WorldWideScience

Sample records for prepare medical students

  1. Preparing Australian medical students for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Evelyn I Hamel; Blashki, Grant; Berry, Helen L; Harley, David; Horton, Graeme; Hall, Gillian

    2009-09-01

    Climate change is now recognised as a global public health problem and the future medical workforce will be working during a period when the health impacts of climate change are likely to be significant. This article discusses the ongoing training on the health impacts of climate change for the current and future medical workforce. The role of medical practitioners in the coming decades will need to include assisting communities to adapt to changing climatic conditions, managing climate sensitive illnesses, and contributing to mitigation efforts to prevent climate change. Climate change and health should be built into the curricula of Australian medical schools spanning public health, clinical medicine, preventive health and global health. We propose a problem based learning approach to highlight clinical and public health implications, and present two hypothetical case studies suitable for teaching purposes.

  2. Preparing Fourth-Year Medical Students to Teach During Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Richard J; Bardach, Naomi S; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Gillum, Leslie A; Haber, Lawrence A; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet S

    2006-01-01

    Interns are expected to teach medical students, yet there is little formal training in medical school to prepare them for this role. To enhance the teaching skills of our graduating students we initiated a 4-hour “teaching to teach” course as part of the end of the fourth-year curriculum. Course evaluations demonstrate that students strongly support this program (overall ratings 2000 to 2005: mean = 4.4 [scale 1 to 5], n = 224). When 2004 course participants were surveyed during the last month of their internship, 84%“agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “The teaching to teach course helped prepare me for my role as a teacher during internship” (2005: mean 4.2 [scale 1 to 5], n = 45, response rate 60%). A course preparing fourth-year students to teach during internship is both feasible and reproducible, with a minimal commitment of faculty and resident time. Participants identify it as an important addition to their education and as useful during internship. PMID:16704402

  3. How do medical students prepare for flipped classrooms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM; de Kleijn, R.A.M.; ten Cate, TJ; van Rijen, HVM; Westerveld, HE

    A flipped classroom, an approach abandoning traditional lectures and having students come together to apply acquired knowledge, requires students to come to class well prepared. The nature of this preparation is currently being debated. Watching web lectures as a preparation has typically been

  4. Ready or not? Expectations of faculty and medical students for clinical skills preparation for clerkships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Wenrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preclerkship clinical-skills training has received increasing attention as a foundational preparation for clerkships. Expectations among medical students and faculty regarding the clinical skills and level of skill mastery needed for starting clerkships are unknown. Medical students, faculty teaching in the preclinical setting, and clinical clerkship faculty may have differing expectations of students entering clerkships. If students' expectations differ from faculty expectations, students may experience anxiety. Alternately, congruent expectations among students and faculty may facilitate integrated and seamless student transitions to clerkships. Aims: To assess the congruence of expectations among preclerkship faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students for the clinical skills and appropriate level of clinical-skills preparation needed to begin clerkships. Methods: Investigators surveyed preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students early in their basic clerkships at a North American medical school that focuses on preclerkship clinical-skills development. Survey questions assessed expectations for the appropriate level of preparation in basic and advanced clinical skills for students entering clerkships. Results: Preclinical faculty and students had higher expectations than clerkship faculty for degree of preparation in most basic skills. Students had higher expectations than both faculty groups for advanced skills preparation. Conclusions: Preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students appear to have different expectations of clinical-skills training needed for clerkships. As American medical schools increasingly introduce clinical-skills training prior to clerkships, more attention to alignment, communication, and integration between preclinical and clerkship faculty will be important to establish common curricular agendas and increase integration of student learning. Clarification of skills

  5. Medical Student Use of Facebook to Support Preparation for Anatomy Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D.; Bickerdike, Suzanne R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of Facebook to support students is an emerging area of educational research. This study explored how a Facebook Page could support Year 2 medical (MBChB) students in preparation for summative anatomy assessments and alleviate test anxiety. Overall, Facebook analytics revealed that in total 49 (19.8% of entire cohort) students posted a…

  6. A 1-week simulated internship course helps prepare medical students for transition to residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laack, Torrey A; Newman, James S; Goyal, Deepi G; Torsher, Laurence C

    2010-06-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is inherently stressful, with potentially negative consequences for both interns and patients. We describe Internship Boot Camp, an innovative course specifically designed to prepare fourth-year medical students for the transition from medical school to internship. An intensive 1-week course, Internship Boot Camp has simulated, longitudinal patient-care scenarios that use high-fidelity medical simulation, standardized patients, procedural task trainers, and problem-based learning to help students apply their knowledge and develop a framework for response to the challenges they will face as interns. In March 2007, 12 students participated in the course as an elective in their final year of medical school, and the other 28 students in their class did not. After beginning internship and 5 to 7 months after the completion of Internship Boot Camp, all 40 former students were asked to complete a blinded survey about their preparation for internship. The overall response rate for the survey was 80%. Of responders to an open-ended question about the aspects of medical school training that best prepared them for internship, 89% (8 of 9) of course participants listed "Internship Boot Camp." The next highest response ("subinternship") was given by 45% (9 of 20) of nonparticipants and 33% (3 of 9) of course participants. Internship Boot Camp is a unique learning environment that is recalled by participants as the most helpful, of all components of their medical school education, in preparation for internship.

  7. Medical students` perceptions of supporting pharmacology learning in English by key information prepared in Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ياسين, تيم; مروان, حجلة ابو; ريجينالد, سيكويرا

    2017-07-16

    We explored medical students` perceptions of supporting pharmacology self-learning in English by focused materials prepared in Arabic. This study targeted third-year medical students at the Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain (n= 183). During the endocrine and metabolism subunit, which is taught in English, slides containing focused information in Arabic preceded detailed English ones. At the end of the subunit, students` perceptions were explored by a questionnaire and focus group discussions. Most participants reported that this intervention made pharmacology learning easier, improved confidence in drug selection, knowledge of adverse drug reactions, detection of response to medications and occurrence of adverse reactions. Most respondents thought that this intervention would help them during the clinical phase of their study and in communicating drug therapy to patients in Arabic. Supporting pharmacology learning in a foreign language with instructional materials prepared in a native language improved students self-reported learning and satisfaction.

  8. Course Offerings in the Fourth Year of Medical School: How U.S. Medical Schools Are Preparing Students for Internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnicki, D Michael; Gallagher, Susan; Willett, Laura; Kane, Gregory; Muntz, Martin; Henry, Daniel; Cannarozzi, Maria; Stewart, Emily; Harrell, Heather; Aiyer, Meenakshy; Salvit, Cori; Chudgar, Saumil; Vu, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The fourth year of medical school remains controversial, despite efforts to reform it. A committee from the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine examined transitions from medical school to internship with the goal of better academic advising for students. In 2013 and 2014, the committee examined published literature and the Web sites of 136 Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited schools for information on current course offerings for the fourth year of medical school. The authors summarized temporal trends and outcomes when available.Subinternships were required by 122 (90%) of the 136 schools and allow students to experience the intern's role. Capstone courses are increasingly used to fill curricular gaps. Revisiting basic sciences in fourth-year rotations helps to reinforce concepts from earlier years. Many schools require rotations in specific settings, like emergency departments, intensive care units, or ambulatory clinics. A growing number of schools require participation in research, including during the fourth year. Students traditionally take fourth-year clinical electives to improve skills, both within their chosen specialties and in other disciplines. Some students work with underserved populations or seek experiences that will be henceforth unavailable, whereas others use electives to "audition" at desired residency sites. Fourth-year requirements vary considerably among medical schools, reflecting different missions and varied student needs. Few objective outcomes data exist to guide students' choices. Nevertheless, both medical students and educators value the fourth year of medical school and feel it can fill diverse functions in preparing for residency.

  9. The key role of a transition course in preparing medical students for internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Alan R; Harleman, Elizabeth; O'sullivan, Patricia S; Maa, John

    2011-07-01

    Among the core transitions in medical education is the one from medical school to residency. Despite this challenging transition, the final year of medical school is known as lacking structure and clarity. The authors examine the preparation of medical students for the professional and personal challenges of internship in the context of transition courses. They first describe the development of a residency transition course, offered since 2001 at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine (UCSF), exploring aspects of a needs assessment, course goals and content, core competencies, and course implementation. They then critically analyze the course, judging it successful based on high subjective satisfaction scores and increased perceived preparedness data. Next, the authors discuss the national context of transition courses, perspectives of various stakeholders, and lessons learned from the UCSF experience. Finally, they consider future directions, suggesting that internship transition courses be a standard part of the medical school curriculum.

  10. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Helen; Marzano, David; Lanham, Michael; Stein, Tamara; Curran, Diana; Hammoud, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Background The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions) had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System. PMID:25430640

  11. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Morgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose: We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods: The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results: Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System.

  12. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  13. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

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    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E., E-mail: Ariel.hirsch@bmc.org

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  14. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  15. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  16. Innovation in internship preparation: an operative anatomy course increases senior medical students' knowledge and confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Nikki; Brunsvold, Melissa; Kabbani, Loay; Lin, Jules; Stansfield, Brent; Mueller, Dean; Minter, Rebecca M

    2013-08-01

    An operative anatomy course was developed within the construct of a surgical internship preparatory curriculum. This course provided fourth-year medical students matching into a surgical residency the opportunity to perform intern-level procedures on cadavers under the guidance of surgical faculty members. Senior medical students performed intern-level procedures on cadavers with the assistance of faculty surgeons. Students' confidence, anxiety, and procedural knowledge were evaluated both preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative data were compared both collectively and based on individual procedures. Student confidence and procedural knowledge significantly increased and anxiety significantly decreased when preoperative and postoperative data were compared (P < .05). Students reported moderate to significant improvement in their ability to perform a variety of surgical tasks. The consistent improvement in confidence, knowledge, and anxiety justifies further development of an operative anatomy course, with future assessment of the impact on performance in surgical residency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA)-Based Framework to Prepare Fourth-Year Medical Students for Internal Medicine Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnicki, D Michael; Aiyer, Meenakshy K; Cannarozzi, Maria L; Carbo, Alexander; Chelminski, Paul R; Chheda, Shobhina G; Chudgar, Saumil M; Harrell, Heather E; Hood, L Chad; Horn, Michelle; Johl, Karnjit; Kane, Gregory C; McNeill, Diana B; Muntz, Marty D; Pereira, Anne G; Stewart, Emily; Tarantino, Heather; Vu, T Robert

    2017-06-20

    The purpose of the fourth year of medical school remains controversial. Competing demands during this transitional phase cause confusion for students and educators. In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released 13 Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (CEPAERs). A committee comprising members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine applied these principles to preparing students for internal medicine residencies. The authors propose a curricular framework based on five CEPAERs that were felt to be most relevant to residency preparation, informed by prior stakeholder surveys. The critical areas outlined include entering orders, forming and answering clinical questions, conducting patient care handovers, collaborating interprofessionally, and recognizing patients requiring urgent care and initiating that care. For each CEPAER, the authors offer suggestions about instruction and assessment of competency. The fourth year of medical school can be rewarding for students, while adequately preparing them to begin residency, by addressing important elements defined in the core entrustable activities. Thus prepared, new residents can function safely and competently in supervised postgraduate settings.

  18. Students come to medical schools prepared to cheat: a multi-campus investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolja Taradi, Sunčana; Taradi, Milan; Knežević, Tin; Đogaš, Zoran

    2010-11-01

    To investigate high school cheating experiences and attitudes towards academic misconduct of freshmen at all four medical schools in Croatia, as a post-communist country in transition, with intention of raising awareness of academic (dis)honesty. Students were given an anonymous questionnaire containing 22 questions on the atmosphere of integrity at their high school, self-reported educational dishonesty, their evaluation of cheating behaviour, and on their expectations about the atmosphere of integrity at their university. All schools of medicine of Croatian universities (Zagreb, Rijeka, Split and Osijek). Descriptive statistics and differences in students' self-reported educational dishonesty, perception of cheating behaviour, and perception of the high school integrity atmosphere. Of the 761 freshmen attending the four medical schools, 508 (67%) completed the questionnaire: 481 Croatian and 27 international students. Of the Croatian respondents, almost all (>99%) self-reported engaging in at least one behaviour of educational dishonesty, and 78% of respondents admitted to having frequently cheated in at least one form of assessed academic misconduct. Only three students admitted to having reported another student for cheating. For most of the questions, there was no significant difference in the responses among Croatian students. However, significant differences were found in most responses between Croatian students and their international counterparts, who were significantly less likely to engage in dishonest behaviours. No individual factor was found to correlate with the incidence of self-admitted dishonest behaviour. Frequent cheaters evaluated academic dishonesty significantly more leniently than those who did not cheat. Academic dishonesty of university students does not begin in higher education; students come to medical schools ready to cheat.

  19. Playing to our human strengths to prepare medical students for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We are living in an age where artificial intelligence and astounding technological advances are bringing truly remarkable change to healthcare. Medical knowledge and skills which form the core responsibility of doctors such as making diagnoses may increasingly be delivered by robots. Machines are gradually acquiring human abilities such as deep learning and empathy. What, then is the role of doctors in future healthcare? And what direction should medical schools be taking to prepare their graduates? This article will give an overview of the evolving technological landscape of healthcare and examine the issues undergraduate medical education may have to address. The experience at The University of Hong Kong will serve as a case study featuring several curricular innovations that aim to empower medical graduates with the capabilities to thrive in the future.

  20. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  1. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  2. Postbaccalaureate Preparation and Performance in Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted of 610 medical students to determine whether postbaccalaureate preparation before matriculation in medical school effected student performance. Results showed lower achievement on some measures of performance in medical school by those who had taken nondegree postbaccalaureate courses. Implications for admission decisions are…

  3. Preparing foundation-year students for medical studies in a problem-based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Massoud, Walid; Al-Banna, Nadia Ali

    2016-01-01

    - and post-test was high (2.38). Paired t-tests showed significant improvements (po.001) for each of the 4 factors. The four factors together explained 60.7% percent of variance in the data. Discussion: Students reported large improvements among learning skills required in a problem-based medical curriculum....... Cronbach's alpha was used to test for internal consistency and reliability of the collected data and Principal Component Exploratory Factor Analysis was performed. Paired t-test was used to examine differences between pre- and post-analysis data. Results: The internal consistency of the questionnaire...... was sufficient. Factor analysis identified four factors: 1) Ability to search for, share, and present information, 2) Ability to develop learning tools and express opinions, 3) Ability to use diverse learning sources, and 4) Ability to participate in discussion and reflect. Overall improvement between pre...

  4. A transitional curriculum for preparing medical students for internship, does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a formative evaluation, we were supposed to find whether an innovative program has some merits to be continued or not. We also determined the critical points of the program. The evaluated program was a clinical pre-clerkship curriculum launched for departing to a less stressful medical clerkship. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the information contained in the students′ logbooks. Using Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure standardized questionnaire, we also assessed the students′ perception of learning environment within six clinical departments. Results: Totally, 64% of expected patient contacts, and teaching of more than 71% of required skills at 4 departments were carried out and students had more positive than negative perspective of their learning environments. Conclusion: The evaluand is a worthwhile program to be continued, though it needs some considerations for improvement.

  5. Preparing to care for an aging population: medical student reflections on their clinical mentors within a new geriatrics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Timothy W; Shield, Renée R; Wetle, Terrie; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Reflective writing techniques such as journaling help provide insights into the process by which medical students are mentored and develop into practicing physicians. The authors sought to analyze medical students' journals regarding their mentored experiences within a new geriatrics curriculum at a U.S. medical school. Thirty preclinical and clinical medical student journalers participated in this project. The authors employed qualitative analytic techniques using an interdisciplinary team process. Three major themes emerged: (a) exposure to clinical mentors challenged medical students' preconceptions regarding older adults and geriatric medicine; (b) students learned new medical knowledge and techniques from observing their mentors; and (c) students provided positive and negative assessments of their mentors. Reflective journaling provides important insights into the process by which medical students draw upon mentored clinical experiences during their training. Such mentorship may be particularly relevant to promoting their interest in geriatrics.

  6. Training medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J

    1987-09-01

    Nigerian 4th year medical students from University of Ibadan spend 8 weeks training in primary health care and public health in the rural Ibarapa Community Health Programme in Oyo State, with ORT as part of the training. Their course of study there includes epidemiological projects, collecting data on diarrhea prevalence, cultural and behavioral practices, assessment and treating children with diarrhea, and teaching ORT to the community. Students worked on the ORT unit on a rotating basis, preparing ORS, monitoring children and talking to mothers. They learned that most mothers recognized diarrhea symptoms, 2/3 had heard about ORS, but less than 1/5 considered it a first step in managing diarrhea. Most would eliminate beans from the child's diet, substituting bland maize porridge. Talking with mothers made them realize that teething children put dirty objects into their mouths and that presence of visible children's feces is associated with diarrhea. Use of soap for hand washing, and availability of clean tap water, rather than well water, decreased incidence of diarrhea. After their training, medical students knew how to prepare ORS correctly, and understand its efficacy. This should increase the acceptance by the medical professionals of ORT as a desirable part of diarrhea control.

  7. The Importance of Preparing Medical Students to Manage Different Types of Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargason, Crayton A., Jr.; Evans, H. Hughes; Ashworth, Carolyn S.; Capper, Stuart A.

    1997-01-01

    To design effective academic health centers for the future, medical leaders must define the competencies needed by tomorrow's physicians, including the ability to manage the uncertainty associated with creating clinical models and the uncertainty associated with managing care delivery. Currently, focus is on the former, but there is increasing…

  8. Contents and features of forming students' culture of health of special medical group in the process of theoretical preparation on physical education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribok N.N.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of forming valued attitude is considered toward own health for students with the presence of diseases. New vision of maintenance of theoretical preparation is found on physical education of students at which rejections are marked in a state of health. An experimental on-line tutorial is offered, on the basis of analysis of the existent program, on physical education for the students of task medical force. It is set that the offered on-line tutorial is directed not only on liquidation of diseases but also on forming, strengthening and maintenance of own health in spiritual, psychical and physical aspects.

  9. Knowledge and Experience of Medical Students with Male Urethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    instruction in this technique to avoid devastating consequences of performing it poorly. ... Medical students in our medical school spend four weeks in urology unit. .... Preparation of short teaching video to be shown to all medical students.

  10. Medical student-mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julie; Macnamara, Marina; Groskin, Anna; Petras, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Medical training is challenging and parenting is a full-time responsibility. Balancing a family with the significant demands of medical school is a daunting endeavor. Yet there is little research available to guide students, faculty, or administrators. Using one U.S. medical school as a case study, this article provides a comprehensive overview of the common personal and professional challenges that medical students who are also mothers face during their undergraduate medical education, and practical strategies and resources useful in navigating such challenges. This article is also a resource guide for the faculty and administrators who teach, advise, and mentor medical-student parents. For leaders in medical education, the article concludes with suggestions to better support the health and educational experience of medical student-parents: 1) a systematic network of career advisors, 2) scheduling flexibility, 3) formal breastfeeding policies and workplace support, 4) institutionally supported childcare, and 5) how student-parents may foster the educational health mission of medical schools.

  11. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international......A. Friesel. Preparing Students for Globalization Working with International Teams with Projects // Electronics and Electrical Engineering. - Kaunas: Technologija, 2019. - No. 6(102). - P. 111-114. This paper summarizes the activities, contents and overall outcomes of our experiences...... with international students studying at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering (in short - IHK); in particular students coming for one semester exchange program under Erasmus-programme. IHK's participation in EU-supported programmes like EIE-Surveyor and ELLEIEC, both ERASMUS thematic networks, have...

  12. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shib Sekhar Datta; Boratne, Abhijit V; Rajkumar Patil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare ...

  13. Preparing students to be academicians: a national student-led summer program in teaching, leadership, scholarship, and academic medical career-building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Michelle M; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie

    2012-12-01

    Medical schools have the responsibility of producing future leaders in academic medicine, yet few students choose academic medicine as a career. In 2009, the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) and the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences joined forces to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to careers in academic medicine through the redesign of an existing annual summer program for medical students. Since 2004, AMSA had hosted the Medical Education Leadership Institute, a weeklong program that attracted medical students from across the country who were interested in gaining teaching skills. In the redesigned sixth annual program, the authors expanded the curriculum to include principles of leadership, of medical education scholarship (or project development), and of academic medicine career-building. The purpose of this article is to describe the features of this comprehensive program and to share the lessons learned from its development and implementation. The authors also describe the multifaceted approach they used to evaluate the program, which featured a rubric they derived from social cognitive career theory.

  14. How prepared are your interns to take calls? Results of a multi-institutional study of simulated pages to prepare medical students for surgery internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischknecht, Adam C; Boehler, Margaret L; Schwind, Cathy J; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Gruppen, Larry D; Brenner, Michael J; Hauge, Linnea S

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated a simulated pages curriculum that was developed to assess communication and clinical decision making in medical students and interns. A curriculum consisting of 14 simulated pages was administered across 5 institutions to 150 senior medical students. A 3-case subset was administered to interns who did not participate in the curriculum. Six expert surgeons identified critical fails and set passing scores for case-specific assessments using the Graphical Hofstee Method. Participants in the curriculum demonstrated superior clinical decision making compared with non-participants across all cases scenarios (P < .01). Average medical student scores for clinical decision making were 46.9%. Global ratings averaged 6.0 for communication and 5.2 for patient care. Passing rates averaged 46%. Participation in a mock page curriculum improved performance. The performance of participants based on expert standards set for simulated page performance highlight the need for innovative approaches to improve interns' preparedness to take calls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Integration of the musculature in the course "functional anatomy of the locomotor system"-Preparing medical students for the dissection course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Christian M; Paulsen, Friedrich; Burger, Pascal H M; Scholz, Michael

    2016-11-01

    To enhance the efficacy of the preclinical first-year course for medical and dental students 'functional anatomy of the locomotor system' (demo course) which serves as a preparation for the dissection course at the Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany. The muscular system was integrated into the curriculum of the demo course. Moreover, the number of tutors was increased from around 5 to 15 for approximately 120 students. A detailed course agenda, which had been lacking hitherto, was developed for each course day. Extensive preparation and briefing of course tutors was introduced. Self-prepared questionnaires were applied to compare student attitudes towards the demo course before and after the restructuring process. Surveys were conducted at the end of the unchanged demo course, at the end of the dissection course in the following term (same students) and at the end of the restructured demo course. The mark given for overall course quality improved from 3 ("satisfactory") to 2 ("good"). The students felt significantly better prepared for the dissection course after the restructuring process, although they perceived the work load as more challenging in relation to the limited time available. They assessed the new course as better structured and stated that the muscular system had been important for the functional comprehension of the locomotor system. According to student opinion, the attempt to improve the demo course quality by providing a detailed course agenda and enhanced tutelage had been successful. As expected, the musculature is critical to functional understanding of the locomotor system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency of Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during class II cavity preparation among dental students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yazdani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during proximal cavity preparation is one of the most common side effects in operative dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of iatrogenic damages to adjacent tooth during the preparation of proximal Class II cavities among undergraduate students at dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010 .   Materials and Methods: 106 posterior permanent teeth which had Class II decay with sound proximal surfaces of adjacent teeth were selected and restored by dental students awarding the aims of the present study. After finishing restoration, proximal surfaces were completely dried by air and evaluated with dental chair light. In doubtful cases, surfaces were evaluated with × 3 magnification. Damages were classified into 2 groups; abrasion and groove. Data were analyzed using Fishers exact and Pearson chi square tests .   Results: The frequency of adjacent surfaces damage were 57.5%, with 31.1% damages as abrasion and 26.4% as groove. Students who used matrix band and wedge in proximal area as preventive instruments showed 53.4% damages and other students showed 57.3% damages (P>0.05. A significantly higher number of females and students at restorative course level (3 used wedge and matrix band than males and students at restorative course level (4 for protecting adjacent teeth (P<0.05.   Conclusion: According to the high percentage of iatrogenic damages on adjacent sound teeth in class II cavity preparation, teaching of preventive methods and using proper techniques is necessary for dental students as future dentists.

  17. Misconduct in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengoechea, Jaime; Moreno, Socorro; Ruiz, Alvaro

    2008-12-01

    Medical students, subject to unique challenges and stressors, frequently engage in misconduct. In this observational study, carried out in a medical school in Colombia, we developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing factors, such as sex, age and academic year. Of the 433 students that responded to our survey, 97.9% did not fully disagree with at least one of the mentioned misconducts and 99.8% admitted to at least one transgression. Based on a scale we developed, 61.4% of the students consistently agreed with misconduct and 44.9% frequently engaged in misconduct. A logistic regression model suggests that being male (OR 1.90, CI 95% 1.27-2.84) and stress (OR 1.04, CI 95% 1.01-1.06) may increase the likelihood of misconduct. In a subgroup of students, excluding those in their last year of studies, higher academic semester (OR 1.25, CI 95%: 1.10-1.42) may also be a risk factor for misconduct. Most of the observed variation in the data, however, is not explained by these factors. Other modifiers, such as student personality and sub-culture, may play a greater role in determining misconduct. The proportion of medical students that engage in misconduct is very high and warrants the attention of the medical education community.

  18. Capturing medical students' idealism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janice K; Weaver, Donna B

    2006-01-01

    Students' idealism and desire to work with underserved populations decline as they progress from preclinical training through clerkships and residency. With an increasingly diverse population and increasing health disparities, academic health centers need to incorporate changes in their curricula to train socially responsible and idealistic physicians. International electives can provide valuable learning experiences to help achieve these goals. Sixty-six preclinical medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch participated in an international elective from 1997 to 2005. After 1 week of didactics, they spent 3 weeks as part of a multidisciplinary medical team in rural Nicaragua. Postelective questionnaires were administered. From students' responses, we identified common learning themes and grouped them under the categories of attitudes, awareness, and skills. Limitations included a self-selection bias, lack of a control group, and limited follow-up. After the elective, students had an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarian efforts, and working with underserved populations both in the United States and abroad, as well as more compassion toward the underserved. Students also reported a heightened awareness of social determinants of health and public health, and a broadened global perspective, as well as increased self-awareness. Our findings illustrate that a well-structured, mentored experience in international health can have a positive impact on preclinical students' attitudes, including their compassion, volunteerism, and interest in serving under-served populations, all measures of idealism.

  19. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  20. Medical school entrance and career plans of Malaysian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, S M

    1996-11-01

    This study investigates the reasons for entry to medicine and the career perspectives of phase III medical students of the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The majority of the students were Malays from low socio-economic backgrounds who entered medical school after completing a 2-year matriculation course. An interest in medicine and helping people were the two main stated reasons for entry to medical school. A group of students wishing to work in private practice was identified. In comparison to the rest of the study body, students in the group were: not well prepared to enter medical school; dissatisfied with the course; and subject to family influences. A desire for monetary gain motivated their choice of medicine as a career. Overall, 13% of the students wished to change career because they were dissatisfied with their experience of medicine as undergraduates. The study did not find a significant difference in career intentions between female and male medical students. However, women were less likely to seek entrance into private practice or pursue formal postgraduate education. The choice of surgery as a career was confined to men. About 90% of the students had already decided on their future specialty. Four well-established specialties were their most popular choices. The gender of the students had no significant influences of the decision to continue into postgraduate education. The proportion of female students who wished to marry doctors was significantly higher than for male students.

  1. Preparation For Medical School via an Intensive Summer Program for Future Doctors: A Pilot Study of Student Confidence and Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, David W.; Ray, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    A medical school conducted a summer pre-matriculation program. The program provided basic sciences content comparable to first year medical student instruction along with clinical and other learning experiences. The study purpose was to examine self-confidence levels and reasoning skills of a single cohort of students. We examined the association…

  2. Preparation for Medical, Dental, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, and Physician Assistant Careers: Helping Students Gain a Competitive Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Carol L.; Seaver, Daniel C.; Berres, Peter N.; Brandt, Barbara F.

    2002-01-01

    Each year, a large number of students begin college with aspirations of entering a health profession. High school teachers and guidance counselors as well as college admission counselors and prehealth advisors can assist students by providing current information regarding general entrance requirements to health professions programs. The purpose of…

  3. Near-peer medical student simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Thomas; Brand, Eleanor; Wong, Emma; Richardson, Jay; Athorn, Sam; Chowdhury, Faiza

    2017-06-01

    There is growing concern that medical students are inadequately prepared for life as a junior doctor. A lack of confidence managing acutely unwell patients is often cited as a barrier to good clinical care. With medical schools investing heavily in simulation equipment, we set out to explore if near-peer simulation training is an effective teaching format. Medical students in their third year of study and above were invited to attend a 90-minute simulation teaching session. The sessions were designed and delivered by final-year medical students using clinical scenarios mapped to the Sheffield MBChB curriculum. Candidates were required to assess, investigate and manage an acutely unwell simulated patient. Pre- and post-simulation training Likert scale questionnaires were completed relating to self-reported confidence levels. There is growing concern that medical students are inadequately prepared for life as a junior doctor RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 25 students (100% response rate); 52 per cent of students had no prior simulation experience. There were statistically significant improvements in self-reported confidence levels in each of the six areas assessed (p < 0.005). Thematic analysis of free-text comments indicated that candidates enjoyed the practical format of the sessions and found the experience useful. Our results suggest that near-peer medical student simulation training benefits both teacher and learner and that this simplistic model could easily be replicated at other medical schools. As the most junior members of the team, medical students are often confined to observer status. Simulation empowers students to practise independently in a safe and protected environment. Furthermore, it may help to alleviate anxiety about starting work as a junior doctor and improve future patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  4. Are medical students being taught anatomy in a way that best prepares them to be a physician?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meral Savran, Mona; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen; Frost Clementsen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reasoning in a clinical context is an attribute of medical expertise. Clinical reasoning in medical school can be encouraged by teaching basic science with a clinical emphasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anatomy is being taught in a way that facilitates the dev......, implying that the teaching they have received has not encouraged clinical reasoning. Clin. Anat., 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  5. The views of doctors in their first year of medical practice on the lasting impact of a preparation for house officer course they undertook as final year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders John H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK General Medical Council recommends that medical students have the opportunity of shadowing the outgoing new doctor whose post they will soon undertake. At the University of Nottingham the two-week shadowing period was preceded by two weeks of lectures/seminars wherein students followed sessions on topics such as common medical/surgical emergencies, contracts, time management, surviving the first two years of clinical practice, careers advice and so on. The present study aimed to gain a better knowledge and understanding of the lasting impact of a four-week preparation course for new Foundation Year 1 doctors [F1 s - interns]. The objectives chosen to achieve this aim were: 1/ to determine the extent to which the lecture/seminar course and shadowing period achieved their stated aim of smoothing the transition from life as a medical student to work as a new doctor; 2/ to evaluate perceptions of the importance of various forms of knowledge in easing the transition between medical student and new doctor Method In the spring of 2007, 90 graduates from Nottingham were randomly selected and then emailed a link to a short, online survey of quantitative and qualitative questions. Of these 76 responded. Analysis of quantitative data was carried out using SPSS 16.0 and employed McNemar's test. Analysis of the qualitative data was carried out using the constant comparative method. Results Only 31% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the lecture/seminar part of the course prepared them well for their first FY1 post; 14% agreed that during their first job they drew on the knowledge gained during the lecture/seminar course; 94% strongly agreed or agreed that the shadowing part of the course was more useful than the lecture/seminar part. Experiential knowledge gained in the shadowing was the most highly valued, followed by procedural knowledge with propositional knowledge coming far behind. Conclusions Our study shows that

  6. Preparing Student Mobility through Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, Marta; Jeanneau, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, going to a foreign country has become all the more significant for Higher Education (HE) students, as concepts such as internationalisation and intercultural competencies have gained a more prominent role in HE. For students to fully benefit from this experience, it is paramount to prepare them for their stay in a foreign country…

  7. Preparing Students for Studying Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    This study is situated in the fields of language education, study abroad (SA) and intercultural communication. The interest in SA is increasing on the part of students, administrators, educators, and business companies for the learning opportunities that it offers. However, SA students are not always prepared to maximize their learning…

  8. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international...... semesters demonstrates the success of this form of education. Equally, the growing number of projects coming from industry demonstrates their positive interest in these kinds of skills for their future employees. Bibl. 6, tabl. 1 (in English; abstracts in English, Russian and Lithuanian)....

  9. Registrars teaching undergraduate medical students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    20% of a registrar's time is spent on teaching UG medical students.[4-8] The benefits of teaching medical students are also seen in the knowledge acquired by registrars. ... The on-the-job role-model as part of teaching is applicable to registrars. The international ... indication of the average working hours per week. • different ...

  10. Forming of educational motivation of students to direction of preparation «Health of a man» in the process of study of medical and biological disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Babich N.L.

    2012-01-01

    The features of forming of educational motivation of students are considered in the process of study of disciplines of medical and biological disciplines. 73 students took part in research. The analysis of publications is resulted in relation to determination of category vehicle of the probed problem, classification of educational reasons; motivational technologies of studies; correlation of reasons of educational activity of students. It is certain and grounded pedagogical terms of forming p...

  11. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Larkin

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.

  12. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

  13. Forming of educational motivation of students to direction of preparation «Health of a man» in the process of study of medical and biological disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babich N.L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The features of forming of educational motivation of students are considered in the process of study of disciplines of medical and biological disciplines. 73 students took part in research. The analysis of publications is resulted in relation to determination of category vehicle of the probed problem, classification of educational reasons; motivational technologies of studies; correlation of reasons of educational activity of students. It is certain and grounded pedagogical terms of forming positive educational motivation of students on the example of study of discipline «Anatomy of timber-toe by bases of sporting morphology». It is recommended in the process of study of the rich in content modules of discipline to make examples of widespread diseases of the different systems and organs. It is set that the noted examples allow directly to influence on forming of educational motivation of students.

  14. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  15. Leadership training for undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Victor

    2016-07-04

    Purpose Physicians play an important leadership role in the management and governance of the healthcare system. Yet, many physicians lack formal management and leadership training to prepare them for this challenging role. This Viewpoint article argues that leadership concepts need to be introduced to undergraduate medical students early and throughout their medical education. Design/methodology/approach Leadership is an integral part of medical practice. The recent inclusion of "Leader" competency in the CanMEDS 2015 represents a subtle but important shift from the previous "manager" competency. Providing medical students with the basics of leadership concepts early in their medical education allows them to integrate leadership principles into their professional practice. Findings The Faculty of Medicine at the Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) has developed an eight-module, fully online Physician Leadership Certificate for their undergraduate medical education program. This program is cited as an example of an undergraduate medical curriculum that offers leadership training throughout the 4 years of the MD program. Originality/value There are a number of continuing professional development opportunities for physicians in the area of management and leadership. This Viewpoint article challenges undergraduate medical education programs to develop and integrate leadership training in their curricula.

  16. Students friendly medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Chandra Chaurasia

    2014-04-01

    always a burden. The professional exams of universities are the matter of their norms and regulation, but we have day-to-day assessment through-out duration; this is enough to moralize them and prepare before final professional examination. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 412-412

  17. Motivation in medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis wer

  18. Motivation in medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis

  19. A comprehensive medical student career development program improves medical student satisfaction with career planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Brian J; Hammoud, Maya M; Middleton, Eric; Moroney, Donney; Schigelone, Amy

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) initiated a new career development program (CDP). The CDP incorporates the 4-phase career development model described by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Careers in Medicine (CiM). The CDP offers self-assessment exercises with guidance from trained counselors for 1st- and 2nd-year medical students. Career exploration experiences include Career Seminar Series luncheons, shadow experiences with faculty, and a shadow program with second-year (M2) and fourth-year (M4) medical students. During the decision-making phase, students work with trained faculty career advisors (FCA). Mandatory sessions are held on career selection, preparing the residency application, interviewing, and program evaluation. During the implementation phase, students meet with deans or counselors to discuss residency application and matching. An "at-risk plan" assists students who may have difficulty matching. The CiM Web site is extensively used during the 4 stages. Data from the AAMC and UMMS Graduation Questionnaires (GQ) show significant improvements for UMMS students in overall satisfaction with career planning services and with faculty mentoring, career assessment activities, career information, and personnel availability. By 2003, UMMS students had significantly higher satisfaction in all measured areas of career planning services when compared with all other U.S. medical students.

