to teach science to all children.

  14. Doped titanium oxide photcatalysts: Preparation, structure and interaction with viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi

    Since the discovery of photoelectrochemical splitting of water on n-titanium oxide (n-TiO2) electrodes by Fujishima and Honda in 1972, there has been much interest in semiconductor-based materials as photocatalysts for both solar energy conversion and environmental applications in the past several decades. Among various semiconductor-based photocatalysts, TiO2 is the only candidate suitable for industrial use because of its high chemical stability, good photoactivity, relatively low cost, and nontoxicity. However, the photocatalytic capability of TiO 2 is limited to only ultraviolet (UV) light (wavelength, lambda, disinfection of bacteria and viruses under visible light illumination. The sol-gel process was optimized to produce high quality TiON-based photocatalysts by carefully modulating the precursor ratio and calcination temperature. A TiON inverse opal structure was created, which demonstrated enhanced visible light absorption and subsequently improved photocatalytic efficiency by the combination of chemical and physical modifications on n-TiO2. The effect of palladium dopant on the optical and photocatalytic properties of TiON/PdO photocatalyst was examined, which suggests that a careful optimization of the transition metal ion dopant concentration is needed to achieve high photocatalytic efficiency in these anion and transition metal ion co-doped TiO2 photocatalysts. High photocatalytic virus disinfection efficiency under visible-light illumination was observed for the first time with TiON/PdO photocatalyst, and the interaction between MS2 virus and TiO2-based semiconductor surfaces was successfully modulated. A strategy to use atomic force microscope (AFM) to conduct in-situ observation of viruses on semiconductor surfaces in aqueous environment was developed, which combines information from both height profile and phase profile and solves the difficulty of observing small nanosized biomolecules on substrates with similar feature sizes.

  15. Interactive Whiteboards and All that Jazz: The Contribution of Musical Metaphors to the Analysis of Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Gary; Kennewell, Steve; Tanner, Howard; Jones, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    The teacher's role has often been described as one of "orchestration", and this musical analogy is a powerful one in characterising the manipulation of features in the classroom setting in order to generate activity or "performance" which leads to learning. However, a classical view of orchestration would fail to recognise the extent to which…

  16. Interactive Whiteboards and All that Jazz: The Contribution of Musical Metaphors to the Analysis of Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Gary; Kennewell, Steve; Tanner, Howard; Jones, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    The teacher's role has often been described as one of "orchestration", and this musical analogy is a powerful one in characterising the manipulation of features in the classroom setting in order to generate activity or "performance" which leads to learning. However, a classical view of orchestration would fail to recognise the extent to which…

  17. Teachers' Facility with Evidence-Based Classroom Management Practices: An Investigation of Teachers' Preparation Programmes and In-Service Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Laura; Quinn, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, teachers' self-reported knowledge and competency ratings for the evidence-based classroom management practices were analysed. Teachers also reflected on how they learned evidence-based classroom management practices. Results suggest that teachers working in schools that implement Positive Behavioural Interventions and…

  18. Mediating Language Learning: Teacher Interactions with ESL Students in a Content-Based Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Draws on constructs of "mediation" from sociocultural theory and "mode continuum" from systemic functional linguistics to investigate how student-teacher talk in a content-based classroom contributes to learners' language development. Shows how teachers mediate between students' linguistic levels in English and their…

  19. A Study of Interactions among Ambiguity Tolerance, Classroom Work Styles, and English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hui-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a preliminary investigation of the inter-relationships between English learners' tolerance for ambiguity, their classroom work styles, and their level of English proficiency. The study population comprised 46 English as a foreign language (EFL) students attending a technical college in Taiwan. The findings indicated that a…

  20. Norm-Transgression Sequences in the Classroom Interaction at a Madrid High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala Recuerda, Esther

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies high school classroom sequences, compiled through critical sociolinguistic ethnography, where norm-transgression is made explicit, and how authority is recovered by the teacher after an open period where class participants generally seize to digress. This way, we will be able to approach several dimensions of linguistic…

  1. Classroom Dimensions Predict Early Peer Interaction when Children Are Diverse in Ethnicity, Race, and Home Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Carollee; Guerra, Alison Wishard; Fuligni, Allison; Zucker, Eleanor; Lee, Linda; Obregon, Nora B.; Spivak, Asha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model for predicting preschool-age children's behaviors with peers from dimensions of the classroom and teacher-child relationship quality when the children were from diverse race, ethnic, and home language backgrounds. Eight hundred children, (M=age 63 months, SD=8.1 months), part of the National Evaluation…

  2. Macro-Situation and Numerical Knowledge Building: The Role of Pupils' Didactic Memory in Classroom Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger, Annick

    2005-01-01

    This paper is based on a long-term didactic engineering about division problems (only in a numerical setting) at primary school. Situations and students' work are analyzed by means of a double theoretical framework: the theory of situations and the theory of conceptual fields (Vergnaud 1991). The analysis focuses mainly on classroom interactions…

  3. Reflecting, Coaching and Mentoring to Enhance Teacher-Child Interactions in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Betty; Donegan-Ritter, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the impact of a year long model of professional development comprised of a monthly cycle of video-based self-reflection, peer coaching, and mentoring and bimonthly workshops focused on selected Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) dimensions. Education supervisors were trained and supported by project staff to lead…

  4. Classroom Dimensions Predict Early Peer Interaction when Children Are Diverse in Ethnicity, Race, and Home Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Carollee; Guerra, Alison Wishard; Fuligni, Allison; Zucker, Eleanor; Lee, Linda; Obregon, Nora B.; Spivak, Asha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model for predicting preschool-age children's behaviors with peers from dimensions of the classroom and teacher-child relationship quality when the children were from diverse race, ethnic, and home language backgrounds. Eight hundred children, (M=age 63 months, SD=8.1 months), part of the National Evaluation…

  5. Laughing and Smiling to Manage Trouble in French-Language Classroom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Cécile; González-Martínez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with communicative functions of laughter and smiling in the classroom studied using a conversation analytical approach. Analysing a corpus of video-recorded French first-language lessons, we show how students sequentially organise laughter and smiling, and use them to preempt, solve or assess a problematic action. We also focus…

  6. Exploring the variability in how educators attend to science classroom interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Colleen Elizabeth

    Many researchers assert educators must develop a shared instructional vision in order for schools to be effective. While this research tends to focus on educators' alignment around goals of science classrooms, I argue that we can't assume that educators agree on what they see when they look at science classrooms. In this dissertation, I explore the variability in what teachers and leaders notice in science classroom episodes and how they reason about what they notice. I ground my studies in real classroom practice: a videotaped lesson in the first study and a live classroom observation in the second. In Chapter 2, I discuss the importance of grounding discussions about teaching and learning in classroom artifacts, a commitment that motivates my dissertation: educators may have a shared vision when discussing teaching and learning in the abstract but disagree about whether that vision is being realized in a classroom. I then describe and analyze the video clip I used in my interviews, highlighting moments that I consider to be good teaching and learning. In Chapter 3, I present my first study, in which I showed this episode to 15 different science teachers, science instructional leaders, and principals. I found that participants attended to many different features in the episode, which led to significant disagreement about what is happening in the episode. Additionally, I found that these differences in attention corresponded to differences in how participants were framing the activity of watching the clip. In Chapter 4, I explore the attentional variability of one science instructional leader, Valerie, in multiple contexts. In addition to interviewing Valerie about the videotaped lesson, I also observed Valerie engage in an "observation cycle" with a teacher. Even though Valerie is quite skilled at attending to student thinking in some contexts, I found that Valerie's attention is strongly context-dependent and gets pulled away from students' scientific thinking

  7. Deaf students and their classroom communication: an evaluation of higher order categorical interactions among school and background characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas E; Anderson, Melissa L

    2010-01-01

    This article investigated to what extent age, use of a cochlear implant, parental hearing status, and use of sign in the home determine language of instruction for profoundly deaf children. Categorical data from 8,325 profoundly deaf students from the 2008 Annual Survey of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children and Youth were analyzed using chi-square automated interaction detector, a stepwise analytic procedure that allows the assessment of higher order interactions among categorical variables. Results indicated that all characteristics were significantly related to classroom communication modality. Although younger and older students demonstrated a different distribution of communication modality, for both younger and older students, cochlear implantation had the greatest effect on differentiating students into communication modalities, yielding greater gains in the speech-only category for implanted students. For all subgroups defined by age and implantation status, the use of sign at home further segregated the sample into communication modality subgroups, reducing the likelihood of speech only and increasing the placement of students into signing classroom settings. Implications for future research in the field of deaf education are discussed.

  8. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

  9. Water in everyday life and in science classrooms: analysis of discursive interactions and teaching strategies in primary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Fortini da Silva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how a primary teacher establishes links between students' initial contributions on the theme ‘water’ and the elements that will make up the teaching approach of this subject in the science classroom. For this purpose, we examine discursive interactions in the first lessons of a teaching sequence, looking for links between events that are being elicited and developed by the teacher with intense participation of the students. We shall also examine the teaching strategies conducted by the teacher, emphasizing the presence of visual resources in text production activities, understanding them as literacy practices in the context of science lessons. To examine the effectiveness of these strategies and mediational resources, we shall analyze some exemplars of the students' productions (texts and drawings. We will use as criteria of analysis: speech marks of the opening activity and of the preliminary discussions in the texts produced by the pupils; evidence of changes in the pupils’ initial repertoires about the theme; evidence of connections between the “water in our lives” and “water as a science subject”. The context of the research is a third year grade classroom in a public elementary school in Contagem / MG - Brazil.

  10. Preparation of Highly Squeezed States and Multi-component Entangled Coherent States via the Raman Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Sbi-Biao

    2002-01-01

    A method is presented for generating highly squeezed states of a cavity field via the atom-cavity field interaction of the Raman type. In the scheme a sequence of three-level A-type atoms interacts with a cavity field, displaced by a classical source, in a Rarman manner. Then the atomic states are measured. By this way the cavity field may collapse onto a superposition of several coherent states, which exhibits strong squeezing. The scheme can also be used to prepare superpositions of many two-mode coherent states for two cavity fields. The coherent states in each mode are on a straight line. This is the first way for preparing multi-component entangled coherent states of this type in cavity QED.

  11. Interaction Enhanced Imaging of Rydberg P states. Preparation and detection of Rydberg atoms for engineering long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavryusev, Vladislav; Ferreira-Cao, Miguel; Kekić, Armin; Zürn, Gerhard; Signoles, Adrien

    2016-12-01

    The Interaction Enhanced Imaging technique allows to detect the spatial distribution of strongly interacting impurities embedded within a gas of background atoms used as a contrast medium [1]. Here we present a detailed study of this technique, applied to detect Rydberg P states. We experimentally realize fast and efficient three-photon excitation of P states, optimized according to the results of a theoretical effective two-level model. Few Rydberg P-state atoms, prepared in a small cloud with dimensions comparable to the blockade radius, are detected with a good sensitivity by averaging over 50 shots. The main aspects of the technique are described with a hard-sphere model, finding good agreement with experimental data. This work paves the way to a non-destructive optical detection of single Rydberg atoms with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  12. An interactional ethnographic study of the construction of literate practices of science and writing in a university science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Nuno Afonso De Freitas Lopes De

    An interactional ethnographic study informed by a sociocultural perspective was conducted to examine how a professor and students discursively and interactionally shaped the basis for engaging in the work of a community of geologists. Specifically, the study examined the role the Question of the Day, an interactive writing activity in the lecture, in affording students opportunities for learning the literate practices of science and how to incorporate them in thinking critically. A writing-intensive, introductory oceanography course given in the Geological Sciences Department was chosen because the professor designed it to emphasize writing in the discipline and science literacy within a science inquiry framework. The study was conducted in two phases: a pilot in 2002 and the current study in the Spring Quarter of 2003. Grounded in the view that members in a classroom construct a culture, this study explored the daily construction of the literate practices of science and writing. This view of classrooms was informed by four bodies of research: interactional ethnography, sociolinguistics sociology of science and Writing In the Disciplines. Through participant observation, data were collected in the lecture and laboratory settings in the form of field notes, video, interviews, and artifacts to explore issues of science literacy in discourse, social action, and writing. Examination of participation in the Question of the Day interactive writing activity revealed that it played a key role in initiating and supporting a view of science and inquiry. As the activity permitted collaboration, it encouraged students to engage in the social process to critically explore a discourse of science and key practices with and through their writing. In daily interaction, participants were shown to take up social positions as scientist and engage in science inquiry to explore theory, examine data, and articulately reformulate knowledge in making oral and written scientific arguments

  13. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  14. Video-Based Analyses of Motivation and Interaction in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller Andersen, Hanne; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2013-04-01

    An analytical framework for examining students' motivation was developed and used for analyses of video excerpts from science classrooms. The framework was developed in an iterative process involving theories on motivation and video excerpts from a 'motivational event' where students worked in groups. Subsequently, the framework was used for an analysis of students' motivation in the whole class situation. A cross-case analysis was carried out illustrating characteristics of students' motivation dependent on the context. This research showed that students' motivation to learn science is stimulated by a range of different factors, with autonomy, relatedness and belonging apparently being the main sources of motivation. The teacher's combined use of questions, uptake and high level evaluation was very important for students' learning processes and motivation, especially students' self-efficacy. By coding and analysing video excerpts from science classrooms, we were able to demonstrate that the analytical framework helped us gain new insights into the effect of teachers' communication and other elements on students' motivation.

  15. A Developmental Typology of Faculty-Student Interaction outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of studies on the educational value of faculty-student interaction have led to two straightforward conclusions: (1) interactions between faculty members and students have positive effects on student outcomes; and (2) such interactions do not occur as regularly as educators might hope. This article presents a typology of faculty-student…

  16. The main social roles of English language in Russia in their connection with CLIL university teaching and classroom interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rubtcova Pavenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the main social roles of English language in Russia in their connection with CLIL university teaching and classroom interaction. Data comes from two stage expert research with CLIL and ESL university teachers (N=33. They were asked about the social roles of English language in the nowadays Russian universities and preferable conception for future development of CLIL university program. Four conceptions were chosen by experts: Global English, Russian English, multilingual conception and English as an investment. The features of each concept were identified and discussed in terms of their influence on the process of CLIL education. The «conceptions-leaders» were determined by ranking. They are Russian English and Multilingual conception.  Despite the fact that the concept of Russian English considered appropriate at the present time, future preferences are associated with the concept of multilingualism.

  17. 大学教室固定桌椅的交互设计%Interaction Design of University Classroom Fixed Tables and Chairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾险峰; 李祎林; 周毅

    2015-01-01

    大学教室是课堂教学、学生自习、组织各类社团活动的主要场所。目前大学教室桌椅不能满足学习活动的多样化需求。交互设计是目前新兴的设计领域,应用交互设计手段能有效解决教室桌椅设计中的实际问题,主要从人际交互设计和人机交互设计两个方面进行展开。人际交互设计可通过重新创建日常学习生活场景、拓展教室桌椅的功能,促进学生之间人际交互。人机交互设计可通过认知与行为流程分析、产品运动方式设计等,提高产品的易用性。%University classroom is the main site of classroom teaching, student study, organize various community activi-ties. Currently the University classroom furniture can not meet the diverse needs of learning activities. Interaction design is the emerging field of design, interactive design tools use classroom furniture design can effectively solve the practical prob-lems, mainly to expand from human interaction design and human-computer interaction design aspects. Interpersonal inter-action design can be re-created scenes of daily school life, classroom desks and chairs to expand the function and promote human interaction between students. HCI design process through cognitive and behavioral analysis, product design, move-ment, improve product ease of use.

  18. An Examination of Interactive Whiteboard Perceptions using the Concerns-Based Adoption Model Stages of Concern and the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow Model of Instructional Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey; Chamblee, Gregory; Slough, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Two high school mathematics teachers who use Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs) in the classroom were interviewed annually over the course of three years regarding their perceptions of the technology. During the third year, the two teachers were asked to complete the Concerns-Based Adoption Model Stages of Concern Questionnaire. The data obtained from…

  19. Exploring Influences of Mathematics Coach-Teacher Interactions on the Development of Teacher Pedagogical Knowledge, Effective Mathematical Teaching Practices, and a Classroom Culture of Mathematical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    This study set out to examine how interactions between a mathematics instructional coach and a teacher influence teacher pedagogical content knowledge, instructional practices, and a classroom culture of mathematical inquiry (CCMI). The research literature on mathematics instructional coaching was limited, but showed promise in supporting…

  20. The Combined Effects of Social Script Training and Peer Buddies on Generalized Peer Interaction of Children with ASD in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundert, Joel; Rowe, Sarah; Harrison, Erin

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges in supporting young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in inclusive classrooms is the generalization of improved social behaviors. Using a multiple-baseline design across participants, this study examined the generalized effects of social script training alone and combined with peer buddies on the interactive play…

  1. Observing physical education teachers' need-supportive interactions in classroom settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerens, Leen; Aelterman, Nathalie; Van den Berghe, Lynn; De Meyer, Jotie; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2013-02-01

    According to self-determination theory, teachers can motivate students by supporting their psychological needs for relatedness, competence, and autonomy. The present study complements extant research (most of which relied on self-report measures) by relying on observations of need-supportive teaching in the domain of physical education (PE), which allows for the identification of concrete, real-life examples of how teacher need support manifests in the classroom. Seventy-four different PE lessons were coded for 5-min intervals to assess the occurrence of 21 need-supportive teaching behaviors. Factor analyses provided evidence for four interpretable factors, namely, relatedness support, autonomy support, and two components of structure (structure before and during the activity). Reasonable evidence was obtained for convergence between observed and student perceived need support. Yet, the low interrater reliability for two of the four scales indicates that these scales need further improvement.

  2. Video-based Analysis of Motivation and Interaction in Science Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hanne Moeller; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2013-01-01

    An analytical framework for examining students’ motivation was developed and used for analyses of video excerpts from science classrooms. The framework was developed in an iterative process involving theories on motivation and video excerpts from a ‘motivational event’ where students worked...... in groups. Subsequently, the framework was used for an analysis of students’ motivation in the whole class situation. A cross-case analysis was carried out illustrating characteristics of students’ motivation dependent on the context. This research showed that students’ motivation to learn science...... is stimulated by a range of different factors, with autonomy, relatedness and belonging apparently being the main sources of motivation. The teacher’s combined use of questions, uptake and high level evaluation was very important for students’ learning processes and motivation, especially students’ self...

  3. Teaching the content in context: Preparing "highly qualified" and "high quality" teachers for instruction in underserved secondary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sara E.

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation research project presents the results of a longitudinal study that investigates the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of 13 preservice secondary science teachers participating in a science teacher credentialing/Masters program designed to integrate issues of equity and diversity throughout coursework and seminars. Results are presented in the form of three papers: The first paper describes changes in preservice teacher knowledge about contextualization in science instruction, where contextualization is defined as facilitating authentic connections between science learning and relevant personal, social, cultural, ecological, and political contexts of students in diverse secondary classrooms; the second paper relates changes in the self-efficacy and content-specific beliefs about science, science teaching, diversity, and diversity in science instruction; and the final paper communicates the experiences and abilities of four "social justice advocates" learning to contextualize science instruction in underserved secondary placement classrooms. Results indicate that secondary student teachers developed more sophisticated understandings of how to contextualize science instruction with a focus on promoting community engagement and social/environmental activism in underserved classrooms and how to integrate science content and diversity instruction through student-centered inquiry activities. Although most of the science teacher candidates developed more positive beliefs about teaching science in underrepresented classrooms, many teacher candidates still attributed their minority students' underperformance and a (perceived) lack of interest in school to family and cultural values. The "social justice advocates" in this study were able to successfully contextualize science instruction to varying degrees in underserved placement classrooms, though the most significant limitations on their practice were the contextual factors of their student teaching

  4. Impact of abbreviated lecture with interactive mini-cases vs traditional lecture on student performance in the large classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leisa L; Nykamp, Diane L; Momary, Kathryn M

    2014-12-15

    To compare the impact of 2 different teaching and learning methods on student mastery of learning objectives in a pharmacotherapy module in the large classroom setting. Two teaching and learning methods were implemented and compared in a required pharmacotherapy module for 2 years. The first year, multiple interactive mini-cases with inclass individual assessment and an abbreviated lecture were used to teach osteoarthritis; a traditional lecture with 1 inclass case discussion was used to teach gout. In the second year, the same topics were used but the methods were flipped. Student performance on pre/post individual readiness assessment tests (iRATs), case questions, and subsequent examinations were compared each year by the teaching and learning method and then between years by topic for each method. Students also voluntarily completed a 20-item evaluation of the teaching and learning methods. Postpresentation iRATs were significantly higher than prepresentation iRATs for each topic each year with the interactive mini-cases; there was no significant difference in iRATs before and after traditional lecture. For osteoarthritis, postpresentation iRATs after interactive mini-cases in year 1 were significantly higher than postpresentation iRATs after traditional lecture in year 2; the difference in iRATs for gout per learning method was not significant. The difference between examination performance for osteoarthritis and gout was not significant when the teaching and learning methods were compared. On the student evaluations, 2 items were significant both years when answers were compared by teaching and learning method. Each year, students ranked their class participation higher with interactive cases than with traditional lecture, but both years they reported enjoying the traditional lecture format more. Multiple interactive mini-cases with an abbreviated lecture improved immediate mastery of learning objectives compared to a traditional lecture format, regardless of

  5. Teacher Perceptions of the Preparation Needed to Work Effectively with English Language Learners in the Secondary Mainstream Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Constance M.