  20. Constructing an Online MCAT Preparation Program as an Alternative to On-Site Preparation for Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre, Berengaria; Perez, Norma A.; Smith, Sarah Toombs

    2017-01-01

    Based on a successful five-week summer program, we constructed an online alternative to prepare Hispanic students to take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). We used input from student premed advisors, students, a faculty mentor, a Verbal Reasoning coach, and the program administrator. Online activities were provided to support the student…

  1. Research and Strategy for the Mental Health Status of Medical Students Preparing for Entrance Examination of Postgraduate%考研医学生心理健康状况调查及调适对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫霄; 楚平华

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解考研医学生的心理健康状况。方法:采用症状自评量表(SLC-90)对390名考研医学生进行测试,并与中国常模进行比较。结果:考研医学生心理健康状况低于全国正常人群水平,心理问题阳性检出率为12.89%,主要心理问题表现为强迫、人际关系敏感、抑郁和敌对。结论:考研医学生群体的心理健康状况不容乐观,他们不同程度地存在一些心理健康问题。因此,对医学考研学子所面临的心理压力进行分析研究,并为降低医学考研学子压力提出具有针对性的意见和建议,十分必要。%Objective:To understand the mental health status of medical students who were prepare for entrance examination of postgraduate. Method:A study had been conducted by using the SLC-90 to test 390 medical students who were prepare for entrance examination of postgraduate and then compared with the China norm. Result:The mental health of the medical students who were prepare for entrance examination of postgraduate was lower than the national normal level,the positive rate of psychological problems was 12.89%,mainly psychological problems were forced,interpersonal sensitivity, depression,hostility and so on. Conclusion:The mental health status of medical students who are prepared for entrance examination of postgraduate are not optimistic,there are some mental health problems at different levels. Therefore,it’s very necessary to carry on the research for the psychological pressure which medical students who are prepare for entrance examination of postgraduate is facing as well as putting forward opinions and suggestions in order to reduce their pressure.

  2. Integrating Population and Clinical Medicine: A New Third-Year Curriculum to Prepare Medical Students for the Care of Individuals, Panels, and Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Riese, Alison; Clyne, Brian; Vanvleet, Marcia W; George, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Population and Clinical Medicine (PCM) I & II constitute two of the nine courses established for the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University's (AMS) innovative dual-degree Primary Care-Population Medicine (PC-PM) program. The courses will run consecutively during students' third year in the program, in conjunction with the Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC). Throughout the courses, students will examine the intersection between population and clinical medicine with a focus on vulnerable populations, the social and community context of care, quality improvement, and leadership. In addition to attending class sessions in which students will engage with leaders in relevant fields, students will also draw from patient and population-level experiences in the LIC to plan and implement two projects: a community-based intervention to address a particular health issue, and a quality improvement project to change a small aspect of care delivery at a clinical site. Finally, leadership skills development sessions will be incorporated, and leadership practice will occur during implementation of student projects.

  3. Teaching leadership: the medical student society model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jacob H; Morley, Gabriella L; Crossley, Eleanor; Bhanderi, Shivam

    2017-05-05

    All health care professionals in the UK are expected to have the medical leadership and management (MLM) skills necessary for improving patient care, as stipulated by the UK General Medical Council (GMC). Newly graduated doctors reported insufficient knowledge about leadership and quality improvement skills, despite all UK medical schools reporting that MLM is taught within their curriculum. A medical student society organised a series of extracurricular educational events focusing on leadership topics. The society recognised that the events needed to be useful and interesting to attract audiences. Therefore, clinical leaders in exciting fields were invited to talk about their experiences and case studies of personal leadership challenges. The emphasis on personal stories, from respected leaders, was a deliberate strategy to attract students and enhance learning. Evaluation data were collected from the audiences to improve the quality of the events and to support a business case for an intercalated degree in MLM. When leadership and management concepts are taught through personal stories, students find it interesting and are prepared to give up their leisure time to engage with the subject. Students appear to recognise the importance of MLM knowledge to their future careers, and are able to organise their own, and their peers', learning and development. Organising these events and collecting feedback can provide students with opportunities to practise leadership, management and quality improvement skills. These extracurricular events, delivered through a student society, allow for subjects to be discussed in more depth and can complement an already crowded undergraduate curriculum. Newly graduated doctors reported insufficient knowledge about leadership and quality improvement skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  4. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Self-medication practice was highly prevalent among the medical students, with 87 % reporting that ... The increase in self-medication is due to a number of ..... resistant strains and increased cost and morbidity. ... Conflict of Interest.

  5. Medical students as medical educators: opportunities for skill development in the absence of formal training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Hafler, Janet P

    2011-09-01

    All physicians, at some point in their career, are responsible for the education of their peers and junior colleagues. Although medical students are expected to develop clinical and research skills in preparation for residency, it is becoming clear that a student should also be expected to develop abilities as a teacher. A handful of institutions have student-as-teacher programs to train medical students in education, but most students graduate from medical school without formal training in this area. When such a program does not exist, medical students can gain experience in education through participation in peer teaching, course design, educational committees, and medical education scholarship. In doing so, they attain important skills in the development, implementation, and evaluation of educational programs. These skills will serve them in their capacity as medical educators as they advance in their careers and gain increasing teaching responsibility as residents, fellows, and attending physicians. Copyright © 2011.

  6. The Impact of a Medical Student's Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltreider, Nancy B.

    1990-01-01

    Examined impact of medical student's suicide on fellow medical students (n=20). Identified pattern of posttraumatic symptoms which persisted over several months. Found students' tendency to identify with victim was related to prevalent experience of medical student depression. (Author/ABL)

  7. [Medical students and drug marketing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Larrañaga, Sara; Rabanaque Hernández, María José

    2014-03-01

    To determine the exposure of medical students to the marketing activities of the pharmaceutical industry, and identify their opinions and attitudes, and also the possible effects this exposure on their training and future professional practice. Descriptive cross-sectional. University of Zaragoza Faculty of Medicine. Third, fourth, fifth and sixth year medical students. The information was obtained using a previously adapted, self-report questionnaire on the exposure, attitudes and perceived suitability of drug marketing activities. Percentages were calculated for the categorical variables, applying the chi squared test for the comparison between the groups. A logistic regression was performed to determine the factors associated with their attitudes towards these activities. A total of 369 questionnaires were returned (93% of those attending classes). The exposure to marketing activities is high, particularly in the clinical stage (78.6% said to have received a gift non-educational gift). The students recognised the possible biases and repercussions in professional practice, although with ambiguity and contradictions. The most accepted activities are those associated with training, and the most critical attitudes appear in the clinical stage, particularly in the sixth year. Exposure to drug marketing by medical students and its possible training and professional effects is frequent and significant. The training environment is particularly open to promotional activities. The differences observed in the later years suggest the need for a specific curriculum subject and development of reflective attitudes by the students themselves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Self‐medication patterns among medical students in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitasha Bhat

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to final year. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS version 16 and the results expressed as proportions.ResultsA total of 200 students, 121 (60.5% female and 79 (39.5% male, were included in the study. Of the medical students surveyed, self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self-medication found it to be time-saving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self-medication were used were: the common cold (69%, fever (63% and headache (60%. The students consulted their textbooks (39% and seniors or classmates (38% for the medications. Antipyretics (71%, analgesics (65%, antihistamines (37% and antibiotics (34% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 33% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication and 5% had experienced adverse reactions. The majority (64% of students advised medications to others, more often to family and friends.ConclusionThe prevalence of self-medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors. A significant number of students are unaware of the adverse effects of the medication that they themselves take and suggest to others. Therefore, potential problems of self-medication should be emphasised to the students.

  9. Student USMLE Step One Preparation and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    This study investigated factors associated with medical students performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step One examination. The USMLE Step One emphasizes basic mechanisms and principles that are typically covered in the first 2 years of medical school. The study examined the relationship among student performance…

  10. Attitudes Toward Medical Cannabis Legalization Among Serbian Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujcic, Isidora; Pavlovic, Aleksandar; Dubljanin, Eleonora; Maksimovic, Jadranka; Nikolic, Aleksandra; Sipetic-Grujicic, Sandra

    2017-07-29

    Currently, medical cannabis polices are experiencing rapid changes, and an increasing number of nations around the world legalize medical cannabis for certain groups of patients, including those in Serbia. To determine medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization and to examine the factors influencing their attitudes. Fourth-year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, had participated in a cross-sectional study. Data were collected by an anonymous questionnaire. Overall, 63.4% students supported medical cannabis legalization, and only 20.8% supported its legalization for recreational use. Students who previously used marijuana (p marijuana recreational use was also related to prior marijuana (p cancer (90.4%) and chronic pain (74.2%) were correctly reported approved medical indications by more than half the students. Students who supported medical cannabis legalization showed better knowledge about indications, in contrast to opponents for legalization who showed better knowledge about side effects. Beliefs that using medical cannabis is safe and has health benefits were correlated with support for legalization, and previous marijuana and alcohol use, while beliefs that medical cannabis poses health risks correlated most strongly with previous marijuana use. Conclusions/Importance: The medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization were significantly correlated with previous use of marijuana and alcohol, knowledge about medical indications and side effects, and their beliefs regarding medical cannabis health benefits and risks.

  11. Quiz gaming competitions for undergraduate medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quiz gaming competitions for undergraduate medical students: Questioning the ... Participants reported that stress levels were very high on stage, but felt it to be ... Key words: Mediquiz; Medical school; Mauritius; Questionnaire; Medical quiz ...

  12. Medical Student Documentation in the Electronic Medical Record: Patterns of Use and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittels, Kathleen; Wallenstein, Joshua; Patwari, Rahul; Patel, Sundip

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) have become ubiquitous in emergency departments. Medical students rotating on emergency medicine (EM) clerkships at these sites have constant exposure to EHRs as they learn essential skills. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), and the Alliance for Clinical Education (ACE) have determined that documentation of the patient encounter in the medical record is an essential skill that all medical students must learn. However, little is known about the current practices or perceived barriers to student documentation in EHRs on EM clerkships. We performed a cross-sectional study of EM clerkship directors at United States medical schools between March and May 2016. A 13-question IRB-approved electronic survey on student documentation was sent to all EM clerkship directors. Only one response from each institution was permitted. We received survey responses from 100 institutions, yielding a response rate of 86%. Currently, 63% of EM clerkships allow medical students to document a patient encounter in the EHR. The most common reasons cited for not permitting students to document a patient encounter were hospital or medical school rule forbidding student documentation (80%), concern for medical liability (60%), and inability of student notes to support medical billing (53%). Almost 95% of respondents provided feedback on student documentation with supervising faculty being the most common group to deliver feedback (92%), followed by residents (64%). Close to two-thirds of medical students are allowed to document in the EHR on EM clerkships. While this number is robust, many organizations such as the AAMC and ACE have issued statements and guidelines that would look to increase this number even further to ensure that students are prepared for residency as well as their future careers. Almost all EM clerkships provided feedback on student documentation indicating the importance for

  13. Prepared to practice? Perception of career preparation and guidance of recent medical graduates at two campuses of a transnational medical school: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Sameer S; McGowan, Yvonne; McGee, Hannah; Whitford, David L

    2016-02-09

    Graduating medical students enter the workforce with substantial medical knowledge and experience, yet little is known about how well they are prepared for the transition to medical practice in diverse settings. We set out to compare perceptions of medical school graduates' career guidance with their perceptions of preparedness to practice as interns. We also set out to compare perceptions of preparedness for hospital practice between graduates from two transnational medical schools. This was a cross-sectional study. A Preparedness for Hospital Practice (PHPQ) survey and career guidance questionnaire was sent to recent medical graduates, incorporating additional free text responses on career preparation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and tests of association including Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Forty three percent (240/555) of graduates responded to the survey: 39 % of respondents were domestic (Dublin, Ireland or Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain) and interning locally; 15 % were overseas students interning locally; 42 % were overseas students interning internationally and 4 % had not started internship. Two variables explained 13 % of the variation in preparedness for hospital practice score: having planned postgraduate education prior to entering medical school and having helpful career guidance in medical school. Overseas graduates interning internationally were more likely to have planned their postgraduate career path prior to entering medical school. Dublin graduates found their career guidance more helpful than Bahrain counterparts. The most cited shortcomings were lack of structured career advice and lack of advice on the Irish and Bahraini postgraduate systems. This study has demonstrated that early consideration of postgraduate career preparation and helpful medical school career guidance has a strong association with perceptions of preparedness of medical graduates for hospital practice. In an era of increasing

  14. Emotional intelligence scale for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional Intelligence has been associated with positive outcome process in varied professions. There is paucity of Indian literature on the subject; especially involving medical undergraduates; and presently there is no scale available to measure the same in the Indian scenario. Objective: To develop a scale to measure Emotional Intelligence among medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four domains of Emotional intelligence were selected, viz. Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness & Social-Skills and these were included for the purpose of domains of the scale. On the basis of focused group discussions and in-depth deliberations with experts, undergraduate and postgraduate medical students a pool of 50 items was generated. The items were reduced to 27 based on expert consensus and on the basis of frequency of endorsement by expert reviews. It was followed by a pilot study of 50 undergraduates. This completed the preparation of the preliminary draft based on content analysis. The questionnaire was then administered in 480 students and the data was analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. For the purpose of concurrent validity, emotional intelligence scale developed by Dr. Ekta was used. Results: The Cronbach′s Alpha for Internal Consistency Reliability was 0.68. The EIS had a significant correlation with social awareness domain of Emotional Intelligence Test (EIT establishing Concurrent Validity. Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence Scale for medical undergraduates was constructed. Reliability and concurrent validity were also established for the same.

  15. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  16. EVALUATION OF PERSONALITY TYPE OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though research in health professional education has confirmed that non - cognitive factors like personality has importance in selection , training and academic performance of the students. To prepare competent medical doctors , medical schools need to monitor and assess the students at regular intervals. Personality typing is a useful tool for counsell ing , motivation and guidance of the students and if considered while developing of course will enhance learning and improve the performance of the medical students. So it is necessary a blend of personality characteristics with the cognitive ability of learner during medical education to become a successful medical student. Aim of the present study was to assess the personality type using Myers - Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI among the first year medical students of J . N . Medical College Belgaum. METHODOLOG Y : One hundred and fifty students gave consent and enrolled in this study. Consented students were subjected to MBTI questionnaire to identify their personality type. RESULTS : MBTI questionnaire was used to identified personality type of the students , out of 150 students were 80 Extroverts (E , 70 Introverts (I , 90 Perceivers (P , 60 Judgers (J , 76 Filling , 57 sensing , 93 intuitive , 74 thinking type i e E>I , P>J , F>S and N>T. The most common personality type was ENFP (14% remaining types showed INFP (12% , INTP (9.3%. INFJ , ENFJ , ESFJ , ESFP were of equal percentage (6.7%. CONCLUSION : It has been seen that different type of personalities are found in different medical schools and health professionals and poor performance and drop out of the student occur from the course when the course structure , teaching format and personality type do not match. Hence there is a need to assess every individual’s personality type which helps in counseling and guidance to learners as a part of remedial measures especially for the low achievers to maximize the learning and students who are

  17. Stress and Depression among Veterinary Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Stacy L; Flanagan, Sean; Castine, Eleanor; Howard, Kimberly A S

    While existing literature suggests that professional students (e.g., medical, dental, law, nursing, etc.) experience high levels of stress and depression, the experiences of veterinary medical students have been less well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels of stress and depression among veterinary medical students and to examine the relationship between these variables. Study participants were 1,245 veterinary medical students from North America. The findings provide support for the assertion that veterinary medical students experience high levels of stress and depression. Results also indicated that there is a correlation between stress and depression for veterinary medical students and that female students experience higher levels of stress and depression than their male counterparts.

  18. Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    and construction. Health Sciences – Thinking about medical school? Join us in this workshop to discuss how doctors diagnose and treat diseases...science educators’ academy: Benefits of inquiry- based teaching for educators and their students. Manuscript in preparation. Kuehler, C. P., Marle, P. D...Henry, R. M. (2012). CSI- chocolate science investigation and the case of the recipe rip-off: Using forensic science to engage students. Manuscript

  19. Student Preparation for the International Environmental Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Meehan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have strategies for exposing students to international experiences, but little is reported on their implementation. One example of an implemented activity is the multidisciplinary research project for undergraduate environment students, at RMIT University, that both prepares students to work in the environment profession and…

  20. Scientific output of Dutch medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eyk, Huub J.; Hooiveld, Michiel H. W.; Van Leeuwen, Thed N.; Van der Wurff, Bert L. J.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the number of students who published at least one scientific paper during the course of their medical studies. Methods: Names and initials of all students who received their medical degree in 2006 or 2007 in one of the six participating university medical centers in the Netherlands we

  1. The Effect of Early Clinical Exposure Program on Attitude Change of Undergraduate Medical Students toward their preparation for Attending Clinical Setting in Internal Medicine, Surgery and Pediatrics Wards during 2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Seifrabei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early clinical exposure on medical students’ attitude toward their preparation for attending clinical setting. Material & Methods: In an interventional before -after study, 52 fourth semester medical students studying at Hamadan University of medical sciences were enrolled in the study. The participants filled out a self-structured questionnaire before and after taking part in a 4 month course in three different wards including: surgery, pediatric and internal wards . The staff’s opinions about the program were also gathered. Result: Mean attitude score increased significantly after taking part in the course in these areas: satisfaction about basic science lessons (P=0.019, understanding social determinants of health (P= 0.03 and understanding clinical thinking and simple clinical skills (P= 0.01. Passing the course did not have any significant effect in communication skills and current semester scores (P.0.05 in both issues. Forty one percent of the academic staff in the mentioned wards believed in the necessity of early clinical exposure in basic science stage, 29.5% denied it's necessity and 29.5% did not express their opinions. Conclusion: It seems that despite the mean score increase of some items, early clinical exposure program doesn’t have any positive effect on the measured items. Therefore, it is recommended to change the medical education program. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci . 2016; 22 (4 :323-330

  2. Effect of Medical Education on Empathy in Osteopathic Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTighe, Adam J; DiTomasso, Robert A; Felgoise, Stephanie; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2016-10-01

    Empathy is an integral component of the patient-physician relationship and involves a cognitive ability to connect with others in a meaningful fashion. Multiple longitudinal studies have shown that self-reported allopathic medical student empathy declines significantly during year 3. However, to date, only 4 cross-sectional studies have been published on osteopathic medical students' empathy. Whereas studies of allopathic medical students reported a decline in empathy, similar results were not found in osteopathic studies. To investigate (1) self-reported empathy through years 1 to 3 of osteopathic medical students and (2) whether empathy declines during year 3. Design included cross-sectional and test-retest data collection. Private osteopathic medical school in the Northeast region of the United States. Osteopathic medical students. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy medical student version. Respondents (N=717) included 383 women (53%) and 334 men (47%). When empathy levels were examined by demographics, the only significant finding was that women reported significantly higher empathy levels than men (112.3 vs 109.3; P<.001). Cross-sectional results indicate that mean empathy levels were significantly lower for third-year students at the end of the year (108.7) compared with first- and second-year students at the beginning of the year (111.3 and 112.4, respectively; P<.05). Test-retest analyses of year 3 indicated significantly lower empathy levels from the beginning to the end of the academic year (111.2 and 108.7, respectively; P<.05). Osteopathic medical students' empathy declined significantly during year 3, which is consistent with the findings from allopathic samples but differs from findings from osteopathic samples. More research is needed to build the data on osteopathic medical student samples and to achieve a better understanding of changes in empathy in osteopathic and allopathic medical students.

  3. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  4. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoreishi A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

  5. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldridge Jocelyne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All 31 medical schools responded. 19 medical schools had a fitness to practise committee dealing with medical students only. Three had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and dentistry. One had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and veterinary medicine. Eight had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and two or more other programmes, such as dentistry, nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, dietetics, social work, pharmacy, psychology, audiology, speech therapy, operating department practice, veterinary medicine and education. Conclusion All 31 UK medical schools with undergraduate programmes have a fitness to practise committee to deal with students whose behaviour has given rise to concern about their fitness to practise. The variation in governance structures for student fitness to practise committees/panels can in part be explained by variations in University structures and the extent to which Universities co-manage undergraduate medicine with other courses.

  6. Mental health of dubai medical college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of the participants, 47 (45.6%) were found to be in normal range (GHQ mean College students reported a significant level of psychiatric distress, however, it should not be underestimated, and actions should be taken to encourage Dubai Medical College students to get help from for psychiatric services for their emotional problems. The risk factors as well as the protective factors must be identified in nation-wide studies to promote mental health of medical students.

  7. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' perceptions of their educational environment including exposure to different kinds of bullying. Bullying was defined as “a “persistent behaviour against a medical student that is intimidating, degrading, offensive or malicious and undermines the confidence and self- esteem of the recipient”. Results revealed that more than one quarter (28.0% of the surveyed students reported exposure to some sort of bullying during their clinical. Ninety percent of the reported insults were verbal, 6% sexual and 4% physical. Males were more exposed but difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Bullying among Saudi medical students is an existing problem. A policy against bullying and harassment should be adopted in all of medical colleges to monitor this phenomenon and support students who have been bullied.

  8. Teaching Sociological Research Methods to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Stanford W.; O'Toole, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Reports the development of a three-course eight-week summer program for medical students. One course covers research methods and the other two involve research practicums in public health and medical sociology. (JDH)

  9. Smoke-free medical students' meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Colin; Rudkjøbing, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Medical students of the world have signalled their commitment to health promotion by prohibiting smoking at the semiannual general assembly meetings of the International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA). Although initially adopted in 2000, the smoke-free bylaw took 5 years...... to come into force. This year finally saw compliance with the bylaw on March 1, 2005, at the IFMSA General Assembly in Antalya, Turkey, when medical students who wanted to smoke had to do so outside....

  10. SLEEP HABITS AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Neera; Varun; Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is part of the rhythm of life; without a good sleep the mind is less adaptive, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep-wake cycle of medical students is quite different and sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, occurrence of napping episodes during the day. This study was designed to assess sleep habits in first year medical students. MATERIAL AND METHODS Participants of this study were healthy medical students of first year MBBS course of S...

  11. Medical students' use of Facebook for educational purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Anam

    2016-06-01

    Medical students use Facebook to interact with one another both socially and educationally. This study investigates how medical students in a UK medical school use Facebook to support their learning. In particular, it identifies the nature of their educational activities, and details their experiences of using an educational Facebook group. Twenty-four medical students who self-identified as being Facebook users were invited to focus groups to attain a general overview of Facebook use within an educational context. A textual analysis was then conducted on a small group of intercalating medical students who used a self-created Facebook group to supplement their learning. Five of these students participated in semi-structured interviews. Six common themes were generated. These included 'collaborative learning', 'strategic uses for the preparation for assessment', 'sharing experiences and providing support', 'creating and maintaining connections', 'personal planning and practical organization' and 'sharing and evaluating educational resources'. Evidence from this study shows that medical students are using Facebook informally to enhance their learning and undergraduate lives. Facebook has enabled students to create a supportive learning community amongst their peers. Medical educators wishing to capitalize on Facebook, as a platform for formal educational initiatives, should remain cautious of intruding on this peer online learning community.

  12. Indigenous Australian medical students' perceptions of their medical school training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Gail; Rolfe, Isobel E; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Treloar, Carla

    2009-11-01

    The Australian Medical Council requires all accredited Australian medical schools to have specific admission and recruitment policies for Indigenous Australian students. However, there is no clear evidence about how these students can be retained through to graduation. This study aimed to explore the training experiences of Indigenous undergraduate medical students and their perceptions of the factors influencing their progression through training. Methods We used a qualitative methodology involving focus groups. All participants had successfully completed at least 1 year of the Bachelor of Medicine programme at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Sixteen of 18 eligible students participated in the study. The factors that influence an Indigenous student's progress through medical training are multi-faceted and inter-related and are associated with student support, course content and styles of learning, personal qualities (such as confidence and coping skills), discrimination and distinctive cultural issues pertinent to Indigenous students. Both academic and non-academic factors affect the progression through training of Indigenous medical students. A number of individual and systemic interventions which actively encourage a range of support networks, increase confidence and coping skills, and reduce cultural clash by assertively addressing discrimination and stereotyping need to be introduced. The outcomes of this work may provide some guidance to medical schools engaged in implementing strategies to enroll and support Indigenous students.

  13. To the point: obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Brittany S; Chuang, Alice W; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Page-Ramsey, Sarah; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2014-07-01

    This article, from the To the Point series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides educators with an overview of considerations for obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for the medical student. Options for integration of obstetrics and gynecology global health into undergraduate medical curricula are discussed. Specific considerations for global health clinical experiences for medical students, including choosing a clinical location, oversight and mentorship, goals and objectives, predeparture preparation, and evaluation, are reviewed.

  14. Perception of educational value in clinical rotations by medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandiah DA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available David A Kandiah School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia Aim: Clinical teaching in Australian medical schools has changed to meet the needs of substantially increased medical student cohorts. As such, formal feedback from these student cohorts is needed about the value they place on the educational input from each clinical rotation. This study aims to determine which aspects of clinical placements are most educationally useful to medical students.Methods: In this study, final year medical students from the University of Western Australia (UWA were surveyed via an anonymous online questionnaire, identifying which clinical placements were found to be the most and the least useful to their learning and the positive aspects of these placements. Two focus groups were conducted prior to the design of the questionnaire to determine the key areas of focus important to medical students. Ethics approval for this study was obtained from the UWA Human Research Ethics Committee.Results: Our focus groups were consistent in finding that students enjoyed placements where they were included as a part of the medical team and played a role in patient care. This was consistent with the concept that inclusiveness and participation in the clinical setting are important in developing competence in tasks and skills. The ratio of students to doctors was crucial, with a low ratio given a higher rating as seen in the rural clinical school.Conclusion: The results of this project could benefit both the local and national medical curricula in identifying the most effective clinical attachments for learning and preparation for prevocational training. This is relevant especially due to the limited number of clinical placements and growing cohort of medical students. The results of this study can also be extrapolated to international medical education. Keywords

  15. Preparing Students for Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Richard; Peterson, Amelia; Weinstein, Emily

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aspects in our lives is learning how to have mutual, caring romantic relationships. Yet while schools and many other industries in this country devote tremendous attention and resources to preparing the young for work, they do remarkably little to prepare them for generous, self-respecting sex and love. Educators and…

  16. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald J.; Grossman, Pamela L.; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, whereas others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  17. (How) do medical students regulate their emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulougeri, Karolina; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2016-12-12

    Medical training can be a challenging and emotionally intense period for medical students. However the emotions experienced by medical students in the face of challenging situations and the emotion regulation strategies they use remains relatively unexplored. The aim of the present study was to explore the emotions elicited by memorable incidents reported by medical students and the associated emotion regulation strategies. Peer interviewing was used to collect medical students' memorable incidents. Medical students at both preclinical and clinical stage of medical school were eligible to participate. In total 104 medical students provided memorable incidents. Only 54 narratives included references to emotions and emotion regulation and thus were further analyzed. The narratives of 47 clinical and 7 preclinical students were further analyzed for their references to emotions and emotion regulation strategies. Forty seven out of 54 incidents described a negative incident associated with negative emotions. The most frequently mentioned emotion was shock and surprise followed by feelings of embarrassment, sadness, anger and tension or anxiety. The most frequent reaction was inaction often associated with emotion regulation strategies such as distraction, focusing on a task, suppression of emotions and reappraisal. When students witnessed mistreatment or disrespect exhibited towards patients, the regulation strategy used involved focusing and comforting the patient. The present study sheds light on the strategies medical students use to deal with intense negative emotions. The vast majority reported inaction in the face of a challenging situation and the use of more subtle strategies to deal with the emotional impact of the incident.

  18. Hearing the voice of medical students worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A Palmer

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The Student Forum, a new section of PLoS Medicine, is a space where medical students from across the world can exchange ideas about the critical issues affecting health and health care from their unique perspective.

  19. Final year nursing students in Nigeria; How knowledgeable and prepared are they to offer medical care to patients with chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwuonu, Chimezie Godswill; Kanu, Hannah Sylvanus; Odigie, Ojeh-Oziegbe

    2017-01-01

    Nurses play an important role in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of care. In other to perform their functions, it is pertinent that they have a good understanding of kidney functions and CKD. We do not know if the current educational curriculum prepares them adequately for this role. To assess the knowledge level of kidney functions and diseases among final year nursing students in Abia State Nigeria. This was a cross sectional study involving final year diploma and Bachelor of nursing (B.Nursing) students who were randomly chosen. Structured, self-administered questionnaire containing 18 items was the tool for data collection. A score of one was given for each correctly answered question on functions of the kidney, symptoms, signs, causes, and complications of CKD. A score of 50% and above was regarded as good knowledge. Two hundred questionnaires were distributed, but 186 were returned (response rate of 93%). Male:female ratio was 1:14.5. One hundred and seventeen (62.9%) knew the correct definition of CKD, but only 69 (37.1%) knew the normal range of glomerular filtration rate. Eighty-one percent had good knowledge of kidney functions while 39 (21%) had good knowledge of CKD. Overall, 42 (22.6%) had good knowledge of kidney functions and CKD. Students who rotated through the dialysis unit during their clinical posting had higher mean knowledge score than others (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in the mean knowledge scores of the diploma and B.Nursing students (P = 0.76). The majority of the final year students had poor knowledge of CKD. There is need to expand the current teaching curriculum so as to increase the knowledge of these future nurses on the basic concepts of CKD to improve outcomes of patient management. Résumé Contexte: Les infirmiers jouent un rôle important dans le suivi des personnes souffrant de la maladie rénale chronique (MRC) aux premiers, deuxièmes et

  20. Preparing Students for the Electronic Cottage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Sally L.; Burdin, Joel

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on Alvin Toffler's "electronic cottage" concept as a way of helping counselors become aware of futuristic thinking patterns, changing work roles and patterns in society, and techniques for preparing students for these changes. (Author/ABB)

  1. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  2. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  3. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  4. Effectiveness of a quality improvement curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Tartaglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As health systems find ways to improve quality of care, medical training programs are finding opportunities to prepare learners on principles of quality improvement (QI. The impact of QI curricula for medical students as measured by student learning is not well delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a QI curriculum for senior medical students as measured by student knowledge and skills. Methods: This study was an observational study that involved a self-assessment and post-test Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT for intervention and control students. A QI curriculum consisting of online modules, live discussions, independent readings and reflective writing, and participation in a mentored QI project was offered to fourth-year medical students completing an honor's elective (intervention group. Senior medical students who received the standard QI curriculum only were recruited as controls. Results: A total of 22 intervention students and 12 control students completed the self-assessment and QIKAT. At baseline, there was no difference between groups in self-reported prior exposure to QI principles. Students in the intervention group reported more comfort with their skills in QI overall and in 9 of the 12 domains (p<0.05. Additionally, intervention students performed better in each of the three case scenarios (p<0.01. Discussion: A brief QI curriculum for senior medical students results in improved comfort and knowledge with QI principles. The strengths of our curriculum include effective use of classroom time and faculty mentorship with reliance on pre-existing online modules and written resources. Additionally, the curriculum is easily expandable to larger groups of students and transferable to other institutions.

  5. Use of Computer among Medical Students: A Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computer is a part of our daily life. In Medical Science it has become an essential product in every hospital. Starting from open heart surgeries to X rays to various clinical tests all are carried out by the help of computer. They communicate with each other by email, live chatting and they also use to take full advantage of technology. They also use the computer and internet nearly as much for social communication as they do for their educational purposes.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to August 2010 at NMC, Birgunj, Nepal. The subjects of this survey were Undergraduate medical students.Results: Most of the students were in the age group of 21- 23yrs and 19 – 20 yrs. Males were more in number (62% compared with females. Among Ist yr students computer as a Source of information got priority but in IInd year students Source of information Preparing notes and reading Research articles were more important. Amusement and Preparing notes and reading Research articles were important factor for IIIrd & IVth Year students.Conclusion: The use of the laptop and personal computers along with internet connectivity is increasing. This is becoming a part of medical education in different parts of the globe. In this study on medical students we observed an association between the year of study and the purpose of computer and internet use. Computer assisted teaching learning activities should be encouraged for the improvement of medical science for the new generations.

  6. The training and expectations of medical students in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves Luzia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the socio-economic profile of medical students in the 1998/99 academic year at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM Medical Faculty in Maputo. It aims to identify their social and geographical origins in addition to their expectations and difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Methods The data were collected through a questionnaire administered to all medical students at the faculty. Results Although most medical students were from outside Maputo City and Maputo Province, expectations of getting into medical school were already associated with a migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. This lays the basis for the concentration of physicians in the capital city once their term of compulsory rural employment as junior doctors is completed. The decision to become a doctor was taken at an early age. Close relatives, or family friends seem to have been an especially important variable in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The academic performance of medical students was dismal. This seems to be related to several difficulties such as lack of library facilities, inadequate financial support, as well as poor high school preparation. Only one fifth of the students reported receiving financial support from the Mozambican government to subsidize their medical studies. Conclusion Medical students seem to know that they will be needed in the public sector, and that this represents an opportunity to contribute to the public's welfare. Nevertheless, their expectations are, already as medical students, to combine their public sector practice with private medical work in order to improve their earnings.

  7. Creativity in Medical Education: The Value of Having Medical Students Make Stuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael J; Myers, Kimberly; Watson, Katie; Czerwiec, M K; Shapiro, Dan; Draus, Stephanie

    2016-12-01

    What is the value of having medical students engage in creative production as part of their learning? Creating something new requires medical students to take risks and even to fail--something they tend to be neither accustomed to nor comfortable with doing. "Making stuff" can help students prepare for such failures in a controlled environment that doesn't threaten their professional identities. Furthermore, doing so can facilitate students becoming resilient and creative problem-solvers who strive to find new ways to address vexing questions. Though creating something new can be fun, this is not the main outcome of interest. Rather, the principle reason we recommend devoting precious curricular time to creative endeavors is because it helps medical students become better doctors.

  8. Analyzing Medical Students' Definitions of Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Heather; Cho, Janice; Strassberg, Donald S.; Rullo, Jordan E.

    2016-01-01

    An inaccurate definition of what constitutes sex can negatively impact the sexual health and wellbeing of patients. This study aimed to determine which behaviors medical students consider to be sex. Survey questions about various sexual behaviors were administered to medical students. All participants agreed that penile-vaginal penetration is sex.…

  9. [Outplacement of medical students in local hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsetmo, R O; Fosse, L; Evensen, S A; Wyller, V B; Nylehn, P; Ogreid, D

    1998-02-28

    The organisation and content of the training of medical students in practical and clinical skills at Norwegian universities is presented and discussed. Based on experience from Tromsø University, an increased use of local hospitals for training medical students in practical and clinical skills is planned for all universities in Norway.

  10. Medical preparation container comprising microwave powered sensor assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical preparation container which comprises a microwave powered sensor assembly. The microwave powered sensor assembly comprises a sensor configured to measure a physical property or chemical property of a medical preparation during its heating in a microwave...

  11. Perception of educational value in clinical rotations by medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, David A

    2017-01-01

    Aim Clinical teaching in Australian medical schools has changed to meet the needs of substantially increased medical student cohorts. As such, formal feedback from these student cohorts is needed about the value they place on the educational input from each clinical rotation. This study aims to determine which aspects of clinical placements are most educationally useful to medical students. Methods In this study, final year medical students from the University of Western Australia (UWA) were surveyed via an anonymous online questionnaire, identifying which clinical placements were found to be the most and the least useful to their learning and the positive aspects of these placements. Two focus groups were conducted prior to the design of the questionnaire to determine the key areas of focus important to medical students. Ethics approval for this study was obtained from the UWA Human Research Ethics Committee. Results Our focus groups were consistent in finding that students enjoyed placements where they were included as a part of the medical team and played a role in patient care. This was consistent with the concept that inclusiveness and participation in the clinical setting are important in developing competence in tasks and skills. The ratio of students to doctors was crucial, with a low ratio given a higher rating as seen in the rural clinical school. Conclusion The results of this project could benefit both the local and national medical curricula in identifying the most effective clinical attachments for learning and preparation for prevocational training. This is relevant especially due to the limited number of clinical placements and growing cohort of medical students. The results of this study can also be extrapolated to international medical education. PMID:28223855

  12. Students' Perceptions of Trigger Warnings in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, Elizabeth A; Díaz, Sebastián; Kerr, Anna M; Balbo, Jane T; Prokopakis, Kayla E; Fredricks, Todd R

    2017-07-28

    Phenomenon: Trigger warnings are verbal statements or written warnings that alert students in advance to potentially distressing material. Medical education includes numerous subjects frequently identified as triggers, such as abuse, rape, self-injurious behaviors, eating disorders, drug and alcohol addiction, and suicide. Thus, exploring medical students' perceptions of trigger warnings may provide a valuable perspective on the use of these warnings in higher education. As part of a larger descriptive, cross-sectional survey study on medical education, we assessed 1st- and 2nd-year medical students' perceptions of trigger warnings in the preclinical curriculum. Five questions specific to trigger warnings explored students' knowledge, prior experience, and perceptions of trigger warnings in medical education. Frequencies of individual question responses were calculated, and qualitative data were analyzed via content and thematic analyses. Of the 424 medical students invited to participate, 259 completed the survey (M = 24.8 years, SD + 3.4, 51.4% female, 76.1% White, 53.7% 1st-year students). Few students (11.2%) were aware of the term trigger warning and its definition. However, after being presented with a formal definition on the online survey, 38.6% reported having had a professor use one. When asked whether they supported the use of trigger warnings in medical education, respondents were distributed fairly equally by response (yes = 31.0%, maybe = 39.2%, no = 29.7%). Qualitative analysis revealed three themes: (a) Trigger Warnings Allow Students to Know What is Coming and Prepare Themselves: Respondents believed that trigger warnings would benefit students with a history of trauma by providing them additional time to prepare for the material and, if appropriate, seek professional help; (b) Students Need to Learn How to Handle Distressing Information: Respondents agreed that they needed to learn and cope with highly sensitive material because they would be

  13. Study of Depression, Anxiety and Stress among the Medical Students in two Medical Colleges of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunwar, D; Risal, A; Koirala, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical education is intended to prepare graduates for a promoting health and caring for the sick. Medical students are confronted with significant academic, psychological and existential stressors. There is insufficient information regarding psychological morbidity among Nepalese medical students. Objective To determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress, among the medical students in Nepal, and its association with sociodemographic characteristics. Method A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted including all students from first to fifth year of student using convenience method of sampling from Kathmandu University Medical School (KUSMS), Dhulikhel and Manipal College of Medical Sciences (MCOMS), Pokhara, Nepal. Depression, Anxiety and stress were assessed using Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Additional questions regarding demographic variables were also included in the survey. Data analysis was done on Statistical Package for the Social Sciences SPSS version 16. Result A total of 538 students participated in the study giving a response rate of 89.6%. Aamong them 56.5% were from age group 21-25 years, 42.2% were below 20 years and only 1.3% were above 25 years of age. Among them 52% were female and 48% were male. Our study found that the overall prevalence of depression was 29.9%, anxiety was 41.1% and stress was 27% among all participated medical students. Depression was significantly associated (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.43-3.47, pstress 27% among undergraduate medical students warrants needs for strategic plans to alleviate depression anxiety and the stressors right from the time they join medical school and has to be continued till they finish the course.