    2013-01-01

    The number of English language learners (ELLs) in the nation's classrooms is over five million, an increase of 57% in the last decade. California alone has 1.4 million ELLs in grades K-12 for the 2011-2012 school year, and one-third are secondary students who need to learn English and content in a very short time. These students usually come from…

  6. The Basic Elements of Interactive Mathematics Classroom Teaching%交互式数学课堂教学的基本要素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂东明

    2011-01-01

    The scientific analysis and argumentation for the basic elements of interactive mathematics classroom teaching is not only a basic task for the study on interactive mathematics classroom teaching, but also a prerequisite and basis for the effective implementation of interactive mathematics classroom teaching. The element of interactive mathematics classroom teaching re- fers to the factors which has decisive and substantive role to the existence and development of the interactive mathematics class- room teaching. There are two elements of the interactive mathematics classroom teaching: subject element and object element. The subject element includes teachers and students and the object element includes the contents of the mathematics teaching, the instant information in the process of the mathematics classroom teaching, the tacit knowledge and the material conditions of the mathematics classroom teaching.%对交互式数学课堂教学的基本要素进行科学的分析和论证,既是研究交互式数学课堂教学的一项基本任务,也是有效实施交互式数学课堂教学的前提和基础。交互式数学课堂教学的要素是指对交互式数学课堂教学的存在和发展起决定性、实质性作用的因素。交互式数学课堂教学的基本要素有两种:主体要素和客体要素。其中主体要素包括教师和学生,客体要素包括数学教学内容、数学课堂教学过程中的即时信息、数学课堂中的缄默知识和数学课堂教学的物质条件。

  7. Using Conversation Analysis in the Second Language Classroom to Teach Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of conversation analysis (CA) to help teaching interactional competence in English to adult second language learners from lower to intermediate levels. To set the context, this article gives a brief overview on the use of CA in second language research as well as considering the construct of interactional competence…

  8. A Voice-Activated, Interactive Videodisc Case Study for Use in the Medical School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, William G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Technological Innovations in Medical Education (TIME) Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is exploring the use of interactive videodisc, microcomputer, and voice recognition technology to create interactive case studies of simulated patients to train second-year medical students in the introduction to…

  9. Using Conversation Analysis in the Second Language Classroom to Teach Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of conversation analysis (CA) to help teaching interactional competence in English to adult second language learners from lower to intermediate levels. To set the context, this article gives a brief overview on the use of CA in second language research as well as considering the construct of interactional competence…

  10. Sexual Identity as Linguistic Failure: Trajectories of Interaction in the Heteronormative Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines interactions from tertiary-level foreign languages classes in which students challenge the heteronormative construction of their sexual identity. These interactions are triggered by questions that potentially reference students' real-world identities but which attribute a heteronormative identity to the questions' recipients.…

  11. A Voice-Activated, Interactive Videodisc Case Study for Use in the Medical School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, William G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Technological Innovations in Medical Education (TIME) Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is exploring the use of interactive videodisc, microcomputer, and voice recognition technology to create interactive case studies of simulated patients to train second-year medical students in the introduction to…

  12. Laptops in Classroom Interaction: The Dynamic Reach of the Laptoped Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, Tomas; Lundin, Johan; Svensson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Laptops and other networked technologies are commonplace at university campuses. While a range of studies researches the negative effects of multitasking, screenpeeking and other laptop related side effects this article emphasize the situational impact of student-laptop interaction. Departing from Goffman's framework on unfocused interaction and…

  13. Promoting Positive Interactions in the Classroom: Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a Universal Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Rachel A.; Lyon, Aaron R.; Budd, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    The adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), an empirically-supported dyadic parent training intervention, to a preschool setting may provide an opportunity to enhance the well-being of both teachers and children by improving the teacher-child relationship and supplying teachers with effective tools for behavior management. The…

  14. Purification and Preparation of Rebaudioside A from Steviol Glycosides Using One-Dimensional Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Li, Rong; Chen, Xiaohui; Yang, Sai; Li, Shuguang; Yang, Kaidi; Chen, Guoliang; Ma, Xiaoxun

    2016-09-01

    A method for purifying and preparing rebaudioside A (RA) from steviol glycosides at preparative scale was developed with resin based on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). In pure water and acetone-water system, the adsorption capacity and selectivity of five anion resins for RA, rebaudioside C (RC) and stevioside (ST) were examined and discussed. Strongly basic IRA458 with the quaternary amine group was chosen as the resin used for separating and preparing RA. The hydroxide form of IRA458 (IRA458-OH) showed the best results in terms of the adsorption behaviors for RA, RC and ST. The retentions of RA, RC and ST on IRA458-OH resin at high concentration of acetone solution followed HILIC mode, in which retention is probably based on surface adsorption of the resin. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, the pooled purity and yield of RA were up to 98.18 and 98.62%, the relative standard deviations (n = 3) for these two parameters were 1.2 and 5.7%, respectively. The present method has the characteristics of simple, low cost, high purity and high yield. The study will be a promising tool for RA industrialized production and also provides a possible mode for purifying and preparing polar components from their analogs.

  15. Addressing Iraqi EFL Teacher/Learner Discourse Interactions in Task-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Bushra Ni'ma

    2014-01-01

    Teaching English in an EFL context involves certain difficulties. The most important is how to prepare learners to use the English language so as to be able to participate in conversations inside and outside the class. Six classes at intermediate level (nine hours) were video and audio-taped in their entirety. The study explored recurring patterns…

  16. Study on the effect of electrostatic interaction on core-shell nanoparticles preparation with microemulsion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiaoxiao; WANG Kemin; TAN Weihong; CHEN Jiyun; DUAN Jinghua; YUAN Yin; LIN Xia

    2005-01-01

    The routine method for preparation of silica core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) is to carry out nucleation and shell coating through the hydrolysis of silane in water in oil (W/O) microemulsion to form three-dimensional netted silica shell. We found that electrostatic interaction of the core materials with shell materials would determine whether the stable core-shell silica NPs formed or not. The traditional important factors such as molecular weight of core materials or the thickness of the shell have no obvious relationship with it. And the stability of the core-shell silica NPs can be improved after changing the electric charge polarity by regulating the experiment condition of relevant materials if some core materials cannot be doped inside to form the stable core-shell silica NPs based on the traditional method, which provided experimental and theoretic foundation for preparation and application of the core-shell silica NPs.

  17. Students' meaning making in classroom discussions: the importance of peer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudsberg, Karin; Östman, Leif; Aaro Östman, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    The aim is to investigate how encounters with peers affect an individual's meaning making in argumentation about socio-scientific issues, and how the individual's meaning making influences the argumentation at the collective level. The analysis is conducted using the analytical method "transactional argumentation analysis" (TAA) which enables in situ studies. TAA combines a transactional perspective on meaning making based on John Dewey's pragmatic philosophy with an argument analysis based on Toulmin's argument pattern. Here TAA is developed further to enable analysis that in detail clarifies the dynamic interplay between the individual and the collective—the intra- and the inter-personal dimensions—and the result of this interplay in terms of meaning making and learning. The empirical material in this study consists of a video-recorded lesson in a Swedish upper secondary school. The results show that the analysed student is influenced by peers when construing arguments, and thereby acts on others' reasoning when making meaning. Further, the results show that most of the additions made by the analysed student are taken further by peers in the subsequent discussion. This study shows how an individual's earlier experiences, knowledge and thinking contribute to the collective meaning making in the classroom.

  18. Students' meaning making in classroom discussions: the importance of peer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudsberg, Karin; Östman, Leif; Aaro Östman, Elisabeth

    2016-07-01

    The aim is to investigate how encounters with peers affect an individual's meaning making in argumentation about socio-scientific issues, and how the individual's meaning making influences the argumentation at the collective level. The analysis is conducted using the analytical method "transactional argumentation analysis" (TAA) which enables in situ studies. TAA combines a transactional perspective on meaning making based on John Dewey's pragmatic philosophy with an argument analysis based on Toulmin's argument pattern. Here TAA is developed further to enable analysis that in detail clarifies the dynamic interplay between the individual and the collective—the intra- and the inter-personal dimensions—and the result of this interplay in terms of meaning making and learning. The empirical material in this study consists of a video-recorded lesson in a Swedish upper secondary school. The results show that the analysed student is influenced by peers when construing arguments, and thereby acts on others' reasoning when making meaning. Further, the results show that most of the additions made by the analysed student are taken further by peers in the subsequent discussion. This study shows how an individual's earlier experiences, knowledge and thinking contribute to the collective meaning making in the classroom.

  19. Interaction Activities in the Foreign Classroom, or How to Grow a Tulip-Rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulston, Christina Bratt; Selekman, Howard R.

    1976-01-01

    A report is made on the use of foreign language for spontaneous communication in an elementary language class. Four correction-free, peer communicative/interaction activities are outlined according to procedures, objectives, and evaluations. (Author/RM)

  20. ORAL INTERACTION AROUND COMPUTERS IN THE PROJECT-ORIENTED CALL CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gumock Jeon-Ellis

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Language teachers need to provide students with a context for genuine communication (Sullivan, 2000. Project-oriented computer-assisted language learning (PrOCALL attempts to achieve this by orienting learners towards tasks, which encourages them to communicate in the target language while working towards completion of a project (Debski, 2000. The study investigates the oral interaction that takes place in this context. According to Vygotsky, social interaction mediates cognitive development. Swain's (2000 application of this concept to language learning suggests that collaborative dialogues mirror the moments of language development. Using this framework, the present study identifies "language related episodes" (Swain & Lapkin, 1998 and describes the characteristics of the oral interaction generated by two small groups of French learners working towards the completion of Web pages in a major Australian university. The study also describes instances of "triadic interaction" (van Lier, 2002 involving learners' interactions with each other and with the computer screen. In sum, the analysis suggests that the PrOCALL context can provide students with opportunities for collaborative dialogues, through which language learning occurs. However, the social context of these interactions is mediated by personal relationships, preferences, and motivations.

  1. Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management…

  2. The curious case of zeolite-clay/binder interactions and their consequences for catalyst preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Gareth T.; Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Oord, R. van; Paalanen, Pasi; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolite-based catalyst bodies are commonly employed in a range of important industrial processes. Depending on the binder and shaping method chosen, vast differences in the reactivity, selectivity and stability are obtained. Here, three highly complementary micro-spectroscopic techniques were employed to study zeolite ZSM-5-binder interactions in SiO2-, Al2O3-, SiO2 : Al2O3- (2 : 1 mix) and kaolinite-bound catalyst pellets. We establish how their preparation influences the zeolite-clay/binder...

  3. 交互课堂量化评优模型构建及应用%Modeling and Application of Quantitative Evaluation in the Interactive Classroom Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈莉; 冯林; 张松; 张养力

    2015-01-01

    Classroom evaluation is the eternal subject of teaching research. And interactive teaching is the core of the future classroom. The objective evaluation of interactive classroom teaching helps to promote the teaching effect. At present, the research on quantitative evaluation based on data mining were mainly in the university and rarely in the elementary education. The elementary education classroom evaluation depended on either specialists with evaluation index or teachers with observing formula, which is subjective and limited in a certain degree. The research on tools which used in the interactive classroom evaluation could promote the equal teaching competition, the professional development of teachers and the improvement of classroom teaching effect. Furthermore, it could mine the key interactive features during teaching. This quantitative appraising model, based on the interactive whiteboard classroom teaching, used the k-means algorithm to cluster the first prize works in the national primary and secondary schools interactive whiteboard classroom teaching competition into several categories and the cluster-centers and unknown-level classroom records were used to do the correlation analysis. If they are similar, it can be inferred that the unknown-level records were excellent too. The results showed that this model was effective, and it was more convincing than the traditional method in comparing one non-excellent classroom record with another one.%课堂评价是教学研究的永恒主题,教学交互是未来课堂的核心,客观评价课堂教学交互有助于掌握课堂教学质量和效果。当前采用数据挖掘技术对课堂进行量化评价的研究主要集中在高等学校,基础教育的课堂量化评价要么由专家借助评价指标完成,要么由教师观察师生课堂言语行为凭借公式判断,这些都有一定主观性和局限性。交互课堂教学评优工具的研究既可以促进平等教学竞争和教师

  4. Sharing not staring 21 interactive whiteboard lessons for the English classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Millum, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Sharing not Staring steers teachers towards using the interactive whiteboard in ways which purposefully tap into its huge potential to make teaching more interactive, more exciting, more creative and enjoyable.The approaches described in this updated and highly practical new edition fall into the following broad categories: Spotlight and word cover/reveal effects - having the impact of a puzzle which emphasises the question as opposed to a standard answer Text Organisation - enabling sequencing and exploration of syntax PowerPoint - exploiting the creative potential of

  5. The Implementation of A Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BASAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one group of educators exploring the flipped classroom. In foreign language classes, such an approach may offer great benefits for both the teachers and students since classroom time can be applied to more interactive tasks. By extending classroom hours in this way, language teachers can focus on successfully addressing all subjects in the curriculum. The aim of this study is (a to gain insights into the perceptions of prospective English language teachers at a state university in Turkey on flipped classrooms and (b to introduce the implementation of a flipped classroom into an English language class. A total of 47 prospective English teachers participated in the study. Qualitative research design was used and data were collected via an open-ended question. Findings of the study indicated that pre-service English teachers had positive perceptions towards the use of the flipped classroom as an integral part of face-to-face courses. It can be concluded that flipped classroom was beneficial in terms of 4 categories based on the content analysis of the responses: learning at one’s own pace, advance student preparation, overcoming the limitations of class time, increasing the participation in the classroom. The study also provides recommendations towards LMS integration into courses in other English language teaching departments and for implementing flipped classrooms in language teaching.

  6. Complexation of chitosan with surfactant like ionic liquids: molecular interactions and preparation of chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Singh, Tejwant; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-10-01

    Interactions and behavior of chitosan (Ch) with surface active ionic liquids (ILs)- 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octylsulfate, [C4mim][C8OSO3] or 3-methyl-1-octylimidazolium chloride, [C8mim][Cl]-have been probed at the air solution interface and in the bulk in aqueous media at pH 3.0 using a multi-technique approach, viz. tensiometry, conductometry, turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). At the interface, a strong complexation is observed in Ch-[C4mim][C8OSO3] system. Bulk [C4mim][C8OSO3] interacts with Ch to form Ch-[C4mim][C8OSO3] complexes which precipitate out at higher IL concentrations, whereas comparatively weaker Ch-[C8mim][Cl] complexes remain solubilized in the solution. DLS measurements showed that the Ch chains contract before the cmc and expands after the cmc upon interaction with both the ILs. Interaction of ILs with Ch resulted in facile preparation of uniformly distributed Ch nanoparticles with good sphericity and control which have been verified using DLS, SEM, AFM, and fluorescence microscopy. The present study provides an understanding of forces governing the complexation behavior of Ch with surface active ILs and their efficacy to produce Ch nanoparticles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Turkish Students' and Teachers' Attitudes toward the Use of Interactive Whiteboards in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews-Aydinli, Julie; Elaziz, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes of students and teachers toward the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in a foreign language teaching and learning context. The study also investigated possible factors affecting teachers' and students' attitudes toward IWB technology. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to 458 students and…

  8. Investigating interactional competence using video recordings in ESL classrooms to enhance communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Hariharan N.

    2016-08-01

    Interactional competence, or knowing and using the appropriate skills for interaction in various communication situations within a given speech community and culture is important in the field of business and professional communication [1], [2]. Similar to many developing countries in the world, Malaysia is a growing economy and undergraduates will have to acquire appropriate communication skills. In this study, two aspects of the interactional communicative competence were investigated, that is the linguistic and paralinguistic behaviors in small group communication as well as conflict management in small group communication. Two groups of student participants were given a problem-solving task based on a letter of complaint. The two groups of students were video recorded during class hours for 40 minutes. The videos and transcription of the group discussions were analyzed to examine the use of language and interaction in small groups. The analysis, findings and interpretations were verified with three lecturers in the field of communication. The results showed that students were able to accomplish the given task using verbal and nonverbal communication. However, participation was unevenly distributed with two students talking for less than a minute. Negotiation was based more on alternative views and consensus was easily achieved. In concluding, suggestions are given on ways to improve English language communication.

  9. Building Interactional Space in an ESL Classroom to Foster Bilingual Identity and Linguistic Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Irene

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data from a yearlong case study of a Mexican American ESL teacher's practice in a K-5 school in the southeastern United States. The study examines how the teacher established bilingual interactional space in her ESL pullout class consisting of six 9- to 11-year old students of Mexican descent. The analysis shows the ways in…

  10. Making Learning Active with Interactive Whiteboards, Podcasts, and Digital Storytelling in ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jung Won; Suh, Suhyun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effective ways to integrate an interactive whiteboard, podcast, and digital storytelling for language proficiency development in English language learners. Researchers integrated these three technologies into a 60-hour intensive summer English program and investigated their impacts on student vocabulary…

  11. Smartphone Response System Using Twitter to Enable Effective Interaction and Improve Engagement in Large Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeongjun; Jeong, Soonmook; Ji, Yongwoon; Lee, Sangeun; Kwon, Key Ho; Jeon, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for seamless interaction between students and their professor using Twitter, one of the typical social network service (SNS) platforms, in large lectures. During the lecture, the professor poses surprise questions in the form of a quiz on an overhead screen at unexpected moments, and students submit their answers…

  12. Corrective Feedback Episodes in Oral Interaction: A Comparison of a CLIL and an EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Ruth; García Mayo, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of corrective feedback (CF), a topic widely investigated in the last few decades (Sheen, 2011), and instructional context. We observed and recorded the oral interaction of an intact class of thirty Spanish intermediate-level high-school learners and two teachers in two settings: a traditional form-oriented English as…

  13. Interactive Problem-Solving Geography: An Introduction in Chinese Classrooms to Locational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Nu Nu; Giles, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Reform in geography education, as reflected in "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards" (1994) for the U.S.A., favors a constructivist approach to learning. This study examines the acceptance of this approach among students in two upper secondary schools in China. A lesson was developed to illustrate interactive problem solving methods.…

  14. Preparing for communication interactions: the value of anticipatory strategies for adults with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, N

    1992-04-01

    Some people with hearing impairment may use anticipatory strategies to prepare for an upcoming communication interaction, such as a doctor's appointment. They may consider vocabulary and statements that might occur, and they may practice speechreading a partner saying the items. Experiment 1 evaluated the effectiveness of two types of anticipatory strategies: workbook activities and situation-specific lipreading practice. Two groups of normal-hearing subjects were asked to prepare for a communication interaction in a bank setting where they would be required to recognize speech using only the visual signal. Each group was assigned to one type of anticipatory strategy. A third group served as a control group. Experiment 2 evaluated whether multifaceted anticipatory practice improved cochlear implant users' ability to recognize statements and words audiovisually that might occur in a doctor's office, bank, movie theater, and gas station. One group of implanted subjects received 4 days of training, 1 day for each setting, and a second group served as a control group. In both experiments, subjects who used anticipatory strategies did not improve their performance on situation-specific sentence tests more than the control subjects.