  14. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  15. Curriculum Type and Sophomore Students' Preparation Time for the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Boyd F.; Cariaga-Lo, Liza

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen medical students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum reported that on average they spent twice as much time preparing for step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination as did 52 students in the traditional lecture-based curriculum at the same school. Different learning approaches were also employed. (SLD)

  16. What medical students value from their teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Maria Theresa; Tani, Massimiliano

    2007-08-01

    As Australian medical educators become more accustomed to the increasing pressures imposed upon them, there is a risk that the traditional educational relationship between a student and his or her teacher is replaced by a pure transactional relationship between a customer and his or her supplier. A large sample of medical students surveyed revealed that medical students seem to value directed rather than independent learning. New approaches to teaching, such as being innovative or entertaining, as well as facilitating participation, do not appear to be very important to medical students. Medical students do not seem to have strong preferences when it comes to assessment, contradicting some of the fundamental suggestions of the recent educational literature, in which assessment is often viewed as a key element in the formation and the direction of learning. The fact that medical students seem to reject many of the paradigms of the psychology-based educational literature, at least based on the large sample surveyed at the University of New South Wales, suggests that caution should be used in the development of training programs for teachers in medical faculties, and that learning and teaching should ensure that students' expectations and teachers' training do not mismatch.

  17. THE IMPACT OF METACOGNITION TRAINING ON METACOGNITIVE AWARENESS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    GÖNÜLLÜ, İpek; ARTAR, Müge

    2014-01-01

     ABSTRACTMetacognition is the knowledge and regulation of one's own cognitive system. Possession and use of metacognitive abilities is necessary for learning and the learners who are metacognitively strong are best prepared to learn throughout their lives. Medical students must be prepared to cope with the uncertainty and evolving understanding inherent in medical practice. The study examined the metacognitive awareness of medical students and the impact of metacognitive training on thei...

  18. The Impact of Metacognition Training on Metacognitive Awareness of Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    GÖNÜLLÜ, İpek; ARTAR, Müge

    2014-01-01

    Metacognition is the knowledge and regulation of one’s own cognitive system. Possession and use of metacognitive abilities is necessary for learning and the learners who are metacognitively strong are best prepared to learn throughout their lives. Medical students must be prepared to cope with the uncertainty and evolving understanding inherent in medical practice. The study examined the metacognitive awareness of medical students and the impact of metacognitive training on their ...

  19. Teacher training program for medical students: improvements needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Diggele C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christie van Diggele,1 Annette Burgess,2 Craig Mellis21The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Sydney Medical School – Central, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaIntroduction: Skills in peer teaching, assessment, and feedback are increasingly documented internationally as required graduate attributes in medicine. Yet these skills are rarely taught in medical schools. We sought to design and deliver a short but effective teacher training (TT program for medical students that could be easily integrated into the professional development curriculum. This study sought to evaluate such a pilot program, based on student perception.Methods: The study took place at a major metropolitan teaching hospital, where 38 medical students were invited to attend a voluntary, newly designed four-module TT program. In total, 23/38 (61% of invited students attended. Mixed methods were used for evaluation. Questionnaires were completed by 21/23 (91% of students, and 6/23 (26% of students participated in a focus group.Results: Students reported that as a result of the program they felt more confident to facilitate small group teaching activities and to provide feedback to peers using the suggested frameworks. Students would like the program to contain more in-depth educational theory and to allow a more time for small group learning activities. They would also like to see opportunities for participation across all clinical schools.Conclusion: The TT program was successful in increasing student awareness of educational theory and practice, thereby improving their confidence in teaching and assessing their peers and making them feel better prepared for their careers as medical practitioners. Key improvements to the program are needed in terms of more in-depth theory and more time spent on small group learning. This might be achieved by complementing the course with e-learning.Keywords: teacher training, medical students, peer teaching, peer

  20. Stress and mental health among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backović Dušan V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, by means of the anonymous questionnaire, containing: socio­demographic data, self­reported health status and stressful influences of studying activities. Mental health status was estimated by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ­12. Results. More than 50% of students perceive frequent feeling of psychic tension, and one third has problems with insomnia. Nearly one­half of students assessed their general stress level as moderate or high. Exams were estimated as high stressor in 63.1% of all students. Stressful effects of communication with teaching staff were reported by one quarter of the examinees. The scores of GHQ­12 were above the threshold in 55.6 % of all students. Mental health problems among students were most significantly associated with stressful experience during exams and contacts with teaching staff. Conclusion. Academic stress makes great influence on mental health of medical students. Reduction of stress effects should be directed to optimization of the examination process and improvement of communication skills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175078

  1. Debt crisis ahead for Irish medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, C; Doyle, B; O'Flynn, S

    2014-06-01

    Internationally medical student debt is a cause of concern. A survey of medical students in UCC (response rate of 191 representing 35% of the EU student cohort) reveals that 34 (26%) of direct entry medicine (DEM) students and 36 (61%) graduate entrants (GEM) have a loan with an anticipated average debt of Euro17,300 and Euro80,000 on graduation respectively. Fifty-three (90%) graduate entrants and 75 (57%) direct entrants revealed that they often worry about their current financial situation. Fifty-three (28%) of students have a part-time job and many were concerned about the degree to which this conflicted with their academic workload. 118 (89%) of school leavers and 48 (81%) graduates received financial assistance from their families to fund their college expenses. Student responses recommended the introduction of a government supported low interest rate loan and other incentives to help service high levels of debt associated with medical education.

  2. Factors associated with stress among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Khadija; Khan, Najamus Saqib; Bashir Kiani, Muhammad Rizwan

    2015-07-01

    To determine the probable factors responsible for stress among undergraduate medical students. The qualitative descriptive study was conducted at a public-sector medical college in Islamabad, Pakistan, from January to April 2014. Self-administered open-ended questionnaires were used to collect data from first year medical students in order to study the factors associated with the new environment. There were 115 students in the study with a mean age of 19±6.76 years. Overall, 35(30.4%) students had mild to moderate physical problems, 20(17.4%) had severe physical problems and 60(52.2%) did not have any physical problem. Average stress score was 19.6±6.76. Major elements responsible for stress identified were environmental factors, new college environment, student abuse, tough study routines and personal factors. Majority of undergraduate students experienced stress due to both academic and emotional factors.

  3. [The use of medical journals by medical students. Which medical journals are read?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algra, Annemijn M; Dekker, Friedo W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of scientific medical journals in Dutch medical curricula. Descriptive questionnaire study. In 2013, medical students (from year 3 onwards) at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), were invited to respond to an online questionnaire. They were presented with 28 multiple-choice questions and 11 statements about the use of scientific medical journals in the medical curriculum. We calculated the frequencies of the answers per question and analysed differences between medical students using two-by-two tables. The questionnaire was completed by 680 (53.0%) of 1277 invited medical students enrolled at the LUMC. Most of the respondents were those doing clinical rotations (56.6%) and 60.1% had research experience. More than half of the students read at least one scientific journal a few times per month; this percentage was 38.8% among third-year students, 49.3% among fourth-year students, 60.0% among those on clinical rotation, and was higher among students with research experience (63.3%) than among those without research experience (44.1%). Nearly 90% of students agreed with the statement that the development of academic and scientific education should take place in the bachelor's phase of medical school. Medical students start to read scientific medical journals at an early phase in the medical curriculum and this increases further when students start to undertake research projects or go on clinical rotation. Medical curricula should be constructed in such a way that medical students learn to select and interpret research findings adequately for themselves before they turn to articles from scientific medical journals.

  4. Developing Medical Students as Teachers: An Anatomy-Based Student-as-Teacher Program with Emphasis on Core Teaching Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Erie Andrew; Starkman, Sidney J.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2013-01-01

    Teaching is an increasingly recognized responsibility of the resident physician. Residents, however, often assume teaching responsibilities without adequate preparation. Consequently, many medical schools have implemented student-as-teacher (SAT) programs that provide near-peer teaching opportunities to senior medical students. Near-peer teaching…

  5. Endotracheal intubation skill acquisition by medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry E. Wang MD MS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their training, medical students may receive introductory experience with advanced resuscitation skills. Endotracheal intubation (ETI – the insertion of a breathing tube into the trachea is an example of an important advanced resuscitation intervention. Only limited data characterize clinical ETI skill acquisition by medical students. We sought to characterize medical student acquisition of ETI procedural skill.11Presented as a poster discussion on 17 October 2007 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in San Francisco, CA.The study included third-year medical students participating in a required anesthesiology clerkship. Students performed ETI on operating room patients under the supervision of attending anesthesiologists. Students reported clinical details of each ETI effort, including patient age, sex, Mallampati score, number of direct laryngoscopies and ETI success. Using mixed-effects regression, we characterized the adjusted association between ETI success and cumulative ETI experience.ETI was attempted by 178 students on 1,646 patients (range 1–23 patients per student; median 9 patients per student, IQR 6–12. Overall ETI success was 75.0% (95% CI 72.9–77.1%. Adjusted for patient age, sex, Mallampati score and number of laryngoscopies, the odds of ETI success improved with cumulative ETI encounters (odds ratio 1.09 per additional ETI encounter; 95% CI 1.04–1.14. Students required at least 17 ETI encounters to achieve 90% predicted ETI success.In this series medical student ETI proficiency was associated with cumulative clinical procedural experience. Clinical experience may provide a viable strategy for fostering medical student procedural skills.

  6. Teaching medical students social responsibility: the right thing to do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, L R; McCurdy, R L

    2000-04-01

    As academic medicine has become more focused on the economic pressures of the marketplace, some educators have expressed concern about whether appropriate attention is being given to the character development and moral education of medical students. The authors conclude that medical schools do indeed have a duty to teach their medical students to be socially responsible. They define a socially responsible individual as a person who takes part in activities that contribute to the happiness, health, and prosperity of a community and its members. They suggest that medical students should participate in carefully designed, socially responsible activities in order to (1) practice and have reinforced such qualities as reliability, trustworthiness, dependability, altruism, and compassion; (2) partially reimburse society for the cost of their medical education; (3) increase their exposure to a population-based approach to health care; and (4) help medical schools fulfill their social contract with the public. The authors outline the process for developing a curriculum to teach social responsibility to medical students and list some of the key questions faculty and administrators must address in the processes of development and implementation. They conclude that while faculty responsible for implementing a curriculum in social responsibility must be highly committed and prepared to address numerous difficult questions concerning the curriculum's philosophy, structure, and function, the potential benefits of such a curriculum are well worth the effort.

  7. Role of a medical student: patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Owen, Stephanie; Green, John

    2017-08-01

    Medical students form an important part of the medical team; however, patients may not be fully aware of their role. Identifying students in the clinical setting is difficult because of their similar attire to other health care professionals. This parity may introduce unethical scenarios where patients may be speaking and consenting to individuals whom they do not recognise as students. A single-sided questionnaire was given to hospital in-patients during a 12-week period. Questions focused on the role of students. With their opinions, patients were given a list of clinical skills and asked whether or not they would allow a student to carry out these skills on themselves. The list included both required and non-required clinical skills by the General Medical Council (GMC). In total, 101 patients participated in the study: 34 males and 67 females. Age at admittance was 63.4 ± 18.0 years; 74.3 per cent of patients were able to identify a student, although 87.1 per cent believed that students should have a designated uniform. Patients were significantly more likely to allow a student to perform required skills on them, as opposed to non-required skills (p < 0.0001); however, previous contact with a medical student made no difference in the likelihood of consenting to a skill being performed. Identifying students in the clinical setting is difficult CONCLUSIONS: The apparent trade-off between patient safety and providing students with learning opportunities has been of long standing concern. Patients consider GMC-required skills as largely appropriate; however, patients feel that students should be more identifiable, and increasing the awareness of the role and capabilities of a student in patient care is important. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  8. Medical students' preparedness for professional activities in early clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Josefin; Maaz, Asja; Hitzblech, Tanja; Holzhausen, Ylva; Peters, Harm

    2017-08-22

    Sufficient preparedness is important for transitions to workplace participation and learning in clinical settings. This study aims to analyse medical students' preparedness for early clerkships using a three-dimensional, socio-cognitive, theory-based model of preparedness anchored in specific professional activities and their supervision level. Medical students from a competency-based undergraduate curriculum were surveyed about preparedness for 21 professional activities and level of perceived supervision during their early clerkships via an online questionnaire. Preparedness was operationalized by the three dimensions of confidence to carry out clerkship activities, being prepared through university teaching and coping with failure by seeking support. Factors influencing preparedness and perceived stress as outcomes were analysed through step-wise regression. Professional activities carried out by the students (n = 147; 19.0%) and their supervision levels varied. While most students reported high confidence to perform the tasks, the activity-specific analysis revealed important gaps in preparation through university teaching. Students regularly searched for support in case of difficulty. One quarter of the variance of each preparedness dimension was explained by self-efficacy, supervision quality, amount of prior clerkship experience and nature of professional activities. Preparedness contributed to predicting perceived stress. The applied three-dimensional concept of preparedness and the task-specific approach provided a detailed and meaningful view on medical students' workplace participation and experiences in early clerkships.

  9. Specialty choices amongst graduating medical students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specialty choices amongst graduating medical students in University of Calabar, ... Factors which influenced choice of specialty amongst the graduating ... interest in anaesthesia specialization, improvement of training facilities and provision of ...

  10. Psychological stress among undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherina, M S; Rampal, L; Kaneson, N

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of psychological stress among medical students and to identify its symptoms and association with depression. A cross-sectional study design was used. Three-hundred and ninety-six medical students at a university in Malaysia were included in the study. Tools similar to the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to screen for psychological stress and depression, respectively. 41.9% of the medical students were found to have psychological stress, which was significantly associated with depression (chi2=4.636, df=1, p<0.05). Psychological stress is common among medical students and is associated with depression.

  11. Mentoring for first year medical students: humanising medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Arati; Singh, Navjeevan; Dhaliwal, Upreet

    2013-01-01

    New entrants are vulnerable to the challenges of the medical course; mentoring programmes are known to offer support. This paper evaluated the experiences of students and faculty enrolled in a new mentoring programme. After needs analysis of students and faculty, a small-group mentoring programme for new medical students was initiated. Fifty-five volunteer faculty mentors were allocated two-three students each. At year-end, feedback using an open-ended questionnaire, revealed that there was no contact in one-third of the cases; the commonest reasons cited were lack of mentee initiative, time and commitment. Supportive mentors were appreciated. Over 95% of respondents believed that mentoring was a good idea; many believed the mentee benefitted; mentors also reported improved communication and affective skills; 60 (77.0%) mentees wanted to mentor new students the following year. Thus, mentoring of first-year students by faculty was effective, when contact occurred, in making the mentee feel supported. Mentoring may be a means of honing the affective domain and humanitarian instincts of medical faculty and students.

  12. Emergency Medicine for medical students world wide!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinpam, Larshan; Thi Huynh, Anh-Nhi

    2015-01-01

    A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/......A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/...

  13. Ireland's medical brain drain: migration intentions of Irish medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gouda, Pishoy

    2015-12-01

    To provide the optimum level of healthcare, it is important that the supply of well-trained doctors meets the demand. However, despite many initiatives, Ireland continues to have a shortfall of physicians, which has been projected to persist. Our study aimed to investigate the migration intentions of Irish medical students and identify the factors that influence their decisions in order to design appropriate interventions to sustain the supply of trained doctors in order to maintain a viable medical system.

  14. Training Medical Students in Empathic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

    2011-01-01

    Empathy is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship, yet previous studies point to its steady decline in medical students as they progress through medical school and residency programs. Empathy training has thus been identified as a goal of instruction, yet it is unclear how this training can best be implemented within the medical…

  15. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  16. Medical Student Empathy: Interpersonal Distinctions and Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kevin D.; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-01-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal…

  17. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  18. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  19. Drinking among medical students: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, D J; Beales, I L

    1989-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of drinking among medical students a questionnaire on smoking, exercise, drinking, and weight was distributed among the students available. A total of 260 replies were received from an estimated available population of 350 students (134 men and 126 women). The mean alcohol consumption obtained by a quantity-frequency measure was 20.5 units/week for male students and 14.6 units/week for female students. Retrospective diary reports showed mean (SE) consumptions of 18 (2) units/week for men (n = 134) and 11 (1) units/week for women (n = 126). Consumption among the men closely matched consumption among men matched for age in the general population. Women, however, drank more than women matched for age. Male and female medical students exceeded the suggested maximum for their sex in equal proportions. Quantity-frequency data showed that 31 (23%) men drank over 35 units/week and 28 (22%) women drank over 21 units/week. Of the 59 students exceeding these limits, 51 responded positively to a standard screening questionnaire for alcohol abuse. Forty students reported that they might have a drinking problem, and 138 reported that alcohol had affected their academic performance at some time; 17 of these were affected frequently. The students suggested sensible maximum consumption figures for health education. Smoking was associated with heavy drinking, especially among the women. These results suggest that some medical students are compromising their future health and their academic performance through excessive drinking.

  20. Enhanced podcasting for medical students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    found podcasting useful (reported here), and how podcasts influence students' learning ... We used students in each class rather than attempting to .... or skip to areas of interest. 34. Just listened to .... factors to this as well. Others have found ...

  1. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  2. Pre-Deployment Medical Readiness Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Immunisation Coverage. Compliance with both the standardisation agreement (STANAG 2037) "Vaccination of NATO Forces" requirements and in response to medical...intelligence summaries for specific operations (e.g. as contained in the relevant operational plan). Appropriate immunisations must be given to all

  3. Critical review: medical students' motivation after failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Chris

    2016-08-01

    About 10 % of students in each years' entrants to medical school will encounter academic failure at some stage in their programme. The usual approach to supporting these students is to offer them short term remedial study programmes that often enhance approaches to study that are orientated towards avoiding failure. In this critical review I will summarise the current theories about student motivation that are most relevant to this group of students and describe how they are enhanced or not by various contextual factors that medical students experience during their programme. I will conclude by suggesting ways in which support programmes for students who have encountered academic failure might be better designed and researched in the future.

  4. Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The learning-disabled medical student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, P; Haake, C; Whitman, B

    1989-10-01

    Developmental pediatricians are being consulted by medical school promotion committees with regard to the course of action to be taken with learning-disabled medical students experiencing academic difficulties. Faculty attitude, a difficulty understanding the nature of learning disabilities, appears to be a major contributor to poor medical school performance on the part of learning-disabled adults. Utilizing the sequential-simultaneous information processing model as a simplified introduction to learning disability patterns, the authors argue that recommending intensive remediation of rote spelling and writing skills in students engaged in graduate education represents both a waste of time and a further emotional trauma to these young professionals.

  6. Reflections: Improving Medical Students' Presentation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-02-26

    Both good communication and presentation skills on the part of an academic teacher are crucial when trying to generate students' interest in the subject of a lecture. More generally, our task is to share knowledge in the most effective way possible. It is also worth teaching students presentation skills, as today's students are tomorrow's teachers. An engaging presentation is a powerful tool. There are some rules for presenting which I consider worthy of being discussed and taught at a medical university.

  7. The reflective elective: using the elective to develop medical students' skills in career planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Caroline; Newport, Melanie

    2008-07-01

    The Tooke inquiry into Modernising Medical Careers highlighted the need for medical schools to become more actively involved in preparing their students for the critical career decisions that they will make during the foundation programme. Incorporating a reflective careers assignment into the elective module may be a useful way of encouraging students to become more highly skilled in self-assessment and career exploration.

  8. How Students Experience and Navigate Transitions in Undergraduate Medical Education: An Application of Bourdieu's Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F.; Richards, Boyd F.; Varpio, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Using Bourdieu's theoretical model as a lens for analysis, we sought to understand how students experience the undergraduate medical education (UME) milieu, focusing on how they navigate transitions from the preclinical phase, to the major clinical year (MCY), and to the preparation for residency phase. Twenty-two medical students participated in…

  9. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  10. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Neal R; Stuart, Melissa K; Singh, Vineet K; Sargentini, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs) were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM) and Infectious Diseases (ID) METHODS: Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I) and students who participated in the CPs (Group II). In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P<0.018; P<0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test). Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P<0.001; P<0.001). Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians.

  11. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal R. Chamberlain

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM and Infectious Diseases (ID Methods : Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Results : Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I and students who participated in the CPs (Group II. In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P < 0.018; P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test. Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P < 0.001; P < 0.001. Conclusion : Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians.

  12. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Neal R.; Stuart, Melissa K.; Singh, Vineet K.; Sargentini, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs) were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM) and Infectious Diseases (ID) Methods Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Results Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I) and students who participated in the CPs (Group II). In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P<0.018; P<0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test). Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P<0.001; P<0.001). Conclusion Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians. PMID:22435014

  13. Teaching Skills in Medical Information Retrieval to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolner, Stuart J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A project that attempts to overcome the principal obstacles and to provide an efficient and effective method of teaching information retrieval skills to second-year medical students is described. The method includes a pretest, a diagnosis of deficiencies in information skills, a self-paced learning module, and a posttest. (Author/MLW)

  14. COLLABORATION AMONG MEDICAL AND NURSING SCHOOL STUDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul YILDIRIM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The term of management characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organization, often a business, through the manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible. Inter-professional collaboration, contribution, between nurses and physicians is an effective example of the management. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare collaboration between nursing and medical student. ‘The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration’ scale developped by Hojat et al. was used. The study included a total of 431 students from three medical faculties and three nursing colleges in Istanbul. Mean age of the students is 21.212.66. Among 431 students 42.9% (185 were male, 57.1% (246 were female. Nursing school students’ mean collaboration score was significantly higher than medical school students (p< 0.05 and t= 3.88. Comprising collaborative learning opportunities for nursing and medical students in their curriculum is feasible. Learning in multi-professional groups will help to increase understanding of others' professional roles by improving patient care and personal development. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(3.000: 166-175

  15. Prevalence of plagiarism among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Frković, Vedran; Turk, Tamara; Azman, Josip; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2005-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of plagiarism among medical students in writing essays. During two academic years, 198 second year medical students attending Medical Informatics course wrote an essay on one of four offered articles. Two of the source articles were available in an electronic form and two in printed form. Two (one electronic and one paper article) were considered less complex and the other two more complex. The essays were examined using plagiarism detection software "WCopyfind," which counted the number of matching phrases with six or more words. Plagiarism rate, expressed as the percentage of the plagiarized text, was calculated as a ratio of the absolute number of matching words and the total number of words in the essay. Only 17 (9%) of students did not plagiarize at all and 68 (34%) plagiarized less than 10% of the text. The average plagiarism rate (% of plagiarized text) was 19% (5-95% percentile=0-88). Students who were strictly warned not to plagiarize had a higher total word count in their essays than students who were not warned (P=0.002) but there was no difference between them in the rate of plagiarism. Students with higher grades in Medical Informatics exam plagiarized less than those with lower grades (P=0.015). Gender, subject source, and complexity had no influence on the plagiarism rate. Plagiarism in writing essays is common among medical students. An explicit warning is not enough to deter students from plagiarism. Detection software can be used to trace and evaluate the rate of plagiarism in written student assays.

  16. Problem-Based Learning of Social Sciences and Humanities by Fourth-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Kathleen K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A required fourth-year course integrating the social sciences and humanities into the required clinical medical curriculum at Dartmouth Medical School is intended to prepare students to deal with the social and humanistic issues involved in medical practice, including law, ethics, economics, and social anthropology. (MSE)

  17. The Value of the Subinternship: A Survey of Fourth Year Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Green, MD MSc

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the subinternship is often regarded as an important part of many fourth year curricula it is rarely studied. Purpose: We aimed to understand the how well the subinternship prepared medical students to perform core clinical skills. Methods: Senior medical students at Boston University School of Medicine rated their perception of the effectiveness of the subinternship and “medical school overall” in preparing them to perform core clinical skills using a written survey. Results: Overall, 69% (101 of students responded. Students believe that the subinternship prepares them to perform most key skills involved in day-to-day medical care. However, students feel less prepared by either their subinternship or overall medical school experience to carry out some complex patient communication skills including delivering “bad news” and discussing end-of-life wishes. Conclusions: The subinternship appears to be effective in preparing students for many of the challenges they will face as an intern and beyond. However, students identified several complex communication skills that could be addressed in part by the subinternship for which they felt unprepared. Student learning would likely be enhanced by creating a longitudinal program to teach these higher-level communication skills during medical school and by integrating practice and feedback of these skills into the subinternship

  18. Problem-solving model in radiology for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, C E; Vydareny, K H; Ten Haken, J D; Calhoun, J G

    1989-05-01

    Current undergraduate medical education is criticized for not preparing physicians to be independent thinkers. The rapid development of new imaging techniques and the problem of escalating medical costs call for efficient patient management. The development of algorithms in imaging work-up of patient problems is an excellent example of problem solving or medical decision making. The senior elective in radiology at our institution incorporates this type of problem-solving session. Small groups (15-25 students) with faculty guidance discuss 5-6 common patient problems to develop an investigative plan in imaging. Algorithms are thus developed by the group, but not presented for memorization. Small changes are then made in the case history so that the students are forced to make new hypotheses and generate a modified algorithm. Correlative costs are included. Flexibility and initiative in development of patient management algorithms are stressed.

  19. Medical students' perception of dyad practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Rasmussen, Maria Birkvad; Bjørck, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Training in pairs (dyad practice) has been shown to improve efficiency of clinical skills training compared with single practice but little is known about students' perception of dyad practice. The aim of this study was to explore the reactions and attitudes of medical students who were instructed....... The students felt dyad practice improved their self-efficacy through social interaction with peers, provided useful insight through observation, and contributed with shared memory of what to do, when they forgot essential steps of the physical examination of the patient. However, some students were concerned...

  20. medical students' preference for choice of clinical specialties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    The important goal of undergraduate medical training is to train doctors who ... many factors considered by medical students when they make up their minds to ... This study seeks to determine the medical student preference for the clinical ...

  1. Advances in medical education and practice: student perceptions of the flipped classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J; Pound, Lynley D

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom (FC) approach to teaching has been increasingly employed in undergraduate medical education in recent years. In FC applications, students are first exposed to content via online resources. Subsequent face-to-face class time can then be devoted to student-centered activities that promote active learning. Although the FC has been well received by students in other contexts, the perceptions of medical students regarding this innovation are unclear. This review serves as an early exploration into medical student perceptions of benefits and limitations of the FC. Medical students have generally expressed strong appreciation for the pre-class preparation activities (especially when facilitated by concise, readily accessed online tools) as well as for interactive, engaging small group classroom activities. Some students have expressed concerns with the FC and noted that suboptimal student preparation and insufficient direction and structure during active learning sessions may limit the student-centered benefits. Although students generally perceive that FC approaches can improve their learning and knowledge, this has not been conclusively shown via performances on assessment tools, which may be related to caveats with the assessment tools used. In any case, lifelong self-directed learning skills are perceived by medical students to be enhanced by the FC. In conclusion, medical students have generally expressed strong satisfaction with early applications of the FC to undergraduate medical education, and generally prefer this method to lecture-based instruction. PMID:28144171

  2. Advances in medical education and practice: student perceptions of the flipped classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J; Pound, Lynley D

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom (FC) approach to teaching has been increasingly employed in undergraduate medical education in recent years. In FC applications, students are first exposed to content via online resources. Subsequent face-to-face class time can then be devoted to student-centered activities that promote active learning. Although the FC has been well received by students in other contexts, the perceptions of medical students regarding this innovation are unclear. This review serves as an early exploration into medical student perceptions of benefits and limitations of the FC. Medical students have generally expressed strong appreciation for the pre-class preparation activities (especially when facilitated by concise, readily accessed online tools) as well as for interactive, engaging small group classroom activities. Some students have expressed concerns with the FC and noted that suboptimal student preparation and insufficient direction and structure during active learning sessions may limit the student-centered benefits. Although students generally perceive that FC approaches can improve their learning and knowledge, this has not been conclusively shown via performances on assessment tools, which may be related to caveats with the assessment tools used. In any case, lifelong self-directed learning skills are perceived by medical students to be enhanced by the FC. In conclusion, medical students have generally expressed strong satisfaction with early applications of the FC to undergraduate medical education, and generally prefer this method to lecture-based instruction.

  3. [Depression and stress management in medical students. A comparative study between freshman and advanced medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, H B; Richter, L; Cramer, M; Vetter, A; Bedau, S; Leweke, F; Milch, W

    2011-05-01

    International studies have indicated a high prevalence of depression and a lack of coping with stress in medical students. Freshman and advanced medical students were investigated using a specific questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) with a response rate of 100%. Of the subjects studied 81.1% did not have any depression, 13.1% slight and 5.8% clinically relevant symptoms of depression. The severity of symptoms was highly associated with subjective appraisal of stressors. Coping skills of first year students significantly influenced the depression symptoms calling for preventative measures even in freshman medical students.

  4. Impacting student anxiety for the USMLE Step 1 through process-oriented preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E. Strowd

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standardized examinations are the key components of medical education. The USMLE Step 1 is the first of these important milestones. Success on this examination requires both content competency and efficient strategies for study and review. Students employ a wide variety of techniques in studying for this examination, with heavy reliance on personal study habits and advice from other students. Nevertheless, few medical curricula formally address these strategies. Methods: In response to student-generated critique at our institution, a five-part seminar series on process-oriented preparation was developed and implemented to address such concerns. The series focused on early guidance and preparation strategies for Step 1 and the many other important challenges in medical school. Emphasis was placed on facilitating conversation and mentorship opportunities between students. Results & Conclusions: A profoundly positive experience was reported by our medical students that included a decreased anxiety level for the Step 1 examination.

  5. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  6. Prevalence of hyperhidrosis among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Fernando Luiz; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Neves; Lima, Luiz Carlos; de Carvalho, Bruna Cecília Neves; Padilla, Rodrigo; Araújo, Katiúscia Karla Lêdo

    2011-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of hyperhidrosis among medical students of Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. We conducted an observational, transversal, survey which examined the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis among medical students of the Federal University of Amazonas and its relation to body mass index (BMI) and stress. Students were weighed and interviewed. We used questionnaires with questions recommended by the International Hyperhidrosis Society to relate hyperhidrosis to the daily activities of each person. Results were given by calculating the prevalence ratios and confidence intervals. Among the 293 students examined, it was found that a total of 16 (5.5%) students had barely tolerable or intolerable excessive sweating, interfering with daily activities. None had known causes of hyperhidrosis and 50% had family history. In all suffering from the condition the disease was bilateral, the mainly affected locations being: hands (35.7%), legs (21.4%), axilla (17.9), face (10 7%), back (7.1%), chest (3.6%) and abdomen (3.6%). There was no predominance regarding gender, age or BMI. We found a positive relationship with BMI and observed a prevalence ratio of 2.48 higher in overweight students than in normal weight or underweight ones. The prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis among medical students of Manaus was 5.5%. There is a positive non-statistical relationship with overweight and obesity. It was further noted an observational relationship with stress.

  7. Medical Student Service Learning Program Teaches Secondary Students about Career Opportunities in Health and Medical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A.; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary…

  8. Analysis of test anxiety in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Pantić Marina; Latas Milan; Obradović Danilo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Most students experience some level of anxiety during the exam. However, when anxiety affects the exam performance, it represents a problem. Test anxiety is a special form of anxiety, which is characterized with somatic, cognitive and behavioral symptoms of anxiety in situations of preparing and performing tests and exams. Test anxiety turns into a problem when it becomes so high that it interferes with test preparation and performance. The objective of this study was to a...

  9. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety.

  10. Understanding intercultural transitions of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Aneta L; Mansour, Nasser; Fisher, Ros

    2015-02-28

    The aim of this research was to explore the transition of medical students to an international branch campus of a medical university established in Bahrain. In order to gain insights into this transition, we explored two culturally diverse systems of learning of the university and the local schools in Bahrain, using Communities of Practice as a lens for understanding transitions. Focus groups were conducted with secondary school teachers and first year medical students. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with university lecturers. The findings suggest that, while Communities of Practice have been influential in contextualising transitions to university, this model does not seem to help us to fully understand intercultural transitions to the case-study university. The research emphasises that more attention should be given to learner individual agency within this theory as a framework for understanding transitions. It also challenges approaches within medical education that attempt to standardise systems of learning through acquisition of established practices.

  11. Medical students' attitudes towards overweight and obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birte Pantenburg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Studies from the USA have identified medical students as a major source of stigmatizing attitudes towards overweight and obese individuals. As data from Europe is scarce, medical students' attitudes were investigated at the University of Leipzig in Leipzig, Germany. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey containing an experimental manipulation consisting of a pair of vignettes depicting an obese and a normal weight 42-year-old woman, respectively. Vignettes were followed by the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS, a semantic differential assessing weight related attitudes. In case of the overweight vignette a panel of questions on causal attribution for the overweight preceded administration of the FPS. SUBJECTS: 671 medical students were enrolled at the University of Leipzig from May to June 2011. RESULTS: The overweight vignette was rated significantly more negative than the normal weight vignette (mean FPS score 3.65±0.45 versus 2.54±0.38, p<0.001. A higher proportion of students had negative attitudes towards the overweight as compared to the normal weight individual (98.9% versus 53.7%, p<0.001. A "positive energy balance" was perceived as the most relevant cause for the overweight, followed by "negligent personality trait", "societal and social environment" and "biomedical causes". Attributing a "positive energy balance" or "negligent personality trait" as relevant cause for the overweight was positively associated with negative attitudes. CONCLUSION: The results of this study confirm and complement findings from other countries, mainly the USA, and indicate that weight bias in the health care setting may be a global issue. Stigmatizing attitudes towards overweight and obesity are prevalent among a sample of medical students at the University of Leipzig. Negative attitudes arise on the basis of holding the individual accountable for the excess weight. They call for bringing the topic of overweight and obesity more into the focus of the medical

  12. Teaching clinical reasoning to medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, S; Bartlett, M; McKinley, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Keele Medical School's new curriculum includes a 5-week course to extend medical students' consultation skills beyond those historically required for competent inductive diagnosis. CONTEXT: Clinical reasoning is a core skill for the practice of medicine, and is known to have implications for patient safety, yet historically it has not been explicitly taught. Rather, it has been assumed that these skills will be learned by accumulating a body of knowledge and by observing expert cl...

  13. Predicting minority students' success in medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, W E; Prieto, D O

    1990-03-01

    Despite recent attention to minority student recruitment and retention, data on predicting the success of minority medical students are scarce. Traditional predictors (college grades and scores on the Medical College Admission Test) have modest correlations with medical school grades and scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination for minority students. Nonetheless, admission committees also consider nontraditional variables when selecting minority students. Measures of nontraditional variables seem to assess types of intelligence not covered by traditional means. A system of organizing nontraditional or noncognitive variables into eight dimensions is proposed. The dimensions are self-concept, realistic, self-appraisal, understanding and dealing with racism, long-range goals, having a strong support person, showing leadership, having community involvement, and nontraditional knowledge acquired. Further, assessment should place more emphasis on recognizing and defining problems and on performance rather than knowledge. Combining traditional and nontraditional methods is best in selecting minority students, and sufficiently well developed measures exist in each area to make this a practical recommendation for any admission program.

  14. Simulated surgical workshops enhance medical school students’ preparation for clinical rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Johnson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA major focus of the medical school curriculum is to ensure medical students are well prepared prior to entering clinical rotations, which includes the compulsory surgical rotation.AimsThe objective of this research was to design and formally evaluate a set of real-life surgical workshops aimed at better preparing medical students for their clinical rotation in surgery. These workshops would be incorporated into the pre-clinical medical school curriculum.MethodDedicated surgical workshops were introduced into the preclinical component of the Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS program at our University in 2009. These workshops encompassed training in the clinical skills needed in the perioperative and wider hospital setting. A survey comprising of eight to nine ranked questions (utilising a five-point Likert Scale as well as three short answer questions was administered to the medical students after they completed their compulsory surgical clinical rotation.ResultsThe overall response rate to the survey evaluating the surgical workshops was 79% (123/155. The mean of the ranked questions ranged from 4.05 to 4.89 which indicated that the students found the workshops useful. When evaluating the short answer questions (via topic coding, additional information was provided that supported and explained the survey findings and also included suggestions for improvements.ConclusionThe findings of the medical student survey demonstrated the value of incorporating dedicated preparatory surgical workshops in the medical school pre-clinical curriculum. However, further research is warranted to determine if this inclusion translated into improved student performance during the clinical surgical rotation.

  15. Preparing Graduate Students as Science Communicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K.; Gutstein, J.

    2012-12-01

    Our presentation introduces our interdisciplinary curriculum that teaches graduate students at our R-1 university to translate their research to general audiences. We also discuss the challenges we have faced and strategies we have employed to broaden graduate education at our campus to include preparation in science communication. Our "Translating Research beyond Academia" curriculum consists of three separate thematically based courses taught over the academic year: Education and Community Outreach, Science Communication and Writing, Communicating with Policy- and Decision-makers. Course goals are to provide professional development training so that graduate students become more capable professionals prepared for careers inside and outside academia while increasing the public understanding of science and technology. Open to graduate students of any discipline, each course meets weekly for two hours; students receive academic credit through a co-sponsoring graduate program. Students learn effective strategies for communicating research and academic knowledge with the media, the general public, youth, stakeholders, and decision- and policy-makers. Courses combine presentations from university and regional experts with hands-on work sessions aimed towards creating effective communications, outreach and policy plans, broader impacts statements, press releases, blogs, and policy briefs. A final presentation and reflections are required. Students may opt for further training through seminars tailored to student need. Initial results of our analyses of student evaluations and work indicate that students appreciate the interdisciplinary, problem-based approach and the low-risk opportunities for learning professional development skills and for exploring non-academic employment. Several students have initiated engaged work in their disciplines, and several have secured employment in campus science communication positions. Two have changed career plans as a direct result of

  16. Headache among medical and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri-de-Barros, João Eliezer; Alencar, Mauricio José de; Berchielli, Luis Felipe; Castelhano Junior, Luis Carlos

    2011-06-01

    Headaches occur frequently and thus are a key component of sociocentric medical education. To study headaches among students of medicine and psychology in a single university. This was a questionnaire-based survey of a cohort of students of medicine and psychology. The overall lifetime prevalence of headache was 98% and over the last year, 91%. Tensional headache accounted for 59% and migraine 22% in medicine; and 48.5% and 32% respectively in psychology. Forty-five percent reported that headaches had a variable sporadic impact on their productivity. The self-medication rate was 77%. Thirty-six percent reported worsening since admission to the university. The prevalence of headaches was very high. Tension-type headaches predominated in males and migraine in females. Tension-type was more frequent among medical students than among psychology students; migraine was more frequent in psychology (more females) than in medicine. Both kinds of students reported that headaches caused low interference with daily activities. The students reported that their symptoms had worsened since admission to the university.

  17. Personality and specialty interest in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Zuckerman, Marvin

    2008-01-01

    Research on the relationship between personality and specialty interest is important because of its implications in student career counseling and in forecasting future specialty distribution. This study was designed to test the following hypotheses: 1. Students interested in 'surgical' specialties would obtain higher scores on a measure of 'impulsive sensation seeking' and lower scores on a measure of 'neuroticism-anxiety'. 2. Students interested in 'hospital-based' specialties would score lower on a measure of 'sociability' whereas those interested in 'primary care' would score higher on this measure. In addition to these two hypotheses, gender differences on personality were also examined. Study participants were 1,076 students who matriculated at Jefferson Medical College between 2002 to 2006. A short version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman personality questionnaire (ZKPQ) measuring five personality factors of 'impulsive sensation Seeking', 'neuroticism-anxiety', 'aggression-hostility', 'sociability', and 'activity' was completed by research participants at the beginning of medical school. Students were also asked to note their specialty interests. Multivariate statistical analyses confirmed the first and partially confirmed the second research hypotheses. Results also showed that men scored higher on 'impulsive sensation seeking,' and women outscored men in the 'neuroticism-Anxiety' and 'activity' scales. Findings suggest that information about the personalities of medical students can help to predict their career interests. Implications for career counseling are discussed.

  18. A STUDY OF DEPRESSION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF PRIVATE MEDICAL COLLEGE IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jai; Arvinda Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Medical Education in Private Medical Colleges is a great contributor to stress among the medical students & possibly even in developing syndromic depression among medical students which is an area of concern worldwide. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and its associate factors among medical students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional survey was conducted among 400 medical students from first to fourth year in Pr...

  19. Relationships between Drug Company Representatives and Medical Students: Medical School Policies and Attitudes of Student Affairs Deans and Third-Year Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierles, Frederick; Brodkey, Amy; Cleary, Lynn; McCurdy, Frederick A.; Mintz, Matthew; Frank, Julia; Lynn, Deborah Joanne; Chao, Jason; Morgenstern, Bruce; Shore, William; Woodard, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to ascertain the details of medical school policies about relationships between drug companies and medical students as well as student affairs deans' attitudes about these interactions. Methods: In 2005, the authors surveyed deans and student affairs deans at all U.S. medical schools and asked whether their schools…

  20. NEEDS ASSESSMENTS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulatha Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In its Vision 2015 statement 1 , the Government of India recognises Health for all as a national goal and expects medical training to produce competent “Physicians of First Contact” towards meeting this goal. The Medical Council of India aims to produce a clinician who understands and provides preventive, promotive, curative, palliative, and holistic care with compassion. In its endeavour to reach this goal, the MCI has emphasised the role of self-directed learning or encouragement of a learner-centric approach. A greater emphasis is placed on exposure to primary and secondary levels of care and to Competency-Based Learning (CBE. AIM In an attempt to crystallise this vision, the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department at Gandhi Medical College, Secunderabad decided to give the students a questionnaire, which would address their needs regarding medical education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and what innovations they would envisage to be part of the teaching learning program of the department. METHODOLOGY A prepared questionnaire was given to students in 3 classes and their opinion on various aspects of the teaching in Obstetrics and Gynaecology was sought. The data was collated and analysed by simple proportions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS Students found the theory classes conducted by the faculty wanting. They wanted more interactive sessions and group discussions. Rural exposure was not considered important. Postings in labour room, operation theatre, and family planning were considered inadequate. The needs of the students must be kept in mind to have effective teaching learning strategies.

  1. Attitudes of Medical Students From Different Countries About Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hulya; Abbasoglu, Osman

    2015-06-15

    Although there have been some case studies that measure the medical students' knowledge and attitude about organ donation, there is no such global survey in the literature. An online questionnaire was prepared to measure the knowledge and attitudes about organ donation. A total of 1541 medical students from 104 different countries responded to the questionnaire. The participants who have received education before were more successful, had a higher self-donation rate, and showed a more-positive attitude toward organ donation than did those who did not receive an education, or a higher self-donation rate, or a more-positive attitude toward organ donation. Opposition against promotion of the organ donation by medical doctors was more widespread among men, preclinical students, African participants, and participants who did not support organ donation. The two most important decisions about increasing the level of organ donation involved in achieving support of the media and the education of the health care workers. Educational programs would improve the knowledge and attitudes of medical students about organ donation and transplantation.

  2. Preparing students to be doctors: introduction of a sub-internship program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robb, W B

    2011-04-05

    Preparing graduates for the transformation from medical student to doctor provides medical schools with a real challenge. Medical educators advocate a process of graduated delegation of responsibility in the clinical years of medical school. This is best exemplified in the North American system of sub-internship programmes; an educational approach which European medical schools have been slow to adopt. This study reports on the introduction of an intensive two-week surgical sub-internship for final medical year students. "Sub-interns" were asked to complete pre and post sub-internship online questionnaires assessing their readiness to perform clinical and practical skills, attitudes towards the program, and how well it prepared students for internship. Forty-nine students completed a questionnaire pre sub-internship and 47 completed the post-questionnaire. Student confidence towards practical and clinical skills and their first day at work increased over the two weeks. Mean Iikert scores for all 6 practical and clinical skills improved post sub-internship. The introduction of a surgical sub-internship is timely and welcomed by medical students. Its development helps bridge the gap in responsibilities between medical student and doctor.

  3. Attitudes toward people with mental illness among medical students

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    Vijayalakshmi Poreddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, people with mental illness frequently encounter stigma, prejudice, and discrimination by public and health care professionals. Research related to medical students′ attitudes toward people with mental illness is limited from India. Aim: The aim was to assess and compare the attitudes toward people with mental illness among medical students′. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study design was carried out among medical students, who were exposed (n = 115 and not exposed (n = 61 to psychiatry training using self-reporting questionnaire. Results: Our findings showed improvement in students′ attitudes after exposure to psychiatry in benevolent (t = 2.510, P < 0.013 and stigmatization (t = 2.656, P < 0.009 domains. Further, gender, residence, and contact with mental illness were the factors that found to be influencing students′ attitudes toward mental illness. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that psychiatric education proved to be effective in changing the attitudes of medical students toward mental illness to a certain extent. However, there is an urgent need to review the current curriculum to prepare undergraduate medical students to provide holistic care to the people with mental health problems.

  4. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quince, Thelma; Thiemann, Pia; Benson, John; Hyde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients' satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have utility across large populations but are limited. Finally, there is a need for greater methodological rigor in investigating the possible determinants of clinical empathy in medical education. Greater specificity of context

  5. Advances in medical education and practice: student perceptions of the flipped classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnanan CJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher J Ramnanan,1 Lynley D Pound2 1Department of Innovation in Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 2Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: The flipped classroom (FC approach to teaching has been increasingly employed in undergraduate medical education in recent years. In FC applications, students are first exposed to content via online resources. Subsequent face-to-face class time can then be devoted to student-centered activities that promote active learning. Although the FC has been well received by students in other contexts, the perceptions of medical students regarding this innovation are unclear. This review serves as an early exploration into medical student perceptions of benefits and limitations of the FC. Medical students have generally expressed strong appreciation for the pre-class preparation activities (especially when facilitated by concise, readily accessed online tools as well as for interactive, engaging small group classroom activities. Some students have expressed concerns with the FC and noted that suboptimal student preparation and insufficient direction and structure during active learning sessions may limit the student-centered benefits. Although students generally perceive that FC approaches can improve their learning and knowledge, this has not been conclusively shown via performances on assessment tools, which may be related to caveats with the assessment tools used. In any case, lifelong self-directed learning skills are perceived by medical students to be enhanced by the FC. In conclusion, medical students have generally expressed strong satisfaction with early applications of the FC to undergraduate medical education, and generally prefer this method to lecture-based instruction. Keywords: flipped classroom, active learning, student perceptions, undergraduate medical education, medical student, case-based learning, problem-based learning, team

  6. SELF MEDICATION PATTERN, INCIDENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH IT, AMONG FIRST YEAR MBBS STUDENTS OF MEDICAL COLLEGE JAMMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Self - medication is quite common practice in general and particularly among medical students. Self - medication can be defined as obtaining and consuming medication without the advice of a clinician for treatment of an ailment. There can be many reasons for increased likelihood of self - medication among the medical students like easy access and senior medical student’s advice, easy access to physician’s samples, because of the white coat, from pharmacist / chemist shops. 1 However self - medication can be quite harmful and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It could lead to various complications and side effects like - habituation and addiction, poisoning, hyper vitaminosis, antibiotic resistance and incorrect and delayed diagnosis, over diagnosis or under diagnosis, at times really serious and fatal consequences can occur. It results in wastage of resources, increase resistance of pathogens and can causes serious hazards like adverse drug reaction, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was performed to assess and evaluate the incidence and awareness of self - medications among the medical students of first professional MBBS in medical college Ja mmu. A study on one hundred medical students of Jammu medical college was conducted to assess and evaluates the pattern of self - medication among these students. This study was done to know the frequencies and reasons and the pattern of self - medication among young medical students of Jammu region. A detail questionnaire was prepared and each student was asked to fill up the Performa and then the data was analyzed. It was found that self - medication is very common (90 % and is comparable to studies from other parts of the world. For most of them the reason for self - medication was common cold . The result emphasizes the amount of problem in the society about self - medication and lack of awareness about side effects. Hence more strict regulations are

  7. Developing medical students as teachers: an anatomy-based student-as-teacher program with emphasis on core teaching competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Jay, Erie; Starkman, Sidney J; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2013-01-01

    Teaching is an increasingly recognized responsibility of the resident physician. Residents, however, often assume teaching responsibilities without adequate preparation. Consequently, many medical schools have implemented student-as-teacher (SAT) programs that provide near-peer teaching opportunities to senior medical students. Near-peer teaching is widely regarded as an effective teaching modality; however, whether near-peer teaching experiences in medical school prepare students for the teaching demands of residency is less understood. We explored whether the anatomy-based SAT program through the Human Structure didactic block at Mayo Medical School addressed the core teaching competencies of a medical educator and prepared its participants for further teaching roles in their medical careers. A web-based survey was sent to all teaching assistants in the anatomy-based SAT program over the past five years (2007-2011). Survey questions were constructed based on previously published competencies in seven teaching domains--course development, course organization, teaching execution, student coaching, student assessment, teacher evaluation, and scholarship. Results of the survey indicate that participants in the anatomy-based SAT program achieved core competencies of a medical educator and felt prepared for the teaching demands of residency.

  8. Selected physical characteristics of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Lajos Ángyán

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure selected anthropometrical characteris-tics, motor abilities and cardiorespiratory functions of medical students. Eighty-seven students were involved in this investigation. The students were categorized into five groups: (1 recreational, doing sport activities irregularly, (2 basketball and (3 handball players, having training at least two times per week, as well as men (4 and women (5 students entering medical school. In all groups the mean body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio were at the upper level of the normal range, while body fat percentage was similar to standards for sedentary subjects. Better motor per-formances were obtained from the basketball and handball players than from the other groups. Static strength for the sample was somewhat above the normal sedentary level. The resting blood pressure and heart rate for most subjects were in the normal. Cardiovascular risk factors were found in six students. Their systolic blood pressure was above 140 mm Hg. There were no sub-jects identified with low blood pressure. The heart rate was elevated for three students from the recreational group, and in the women. Bradycardia did not occur. The vital capacity and the ability to hold one’s breath was at the upper level of the normal range. The present results emphasis the need to improve the students` prevention oriented life style through participation in exercising.

  9. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  10. Measurement of Psychosocial Attitudes in Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbush, Rhea L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a behavioral sciences course on first-year medical students' attitudes toward social factors as determinants of health or illness, preventive medicine, paramedical cooperation, physician-patient relationships, government role in health care, and general liberalism was found to be minimal immediately after the course. (MSE)

  11. Transfer of Student Learning in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L.; Cranton, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Transfer of learning among the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains and among three clinical disciplines (medicine, pediatrics, and surgery) was examined in the final year of a medical student clerkship program. A model based on ethnographic analysis followed by performance measurement was used. (Author/MLW)

  12. Psychosocial Characteristics of Female Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Phyllis; And Others

    Self-perceptions of male and female medical students on various psychosocial characteristics were compared in 1980. The questionnaire consisted of: the Social Support Networks questions, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (Holmes and Rahe, 1967), the General Well Being Scale (Gurin, Veroff, and Felds, 1960), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale…

  13. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  14. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  15. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Abdulrasheed Ibrahim,. Department of ... the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to ... Ibrahim and Asuku: Generation Y medical students and plastic surgery as a career choice. 13. Nigerian .... Competition for obtaining a residency position affects my choice of specialty. 49 (45).

  16. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  17. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quince T

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Thelma Quince, Pia Thiemann, John Benson, Sarah Hyde Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients’ satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have

  18. Prepared for practice? Law teaching and assessment in UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Shoot, Michael; McKimm, Judy

    2010-11-01

    A revised core curriculum for medical ethics and law in UK medical schools has been published. The General Medical Council requires medical graduates to understand law and ethics and behave in accordance with ethical and legal principles. A parallel policy agenda emphasises accountability, the development of professionalism and patient safety. Given the renewed focus on teaching and learning law alongside medical ethics and the development of professional identity, this survey aimed to identify how medical schools are responding to the preparation of medical students for practice in the future. Questions were asked about the location, content and methods of teaching and assessment of law in undergraduate medical education. Examples of course documentation were requested to illustrate the approaches being taken. A 76% response rate was achieved. Most responding schools integrate law teaching with medical ethics, emphasising both the acquisition of knowledge and its application in a clinical context. Teaching, learning and assessment of law in clinical attachments is much less formalised than that in non-clinical education. Coverage of recommended topic areas varies, raising questions about the degree to which students can embed their knowledge and skills in actual practice. More positively, teaching does not rely on single individuals and clear descriptions were offered for problem-based and small group case-based learning. Further research is required to explore whether there are optimum ways of ensuring that legal knowledge, and skills in its use, form part of the development of professionalism among doctors in training.

  19. To the point: teaching the obstetrics and gynecology medical student in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Brittany S; Craig, LaTasha B; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hopkins, Laura; McKenzie, Margaret L; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Graziano, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    This article, from the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, is a review of considerations for teaching the medical student in the operating room during the obstetrics/gynecology clerkship. The importance of the medical student operating room experience and barriers to learning in the operating room are discussed. Specific considerations for the improvement of medical student learning and operating room experience, which include the development of operating room objectives and specific curricula, an increasing awareness regarding role modeling, and faculty development, are reviewed.

  20. [A workshop to improve written communication skills of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitran, Marcela; Zúñiga, Denisse; Flotts, Paulina; Padilla, Oslando; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2009-05-01

    Despite being among the best academically prepared of the country, many medical students have difficulties to communicate in writing. In 2005, the School of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile introduced a writing workshop in the undergraduate curriculum, to enhance the students' writing skills. To describe the workshop and its impact on the writing skills of 3 cohorts of students. This 30-h workshop used a participative methodology with emphasis on deliberate practice and feedback. Students worked in small groups with a faculty member specially trained in writing. The qualities of the essays written before and after the workshop were compared. Essays were rated by a professional team that used an analytic rubric to measure formal aspects of text writing as well as more complex thinking processes. There was a significant improvement in the quality of the texts written after the workshop; the main changes occurred in argumentation, and in paragraph and text structure. This improvement was inversely proportional to the initial level of performance, and independent of gender. A writing workshop based on deliberate practice and personalized feedback is effective to enhance the writing proficiency of medical students. Due to its design, this workshop could be useful for students of other careers and universities.

  1. Development of a Modified Korean East Asian Student Stress Inventory by Comparing Stress Levels in Medical Students with Those in Non-Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hee Kon; Kang, Seok Hoon; Lim, Sun-Hye; Yang, Jeong Hee; Chae, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical students are usually under more stress than that experienced by non-medical students. Stress testing tools for Korean medical students have not been sufficiently studied. Thus, we adapted and modified the East Asian Student Stress Inventory (EASSI), a stress testing tool for Korean students studying abroad, and verified its usefulness as a stress test in Korean university students. We also compared and analyzed stress levels between medical and non-medical students. Methods...

  2. Oral Health Education for Medical Students: Malaysian and Australian Students' Perceptions of Educational Experience and Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mas S; Abuzar, Menaka A; Razak, Ishak A; Rahman, Sabariah A; Borromeo, Gelsomina L

    2017-09-01

    Education in oral health is important to prepare future medical professionals for collaborative roles in maintaining patients' oral health, an important component of general health and well-being. The aims of this study were to determine the perceptions of medical students in Malaysia and Australia of the quality of their training in oral health care and their perceptions of their professional role in maintaining the oral health of their patients. A survey was administered in the classroom with final-year Malaysian (n=527; response rate=79.3%) and Australian (n=455; response rate: 60%) medical students at selected institutions in those countries. In the results, most of these medical students reported encountering patients with oral health conditions including ulcers, halitosis, and edentulism. A majority in both countries reported believing they should advise patients to obtain regular dental check-ups and eat a healthy diet, although they reported feeling less than comfortable in managing emergency dental cases. A high percentage reported they received a good education in smoking cessation but not in managing dental trauma, detecting cancerous lesions, or providing dietary advice in oral disease prevention. They expressed support for inclusion of oral health education in medical curricula. These students' experience with and perceptions of oral health care provide valuable information for medical curriculum development in these two countries as well as increasing understanding of this aspect of interprofessional education and practice now in development around the world.

  3. [Kolb's learning styles in medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the relationship of Kolb's learning styles in academic success or failure in medical students. A prospective cohort study in 116 medical students of a private Argentine university was performed between March 2005 and March 2011. The follow-up included two cut-offs; during 2005-2006 the students' learning styles were determined and five years later, when individuals had to end their career, they were grouped into graduated, delayed or dropped status. At the end of the period, 50% of the students ended successfully, 24.1% abandoned and 25.9% was delayed. Learning styles were assimilator in 60.3% of cases, divergent in 14.7%, accommodator in 6.9%, convergent in 6.0% and undefined in 12.1%. In conclusion, the follow-up during the career demonstrated that convergent or undefined styles had a tendency to abandon the career, while delayed students had a more theoretical and reflexive style than successful individuals. The results observed in convergent students differed from other reports. This difference would be explained by a particular characteristic of the sample or by the teaching and evaluation profile of the university.

  4. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Computer-assisted group study for learning/teaching medical entomology to medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudharsanam Manni Balasubramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe an innovative method used for teaching entomology. Setting : It was performed at Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, JIPMER, Puducherry. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five second year medical students were divided into two batches. Each batch had two sessions on entomology. In each session students were divided into small groups and assigned to prepare on the various insects of medical entomological importance and present on the prepared topic. The topics included vector characteristics, vector habits, diseases transmitted and modes of transmission of diseases, control of vectors. The corresponding photographs of the insects were projected at the end of each presentation. The modes of transmission, diseases transmitted, and control measures were learnt through the oral presentations. After each session students were shown the slides under microscopes to reinforce the features. Pretest and posttest were used to find the gain in knowledge and feedback was taken at the end of each session. Results: Comparison of pretest and posttest scores showed a statistically significant gain in the knowledge. Feedback from students revealed that objectives were clear for 42 of the 55 students. Facilitating factors included interactive session (14, group discussion (31, PowerPoint presentation (24, good moderator (14. Factors which hindered learning were lack of time for preparation (13 and afternoon sessions (2. Students suggested that more of this type of classes should be taken for them in near future (28. Conclusion: This method served as an effective alternative method as judged by students′ performance and feedback.

  6. Medical student empathy: interpersonal distinctions and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kevin D; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-12-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal quality, empathy is a social behavior well-suited to be examined from an interpersonal perspective. The present study used the interpersonal theory of clinical, personality, and social psychology to examine the construct of empathy and theorize about likely interpersonal correlates. One hundred and sixty-three students from an academic health center in the southeastern United States participated in this study. The medical student version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was used to assess empathy and its factors: Perspective taking, compassionate care, and walking in the patient's shoes. Interpersonal assessments included the International Personality Item Pool-Interpersonal Circumplex, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale. Distinct interpersonal styles and correlates emerged among empathy and its factors. While all factors of empathy were related to interpersonal warmth, perspective taking and compassionate care were also associated with submissiveness. Of note, only walking in the patient's shoes was correlated with both social support and less loneliness. These findings are discussed in light of interpersonal theory with particular attention paid to the implications for medical education and professional development.

  7. Attitudes toward euthanasia among Swedish medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Marit; Strang, Peter; Milberg, Anna

    2007-10-01

    Attitudes toward euthanasia differ between individuals and populations, and in many studies the medical profession is more reluctant than the general public. Our goal was to explore medical students' attitude toward euthanasia. A questionnaire containing open-ended questions was answered anonymously by 165 first- and fifth-year medical students. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with no predetermined categories. The students' arguments opposing euthanasia were based on opinions of 1. euthanasia being morally wrong, 2. fear of possible negative effects on society, 3. euthanasia causing strain on physicians and 4. doubts about the true meaning of requests of euthanasia from patients. Arguments supporting euthanasia were based on 1. patients' autonomy and 2. the relief of suffering, which could be caused by severe illnesses, reduced integrity, hopelessness, social factors and old age. There are several contradictions in the students' arguments and the results indicate a possible need for education focusing on the possibility of symptom control in palliative care and patients' perceived quality of life.

  8. Medical student service learning program teaches secondary students about career opportunities in health and medical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary students to foster their interest in healthcare and medicine. High school student participants are engaged in a semester-long course that relies on interactive lectures, problem-based learning sessions, mentoring relationships with medical students, and opportunities for shadowing healthcare providers. To date, the curriculum has been offered for 7 consecutive years. To determine the impact that participation in the curriculum has had on college/career choices and to identify areas for improvement, an electronic questionnaire was sent to former participants. Based on a 32% response rate, 81% of former participants indicated that participation in the course influenced their decision to pursue a medical/science-related career. More than half (67%) of respondents indicated intent to pursue a MD/PhD or other postgraduate degree. Based on responses obtained, additional opportunities to incorporate laboratory-based research and simulation sessions should be explored. In addition, a more formalized mentoring component has been added to the course to enhance communication between medical students and mentees. Health/medicine-related educational outreach programs targeting high school students may serve as a pipeline to introduce or reinforce career opportunities in healthcare and related sciences. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  9. Case reports in medical education: a platform for training medical students, residents, and fellows in scientific writing and critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Aleksandra G; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-04-06

    A case report is a detailed narrative that usually illustrates a diagnostic or therapeutic problem experienced by one or several patients. Case reports commonly serve as the first line of evidence for new interventions or they function as alarms that an issue exists with an already established therapy. Case reports are of minor importance in evidence-based medicine; however, they make meaningful contributions to both the knowledge and education of medical students, residents, and fellows. Case reports are written with the goal of sharing information for medical, scientific, or educational purposes. They often serve as medical or even undergraduate students' first experience with medical writing and they provide a solid foundation for manuscript preparation and publication. In the last few decades, there has been an exponential increase in medical student research, specifically in the number of manuscripts published by medical students. It is important to foster this academic spirit among students by encouraging them to become involved in research. This editorial will focus on the value and educational benefits of writing case reports for medical students, university students, residents, and fellows.

  10. Exposing medical students to expanding populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindenthal JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available JJ Lindenthal,1,2 JA DeLisa,3 GF Heinrich,4 WS Calderón Gerstein,5 1Department of Psychiatry, Institute for the Public Understanding of Health and Medicine, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico Health Science Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA; 4Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA; 5Hospital Nacional Ramiro Prialé, EsSalud, Huancayo, Peru Abstract: Physicians are required to advocate for and counsel patients based on the best science and the interests of the individual while avoiding discrimination, ensuring equal access to health and mental services. Nonetheless, the communication gap between physician and patients has long been observed. To this end, the Institute for the Public Understanding of Health and Medicine of the Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School has expanded its efforts. This report describes two new programs: a legacy lecture series for medical students and an international “experience”, in Huancayo, Peru, for medical students and faculty. The MiniMed outreach program, now in its ninth year and first described in this journal in 2012, was designed to empower the powerless to communicate more effectively with clinicians, thus improving both the effectiveness of the physician–patient relationship and health care outcomes. The approach of the two new programs and their effects on patients, particularly the underserved, and medical students and faculty, are outlined in the following article. Keywords: MiniMed program, equal access, underserved populations, Newark Renaissance House, Kintock Group, role modeling 

  11. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  12. Knowledge of Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences Regarding Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  13. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-07-13

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  14. A Study of Medical Students\\' Viewpoints at Zahedan Medical University on the Effects of the Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roudbari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The course "Health IV" and "consulting room" are two resources of learning about the method of preparing proposal and passing the final thesis for medical students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the students' viewpoints on the effects of "Health IV" and consulting room on their final theses (pl. of thesis. Methods : The sample in this descriptive study included 155 medical students of ZUMS who had registered their theses at the school. The study was conducted during 2005-2006 and the data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed via descriptive statistics of correlation and Chi-square test. Results : The findings of the study revealed that 38.1% of the students agreed or completely agreed with integrating the two courses "Research Methods" and "Health IV". Also, 43.9% of the subjects disagreed or completely disagreed with it. Approximately, 35% of the students used the services of the consulting room in writing their proposals. The effect of this service on the final thesis was low and very low in 10.3%, moderate in 12.3%, and high and very high in 20% of the students. About 25.8% of the subjects used the room services in conducting their theses, 61.3% did not use the services. The percent of the students who used the room in writing the proposal or doing their theses or did not use it at all was 85%. The effect of the room on conducting the thesis project was low and very low in 7.1%, moderate in 11.6%, and high and very high in 20%. Conclusion : The high amount of agreement with the complete integration of the "Research Methods" and "Health IV" needs more investigation. Also, the necessity of the consulting room should be revised by the manager and its continuation should be on the students' demands.

  15. Hand Hygiene Practices among Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzam al Kadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hand hygiene is a cost-effective method in preventing infection transmission. Hand hygiene practices have been found to be faulty in most healthcare settings. We conducted a study to evaluate the awareness, and compliance of hand hygiene among undergraduate medical students during their clinical phase in Qassim College of Medicine, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A questionnaire based on World Health Organization’s concept of “Five Moments for Hand Hygiene” was used to evaluate the awareness of the indications for hand hygiene and compliance was observed during Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE sessions. Sixty students including thirty-six males (60% and twenty-four females (40% participated voluntarily in the study. Results. The average awareness regarding the positive indications of hand hygiene was 56%. Rest of the 44% of students were either not sure or unaware of the indications of hygiene. Only 29% of students were able to identify all the five indications for hand hygiene in the questionnaire. Compliance as assessed during OSCE sessions was only 17% with no significant difference between the genders. Conclusion. It was concluded that serious efforts are needed to improve the hand hygiene practices among medical students.

  16. LEARNING STYLES ADOPTED BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay Shah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning results in gain of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Some like to learn by seeing, some by hearing and some by demonstration. Learning style influences the retention of information and depth of comprehension. Understanding their preferred learning styles as visual, auditory, read-write or kinesthetic learners will help improve the teaching methods adopted. Role of the educator necessitates making the most of each teaching opportunity by understanding the characteristics of the learning audience and incorporating demonstrated principles of adult educational design, with a focus on collaborative learning and variety in presentation techniques. The goal is to provide student oriented education, producing efficient doctors. A cross-sectional study among 92 medical students of the Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar, conducted in 2009. VARK questionnaire was used to access their learning preference. Preference for different learning styles were, visual (V 1.08%, auditory (A 20.65%, reading/writing (R 2.17% and kinesthetic (K 17.39%. 41.30% of the total 92 students preferred a single mode of information presentation. Of the 92 students who preferred multiple modes of information presentation, some preferred two modes (bimodal, 31.52%, some preferred three modes (tri-modal, 27.13%, and only one student preferred quadri-modal.

  17. Migration Intentions of Ghanaian Medical Students: The Influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Migration Intentions of Ghanaian Medical Students: The Influence of existing Funding Mechanisms of Medical Education("The Fee Factor") ... CI=1.32, 3.38) than non-fee-paying students to have intentions of migrating after their training.

  18. Mental depression and coping strategies among medical students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental depression and coping strategies among medical students of University ... attitudes, finances, frequent examinations / tests, parental expectations, dual ... The prevalence of mild to moderate depression among medical students is high .

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Medical Students Regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appropriate practice toward infectious, occupational risks of. HBV. ... Keywords: Attitudes, Hepatitis B, Knowledge, Medical students, Saudi Arabia ..... this is a relatively small scale study among medical students .... Conflict of Interest: None.

  20. Attitude of final year medical students towards community medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitude of final year medical students towards community medicine in Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. ... A total of 94 graduating medical students during the 2006/2007 academic session were invited to participate in ... Article Metrics.

  1. Improving the transition from medical school to internship - evaluation of a preparation for internship course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicluna, Helen A; Grimm, Michael C; Jones, Philip D; Pilotto, Louis S; McNeil, H Patrick

    2014-02-03

    This study evaluates the impact of a new 'Preparation for Internship' (PRINT) course, which was developed to facilitate the transition of University of New South Wales (UNSW) medical graduates from Medical School to Internship. During a period of major curricular reform, the 2007 (old program) and 2009 (new program) cohorts of UNSW final year students completed the Clinical Capability Questionnaire (CCQ) prior to and after undertaking the PRINT course. Clinical supervisors' ratings and self-ratings of UNSW 2009 medical graduates were obtained from the Hospital-based Prevocational Progress Review Form. Prior to PRINT, students from both cohorts perceived they had good clinical skills, with lower ratings for capability in procedural skills, operational management, and administrative tasks. After completing PRINT, students from both cohorts perceived significant improvement in their capability in procedural skills, operational management, and administrative tasks. Although PRINT also improved student-perceived capability in confidence, interpersonal skills and collaboration in both cohorts, curriculum reform to a new outcomes-based program was far more influential in improving self-perceptions in these facets of preparedness for hospital practice than PRINT. The PRINT course was most effective in improving students' perceptions of their capability in procedural skills, operational management and administrative tasks, indicating that student-to-intern transition courses should be clinically orientated, address relevant skills, use experiential learning, and focus on practical tasks. Other aspects that are important in preparation of medical students for hospital practice cannot be addressed in a PRINT course, but major improvements are achievable by program-wide curriculum reform.

  2. Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance: National Standard Curriculum. Student Study Guide (Third Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This student study guide is one of three documents prepared for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), National Standard Curriculum. The course is designed to develop skills in symptom recognition and in all emergency care procedures and techniques currently considered to be within the responsibilities of an EMT providing emergency medical care…

  3. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah B

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bahia Abdallah,1 Jihad Irani,2 Silva Dakessian Sailian,1 Vicky George Gebran,1 Ursula Rizk1 1Nursing Program at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, 2Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in

  4. Directing students to profound open-book test preparation : The relationship between deep learning and open-book test time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne-Penninga, M.; Kuks, J.B.; Hofman, W.H.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Considering the growing amount of medical knowledge and the focus of medical education on acquiring competences, using open-book tests seems inevitable. A possible disadvantage of these tests is that students underestimate test preparation. Aims: We examined whether students who used a d

  5. AN ASSESSMENT OF PERSONALITY ASPECTS OF THE STUDENTS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nikpour

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a base-scale is prepared for the evaluation of the personality grounds of the Tehran University of Medical Science students. Such a scoring scale may be useful to help the medical science students in career development, psychosocial consultations, and appropriate supportive care plans. A sample of 205 female and male students resident in dormitories were evaluated using “Bernreuter” personality questionnaires and computer programs prepared in this center. The percentiles of each scale is scored and represented in a systematic framework. Considering the normal distribution of the results using their means and standard deviations, the important percentages in each scale is tabulated.

  6. The moral education of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, R

    1998-01-01

    The author begins his essay by discussing George Eliot's novel Middlemarch, in which a doctor, early in his career, wanders from his idealistic commitment to serving the poor. Although he establishes a prominent practice, he considers himself a failure because "he had not done what he once meant to do." The essay explores how many of us (physicians included) forsake certain ideals or principles--not in one grand gesture, but in moment-to-moment decisions, in day-to-day rationalizations and self-deceptions, until we find ourselves caught in lives whose implications we have long ago stopped examining, never mind judging. Medical education barrages students with information, fosters sometimes ruthless competition, and perpetuates rote memorization and an obsession with test scores--all of which stifle moral reflection. Apart from radically rethinking medical education (doing away with the MCAT, for example, as Lewis Thomas proposed), how can we teach students to consider what it means to be a good doctor? Calling upon the work of Eliot, Walker Percy, and others, the author discusses how the study of literature can broaden and deepen the inner lives of medical students and encourage moral reflectiveness.

  7. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  8. Addressing gaps in abortion education: a sexual health elective created by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro-Bruce, Emily; Schoenfeld, Elizabeth; Nothnagle, Melissa; Taylor, Julie

    2006-05-01

    Medical school curricula frequently contain gaps in the areas of abortion and sexual health. A group of first- and second-year medical students at the authors' institution organized a collaborative, multidisciplinary elective course to address such omissions in the preclinical curriculum. This paper describes the process of creating and implementing the elective. Medical students identified curricular gaps in the areas of abortion, sexual assault, lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender health, and HIV counseling. Clinical faculty and community-based professionals were invited to address these topics in a weekly lecture series organized by students. The course also included a half-day experience shadowing at a local abortion clinic. Collaboration with several student groups helped broaden student interest in and increase financial support for the elective. Some 37% of all first- and second-year students enrolled in the elective and received institutional credit for the course. Written and verbal evaluations confirmed student satisfaction with the lectures and the clinical experience. Dynamic and well-prepared speakers who presented interesting medical content received the highest ratings from students. Student leaders identified several challenges in implementing the elective. Ultimately the elective proved to be a successful collaboration among students, faculty, and healthcare providers, and resulted in permanent changes in the standard medical school curriculum. Challenges for student-initiated electives include difficulty in finding administrative support, securing funding and ensuring sustainability. This paper aims to make this process accessible and applicable to other students and faculty interested in addressing curricular gaps at their respective medical schools.