  15. Las dinámicas interactivas en el ámbito universitario: el clima de aula / The interactive dynamics in the university context: the classroom environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulay Pereira Pérez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recibido 28 de julio de 2009 • Aceptado 02 de diciembre de 2009 • Corregido 20 de marzo de 2010   Resumen. Las relaciones interpersonales en el ámbito humano cobran vital sentido desde el nacimiento y se van conformando en los procesos de interacción y socialización. El contexto educativo no está exento de procesos comunicativos e interactivos. Es en el aula de clase, donde, de manera más específica, se pueden identificar dichos procesos. El aula puede ser entendida como el espacio físico-humano, en el cual se desarrollan dinámicas a partir de las interacciones entre el profesorado y el grupo estudiantil, los contenidos, las estrategias de aprendizaje y el clima de aula que de ello se genera; aspectos todos, que como parte de los procesos de enseñanza y de aprendizaje están presentes en el ámbito de la clase. Es interesante analizar el clima de aula y las dinámicas interactivas que en ella se desarrollan, independientemente de la edad del estudiante –ya sea que se trate de infantes, adolescentes o adultos–. En este caso particular, se analiza el clima de aula en el ámbito universitario, entendiendo que las dinámicas interactivas que en el aula se desarrollen, determinan un ambiente propicio o no, para el proceso de enseñanza y de aprendizaje, que ha de ser considerado, si se opta por una educación integral y de calidad.  Abstract. Interpersonal relationships in human communities gained a great value since the begging of mankind, these relationships are constructed on interaction and socialization. The educational context is not exempt of these interactive and communicative processes, and it is specifically in the classroom where they can be found. The classroom can be identified as a physical and a humane space, in which dynamics are developed from the interactions between teachers and students, learning content, learning strategies and the class environment. All of these aspects are presented in the classroom as part

  16. Exploring classroom feedback interactions around EAP writing : a data based model

    OpenAIRE

    Unlu, Zuleyha; Wharton, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on case study research in the grounded theory tradition. In this paper we describe and theorise feedback interactions on EAP writing which were observed in classes in our institution. Working from detailed descriptions of feedback incidents and from interviews with teachers and students, we theorise a series of teacher and student actions. We argue that combinations of these actions are both reflective and constitutive of patterns of teacher-student relationships in the cl...

  17. The curious case of zeolite-clay/binder interactions and their consequences for catalyst preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Gareth T; Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Oord, Ramon; Paalanen, Pasi; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-07-04

    Zeolite-based catalyst bodies are commonly employed in a range of important industrial processes. Depending on the binder and shaping method chosen, vast differences in the reactivity, selectivity and stability are obtained. Here, three highly complementary micro-spectroscopic techniques were employed to study zeolite ZSM-5-binder interactions in SiO2-, Al2O3-, SiO2 : Al2O3- (2 : 1 mix) and kaolinite-bound catalyst pellets. We establish how their preparation influences the zeolite-clay/binder interactions. Using thiophene as an acid-catalyzed staining reaction, light absorbing oligomers produced in each sample were followed. To our surprise, kaolinite decreased the overall reactivity of the sample due to the phase change of the binder, creating a hard impenetrable outer layer. Aluminum migration to the zeolite was observed when Al2O3 was selected as a binder, creating additional Brønsted acid sites, which favored the formation of ring-opened thiophene oligomers compared to the larger oligomer species produced when SiO2 was used as a binder. In the latter case, the interaction of the Si-OH groups in the binder with thiophene was revealed to have a large impact in creating such large oligomer species. Furthermore, the combination of a SiO2 : Al2O3 mix as a binder enhanced the reactivity, possibly due to the creation of additional Brønsted acid sites between the two binder components during pellet preparation. It is evident that, independent of the shaping method, the intimate contact between the zeolite and binder heavily impacts the reactivity and product selectivity, with the type of binder playing a vital role.

  18. 大学英语教学中的课堂互动%Classroom Interaction in College English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严瑞清

    2010-01-01

    随着我国改革开放政策的实施以及与其他国家交流的增多,英语越来越重要,需要更多的具有高水平英语口的人才,由于我国传统英语教学方式的影响,我国大学生的英语口语水平低.基于第二语言习得理论,大学英语教师采取有效的教学方法即课堂互动来提高学生的英语口水平.%With the Reform and Open policy of our country and the frequent communication with other countries, English is becoming more and more important, and people with higher level of spoken English are needed, however, influenced by the traditional teaching methods, our college students do not have such abilities, their speaking ability is very weak, which urgently demands the college English teachers improve the students' speaking ability. Classroom interaction can be an effective method to improve their spoken English based on the theories of second language acquisition.

  19. POLYMER/MONTMORILLONITE COMPLEXES:PREPARATION AND INTERACTIONS WITH ROSIN ACID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Zhao; Wenxia Liu

    2004-01-01

    Polymer/montmorillonite complexes were prepared via intercalating polymers of low molecular weight into layers of montmorillonite and evaluated for their interactions with rosin acid. Three polymers from various amines modified by epichlorohydrin and an acidified diethylenetriamine were separately intercalated into montmorillonite via direct solution intercalation. X-ray diffraction patterns are performed to obtain information about the intercalation of these agents. The examination revealed that it was feasible for the direct intercalation of polymers, while hard for the unmodified diethylenetriamine. Adsorption isotherm curves were established to assess the efficiency of the various montmorillonites including the intercalated montmorillonites, the simple mixtures of the corresponding intercalation agents and ordinary montmorillonite in removing pitch from water solution. From the adsorption behavior of various samples, it was found that the interaction of the montmorillonite with pitch was not only through van der Waals attraction, but also through electrostatic interactions. Both the organo-philic and the surface electrostatic properties of the montmorillonites are important for successful pitch control.

  20. Effective questioning--the key of university English classroom interaction%有效提问--大学英语课堂互动的关键

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张书红; 崔伟丽

    2013-01-01

    Interaction is the key of university English classroom communication, collaboration, learning process in new period. Effective interaction depends largely on the effect of question. The paper from the classroom question, to analyze the strategies and skills on how to conduct effective questioning in university English classroom, I hope to provide advice and help to carry out active and effective interaction between teachers and students.%  互动是新时期大学英语课堂交流、合作、学习过程的关键。积极有效的互动在很大程度上取决于提问的效果。本方从课堂提问入手,分析了在大学英语课堂如何进行有效提问的策略和技巧,希望对师生间开展积极有效的互动提供建议和帮助。

  1. The effect of vocal music in the classroom interactive teaching and its implementation strategy%声乐课堂中互动教学的作用及其实现策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙树敏

    2014-01-01

    This paper first analyzes the interactive teaching in vocal music classroom research value and significance, and then discussed the role of vocal music in the classroom interaction teaching, final y focuses on vocal music classroom interactive teaching in the implementation of the strategy. The research achievements of this paper would be implemented on the teaching of vocal music in the classroom interaction is of great significance.%本文首先分析了声乐课堂中互动教学的研究价值和意义,然后讨论了声乐课堂中互动教学的作用,最后重点研究了声乐课堂中互动教学的实现策略。本文的研究成果将会对声乐课堂中互动教学的实施具有重要意义。

  2. Student Performance in a Pharmacotherapy Oncology Module Before and After Flipping the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossaer, John B; Panus, Peter; Stewart, David W; Hagemeier, Nick E; George, Joshua

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To determine if a flipped classroom improved student examination performance in a pharmacotherapy oncology module. Design. Third-year pharmacy students in 2012 experienced the oncology module as interactive lectures with optional case studies as supplemental homework. In 2013, students experienced the same content in a primarily flipped classroom. Students were instructed to watch vodcasts (video podcasts) before in-class case studies but were not held accountable (ie, quizzed) for preclass preparation. Examination questions were identical in both cohorts. Performance on examination questions was compared between the two cohorts using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with prior academic performance variables (grade point average [GPA]) as covariates. Assessment. The students who experienced the flipped classroom approach performed poorer on examination questions than the cohort who experienced interactive lecture, with previous GPA used as a covariate. Conclusion. A flipped classroom does not necessarily improve student performance. Further research is needed to determine optimal classroom flipping techniques.

  3. Study on the interaction between bovine serum albumin and starch nanoparticles prepared by isoamylolysis and recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Na; Qiu, Chao; Li, Xiaojing; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-04-01

    The current study primarily investigated the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with starch nanoparticles (SNPs) prepared by isoamylolysis and recrystallization using UV-vis, fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD). The enhanced absorbance observed by UV-vis spectroscopy and decreased intensity of fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that BSA could bind to SNPs and form a BSA-SNP complex. The synchronous fluorescence spectra revealed that the emission maximum of Tyr residue (at Δλ=15nm) was red-shifted at the investigated concentrations range, indicating that the conformation of BSA was changed. Quenching parameters showed that the quenching effect of SNPs was static quenching. TEM images showed that the SNPs were surrounded by protein coronae, indicating that nanoparticle-protein complexes had formed. The FTIR and CD characterization indicated that the SNPs induced structural changes in the secondary structure of BSA.

  4. Enhancing Student Learning in and out of the Classroom with Electronic Teaching and Study Aids Built Around Interactive Groundwater Visualization Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, W.; McKillip, M.; Li, S.

    2003-12-01

    Advances in electronic resources allow more realistic student problems, increased student engagement and self learning, and the use of interactive, exploratory learning. We are using a sophisticated yet easy-to-use groundwater modeling and visualization program (Interactive Groundwater, IGW, Li and Liu: www.egr.msu.edu/ ˜lishug/research/igw) to build packages of innovative tools for instructors and students. Equipped with an advanced graphical interface, IGW allows interactive visualization and manipulation of complex, multidimensional subsurface systems including hydrology, contaminant transport and assessment of contaminated sites. Two principle product packages are the Graphical Teaching Aid (GTA) and the Student Learning Exercise (SLE), developed as part of the NSF-supported Virtual Interactive Remediation in the Groundwater Environment (VIRGE). A GTA is a classroom-presentation guide that includes text materials for the instructor as well as supporting electronic IGW files for interactive graphical demonstrations and discussions in the classroom. Text files include a conceptual outline and a list of principles to be examined in the lecture as well as a flexible script punctuated and illustrated throughout by use of IGW as a highly interactive "electronic chalkboard". The thorough text guides the instructor in the effective use of IGW, suggests ideas to engage student interaction, and provides ways to tailor the interactive presentation to student needs. An SLE complements the GTA as an interactive exercise to engage students in discovery learning. As with GTAs, SLEs are designed for specific levels of classes (undergraduate or graduate) and specific populations (non-technical, science, or engineering majors). Text files (background and instruction) and IGW files (for problem visualization, interactive manipulation and solution) are provided. The SLEs include interactive computer-based exercises ranging from introductory investigations to extensive, open

  5. Interactions between alpha-latrotoxin and trivalent cations in rat striatal synaptosomal preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheer, H.W.

    1989-05-01

    The interactions between alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-LTx), a neurosecretagogue purified from the venom of the black widow spider, and the trivalent cations Al3+, Y3+, La3+, Gd3+, and Yb3+ were investigated in rat striatal synaptosomal preparations. All trivalent cations tested were inhibitors of alpha-LTx-induced (/sup 3/H)dopamine ((/sup 3/H)DA) release (order of potency: Yb3+ greater than Gd3+ approximately Y3+ greater than La3+ greater than Al3+). Only with Al3+ could inhibition of (/sup 3/H)DA release be attributed to a block of /sup 125/I-alpha-LTx specific binding to synaptosomal preparations. The inhibitory effect of trivalent ions was reversible provided synaptosomes were washed with buffer containing EDTA. Trivalent ions also inhibited alpha-LTx-induced (/sup 3/H)DA release at times when alpha-LTx-stimulated release was already evident. alpha-LTx-induced synaptosomal membrane depolarization was blocked by La3+, but not affected by Gd3+, Y3+, and Yb3+. alpha-LTx-stimulated uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ was inhibited by all trivalent cations tested. These results demonstrate that there exist at least three means by which trivalent cations can inhibit alpha-LTx action in rat striatal synaptosomal preparations: (1) inhibition of alpha-LTx binding (Al3+); (2) inhibition of alpha-LTx-induced depolarization (La3+); and (3) inhibition of alpha-LTx-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake (Gd3+, Y3+, Yb3+, La3+).

  6. Perspectives of Preservice and In-Service Teachers on Their Preparation to Work with Parents in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Zafer; Unal, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines preservice and in-service teachers' perspectives on their preparation in learning parental involvement strategies and explores their opinions on what kind of experiences regarding parental involvement they think teacher education programs should provide. The data from the study suggested that the preservice teachers held…

  7. Reconceptualizing Teacher Preparation for Inclusive Classrooms: A Description of the Dual License Program at the University of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Elizabeth B.; Rossi, Pamela J.; de Valenzuela, J. S.; Howarth, Sam

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the Dual License Teacher Preparation Program at the University of New Mexico and the national and state context within which it was developed and continues to evolve. Graduates of the program are eligible for licensure in general education (K-8) and special education (K-12). Teacher collaboration is highlighted. (Contains…

  8. A facile drug delivery system preparation through the interaction between drug and iron ion of transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lin [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Liu, Jihua [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Wei, Shaohua; Ge, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jiahong, E-mail: zhoujiahong@njnu.edu.cn [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yu, Boyang, E-mail: boyangyu59@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Shen, Jian [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China)

    2013-09-15

    Many anticancer drugs have the capability to form stable complex with metal ions. Based on such property, a simple method to combine these drugs with transferrin, through the interaction between drug and Fe ion of transferrin, to improve their anticancer activity, is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, the complex of photosensitive anticancer drug hypocrellin A and transferrin was prepared by such facile method. The results indicated that the complex of hypocrellin A and transferrin can stabilize in aqueous solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated the superior cancer cell uptake ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin complex to the free hypocrellin A. Significant damage to such drug-impregnated tumor cells was observed upon irradiation and the cancer cells killing ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin was stronger than the free hypocrellin A within a certain range of concentrations. The above results demonstrated the validity and potential of our proposed strategy to prepare the drug delivery system of this type of anti-cancer drugs and transferrin.

  9. Preparing for Interaction : A comparative study on the different ways dutch actors prepare themself to work in the comprehensive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thönissen, F.H.; Homberg, M.J.C. van den; Pieneman, R.B.J.; Rjetjens, B.; Berg, P. van den

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an overview on how Dutch military and civilian professionals prepare themselves for a comprehensive approach in conflict-affected areas. What works for the different actors and what can be improved? The study addresses these and other questions.

  10. Teaching Freshmen About Water, Energy, Food, the Environment, and Public Policy in an Interactive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. C.; Abarca, S.; Bollinger, T.; Cox, S.; Engel, D.; Miranda, E.; Pelkey, S.; Shaffer, M.; Taylor, J.; VanSomeren, C.; Yoerg, A.; Jeffries, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Opportunities and tradeoffs related to water, energy, food, and the environment will be of critical concern for the next generatiion of people on Earth. Better future decisions are likely if those who are now students explore these issues from scientific and multicultural approaches using cross-cutting concepts. In the Fall of 2015 at the University of Kansas, this topic is the focus of one of the Freshman Honors courses. These courses bring 10 freshmen from different backgrounds together to develop skills in discussion, understanding different viewpoints, researching a focused topic, and expression through read and writing. The course coordinator is a specialist in the very nerdy field of numerical simulation of environmental systems. Invited speakers will come from, for example, the KU Law School and the English Department. A Policy Conference with adversarial and collaborative role playing will be conducted toward the end of the class. The roles played will include politicians, scientists, and native Americans. A poster will be developed for presentation at a KU Symposium and AGU, which will hopefully (at the discretion of the students) provide an interactive experience for the audience. Please come see how the class turned out and provide discussion and suggestions.

  11. Biological Processes that Prepare Mammalian Spermatozoa to Interact with an Egg and Fertilize It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daulat R. P. Tulsiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mouse and other mammals studied, including man, ejaculated spermatozoa cannot immediately fertilize an egg. They require a certain period of residence in the female genital tract to become functionally competent cells. As spermatozoa traverse through the female genital tract, they undergo multiple biochemical and physiological changes collectively referred to as capacitation. Only capacitated spermatozoa interact with the extracellular egg coat, the zona pellucida. The tight irreversible binding of the opposite gametes triggers a Ca2+-dependent signal transduction cascade. The net result is the fusion of the sperm plasma membrane and the underlying outer acrosomal membrane at multiple sites that causes the release of acrosomal contents at the site of sperm-egg adhesion. The hydrolytic action of the acrosomal enzymes released, along with the hyperactivated beat pattern of the bound spermatozoon, is important factor that directs the sperm to penetrate the egg coat and fertilize the egg. The sperm capacitation and the induction of the acrosomal reaction are Ca2+-dependent signaling events that have been of wide interest to reproductive biologists for over half a century. In this paper, we intend to discuss data from this and other laboratories that highlight the biological processes which prepare spermatozoa to interact with an egg and fertilize it.

  12. Colocalization and interaction between elongasome and divisome during a preparative cell division phase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, René; Verheul, Jolanda; Vischer, Norbert O E; Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Banzhaf, Manuel; Vollmer, Waldemar; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2013-03-01

    The rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli grows by insertion of peptidoglycan into the lateral wall during cell elongation and synthesis of new poles during cell division. The monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3 are part of specialized protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively, which catalyse peptidoglycan extension and maturation. Endogenous immunolabelled PBP2 localized in the cylindrical part of the cell as well as transiently at midcell. Using the novel image analysis tool Coli-Inspector to analyse protein localization as function of the bacterial cell age, we compared PBP2 localization with that of other E. coli cell elongation and division proteins including PBP3. Interestingly, the midcell localization of the two transpeptidases overlaps in time during the early period of divisome maturation. Försters Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) experiments revealed an interaction between PBP2 and PBP3 when both are present at midcell. A decrease in the midcell diameter is visible after 40% of the division cycle indicating that the onset of new cell pole synthesis starts much earlier than previously identified by visual inspection. The data support a new model of the division cycle in which the elongasome and divisome interact to prepare for cell division.

  13. Attitudes of Saudi Arabian secondary preservice teachers toward teaching practices in science: The adequacy of preparation to use teaching strategies in classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabber, Jabber M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of Saudi Arabian secondary preservice science teachers (SPSTs) toward a variety of science teaching practices. An ultimate, essential goal of this study was to use generated information and findings to improve the current secondary science education programs in Saudi Arabia and to develop better science teacher practices. The selected practices were posted by the National Research Council in 1999. These indicated that students learn science best through understanding of science rather than memorization of scientific facts and concepts, building new knowledge and understanding on what is already known and believed, formulating new knowledge by modifying and refining current concepts and by adding new concepts to what is already known, taking care of their own learning, social learning environments and interactions, and application of knowledge to novel situations. The study's sample consisted of all (147) SPSTs enrolled in the spring semester of 2003 in four Teachers' Colleges: Riyadh, Makkah, Taif, and Dammam. All participants were performing student teaching in secondary schools. This study used quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Only three SPSTs were purposefully selected from each college for seven semi-structured interview questions, lasting an hour per interview. They were asked to complete a 58-item questionnaire survey and respond to four open-ended survey questions. To assess their attitudes toward the above science teaching practices, data was analyzed using the Rasch analysis model, other parametric tests (e.g., a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and independent-samples t-test), and non-parametric tests (e.g., a chi-square of independent test). Furthermore, qualitative procedures were also used to assess SPSTs' views of some specific aspects about science teaching and the current secondary science education programs in Saudi Arabia. This was achieved through a careful

  14. Advancing "Media Arts" Education in "Visual Arts" Classrooms: Addressing Policy Ambiguities and Gaps in Art Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bequette, James W.; Brennan, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, arts policymakers in Minnesota have positioned "media arts"--defined as the "study and practice of examining human communication through photography, film or video, audio, computer or digital arts, and interactive media"--within the realm of aesthetic education and considered it one of six arts areas. This article explores the…

  15. Advancing "Media Arts" Education in "Visual Arts" Classrooms: Addressing Policy Ambiguities and Gaps in Art Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bequette, James W.; Brennan, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, arts policymakers in Minnesota have positioned "media arts"--defined as the "study and practice of examining human communication through photography, film or video, audio, computer or digital arts, and interactive media"--within the realm of aesthetic education and considered it one of six arts areas. This…

  16. Chromatographic preparation and kinetic analysis of interactions between tabun enantiomers and acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenberken, O; Thiermann, H; Worek, F; Reiter, G

    2010-06-02

    The easy accessibility to highly toxic OP (organophosphorus)-type chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) underlines the necessity for an effective medical treatment. Acute OP toxicity is primarily caused by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7). Reactivators (oximes) of inhibited AChE are a mainstay of treatment. However, the commercially available compounds, obidoxime and pralidoxime, are considered rather ineffective against various nerve agents, including tabun. OP-type chemical warfare agents include an asymmetrical P-atom and consist of at least two stereoisomers. Previous studies with the nerve agents sarin and soman showed marked differences between (-)- and (+)-P isomers regarding AChE inhibition and stability in biological matrices. Hence, stereoselectivity is a key parameter for the development of optimized treatment. In the present study, the tabun enantiomers were isolated by semi-preparative liquid-chromatography (LC) with offline analysis by GC-PCI-MS and final characterization of optical purity (99.98% (-)-tabun and 99.83% (+)-tabun) and specific optical rotation. The inhibition and reactivation kinetics of the tabun enantiomers were determined with human and swine AChE and the aging kinetics with human AChE. The results show a large difference in the inhibitory potency between (-)- and (+)-tabun. The determination of reactivation and aging kinetics indicates that both reactions are at least in part determined by the residual (-)-tabun contamination (0.17%) of the (+)-tabun preparation. These data provide further insight into the kinetic interactions between tabun enantiomers and AChE and may contribute to the development of more effective treatment options.