  9. Enhancing and sustaining empathy in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Axelrod, David; Spandorfer, John; Mangione, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    Empathy is an important component of physician competence that needs to be enhanced. To test the hypotheses that medical students' empathy can be enhanced and sustained by targeted activities. This was a two-phase study in which 248 medical students participated. In Phase 1, students in the experimental group watched and discussed video clips of patient encounters meant to enhance empathic understanding; those in the control group watched a documentary film. Ten weeks later in Phase 2 of the study, students who were in the experimental group were divided into two groups. One group attended a lecture on empathy in patient care, and the other plus the control group watched a movie about racism. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) was administered pre-post in Phase 1 and posttest in Phase 2. In Phase 1, the JSE mean score for the experimental group improved significantly (p < 0.01); no change in the JSE scores was observed in the control group. In Phase 2, the JSE mean score improvement was sustained in the group that attended the lecture, but not in the other group. No change in empathy was noticed in the control group. Research hypotheses were confirmed.

  10. Medical graduates feel well-prepared for clinical work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Kjeldsen, Inge Trads

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to assess the coherence between the undergraduate medical program at Aarhus University and the foundation year. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional questionnaire survey included 503 doctors graduated from Aarhus University from the winter of 2007....../2008 to the summer of 2009. RESULTS: The response rate was 73%. Approximately 73% of the respondents were in their foundation year or their first year of specialist training and 83% generally felt well-prepared. Respondents found that most of the learning outcomes of the undergraduate medical curriculum at Aarhus...... University are important for junior doctors. More than 90% of the respondents estimated that they were sufficiently prepared when it came to core outcomes such as history taking and physical examination. Five issues diverged considerably in importance stated and preparedness experienced: suggestion...

  11. The continual assessment of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, H; Nhonoli, A M

    1978-01-01

    At the new Medical Faculty at the University of Dar-es-Salaam (East Africa) a number of innovations were instituted. The most significant was continual assessment of students. During the first 3 years of the course, results of weekly testing may comprise three-fourths of each student's assessment. Later they are assessed on each rotation and clerkship; and these must be completed satisfactorily before Final Examinations are taken. These assessments never contribute less than one-half of the final results. Failures were reduced from 10 to 2% with no reduction in standards or performance levels. The method utilizes Reinforcement Theory techniques; specifically referred to are schedules of testing, grades as reinforcers, and frequent feed-back for students, self-shaping of study strategies and for constant surveilance of its teaching by the Faculty.

  12. Medical Student Mentorship in Plastic Surgery: The Mentee's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jenny C; Rendon, Juan; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Mentorship is a universal concept that has a significant impact on nearly every surgical career. Although frequently editorialized, true data investigating the value of mentorship are lacking in the plastic surgery literature. This study evaluates mentorship in plastic surgery from the medical student perspective. An electronic survey was sent to recently matched postgraduate year-1 integrated track residents in 2014, with a response rate of 76 percent. Seventy-seven percent of students reported a mentoring relationship. Details of the mentoring relationship were defined. Over 80 percent of students reported a mentor's influence in their decision to pursue plastic surgery, and nearly 40 percent of students expressed interest in practicing the same subspecialty as their mentor. Benefits of the relationship were also described. Mentees value guidance around career preparation and advice and prioritized "a genuine interest in their career and personal development" above all other mentor qualities (p ≤ 1.6 × 10). Mentees prefer frequent, one-on-one interactions over less frequent interaction or group activities. Students did not prefer "assigned" relationships (91 percent), but did prefer "facilitated exposure." Major barriers to mentorship included mentor time constraints and lack of exposure to plastic surgery. Indeed, significant differences in the presence of a mentoring relationship correlated with involvement of the plastic surgery department in the medical school curriculum. This study defines successes and highlights areas for improvement of mentorship of plastic surgery medical students. Successful mentorship may contribute to the future of plastic surgery, and a commitment toward this endeavor is needed at the local, departmental, and national leadership levels.

  13. Introducing managed care to the medical school curriculum: effect on student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, T S; Baldor, R A; Casey, L M; Chuman, A; Lasser, D; Ehrlich, A; Gurwitz, J H

    1998-07-01

    In order to assess the effect of clinical training and didactic instruction on medical student attitudes toward managed care, we conducted a survey of all medical students at the midpoint of their third year clerkships at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The students were exposed to clinical training in managed care settings and a 2-day required course on the principles underlying managed care. The main outcome measures were student attitudes toward the concepts of managed care, managed care organizations, and future careers in managed care. Students also assessed the attitudes of medical faculty toward managed care. Attitudes of students with previous clinical training in managed care settings did not differ from those of students without such exposure toward the concepts underlying managed care or managed care organizations and were less positive about careers in managed care. Student responses before and after the 2-day course on managed care demonstrated that attitudes moved in a significantly positive direction. Seventy-one percent of students reported that the opinions they had heard from medical faculty about managed care were negative. Preparing medical students to practice medicine effectively in managed care settings will require focused attention on managed care issues in the medical school curriculum and the combined efforts of academic health centers and managed care organizations.

  14. Preparing Today's Nursing Students for Tomorrow's Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Federal directives, nursing and nursing education associations, as well as accrediting bodies emphasize the importance of integrating health information technology and EHRs into nursing practice. Additionally, informatics is a required competency of baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing education's efforts to enhance students' learning in the area of electronic documentation is at its peak. The goal of enabling nurses to make healthcare safer, more effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable can only be achieved if a variety of technologies are clearly integrated into nursing education. Therefore, some schools have developed educational innovations to incorporate academic EHRs. As the mental health setting is unique, extraordinary attention has to be provided during the education of electronic documentation. Nursing education efforts must focus on interventions that provide resources that enhance the participant's knowledge and skills related to electronic documentation in a variety of clinical settings. Additionally, implementing academic EHRs in clinical settings offers nursing educators an opportunity to note the benefits. The state of nursing education depends on the accessibility to utilize academic EHRs in the nursing curriculum within the clinical setting to effectively prepare students for real-word practice.

  15. Impact of online learning modules on medical student microbiology examination scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mary T

    2008-01-01

    Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examination, students traditionally utilize print-based board examination review books. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether students who train using web-based quizzes score differently as a group on this statewide examination than students who do not utilize the materials online for exam preparation. The study included 71 learners from two different campuses who were taught by the same instructor and were admitted to medical school with similar exemplary credentials. Results were aggregated for three consecutive years. A standard medical microbiology textbook was used to assign the same suggested readings for all students and similar laboratory sessions were provided for all learners. The independent variable was use of the web-based quizzes to prepare before examinations, as indicated by student web usage logs. The dependent variable was score on the statewide final examination. Results support the hypothesis that students who use preparation modules online score higher on the final examination than students who do not. Moreover, students who prepared online scored higher on questions designed to test synthesis of knowledge and analysis of data. The significant difference in final examination outcome (P medical microbiology.

  16. Are new medical students' specialty preferences gendered? Related motivational factors at a Dutch medical school.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tongeren-Alers, M.L.G. van; Esch, M. van der; Verdonk, P.; Johansson, E.; Hamberg, K.; Lagro-Janssen, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female students currently outnumber male students in most medical schools. Some medical specialties are highly gender segregated. Therefore, it is interesting to know whether medical students have early specialization preferences based on their gender. Consequently, we like to know impor

  17. Characteristics of test anxiety among medical students and congruence of strategies to address it

    OpenAIRE

    Encandela, John; Gibson, Crystal; Angoff, Nancy; Leydon, Gary; Green, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students may experience test anxiety associated with ‘high stakes’ exams, such as Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination.Methods: We collected qualitative responses about test anxiety at three points in time from 93 second-year medical students engaged in studying for and taking Step 1.Results: Causes of test anxiety as reported by students were related to negative self-talk during preparation for the exam. Effects of anxiety had to do with emotional w...

  18. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirali Vora

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods: Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results: All course participants (N=30 completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion: Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

  19. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  20. Medical Students Circadian Sleep Rhythms and Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Pérez-Olmos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate, with a preliminarystudy, the distribution of circadian rhythms, sleepschedule patterns and their relationship withacademic performance on medical students.Methodology: in this descriptive study, a 10 itemoriginal questionnaire about sleep rhythms andacademic performance was applied to medicalstudents from different semesters. Week (classtime and weekend schedules, preferences,daytime somnolence and academic performancewere asked. Three chronotypes (morningness,intermediate and eveningness were definedamong waking-sleeping preference, difficulty tosleep early, exam preparation preference hour and real sleep schedule. The sleep hour deficit perweek night was also calculated. Results: Of the318 medical students that answered the questionnaire,62.6% corresponded to intermediatechronotypes, 8.8% to evening-type and 28.7%to morning-type. Significant difference wasfound among the two chronotype tails (p=0.000,Chi-square 31.13. No correlation was foundbetween academic performance and age, sex,chronotype, week sleep deficit and sleep hours inweek and weekends. A 71.1% of the students slept6 or fewer hours during class time and 78% hada sleep deficit (more frequent in the eveningchronotype. Conclusions: No relation was foundbetween sleep chronotype and academic performance.Students tend to morningness. Fewstudies have been made on equatorial zones orwithout seasons.

  1. German medical students´ exposure and attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotion: A cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Kristine; Kremer, Marcel Stephan; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Kochen, Michael M.; Chenot, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Early contact of medical students with pharmaceutical promotion has been shown in many international studies. We assessed the frequency and places of contact of German medical students to pharmaceutical promotion and examined their attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotional activities. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was based on a self-developed questionnaire. It was distributed to all clinical students at the University of Goettingen Medical School in 2010. A 4-point rating scale was used to assess the attitudes toward different statements regarding pharmaceutical promotion. Results: The overall response rate was 55% (702/1287). The proportion of students with direct contact to pharmaceutical sales representatives increased from 21% in the first clinical year up to 77% in the final year. 60% were contacted during their elective clerkship. 80% had accepted promotional gifts. 86% stated their prescribing behavior to be unsusceptible to the influence of accepting promotional gifts. However, 35% of the unsusceptible students assumed doctors to be susceptible. Almost all (90%) reported that dealing with pharmaceutical promotion was never addressed during lectures and 65% did not feel well prepared for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. 19% agreed to prohibit contacts between medical students and the pharmaceutical industry. Conclusions: German medical students get in contact with pharmaceutical promotion early and frequently. There is limited awareness for associated conflicts of interests. Medical schools need to regulate contacts and incorporate the topic in their curriculum to prepare students for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25228934

  2. Alcohol consumption and lifestyle in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Mabbutt, P S; Shaffer, J

    1994-01-01

    1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th year medical students completed a questionnaire with 35 questions relating to diet, general health, exercise, smoking and drinking. Based on reported 'typical weekly intake' one-third of male non-Asian students in years 1-3, and 59% in year 5 were drinking above safe limits. 12-26% of non-Asian female students were drinking above safe limits. In all years most Asian students were drinking within safe limits. Non-Asians smoked more than Asians and males smoked more than females. A group of non-Asian male students with alcohol intake for the previous week > 35 units was compared with a group of safe drinkers ( 0 units/week). Significantly more of the former group drank > 10 units per occasion, had been hurt as a result of someone's drinking, had caused physical harm and drank at lunch. Although 65% were aware their level of drinking was dangerous, only 7.5% wanted advice on safe drinking and only 5% wanted to drink less. The dangerous level drinkers ate less fruit and smoked more cigarettes than those drinking safely, but there were no other significant differences and there was no evidence for impaired academic performance.

  3. Student-Led Objective Tutorial (SLOT) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagnanam, Gurusamy; Saraswathi, Simansalam; Rajasekaran, Aiyalu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose - To assess an innovative tutoring program named 'Student-Led Objective Tutorial' (SLOT) among undergraduate medical students. Method - The program was conceptualized by the Pharmacology Unit of Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Asian Institute of Medicine Science & Technology (AIMST), Malaysia and implemented in the middle of 2005. A cohort of 246 medical undergraduate students (spread across 5 consecutive batches) participated. Following a brief explanation on the purpose and nature of SLOT, each batch was divided into small groups and was given a reading assignment on 4 previously delivered lecture topics. Each group was asked to prepare 3-5 multiple choice questions (MCQs) of their own in PowerPoint format to be presented, in turns, to the whole class on the day of SLOT. The proceedings were facilitated by 2 lecturers. Student feedback on the efficacy and benefits were assessed through an anonymous self administered questionnaire. Results - About 76% (188) of the students favored SLOT. The acceptance rate of SLOT was higher among males. There was no significant difference between batches in their opinions on whether to pursue SLOT in future. The most prevalent positive comment was that SLOT enhanced learning skills, and the negative comment being, it consumed more time. Conclusions - SLOT is a novel tutorial method which can offset faculty shortage with advantages like enhanced interest among teachers and learners, uniform reach of content, opportunities for group learning, and involvement of visual aids as teaching-learning (T-L) method. SLOT unraveled the students' potential of peer tutoring both inside as well as outside the classroom. Consumer tutors (students) can be tapped as a resource for SLOT for all subjects and courses in healthcare teaching.

  4. Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frost KA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Frost,1,2 Elizabeth P Metcalf,3 Rachel Brooks,2,3 Paul Kinnersley,3 Stephen R Greenwood,3 Colin VE Powell1,2,4 1Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital for Wales, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Institute of Medical Education, 4Molecular and Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales Background: Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-specific communication skills teaching is complex and under-researched. We report on the development of a scenario-based pediatric clinical communication skills program as well as students’ assessment of this module. Methods: We designed a pediatric clinical communication skills program and delivered it five times during one academic year via small-group teaching. Students were asked to score the workshop in eight domains (learning objectives, complexity, interest, competencies, confidence, tutors, feedback, and discussion using 5-point Likert scales, along with free text comments that were grouped and analyzed thematically, identifying both the strengths of the workshop and changes suggested to improve future delivery. Results: Two hundred and twenty-one of 275 (80% student feedback forms were returned. Ninety-six percent of students' comments were positive or very positive, highlighting themes such as the timing of teaching, relevance, group sizes, and the use of actors, tutors, and clinical scenarios. Conclusion: Scenario-based teaching of clinical communication skills is positively received by students. Studies need to demonstrate an impact on practice, performance, development, and sustainability of communications training. Keywords: communication training, undergraduates, pediatrics, actors

  5. Smoothing out transitions: how pedagogy influences medical students' achievement of self-regulated learning goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Casey B

    2007-08-01

    Medical school is an academic and developmental path toward a professional life demanding self-regulation and self-education. Thus, many medical schools include in their goals for medical student education their graduates' ability to self-assess and self-regulate their education upon graduation and throughout their professional lives. This study explores links between medical students' use of self-regulated learning as it relates to motivation, autonomy, and control, and how these influenced their experiences in medical school. Subjects were medical students in two distinct medical school environments, "Problem-based learning" and "Traditional." PBL students described a rough transition into medical school, but once they felt comfortable with the autonomy and control PBL gave them, they embraced the independence and responsibility. They found themselves motivated to learning for learning's sake, and able to channel their motivation into effective transitions from the classrooms into the clerkships. Traditional students had a rougher transition from the classrooms to the clerkships. In the first two years they relied on faculty to direct and control learning, and they channeled their motivation toward achieving the highest grade. In the clerkships, they found faculty expected them to be more independent and self-directed than they felt prepared to be, and they struggled to assume responsibility for their learning. Self-regulated learning can help smooth out the transitions through medical school by preparing first and second year students for expectations in the third and fourth years, which can then maximize learning in the clinical milieu, and prepare medical students for a lifetime of learning.

  6. Impact of Online Learning Modules on Medical Student Microbiology Examination Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Mary T. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examinati...

  7. Views of junior doctors about whether their medical school prepared them well for work: questionnaire surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Kathryn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition from medical student to junior doctor in postgraduate training is a critical stage in career progression. We report junior doctors' views about the extent to which their medical school prepared them for their work in clinical practice. Methods Postal questionnaires were used to survey the medical graduates of 1999, 2000, 2002 and 2005, from all UK medical schools, one year after graduation, and graduates of 2000, 2002 and 2005 three years after graduation. Summary statistics, chi-squared tests, and binary logistic regression were used to analyse the results. The main outcome measure was the level of agreement that medical school had prepared the responder well for work. Results Response rate was 63.7% (11610/18216 in year one and 60.2% (8427/13997 in year three. One year after graduation, 36.3% (95% CI: 34.6, 38.0 of 1999/2000 graduates, 50.3% (48.5, 52.2 of 2002 graduates, and 58.2% (56.5, 59.9 of 2005 graduates agreed their medical school had prepared them well. Conversely, in year three agreement fell from 48.9% (47.1, 50.7 to 38.0% (36.0, 40.0 to 28.0% (26.2, 29.7. Combining cohorts at year one, percentages who agreed that they had been well prepared ranged from 82% (95% CI: 79-87 at the medical school with the highest level of agreement to 30% (25-35 at the lowest. At year three the range was 70% to 27%. Ethnicity and sex were partial predictors of doctors' level of agreement; following adjustment for them, substantial differences between schools remained. In years one and three, 30% and 34% of doctors specified that feeling unprepared had been a serious or medium-sized problem for them (only 3% in each year regarded it as serious. Conclusions The vast knowledge base of clinical practice makes full preparation impossible. Our statement about feeling prepared is simple yet discriminating and identified some substantial differences between medical schools. Medical schools need feedback from graduates about

  8. [Relationship between self-directed learning with learning styles and strategies in medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez U, Carolina; Fasce H, Eduardo; Pérez V, Cristhian; Ortega B, Javiera; Parra P, Paula; Ortiz M, Liliana; Matus B, Olga; Ibáñez G, Pilar

    2014-11-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) skills are particularly important in medical education, considering that physicians should be able to regulate their own learning experiences. To evaluate the relationship between learning styles and strategies and self-directed learning in medical students. One hundred ninety nine first year medical students (120 males) participated in the study. Preparation for Independent Learning (EPAI) scale was used to assess self-direction. Schmeck learning strategies scale and Honey and Alonso (CHAEA) scales were used to evaluate learning styles and strategies. Theoretical learning style and deep processing learning strategy had positive correlations with self-direct learning. Medical students with theoretical styles and low retention of facts are those with greater ability to self-direct their learning. Further studies are required to determine the relationship between learning styles and strategies with SDL in medical students. The acquired knowledge will allow the adjustment of teaching strategies to encourage SDL.

  9. Herpetic Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Medical Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Vidica Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV is often documented during periods of immunosuppression in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; it is rare in immunocompetent diagnosed patients. Case reports of herpetic esophagitis in students of health sciences are extremely rare. The disease presents with a clinical picture characterized by acute odynophagia and retrosternal pain without obvious causes and ulcers, evidenced endoscopically in the middistal esophagus. Diagnosis depends on endoscopy, biopsies for pathology studies, and immunohistochemistry techniques. The disease course is often benign; however, treatment with acyclovir speeds the disappearance of symptoms and limits the severity of infection. In this report, we present a case of herpetic esophagitis in an immunocompetent medical student, with reference to its clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. The disease may have manifested as a result of emotional stress experienced by the patient.

  10. Roles of Principals in the Preparing Students to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Bingul, Murat

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the impacts of school leaders on the school curriculums of preparing students to life. Even if the school leaders and teachers are expert in their area related to the functions of the schools, it seems that schools are failing in the preparation of the students to life. The school leaders may play an important role to…

  11. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  12. In Their Words: Student Preparation and Perspectives on US Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    US universities are admitting higher percentages of international students, bringing into focus concerns with how to best support them once they are at the university. However, less attention has been paid to the preparation they undertake before matriculation. This study looks at how students are prepared before arrival and how this preparation…

  13. Influencing factors of mental health of medical students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Meng, Heng; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xin-hao; Liu, Zhuo; Luo, Ai; Feng, Zhan-chun

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the mental health status of medical students in China, and analyzed the influencing factors in order to provide evidence for mental health education for medical students. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to recruit medical students from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. The questionnaire survey on general information and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) were used for investigation and analysis. The results showed among the 1137 valid questionnaires, 278 (24.45%) participants had SCL-90 score ≥ 160. The top three mental problems of medical students were obsessive-compulsive disorder, interpersonal sensitivity and depression in terms of the factor score ≥ 2.5 and the number of participants who reflected on the diseases. The third-year medical students had the worst mental health status, and fifth-year medical students had the best mental health status. Students from rural area had more psychological problems than those from urban area; furthermore, students with high professional satisfaction, those who were the single child of the family, non-poor students, and those whose parents had high education level had better mental health status. It was concluded that the mental health of medical students is not optimistic in China. Medical students have some mental health problems of different degrees. Factors that influence the mental health of medical students include academic pressure, professional satisfaction level and family environment.

  14. [A preliminary exploration into medical genetics teaching to international students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cao-Yi; Zhao, Xiang-Qiang; Xie, Xiao-Ling; Tan, Xiang-Ling

    2008-12-01

    Medical education to international students has become an important part of higher education in China. Medical genetics is an essential and required course for international medical students. However, the internationalization of higher education in China has challenged the traditional teaching style of medical genetics. In this article, we discussed current situation and challenges in medical genetics teaching to international students, summarized special features and problems we encountered in teaching Indian students, and proposed some practical strategies to address these challenges and to improve the teaching.

  15. Selection of medical students--are all matriculation examinations equivalent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, G; Mitchell, D; McGregor, M; Fridjohn, P

    1987-09-19

    The marks achieved by students vary significantly with the type of matriculation examination written. In particular, students who write the examination set by the Transvaal Education Department score significantly higher matriculation marks than other students but score the same in the first year at medical school as other students. These students have an undeserved advantage in the selection process.

  16. Prevalence of Depression Among Medical Students of a Private Medical College in India

    OpenAIRE

    Ajit Singh; Amar Lal,; Shekhar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medical education can contribute to the development of depression in medical students which may have possible negative academic and professional consequences. The aims of this study were to explore the prevalence of depressive symptoms and their relationships to socio-demographic variables among a cross section of medical students of a private medical college in India. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted including all students from first t...

  17. Factors Associated with Undertreatment of Medical Student Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Givens, Jane L.; Shea, Judy A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors measured factors associated with undertreatment of medical students' depression. They administered a cross-sectional Beck Depression Inventory and sociodemographic questionnaire to students at 1 medical school, defining their outcome measure as the use of counseling services or antidepressant medication. Of an estimated 450 available…

  18. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  19. Teaching Communication Skills to First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Mark; Letendre, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    A course in communication skills for medical students at the University of Massachusetts Medical School is described. Three issues are examined: the effectiveness of behavioral scientists and physicians as course instructors, the value of videotaped role-playing exercises, and the value of trained actors and medical students as simulated patients.…

  20. Medical Students' Perceptions and Preferences for Sexual Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian; Bezek, Katelyn

    2017-01-01

    Sexual health topics are not well-covered in US medical schools. Research has not typically asked medical students what sexual health topics they would like addressed and their preferred methods of sexual health education. This study attempted to address this deficit via an online survey of medical students at an institution where little sexual…

  1. Willingness of Medical Students for Hepatitis B & C Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Mahsud, Muhammad Amin Jan; Hussain, Javed; Khan, Muhammad Hussain; Khan, Habibullah; Noman, Nargis; Rabi, Fazle, Din, Siraj ud

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers including medical students are vulnerable to hepatitis B & C virus infections. The objective of this study was to determine the level of willingness for screening among medical students. Methodology: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at Gomal Medical College, Dera Ismail Khan from 1st April 2010 to 15…

  2. [Internship abroad: should be mandatory for all medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilma, Jan S

    2009-01-01

    Medical students in the Netherlands have the opportunity to follow an internship abroad. In general, they view this as a unique experience. There are personal, scientific, political and humanitarian reasons to support making such an internship abroad obligatory for all medical students. Therefore the Dutch medical study programme, developed in 2001, needs to be reviewed.

  3. A Realistic Digital Deteriorating Patient to Foster Emergency Decision-Making Skills in Medical Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchard, Emmanuel G.; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Naismith, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The Deteriorating Patient Activity (DPA) is a real-life educational simulation that prepares medical students to effectively approach emergency situations through a role play where their instructor plays the role of a patient whose state is rapidly deteriorating. Although proven engaging and effe......The Deteriorating Patient Activity (DPA) is a real-life educational simulation that prepares medical students to effectively approach emergency situations through a role play where their instructor plays the role of a patient whose state is rapidly deteriorating. Although proven engaging...... and effective in improving student decision making, DPA is difficult to carry out since it requires students and medical instructors, all busy people, to be available at the same time and location. The present paper describes the “Digital” Deteriorating Patient Activity (DDPA), an agent-based tutoring system...

  4. Patients' view on medical students in dermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Doğruk Kaçar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Practical training of medical students, especially in specialties such as dermatology, is performed in outpatient clinics where mostly outpatients are encountered. The aim of this study was to compare patients’ perspectives on medical students in two university hospitals (X–Y situated in different regions of Turkey. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 patients, who visited outpatient clinics of X (group 1 and Y (group 2 university hospitals during practical training for fifth year medical students, were included in this study. A questionnaire composed of 16 items was filled by all patients. The first eight questions were about patients’ consent and preferences on the presence of medical students during their interview and the remaining eight questions inquired patients’ overall thoughts on medical students. Results: The patients in both groups were willing to be a part of the educational programme of medical students (39.8%, 53.5%, respectively. The patients were aware that they had the right to refuse the presence of medical students (61.0%, 62.3% and majority wanted to be informed on the presence of medical students during the interview (72.4%, 80.7%. While patients in group 1 evaluated being with medical students as pleasurable (43.1%, patients in group 2 did not agree (44.7%. In addition, both groups were not bothered to share personal information with medical students (50.4%, 44.7% and stated that they would recommend their friends and relatives to have a physical examination done by medical students (51.2%, 41.2%. Conclusion: The active role of medical students during dermatology training is positively viewed by patients in both western and eastern parts of our country. The patients’ request on being informed for the presence of medical students during clinical examination reveals the requirement of oral and written informed consent.

  5. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medical education can bea health hazard for medical students

  6. Medical student clerkship performance and career selection after a junior medical student surgical mentorship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, K M; Schwartz, T M; Rao, V; Khokhar, M T; Miner, T J; Harrington, D T; Ryder, B A

    2016-02-01

    The impact of early medical school mentorship in students' clerkships performance and career selection is unknown. We administered Introduction to Surgery, a resident-directed, semester-long, preclinical elective to junior medical students who answered a Likert-type survey after residency application. Elective participants (EPs) were compared with nonparticipant applicants (EAs), medical school class (MS), and national match outcomes (USA). All 18 EPs (7 M1's, 11 M2's) completed the elective and survey. EP reported more confidence and improved surgical skills, especially attributed to resident mentorship (F(13,237) = 2.3, P = 8*10(-3)). EP "honored" the clerkship more than MS (P = .05); 55.6% of EP, 37.5% of EA, and 27.7% of MS chose surgical fields, yielding a relative risk of 2.0 for EP vs MS (95% confidence interval: 1.3 to 3.2, P = 4*10(-3)). EP "strongly agree" with future mentorship programs (4.6/5), and 1 EP reported the course to be the "main reason" for applying to general surgery. Introduction to Surgery provides a model for a multifaceted junior medical student mentorship program, which has the potential to retain interested students for surgical career selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Training Medical Students in Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opheim, Arild; Andreasson, Sven; Eklund, Astri Brandell; Prescott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of brief training in Motivational interviewing (MI) for medical students. Design: Video recordings of consultations between 113 final-year medical students and simulated patients were scored blind by two independent raters with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC). Half of the students participated in a…

  8. Medical Student Response to a Class Lipid-Screening Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Gifford; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Medical students at the State University of New York's Downstate Medical Center initiated and carried out a voluntary project to screen lipids (cholesterol) to identify known coronary risk factors. The incidence of coronary disease factors among these students and the response of students with high cholesterol levels are reported. (Authors/PP)

  9. Medical Students as Facilitators for Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Cathrine; Bjerrum, Flemming; Mahmood, Badar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Teaching basic clinical skills to student peers and residents by medical students has previously been shown effective. This study examines if medical students can facilitate laparoscopic procedural tasks to residents using a virtual reality simulator. METHODS: This was a retrospective...... practicing on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator....

  10. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, B

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system.

  11. University Preparation for Native American Students: Theory and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Jeanna; Chiste, Katherine Beaty

    1986-01-01

    Describes a summer program at the University of Lethbridge designed to improve the retention and graduation rates of Native American students, most of whom are adult reentry students with incomplete secondary school preparation; covers program theory, cultural background, staffing, student screening, curriculum, and outcomes. (JHZ)

  12. Preparing Students for After-College Life: The Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelli K.

    2012-01-01

    Historical context informs the work of student affairs professionals and others in higher education in striking the right balance in helping prepare students for life after college, but significant new pressures face students, their mentors, and educational institutions today. This chapter discusses the contexts that shape the work of student…

  13. 'Soft and fluffy': medical students' attitudes towards psychology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Stephen; Wallace, Sarah; Nathan, Yoga; McGrath, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Psychology is viewed by medical students in a negative light. In order to understand this phenomenon, we interviewed 19 medical students about their experiences of psychology in medical education. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were generated: attitudes, teaching culture, curriculum factors and future career path; negative attitudes were transmitted by teachers to students and psychology was associated with students opting for a career in general practice. In summary, appreciation of psychology in medical education will only happen if all educators involved in medical education value and respect each other's speciality and expertise.

  14. Technical skills acquisition in surgery-bound senior medical students: an evaluation of student assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Vanessa A; Marks, Joshua A; Bodzin, Adam S; Comeau, Jason A; Maxwell, Pinckney J; Isenberg, Gerald A; Martin, Niels D

    2012-01-01

    To prepare students pursuing surgical careers, we devised a senior subinternship curriculum supplement that focused on the acquisition of technical skills required of surgical residents. We hypothesized that more assertive students, those that accomplished more of the curriculum, would perform better on a technical skills Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Senior medical students rotating on their first general surgery subinternship were administered a 6-station OSCE on the first day of their subinternship and again during the final week of the month-long rotation. A self-directed, 38-task "scavenger hunt" representing common intern level clinical skills, procedures, and patient care activities was provided to each student. The study was performed at Jefferson Medical College, a large, private medical school in Philadelphia, PA. Forty-nine senior students completed surgical subinternships between July 2009 and September 2010, and participated both in the pre-/post-OSCEs and the scavenger hunt. Students performed significantly better on the post-rotation OSCE than on the pre-rotation OSCE; 70.2% ± 8.1% vs. 60.4% ± 12.0%, p Assertiveness scores from the "scavenger hunt" did not correlate with final OSCE scores (r = -0.328, p = 0.25), and were negatively correlated with the change between pre- and post-OSCE scores (r = -0.573, p assertiveness scores were determined by the number of tasks completed over the course of the rotation. As surgical education becomes more streamlined with evolving work hour restrictions, medical school education is playing an increasingly pivotal role in preparing students for internship. In our study, individual assertiveness in completing structured self-directed learning tasks did not directly predict the acquisition of proficiency in technical skills. We feel assertiveness is overshadowed by other factors that may carry more weight in terms of technical skills acquisition. Further studies are required to delineate these

  15. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  16. Advanced 3D visualization in student-centred medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silén, Charlotte; Wirell, Staffan; Kvist, Joanna; Nylander, Eva; Smedby, Orjan

    2008-06-01

    Healthcare students have difficulties achieving a conceptual understanding of 3D anatomy and misconceptions about physiological phenomena are persistent and hard to address. 3D visualization has improved the possibilities of facilitating understanding of complex phenomena. A project was carried out in which high quality 3D visualizations using high-resolution CT and MR images from clinical research were developed for educational use. Instead of standard stacks of slices (original or multiplanar reformatted) volume-rendering images in the quicktime VR format that enables students to interact intuitively were included. Based on learning theories underpinning problem based learning, 3D visualizations were implemented in the existing curricula of the medical and physiotherapy programs. The images/films were used in lectures, demonstrations and tutorial sessions. Self-study material was also developed. To support learning efficacy by developing and using 3D datasets in regular health care curricula and enhancing the knowledge about possible educational value of 3D visualizations in learning anatomy and physiology. Questionnaires were used to investigate the medical and physiotherapy students' opinions about the different formats of visualizations and their learning experiences. The 3D images/films stimulated the students will to understand more and helped them to get insights about biological variations and different organs size, space extent and relation to each other. The virtual dissections gave a clearer picture than ordinary dissections and the possibility to turn structures around was instructive. 3D visualizations based on authentic, viable material point out a new dimension of learning material in anatomy, physiology and probably also pathophysiology. It was successful to implement 3D images in already existing themes in the educational programs. The results show that deeper knowledge is required about students' interpretation of images/films in relation to

  17. Medical Humanities Coursework Is Associated with Greater Measured Empathy in Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeremy; Benson, Lauren M; Swanson, Judy; Potyk, Darryl; Daratha, Kenn; Roberts, Ken

    2016-12-01

    The primary focus of the study was to determine whether coursework in the medical humanities would ameliorate students' loss of and failure to develop empathy, a problem known to be common during medical education. Students were offered an elective course in the Medical Humanities for academic credit. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy Student Version (JSE-S) was administered at the beginning and end of an academic year in which humanities courses were offered. Changes in JSE-S scores among students who studied Medical Humanities were compared with changes in student who did not take any humanities coursework. Medical humanities coursework correlated with superior empathy outcomes among the medical students. Of students not enrolled in humanities courses, 71% declined or failed to increase in JSE-S score over the academic year. Of those who took humanities coursework, 46% declined or failed to increase in JSE-S scores. The difference was statistically significant (P = .03). The medical humanities curriculum correlated with favorable empathy outcomes as measured by the JSE-S. Elective medical humanities coursework correlated with improved empathy score outcomes in a group of US medical students. This may reflect a direct effect of the humanities coursework. Alternately, students' elective choice to take medical humanities coursework may be a marker for students with a propensity to favorable empathy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nursing students and the supervision of medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Seari, Kerry; Happell, Brenda; Burke, Karena J; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-01-01

    Up to one in five medication administrations in Australian hospitals involve an error. As registered nurses (RNs) are at the forefront of medication administration, they have been the focus of attempts to reduce errors. Given that nursing students have reported errors or experiences of near misses, their practices, as well as the supervision they receive from RNs, also deserves investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' experiences of supervision while administering medications. Students (N= 45) completed a questionnaire on their supervision experiences while administering medications. The findings revealed that 88% of students agreed that they had been directly supervised during the entirety of administration procedures. Although 7% of students reported not receiving supervision throughout medication administration, higher percentages of students indicated that they received lower levels of supervision when wards were busy (66%), when they felt under pressure to comply with the wishes of RNs (40%), when students had been in clinical settings for extended periods of time (51%), and when the RNs trusted the student nurses (37%). Approximately one third (29%) of student nurses disagreed that RNs followed the six rights when administering medications. These findings suggest that student nurses are not always adequately supervised and are at times administering medications outside the parameters of the law. Healthcare organisations need to adapt their policies and practices to ensure that the legal requirements surrounding student nurse administration of medications are being met, as well as the educational and welfare needs of neophyte nurses.

  19. Synchronous videoconferencing: impact on achievement of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, Kari; Sefcik, Donald; Wilson, Suzanne G; McDaniel, John T; Zemper, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools are expanding their enrollment, and synchronous lecture broadcast is being used more frequently to deliver instruction across multiple sites. To assess whether the videoconferencing lecture-delivery method is associated with differences in medical student performance on national licensing examinations at lecture site-of-origin versus lecture receiving sites. The academic preparedness of medical students at the time of admission and performance on a national licensing examination were compared for students predominantly receiving live lectures and those receiving synchronous videoconferencing lectures. External metrics were analyzed to establish baseline preparedness (Medical College Admission Test scores) and to determine academic achievement (national licensing examination scores). The authors found no statistically significant differences between site-of-origin and receiving sites in medical student preparedness or academic achievement. Medical students that receive the majority of their lectures through synchronous videoconferencing perform no differently on national licensing examinations than students that attend live lectures at the site-of-origin.

  20. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2)…

  1. Reducing medication errors: Teaching strategies that increase nursing students' awareness of medication errors and their prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Sharon; Hewitt, Jayne; Stanbrough, Rebecca; McAndrew, Ron

    2017-02-14

    Medication errors are a patient safety and quality of care issue. There is evidence to suggest many undergraduate nursing curricula do not adequately educate students about the factors that contribute to medication errors and possible strategies to prevent them. We designed and developed a suite of teaching strategies that raise students' awareness of medication error producing situations and their prevention.