  17. A New Way of Using the Interactive Whiteboard in a High School Physics Classroom: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorcic, Bor; Etkina, Eugenia; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2017-02-01

    In recent decades, the interactive whiteboard (IWB) has become a relatively common educational tool in Western schools. The IWB is essentially a large touch screen, that enables the user to interact with digital content in ways that are not possible with an ordinary computer-projector-canvas setup. However, the unique possibilities of IWBs are rarely leveraged to enhance teaching and learning beyond the primary school level. This is particularly noticeable in high school physics. We describe how a high school physics teacher learned to use an IWB in a new way, how she planned and implemented a lesson on the topic of orbital motion of planets, and what tensions arose in the process. We used an ethnographic approach to account for the teacher's and involved students' perspectives throughout the process of teacher preparation, lesson planning, and the implementation of the lesson. To interpret the data, we used the conceptual framework of activity theory. We found that an entrenched culture of traditional white/blackboard use in physics instruction interferes with more technologically innovative and more student-centered instructional approaches that leverage the IWB's unique instructional potential. Furthermore, we found that the teacher's confidence in the mastery of the IWB plays a crucial role in the teacher's willingness to transfer agency within the lesson to the students.

  18. Communication in the Classroom: Research and Observation. ERIC Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Don M.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of ERIC resources on the following topics: teacher communication; research on classroom interaction; using systematic observations to improve teaching; different systems of classroom observations; and research on classroom observation techniques. (PD)

  19. A description of a staff development program: Preparing the elementary school classroom teacher to lead environmental field trips and to use an integrated subject approach to environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egana, John Joseph

    This study of the Field Trip Specialist Program (FTS) described how a professional development plan fostered change in the traditional roles of third and fourth grade teachers. Teachers that volunteered were prepared to become interpretive guides for their class on environmental field trips, integrate their basic subject areas lessons into an environmental science context, and develop their self-perception as professional educators. This qualitative study made use of quantitative data and drew on information collected over four years from surveys, interviews, classroom observations, field trip and workshop observations, focus groups, journals and assessments performed in Florida. The FTS Program attracted teachers who thought it was important for all students to understand environmental issues, and these teachers believed in integrated instruction. These beliefs were inconsistent with many aspects of school culture. FTS invited the participation of these teachers and encouraged them to take control of the program by serving as instructors and program developers. Teachers described themselves as prepared to deliver the FTS Program with a high level of motivation and relevance. They also credited the program as beneficial in preparation for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests (FCAT). Teachers reported that their responsibility as field trip leaders was the primary factor motivating them to provide conscientious presentation of pre- and post-field trip lessons and thorough integration of environmental topics in basic subject area instruction. Despite the impact of the field trip leadership factor, I could not find another program in the State of Florida that required teachers to lead their own field trips. Other influential factors specific to this program were: Voluntary participation, on-site field instruction, peer instructors and program developers, high quality and task specific materials, and pre- and post-assessments for students. Factors were identified

  20. Evaluation of traditional classroom teaching methods versus course delivery via the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M; Carlton, K H; Ali, N S

    1999-09-01

    Higher education is moving with deliberate speed to an electronic classroom. Much has been published on faculty experiences with World Wide Web (WWW) course delivery. However, little research exists on the evaluation of these methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of two approaches to teaching: classroom and WWW modules. Classroom methods were rated significantly higher in relation to content, interaction, participation, faculty preparation, and communication. Technical skills were rated higher for WWW modules. Critical thinking and time allotted for assignments were not significantly different between classroom and WWW instruction. Open-ended comments were rich and supported both positive and negative aspects of classroom and WWW-based modules. Implications call for creativity in course development, course redesign and orientation, active communication with students, support for technical problems, faculty development, and university-wide planning through partnerships.

  1. Unity in the Elementary School Classroom: Building Community Through Increasing Positive Social Interactions Between and Among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt-Jaeger, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Children's sense of a community is essential in elementary schools. This helps gives students a sense of belonging and control over their environment. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of several strategies from the Toolbox Project and their effect on building community in the classroom. Collin (2003b) discusses his Toolbox…

  2. Applying Positioning Theory to the Analysis of Classroom Interactions: Mediating Micro-Identities, Macro-Kinds, and Ideologies of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kate T.

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to positioning theory by approaching the discursive and material mediation of classroom positioning from an integrated micro-, meso-, and macro-social perspective. I propose an analytic framework that unpacks the lived and ideological resources for positioning and their social and curricular implications for understanding…

  3. A Strategy to Increase the Social Interactions of 3-Year-Old Children with Disabilities in an Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.; Brown, Tiara S.

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the play behaviors of children with disabilities (e.g., developmental delays, specific language impairment) who participated in a social communication intervention targeting skills such as initiations, responses, name use, proximity, and turn-taking. Three children who were enrolled in an inclusive classroom met the…

  4. Using a Classroom Response System for Promoting Interaction to Teaching Mathematics to Large Groups of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Adolfo; Barragués, José Ignacio; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the design and evaluation of a proposal to use Classroom Response Systems (CRS), intended to promote participative classes of Mathematics at University. The proposal is based on Problem Based Learnig (PBL) and uses Robert's six hypotheses for mathematical teaching-learning. The results show that PBL is a relevant strategy to…

  5. Student-Initiated Use of Multilingual Resources in English-Language Classroom Interaction: Next-Turn Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Gudrun; Sert, Olcay; Durus, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of multilingual resources by plurilingual participants in two English language classrooms in Luxembourg. Using Conversation Analysis and drawing on transcriptions of video-recordings, we present three examples of student use of multilingual resources and their respective teacher next turn management (through…

  6. Classroom Behaviors of Asian American Students in Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shwu-yong L.; Waxman, Hersholt C.

    This study examines Asian American middle school students' classroom behaviors in mathematics using systematic classroom observation techniques. The study explores questions related to classroom behaviors in terms of interactions with teachers, classroom settings, activities, and manners; differences in classroom behaviors between boys and girls…

  7. Incivility beyond the Classroom Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Wendy L.; Rehling, Diana L.

    2011-01-01

    Classroom incivility has become a major concern in higher education. Faculty and students frequently interact outside of class, and the lack of civility in those interactions can influence the relationship between students and faculty and impact classroom dynamics. Based on a survey of faculty at a Midwestern public university, this study reports…

  8. Guidelines for Language Classroom Instruction1(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig Chaudron; Graham Crookes

    2008-01-01

    @@ In"Guidelines for Language Classroom Instruction,"Crookes and Chaudron review research and practice in both second and foreign language contexts.The main areas of classroom instruction described are:presentational modes and focus on form,types of activities and parameters of tasks and interaction,classroom organization,teacher control of interaction,and corrective feedback.

  9. The Role of Interactions between Student and Classroom Context in Developing Adaptive Self-Efficacy in One Sixth-Grade Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin Ozdemir, I. Elif; Pape, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Research and theory suggest several instructional practices that could enhance student self-efficacy. However, little is known about the ways these instructional practices interact with individual students to create opportunities or challenges for developing adaptive self-efficacy. In this study, we focused on two sources of efficacy, mastery…

  10. On Explanation in Teacher Talk and Classroom Interaction%教师话语的解释特征与课堂互动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时常珺

    2014-01-01

    解释在所有EFL课堂教师话语中占了相当大的份额,而在师生互动中完成解释,不仅帮助学生理解语言知识,同时锻炼了学生的语言运用能力。通过对所收集到的语料进行定量和定性分析,探讨了教师话语的解释特征及其如何从不同方面激发和推动课堂互动,在加强解释有效性的同时,促进学生二语习得。%Teacher explanation takes up a significant portion in teacher talk in all EFL classrooms .Explana-tion accomplished in the process of teacher -student interaction not only benefits students ’ understanding of the language but also develops their capacity of applying the language .This paper ,based on a quantitative and quali-tative analysis of the data collected ,explores the features of teacher explanation and how teacher explanation trig-gers and promotes classroom interaction from different aspects ,strengthening the effectiveness of explanation and at the same time ,facilitating students’ second language acquisition .

  11. Capturing Earth Science Learning Dynamics: Communication Interactions of ESE Teachers and Children Occurring in Online, Classroom, and Small-Group Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, C. W.; Prince, B. L.

    2002-12-01

    While the processes of schooling in science are usually measured in the resulting skills and products that students acquire or generate, another way to understand science learning is to explore the interactions and discourse that occur during actual learning activities. To investigate the dynamics of inquiry-based learning of earth science, we have explored the patterns that emerge in several learning environments: when teachers create dialog with other teachers in online ESE courses; when they teach earth science lessons in their classrooms; when they discuss their teaching perspectives in interviews; and when small groups of children engage in learning earth science together. By observing and scoring lesson exchanges, preserving online discussions, and documenting words and interactions in audio or video recordings, we are able to distinguish communication configurations that occur when teachers and children engage in the learning of earth science that would otherwise be invisible.

  12. Towards a Pedagogy for the Application of Empathy in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is theorized to improve the teaching effectiveness of teachers in urban and multicultural classroom settings. However, the field has few models useful for training and preparing teachers to cultivate empathy as a professional disposition. This study examines the academic, behavioral, and social/relational interactions of four White female…

  13. Towards a Pedagogy for the Application of Empathy in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is theorized to improve the teaching effectiveness of teachers in urban and multicultural classroom settings. However, the field has few models useful for training and preparing teachers to cultivate empathy as a professional disposition. This study examines the academic, behavioral, and social/relational interactions of four White female…

  14. Interactions between cavity preparation and restoration events and their effects on pulp vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisithphrom, Kessiri; Murray, Peter E; About, Imad; Windsor, L Jack

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise effect and rank the importance of cavity preparation and restoration variables on human pulp vitality. Fifty-three Class V unexposed cavities were prepared and restored with calcium hydroxide/amalgam, resin-modified glass ionomer, zinc oxide-eugenol, resin composite, or zinc polycarboxylate materials. Pulp vitality was reduced by the remaining dentin thickness of the cavity preparations, whereas the other variables, including the type of restorative material, had little effect. Restorative materials cause minimal pulp damage in isolation; it is more important to minimize the removal of intact dentin to maintain the vitality of teeth.

  15. Interaction between plastic catheter tubings and regular insulin preparations used for continuous subcutaneous insulin-infusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, E; Lange, G; Gasthaus, M; Boxberger, M; Berger, M

    1987-01-01

    In search of possible interactions between plastic tubings used for insulin-pump treatment and commercial regular insulin preparations, various catheter sets made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), and nylon plastics were perfused at 30 degrees C in a laboratory setting for up to 72 h. The perfused insulin solutions were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Although no plasticizer, e.g., dioctyl phthalate, or nickel or chromium ions were found in the perfusates, substantial interactions between the plastics and the insulin solutions were detected, extraction of bacteriostatic additives from the insulin solutions in particular. The PVC retained up to 88% of the bacteriostatics from the insulin preparations, whereas PE tubings retained only 10-15%. Whether the loss of preservatives during perfusion through PVC catheters predisposes to cutaneous infections during insulin-pump therapy remains to be shown.

  16. Exposing Conditional Inclusive Ideologies through Simulated Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotger, Benjamin; Ashby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript examines how teacher candidates enacted their extensive inclusive classroom preparation within simulated interactions. Diffusing a common medical education pedagogy to teacher education, the researchers situated inclusively-trained teacher candidates in front of standardized paraprofessionals. Data from these simulated interactions…

  17. 论大学图书馆阅览室与课堂互动数字教学模式%Discussion on the Interactive Digital Teaching Mode between University Library's Reading Room and Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡耀斌

    2015-01-01

    This paper expounds the target and significance of establishing the interactive digital teaching mode between university library's reading room and classroom,and probes into the main methods for establishing the interactive digital teaching mode between university library's reading room and classroom.%阐述了建立大学图书馆阅览室与课堂互动数字教学模式的目的与意义,探讨了建立大学图书馆阅览室与课堂互动数字教学模式的主要方法.

  18. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  19. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  20. The relationship between classroom quality and students' engagement in secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Tuomo; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Kuorelahti, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement has been identified as an influential mediator between classroom interactional quality and adolescent learning outcomes. This study examined the relationship between classroom quality and student behavioural engagement in secondary school classrooms. Three dimensions of classroom quality (emotional, organisational and instructional support) and the dimension of student engagement were observed in nine classrooms using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System. Self-ratings of...

  1. “What is the date today?”: A dialogist perspective on expert EFL teachers’ classroom interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tůma František

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a micro-analysis of an EFL classroom episode in which the teacher and the pupils worked on the concepts “date” and “day” (and relatedly saying the date in English, which the learners had not fully internalized yet. Conversation analysis (CA and concepts from sociocultural theory (SCT are used in the analysis to reveal how the mutual understanding proceeded. It is argued that the presented dialogist perspective can cast light on the intricacies of the teaching and learning processes.

  2. The Benefits & Drawbacks of Integrating Cloud Computing and Interactive Whiteboards in Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Elfreda; Tirotta, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-first century technology has changed the way tools are used to support and enhance learning and instruction. Cloud computing and interactive white boards, make it possible for learners to interact, simulate, collaborate, and document learning experiences and real world problem-solving. This article discusses how various technologies (blogs,…

  3. Interaction and Language Acquisition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙红叶

    2016-01-01

    Based on Long's Interaction Hypothesis (IH), the paper examines the aspects of interaction that might facilitate natu-ralistic language development and goes further to propose features of interaction that could encourage classroom second lan-guage acquisition, in the hope that improved classroom interation will enhance teaching effectiveness in language classroom.

  4. El aula especializada de inglés para la autopreparación de los estudiantes de la carrera de Medicina Veterinaria - The specialized classroom of English for the self-preparation of the students of Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel L. Vega

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl aula especializada de inglés para la autopreparación de los alumnos de la carrera de Medicina Veterinaria resulta una propuesta innovadora para viabilizar el trabajo con el aprendizaje de este idioma a través de laserie At your Pace.AbstractThe specialized classroom of English for the self-preparation of the students of Veterinary Specialty is a novel proposition to make viable the work with the learning of this language with the course At your Pace.

  5. Facile Preparation of Stable Antibody-Gold Conjugates and Application to Affinity-Capture Self-Interaction Nanoparticle Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Steven B; Wu, Jiemin; Alam, Magfur E; Schultz, Jason S; Dickinson, Craig D; Seminer, Carly R; Tessier, Peter M

    2016-10-19

    Protein-nanoparticle conjugates are widely used for conventional applications such as immunohistochemistry and biomolecular detection as well as emerging applications such as therapeutics and advanced materials. Nevertheless, it remains challenging to reproducibly prepare stable protein-nanoparticle conjugates with highly similar optical properties. Here we report an improved physisorption method for reproducibly preparing stable antibody-gold conjugates at acidic pH using polyclonal antibodies from a wide range of species (human, goat, rabbit, mouse, and rat). We find that gold particles synthesized using citrate alone or in combination with tannic acid are similar in size but display variable colloidal stability when conjugated to polyclonal antibodies. The variability in conjugate stability is due to differences in the pH and composition of the original gold colloid, which prevents reproducible preparation of stable antibody conjugates without additional purification of the particles prior to conjugation. Sedimentation-based purification of gold particles synthesized using different methods enabled reproducible generation of antibody-gold conjugates with high stability and similar plasmon wavelengths. We also find that antibody conjugates prepared using our improved procedure display excellent performance when applied to a high-throughput immunogold assay (affinity-capture self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy, AC-SINS) for identifying monoclonal antibodies with low self-association, high solubility, and low viscosity. The stable antibody conjugates prepared with various types of gold colloid result in robust and reproducible AC-SINS measurements of antibody self-association using extremely dilute (microgram per mL) and unpurified antibody solutions. We expect that this improved methodology will be useful for reproducibly preparing stable antibody-gold conjugates for diverse applications.

  6. Classroom Furniture: The Mod Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the first article in a six-part series on the elements of a collaborative classroom: furniture, social media, video/web conferencing tools, collaborative software, interactive devices, and mobile devices. With most universities facing tight budgets, convincing administrators to invest in expensive new classrooms is a challenge. Many higher…

  7. Classroom Furniture: The Mod Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the first article in a six-part series on the elements of a collaborative classroom: furniture, social media, video/web conferencing tools, collaborative software, interactive devices, and mobile devices. With most universities facing tight budgets, convincing administrators to invest in expensive new classrooms is a challenge. Many higher…

  8. Aspects of Classroom Discourse Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁蕾

    2008-01-01

    One influential approach to the study of spoken discourse is developed at the University of Birmingham in which the researchers initially concerned themselves with the strueture of discourse in school classroom. One of the interaction features of teacher-talk is to ask questions. They have attracted considerable attention from researchers of language classroom teaching.

  9. Toward More Just Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 2010

    2010-01-01

    To address issues of equity with young children, early childhood educators must become interventionists. They must reconsider how they interact with children to identify the subtle ways that power structures classroom life and shapes children's identities. It is important to attend to the materials in the classroom to ensure that they are…

  10. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  11. Classroom Dimensions and Classroom Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Arthur J.; Solomon, Daniel

    Although classroom "openness" has been much discussed in recent years, there has been little effort to investigate to what degree this openness occurs within a general sample of classrooms. The purpose of this study is to identify significant attributes of classroom activity and organization relevant to the concepts of "traditional" and "open" and…

  12. Preparation of Entangled Atomic States Through Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the generation of two-atom maximally entangled states and multi-atom maximally entangled states of W class. The scheme is based on the simultaneous resonant interaction of atoms with a single-mode cavity field. It does not require accurate adjustment of the interaction time. The time needed to complete the generation does not increase with the number of the atom.

  13. The Organization of Second Language Classroom Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Euen Hyuk (Sarah)

    1999-01-01

    Explores classroom pedagogy through a focus on classroom interaction. Takes ideas from conversation analysis as a foundation and starts to unravel some of the structures used for classroom pedagogy. Uses the notion of repair, but takes it one step further by understanding repair to be a pedagogical tool used in the English-as-a-Second-Language…

  14. Classroom management in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Ünlü

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In schools, classrooms are the first and the most important places in where the interaction of student-teacher is experienced intensively and education-teaching activities are carried out. Classroom is also considered as places where the physical education lessons are taught. In physical education lessons, it is possible to have success in teaching activities and demanded behavior changes with the classrooms where the students can feel themselves comfort and untroubled, meet their needs easily and have minimum discipline problems. From this point of view in this study effective classroom management in physical education lessons, discipline problems and the design of physical environment are going to be examined.