  2. Attitudes of medical students towards euthanasia in a multicultural setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adchalingam, K; Kong, W H; Zakiah, M A; Zaini, M; Wong, Y L; Lang, C C

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of 400 medical students of multicultural backgrounds at the University of Malaya was conducted to understand their attitudes towards euthanasia and factors related to medical...

  3. Introduction of a virtual workstation into radiology medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Colin D; Lowry, Peter A; Petersen, Brian D; Jesse, Mary K

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article describes the creation of a virtual workstation for use by medical students and implementation of that workstation in the reading room. CONCLUSION. A radiology virtual workstation for medical students was created using OsiriX imaging software to authentically simulate the experience of interacting with cases selected to cover important musculoskeletal imaging diagnoses. A workstation that allows the manipulation and interpretation of complete anonymized DICOM images may enhance the educational experience of medical students.

  4. Depression and type D personality among undergraduate medical students

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Context: Academic pressure, though established, is an unavoidable cause of depression in medical students. Role of Type D personality as determinant of depression is a new approach to the problem. Aim: Determination of relationship between Type D personality and Depression among medical students. Setting and Design: Undergraduate students (both male and female, total 150) of Midnapore Medical College. Materials and Methods: Beck Depression Inventory for depression and DS 14 for type D persona...

  5. Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, N.; Krishnamurthy, V.; J Majhi; Gupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic ra...

  6. Psychometric properties of the Medical Student Well-Being Index among medical students in a Malaysian medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri; Yaacob, Mohd Jamil; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Esa, Ab Rahman

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the convergent, discriminant, construct, concurrent and discriminative validity of the Medical Student Wellbeing Index (MSWBI) as well as to evaluate its internal consistency and optimal cut-off total scores to detect at least moderate levels of general psychological distress, stress, anxiety and depression symptoms. A cross sectional study was done on 171 medical students. The MSWBI and DASS-21 were administered and returned immediately upon completion. Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability analysis, ROC analysis and Pearson correlation test were applied to assess psychometric properties of the MSWBI. A total of 168 (98.2%) medical students responded. The goodness of fit indices showed the MSWBI had a good construct (χ(2)=6.14, p=0.803, RMSEAinternal consistency. Pearson correlation coefficients and ROC analysis suggested each MSWBI's item showed adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Its optimal cut-off scores to detect at least moderate levels of general psychological distress, stress, anxiety, and depression were 1.5, 2.5, 1.5 and 2.5 respectively with sensitivity and specificity ranged from 62 to 80% and the areas under ROC curve ranged from 0.71 to 0.83. This study showed that the MSWBI had good level of psychometric properties. The MSWBI score more than 2 can be considered as having significant psychological distress. The MSWBI is a valid and reliable screening instrument to assess psychological distress of medical students.

  7. Preparing Students for College... and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; Mero, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    In many ways, Roxbury Preparatory Charter School is typical of Boston's Mission Hill area: the student body is composed entirely of students of color, most of whom live in single-parent households. More than 68% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals. What is not typical is that for the fourth consecutive year, Roxbury Prep, which…

  8. Help Students Prepare for High School Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Christopher; Connor, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety! Stress! Fear! Everyone lives in a time of escalating accountability in terms of state, district, and city-wide examinations that measure student growth in the acquisition of skills and content area knowledge. All students feel increased pressure to constantly demonstrate improved levels of academic performance. For students with cognitive…

  9. Online Discussion Assignments Improve Students' Class Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T.

    2010-01-01

    To increase the number of students who read the text before class and to promote student interaction centering on text material, I developed an online discussion assignment as a required component of a cognitive psychology course. Across 2 studies, this assignment had a limited effect on examination performance, but students completing online…

  10. [Relationship between self-directed learning and value profile in Chilean medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasce, Eduardo; Pérez, Cristhian; Ortiz, Liliana; Parra, Paula; Ibáñez, Pilar; Matus, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Medical education should prepare students to face a dynamic environment, through competencies that allow them to learn independently. To evaluate the relationship between self-directed learning and value profile of undergraduate first year students in a medical school in Chile. Self-Directed Learning Scale and Schwartz's Values Questionnaire were applied to 235 medical students from the University of Concepción, Chile. Self-direction and Security are value types that correlate directly and significantly with the overall scale and with the five subscales of Self-Directed Learning. In first year medical students ofUniversity of Concepcion, Chile, Self-direction and Security are values that facilitate Self-directed Learning.

  11. Factors affecting career preferences of medical students at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting career preferences of medical students at the College of ... students, respondents from rural areas and small towns, and whose parents were ... between doctors' career expectations and the country's healthcare needs.

  12. The conceptualisation of "soft skills" among medical students before ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conceptualisation of "soft skills" among medical students before and after ... emphasis on soft skills, including professional interpersonal and social skills, ... Results: Both groups of students revealed conceptualisations of soft skills that ...

  13. Evaluation of Competence of Medical Students in Performing Direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    which they underwent a didactic lecture on direct ophthalmoscopy and ... exam. Exclusion criteria. Medical students who failed to meet 75% attendance as ... the Y instructor believes students are motivated to learn willingly without close ...

  14. Depression, anxiety, stress and substance use in medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing causes mental health problems in medical students. Students themselves perceive ... possible consequence of high levels of depression, anxiety and stress in this population group. .... antidepressants progressing from semesters 3 to 5,.

  15. Perception of Simulation‑based Learning among Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    has been reported to be inadequate by students even after graduation.[1] Not ... Keywords: Interns, Medical students, Perception, Simulation‑based learning. Access this article ... the cost associated with simulation equipments. However,.

  16. Educational program on sexual medicine for medical students: pilot project in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Torres, Luiz O.; Abdo, Carmita; Abdo, João A.; Faria, Geraldo

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the factors that influence the graduation of medical students in relation to the preparation of their approach to sexual health care. Teaching hours for sexual education in undergraduate medical courses are frequently insufficient to prepare them for their roles to treat this complex issue. This study aimed to evaluate the delivery of sexual education to medical students by assessing their knowledge, attitudes, and self-confidence to treat patients. Methods A 1-day course was organized to tackle the main concerns of patients in respect to sexual health problems. The course was comprised of classes and time for students to discuss doubts with specialists. At the end of the course the knowledge of students on the subject and their confidence to care for patients with concerns on sexual issues were evaluated. Results Seventy-four medical students participated in the 1-day educational program on sexual medicine that included lectures about different topics and discussion. At the end of the course, students answered questionnaires about how the course had possibly improved their confidence regarding dealing with sexual issues. The analysis of the opinions of the students suggested an improvement in self-confidence with regard to discussing sexual behavior with patients. Conclusions The results demonstrated a necessity to increase knowledge and stimulate positive attitudes of students about sexuality thereby improving their ability to treat patients with sexuality problems.

  17. An innovative blended learning approach using virtual patients as preparation for skills laboratory training: perceptions of students and tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ronny; Bosse, Hans Martin; Simon, Anke; Nikendei, Christoph; Huwendiek, Sören

    2013-02-12

    Currently only a few reports exist on how to prepare medical students for skills laboratory training. We investigated how students and tutors perceive a blended learning approach using virtual patients (VPs) as preparation for skills training. Fifth-year medical students (N=617) were invited to voluntarily participate in a paediatric skills laboratory with four specially designed VPs as preparation. The cases focused on procedures in the laboratory using interactive questions, static and interactive images, and video clips. All students were asked to assess the VP design. After participating in the skills laboratory 310 of the 617 students were additionally asked to assess the blended learning approach through established questionnaires. Tutors' perceptions (N=9) were assessed by semi-structured interviews. From the 617 students 1,459 VP design questionnaires were returned (59.1%). Of the 310 students 213 chose to participate in the skills laboratory; 179 blended learning questionnaires were returned (84.0%). Students provided high overall acceptance ratings of the VP design and blended learning approach. By using VPs as preparation, skills laboratory time was felt to be used more effectively. Tutors perceived students as being well prepared for the skills laboratory with efficient uses of time. The overall acceptance of the blended learning approach was high among students and tutors. VPs proved to be a convenient cognitive preparation tool for skills training.

  18. Succinct guide to liver transplantation for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Maw Ho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature on liver transplantation for use in medical education is limited and as yet unsatisfactory. The aim of this article is to help medical students gain enough insight into the reality of being a liver transplant recipient. This is crucial so in the future they can feel confident in approaching these patients with adequate knowledge and confidence. The knowledge-tree based learning core topics are designed for a 2-h class including indication/contraindication in the real-world setting, model for end stage liver disease scoring and organ allocation policy, liver transplantation for hepatic malignancy, transplantation surgery, immunosuppression strategy in practical consideration, and management of viral hepatitis. The rationales of each topic are discussed comprehensively for better understanding by medical students. Recipient candidates may have reversible contraindications that halt the surgery temporarily and therefore, it warrants re-evaluation before transplant. Organ allocation policy is primarily based on disease severity instead of waiting time. Transplant surgery usually involves resection of the whole liver, in situ implantation with reconstruction of the hepatic vein, the portal vein, the hepatic artery and the biliary duct in sequence. The primary goal of artificial immunosuppression is to prevent graft rejection, and the secondary one is to reduce its complication or side effects. Life-long oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues against hepatitis virus B is needed while short course of direct acting agents against hepatitis viral C is enough to eradicate the virus. Basic understanding of the underlying rationales will help students prepare for advanced learning and cope with the recipients confidently in the future.

  19. Social network utilization (Facebook) & e-Professionalism among medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Jawaid, Masood; Khan, Muhammad Hassaan; Bhutto, Shahzadi Nisar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To find out the frequency and contents of online social networking (Facebook) among medical students of Dow University of Health Sciences. Methods: The sample of the study comprised of final year students of two medical colleges of Dow University of Health Sciences – Karachi. Systematic search for the face book profiles of the students was carried out with a new Facebook account. In the initial phase of search, it was determined whether each student had a Facebook account and the s...

  20. The contribution and challenges of electives in the development of social accountability in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah; Green, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Overseas electives are a key feature of western medical schools, with a high proportion of senior students taking the opportunity to travel to poorly resourced countries. Development of enhanced clinical skills is the focus of most electives; however, they provide a valuable opportunity to enhance medical students' sense of social accountability. Medical schools have a responsibility to ensure adequate preparation by the students, including close liaison and negotiation with host institutions to ensure maximal benefit for both student and the host communities. Anticipating intended and unintentional learning outcomes, which relate not only to global health knowledge and clinical skills but incorporate explicit expectations of a range of generic, professional and social responsibility outcomes, will help to ensure maximum benefit. Incorporating reflective accounts and host feedback into elective assessments will contribute to students' development, and ensure viability and sustainability of this valuable learning opportunity.

  1. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined.

  2. Clinical psychomotor skills among left and right handed medical students: are the left-handed medical students left out?

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing perception that the left handed (LH) medical students are facing difficulties while performing the clinical tasks that involve psychomotor skill, although the evidence is very limited and diverse. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical psychomotor skills among Right-handed (RH) and left-handed (LH) medical students. Methods For this study, 54 (27 left handed and 27 right handed) first year medical students were selected. They were trained for different ...

  3. Voluntary peer-led exam preparation course for international first year students: Tutees' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Daniel; Eckart, Wolfgang; Karimian-Jazi, Kianush; Amr, Ali; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-06-18

    While the number of international students has increased over the last decade, such students face diverse challenges due to language and cultural barriers. International medical students suffer from personal distress and a lack of support. Their performance is significantly lower than non-international peers in clinical examinations. We investigated whether international students benefit from a peer-led exam preparation course. An exam preparation course was designed, and relevant learning objectives were defined. Two evaluations were undertaken: Using a qualitative approach, tutees (N = 10) were asked for their thoughts and comments in a semi-structured interview at the end of the semester. From a quantitative perspective, all participants (N = 22) were asked to complete questionnaires at the end of each course session. International students reported a range of significant benefits from the course as they prepared for upcoming exams. They benefited from technical and didactic, as well as social learning experiences. They also considered aspects of the tutorial's framework helpful. Social and cognitive congruence seem to be the key factors to success within international medical students' education. If tutors have a migration background, they can operate as authentic role models. Furthermore, because they are still students themselves, they can offer support using relevant and understandable language.

  4. Role of Religiosity in Psychological Well-Being Among Medical and Non-medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Shemaila; Saleem, Tamkeen

    2016-12-27

    Religion has been generally considered as a protective factor for the psychological health of the people. As many studies have publicized a high prevalence of psychological morbidities among the medical students during their academic stages of medical schools, it is significant to investigate whether religiosity functions as a protective factor, to explore religiosity as a predictor of psychological well-being in a sample of medical students, and to compare the results of medical students as well as non-medical students with respect to religiosity and psychological well-being. The study is carried out in Federal Medical and Dental College and International Islamic University, Islamabad. The present study examined a sample of 120 medical students from Federal Medical and Dental College and 120 non-medical students from International Islamic University, Islamabad. Purposive sampling was used. The respondents completed religious orientation scale and scale of psychological well-being scale along with a demographic data sheet. In order to measure the study variables, linear regression and t test were used. The findings revealed that religiosity is a strong predictor of psychological well-being. Extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity predicts psychological well-being among the students. The results indicated a significant difference in psychological well-being between medical and non-medical students. No significant difference was found in religiosity of medical and non-medical students. The gender differences in religiosity and psychological well-being were found to be insignificant. The results emphasize that psychological well-being is prophesied by religiosity. The present research suggests further investigations and also endows with trends for psychological evaluation, development of religious beliefs, and interventions for augmenting psychological well-being among the medical students.

  5. A study of stress in medical students at Seth G.S. Medical College.

    OpenAIRE

    Supe A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is usually observed that medical students undergo tremendous stress during various stages of the MBBS course. There is a high rate of suicide among them. METHODS: To determine incidence of stress and factors controlling stress in medical students at various stages of MBBS course at Seth G S Medical college, 238 students (First year 98, Second 76, Third 64) were asked to complete a questionnaire on personal data (gender, stay at hostel, mode of travel, time spent in travel every...

  6. Student pharmacist initiated medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrus MR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Joint Commission continues to emphasize the importance of medication reconciliation in all practice settings. Pharmacists and student pharmacists are uniquely trained in this aspect of patient care, and can assist with keeping accurate and complete medication records through patient interview in the outpatient setting.Objective: The objective of this study was to quantify and describe medication reconciliation efforts by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center.Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all standard medication reconciliation forms completed by student pharmacists during patient interviews from April 2010 to July 2010. The number of reviews conducted was recorded, along with the frequency of each type of discrepancy. A discrepancy was defined as any lack of agreement between the medication list in the electronic health record (EHR and the patient-reported regimen and included any differences in dose or frequency of a medication, duplication of the same medication, medication no longer taken or omission of any medication.Results: A total of 213 standard medication forms from the 4 month period were reviewed. A total of 555 discrepancies were found, including medications no longer taken, prescription medications that needed to be added to the EHR, over-the-counter(OTC and herbal medications that needed to be added to the EHR, medications taken differently than recorded in the EHR, and medication allergies which needed to be updated. An average of 2.6 discrepancies was found per patient interviewed.Conclusion: Student pharmacist-initiated medication reconciliation in an outpatient family medicine center resulted in the resolution of numerous discrepancies in the medication lists of individual patients. Pharmacists and student pharmacists are uniquely trained in medication history taking and play a vital role in medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting.

  7. Medical students writing on death, dying and palliative care: a qualitative analysis of reflective essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Jason W; Dikomitis, Lisa; Gadoud, Amy

    2016-12-01

    Medical students and doctors are becoming better prepared to care for patients with palliative care needs and support patients at the end of life. This preparation needs to start at medical school. To assess how medical students learn about death, dying and palliative care during a clinical placement using reflective essays and to provide insights to improve medical education about end-of-life care and/or palliative care. Qualitative study in which all reflective essays written by third-year medical students in 1 year from a UK medical school were searched electronically for those that included 'death', 'dying' and 'palliative care'. The anonymised data were managed using QSR NVivo 10 software, and a systematic analysis was conducted in three distinct phases: (1) open coding; (2) axial coding and (3) selective coding. Ethical approval was received. 54 essays met the inclusion criteria from 241 essays screened for the terms 'death', 'dying' or 'palliative'; 22 students gave consent for participation and their 24 essays were included. Saturation of themes was reached. Three overarching themes were identified: emotions, empathy and experiential and reflective learning. Students emphasised trying to develop a balance between showing empathy and their emotional state. Students learnt a lot from clinical encounters and watching doctors manage difficult situations, as well as from their refection during and after the experience. Reflective essays give insights into the way students learn about death, dying and palliative care and how it affects them personally as well as the preparation that is needed to be better equipped to deal with these kinds of experiences. Analysis of the essays enabled the proposal of new strategies to help make them more effective learning tools and to optimise students' learning from a palliative care attachment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Charles P; Donaldson, Katherine M; Vantsevich, Anna V

    2016-05-01

    Health care around the world is going digital. This inexorable trend will result in: (1) routine documentation of care in digital form and emerging national infrastructures for sharing data that allow progress toward a learning health system; and (2) a biomedical "knowledge cloud" that is fully integrated into practice environments and accessible to both providers and consumers of healthcare. Concurrently, medical students will be complete digital natives who have literally grown up with the Internet and will enter practice early in the next decade when the projected changes in practice approach maturity. This essay describes three competencies linked to this evolving information environment-(1) knowing what you do and don't know, (2) ability to ask a good question, and (3) skills in evaluating and weighing evidence-and suggests educational approaches to promote student mastery of each competency. Shifting medical education to address these competencies will call into question many current methods but may be essential to fully prepare trainees for optimal practice in the future.

  9. Medical and nursing students' knowledge and attitudes toward violence against women in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Basanti

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitudes towards violence against women among fourth (final) year baccalaureate nursing students and fifth (final) year medical students from two distinct educational institutions in India. Data were collected from 440 students using two questionnaires: the Student Exposure to Woman Abuse Questionnaire (SEWAQ), and the Inventory of Beliefs about Wife Beating (IBWB). Results were analysed based on gender, profession, and educational institution. Nursing students believed that they had received more classroom preparation and practical skills to better prepare them to assist abused clients than male and female medical students. Only 38% of the participants believed that they had acquired classroom knowledge on woman abuse through their respective educational programs, whereas 43% thought they had practical skills to care for victims. All participants were sympathetic toward abuse victims, but demonstrated varying attitudes about the justification for abuse against women, help given to victims, punishment of the offender and the effect of woman abuse. Female medical students believed more strongly than males and nursing students that wives do not gain from being beaten. Congruent with existing literature, the study demonstrated that health care students in India do not receive sufficient training, practical skills and classroom knowledge to effectively manage abuse against women.

  10. Clinical experience of medical students in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Alam Sher; Seng, Quah Ban

    2003-07-01

    This paper compares the clinical experience in acute conditions of the undergraduate students of a medical school from a developing country (Malaysia) with those from a developed country (UK). This study was conducted at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). Through questionnaire survey enquiry was made about 27 acute medical conditions (i.e. conditions related to internal medicine, paediatrics, and psychiatry), 15 acute surgical conditions (i.e. conditions related to general surgery, orthopaedics, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, gynaecology and obstetrics), 15 surgical operations and 26 practical procedures. The results obtained were compared with published data from the UK. Acute medical conditions were seen by higher number of the USM students but with less frequency than the British students. The USM students saw practical procedures more frequently than the British students did, but almost an equal number performed these procedures independently. The British students attended surgical operations more frequently than the USM students did. Given the limitations of comparison (epidemiological, cultural and geographical differences, conventional curriculum (in the British medical schools) vs. problem based learning curriculum (in the Malaysian medical school)) the overall clinical experience of the medical students in the USM and the UK was comparable. The USM students had more opportunities to observe cases and procedures but "hands on" experience was similar to that of the British students.

  11. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Medical Students: Letter from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxue Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the knowledge of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS among Chinese medical students. Methods: A structured questionnaire on MERS was conducted among 214 medical students in China. Results: The average correction of the single question varied from 36.0% to 89.7%. There is a significant difference on MERS knowledge among different majors of medical students (p < 0.05. Management students scored significantly higher than students of other majors (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Chinese medical students had good knowledge of MERS. The MERS knowledge score varied among students of different majors. Education on disease control should be included in the school curriculum.

  12. Medical student resilience and stressful clinical events during clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpy, Jennifer C; Lee, Wei Wei; Woodruff, James N; Pincavage, Amber T

    2017-01-01

    Medical students face numerous stressors during their clinical years, including difficult clinical events. Fostering resilience is a promising way to mitigate negative effects of stressors, prevent burnout, and help students thrive after difficult experiences. However, little is known about medical student resilience. To characterize medical student resilience and responses to difficult clinical events during clinical training. Sixty-two third-year (MS3) and 55 fourth-year (MS4) University of Chicago medical students completed surveys in 2016 assessing resilience (Connor Davidson Resilience Scale, CD-RISC 10), symptoms of burnout, need for resilience training, and responses to difficult clinical events. Medical student mean resilience was lower than in a general population sample. Resilience was higher in males, MS4s, those without burnout symptoms, and students who felt able to cope with difficult clinical events. When students experienced difficult events in the clinical setting, the majority identified poor team dynamics among the most stressful, and agreed their wellbeing was affected by difficult clinical events. A majority also would prefer to discuss these events with their team later that day. Students discussed events with peers more than with attendings or residents. Students comfortable discussing stress and burnout with peers had higher resilience. Most students believed resilience training would be helpful and most beneficial during MS3 year. Clinical medical student resilience was lower than in the general population but higher in MS4s and students reporting no burnout. Students had some insight into their resilience and most thought resilience training would be helpful. Students discussed difficult clinical events most often with peers. More curricula promoting medical student resilience are needed.

  13. Parent attitudes towards medical student attendance and interaction in the paediatric burns outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shinichiro; McBride, Craig A; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-05-01

    Medical student attendance in the Outpatient Department is not only essential for the teaching of paediatric burns, but is also important in the recruitment of promising individuals for the growth of our speciality. In 2008, 110 consecutive parents were asked to complete written surveys before the start of their clinic appointment. Only one parent per family could choose to complete the survey. The response rate was 100%. Parents from a diverse range of cultural, educational and socioeconomic were represented in this study. Eighteen parents (16.4%), 48 parents (46.3%) and 44 parents (40.0%) considered their child's burn to be severe, moderate and mild, respectively. One hundred and nine parents (99.1%) accepted the attendance of medical students. Forty-two parents (38.5%) preferred fewer than 3 students, 35 parents (32.1%) would be comfortable with 3-5 medical students and 32 parents (29.4%) could accept more than 6 medical students. One hundred and two parents (92.7%) would allow students to physically interact with their children and 108 parents (99.2%) would allow medical students to freely ask questions in burns clinic. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that high income earners would be comfortable with fewer medical students attending clinic than low income earners (p=0.007). Also, younger parents (p=0.002) and parents from families who made less than A$25,000 a year (p=0.009), believed that they could perceive 'a lot of benefit' from observing medical students being taught, whereas older parents and parents from higher income families responded more often with a perception of only 'some benefit'. This first study in a paediatric outpatient setting shows that parents are overwhelmingly prepared to have medical students involved in the care of their child. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Female medical students are estimated to have a higher risk for developing eating disorders than male medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Nete; Bak, Nanna Hasle; Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context.......Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context....

  15. Perception of the Medical Students on Their Future Career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Results: Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them...

  16. Teaching adjuvant endocrine breast cancer treatment to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, M; Fluit, C; Timmer-Bonte, J; Ottevanger, P; Verhagen, C; Klaassen, T; van Laarhoven, H W M

    2013-05-01

    In undergraduate medical education, students are supposed to acquire knowledge and understanding about the basic principles of adjuvant breast cancer treatment. The best education method in this context is unknown. In this randomised study we assessed the effect of designing a patient education poster on knowledge, perceived participation and students' satisfaction compared with case-oriented education concerning endocrine therapy for breast cancer patients. This study was conducted in the Bachelor Oncology Course for undergraduate students in Medical Science of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. In the experimental group, students designed and created a patient education poster in small groups. In the control group, students answered case-based questions in small groups. Knowledge was tested at different moments using multiple-choice questions. To assess perceived participation and satisfaction, students filled out questionnaires. 329 students participated in the study. No difference in knowledge was observed between the experimental and control group. However, students in the control group reported a higher perceived participation and satisfaction compared with the students in the experimental group (pstudents' perceived participation and satisfaction. Working on case-based questions may be appreciated by medical students as most relevant for their future profession. We advocate more attention to the importance of patient education in the medical curriculum, to help students realise the relevance of this aspect of medical profession.

  17. Preparation courses for medical clerkships and the final clinical internship in medical education – The Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spura, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Goals: Supporting medical students entering their internships – the clinical clerkship and the internship “final clinical year” (Praktisches Jahr, PJ – the seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Ready for PJ” were held for the first time in 2014 and continued successfully in 2015. These seminars are part of the “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (Magdeburger Curriculum zur Versorgungskompetenz, MCV. The concept comprises three main issues: “Understanding interdisciplinary clinical procedures”, “Interprofessional collaboration”, and “Individual cases and their reference to the system.” The aim of the seminar series is to prepare students as medical trainees for their role in the practice-oriented clinical clerkship and PJ, respectively.Methods: Quality assurance evaluations and didactic research are integral parts of the seminars. In preparation for the “Ready for PJ” seminar a needs assessment was conducted. The seminars were rated by the participants using an anonymized questionnaire consisting of a 5-choice Likert scale (ranging from 1=fully agree to 5=fully disagree and spaces for comments that was generated by the evaluation software Evasys.Results: The results are presented for the preparatory seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Fit für PJ” held in 2014 and 2015. Overall, the students regarded the facultative courses as very good preparation for the clerkship as well as for the PJ. The three-dimensional main curricular concept of the MCV was recognized in the evaluation as a valuable educational approach. Interprofessional collaboration, taught by instructors focussing in teamwork between disciplines, was scored positively and highly valued.Conclusions: The “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (MCV integrates clerkship and PJ in a framing educational concept and allows students a better appreciation of their role in patient care and the tasks that they will

  18. Oregon Students Help Prepare Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Tom

    1973-01-01

    Describes a field-biology research project conducted at Coos Bay, Oregon by high school students attending the summer sessions at Terramar Field Science Facility during the summer of 1972. Discusses the value of this type of environmental survey for both the students and the community. (JR)

  19. Community Colleges: Preparing Students for Diverse Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    Postgraduation outcomes for community college students are complex. In addition to traditional job placement and earnings information, transferring to a 4-year institution is a positive first-destination outcome. Furthermore, community college students may have education and career goals that do not include earning a degree. Community college…

  20. First year medical students' attitude toward anatomical corpse dissection and its relationship with their personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Mihai HoraŢiu; Popescu, CodruŢa Alina; Suciu, ŞoimiŢa Mihaela; Buzoianu, Anca Dana

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy is an important and intense mandatory course offered during the first year of medical school. Corpse dissection is very important in Anatomy teaching, and first year students will encounter, most likely for the first time, a dead human body during Anatomy labs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anxiety experienced by medical students with no previous corpse dissection background just before, after a week, and then after a month of dissection labs, and to investigate the relationship between students' personality and their attitude towards dissection. 138 first year English Section medical students from the "Iuliu Hatieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, completed a personality inventory, an anxiety scale and a questionnaire to assess their attitudes and reactions to anatomical dissection. The level of anxiety reported by students increased from before the first dissection encounter to after one month of dissection labs. There is a relationship between the Five Factor model of personality and students' attitudes towards dissection. Medical students could be better prepared for their first corpse dissection experience if the preparation before dissection would take in consideration their psychological traits.

  1. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelvey BM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bethany M Shelvey,1 Sion A Coulman,2 Dai N John2 1School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Background: The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to evaluate medical students’ experiences of therapeutics and prescribing IPE, with pharmacy students, 1 year following the session. Methods: Following ethics committee approval, 3rd year medical students at Cardiff University were invited to participate using non-probability sampling. Topic guide development was informed by the literature and research team discussions, including a review of the materials used in the IPE session. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews explored experiences, prior to, during, and after the IPE session. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Results: Eighteen medical students were interviewed; 11 were females. Seven themes were identified, namely 1 refinement of pre-session preparation, 2 session value, 3 learning with a pharmacy student, 4 learning about a pharmacist, 5 learning from a pharmacy student, 6 importance and application of what was learnt into practice, and 7 suggestions for change. Conclusion: This study provides a valuable insight into medical students’ experiences of a therapeutics and prescribing IPE session and emphasizes the value they placed on interaction with pharmacy students. Medical students were able to recall clear learning experiences from the IPE session that had taken place 12 months earlier, which itself is an indicator of the impact of the session on the students. Furthermore, they were able to describe how knowledge and skills learnt had been applied to

  2. Quantitative Description of Medical Student Interest in Neurology and Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Raddy L; Cuoco, Joshua A; Guercio, Erik; Levitan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Given the well-documented shortage of physicians in primary care and several other specialties, quantitative understanding of residency application and matching data among osteopathic and allopathic medical students has implications for predicting trends in the physician workforce. To estimate medical student interest in neurology and psychiatry based on numbers of applicants and matches to neurology and psychiatry osteopathic and allopathic residency programs. Also, to gauge students' previous academic experience with brain and cognitive sciences. The number of available postgraduate year 1 positions, applicants, and matches from graduating years 2011 through 2015 were collected from the National Matching Services Inc and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine for osteopathic programs and the National Resident Matching Program and the Association of American Medical Colleges for allopathic programs. To determine and compare osteopathic and allopathic medical students' interest in neurology and psychiatry, the number of positions, applicants, and matches were analyzed considering the number of total osteopathic and allopathic graduates in the given year using 2-tailed χ2 analyses with Yates correction. In addition, osteopathic and allopathic medical schools' websites were reviewed to determine whether neurology and psychiatry rotations were required. Osteopathic medical students' reported undergraduate majors were also gathered. Compared with allopathic medical students, osteopathic medical students had significantly greater interest (as measured by applicants) in neurology (χ21=11.85, Pneurology and psychiatry residency programs. Approximately 6% of osteopathic vs nearly 85% of allopathic medical schools had required neurology rotations. Nearly 10% of osteopathic applicants and matriculants had undergraduate coursework in brain and cognitive sciences. Osteopathic medical students demonstrated greater interest than allopathic medical

  3. Students' perspectives on the fourth year of medical school: a mixed-methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen J; Lockspeiser, Tai M; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the purpose and value of the fourth year of medical school from the perspective of medical students. In this study, the authors systematically explored the year's purpose and value as determined by students. In April 2011, the authors conducted semistructured focus groups with graduating fourth-year students at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to understand their perspectives on the purpose of the fourth year. Using results of a thematic analysis of the focus group data, the authors developed and administered a 10-item questionnaire to all graduating fourth-year medical students in May 2011. Questionnaire data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. A total of 17 students participated in two focus groups. Six themes related to the purpose of the fourth year emerged from the focus group data: career development and preparation, pursuing personal interests, career identification, exploration of diverse practice settings, influence of emotion, and flexibility and individualization. The questionnaire was completed by 134 of 148 students (91% response rate). Factor analysis of the questionnaire data identified five factors: strengthening one's residency application, developing skills, pursuing personal interests, exploring diverse practice settings, and identifying a career. Medical students uniformly identified the fourth year of medical school as having purpose and value, but their views on the fourth year's purpose differed. This finding underscores the importance of the individualization of the fourth year. Students' perspectives should inform any decisions made about modifying fourth-year curricula and structure.

  4. Smartphone, the New Learning Aid amongst Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavali, Monika Y; Khismatrao, Deepak S; Gavali, Yogesh V; Patil, K B

    2017-05-01

    The use of smartphone is increasing day by day for personal as well as professional purpose. They are becoming a more suitable tool for advancing education in developing countries. Mobile access to information and many applications are successfully harnessed in health care. Smartphones are also becoming popular as an effective educational tool. The present study was conducted to evaluate the use of smartphones as an educational tool amongst the medical students. The study also aimed at identifying the common medical application used by the students. It was an observational cross-sectional study carried out amongst medical students of private medical institute in India. A validated 16 point, structured, open-ended, questionnaire regarding ownership and use of smart phones was self-administered to 446 medical students. Data were analysed using SPSS and open ended questions were analysed by summative content analysis. Among the study population, 96% owned a smartphone -Android based 72.4%, i phone 13.0%, Windows based Nokia phones 7% and Blackberry 3.6%. Common medical applications used by the students were Anatomy and Medical Dictionary in First MBBS; Medical Dictionary, Medscape and Google/Wikipedia in Second MBBS; and Medscape, Google/Wikipedia and Prognosis/Diagnosis in Third MBBS. More than 90% students, reported to have technological skills to use smartphones, for medical education, communication and instant access during bedside teaching. Advertently, 37.2% students felt if smartphones are used for clinical purposes, they will need to spend less time with patients. Almost 79.4% felt that smartphones should be introduced in MBBS course. Smartphone use amongst medical students as learning aid for various medical applications is rapidly advancing. But it will be worthwhile to study whether use of smartphones has any impact on the grades of the students before introducing them in medical schools.

  5. Psychostimulant drug abuse and personality factors in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joshua T; Vu, Duc M; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Psychostimulants have a high abuse potential and are appealing to college students for enhancing their examination performance. This study was designed to examine the prevalence of psychostimulant drug abuse among medical students and to test the hypothesis that medical students who use psychostimulant drugs for non-medical reasons are characterized by a sensation seeking and aggressive-hostility personality and exhibit lower empathy. The Zuckerman-Kuhlman personality questionnaire and the Jefferson scale of empathy were completed anonymously on-line by 321 medical students in 2010-2011 academic year. A total of 45 students (14%) reported that they had abused psychostimulant medications either before or during medical school. RESULTS of multivariate analysis of variance provided support for one of our research hypothesis: students who reported using psychostimulant compared to the rest, obtained a significantly higher average score on the aggressive-hostility personality factor. No other significant differences were observed. Further research is needed to confirm the rate of psychostimulant drug abusers among medical students in other medical schools. In particular, it is desirable to examine if such psychostimulant drug abusers are likely to abuse other substances in medical school and later in their professional career.

  6. Remediation of at-risk medical students: theory in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winston, K.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has shown that a programme that draws on a blend of theories makes a positive difference to outcomes for students who fail and repeat their first semester at medical school. Exploration of student and teacher perspectives revealed that remediation of struggling medical

  7. Remediation of at-risk medical students: theory in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winston, K.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has shown that a programme that draws on a blend of theories makes a positive difference to outcomes for students who fail and repeat their first semester at medical school. Exploration of student and teacher perspectives revealed that remediation of struggling medical stud

  8. Multi-Media Self-Instruction for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyman, John P.; Guyton, Rick

    1978-01-01

    A study of 12 individual self-instructional programs comprising six types of media, used to supplement the learning of senior medical students taking elective family practice preceptorships in communities distant from the medical school, is described. These students showed a gain in knowledge from pretest to delayed retention test while a control…

  9. The Dialysis Exercise: A Clinical Simulation for Preclinical Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Bernstein, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A clinical decision-making simulation that helps students understand the relationship between psychosocial factors and medical problem-solving is described. A group of medical students and one faculty member comprise a selection committee to agree on the order in which four patients will be selected for renal dialysis. (MLW)

  10. Specialty preferences : Trends and perceptions among Saudi undergraduate medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehmood, Syed Imran; Kumar, Ashish; Al-Binali, Ali; Borleffs, Jan C. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The exploration of specialty choices by medical students is a hot debate as it affects several important determinants of health care delivery. This study was carried out to determine variation in specialty preferences during medical school training and the perceptions that affect student

  11. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  12. Gender bias in specialty preferences among Danish medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard; Skytte, Nanna Hasle Bak; Dissing, Agnete Skovlund

    2011-01-01

    Female medical students tend to prefer person-oriented specialties characterized by close doctor-patient contact and aspects of care. Conversely, male medical students tend to seek towards specialties with elements of autonomy, technology and "action" . Furthermore, female doctors will outnumber ...