  15. Supramolecular Guest-Host Interactions for the Preparation of Biomedical Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Christopher B; Mealy, Joshua E; Burdick, Jason A

    2015-12-16

    Supramolecular chemistry has emerged as an important technique for the formation of biomaterials, including nano- and microparticles and hydrogels. One specific class of supramolecular chemistry is the direct association of guest-host pairs, which involves host macrocycles such as cyclodextrins and cucurbit[n]urils and a wide range of guest molecules, where association is typically driven by molecule size and hydrophobicity. These systems are of particular interest in the biomedical field due to their dynamic nature, chemical diversity, relative ease of synthesis, and ability to interact with biological or synthetic molecules. In this review, we discuss aspects of polymeric material assembly mediated by guest-host interactions, including the fundamentals of assembly into functional biomedical materials. Additionally, applications of biomaterials that utilize guest-host interactions are discussed with a focus on injectable material formulations, the sequestration and delivery of encapsulated cargo (i.e., drugs, biomolecules), and the investigation of cell-material interactions (i.e., adhesion, differentiation, and delivery). While methodologies for guest-host mediated assembly and biological interaction have rapidly evolved in recent years, they remain far from realizing their full potential in the biomaterials field.

  16. Current Situation Investigation of the Interactive Classroom Teaching (Ⅲ)%互动式课堂教学现状的调查(Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚; 王翀; 易龙; 廖晓兰

    2013-01-01

    A form of questionnaire by investigation was carried out to study the current situation of interactive class-room teaching in order to improve the quality of talent fosterage. The results showed that many teachers believed that the interest and intelligence of the students were the most important factors for interactive classroom teaching;second-ly, students'attitude towards study and individual mood may also affect the results of interactive classroom teaching. In respect of requirements for teachers in teacher-student interaction, 27% of students believed that teachers should be rigorous and methodical, 24% thought that teachers should be humorous, wit and concentrative, 13% considered teachers should be erudite, while 36% believed that teachers should not only be rigorous, humour and wit, and eru-dite, but also should have fairly strong capability of synthesis. When investigating the interactive role of teachers and students, 68% of teachers believed both teachers and students need mutual efforts, 16% of teachers thought it laid stress on teachers, 15% of teachers considered students should set store on, and some individual chose others. In ad-dition, when investigating the form of teacher-student interaction, 35% of students believed“the setting scene” work best results in classroom interaction, 28% considered that the effect of “debate competition” interaction will result well, 21% selected the style of “asking student by naming him or her” interaction, only a few students chose “visi-tors'book” as interaction. The results of this investigation provided references for universities and colleges to carry out interactive mode of teaching reformation.%为加强课堂教学改革,提高人才培养质量,采取问卷调查的形式对互动式课堂教学现状进行了研究。结果表明:多数教师认为学生的兴趣和智力是影响师生互动的重要因素,其次学习态度和个人情绪也会影响互动式课堂教学效果;在

  17. Oral Communication Needs of New Korean Students in a US Busincess Communication Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jungyin (Janice)

    2013-01-01

    In order for MBA programs in the US to prepare Korean students for international business, an international and interactive learning environment is required. This article examines the role of the interactive lecturing style in a US MBA program in influencing the oral classroom participation of five Korean students in the program. Data for this study come from formal and informal interviews and class observations over the course of one semester. Participants were three male and two female stud...

  18. PREPARING TEACHERS LIFE SAFETY TO THE ORGANIZATION OF INTERDEPARTMENTAL INTERACTION BY MEANS OF EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Любовь Петровна Кислякова

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: identify areas of interdepartmental interaction in the organization of the educational practice of future teachers life safety.Methodology: a theoretical analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature; analysis of the content of educational practice.Results: identified areas of interdepartmental interaction in the organization of the educational practice of future teachers life safety: Health Organization, the Office of Civil Defense, Emergencies and Disaster Relief, the Office of Internal Affairs, the office of drug control.Practical implications: the system of pedagogical education.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-15

  19. Preparation of Multicomponent Schr(o)dinger Cat States Through Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A simple method is presented for generating multicomponent Schrodinger cat states through resonant atom-field interactions. In the scheme n two-level atoms, initially in ground states, are sent through a resonant cavity filled with a strong coherent field sequentially. Then state-selective measurements are performed on the atoms. The detections of the atoms in ground states collapse the cavity field onto a superposition of 2n coherent states. This is the first way for producing superpositions of many coherent states through resonant atom-field interaction.

  20. Using interactive online role-playing simulations to develop global competency and to prepare engineering students for a globalised world

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dominik; Wold, Kari; Moore, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    The world is changing significantly, and it is becoming increasingly globalised. This means that countries, businesses, and professionals must think and act globally to be successful. Many individuals, however, are not prepared with the global competency skills needed to communicate and perform effectively in a globalised system. To address this need, higher education institutions are looking for ways to instil these skills in their students. This paper explains one promising approach using current learning principles: transnational interactive online environments in engineering education. In 2011, the TU Dortmund and the University of Virginia initiated a collaboration in which engineering students from both universities took part in one online synchronous course and worked together on global topics. This paper describes how the course was designed and discusses specific research results regarding how interactive online role-playing simulations support students in gaining the global competency skills required to actively participate in today's international workforce.

  1. Researching Computer-Based Collaborative Learning in Inclusive Classrooms in Cyprus: The Role of the Computer in Pupils' Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrou, Katerina; Lewis, Ann; Douglas, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study of the role of the computer in scaffolding pupils' interaction and its effects on the disabled (D) pupils' participation and inclusion in the context of socio-cultural theories and the ideals of inclusive education. The study investigated the interactions of pairs of D and non-disabled (ND) pupils…

  2. In between Self-Knowledge and School Demands: Policy Enacted in the Swedish Middle-Year Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Marie; Prieto, Héctor Pérez

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the interaction in a Year 5 classroom where students fill in a "self-evaluation form" as a preparation for a forthcoming discussion on progress aiming at the production of an Individual Developmental Plan. Drawing on the theoretical concepts of fabrications and performativity, we understand this as an…

  3. Investigation and correlation of drug polymer miscibility and molecular interactions by various approaches for the preparation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan; Trivino, Anne; Prasad, Dev; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-04-25

    Curcumin (CUR) was used as a poorly soluble drug whereas polyvinyl pyrrolidone K90 (PVP), Eudragit EPO (EPO), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose E5 (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG) were used as hydrophilic polymers. CUR polymer miscibility was evaluated by solubility parameter, melting point depression and glass transition temperature (Tg) measurements. Molecular interactions between CUR and polymers were determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman. Amorphous solid dispersions were prepared with CUR-polymer ratio of 70:30 (w/w) by solvent evaporation technique and were evaluated for dissolution enhancement using USP II method. Physical states of solid dispersions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) whereas thermal behaviors were investigated using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). CUR-EPO system showed good miscibility through all the approaches, whereas immiscibility was found in other CUR-polymer systems. CUR-EPO and CUR-HPMC systems showed significant molecular interactions whereas CUR-PVP and CUR-PEG showed no molecular interactions. All solid dispersions showed significant dissolution enhancement with CUR-EPO showing highest dissolution rate during first 1h whereas CUR-HPMC was effective in maintaining high CUR concentrations for 6h. The study highlights the importance of investigating and correlating drug polymer miscibility and molecular interactions by various approaches for successful formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

  4. High school biology students' participation in a year-long sequence of analogical activities: The relationship of development of analogical thought to student learning and classroom interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Marcella Wichser

    1999-10-01

    This research explored development of analogical thought through high school biology students' participation in a year-long sequence of analogical activities. Analogizing involves: selecting a familiar analog; mapping similarities and differences between the analog and less familiar target; making inferences from the analogy; evaluating validity of the inferences; and ultimately, understanding the biological target (Holyoak & Thagard, 1995). This investigation considered: student development of independence in learning through analogical thought, student learning of biology, the relationship between development of students' analogical thinking and students' learning of biology, and the quality of student interactions in the classroom This researcher, as teacher participant, used three approaches for teaching by analogy: traditional didactic, teacher-guided, and analogy-generated-by-the-student (Zeitoun, 1983). Within cooperative groups, students in one honors biology class actively engaged in research-based analogical activities that targeted specific biological topics. Two honors biology classes participated in similar, but nonanalogical activities that targeted the same biological topics. This two-class comparison group permitted analytical separation of effects of the analogical emphasis from the effects of biology content and activity-based learning. Data collected included: fieldnotes of researcher observations, student responses to guidesheets, tapes of group interactions, student products, student perceptions survey evaluations, ratings of students' expressed analogical development, pre- and posttest scores on a biology achievement test, essay responses, and selected student interviews. These data formed the basis for researcher qualitative analysis, augmented by quantitative techniques. Through participation in the sequence of analogical activities, students developed their abilities to engage in the processes of analogical thinking, but attained different

  5. Facile preparation of robust microcapsules by manipulating metal-coordination interaction between biomineral layer and bioadhesive layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Jiafu; Jiang, Zhongyi; Jiang, Yanjun; Meng, Ruijie; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Yanpeng; Zheng, Yang

    2011-02-01

    A novel approach combining biomimetic mineralization and bioadhesion is proposed to prepare robust and versatile organic-inorganic hybrid microcapsules. More specifically, these microcapsules are fabricated by sequential deposition of inorganic layer and organic layer on the surface of CaCO(3) microparticles, followed by the dissolution of CaCO(3) microparticles using EDTA. During the preparation process, protamine induces the hydrolysis and condensation of titania or silica precursor to form the inorganic layer or the biomineral layer. The organic layer or bioadhesive layer was formed through the rapid, spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine (PDA) on the surface of the biomineral layer. There exist multiple interactions between the inorganic layer and the organic layer. Thus, the as-prepared organic-inorganic hybrid microcapsules acquire much higher mechanical stability and surface reactivity than pure titania or pure silica microcapsules. Furthermore, protamine/titania/polydopamine hybrid microcapsules display superior mechanical stability to protamine/silica/polydopamine hybrid microcapsules because of the formation of Ti(IV)-catechol coordination complex between the biomineral layer and the bioadhesive layer. As an example of application, three enzymes are respectively immobilized through physical encapsulation in the lumen, in situ entrapment within the wall and chemical attachment on the out surface of the hybrid microcapsules. The as-constructed multienzyme system displays higher catalytic activity and operational stability. Hopefully, the approach developed in this study will evolve as a generic platform for facile and controllable preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with different compositions and shapes for a variety of applications in catalysis, sensor, drug/gene delivery.

  6. 'Flipping' the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2016-09-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students and new graduates to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes the benefits and challenges of using a "flipped" classroom to promote active engagement among learners and more meaningful interaction between learners and educators.

  7. My Classroom: Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Yulia Bulatkulova discovered her passion for English language teaching at a young age as a result of the example set by an esteemed childhood English teacher, Elvira Kuyanova. This article discusses how Ms. Bulatkulova's interactions with her students, both inside and outside the classroom, demonstrate that she has followed in the footsteps of her…

  8. Flexible Classroom Furniture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Hassell,

    2011-01-01

    Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

  9. Classroom Discipline and Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kayoun

    This study explored how children are socialized through discipline in the preschool classroom. Using detailed descriptions of teacher-student interactions and an interpretive method, the study mapped the process of the children's socialization and the role of discipline. The case study in one 4-year-olds' room examined early socialization…

  10. Bibliotherapy for Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenman, Gordon; Harper, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The focus and goal of classroom management should be first and foremost learning. When trying to prevent interruptions to learning, or dealing with interruptions to learning when they occur, teachers need to move beyond simply imposing a consequence and assuming students have learned from the interaction. Students need to be taught the skills and…

  11. Incivility Beyond the Classroom Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy L. Bjorklund, PhD

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Classroom incivility has become a major concern in higher education. Faculty and students frequently interact outside of class, and the lack of civility in those interactions can influence the relationship between students and faculty and impact classroom dynamics. Based on a survey of faculty at a Midwestern public university, this study reports that faculty experience a fair amount of moderately inappropriate student behavior outside the classroom, including missing scheduled appointments, wearing revealing clothing, and requesting a grade change. These results can help faculty and administrators guide students toward more appropriate behavior and create better relationships between faculty and students.

  12. Classroom Questioning Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小林

    2013-01-01

      Interaction has been playing a more and more important role in language research since the early 1970s,when the communicative teaching method was widely applied in language teaching. Questioning is the most common classroom interaction. This thesis analyzed the influence on students' immediate oral production by applying different teacher questioning strategies including teacher's question types,teacher question modification and teacher feedback.

  13. Preparation of Functional Fluorescent Microspheres Used for HTS and Their Interaction with Biomolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bai-ling; LI Song-Jun

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable interest in protein adsorption onto microspheres because of its importance in a wide range of biomedical applications, such as artificial tissues and organs, drug delivery systems, biosensors, solid-phase immunoassays, immunomagnetic cell separation and immobilized enzymes or catalyst. It has been well known that the interaction between proteins and microspheres plays important roles in this process. Major interaction involved in the adsorption can be classified as electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding. Indeed, adsorption of proteins onto microspheres is a complex process and often can involve many dynamic steps, from the initial attachment of the protein on the surface of microspheres to the equilibrium. Also the conformation of proteins probably occurs to a certain degree of deformation or structural change due to the large area of contact. Recently, much interest has been shown in sulfonated microspheres, since sulfonate-group itself is one of components in bio-bodies, as well as is sensitive to the change of pH or ionic strength. Indeed, so far, scanty investigations have been performed in the full range. Also few researches have involved the data on adsorption rate and the maximum amount of protein adsorbed, or the reversibility of the process and conformational change of protein adsorbed as well.In present study, BSA (bovine serum albumin) was chosen as the model protein and sulfonated PMMA [poly(methyl methacrylate)] microspheres as the matrix to investigate the adsorption process.The purpose is to show some information especially the intrinsic information involved by the adsorption process Adsorption of BSA onto sulfonated microspheres (MS) has been investigated as a function of time, protein concentration and pH. The adsorption appears to be a reversible process and the presence of sulfonate groups can play important roles in the adsorption process, so as to increase the amount of protein adsorbed and influences the

  14. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MetLife, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers" was conducted by Harris Interactive and is the twenty-seventh in a series sponsored annually by MetLife since 1984 to give voice to those closest to the classroom. This MetLife Survey examines the priority that all students graduate from high school prepared…

  15. 浅析大学英语课堂互动教学模式%On College English Classroom Interaction Teaching Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    简丽丽

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing deepening of economic globalization, enormous changes have taken place in China's reform and opening up in the past of three decades. As a result of frequent foreign economic and cultural exchanges, English has grad-ually become the most important common language. Most college students who should have grasped good communication skil-ls, nevertheless, still can not effectively use the language. This is due to the traditional college English teaching mode which not only largely ignored the multilateral and multilayer interaction between teachers and students in the classroom, but also neglected the essence of English as a communicative tool. Accordingly, this article attempts to explore the interactive teaching mode in college English classroom from the perspective of second language acquisition theory in order to improve the quality of English teaching and to provide effective and appropriate English teaching methods for teachers so as to achieve optimal teaching de-signs and implementation, thus enhancing the ability of students to use the English language.%在经济全球化不断深入的今天,英语渐渐成为最重要的语言。可是对于大多数在校大学生而言,他们本都应该掌握了良好的语言沟通能力,可其中不少仍然不能够有效地使用这门语言。这是由于传统的大学英语课堂教学模式在很大程度上忽视了师生在课堂教学中出现的交互作用,也忽视了英语作为一种交际工具的本质。本文从二语习得的理论出发试图探讨大学英语课堂互动教学模式,以求达到教学设计与教学实施的最优化,提高学生运用英语的能力。

  16. Relative Abstract Nature of the Three Core Science Subjects at the Senior Secondary Level in Nigeria as Exemplified by Classroom Interaction Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel E Achor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined relative abstract nature of Biology, Chemistry and Physics offered at the senior secondary schools (SSS in Ankpa education zone of Kogi State of Nigeria based on the analysis of classroom interactions. In each of the three comparable public schools used, the same class of Senior Secondary 2 (SS 2 or 11th grade students were each taught Biology, Chemistry and Physics. In each school, reproduction, chemical kinetics and refraction were taught in Biology, Chemistry and Physics respectively. The researchers personally took record of interactions during the 9 periods (taught by 9 science teachers lasting for 35 minutes each using Flanders’ Interaction Analysis Categories (FIAC. Inter observer’s rater reliability was 0.69 using Scott’s Phi coefficient. Using a 10 by 10 matrix and percentage for final analysis, the extent of students’ participation in the lesson which its decreasing order was used to estimate the degree of the abstract nature or difficulty experienced in each subject was determined. The result revealed that the physical sciences were more abstract than the biological science with physics having the highest index. There was no close match between teachers’ level of motivation during the lessons and students’ participation except in Biology. Consequent upon these, it was recommended that chemistry and physics teachers should always ensure that there is a close match between cognitive ability of learners and cognitive demands of the subjects or lessons taught; that concrete teaching materials be used in the two more abstract subjects to reduce the formal reasoning or abstract requirements in the lessons to concrete demand levels, among others.

  17. Cobalt-Doped Brushite Cement: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Interaction with Osteosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Haley; Han, Weiguo; Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Elsawa, Sherine F.

    2017-08-01

    Brushite cement (BrC) is being widely used in bone and dental tissue engineering application because of its significant biocompatibility, bioresorbability, and moldability. Here, we have reported the effects of cobalt (Co) and its concentration on physical and biological properties of BrC. Our results show that Co addition stabilizes the tricalcium phosphate structure and decreases the amount of BrC phase in the final product. The in vitro interaction of samples with osteosarcoma MG-63 cells proved the cytocompatibility of all compositions in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Although the cell viability increased under hypoxia, the change was insignificant compared with normoxic conditions. Our data show that Co addition reduced hypoxia inducible factor-1α and glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 2 expression in MG-63, suggesting Co may provide the benefit of reducing the effects of hypoxia on gene expression in the osteosarcoma cell line.

  18. The Impact of the Interactive Whiteboard on the Teacher and Children's Language Use in an ESL Immersion Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Yvette; Yanez, Lorena; Verdu, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    As a teaching resource, interactive whiteboards (IWB) are becoming increasingly popular in schools outside the UK, including Spain. Research carried out so far has tended to examine the effects of IWB use on teaching and learning in monolingual contexts where English is the first language for learners. The present study adds a new dimension to…

  19. Using a Humanoid Robot to Develop a Dialogue-Based Interactive Learning Environment for Elementary Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school is the critical stage during which the development of listening comprehension and oral abilities in language acquisition occur, especially with a foreign language. However, the current foreign language instructors often adopt one-way teaching, and the learning environment lacks any interactive instructional media with which to…

  20. Using a Humanoid Robot to Develop a Dialogue-Based Interactive Learning Environment for Elementary Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school is the critical stage during which the development of listening comprehension and oral abilities in language acquisition occur, especially with a foreign language. However, the current foreign language instructors often adopt one-way teaching, and the learning environment lacks any interactive instructional media with which to…

  1. Effects of Isolate and Social Toys on the Social Interactions of Preschoolers in an Inclusive Head Start Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Shannon Renee; Vail, Cynthia O.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of manipulating toy sets on the social verbal interaction that occurs between preschool-age children with disabilities and their typically developing peers. A single-subject alternating-treatments design was used to evaluate the effects of manipulating social toy sets and isolate toy sets on…

  2. Training in Interaction Analysis as a Means of Staff Development for Master Teachers, Classroom Teachers and Paraprofessionals. Maxi II Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph H.

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an inservice staff development program in promoting change in patterns of teacher-child interaction. The program used (1) the combined techniques of systematic analysis of teaching behavior with the Behavior Ratings and Analysis of Communication in Education (BRACE) observation system, (2)…

  3. Improving Pupil Group Work Interaction and Dialogue in Primary Classrooms: Results from a Year-Long Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Ed; Rubie-Davies, Christine; Blatchford, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Findings are reported from a year-long evaluation of the effectiveness of the SPRinG programme relative to a control group. SPRinG aimed to address the wide gap between the potential of group interaction to promote learning and its limited use in schools. The project involved working with teachers to develop strategies for enhancing pupil group…

  4. Effective Classroom Instruction: Implications of Child Characteristics by Reading Instruction Interactions on First Graders' Word Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Frederick J.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Toste, Jessica R.; Lundblom, Erin; Crowe, Elizabeth C.; Fishman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Too many children fail to learn how to read proficiently with serious consequences for their overall well-being and long-term success in school. This may be because providing effective instruction is more complex than many of the current models of reading instruction portray; there are Child Characteristic x Instruction (CXI) interactions. Here we…

  5. Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Valynda

    2010-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

  6. Zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol: preparation, characterization, interaction with bovine serum albumin and near infrared fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Feng; Cao, Bo; Cui, Yanli; Liu, Tianjun

    2012-05-25

    Zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol was prepared to track and monitor the in vivo fate of polyethylene glycol. The chemical structures were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Their light stability and fluorescence quantum yield were evaluated by UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy methods. The interaction of zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol with bovine serum albumin was evaluated by fluorescence titration and isothermal titration calorimetry methods. Optical imaging in vivo, organ aggregation as well as distribution of fluorescence experiments for tracking polyethylene glycol were performed with zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol as fluorescent agent. Results show that zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol has good optical stability and high emission ability in the near infrared region. Imaging results demonstrate that zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol can track and monitor the in vivo process by near infrared fluorescence imaging, which implies its potential in biomaterials evaluation in vivo by a real-time noninvasive method.

  7. Preparation of a novel carboxyl stationary phase by "thiol-ene" click chemistry for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi-Tian; Liu, Tao; Ji, Shu-Xian; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2013-08-01

    A novel carboxyl-bonded silica stationary phase was prepared by "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The resultant Thiol-Click-COOH phase was evaluated under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mobile phase conditions. A comparison of the chromatographic performance of Thiol-Click-COOH and pure silica columns was performed according to the retention behaviors of analytes and the charged state of the stationary phases. The results indicated that the newly developed Thiol-Click-COOH column has a higher surface charge and stronger hydrophilicity than the pure silica column. Furthermore, the chromatographic behaviors of five nucleosides on the Thiol-Click-COOH phase were investigated in detail. Finally, a good separation of 13 nucleosides and bases, and four water-soluble vitamins was achieved.

  8. In vitro metabolism and interactions of the fungicide metalaxyl in human liver preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Khaled; Reponen, Petri; Jalonen, Jorma; Pelkonen, Olavi

    2007-01-01

    In order to provide additional information for risk assessment of the fungicide metalaxyl, the main objectives were (1) to elucidate the interactions of metalaxyl with different human liver cytochrome P450 enzymes, (2) to tentitatively identify and (semi)quantify metabolites in vitro and (3) to identify human CYP enzymes responsible for metabolism. The mean inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) for 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylation (CYP2B) and bupropion hydroxylation (2B6) were 48.9 and 41.7μM, respectively. The biotransformation reactions were hydroxylation, (di)demethylation and lactone formation. In human liver microsomes predominant metabolites were two hydroxymetalaxyl derivatives or atropisomers of one of the derivatives. On the basis of previous rat studies these could be N-(2-hydroxymethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)alanine methyl ester and/or N-(2,6-dimethyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)alanine methyl ester. The amounts of didemethylmetalaxyl N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(hydroxyacetyl)alanine and lactone 4-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-3-methylmorpholine-2,5-dione were higher in homogenates than microsomes. The carcinogenic 2,6-dimethylaniline was not detected. Among the nine major human CYPs, CYP3A4 was the only one responsible for metalaxyl hydroxylation, while CYP2B6 was the major isoform responsible for (di)demethylation and lactone formation. Copyright © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reward favours the prepared: incentive and task-informative cues interact to enhance attentional control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Kimberly S.; Braver, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    The dual mechanisms of control account suggests that cognitive control may be implemented through relatively proactive mechanisms in anticipation of stimulus onset, or through reactive mechanisms, triggered in response to changing stimulus demands. Reward incentives and task-informative cues (signaling the presence/absence of upcoming cognitive demand) have both been found to influence cognitive control in a proactive or preparatory fashion; yet, it is currently unclear whether and how such cue effects interact. We investigated this in two experiments using an adapted flanker paradigm, where task-informative and reward incentive cues were orthogonally manipulated on a trial-by-trial basis. In Experiment 1, results indicated that incentives not only speed RTs, but specifically reduce both interference and facilitation effects when combined with task-informative cues, suggesting enhanced proactive attentional control. Experiment 2 manipulated the timing of incentive cue information, demonstrating that such proactive control effects were only replicated with sufficient time to process the incentive cue (Early Incentive); when incentive signals were presented close to target onset (Late Incentive) the primary effect was a speed-accuracy tradeoff. Together, results suggest that advance cueing may trigger differing control strategies, and that these strategies may critically depend on both the timing – and the motivational incentive – to use such cues. PMID:26322689

  10. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography of proteins. IV. Protein adsorption capacity and transport in preparative mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Brian C S; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-01-21

    The adsorption isotherms of four model proteins (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin, ovalbumin, and BSA) on eight commercial phenyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography media were measured. The isotherms were softer than those usually seen in ion-exchange chromatography of proteins, and the static capacities of the media were lower, ranging from 30 to 110 mg/mL, depending on the ammonium sulfate concentration and the protein and adsorbent types. The protein-accessible surface area appears to be the main factor determining the binding capacity, and little correlation was seen with the protein affinities of the adsorbents. Breakthrough experiments showed that the dynamic capacities of the adsorbents at 10% breakthrough were 20-80% of the static capacities, depending on adsorbent type. Protein diffusivities in the adsorbents were estimated from batch uptake experiments using the pore diffusion and homogeneous diffusion models. Protein transport was affected by the adsorbent pore structures. Apparent diffusivities were higher at lower salt concentrations and column loadings, suggesting that adsorbed proteins may retard intraparticle protein transport. The diffusivities estimated from the batch uptake experiments were used to predict column breakthrough behavior. Analytical solutions developed for ion-exchange systems were able to provide accurate predictions for lysozyme breakthrough but not for ovalbumin. Impurities in the ovalbumin solutions used for the breakthrough experiments may have affected the ovalbumin uptake and led to the discrepancies between the predictions and the experimental results.

  11. Interaction study between digoxin and a preparation of hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankanow, Roberta; Tamer, Helen R; Streetman, Daniel S; Smith, Scott G; Welton, Janice L; Annesley, Thomas; Aaronson, Keith D; Bleske, Barry E

    2003-06-01

    Hawthorn, an herbal supplement, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of heart failure. The flavonoid components of hawthorn may be responsible for hawthorn's beneficial effects in the treatment of heart failure. However, these components may also affect P-glycoprotein function and cause interactions with drugs that are P-glycoprotein substrates, such as digoxin, which is also used to treat heart failure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hawthorn on digoxin pharmacokinetic parameters. A randomized, crossover trial with 8 healthy volunteers was performed evaluating digoxin 0.25 mg alone (D) for 10 days and digoxin 0.25 mg with Crataegus special extract WS 1442 (hawthorn leaves with flowers; Dr. Willmar Schwabe Pharmaceuticals) 450 mg twice daily (D + H) for 21 days. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed for 72 hours. There were no statistically significant differences in any measured pharmacokinetic parameters. The AUC0-infinity, Cmax-Cmin, Cmin, and renal clearance for the D group were 79 +/- 26 mcg.h/L, 1.4 +/- 0.7 mcg/L, 0.84 +/- 0.2 mcg/L, and 74 +/- 10 mL/min versus 73 +/- 20 mcg.h/L, 1.1 +/- 0.1 mcg/L, 0.65 +/- 0.2 mcg/L, and 81 +/- 22 mL/min for the D + H group, respectively (p > 0.05). Following 3 weeks of concomitant therapy, hawthorn did not significantly alter the pharmacokinetic parameters for digoxin. This suggests that both hawthorn and digoxin, in the doses and dosage form studied, may be coadministered safely.

  12. Interactive learning activities for the middle school classroom to promote healthy energy balance and decrease diabetes risk in the HEALTHY primary prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Elizabeth M; Giles, Catherine; Firrell, L Suzanne; Zeveloff, Abigail D; Hirst, Kathryn; Marcus, Marsha D

    2014-01-01

    The HEALTHY trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention program to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes in middle school students. The comprehensive intervention addressed nutrition, physical activity, and behavior in the context of a social marketing-based communications campaign to promote healthy energy balance. One element was a classroom-based program called FLASH (Fun Learning Activities for Student Health). Five FLASH modules were delivered, one per semester. Process evaluation data were collected from teachers at 21 schools and study staff at seven national sites via survey, interview, and in-class observation. Data from the first four modules were evaluated and showed that FLASH was delivered with high fidelity. Sessions that required peer interaction were rated as the most effective in engaging students and promoting knowledge. Study-provided material resources and on-site support were identified as key facilitators. Student misbehavior was viewed as the greatest barrier. Although the high level of support provided by the study is not likely to be replicated in school systems, those developing wellness policies, health curricula, and teacher training programs may benefit from using the evidence-supported, publicly available HEALTHY materials in their efforts to reduce diabetes risk factors in middle school youth.

  13. 浅谈互动性学习在会计课堂的应用%Discussion on the Application of Interactive Learning in Accounting Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁燕瑜

    2012-01-01

    The traditional classroom instruction in the treatment of students and the learning relationship, often focuses too much on the objectivity, passivity and dependence and neglects the human initiative, and independence. The essence of " interactive learning " is to improve students~main body position, to focus on improving the students'quality and embody the "people - oriented" innovation education teaching idea. It reflects the students'subjectivity. Its application strategy is divided into the four following stages: creation of situations, interactive learning, common efforts of teachers and students to construct knowledge and multiple constructive evolution.%传统的课堂教学在处理学生与学习的关系时,往往过于注重人的客观性、被动性和依赖性而忽略了人的主动性、能动性和独立性。“互动性学习”的本质就是要提高学生的主体地位,着眼于学生素质的提高,体现“以人为本”的创新教育教学理念。互动性学习极大地体现了学生学习的主体性,其应用策略为教师创设情境、师生互动学习、师生共同建构知识和多元建设性评价四个阶段。

  14. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students…

  15. Teacher Follow-Through and Classroom Harmony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jane; DeLorenzo, Chip

    2011-01-01

    During the author's first year teaching, she, like many first-year teachers, found that the most difficult task in creating a peaceful classroom environment was not in the lesson giving or preparation of the classroom, but in managing the "misbehavior" of the children. Meanwhile, her mentor, a veteran teacher of over 20 years, seemed to handle the…

  16. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students…

  17. Bringing Reality to Classroom Management in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Gordon; Edwards, Susan; Cushman, Carey Anne

    2015-01-01

    Learning how to manage a classroom effectively is a difficult task for preservice teachers. This is compounded by the lack of attention that classroom management receives in many teacher preparation programs and in the field of education in general. This article offers a rationale for the lack of attention to classroom management in teacher…

  18. Bringing Reality to Classroom Management in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Gordon; Edwards, Susan; Cushman, Carey Anne

    2015-01-01

    Learning how to manage a classroom effectively is a difficult task for preservice teachers. This is compounded by the lack of attention that classroom management receives in many teacher preparation programs and in the field of education in general. This article offers a rationale for the lack of attention to classroom management in teacher…

  19. The Changing Face of Language Learning: Learning beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2015-01-01

    There are two important dimensions to successful second language learning: what goes on inside the classroom and what goes on outside of the classroom. While language teaching has always been seen as a preparation for out-of-class uses of language, much of the focus in language teaching in the past has typically been on classroom-based language…

  20. Unwelcoming Classroom Climates: The Role of Gender Microaggressions in CTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jaime; Struthers, Brice; Yamanaka, Aoi

    2017-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature, gender and CTE, classroom climate, and faculty-student interactions and presents results of a qualitative study on gender microaggressions in community college CTE classrooms.

  1. 论基础教育课程有效课堂教学系统互动生成机制%On the Interaction and the Generation Mechanism of the Effective Classroom Teaching System in Basic Education Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔友兴

    2011-01-01

    在新课程改革中,有效课堂教学成为一个广为关注的焦点。它是一种以文%The effective classroom teaching has become a focus of attention in the new curriculum reform.It's a kind of classroom teaching style,which is constructed through the medium of text in the process of interactive teaching and studying.By way of the style,the teaching subjects(teachers and students)can develop the ability,shape the personality,promote the harmonious development of knowledge,emotion,willpower and action,so that the continuous generation of the classroom teaching will be achieved.The effective classroom teaching is the integration of subject and guidance,and the integration of static state and dynamic state.It is mainly composed of such four factors as the environment,the teacher,the student and the text.

  2. Application of Flipped Classroom in English Majors' Grammar Teaching%Application of Flipped Classroom in English Majors'Grammar Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕丽梅

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzed how flipped classroom facilitated grammar teaching for English majors by indicating the principle status of students in class, shaping good classroom atmosphere of grammar learning and expanding English grammar teaching. Meanwhile, it raised strategies of flipped classroom applied in English majors' grammar teaching such as preparations before class and abundant teaching methods.

  3. Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

  4. Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

  5. Preparation and Determination of Drug-Polymer Interaction and In-vitro Release of Didanosine Microspheres made of Cellulose Acetate Phthalate or Ethyl cellulose Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi R. K; Barik B. B.; Sahoo S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the drug-polymer interaction of Didanosine using two polymers with different characteristics as Ethyl cellulose or Cellulose acetate phthalate. Microspheres were prepared by the emulsion solvent evaporation. The effect of drug-polymer interaction was studied for each of microspheres. Important parameters in the evaluation of a microencapsulation technique are encapsulation efficiency, yield production, particle size, surface characteri...

  6. Acceptability of the flipped classroom approach for in-house teaching in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eunicia; Brainard, Andrew; Larkin, Gregory L

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relative acceptability of the flipped classroom approach compared with traditional didactics for in-house teaching in emergency medicine. Our department changed its learning model from a 'standard' lecture-based model to a 'flipped classroom' model. The 'flipped classroom' included provided pre-session learning objectives and resources before each 2 h weekly session. In-session activities emphasised active learning strategies and knowledge application. Feedback was sought from all medical staff regarding the acceptability of the new approach using an online anonymous cross-sectional qualitative survey. Feedback was received from 49/57 (86%) medical staff. Ninety-eight per cent (48/49) of respondents preferred the flipped classroom over the traditional approach. Aspects of the flipped classroom learners liked most included case-based discussion, interaction with peers, application of knowledge, self-directed learning and small-group learning. Barriers to pre-session learning include work commitments, 'life', perceived lack of time, family commitments, exam preparation and high volume of learning materials. Reported motivational factors promoting pre-session learning include formal assessment, participation requirements, more time, less material, more clinical relevance and/or more interesting material. Case studies and 'hands-on' activities were perceived to be the most useful in-session activities. The flipped classroom shows promise as an acceptable approach to in-house emergency medicine teaching. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Rapid Feedback Assessment Methods: Can We Improve Engagement and Preparation for Exams in Large-Enrollment Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Sehoya H.; Fall, Bruce A.; Wick, Susan M.; Walker, J. D.; Baepler, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Scratch-off immediate feedback assessment technique (IF-AT) forms and classroom response systems (clickers) can increase student engagement and interaction and help students prepare for exams by indicating the type and level of questions they will encounter. We used the IF-AT throughout the semester in three sections of a lower-division biology…

  8. The Hubble Exoplanet Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Laura; Carson, J.; Ruwadi, D.; Low, K.; Jordan, S.; Schneider, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a status report on the Hubble Exoplanet Classroom, an interactive website designed to engage 8-12th grade students in physical science concepts using the exciting field of exoplanet studies. Addressing national teaching standards, the webpage allows educators to enhance their physical science, physics, and astronomy curriculum with student-driven lessons. The webpage records students' performance on lessons and quizzes and compiles the results, which can be accessed by the instructor using a secure website.

  9. Developing Elementary Teachers' Understandings of Hedges and Personal Pronouns in Inquiry-Based Science Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of introducing elementary teachers to the scholarly literature on personal pronouns and hedges in classroom discourse, a professional development strategy adopted during a summer institute to enhance teachers’ social understanding (i.e., their understanding of the social functions of language in science discussions). Teachers became aware of how hedges can be employed to remain neutral toward students’ oral contributions to classroom discussions, invite students to share their opinions and articulate their own ideas, and motivate students to inquire. Teachers recognized that the combined use of I and you can render their feedback authoritative, you can shift the focus from the investigation to students’ competence, and we can lead to authority loss. It is argued that explicitness, reflectivity, and contextualization are essential features of professional development programs aimed at improving teachers’ understandings of the social dimension of inquiry-based science classrooms and preparing teachers to engage in inquiry-based teacher-student interactions.

  10. Discussing How to Realize the Interaction Between Teachers and Students of Senior Chinese Classroom%浅议如何实现高中语文课堂的师生互动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄碧珍

    2014-01-01

    新课改背景下,高中的语文教学更加强调对学生兴趣的培养。课堂上师生的有效互动是调动学生课堂学习兴趣的重要方式,因此高中语文课堂教学更加强调师生互动。就如何实现高中语文课堂的师生互动展开比较细致的分析与探讨。新课改背景下,课堂内师生的有效互动成为保障各种创新教学方法实践的必然前提。%Under the background of new curriculum reform,language teaching in senior high school is more emphasis on the training of students interested.The effective interaction between teachers and students in class is an important way to mobilize students learning interest , so high school Chinese classroom teaching emphasizes the interaction between teachers and students.It discusses how to realize the interaction between teachers and students in senior high school Chinese classroom launches detailed analysis and discussion.Under the background of new curriculum reform,it is precomdition of ensuring all kinds of innovative teacheing methods and practice to interact effectively between teachers and students.

  11. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Burblies

    Full Text Available Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  12. Best Practices for Launching a Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ashley A.; DuFrene, Debbie D.

    2016-01-01

    Popularity is growing for flipped classroom instruction, which replaces lectures with out-of-class delivery of streaming video, reading materials, online chats, and other modalities. Face-to-face class time is spent on instructor-student and student-student interaction, including small group problem solving and discussion. Classroom flipping has…

  13. Classroom Observation Techniques. IDEA Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, Keith A.

    Techniques for observing the classroom behavior of teachers and students are examined. These techniques provide a framework for analyzing and understanding classroom interaction, for making decisions about what should be happening, and for changing instructional behavior when it is necessary. The observation methods allow collection, analysis, and…

  14. MOOC’s Classroom Interaction Optimization Strategy:Based on Social Capital Theory%社会资本理论视域下MOOC课堂互动策略分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田阳; 冯锐

    2014-01-01

    近年来在线教育的发展备受瞩目,尤其MOOC的兴起更是助推了在线教育向更广阔的空间发展,如Coursera、Udacity、edX等平台同时吸引了近千万的注册用户参与学习。当前针对MOOC的研究主要表现在其理论根源和发展趋势层面,实际上MOOC已经被广泛应用到高等教育的各专业学习当中,甚至有的高校已经先行一步互认MOOC学分,这些研究与当前形势不对称。该研究就是本着打破这种局面,通过分析发现MOOC课堂互动是在社交网媒环境下发生的行为现象,基于社会资本理论结合网络本身和人的自身因素分析社会网络中的现象问题。通过剖析MOOC课堂互动的网络结构、网络关系、信任、认知,解析其课堂互动引发的知识生成和知识转移现象,然后提出针对优化MOOC课堂互动的网络结构和关系网络的形成、增加MOOC课堂互动的个体间信任、减少课堂互动中存在的认知障碍和噪音干扰的四个优化策略。%In recent years, the development of online education in high-profile. In particular, the rise of MOOC is boosting the broader space for development to online education. If Coursera, Udacity, edX platforms simultaneously attracted nearly 10 million registered users to participate in learning. Current research on MOOC mainly in its theoretical origins and development trend levels. In fact MOOC has been widely applied to various professional education among higher education, and even some universities already one step ahead of the mutual recognition of MOOC credits. These studies and the current situation asymmetry. This study is in line to break this situation. The analysis shows that the behavior of classroom interaction MOOC phenomenon occurs in a social network media environment. Based on social capital theory can analyze the social network phenomenon problem combining the network itself and the human factor itself. Thus, by analyzing MOOC

  15. Classroom Ordering and the Situational Imperatives of Routine and Ritual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, David; McFarland, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    This article contends that the problem of classroom order rests less in the roles and compositions of classrooms than in the multidimensional nature of their social situations. Classroom order arises from the dynamic relationship between distinct situational requirements: the coordination of interaction into institutionalized patterns (routine)…

  16. Virtual Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    2013-01-01

    In the Scandinavian countries: Sweden, Norway and Denmark, the project GNU (Grænseoverskridende Nordisk Undervisning, i.e. Transnational Nordic Teaching) is experimenting with ways of conducting teaching across the borders in the elementary schools. The cloud classes are organised with one class ...... and benefits in regard to learning and pedagogy with virtual classroom....