  13. Using Ultrasound to Teach Medical Students Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Floyd E., III; Wilson, L. Britt; Hoppmann, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is being incorporated more into undergraduate medical education. Studies have shown that medical students have positive perceptions about the value of ultrasound in teaching courses like anatomy and physiology. The purpose of the present study was to provide objective evidence of whether ultrasound helps students learn cardiac…

  14. Sexual Health of Dutch Medical Students : Nothing to Worry about

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fickweiler, Freek; Keers, Joost C.; Schultz, Willibrord C. M. Weijmar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Little is known about the sexual lives and development of medical students because of relatively small sample sizes and, in particular, low response rates in research. Enhancing medical students' awareness and understanding of sexual behavior is imperative, as gaps in knowledge might i

  15. Sexual Health of Dutch Medical Students : Nothing to Worry about

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fickweiler, Freek; Keers, Joost C.; Schultz, Willibrord C. M. Weijmar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Little is known about the sexual lives and development of medical students because of relatively small sample sizes and, in particular, low response rates in research. Enhancing medical students' awareness and understanding of sexual behavior is imperative, as gaps in knowledge might i

  16. Sexual Health of Dutch Medical Students : Nothing to Worry about

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fickweiler, Freek; Keers, Joost C.; Schultz, Willibrord C. M. Weijmar

    Introduction. Little is known about the sexual lives and development of medical students because of relatively small sample sizes and, in particular, low response rates in research. Enhancing medical students' awareness and understanding of sexual behavior is imperative, as gaps in knowledge might

  17. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  18. Training Medical Students about Hazardous Drinking Using Simple Assessment Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Jesús López-Torres; Pretel, Fernando Andrés; Bravo, Beatriz Navarro; Rabadan, Francisco Escobar; Serrano Selva, Juan Pedro; Latorre Postigo, Jose Miguel; Martínez, Ignacio Párraga

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the ability of medical students to identify hazardous drinkers using screening tools recommended in clinical practice. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Setting: Faculty of Medicine of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Method: The medical students learnt to use Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and…

  19. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  20. Surgeons underestimate their influence on medical students entering surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quillin 3rd, R.C.; Pritts, T.A.; Davis, B.R.; Hanseman, D.; Collins, J.M.; Athota, K.P.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Tevar, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positive surgical role models influence medical students to pursue a career in surgery. However, the perception by role models of their own effectiveness has yet to be examined. In this study, we evaluated the influence of surgical role models on medical student career choice, and how th

  1. Choice of Specialization among Female Clinical Medical Students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... Keywords: Choice of specialization; Female medical students; Kano; Nigeria. INTRODUCTION ... future location and settling intention and lecturer's personality [12]. ... expected to attend to females in the health care delivery, there is the need ..... preference and attitude of medical students in Cairo within the.

  2. Gender differences in motives and career choice of medical students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Emmerik, H. van

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Insight in the choices of medical students concerning their future career is an actual issue, since the population is changing towards a majority of female students. We focus here on insight in the effect of gender and life-stage on students’ preferences concerning a medical specialty,

  3. Medical Student Views of Substance Abuse Treatment, Policy and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Everett, Worth W.; Sharma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact of medical education on students' views of substance abuse treatment, public policy options and training. Method: A longitudinal survey was conducted on a single-class cohort of 101 students in a major American, urban medical school. The survey was administered in the Spring semesters of the first to third…

  4. Multi-Media Self-Instruction for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyman, John P.; Guyton, Rick

    1978-01-01

    A study of 12 individual self-instructional programs comprising six types of media, used to supplement the learning of senior medical students taking elective family practice preceptorships in communities distant from the medical school, is described. These students showed a gain in knowledge from pretest to delayed retention test while a control…

  5. Are Teacher and Principal Candidates Prepared to Address Student Cyberbullying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Bonner, Jessica L.; Styron, Jennifer L.; Bridgeforth, James; Martin, Cecelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the preparation of teacher and principal candidates to address problems created in K-12 settings as a result of cyberbullying. Participants included teacher and principal preparation students. Findings indicated that respondents were familiar with the most common forms of cyberbullying and its impact on…

  6. A Turkish study of medical student learning styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaca, S; Gulpinar, M

    2011-12-01

    A good understanding of the learning styles of students is necessary for optimizing the quality of the learning process. There are few studies in Turkey on the subject of the learning characteristics of medical students. The aim of this study was to define the learning patterns of Turkish medical students based on the Turkish version of Vermunts Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS). The Turkish version of the ILS was developed and administered to 532 medical students. Learning patterns were investigated using factor analysis. Internal consistencies of scales ranged from 0.43 to 0.80. The Turkish version of the ILS identified four learning styles among medical students. In comparing the pre-clinical and clinical phases of medical students related to mental models of learning, statistically significant differences (p learning characteristics: lack of regulation; certificate; self-test and ambivalent orientation; intake of knowledge; and use of knowledge. The Turkish version of the ILS can be used to identify learning styles of medical students. Our findings indicate an intermediate position for our students on a teacher-regulated to student-regulated learning continuum. A variety of teaching methods and learning activities should be provided in medical schools in order to address the range of learning styles.

  7. Fostering research skills in undergraduate medical students through mentored students projects: example from an Indian medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, V; Abraham, R R; Adiga, A; Ramnarayan, K; Kamath, A

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare decision-making is largely reliant on evidence-based medicine; building skills in scientific reasoning and thinking among medical students becomes an important part of medical education. Medical students in India have no formal path to becoming physicians, scientists or academicians. This study examines students' perceptions regarding research skills improvement after participating in the Mentored Student Project programme at Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal Campus, India. Additionally, this paper describes the initiatives taken for the continual improvement of the Mentored Student Project programme based on faculty and student perspectives. At Melaka Manipal Medical College, Mentored Student Project was implemented in the curriculum during second year of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programme with the intention of developing research skills essential to the career development of medical students. The study design was cross-sectional. To inculcate the spirit of team work students were grouped (n=3 to 5) and each group was asked to select a research project. The students' research projects were guided by their mentors. A questionnaire (Likert's five point scale) on students' perceptions regarding improvement in research skills after undertaking projects and guidance received from the mentor was administered to medical students after they had completed their Mentored Student Project. The responses of students were summarised using percentages. The median grade with inter-quartile range was reported for each item in the questionnaire. The median grade for all the items related to perceptions regarding improvement in research skills was 4 which reflected that the majority of the students felt that Mentored Student Project had improved their research skills. The problems encountered by the students during Mentored Student Project were related to time management for the Mentored Student Project and mentors. This study shows that students

  8. Usage of emergency contraception between medical related and non-medical related students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalid, A K

    2009-04-01

    Teenagers and young adultshave the most risk of unplanned pregnancy, due to lack of awareness to see a family planning provider after unprotected sexual intercourse. In addition, nearly one in five physicians is reluctant to provide information regarding Emergency Contraception (EC) to women and this may contribute to their lack of awareness. This study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the use of EC between medical related students compared to non-medical related students. Data collection was done using questionnaires distributed among students in University College Cork (UCC). 93% of medically related students were aware of EC compared to only 73.5% of non-medically related students. Medical related students also were more aware about the mechanism of action and detailed knowledge of EC compared to the non-medical students. This study has proven that medically related students have more detailed knowledge regarding EC compared to non-medical related students. However, there was no significant difference noted regarding the attitude and practice between the two groups.

  9. How students experience and navigate transitions in undergraduate medical education: an application of Bourdieu's theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Richards, Boyd F; Varpio, Lara

    2015-10-01

    Using Bourdieu's theoretical model as a lens for analysis, we sought to understand how students experience the undergraduate medical education (UME) milieu, focusing on how they navigate transitions from the preclinical phase, to the major clinical year (MCY), and to the preparation for residency phase. Twenty-two medical students participated in this longitudinal case study. Students had similar preclinical and post-MCY experiences but different MCY experiences (rotational vs. longitudinal tracks). We interviewed students every 6 months in the preclinical phase, mid-way through MCY, and 7-8 months before graduation (101 total interviews). We inductively created codes, iteratively revised codes to best-fit the data, and thematically clustered codes into Bourdieu-informed categories: field (social structures), capital (resources) and habitus (dispositions). We found that students acclimated to shifts in the UME field as they moved through medical school: from medical school itself to the health system and back. To successfully navigate transitions, students learned to secure capital as medical knowledge and social connections in the preclinical and preparation for residency phases, and as reputable patient care and being noticed in the clinical phase. To obtain capital, and be well-positioned for the next phase of training, students consistently relied on dispositions of initiative and flexibility. In summary, students experience the complex context of medical school through a series of transitions. Efforts to improve UME would be well-served by greater awareness of the social structures (field) that students encounter, the resources to which they afford value (capital), and the dispositions which aid acquisition of these resources (habitus).

  10. International students in United States' medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Jashodeep; Miller, Bonnie M

    2012-01-01

    Matriculation of international students to United States' (US) medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. While these students' numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools - both public and private - to support international students' education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to healthcare disparity eradication, minority health issues, and service in

  11. Cultural minority students' experiences with intercultural competency in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyerzapf, Hannah; Abma, Tineke

    2017-05-01

    Medical schools increasingly value and focus on teaching students intercultural competency within present-day multicultural society. Little is known about the experiences of cultural minority students in intercultural competence activities. This article discusses the intercultural competence activities of medical education in a Dutch university from the perspective of cultural minority students. We will formulate recommendations for how to stimulate intercultural competency in, as well as inclusiveness of, medical education. A qualitative evaluation was performed within a medical school in the Netherlands. Data were collected through interviews (n = 23), a focus group (six participants) and participant observations (20 hours). Thematic analysis was performed. Cultural minority students experienced a lack of respect and understanding by cultural majority students and teachers. Education activities intended to transfer intercultural knowledge, address personal prejudice and stimulate intercultural sensitivity were perceived as stigmatising and as creating an unsafe climate for cultural minority students. Cultural minority and majority students on campus seemed segregated and the intercultural awareness of minority students was not integrated in intercultural competence activities. As cultural minority students were confronted with microaggressions, the medical school did not succeed in creating a safe education environment for all students. Contrary to their aims and intentions, intercultural competence activities had limited effect and seemed to support the polarisation of cultural minority and majority students and teachers. This can be seen as pointing towards a hidden curriculum privileging majority over minority students. For structural integration of intercultural competency in medical education, the focus must penetrate beyond curricular activities towards the critical addressing of the culture and structure of medical school. Collective commitment to

  12. PERCEPTION OF MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS ARTIFICIAL BONES AND POP MODELS OF VISCERA

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Tulshidas Patil; Nazia Quadir; Rashmi Deopujari; Vivekanand Gajbhiye

    2015-01-01

    Background: In learning of anatomy, bones and viscera are very important. Now days, artificial bones are replacing the original bones for study purpose due to unavailability. Original viscera are available for students only at dissection hours. So we have tried to find out perception of medical students towards artificial bones and POP models of viscera. Materials and Methods: We had prepared a questionnaire consisting of 20 questions, 10 related to bones and 10 related to the POP models o...

  13. Measuring medical students' orientation toward lifelong learning: a psychometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Angela P; Mazmanian, Paul E; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Kreutzer, Kathleen O; Carrico, Robert J; Carr, Caroline; Veloski, Jon; Rafiq, Azhar

    2010-10-01

    The principle of lifelong learning is pervasive in regulations governing medical education and medical practice; yet, tools to measure lifelong learning are lagging in development. This study evaluates the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JeffSPLL) adapted for administration to medical students. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning-Medical Students (JeffSPLL-MS) was administered to 732 medical students in four classes. Factor analysis and t tests were performed to investigate its construct validity. Maximum likelihood factor analysis identified a three-factor solution explaining 46% of total variance. Mean scores of clinical and preclinical students were compared; clinical students scored significantly higher in orientation toward lifelong learning (P < .001). The JeffSPLL-MS presents findings consistent with key concepts of lifelong learning. Results from use of the JeffSPLL-MS may reliably inform curriculum design and education policy decisions that shape the careers of physicians.

  14. Dynamics of Determining Motives in Choosing the Medical Profession by Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kloktunova N.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to study motivation of students of medical schools in choice of profession of the doctor and dynamics of defining motives in educational space of university. Material and methods: 497 students of the 1 st course took part in comparative research (356 students of medical faculty and 141 students of pediatric faculty and 382 students of the 6th course (270 students of medical faculty and 112 students of pediatric faculty of Saratov state medical university n.a. V. I. Razumovsky. In research methods of questioning and statistical data processing have been used. Results: The comparative analysis of the maximum and minimum values of the main types of motivation in professional field choice allowed to determine leading motives in medical students, and also to reveal their dynamics connected with various stages of professionalizing in the course of receiving medical education. Conclusion: Professional self-determination of the student of medical school has a multi-vector focus of structure of motivation. Determination by internal motives is supplemented with influence of external motivation, both positive, and negative value. In students of the 6th course indicators of motives included «Prestige», «Opportunity to help people», «Possibility of use of professional skills out of work».

  15. Medical Students and Staff Physicians: The Question of Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, Michael; Mai, Johnny P; Zapanta, Philip E; Camacho, Macario

    2017-07-01

    Social media's prevalence among the professional world is rapidly increasing. Its use among medical personnel-specifically, medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians-could compromise personal-professional boundaries. Could the acceptance or lack of acceptance of a friend request bias the medical student application process? If friend requests are accepted, then medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians are provided access to very personal aspects of one another's lives, which may not have been the intent. The question remains whether the separation of one's personal life from work is necessary. Should medical students restrict social media relationships with residents and staff physicians to professional social media networks? The suitability and opportunities of social media among medical professionals is an ongoing issue for research that needs continued evaluation.

  16. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) for undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Hajar; Mirmohamadsadeghi, Maede; Adibi, Iman; Ashorion, Vahid; Sadeghizade, Atefe; Adibi, Peiman

    2008-09-01

    Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to practitioners and residents will improve their performance. There is insufficient evidence regarding the teaching of EBM in undergraduate medical education. We aimed to determine whether an EBM workshop would improve undergraduate medical student's ability to form clinical questions and search databases, as well as their attitudes towards EBM. This was a quasi-experimental study on fifth- and sixth-year medical students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. In a 4- day workshop, students learned and practised how to form clinical questions, perform literature searches and carry out critical appraisals. We assessed the student's ability to form a clinical question and their performance in searching and identifying the best clinical literature to answer the question, before and after the workshop. Students' attitudes were assessed using the Likert scale 15-item questionnaire on the last day of the workshop. Wilcoxon signed ranks test was performed to compare pre- and post-tests. The workshop increased students' scores in developing clinical questions (P = 0.004, mean rank = 14) and search skills (P EBM [mean = 3.76, (standared deviation = 0.7)]. The course allowed students (79.2%) to appreciate the need for EBM education for medical students. The students also commented that the course showed them the importance of EBM knowledge in effective clinical performance. EBM workshop for undergraduate medical students increased their ability to form clinical questions and carry out appropriate literature searches. It also improved their attitudes towards learning and applying EBM.

  17. A study of exam related anxiety amongst medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Pahwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study focuses on pre-examination anxiety amongst medical students & its personality co-relates. Material & Method : 91 medical students were administered Eysenck Personality Questionnaire to determine predominant personality trait if any and Beck′s Anxiety Inventory. Results : There was an increase in anxiety levels prior to exam, more so in females and in students with neuroticism and extraversion temperaments. Conclusion: Anxiety levels increase in medical students prior to exams and are associated with certain personality traits, though the difference is not statistically significant.

  18. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  19. Intercultural Preparation for Future Mobile Students: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, Ana; Golubeva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Higher education (HE) student mobility offers the opportunity to acquire, among other things, intercultural experience. Nevertheless, it is crucial to prepare students and give them the tools to reflect on their experiences before, during and after study abroad. In this pedagogical paper, we present and discuss "Perceptions of self and…

  20. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  1. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  2. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  3. Self-medication among medical student in King Abdul-Aziz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooataz Mohammed Aashi

    2016-03-01

    Results: Paracetamol were the most frequently 117 (23.1% drug uses by medical students, followed by antihistaminic 48 (9.5%, antibiotic 33 (6.5%, NSAIDS 22 (4.3%, anti- anxiety 7 (1.4% and opioid 4 (0.8%. Most of them were self-medication (74%. Relief fever was the most common cause for seeking self-medication reported by medical student 103 (20.4%, most frequent side effects was nausea and vomiting 47 (9.3% Conclusions: There is an increase of self-medication in medical students of KAU especially paracetamol and NSAIDs use. We suggest increasing studies on the local irrational use of medications and increasing awareness on the importance of prescribed medications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 942-946

  4. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, B

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system. AIMS: We have performed a pilot study to determine the feasibility of developing a Junior Tutor Programme, to assist in the delivery of tutorials to undergraduate medical students. METHODS: This was designed and delivered by interns under the supervision of the academic staff in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery in Connolly Hospital. The programme was evaluated by a questionnaire filled in by the students anonymously. RESULTS: A supervised programme of tutorials delivered by interns is a potentially useful way to ensure delivery of clinical teaching to undergraduate medical students.

  5. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion and other reproductive health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, R A; Robinson, K B; Larson, E H; Dobie, S A

    1999-03-01

    This paper investigated the attitude toward abortion and other reproductive health services of first- and second-year medical students at the Seattle campus of the University of Washington, a large regional primary care-oriented medical school, in 1996-97. A total of 219 (76.6%) students responded. The majority of the students support the availability of a broad range of reproductive health services including abortion; 58.1% felt that first-trimester abortions should be available to patients under most circumstances. Of the 43.4% of students who anticipated a career in family practice, most expected to provide abortions in their future practices. Moreover, older students and women were more likely to support the provision of abortion services. This study concludes that despite the continuing pressure on abortion providers, most first- and second-year medical students at a fairly state-supported medical school intend to incorporate this procedure into their future practices.

  6. Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic random sampling, interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire. Result: The sample consisted of 485 (50.7% males and 472 (49.3% females, aged 17-25 years. Gadgets of at least one variety were uniformly used by all the students, 22.4% of the students surveyed were found to be gadget dependent. Conclusion: Our study shows high prevalence of gadget dependency among medical students. There is need to create awareness regarding the problem of gadget dependency and its social and health effects.

  7. Resilience and Psychological Distress in Psychology and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Stephen; Licinio, Julio

    2017-04-01

    The authors investigated levels of resilience and psychological distress in medical and psychology students, factors that may affect these levels, the relationship between resilience and psychological distress, and student opinion on causes of stress and possible interventions. A voluntary anonymous online survey was distributed to University of Adelaide medical and psychology students. Medical and psychology students (n = 560; response rate = 24.7%) had similar mean resilience and psychological distress scores, and 47.9% of medical students and 55.1% of psychology students were psychologically distressed. Higher levels of resilience were associated with lower levels of distress (p resilience-based interventions, greater financial support, clearer learning objectives and more continuous assessment as potential means to reduce the effects of stress. Higher levels of resilience were associated with lower levels of psychological distress. Further studies are required to determine the efficacy of resilience-based interventions in these groups.

  8. Monitoring the Veterinary Medical Student Experience: An Institutional Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, RoseAnn; Mavis, Brian E; Lloyd, James W; Grabill, Chandra M; Henry, Rebecca C; Patterson, Coretta C

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary medical school challenges students academically and personally, and some students report depression and anxiety at rates higher than the general population and other medical students. This study describes changes in veterinary medical student self-esteem (SE) over four years of professional education, attending to differences between high and low SE students and the characteristics specific to low SE veterinary medical students. The study population was students enrolled at the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006 to 2012. We used data from the annual anonymous survey administered college-wide that is used to monitor the curriculum and learning environment. The survey asked respondents to rate their knowledge and skill development, learning environment, perceptions of stress, skill development, and SE. Participants also provided information on their academic performance and demographics. A contrasting groups design was used: high and low SE students were compared using logistic regression to identify factors associated with low SE. A total of 1,653 respondents met inclusion criteria: 789 low SE and 864 high SE students. The proportion of high and low SE students varied over time, with the greatest proportion of low SE students during the second-year of the program. Perceived stress was associated with low SE, whereas perceived supportive learning environment and skill development were associated with high SE. These data have provided impetus for curricular and learning environment changes to enhance student support. They also provide guidance for additional research to better understand various student academic trajectories and their implications for success.

  9. How do medical students differ in their interpersonal needs?

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, Yera; Cho, A Ra; Huh, Sun; Kim, Sun

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowing one’s interpersonal relationship preferences can be tremendously helpful for medical students’ lives. The purpose of this study was to examine the interpersonal needs in medical students. Methods Between 2010 and 2015, a total of 877 students from four Korean medical schools took the Korean version of the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation – Behaviour (FIRO-B) scale. The FIRO-B results were analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequency, independent t-test, and ...

  10. What factors influence UK medical students' choice of foundation school?

    OpenAIRE

    Miah, S.; Pang, K.H.; Rebello, W.; Rubakumar, Z.; Fung, V; Venugopal, S.; Begum, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to identify the factors influencing UK medical student applicants’ choice of foundation school. We also explored the factors that doctors currently approaching the end of their 2-year program believe should be considered. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during the 2013–2014 academic year. An online questionnaire was distributed to 2092 final-year medical students from nine UK medical schools and 84 foundation year-2 (FY2) doctors from eight foundation sc...

  11. Diversity of Emotional Intelligence among Nursing and Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Kyung Hee; Park, Euna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to identify the types of perception of emotional intelligence among nursing and medical students and their characteristics using Q methodology, and to build the basic data for the development of a program for the would-be medical professionals to effectively adapt to various clinical settings in which their emotions are involved. Methods Data were collected from 35 nursing and medical students by allowing them to classify 40 Q statements related to emot...

  12. Relationship of Emotional Intelligence and Stress in Undergraduate Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeela Moghal; Saba Yasien; Tabassum Alvi; Washdev

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Medical education is considered as highly stressful. The role of emotional intelligence in managing stress and in better adjustment is wellrecognised. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association of emotional intelligence and its subcomponents with stress in undergraduate medical students. Method: Total sample consisted on 238 undergraduate medical students including 73 males, and 165 females. Demographic form, the scale of emotional intelligence and perceived st...

  13. Internet use and its addiction level in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhayay N; Guragain S

    2017-01-01

    Namrata Upadhayay,1 Sanjeev Guragain2 1Department of Physiology; 2Department of Pharmacology, Gandaki Medical College, Pokhara Lekhnath, Nepal Objective: To compare the Internet addiction levels between male and female medical students.Methods: One hundred medical students (male: 50, female: 50) aged 17–30 years were included in a cross-sectional study. A standardized questionnaire was used to assess their Internet addiction level. Additionally, a self-designed questionnaire was use...

  14. Rising concern of nomophobia amongst Indian medical students

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aims and objectives of current study were to assess the pattern of mobile phone usage and prevalence of nomophobia amongst third year medical students in north India. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted amongst 130 medical students of third year MBBS of Sri Aurobindo institute of medical sciences, Indore. A pre-formed pre-tested questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed statistically by simple proportions. Results: Response rate was 90.76%. Female preponderance...

  15. EFSUMB statement on medical student education in ultrasound [short version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantisani, V; Dietrich, C F; Badea, R;

    2016-01-01

    The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) recommends that ultrasound should be used systematically as an easy accessible and instructive educational tool in the curriculum of modern medical schools. Medical students should acquire theoretical knowledge...... of the modality and hands-on training should be implemented and adhere to evidence-based principles. In this paper we summarise EFSUMB policy statements on medical student education in ultrasound....

  16. Rising concern of nomophobia amongst Indian medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Neelima Sharma; Pooja Sharma; Neha Sharma; R. R. Wavare

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aims and objectives of current study were to assess the pattern of mobile phone usage and prevalence of nomophobia amongst third year medical students in north India. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted amongst 130 medical students of third year MBBS of Sri Aurobindo institute of medical sciences, Indore. A pre-formed pre-tested questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed statistically by simple proportions. Results: Response rate was 90.76%. Female preponderance...

  17. An Analysis of Student Choices in Medical Ethical Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloshin, Phyllis Lerman

    This report describes a study undertaken to assess student choices in medical ethical dilemmas. Medical ethical dilemmas are interpreted to include problems such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, experimentation on humans, allocation of scarce medical resources, and physician and health personnel training. The major purpose of the study was…

  18. Resilience, stress, and coping among Canadian medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behruz Rahimi

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Medical students are neither more resilient nor better equipped with coping skills than peers in the population.  Greater emphasis on self-care among medical trainees is recommended.  Emphasizing the importance of self-care during medical training, whether by formal incorporation into the curriculum or informal mentorship, deserves further study.

  19. Using Theater to Increase Empathy Training in Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jo Marie; Trial, Janet; Piver, Debra E.; Schaff, Pamela B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Developing and nurturing empathy in medical trainees has been recognized as an essential element of medical education. Theater may be a unique instructional modality to increase empathy training. Methods: A multi-disciplinary team developed a theater workshop for first year medical students. Through the use of theater games, art images…

  20. An Analysis of Student Choices in Medical Ethical Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloshin, Phyllis Lerman

    This report describes a study undertaken to assess student choices in medical ethical dilemmas. Medical ethical dilemmas are interpreted to include problems such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, experimentation on humans, allocation of scarce medical resources, and physician and health personnel training. The major purpose of the study was…

  1. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-06-05

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (Phome increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid medication administered in the strip packaging nursing home increased medication

  2. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fronteira Inês

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2007-2008 academic year. Results Students decide to study medicine at an early age. Relatives and friends seem to have an especially important influence in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The degree of feminization of the student population differs among the different countries. Although most medical students are from outside the capital cities, expectations of getting into medical school are already associated with migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. Academic performance is poor. This seems to be related to difficulties in accessing materials, finances and insufficient high school preparation. Medical students recognize the public sector demand but their expectations are to combine public sector practice with private work, in order to improve their earnings. Salary expectations of students vary between the three countries. Approximately 75% want to train as hospital specialists and to follow a hospital-based career. A significant proportion is unsure about their future area of specialization, which for many students is equated with migration to study abroad. Conclusions Medical education is an important national investment, but the returns obtained are not as efficient as expected. Investments in high-school preparation, tutoring, and infrastructure are likely to have a significant impact on the success rate of medical schools. Special attention should be given

  3. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrinho, Paulo; Sidat, Mohsin; Fresta, Mário Jorge; Rodrigues, Amabélia; Fronteira, Inês; da Silva, Florinda; Mercer, Hugo; Cabral, Jorge; Dussault, Gilles

    2011-04-07

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2007-2008 academic year. Students decide to study medicine at an early age. Relatives and friends seem to have an especially important influence in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor.The degree of feminization of the student population differs among the different countries.Although most medical students are from outside the capital cities, expectations of getting into medical school are already associated with migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education.Academic performance is poor. This seems to be related to difficulties in accessing materials, finances and insufficient high school preparation.Medical students recognize the public sector demand but their expectations are to combine public sector practice with private work, in order to improve their earnings. Salary expectations of students vary between the three countries.Approximately 75% want to train as hospital specialists and to follow a hospital-based career. A significant proportion is unsure about their future area of specialization, which for many students is equated with migration to study abroad. Medical education is an important national investment, but the returns obtained are not as efficient as expected. Investments in high-school preparation, tutoring, and infrastructure are likely to have a significant impact on the success rate of medical schools. Special attention should be given to the socialization of students and the role model status of their

  4. Perfection of physical preparation of students by facilities of boxing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylovskiy O.V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The question of physical preparedness of students of the unspecialized institutes of higher of I-IV of courses is considered. Offered and grounded idea of the use of facilities of boxing in form educational trainings employments. They are used for perfection of physical preparation of students as an alternative to the lessons on physical education. For the students of experimental group more considerable increase of indexes of physical preparedness is marked by comparison to a control group.

  5. Anatomy learning styles and strategies among Jordanian and Malaysian medical students: the impact of culture on learning anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Mustafa, Intisar G; Hoja, Ibrahim M

    2013-07-01

    The study aims to investigate anatomy learning styles and strategies of Jordanian and Malaysian medical students at the Jordan University of Science and Technology. The study is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Students' responses for the questionnaire were numerically coded, and the results were analyzed to reveal statistically significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students. The results showed that Jordanian medical students were less interested in using cadavers in learning anatomy than Malaysian medical students. However, similar to their Malaysian counterparts, they prefer to employ other tools to learn anatomy like plastinated models and Internet-based resources. In addition to the aforementioned tools, Malaysian students were more interested in using cross-sectional images and making their own revision cards. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students were more interested in learning anatomy through clinical cases, and by system rather than by region. Moreover, it was revealed that Jordanian medical students learn anatomy more efficiently when they formulate a general view of a particular topic. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students also relied on reciting definitions and memorizing facts to learn anatomy. The study also reported significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students' perspectives on learning anatomy. The findings of the study suggest that Jordanian and Malaysian medical students posses different cultures of learning. Jordanian anatomy instructors need to consider these different learning cultures when they prepare their instructional methods and teaching materials to fulfill the educational needs of their culturally diverse students.

  6. Social problem solving and coping skills of medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Yigit; Sevgi Ozcan; Gulsah Seydaoglu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate medical students' social problem solving and coping skills. Material and Methods: In this correlational descriptive study, data were gathered from 457 medical students. Social Problem Solving Inventory and Social Problem Coping Behaviours Inventory were used. Results: The most preferred activities when the students face a problem were talking with friends (87.1%), talking with special persons (85.4%), sleeping (82.6%), talking with family...

  7. Students' conceptions of the medical profession: an interview study.

    OpenAIRE

    Nieuwhof, M.G.H.; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Kuyvenhoven, M M; Soethout, M.B.M.; ten Cate, Th.J.

    2005-01-01

    Students' beliefs and attitudes towards the medical profession have been studied in relation to career choices, but most research has been restricted to either predetermined aspects or to a limited number of specialties. This study aimed at getting unprompted insight in the students' perceptions of their future profession in dimensions that may be determinants of study success and career choice. Undergraduate and graduated medical students were interviewed and asked to characterize the medica...

  8. Internet addiction and its determinants among medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Bhushan Chaudhari; Preethi Menon; Daniel Saldanha; Abhinav Tewari; Labhanya Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exponential use of internet has resulted in internet addiction in recent times. Students are particularly at risk because of their unique personal, social, and academic needs. Objectives: The study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of internet addiction and its determinants among medical students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 282 medical students with the help of semi-structured questionnaire consisting of questions related to demographic i...

  9. NUTRITION HABITS AND FOOD CONSUMPTION FREQUENCIES OF MEDICAL FACULTY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNAL, Ayşe Emel; GÜRTEKİN, Başak; Özel, Sevda; ERBİL, Suna; AYVAZ, Özkan; Güngör, Günay

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective: Medical faculty students may develop irregular eating habits for reasons such as their social – economic situations, adaptation to faculty life, dormitory or their new environment.  As a result, some students eventually ignore their basic food requirements and have a diet that is cabohydrate, saturated fat and cholesterol rich. Our aim was to search the nutritional habits and food consumption of medical faculty students in order to provide a healthy diet advice.Material and...

  10. NUTRITION HABITS AND FOOD CONSUMPTION FREQUENCIES OF MEDICAL FACULTY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNAL, Ayşe Emel; GÜRTEKİN, Başak; ÖZEL, Sevda; ERBİL, Suna; AYVAZ, Özkan; Güngör, Günay

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective: Medical faculty students may develop irregular eating habits for reasons such as their social – economic situations, adaptation to faculty life, dormitory or their new environment.  As a result, some students eventually ignore their basic food requirements and have a diet that is cabohydrate, saturated fat and cholesterol rich. Our aim was to search the nutritional habits and food consumption of medical faculty students in order to provide a healthy diet advice.Material and...

  11. A review of teaching skills development programmes for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Gregory E; McCullough, Brendan; Ramnanan, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    The CanMEDS role of Scholar requires that medical trainees develop their skills as medical educators. The development of teaching skills in undergraduate medical students is therefore desirable, especially in view of the teaching obligations in residency programmes. The goal of this review was to identify the characteristics and outcomes of programmes designed to develop the teaching skills of undergraduate medical students. The authors searched medical literature databases using combinations of the search terms 'medical student', 'teacher', 'teaching skills', 'peer teaching', 'near-peer teaching' and 'student as teacher'. Twenty papers fit the predetermined search criteria, which included original characterisations of specific programmes involving undergraduate medical students. Three types of initiative were identified in the reviewed articles: peer teaching programmes; teaching workshops, and community outreach programmes. The majority of study participants were students in Years 3 and 4. Subjective self-evaluation by participants using Likert scale-based surveys was by far the most commonly used method of measuring project outcomes. Objective, quantitative teaching-related outcomes were rarely noted in the reports reviewed. Self-perceived improvements in teaching skills were noted by participants in most of the reports. Other perceived benefits included increases in organisational skills, knowledge and confidence in giving feedback. Although several types of programmes have been shown to subjectively improve the teaching skills of undergraduate medical students, characterisation of the objective outcomes of these initiatives is lacking and requires further study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Well-being in first year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardelli, Gina; Sim, Wonjin; Borges, Nicole; Roman, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    This study explored the well-being, attitudes toward counseling, willingness to seek counseling, and coping strategies of first year medical students. Gender differences in attitudes toward and willingness to seek counseling were also explored. One hundred five first year medical students (98 % response rate) were administered a 59-item questionnaire about well-being, attitudes toward counseling, willingness to seek counseling, and coping strategies during the first week of medical school. The data were analyzed with hierarchical regression and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Female medical students were less willing to seek counseling and had more negative attitudes toward counseling compared to male medical students. Most students indicated that they chose not to seek counseling because they did not feel a need for it. Three students reported that stigma prevented them from seeking counseling. Unhealthy coping strategies (denial, self-blame, and substance use) were negatively associated with well-being while healthy coping strategies (active coping, emotional support, and instrumental support) did not correlate with well-being. Medical schools should continue efforts to make counseling accessible. Conversations about counseling may help address the more negative attitudes of female students toward counseling, a finding which merits further investigation given that women typically have more positive attitudes toward counseling than men. Use of unhealthy coping strategies can be addressed in classes, clubs, and by advisors and mentors. Limitations of this study include that only first year medical students were surveyed and that it was a cross sectional study.

  13. A history of medical student debt: observations and implications for the future of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Chen, Candice; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2011-07-01

    Over the last 50 years, medical student debt has become a problem of national importance, and obtaining medical education in the United States has become a loan-dependent, individual investment. Although this phenomenon must be understood in the general context of U.S. higher education as well as economic and social trends in late-20th-century America, the historical problem of medical student debt requires specific attention for several reasons. First, current mechanisms for students' educational financing may not withstand debt levels above a certain ceiling which is rapidly approaching. Second, there are no standards for costs of medical school attendance, and these can vary dramatically between different schools even within a single city. Third, there is no consensus on the true cost of educating a medical student, which limits accountability to students and society for these costs. Fourth, policy efforts to improve physician workforce diversity and mitigate shortages in the primary care workforce are inhibited by rising levels of medical student indebtedness. Fortunately, the current effort to expand the U.S. physician workforce presents a unique opportunity to confront the unsustainable growth of medical student debt and explore new approaches to the financing of medical students' education.

  14. Medical Students and Abortion: Reconciling Personal Beliefs and Professional Roles at One Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dans, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys of first- and fourth-year Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical students found little change in attitudes about abortion over four years. Attitudes correlated most strongly with personal beliefs about when a fetus is considered human life and somewhat with student gender. Results are used in a medical ethics course to illuminate…

  15. Medical Student and Senior Participants' Perceptions of a Mentoring Program Designed to Enhance Geriatric Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Sara J.; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A.; Rheaume, Carol E.; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second-year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards…

  16. The globalization of medical education: sending American medical students overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of global health experiences on our students are vast and can be enhanced by our development of structured curricula and feedback systems that will maximize the benefits to students and to the populations they treat now and in the future.

  17. Using Computer and Internet for Medical Literature Searching Among Medical Students in Hadramout University, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Salim Bin Ghouth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some researchers have observed that medical students used computer and internet for nonmedical purposes. Is this the case among medical students in a newly established medical college of Hadramout University in Yemen?Objectives: To assess the knowledge and usage of computer and internet among medical students of Hadramout University, find out the medical applications for which they use internet, and the factors that encourage the students to use computer and internet, with an emphasis on gender variations.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 102 randomly selected students from second to sixth year at the academic year 2005/2006 by using structured questionnaire of 23 items. Results: Seventy four students have computer at home (73%, 77 students use internet for general purposes (76.2% and lesser use internet for educational and research purposes, with significant gender variations. The students opined that accessibility of internet in the college (84.2% and training about online searching (74.3% were the most expected factors to improve using of internet for medical research.Conclusion: Incorporating online search of medical literature in curriculum planning is essential to improve the student skills in research.

  18. Comparing Tolerance of Ambiguity in Veterinary and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jason; Hammond, Jennifer A; Roberts, Martin; Mattick, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines suggest that educators in both medical and veterinary professions should do more to ensure that students can tolerate ambiguity. Designing curricula to achieve this requires the ability to measure and understand differences in ambiguity tolerance among and within professional groups. Although scales have been developed to measure tolerance of ambiguity in both medical and veterinary professions, no comparative studies have been reported. We compared the tolerance of ambiguity of medical and veterinary students, hypothesizing that veterinary students would have higher tolerance of ambiguity, given the greater patient diversity and less well-established evidence base underpinning practice. We conducted a secondary analysis of questionnaire data from first- to fourth-year medical and veterinary students. Tolerance of ambiguity scores were calculated and compared using the TAMSAD scale (29 items validated for the medical student population), the TAVS scale (27 items validated for the veterinary student population), and a scale comprising the 22 items common to both scales. Using the TAMSAD and TAVS scales, medical students had a significantly higher mean tolerance of ambiguity score than veterinary students (56.1 vs. 54.1, pveterinary students, although this depends on the scale used.