  17. Classroom Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

  18. Classroom Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jacqueline; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes five classroom activities or projects used in Canadian social studies classes. Includes discussions of the use of artifacts, a field trip to Spain, a simulation of the Earth Summit meeting, and the application of mahatma Gandhi's philosophy to current problems. (CFR)

  19. The Use and Functions of Discourse Markers in EFL Classroom Interaction Los usos y las funciones de los marcadores del discurso en la interacción en el aula de inglés como lengua extranjera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Chapetón Castro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate classroom interaction in the context of English as a foreign language being the teacher a nonnative speaker of the language. One specific aspect of classroom interaction and language use is the focus of attention, namely discourse markers (DMs. Using data from an EFL class, this study describes the occurrences and frequencies of DMs. It also provides an account for the main functions of DMs as they were used by a nonnative teacher of English and five adult students of EFL. A qualitative analysis reveals that discourse markers fulfill a number of textual and interpersonal functions which may contribute greatly to the coherent and pragmatic flow of the discourse generated in classroom interaction.El artículo que aquí se presenta intenta investigar la interacción que ocurre en el aula de inglés como lengua extranjera cuando el profesor de inglés es nonativo. Un aspecto específico de la interacción en el aula y del uso del lenguaje es la presencia de los marcadores del discurso (MD. Con base en datos empíricos, este estudio pretende describir las ocurrencias, la frecuencia y las funciones principales de los MD. El análisis cualitativo de los datos revela que los MD cumplen funciones tanto textuales como interpersonales que pueden facilitar y contribuir al flujo coherente y pragmático del discurso generado en la interacción de aula.

  20. The influence of classroom aggression and classroom climate on aggressive-disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duane E; Bierman, Karen L; Powers, C J

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that early classroom experiences influence the socialization of aggression. Tracking changes in the aggressive behavior of 4,179 children from kindergarten to second-grade (ages 5-8), this study examined the impact of 2 important features of the classroom context--aggregate peer aggression and climates characterized by supportive teacher-student interactions. The aggregate aggression scores of children assigned to first-grade classrooms predicted the level of classroom aggression (assessed by teacher ratings) and quality of classroom climate (assessed by observers) that emerged by the end of Grade 1. Hierarchical linear model analyses revealed that first-grade classroom aggression and quality of classroom climate made independent contributions to changes in student aggression, as students moved from kindergarten to second grade. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

  1. Preparing Pupils to Cooperate during Cooperative Controversy in Grade 6: A Way to Increase Positive Interactions and Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Mijal; Buchs, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Research has underlined the necessity to prepare pupils to cooperate in order to boost cooperative learning benefits. However, this kind of training may appear very demanding. The present study aims to demonstrate that a short preparation related to social support and targeted cooperative rules relevant for the task increases constructive…

  2. Understanding Teachers' Routines to Inform Classroom Technology Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Pengcheng; Bakker, Saskia; Eggen, Berry

    2017-01-01

    Secondary school teachers have quite busy and complex routines in their classrooms. However, present classroom technologies usually require focused attention from teachers while being interacted with, which restricts their use in teachers' daily routines. Peripheral interaction is a human-computer interaction style that aims to enable interaction…

  3. How Much L1 Is Too Much? Teachers' Language Use in Response to Students' Abilities and Classroom Interaction in Content and Language Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yuen Yi

    2015-01-01

    In Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) classrooms where students' L2 proficiency has not reached the threshold level, teachers have been observed to use L1 to assist students in grasping specific technical terms and abstract concepts. It is argued to be a 'realistic' approach to the learning problems caused by students' limited L2…

  4. How Much L1 Is Too Much? Teachers' Language Use in Response to Students' Abilities and Classroom Interaction in Content and Language Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yuen Yi

    2015-01-01

    In Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) classrooms where students' L2 proficiency has not reached the threshold level, teachers have been observed to use L1 to assist students in grasping specific technical terms and abstract concepts. It is argued to be a 'realistic' approach to the learning problems caused by students' limited L2…

  5. Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

  6. Training Our Future Teachers: Classroom Management. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Julie; Putman, Hannah; Walsh, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This report examines traditional teacher preparation in classroom management, which is a struggle for many teachers, especially new ones. 122 teacher preparation programs--both elementary and secondary, graduate and undergraduate--were examined to review the full breadth of the professional sequence. The following conclusions are made as a result…

  7. How Creative Is Your Early Childhood Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Vanessa; Tuthill, Laura

    2012-01-01

    One of the roles of educators is to prepare their students for future success; this means preparing them to be creative thinkers capable of solving problems that do not yet exist. In order to teach children to be more creative, teachers need to be aware of barriers to creativity and minimize these in their classrooms. Some roadblocks to…

  8. How Creative Is Your Early Childhood Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Vanessa; Tuthill, Laura

    2012-01-01

    One of the roles of educators is to prepare their students for future success; this means preparing them to be creative thinkers capable of solving problems that do not yet exist. In order to teach children to be more creative, teachers need to be aware of barriers to creativity and minimize these in their classrooms. Some roadblocks to…

  9. When classroom becomes school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Vibeke Røn

    2017-01-01

    questions on how both teaching and student learning more effectively can prepare nursing students to enter a complex health care system and practice. Critique of newly educated nurses not prepared for the task, has over decades pushed forwards reforms in the nursing education throughout Europe (Spitzer...... of the studies primarily focus on the clinical learning context. Based upon educational ethnographic studies following nursing students in and out of both learning contexts (Noer, 2016) and by drawing on concepts of formation (Benner, 2011), learning strategies (Borgnakke, 2008) and positioning strategies...... & Perrenoud, 2006). In Denmark alone changes have been made numerously times in the last two decades. Concurrently, a considerable amount of studies has been published focusing on the nursing education, stressing a call for transformation. Division of learning contexts into clinical and classroom settings...

  10. The Correlation between Level of Classroom Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Classroom Management Ability Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine BABAOĞLAN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the level of classroom teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and classroom management ability perceptions and the correlation between these beliefs and perceptions. The study group were 401 classroom teachers who were working as a classroom teacher in public elementary schools, in 2009, in Burdur, Ağlasun, Kemer, Gölhisar, in Türkiye. The data was collected with the “Teacher Self-Efficacy Belief Scale” and “Classroom Management Ability Scale”. Numerous statistical techniques such as means and standard deviations and correlation were used for analyzing the data. This research findings show that the level of self-efficacy beliefs of classroom teachers are at “quite high” level. In addition to the level of classroom teachers’ "plan program activities and physical layout" dimension of the classroom management ability perceptions were "good" level, "teacher-student relationship regulation and time management" and "classroom interaction and behavior regulation" dimensions were "very good" level. Finally, it is seen that there is a meaningful and middle level correlation between the level of classroom teachers' self-efficacy beliefs and classroom management ability perceptions in all dimensions.

  11. Preparation and characterization of chemical gradient surfaces and their application for the study of cellular interaction phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Schakenraad, JM; vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    Chemical gradient surfaces are surfaces with a gradually changing chemistry along their length which is responsible for a position bound variation in physical properties, most notably, the wettability. In this review, methods to prepare (palladium deposition, diffusion technique, density gradient

  12. Learning about Chemiosmosis and ATP Synthesis with Animations Outside of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Eric E; Reindl, Katie M; Johnson, Christina; McClean, Phillip; Offerdahl, Erika G; Schroeder, Noah L; White, Alan R

    2017-04-01

    Many undergraduate biology courses have begun to implement instructional strategies aimed at increasing student interaction with course material outside of the classroom. Two examples of such practices are introducing students to concepts as preparation prior to instruction, and as conceptual reinforcement after the instructional period. Using a three-group design, we investigate the impact of an animation developed as part of the Virtual Cell Animation Collection on the topic of concentration gradients and their role in the actions of ATP synthase as a means of pre-class preparation or post-class reinforcement compared with a no-intervention control group. Results from seven sections of introductory biology (n = 732) randomized to treatments over two semesters show that students who viewed animation as preparation (d = 0.44, p assessment. Direct comparison of the preparation and reinforcement treatments shows no significant difference in student outcomes between the two treatment groups (p = 0.87). Results suggest that while student interaction with animations on the topic of concentration gradients outside of the classroom may lead to greater learning outcomes than the control group, in the traditional lecture-based course the timing of such interactions may not be as important.

  13. Learning about Chemiosmosis and ATP Synthesis with Animations Outside of the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E. Goff

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many undergraduate biology courses have begun to implement instructional strategies aimed at increasing student interaction with course material outside of the classroom. Two examples of such practices are introducing students to concepts as preparation prior to instruction, and as conceptual reinforcement after the instructional period. Using a three-group design, we investigate the impact of an animation developed as part of the Virtual Cell Animation Collection on the topic of concentration gradients and their role in the actions of ATP synthase as a means of pre-class preparation or post-class reinforcement compared with a no-intervention control group. Results from seven sections of introductory biology (n = 732 randomized to treatments over two semesters show that students who viewed animation as preparation (d = 0.44, p < 0.001 or as reinforcement (d = 0.53, p < 0.001 both outperformed students in the control group on a follow-up assessment. Direct comparison of the preparation and reinforcement treatments shows no significant difference in student outcomes between the two treatment groups (p = 0.87. Results suggest that while student interaction with animations on the topic of concentration gradients outside of the classroom may lead to greater learning outcomes than the control group, in the traditional lecture-based course the timing of such interactions may not be as important.

  14. 基于WBCL模型的交互式协同虚拟教学环境--Web Classroom%Interactive Collaborative Virtual Teaching and Learning Environment Based on WBCL Model--Web Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申瑞民; 丁大宇; 汪启军; 李孙新

    2000-01-01

    在构建主义CAI理论的基础上,结合CSCL(Computer Supported Collaborative Learning)模型,引入了WBCL(Web Based Collaborative Learning)的概念,提出了一个符合WBCL模式的、有效的远程师生交互、协同的虚拟教学环境模型--Web Classroom.该系统模型为身处异地的师生提供了一个基于Web的有效教学环境,并在Web Classroom模型的基础上实现了一个基于Web的多点语音支持的多媒体师生交流系统.

  15. Techniques for integrating the animations, multimedia, and interactive features of NASA’s climate change website, Climate Change: NASA’s Eyes on the Earth, into the classroom to advance climate literacy and encourage interest in STEM disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, L. F.; Jackson, R.; Greene, M.

    2009-12-01

    I developed a variety of educational content for the "Climate Change: NASA’s Eyes on the Earth" website, notably an interactive feature for the "Key Indicators: Ice Mass Loss" link that includes photo pair images of glaciers around the world, changes in Arctic sea ice extent videos, Greenland glacial calving time lapse videos, and Antarctic ice shelf break up animations, plus news pieces and a Sea Level Quiz. I integrated these resources and other recent NASA and JPL climate and oceanography data and information into climate change components of Oceanography Lab exercises, Oceanography lectures and Introduction to Environmental Technology courses. I observed that using these Internet interactive features in the classroom greatly improved student participation, topic comprehension, scientific curiosity and interest in Earth and climate science across diverse student populations. Arctic Sea Ice Extent Summer 2007 Credit: NASA

  16. The Effects of a Creative Problem-Solving Workshop upon the Cognitive Operations of Verbal Classroom Interaction in the primary School Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Felix

    1972-01-01

    Results of the inservice workshop indicated that there was a decrease in routine and cognitive/memory verbal interaction while convergent and divergent thinking verbal interaction increased. Evaluative thinking verbal interaction remained stable. (Author)

  17. Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeman, L.D.; Wubbels, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; van der Ende, J.; Maras, A.; Hopman, J.A.B.; Tick, Nouchka

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher–child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both t

  18. Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeman, L.D.; Wubbels, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; van der Ende, J.; Maras, A.; Hopman, J.A.B.; Tick, Nouchka

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher–child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both t

  19. Exploring a Flipped Classroom Approach in a Japanese Language Classroom: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prefume, Yuko Enomoto

    2015-01-01

    A flipped classroom approach promotes active learning and increases teacher-student interactions by maximizing face-to-face class time (Hamdan, McKnight, Mcknight, Arfstrom, & Arfstrom, 2013). In this study, "flipped classroom" is combined with the use of technology and is described as an instructional approach that provides lectures…

  20. Counseling Special Students: An Activity Book for Encouraging Positive Interaction Between Non-Handicapped and Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Hazel

    The activity book is designed to assist school counselors in preparing nonhandicapped persons to interact in a positive manner with the handicapped. An introductory section defines the term handicapped, offers program management guidelines, considers needs assessment, and describes three counseling models (peer helper, classroom guidance, and…

  1. The Impact of Misbehavior on Classroom Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Nancy J.; Jones, Cathy R.; Costner, Richard H.; Savage-David, Emma; Hunt, Gilbert H.

    2011-01-01

    Classrooms are complex societies. Teachers are the leaders of these societies and the way they exercise their leadership abilities greatly affects the interactions that take place between teachers and students as well as interactions between the students themselves. These interactions, both social and instructional, have a great impact on the…

  2. Research of One-to-One Digital Learning Environment in Interactive Response Smart Classroom%一对一数字化互动反馈智能课堂学习环境研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟东; 金义富

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize the comprehensive and timely interactive response in classroom teaching, lfexible carry out learning of various pattern, evaluation, analysis and management, with interactive response system as the foundation, combined with the e-Schoolbag, one-to-one digital learning, cloud desktop, knowledge base and virtual classroom digital learning related technical analysis, large data based learning more improved, we establish a one-to-one digital interactive response smart classroom learning environment. The formation of the knowledge base, can be used for analysis of the learning based Big Data, personalized learning resource recommendation, association search heuristic knowledge, the subjective questions’ automatic scoring. This paper putted forward a method of subjective score of the cross, and gives the main lfow scheme. it is realized that the complex subjective questions can also be interactive and quickly feedback in the class.%为了实现课堂教学中及时全面的互动反馈,灵活开展各种模式的学习和评价分析管理,该文以互动反馈系统为基础,结合电子书包、一对一数字化学习、云桌面、知识库、基于大数据的学习分析、虚拟课堂等数字化学习相关技术进行改进后,构建了一种一对一数字化互动反馈智能课堂学习环境。形成的知识库,可进行基于大数据的学习分析、个性化学习资源推荐、启发式联想搜索知识、主观题的自动评分等。该文提出了一种主观题交叉评分的方法,并给出了主要流程方案,实现了复杂主观题也能进行互动并可当堂反馈。

  3. Racial identification, knowledge, and the politics of everyday life in an Arizona science classroom: A linguistic ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brendan Harold

    This dissertation is a linguistic ethnography of a high school Astronomy/Oceanography classroom in southern Arizona, where an exceptionally promising, novice, white science teacher and mostly Mexican-American students confronted issues of identity and difference through interactions both related and unrelated to science learning. Through close analysis of video-recorded, naturally-occurring interaction and rich ethnographic description, the study documents how a teacher and students accomplished everyday classroom life, built caring relationships, and pursued scientific inquiry at a time and in a place where nationally- and locally-circulating discourses about immigration and race infused even routine interactions with tension and uncertainty. In their talk, students appropriated elements of racializing discourses, but also used language creatively to "speak back" to commonsense notions about Mexicanness. Careful examination of science-related interactions reveals the participants' negotiation of multiple, intersecting forms of citizenship (i.e., cultural and scientific citizenship) in the classroom, through multidirectional processes of language socialization in which students and the teacher regularly exchanged expert and novice roles. This study offers insight into the continuing relevance of racial, cultural, and linguistic identity to students' experiences of schooling, and sheds new light on classroom discourse, teacher-student relationships, and dimensions of citizenship in science learning, with important implications for teacher preparation and practice.

  4. Bringing Classroom-Based Assessment into the EFL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Finch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   This paper describes how English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers can bring reliable, valid, user-friendly assessment into their classrooms, and thus improve the quality of learning that occurs there. Based on the experience of the author as a an EFL teacher and teacher-trainer, it is suggested that the promotion and development of autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem that takes place in a Classroom-Based Assessment (CBA environment facilitates an holistic approach to language learning and prepares the students for the high-stakes tests that often determine their motivation for learning English. Rather than relying on the memorization of language code, form, lexis, and prepared answers, students who have learned in a CBA environment are able to self-assess, peer-assess, build portfolios, and edit their own work. Not only does this reduce the assessment burden on the teacher, but it also develops the skills of problem-solving, critical thinking, and summarization in the students, in addition to a heightened awareness of the language-learning process. By learning how to set goals, assess their achievements, and reflect on their future learning needs, students become more efficient language learners. While acknowledging the place of standardized, summative tests in contemporary society, it is suggested that CBA in the EFL classroom can enhance long-term learning and consequently enable and empower students to prepare for their future learning needs.

  5. Preparation and characterization of chemical gradient surfaces and their application for the study of cellular interaction phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Schakenraad, JM; vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    Chemical gradient surfaces are surfaces with a gradually changing chemistry along their length which is responsible for a position bound variation in physical properties, most notably, the wettability. In this review, methods to prepare (palladium deposition, diffusion technique, density gradient me

  6. Using Interactive Online Role-Playing Simulations to Develop Global Competency and to Prepare Engineering Students for a Globalised World

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dominik; Wold, Kari; Moore, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The world is changing significantly, and it is becoming increasingly globalised. This means that countries, businesses, and professionals must think and act globally to be successful. Many individuals, however, are not prepared with the global competency skills needed to communicate and perform effectively in a globalised system. To address this…

  7. Preparation and characterization of chemical gradient surfaces and their application for the study of cellular interaction phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Schakenraad, JM; vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    Chemical gradient surfaces are surfaces with a gradually changing chemistry along their length which is responsible for a position bound variation in physical properties, most notably, the wettability. In this review, methods to prepare (palladium deposition, diffusion technique, density gradient me

  8. Purification of saponins from leaves of Panax notoginseng using preparative two-dimensional reversed-phase liquid chromatography/hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiujie; Zhang, Xiuli; Feng, Jiatao; Guo, Zhimou; Xiao, Yuansheng; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-04-01

    Saponins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and have been shown to be active components of many medicinal herbs. In this study, a two-dimensional purification method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography was successfully applied to purify saponins from leaves of Panax notoginseng. Nine saponin reference standards were used to test the separation modes and columns. The standards could not be resolved using C18 columns owing to their limited polar selectivity. However, they were completely separated on a XAmide column in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode, including two pairs of standards that were coeluted on a C18 column. The elution order of the standards on the two columns was sufficiently different, with a correlation coefficient between retention times on the C18 and XAmide columns of 0.0126, indicating good column orthogonality. Therefore, the first-dimension preparation was performed on a C18 column, followed by a XAmide column that was used to separate the fractions in the second dimension. Fifty-four fractions were prepared in the first dimension, with 25 fractions rich in saponins. Eight saponins, including two pairs of isomeric saponins and one new saponin, were isolated and identified from three representative fractions. This procedure was shown to be an effective approach for the preparative isolation and purification of saponins from leaves of P. notoginseng. Moreover, this method could possibly be employed in the purification of low-content and novel active saponins from natural products.

  9. Preparation of water-soluble glycoconjugated poly(acrylamide) for NMR analyses of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Trinh Anh; Trung, Phan Nghia; Dinh, Bui Long; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kato, Koichi

    2014-05-01

    Oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates are important biopolymers not only as carriers of information in cell-cell interactions but also as markers of cellular differentiation, aging, and malignant alteration. Molecular interactions where carbohydrates are involved are usually considered as weak interactions, so the study and evaluation of these interactions is still in its infancy. The evidences and studies of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCI) will be confirming the importance of this mechanism for specific cell adhesion and communication. Their development will go hand in hand with the development of new and more sensitive techniques to study weak interactions. Recently, synthetic glycopolymers with functions similar to those of such natural carbohydrates and with specific pendant saccharide moieties were used as a solution for enhancement CCI when forming polyvalent interactions. Carbohydrates are ubiquitous components of cell wall membranes and occur as glycolipids, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and capsular polysaccharides. As such they can participate in forefront intramolecular and intracellular events. Apart from their recognized roles in the physicochemical properties of glycolipids and glycoproteins. In this study, we designed trisaccharide monomers for free radical polymerization. Subsequently, the trisaccharide unit for chemical conjugation was synthesized from galactosamine in good yield. For further NMR analyses of CCI, glycopolymers composed of these sugar derivatives will be provided.

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; Fletcher, Brooke; McMullen, Evelyn; Beyene, Joseph; Shah, Prakesh S

    2016-01-01

    The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs is thought to be important for children's outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children's outcomes.

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  12. Improving Method-in-Use through Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Method-in-use (Nunn, Describing classroom interaction in intercultural curricular research and development, University of Reading, 1996, International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching 37: 23-42, 1999) is a description of the method actually being enacted through classroom interaction in a particular context. The description is…

  13. Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Stears

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners construct knowledge in social settings. In our research we attempted to determine the types of outcomes achieved in a Grade 6 classroom where alternative strategies such as interactive assessments were implemented. Analyses of these outcomes show that the learners learned much more than the tests indicate, although what they learnt was not necessarily science. The implications for assessment are clear: strategies that assess knowledge of science concepts, as well as assessment of outcomes other than science outcomes, are required if we wish to gain a holistic understanding of the learning that occurs in science classrooms.

  14. Interactive Research on"Flipped Classroom"and College History Teaching Practice%“翻转课堂”与高校历史学教学实践互动研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仝相卿

    2016-01-01

    高校教师利用“翻转课堂”提高学生习热情的具体实践,包括师生角色、教学地点和时间的翻转等,有seminar、图书馆“读架”、实地考察、QQ群、朋友圈等形式,在实施过程中,学生要适应角色主动学习,教师要转变教学理念,做好引导者的角色,通过师生之间的良性互动和“翻转”,使翻转课堂在高等教育人才培养中发挥更有效的作用。%College teachers use"flipped classroom"improve the students learning enthusiasm of the specific practice, inclu-ding the roles of teachers and students, the teaching time and place such as rollover, seminar, library"reading frame, field trips, QQ group, circle of friends and other forms, in the implementation process, students should adapt to the role of active learning, teachers should change the teaching idea, do a guide role through benign interaction between teachers and students and"flip"the flipped classroom to play a more effective role in talent cultivation in higher education.

  15. Learning from avatars: Learning assistants practice physics pedagogy in a classroom simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, Jacquelyn J.; Straub, Carrie L.; Thomas, Kevin H.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] Undergraduate students are increasingly being used to support course transformations that incorporate research-based instructional strategies. While such students are typically selected based on strong content knowledge and possible interest in teaching, they often do not have previous pedagogical training. The current training models make use of real students or classmates role playing as students as the test subjects. We present a new environment for facilitating the practice of physics pedagogy skills, a highly immersive mixed-reality classroom simulator, and assess its effectiveness for undergraduate physics learning assistants (LAs). LAs prepared, taught, and reflected on a lesson about motion graphs for five highly interactive computer generated student avatars in the mixed-reality classroom simulator. To assess the effectiveness of the simulator for this population, we analyzed the pedagogical skills LAs intended to practice and exhibited during their lessons and explored LAs' descriptions of their experiences with the simulator. Our results indicate that the classroom simulator created a safe, effective environment for LAs to practice a variety of skills, such as questioning styles and wait time. Additionally, our analysis revealed areas for improvement in our preparation of LAs and use of the simulator. We conclude with a summary of research questions this environment could facilitate.

  16. 基于认知耦合态的翻转课堂人机交互设计%Human-Computer Interaction Design for Flipped Classroom Based on Cognitive Coupling States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凤燕; 朱旭; 程仁贵; 孟世敏

    2014-01-01

    在无监督环境中,保持学生持续而有效的学习是翻转课堂的难点。翻转课堂无监督学习环境是人机情境。从人机交互角度,学生沉浸在持续学习中,达到有效学习、深度学习状态,也称“人机认知耦合态”。认知耦合态是学生认知结构、个性、能力和教师设计的学习内容、情境、轨道匹配的状态,是学生和机器相互依赖,形成高效学习体。人机耦合态设计理念上需理解学生心理规律及过程,让计算机成为“教助理”引导学生学习;设计形式上需采集人机交互数据、观测学习过程、创意耦合情境、调制认知过程。翻转课堂中人机认知耦合设计重点是教学资源结构、认知思维过程、在线导学互动、学习成像形式、认知大数据处理技术、实证教学实施方法。基于人机认知耦合态的翻转课堂是教育数字化、实证化思想的实践,也是信息技术与教育深度融合的尝试。%The difficult point in the flipped classroom is how to keep persistent and effective learning in unsupervised environment. The unsupervised learning environment in the flipped classroom is human-computer situation. In human-computer interaction, the persistent learning requires that students immerse themselves in interactive situation, so as to achieve the effective learning and deep learning, which is known as Cognitive Coupling State (CCS). The CCS is a match between the cognitive structure, personality, ability of students and the learning content, design situation, track of teachers ’ design. Students and machines rely on each other. When one designs the CCS, he should study the psychology of students and use computers as teaching assistants to guide students’ learning. Collecting the data of the human-computer interaction, observing learning process, creating coupling situation and modulating cognitive process are needed in the design of CCS. The key points of

  17. Presence of a substance in the Third International Standard of Old Tuberculin that interacts negatively with the biological potency of the preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtung, O; Fodstad, F; Mordal, K; Waaler, H

    1968-01-01

    In the course of experiments designed as part of a biological assay of the Third International Standard of Old Tuberculin (OT) it was noticed that this preparation at the usual concentrations failed to elicit the expected concentration-response in persons on whom the von Pirquet was performed.Further specially designed experiments have shown that this phenomenon is due to the presence in the Third OT Standard of a substance that interferes with, or blocks, the biological response to the tuberculin. However, the substance has not yet been identified nor has a model yet been constructed to explain in detail the nature of the interaction between that substance and the tuberculin.

  18. Creating Classrooms of Preference: An Exercise in Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews Appreciative Inquiry (AI) as a process used in organizational creation and change and then outlines steps for an in-class exercise titled "The Preferred Classroom," to be used to design and organize a college classroom for the term. The exercise also prepares business students for future exposure to AI. A brief literature…

  19. Persistent Classroom Management Training Needs of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Laura M.; Montague, Marcia L.; Landmark, Leena Jo; Williams-Diehm, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Experienced special education teachers (n = 62) were surveyed on their professional preparation to become effective classroom managers. Despite having received extensive preservice training, over 83% of the sample reported being underprepared in classroom management and behavioral interventions. No statistically significant difference was found…

  20. Social Obstacles to Intercultural Competence in America's Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Greber, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    In contrast with debates over language pedagogy or aptitude, this paper examines seven societal obstacles which impact the success of classroom language learning and the development of intercultural competence in American language classrooms. These include expectations for teacher preparation, language proficiency and target language use;…

  1. Latest LHCf results and preparation to the LHC run for 13 TeV proton–proton interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonechi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment is a CERN experiment dedicated to forward physics which is optimized to measure the neutral particle flow at extreme pseudo-rapidity values, ranging from 8.4 up to infinity. LHCf results are extremely important for the calibration of the hadronic interaction models used for the study of the development of atmospheric showers in the Earth atmosphere. Starting from the recent run of proton-Lead nucleus interactions at LHC, the LHCf and ATLAS collaborations have performed a common data taking which allows a combined study of the central and forward regions of the interaction. The latest results of LHCf, the upgrade of the detectors for the next 6.5 TeV + 6.5 TeV proton–proton run and the status of the LHCf-ATLAS common activities are summarized in this paper.

  2. Preparation and surface functionalization of MWCNTs: study of the composite materials produced by the interaction with an iron phthalocyanine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asedegbega-Nieto, Esther; Pérez-Cadenas, María; Carter, Jonathan; Anderson, James A; Guerrero-Ruiz, Antonio

    2011-04-20

    Carbon nanotubes [CNTs] were synthesized by the catalytic vapor decomposition method. Thereafter, they were functionalized in order to incorporate the oxygen groups (OCNT) and subsequently the amine groups (ACNT). All three CNTs (the as-synthesized and functionalized) underwent reaction with an iron organometallic complex (FePcS), iron(III) phthalocyanine-4,4",4",4"-tetrasulfonic acid, in order to study the nature of the interaction between this complex and the CNTs and the potential formation of nanocomposite materials. Transmission electronic microscopy, N2 adsorption at 77 K, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature-programmed desorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were the characterization techniques employed to confirm the successful functionalization of CNTs as well as the type of interaction existing with the FePcS. All results obtained led to the same conclusion: There were no specific chemical interactions between CNTs and the fixed FePcS.

  3. Preparation and surface functionalization of MWCNTs: study of the composite materials produced by the interaction with an iron phthalocyanine complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes [CNTs] were synthesized by the catalytic vapor decomposition method. Thereafter, they were functionalized in order to incorporate the oxygen groups (OCNT and subsequently the amine groups (ACNT. All three CNTs (the as-synthesized and functionalized underwent reaction with an iron organometallic complex (FePcS, iron(III phthalocyanine-4,4",4",4""-tetrasulfonic acid, in order to study the nature of the interaction between this complex and the CNTs and the potential formation of nanocomposite materials. Transmission electronic microscopy, N2 adsorption at 77 K, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature-programmed desorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were the characterization techniques employed to confirm the successful functionalization of CNTs as well as the type of interaction existing with the FePcS. All results obtained led to the same conclusion: There were no specific chemical interactions between CNTs and the fixed FePcS.

  4. Three Big Hands-On Noncomputer Models for the Biology Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James E.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes models for the lichen symbiosis, genomic, and plasmid DNA and fluid mosaic membrane structure. The models operate at the classroom level with the classroom becoming the cell in a DNA exercise with students as interactive components. (DDR)

  5. Interação entre professora e alunos em salas de aula com proposta pedagógica de educação inclusiva Teacher and students' interaction in classrooms with pedagogical proposal in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cerqueira da Silva

    2005-12-01

    the teacher's mastery of knowledge, his technic-scientifical capability and ability to teach through research, the socio-cultural characteristics and psychological profiles of the social actors involved - teacher and student. With the goal of searching for a better understanding of this universe, this study was developed and aimed at describing the interactions occurring between a teacher and her students in classrooms in which it was proposed to adopt an inclusive classroom. The data were collected in 2 classrooms in a public primary school in the city of Bauru. The data collecting process was carried out by videotaping the classroom allowing the data to be reviewed later. The taping took place during the first semester of the 2001 school year. The analysis of the data was based on a previously developed system of categories, and the data were dealt quantitative and qualitatively. The results showed peculiarities and differences in the interactions of the teacher with her students, due to the presence or absence of disability. The interaction also demonstrated advances in educational practice regarding the teacher´s attention to the student with disability.

  6. 初中语文教学中如何实现课堂互动的探讨%Explore How to Achieve Interactive Classroom in Junior High School Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗小红

    2012-01-01

    在新课程改革背景下,教师的教学方法与学生的学习方法均发生了改变。要求教师积极转变教学思路,在教学中如何实现课堂互动,构建良好的师生关系,提高学生学习主动性与积极性。本文将对此问题进行分析与阐述。%In the context of the new curriculum reform, the teacher's teaching methods and students' learning method has changed. Requiresteachers to change their teaching ideas, classroom interaction, teaching how to build a good teacher-stu- dent relationship, to improve students' motivation to learn and enthusiasm. This article describes the analysis and interpreta- tion of this issue.

  7. Content, Preparation, and Formative Evaluation of an Interactive Videodisc System to Enhance Communication Skills in Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Michael W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The process of developing and evaluating an interactive videodisc system to teach communication skills for community and institutional pharmacy practice settings is described. An interdisciplinary team was used to integrate therapeutics, communication theory, media design, video production, and computer programing in the software development…

  8. Preparing Business Vocabulary for the ESP Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangpijaikul, Montri

    2014-01-01

    This research combines corpus-based and intuition-based approaches in developing a list of important words in business news that Thai learners of business English need to know. The Thai corpus of English for Business and Economic News (Thai-EBEN) has been compiled from English business news articles in the Thai press. A computer concordancing…

  9. Preparing Business Vocabulary for the ESP Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangpijaikul, Montri

    2014-01-01

    This research combines corpus-based and intuition-based approaches in developing a list of important words in business news that Thai learners of business English need to know. The Thai corpus of English for Business and Economic News (Thai-EBEN) has been compiled from English business news articles in the Thai press. A computer concordancing…

  10. Preparation of a new nanobiosensor for the determination of some biogenic polyamines and investigation of their interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Noori, Abolhassan; Zahra Bathaie, S; Yousef-Elahi, Mozhdeh; Mousavi, Mir F

    2016-03-15

    Biogenic polyamines are small organic polycations involving in a variety of biological processes. They form high affinity complexes with DNA. Here, we have followed two different novel approaches, either fabrication of an electrochemical nanobiosensor for determination of three of the most important biogenic polyamines; spermine (SPM), spermidine (SPD) and putrescine (PUT), or electrochemical investigation of their interaction with DNA. Strong binding of polyamines to DNA makes the DNA a suitable recognition element for construction of a sensitive biosensor. The fabricated biosensor responded to SPM, SPD and PUT over an extended dynamic range of 0.04-100 μM, 0.01-24 μM, and 0.08-100 μM respectively, with low detection limits of a few nM. We also studied the interaction of polyamines with three different DNA sequences with base composition of 100% AT, 80% AT and 100% GC in the presence of [Ru(NH3)6]3(+) as a redox probe. The highest kb values were obtained in the interaction of polyamines with 80% AT (mixed) DNA sequence. The kb values were 5.24 × 10(5), 4.17 × 10(5) and 1.46 × 10(5)M(-1) for SPM, SPD and PUT, respectively, which correlated well with their increasing number of amino groups. In addition, competition study showed the impotence of SPD to replace with histone H1 in histone H1-DNA complex, which indicates the more potent interaction of histone H1 with DNA. In this proof-of-principle study, we have proposed an approach for simple, cost-effective, miniaturizable, and direct-readout detection of polyamines, as well as the understanding of the modes of interaction between polyamines and DNA.

  11. Twelve tips for "flipping" the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. The following tips outline the steps involved in making a successful transition to a flipped classroom approach. The tips are based on the available literature alongside the author's experience of using the approach in a medical education setting. Flipping a classroom has a number of potential benefits, for example increased educator-student interaction, but must be planned and implemented carefully to support effective learning.

  12. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  13. The preparation of an elastomer/silicate layer nanocompound with an exfoliated structure and a strong ionic interfacial interaction by utilizing an elastomer latex containing pyridine groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-jian; Wang, Yi-qing; Feng, Yi-ping; Liu, Qing-sheng; Zhang, Li-qun

    2010-03-19

    A great variety of polymer/layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites have been reported, however, there are few exfoliated PLS nanocomposites and their inorganic-organic interfaces are still a great problem, especially for the elastomers. In this research, a kind of exfoliated elastomer/silicate layer nanocompound was prepared and proved by XRD and TEM, in which 10 phr Na(+)-montmorillonite was dispersed in butadiene-styrene-vinyl pyridine rubber by latex compounding method with acidic flocculants. Moreover, a dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) suggested a strong interfacial interaction (interaction parameter B(H) = 4.91) between the silicate layers and macromolecules in addition to the weak inorganic-organic interfacial interaction, and solid state (15)N NMR indicated the formation of a strong ionic interface through the acidifying pyridine. Subsequently, a remarkable improvement of the dispersing morphology, mechanical performance and gas barrier property appeared, compared to that using calcium ion flocculants. This supports the formation of an exfoliated structure and an improved interfacial interaction.

  14. Highly conductive poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-reduced graphene oxide composite prepared by self-assembly of PMMA latex and graphene oxide through electrostatic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Viet Hung; Dang, Thanh Truong; Hur, Seung Hyun; Kim, Eui Jung; Chung, Jin Suk

    2012-05-01

    We report a simple, environmentally friendly approach for preparing highly conductive poly(methyl methacrylate)-reduced graphene oxide (PMMA-RGO) composites by self-assembly of positively charged PMMA latex particles and negatively charged graphene oxide sheets through electrostatic interactions, followed by hydrazine reduction. The PMMA latex was prepared by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization using a cationic free radical initiator, which created the positive charges on the surface of the PMMA particle. By mixing PMMA latex with a graphene oxide dispersion, positively charged PMMA particles easily assembled with negatively charged graphene oxide sheets through electrostatic interaction. The obtained PMMA-RGO exhibited excellent electrical properties with a percolation threshold as low as 0.16 vol % and an electrical conductivity of 64 S/m at only 2.7 vol %. Moreover, the thermomechanical properties of PMMA-RGO were also significantly improved. The storage modulus of PMMA-RGO increased by about 30% at 4.0 wt % RGO at room temperature while the glass transition temperature of PMMA-RGO increased 15 °C at only 0.5 wt % RGO.

  15. Controlled interactions between anhydrous keggin-type heteropolyacids and silica support: Preparation and characterization of well-defined silica-supported polyoxometalate species

    KAUST Repository

    Grinenval, Eva

    2010-11-11

    Anhydrous Keggin-type phosphorus heteropolyacids were deposited on partially dehydroxylated silica by using the surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) strategy. The resulting solids were characterized by a combination of physicochemical methods including IR, Raman, 1D and 2D 1H, and 31P MAS NMR, electron microscopy experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is shown that the main surface species is [ - Si(OH...H+)]2[H+]1[PM 12O403-] where the polyoxometalate is linked to the support by proton interaction with two silanols. Two other minor species (10% each) are formed by coordination of the polyoxometalate to the surface via the interaction between all three protons with three silanol groups or via three covalent bonds formed by dehydroxylation of the above species. Comparison of the reactivity of these solids and of compounds prepared by a classical way shows that the samples prepared by the SOMC approach contain ca. 7 times more acid sites. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. The Dynamics of Classroom Small Talk

    OpenAIRE

    Luk, Jasmine

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates how classroom small talk between a teacher and students constitutes a distinct interaction pattern which varies significantly from pedagogical discourse of an institutional nature such as the initiation/response/feedback (IRF) pattern described in previous literature (Mehan, 1979; Sinclair & Coulthard, 1975). By presenting a piece of extended small talk in an ESL secondary classroom in Hong Kong and contrasting it with a piece of typical teacher-orchestrated institution...

  17. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention.2 We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time Teaching approach (JiTT).3 To our surprise, this tweak—which we like to call the flip-JiTT—ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

  18. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet, it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time-Teaching approach (JiTT). To our surprise, this tweak - which we like to call the flip-JiTT - ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

  19. The Construction of Interactive Classroom Teaching Mode%互动式教学模式的构建——以大学英语课堂教学为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李菁菁

    2012-01-01

      In essential, language teaching is an interactive activity of communication. In the course of teaching, teachers need to build an interactive atmosphere for inspiring the students to gain second language competence. On the basis of the University English Teaching Requirements, constructing the interactive classroom teaching mode integrated with teaching experience is mainly investigated.%  外语教学本质上是一种互动式的交际活动。教师在教学过程中,应积极地为学生营造多样化、互动式的语言学习环境,引导学生在互动中提高语言的综合运用能力。本文以大学英语课程教学要求为依据,结合大学英语课堂教学实践,探讨互动式教学模式的构建。

  20. Interactive Model of Foreign Autonomous Learning in Virtual Classroom Based on Network%基于网络的虚拟课堂下外语自主学习的交互模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡启实; 余卫星

    2015-01-01

    依据外语自主学习教学的模式,分析其当前的教学特点,借助自主学习平台和虚拟课堂云桌面模式,详细阐述自主学习交互模式,包括教师与学生互动和学生与学生互动,设置教学虚拟班级,明确教与学的主体流程,分析其个性问题与共性问题,分类施教;并提出交互中的测试模式.%In the consideration of foreign language autonomous learning mode, analyses of the current characteristics, according to foreign language learning platform and virtual classroom cloud desktop model, describes the interactive model of autonomous learning in details, including the interaction between teachers and students, students and students, sets up teaching virtual class, defines its main process, analyses the personality and common problems, teaches students in accordance with their aptitude and different types, and puts forward test mode of interaction.