  19. (Academic) preparation of/for students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Engstrøm, Emma; Sandermann, Weibke

    of both cases include the methodological empirical approach, emphasis on the process of ‘othering’, ethnocentrism and ethno- racial representations. The first case deals with pre-departure preparation inspired by MUD (memory, understanding and doing) principles, while the second deals with the ongoing in...

  20. Teaching Pharmacology at a Nepalese Medical School: The Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR, ,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal conducts problem-basedpharmacology learning during small-group practical sessions.The present study was carried out to obtain student feedbackregarding the sessions and suggestions for improvement.MethodThe questionnaire-based study was carried out among firstyear medical students during July 2009. Respondents wereenrolled after explaining the aims and objectives of the studyand obtaining written, informed consent. Basic demographicinformation and student agreement with a set of 30statements using a modified Likert-type scale was noted.ResultsSixty-four of the 75 students (86% participated. The mediantotal score was 107 (maximum score 150 and was higheramong males, students from within the Kathmandu valley andself-financing students. The differences were not statisticallysignificant. The suggestions for improvement were improvingthe physical infrastructure of the lab and providing more timefor the practical exercises.ConclusionStudent opinion was favourable. The findings would be ofinterest to medical educators especially in developingcountries.

  1. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Maria Lucia da Silva Germano; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister; Paraizo, Mariana Martins; Paciornik, Ester Fogel

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork. Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná. Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program. The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals. Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  2. Tobacco and alcohol use among male dental and medical students studying in Davangere city: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M G Inderjit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess and compare tobacco and alcohol usage among male medical and dental students among students belonging to dental and medical colleges in Davangere city. Materials and Methods: A self-designed questionnaire containing 20 close-ended questions was prepared to collect the required and relevant information pertaining to tobacco and alcohol consumption. The questionnaire was distributed among 400 students belonging to dental and medical colleges in Davangere city. Results: Among the 400 respondents, 48.5% were smokers and 45.75% of students were alcoholics. Among smokers, 55.70% were house surgeon students and 23.07% were 1 st year. Significant difference was found in the percentage of tobacco consumption among medical and dental house surgeon students. The main reason for smoking was examination preparation and workload. Among alcoholics, 51.67% were house surgeon students and 21.9% were 1 st year. The main reason for alcohol consumption was to get relief from tensions. Conclusions: Final year students and house surgeons had more influence of tobacco and alcohol consumption habits when compared to 1 st year students in both dental as well in medical college. Academic demand, work pressure, examination stress, and anxiety were found to be significantly influencing tobacco and alcohol habits among both medical and dental students.

  3. Stress and Depressed Mood in Medical Students, Law Students, and Graduate Students at McGill University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmers, Karin F.; Danoff, Deborah; Steinert, Yvonne; Young, Simon N.; Leyton, Marco

    1997-01-01

    Administration of the Derogatis Stress Profile to 509 medical students, 380 law students, and 215 graduate students at McGill University (Ontario) revealed that medical students are not greatly stressed relative to other groups, so other explanations must be sought for elevated levels of depression in some. One clear stressor found is the…

  4. Undergraduate Medical Students' Reasoning with Regard to the Prescribing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, C. S.; Botha, J.

    2007-01-01

    When final year medical students reporting poor prescribing confidence were tested, key prescribing weaknesses emerged. This study aimed to characterize student variability in both the experience of and cognitive levels displayed during prescribing. Blooms Taxonomy cognitive categories were assigned to each question of a student test measuring…

  5. Implications of the Hospitalist Model for Medical Students' Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E.; Wachter, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Proposes a research agenda to investigate the educational impact for medical students of the hospitalist model, suggests strategies to mitigate the limitations in students' exposures to subspecialty faculty, and recommends professional development in teaching for hospitalists to ensure that student education thrives in this new environment of…

  6. Medical students' use of caffeine for 'academic purposes' and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical students' use of caffeine for 'academic purposes' and their knowledge ... students at the University of the Free State in 2006, and their knowledge of its benefits ... commonly consumed caffeinated product among these students, followed by energy mixtures and tablets (37.9%), and soft drinks (36%). ... Article Metrics.

  7. An elective pharmaceutical care course to prepare students for an advanced pharmacy practice experience in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhase, Ellen M; Miller, Monica L; Ogallo, William; Pastakia, Sonak D

    2013-04-12

    OBJECTIVE. To develop a prerequisite elective course to prepare students for an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Kenya. DESIGN. The course addressed Kenyan culture, travel preparation, patient care, and disease-state management. Instructional formats used were small-group discussions and lectures, including some Web-based presentations by Kenyan pharmacists on disease states commonly treated in Kenya. Cultural activities include instruction in conversational and medical Kiswahili and reading of a novel related to global health programs. ASSESSMENT. Student performance was assessed using written care plans, quizzes, reflection papers, a formulary management exercise, and pre- and post-course assessments. Student feedback on course evaluations indicated that the course was well received and students felt prepared for the APPE. CONCLUSION. This course offered a unique opportunity for students to learn about pharmacy practice in global health and to apply previously acquired skills in a resource-constrained international setting. It prepares students to actively participate in clinical care activities during an international APPE.

  8. Dietitians' Perspectives on Teaching Nutrition to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Emily; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Ray, Sumantra; Ball, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The provision of nutrition care by health professionals can facilitate improved patient nutrition behaviors. Some education institutions include nutrition in their medical curriculum; however, doctors and medical students continue to lack competence in providing nutrition care. Dietitians are increasingly teaching nutrition to medical students, yet evidence on the topic remains anecdotal. It is important to understand the experiences of these dietitians to support improvements in undergraduate medical nutrition education. The aim of this study was to explore dietitians' perspectives of teaching nutrition to medical students. A qualitative study was conducted in collaboration with the Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme (NNEdPro). Twenty-four dietitians who had provided nutrition education to medical students participated in individual semistructured interviews. Participants were from Australia (n = 5), New Zealand (n = 1), the United States (n = 6), Canada (n = 5), the United Kingdom (n = 5), Germany (n = 1), and Finland (n = 1). Data analysis was conducted using a constant comparative approach to thematic analysis. The dietitians expressed confidence in their ability to teach medical students and believed that they were the most appropriate professionals to administer the education. However, they were not confident that medical students graduate with sufficient nutrition competence and attributed this to poor curriculum planning for nutrition. Dietitians had access to useful resources and tools to support education, with opportunity to contribute further to integration of nutrition throughout medical curricula. This study suggests that dietitians are likely appropriate nutrition teachers in medical education. However, optimizing dietitians' role requires their further involvement in curriculum planning and development. Including dietitians as members of medical faculty would facilitate their input on nutrition throughout the curriculum, which could

  9. Medical student career survey--vascular surgery awareness initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Christopher J; Bachusz, Rebecca C; Mancini, Eric; Rits, Yevgeniy; Mattos, Mark A; Rubin, Jeffrey R

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this survey were to identify medical students' general knowledge of vascular surgery as a career choice on entrance to medical school, and how student perspectives change during their exposure to clinical disciplines. Furthermore, we sought to determine which factors may influence the choice of a particular career path, and to apply this knowledge to improve the recruitment process of medical students into the specialty of vascular surgery. A one-time anonymous questionnaire consisting of 21 open and multiple-choice questions was distributed to first- (MS1), second- (MS2), and third-year (MS3) medical students at a large single-campus medical school. Responses were collected and subjected to analysis. Three hundred thirty-eight medical students responded to the survey (110 MS1, 126 MS2, and 102 MS3). Two hundred thirty-six MS1 and MS2 students had no clinical exposure to vascular surgery. Of 102 MS3 students having completed a general surgery rotation, 38 had exposure to vascular surgery. Of MS1 and MS2 students, 49% would consider vascular surgery. An additional 19% were willing to consider vascular surgery if the length of training was reduced. Twenty-six percent of the clinical students rotated on a vascular surgery service during their clinical general surgery rotation, of which 78% reported a positive experience. Only 26% (10 of 38) still considered vascular surgery as a career at the MS3 level. Thirty-four percent of students would consider vascular surgery if the training was reduced from 7 to 5 years. However, only 5% of MS1 and MS2 (11 of 236) and 9% of MS3 (9 of 102) students were aware of the 0 + 5 training program. As students advanced in medical school, lifestyle (31% MS1 vs. 63% MS3, P training (19% MS1 and 2 vs. 34% MS3, P factor in their career choice decision making. Medical students have minimal knowledge of vascular surgery on entry to medical school; however, many are willing to consider vascular surgery as a career. Lack of

  10. Physicians-in-training are not prepared to prescribe medical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanoff, Anastasia B; Quan, Tiffany; Dufault, Carolyn; Awad, Michael; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2017-09-04

    While medical marijuana use is legal in more than half of U.S. states, evidence is limited about the preparation of physicians-in-training to prescribe medical marijuana. We asked whether current medical school and graduate medical educational training prepare physicians to prescribe medical marijuana. We conducted a national survey of U.S. medical school curriculum deans, a similar survey of residents and fellows at Washington University in St. Louis, and a query of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Curriculum Inventory database for keywords associated with medical marijuana. Surveys were obtained from 101 curriculum deans, and 258 residents and fellows. 145 schools were included in the curriculum search. The majority of deans (66.7%) reported that their graduates were not at all prepared to prescribe medical marijuana, and 25.0% reported that their graduates were not at all prepared to answer questions about medical marijuana. The vast majority of residents and fellows (89.5%) felt not at all prepared to prescribe medical marijuana, while 35.3% felt not at all prepared to answer questions, and 84.9% reported receiving no education in medical school or residency on medical marijuana. Finally, only 9% of medical school curriculums document in the AAMC Curriculum Inventory database content on medical marijuana. Our study highlights a fundamental mismatch between the state-level legalization of medical marijuana and the lack of preparation of physicians-in-training to prescribe it. With even more states on the cusp of legalizing medical marijuana, physician training should adapt to encompass this new reality of medical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Perception of medical students about pharmacology and scope of improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A; Datta, P P; Pattanayak, C; Panda, P

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacology is a subject taught in the medical curriculum in India over a period of one and half years along with pathology, microbiology and forensic medicine. The present study was planned to know the opinion of medical students regarding pharmacology and to assess the proposed teaching schedule and methods of teaching pharmacology. The study was conducted in a private medical college in eastern India among the medical undergraduate students in 5th semester. Total 74 students participated in the study. A pre-designed, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was given to the students and data was collected after one hour. Collected data was compiled, tabulated and analyzed in SPSS (version 16.0). The subject was perceived as interesting and useful by majority of students and most of them were in opinion to integrate pharmacology with the clinical subjects. Lecture in whole class was the most preferred teaching method according to the students and teaching with chalk and board they preferred most. Rational use of medicine, clinical trial, pediatric and geriatric pharmacology are the important topics the students felt to be included in the curriculum. Regular assessment of teaching methods by the students and taking suggestions from the students about improving the teaching method and redesigning the curriculum can help a lot in improving the learning capacity of the medical students and that will give benefit for the society as a whole.

  12. Computer laboratory in medical education for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Marinović, Darko; Kern, Josipa

    2009-01-01

    Five generations of second year students at the Zagreb University School of Medicine were interviewed through an anonymous questionnaire on their use of personal computers, Internet, computer laboratories and computer-assisted education in general. Results show an advance in students' usage of information and communication technology during the period from 1998/99 to 2002/03. However, their positive opinion about computer laboratory depends on installed capacities: the better the computer laboratory technology, the better the students' acceptance and use of it.

  13. International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashodeep Datta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools – both public and private – to support international students’ education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME. However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. Conclusion: By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to

  14. South African medical schools: Current state of selection criteria and medical students' demographic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, L J; van Zyl, G J; St Clair Gibson, A; Viljoen, M; Iputo, J E; Mammen, M; Chitha, W; Perez, A M; Hartman, N; Fonn, S; Green-Thompson, L; Ayo-Ysuf, O A; Botha, G C; Manning, D; Botha, S J; Hift, R; Retief, P; van Heerden, B B; Volmink, J

    2015-12-16

    Selection of medical students at South African (SA) medical schools must promote equitable and fair access to students from all population groups, while ensuring optimal student throughput and success, and training future healthcare practitioners who will fulfil the needs of the local society. In keeping with international practices, a variety of academic and non-academic measures are used to select applicants for medical training programmes in SA medical schools. To provide an overview of the selection procedures used by all eight medical schools in SA, and the student demographics (race and gender) at these medical schools, and to determine to what extent collective practices are achieving the goals of student diversity and inclusivity. A retrospective, quantitative, descriptive study design was used. All eight medical schools in SA provided information regarding selection criteria, selection procedures, and student demographics (race and gender). Descriptive analysis of data was done by calculating frequencies and percentages of the variables measured. Medical schools in SA make use of academic and non-academic criteria in their selection processes. The latter include indices of socioeconomic disadvantage. Most undergraduate medical students in SA are black (38.7%), followed by white (33.0%), coloured (13.4%) and Indian/Asian (13.6%). The majority of students are female (62.2%). The number of black students is still proportionately lower than in the general population, while other groups are overrepresented. Selection policies for undergraduate medical programmes aimed at redress should be continued and further refined, along with the provision of support to ensure student success.

  15. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Deressa Wakgari; Azazh Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their trainin...

  16. The Relationship between Promotions Committees' Identification of Problem Medical Students and Subsequent State Medical Board Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Sally A.; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this…

  17. Reform of the Method for Evaluating the Teaching of Medical Linguistics to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkui; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Longlu

    2014-01-01

    Explorating reform of the teaching evaluation method for vocational competency-based education (CBE) curricula for medical students is a very important process in following international medical education standards, intensify ing education and teaching reforms, enhancing teaching management, and improving the quality of medical education. This…

  18. Reform of the Method for Evaluating the Teaching of Medical Linguistics to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkui; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Longlu

    2014-01-01

    Explorating reform of the teaching evaluation method for vocational competency-based education (CBE) curricula for medical students is a very important process in following international medical education standards, intensify ing education and teaching reforms, enhancing teaching management, and improving the quality of medical education. This…

  19. Awareness of academic use of smartphones and medical apps among medical students in a private medical college?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jehanzaib; Haq, Usman; Bashir, Ali; Shah, Syed Aslam

    2016-02-01

    To assess the awareness of medical apps and academic use of smartphones among medical students. The questionnaire-based descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2015 and comprised medical students of the Rawal Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan. The self-designed questionnaire was reviewed by a panel of expert for content reliability and validity. Questionnaires were distributed in the classrooms and were filled by the students anonymously. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Among the 569 medical students in the study, 545 (95.8%) had smartphones and 24(4.2%) were using simple cell phones. Overall, 226(41.46%) of the smart phone users were using some medical apps. Besides, 137(24.08%) were aware of the medical apps but were not using them. Also, 391(71.7%) students were not using any type of medical text eBooks through their phone, and only 154(28.3%) had relevant text eBooks in their phones. Medical college students were using smartphones mostly as a means of telecommunication rather than a gadget for improving medical knowledge.

  20. Internet and medical student in Marrakech

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    difficulties encountered when using internet for medical purpose were similar. This can be ... Conclusion:The learning process is still based on traditional methods. Educational .... English as a language for their internet medical searches, while ...

  1. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  2. Preparing Students for the AP Economics Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Sally; Ashmead, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The first step in teaching-to-understand economics is not teaching "the rules," but working with fundamental economic models from the outset. Many of the concepts in economics are illustrated through models. Students must: (1) be able to draw these models; (2) understand the assumptions of the models; and (3) use the models for analysis.…

  3. Instructional Innovations: Preparing Students for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Norman

    1994-01-01

    Forward-looking educators are teaching students to be flexible, creative thinkers by using cooperative learning, authentic assessments, interdisciplinary units taught to heterogeneous groups. Principals should facilitate appropriate staff development, build master planning schedule providing for team planning periods, allow staff members to attend…

  4. Undergraduate Accounting Students: Prepared for the Workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers-Clark, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore and investigate student perceptions as to what generic skills they considered were important for accountants and to what extent these skills were developed by their programme of study. Design/methodology/approach: Data gathered from 357 UK undergraduate accounting degree graduates were used to develop insights…

  5. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  6. Evaluation of a virtual reality simulation system for porcelain fused to metal crown preparation at Tokyo Medical and Dental University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hirono; Ikeda, Masaomi; Araki, Koji

    2013-06-01

    The use of virtual reality simulation (VRS) is a new teaching modality in dentistry, and there is scope for further research evaluating its use under different educational programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how VRS with or without instructor feedback influenced students' learning and skills related to porcelain fused to metal (PFM) crown preparation. In this study, forty-three dental students in their fifth year of study at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan, were randomly divided into three groups: the first group used VRS (DentSim) with the instructor's feedback (DSF) (n=15), the second group used VRS without the instructor's feedback (DS) (n=15), and the third group neither used features of VRS (NDS) (n=13) nor received the instructor's feedback. All the students performed PFM crown preparation under the same setup once a week for four weeks. Total scores, preparation time, and twelve evaluation items were compared among the three groups and four experiments. The total scores of students in the DSF and DS groups were significantly higher than those in the NDS group. The presence of the instructor did not result in significant difference when VRS was used for training, while it shortened the preparation time at early stages. The results of this study suggested that the use of the VRS system improved student training for PFM crown preparation.

  7. PowerPoint or chalk and talk: Perceptions of medical students versus dental students in a medical college in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Seth

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Vikas Seth, Prerna Upadhyaya, Mushtaq Ahmad, Vijay MogheDepartment of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, IndiaPurpose: To assess students’ perceptions of the impact of PowerPoint (PPT presentations in lectures in comparison to the traditional chalk and talk method and lectures using ­transparencies and overhead projector (TOHP. The study analyzes the preferences for teaching aids of medical students versus dental students.Methods: Second year medical and dental undergraduates were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about their perceptions of the three lecture delivery methods. Following analysis of the questionnaire the students were interviewed further. The results were analyzed separately for medical and dental students to see if there was any difference in their perceptions.Results: The majority of the medical students (65.33% preferred PPT presentations, while 15.16% of students preferred the lectures using chalkboard, and 19.51% preferred TOHP for teaching (P < 0.001. Of the dental students: 41.84% preferred chalkboard, 31.21% preferred TOHP, and 25.85% students preferred PPT presentations in the lectures (P < 0.05. Some important comments of the students were also recorded on interview which could be valuable for the medical teachers.Conclusion: The medical students clearly preferred the use of PPT presentations while the dental students did not. The study does not bring out evidence based superiority of any lecture delivery method. It appears that in the hands of a trained teacher any teaching aid would be appropriate and effective. This highlights the need for formal training in teaching technologies to develop good presentation skills and thus motivate the students.Keywords: audiovisual aids, medical education, lecture delivery methods, PowerPoint presentations, OHP, chalkboard

  8. Recent developments in assessing medical students.

    OpenAIRE

    Fowell, S. L.; Bligh, J G

    1998-01-01

    Most medical schools in the UK are revising their undergraduate courses in response to the recommendations published by the General Medical Council Education Committee in Tomorrow's doctors. However, achievement of the objectives of curricular change is attendant on revision of the assessment process. This paper reviews traditional and more recently developed methods for assessment of medical education in the light of the General Medical Council's recommendations which relate specifically to ...

  9. [Knowledge and attitudes of medical students on decriminalized induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Roa, Eliana M; Ochoa-Vera, Miguel E

    2015-12-01

    Objective To explore if the academic exposure to legal abortion affects the knowledge and attitudes of medical students. Method To asses this relationship, both qualitative and quantitative approaches were performed. We analyzed a medical student cohort enrolled in gynecology and obstetrics at two accredited universities in Bucaramanga, Colombia during the second half of 2011. Students were invited to participate in two anonymous surveys. One survey was conducted in the first three weeks of the semester, and the second was done in the last three weeks. A quantitative approach was taken by a group interview of two random groups of participants. One group was composed of medical students of gynecology and obstetrics (fourth year of medicine), and the other group was composed of medical students in their last year (internal medical students). Results The items pregnancy with risk to the mother´s life, or affected by a non-viable fetal malformation, or result of rape were recognized and accepted. 46% of the participants changed their attitude about legal abortion at the end of the semester. Three out of every four participants changed their attitude to accept the decriminalized conditions, while one out of every four people had the opposite change of opinion. Medical student´s don´t believe that general practitioners are trained to advice patients in these cases. Conclusions Educating and training general practitioners in issues related to legal abortion may decrease the risk of inadequate medical assessment in cases of legal abortion.

  10. Medical professionalism on television: student perceptions and pedagogical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Wilson, Ian; Langendyk, Vicki

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has pointed to the role television can play in informing health practices and beliefs. Within the academic setting in particular, some educators have raised concerns about the influence of medical dramas on students. Less research, however, draws on the perspectives of students, and this study therefore explores medical students' perceptions of medical practice and professionalism in popular medical television programmes. Qualitative data from surveys of Australian undergraduate medical students showed that students perceived professionalism in dichotomous ways, with three main themes: cure-care, where a doctor's skill is either technical or interpersonal; work-leisure, where a doctor is either dedicated to work or personal life; and clinical-administration, where work is either direct patient care or administration. There continue to be imagined divisions between curing and caring for students, who express concerns about balancing work and leisure, and expectations that doctors should have little administrative work. Given students were able to identify these important contemporary issues around professionalism on television, there is pedagogical value in using popular images of the medical world in medical education.

  11. Irish Medical Students Understanding of the Intern Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, P; Kitt, K; Evans, D S; Goggin, D; McGrath, D; Last, J; Hennessy, M; Arnett, R; O'Flynn, S; Dunne, F; O'Donovan, D

    2016-04-11

    Upon completion of medical school in Ireland, graduates must make the transition to becoming interns. The transition into the intern year may be described as challenging as graduates assume clinical responsibilities. Historically, a survey of interns in 1996 found that 91% felt unprepared for their role. However, recent surveys in 2012 have demonstrated that this is changing with preparedness rates reaching 52%. This can be partially explained by multiple initiatives at the local and national level. Our study aimed evaluate medical student understanding of the intern year and associated factors. An online, cross-sectional survey was sent out to all Irish medical students in 2013 and included questions regarding their understanding of the intern year. Two thousand, two hundred and forty-eight students responded, with 1,224 (55.4%) of students agreeing or strongly agreeing that they had a good understanding of what the intern year entails. This rose to 485 (73.7%) among senior medical students. Of junior medical students, 260 (42.8%) indicated they understood what the intern year, compared to 479 (48.7%) of intermediate medical students. Initiatives to continue improving preparedness for the intern year are essential in ensuring a smooth and less stressful transition into the medical workforce.

  12. Premedical anatomy experience and student performance in medical gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, Peter; McDaniel, Dalton J; Jordan, Rebecca M

    2017-04-01

    Gross anatomy is considered one of the most important basic science courses in medical education, yet few medical schools require its completion prior to matriculation. The effect of taking anatomy courses before entering medical school on performance in medical gross anatomy has been previously studied with inconsistent results. The effect of premedical anatomy coursework on performance in medical gross anatomy, overall medical school grade point average (GPA), and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 1 (COMLEX 1) score was evaluated in 456 first-year osteopathic medical students along with a survey on its perceived benefits on success in medical gross anatomy course. No significant differences were found in gross anatomy grade, GPA, or COMLEX 1 score between students with premedical anatomy coursework and those without. However, significant differences and higher scores were observed in students who had taken three or more undergraduate anatomy courses including at least one with cadaveric laboratory. There was significantly lower perceived benefit for academic success in the medical gross anatomy course (P<.001) from those students who had taken premedical anatomy courses (5.9 of 10) compared with those who had not (8.2 of 10). Results suggest that requiring any anatomy course as a prerequisite for medical school would not have significant effect on student performance in the medical gross anatomy course. However, requiring more specific anatomy coursework including taking three or more undergraduate anatomy courses, one with cadaveric laboratory component, may result in higher medical gross anatomy grades, medical school GPA, and COMLEX 1 scores. Clin. Anat. 30:303-311, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Self-Medication among School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALBashtawy, Mohammed; Batiha, Abdul-Monim; Tawalbeh, Loai; Tubaishat, Ahmad; AlAzzam, Manar

    2015-01-01

    Self-medication, usually with over-the-counter (OTC) medication, is reported as a community health problem that affects many people worldwide. Most self-medication practice usually begins with the onset of adolescence. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan, using a simple random sampling method to select…

  14. Ubiquitous testing using tablets: its impact on medical student perceptions of and engagement in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee-Young

    2016-03-01

    Ubiquitous testing has the potential to affect medical education by enhancing the authenticity of the assessment using multimedia items. This study explored medical students' experience with ubiquitous testing and its impact on student learning. A cohort (n=48) of third-year students at a medical school in South Korea participated in this study. The students were divided into two groups and were given different versions of 10 content-matched items: one in text version (the text group) and the other in multimedia version (the multimedia group). Multimedia items were delivered using tablets. Item response analyses were performed to compare item characteristics between the two versions. Additionally, focus group interviews were held to investigate the students' experiences of ubiquitous testing. The mean test score was significantly higher in the text group. Item difficulty and discrimination did not differ between text and multimedia items. The participants generally showed positive responses on ubiquitous testing. Still, they felt that the lectures that they had taken in preclinical years did not prepare them enough for this type of assessment and clinical encounters during clerkships were more helpful. To be better prepared, the participants felt that they needed to engage more actively in learning in clinical clerkships and have more access to multimedia learning resources. Ubiquitous testing can positively affect student learning by reinforcing the importance of being able to understand and apply knowledge in clinical contexts, which drives students to engage more actively in learning in clinical settings.

  15. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  16. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  17. Effects of a refugee elective on medical student perceptions

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    Dussán Kathleen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are growing numbers of refugees throughout the world. Refugee health is a relatively unstudied and rarely taught component of medical education. In response to this need, a Refugee Health Elective was begun. Medical student perceptions toward cultural aspects of medicine and refugee health before and after participation in the elective were measured. Methods Preliminary questionnaires were given to all preclinical students at the academic year commencement with follow-up questionnaires at the refugee elective's conclusion. Both questionnaires examined students' comfort in interacting with patients and familiarity with refugee medical issues, alternative medical practices, and social hindrances to medical care. The preliminary answers served as a control and follow-up questionnaire data were separated into participant/non-participant categories. All preclinical medical students at two Midwestern medical schools were provided the opportunity to participate in the Refugee Health Elective and surveys. The 3 data groups were compared using unadjusted and adjusted analysis techniques with the Kruskall-Wallis, Bonferroni and ANCOVA adjustment. P-values Results 408 and 403 students filled out the preliminary and follow-up questionnaires, respectfully, 42 of whom participated in the elective. Students considering themselves minorities or multilingual were more likely to participate. Elective participants were more likely to be able to recognize the medical/mental health issues common to refugees, to feel comfortable interacting with foreign-born patients, and to identify cultural differences in understanding medical/mental health conditions, after adjusting for minority or multilingual status. Conclusion As medical schools integrate a more multicultural curriculum, a Refugee Health Elective for preclinical students can enhance awareness and promote change in attitude toward medical/mental health issues common to refugees. This

  18. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

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    Tømmerås Karin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes

  19. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

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    Huhn, D.; Junne, F.; Zipfel, S.; Duelli, R.; Resch, F.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential. PMID:25699112

  20. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huhn, D.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists.Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1. The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2. The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3. The offers for non-German students; and 4. The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis.Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology.Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  1. Assessment of Medication Use among University Students in Ethiopia

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    Dessalegn Asmelashe Gelayee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The extent, nature, and determinants of medication use of individuals can be known from drug utilization studies. Objectives. This study intended to determine medication consumption, sharing, storage, and disposal practices of university students in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 404 university students selected through stratified random sampling technique. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS version 20 statistical software. Pearson’s Chi-square test of independence was conducted with P<0.05 taken as statistically significant. Results. At 95.3% response rate, the prevalences of medication consumption and sharing were 35.3% (N=136 and 38.2% (N=147, respectively. One hundred (26% respondents admitted that they often keep leftover medications for future use while the rest (N=285, 74% discard them primarily into toilets (N=126, 44.2%. Evidence of association existed between medication taking and year of study (P=0.048, medication sharing and sex (P=0.003, and medication sharing and year of study (P=0.015. Conclusion. There is a high prevalence of medication consumption, medication sharing, and inappropriate disposal practices which are influenced by sex and educational status of the university students. Thus medication use related educational interventions need to be given to students in general.

  2. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

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    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  3. Measuring the effectiveness of pharmacology teaching in undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Aguilar, Maria Esther; Martinez-Gonzalez, Adrian; Rodriguez, Rodolfo

    2012-03-01

    Information overload and recent curricular changes are viewed as important contributory factors to insufficient pharmacological education of medical students. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of pharmacology teaching in our medical school. The study subjects were 455 second-year medical students, class of 2010, and 26 pharmacology teachers at the National University of Mexico Medical School. To assess pharmacological knowledge, students were required to take 3 multiple-choice exams (70 questions each) as part of their evaluation in the pharmacology course. A 30-item questionnaire was used to explore the students' opinion on teaching. Pharmacology professors evaluated themselves using a similar questionnaire. Students and teachers rated each statement on a 5-point Likert scale. The groups' exam scores ranged from 54.5% to 90.0% of correct responses, with a mean score of 77.3%. Only 73 (16%) of 455 students obtained an exam score of 90% and higher. Students' evaluations of faculty and professor self-ratings were very high (90% and 96.2%, of the maximal response, respectively). Student and professor ratings were not correlated with exam scores (r = 0.291). Our study shows that knowledge on pharmacology is incomplete in a large proportion of second-year medical students and indicates that there is an urgent need to review undergraduate training in pharmacology. The lack of relationship between the subjective ratings of teacher effectiveness and objective exam scores suggests the use of more demanding measures to assess the effectiveness of teaching.

  4. Mental problems among first-year conservatory students compared with medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Fenema, E M; van Geel, C C J

    2014-06-01

    Musical education and the musical profession can be stressful, which may make musicians vulnerable for stress-related disorders. To determine if music students are particularly at risk for mental problems, we used the Standardised Assessment of Personality-Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) and the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ48S) to compare symptoms in first-year conservatory students (n=33) and first-year medical students (n=43). On the SAPAS, we found that medical students have significantly more difficulty making and keeping friends (p=0.015). Also, we observed a trend that conservatory students lose their temper more easily (p=0.040). Both student groups showed high scores for the personality trait "perfectionism." On the SQ48, we observed a trend that both conservatory and medical students experience more psychological problems than the general population, but there were no significant differences between conservatory students and medical students in the total scores of both questionnaires.

  5. PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF STUDENTS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

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    A. G. Hentonen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem and the essence of training students for inclusive education in terms of higher education. The implementation of inclusive education is seen in several ways: the traditional school attendance by students with disabilities, learning at home and distance learning. The need for a barrier-free environment in the educational institutions represented by the basic requirements for the training of students for inclusion, providing mastery of pedagogical knowledge, promoting the development of creativity, the ability to generate new ideas, the implementation of a humanistic position that is based on ownership, dialogue, understanding and acceptance of the child with special abilities for granted. Competence approach is the methodological basis of training future teachers to work with children in the conditions of inclusive education. On the basis of this approach, the article presents a set of competencies that can successfully carry out the work with children and families in the conditions of inclusive education. The main competence of professional readiness of students for Inclusive Educ ation: monitoring,  diagnostic and informative.  Mon itoring competence involves tracking the process of training and education of children in inclusive education. Diagnostic ability to work with this category of   children   and   their   parents.   The   content   knowledge  of  the  problems  of  training  and  educ ation, understanding of the content of inclusive ed ucation, acquisition of knowledge and skills in wor king with children with special needs.

  6. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  7. Prevalence, pattern and perceptions of self-medication in medical students

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    Rushi N. Pandya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of self-medication is highly prevalent in the community more so amongst the medical students. Self-medication can be defined as the use of drugs to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, or the intermittent or continued use of a prescribed drug for chronic or recurrent disease or symptoms. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence and pattern of use of self-medication among medical students from first year to internship. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out among under graduate medical students including interns of Smt. NHL Municipal Medical College, Ahmedabad during the period of March 2010 to May 2010. Results: Out of 747 students and interns enrolled, 685 responded (91.7%. Out of 685 respondents 564 (82.3% reported self-medication within one year of recall period. Most common conditions/symptoms for self-medication in students were fever (72.7%, headache (69.1%, upper respiratory tract infections (64.1% followed by others like body-ache, abdominal pain, diarrhoea etc. Over the counter drugs (84.2% was the most common category of drugs used by all the students except first year students who used prescription only drugs more frequently (48.5%. Herbal and Ayurvedic drugs were also used as self-medication (17.8%; most frequently by the first year students (22.7%. Conclusion: The pattern of self-medication practice changes with time and advancement of knowledge. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 275-280

  8. Attitudes of Sri Lankan medical students toward learning communication skills.

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    Marambe, Kosala N; Edussuriya, D H; Dayaratne, K M P L

    2012-01-01

    The General Medical Council of the UK, advocates that by the end of their undergraduate course, medical students should be proficient in communicating with patients. However, the attitude of some medical students toward formal training in communication skills seems lukewarm. Although several studies on assessing attitudes of medical students on learning communication skills have been carried out in Europe and America, Asian studies are very few and literature in the Sri Lankan context is lacking. To explore the attitudes of first to fourth year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya (FOMUP), Sri Lanka on learning communication skills and to identify possible factors that may influence student attitudes. A total of 675 students from year 1 to 4 of the FOMUP were asked to complete a modified version of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale. Items of its positive attitude scale (PAS) were analyzed together while negative items were considered individually. Response rates ranged from 70% to 98% for the various year groups. There were no significant differences between the PAS for males and females and for those exposed to formal training and those who were not. The junior students scored significantly higher on the PAS than seniors. Most students of all the groups disagreed with the item "I don't see why I should learn communication skills". Approximately one-quarter of the students of each group endorsed the statement "Nobody is going to fail their medical degree for having poor communication skills". Out of the students who have undergone formal communication training, almost one-third agreed that they find it difficult to take communication skills learning seriously. Although medical students seem to have realized the importance of communication skills training for the practice of medicine, a significant minority have reservations on attending such sessions. Sri Lanka faculty will need to make a concerted effort to change this

  9. Social and physiological peculiarities and professional orientation of medical students

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    O. V. Toussova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes personality features, self-regulation patterns and professional orientation of medical students. It represents the results of the study conducted among the fourth year students. The sample is characterized with high enough behavior regulation, extraversion, high learning potential, flexible thinking, following intuition and personal opinion in profession choice. High anxiety as personality feature and stress vulnerability is typical for female students; independence tendency is typical for male students.

  10. Evidence-based public health education as preparation for medical school.

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    Riegelman, Richard K; Garr, David R

    2008-04-01

    The Institute of Medicine has recommended that all undergraduates have access to public health education. An evidence-based public health framework including curricula such as "Public Health 101" and "Epidemiology 101" was recommended for all colleges and universities by arts and sciences, public health, and clinical health professions educators as part of the Consensus Conference on Undergraduate Public Health Education. These courses should foster critical thinking whereby students learn to broadly frame options, critically analyze data, and understand the uncertainties that remain. College-level competencies or learning outcomes in research literature reading, determinants of health, basic understanding of health care systems, and the synergies between health care and public health can provide preparation for medical education. Formally tested competencies could substitute for a growing list of prerequisite courses. Grounded in principles similar to those of evidence-based medicine, evidence-based public health includes problem description, causation, evidence-based recommendations for intervention, and implementation considering key issues of when, who, and how to intervene. Curriculum frameworks for structuring "Public Health 101" and "Epidemiology 101" are provided by the Consensus Conference that lay the foundation for teaching evidence-based public health as well as evidence-based medicine. Medical school preparation based on this foundation should enable the Clinical Prevention and Population Health Curriculum Framework, including the evidence base for practice and health systems and health policy, to be fully integrated into the four years of medical school. A faculty development program, curriculum guide, interest group, and clear student interest are facilitating rapid acceptance of the need for these curricula.

  11. Longitudinal trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medication among middle and high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Carol J.; Cranford, James A.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription medications has been identified as a major public health problem among youth, although few longitudinal studies have examined non-medical use of prescription medications in the context of other drug use. Previous cross-sectional studies have shown gender and race differences in non-medical use of prescription medications. It was hypothesized that (1) non-medical use of prescription medications increases with age, and (2) these increases will be stronger in magnitude among female and Caucasian adolescents. Changes in non-medical use of prescription medications across 4 years were examined and compared with changes in other drug use (e.g., alcohol and marijuana). Middle and high school students enrolled in 5 schools in southeastern Michigan completed web-based surveys at 4 annual time points. The cumulative sample size was 5,217. The sample ranged from 12 to 18 years, 61% were Caucasian, 34% were African American, and 50% were female. Using a series of repeated measures latent class analyses, the trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medications were examined, demonstrating a 2-class solution: (1) the no/low non-medical use of prescription medications group had low probabilities of any non-medical use of prescription medications across all grades, and (2) the any non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a roughly linear increase in the probability of non-medical use of prescription medications over time. The probability of any non-medical use of prescription medications increased during the transition from middle school to high school. Results from this longitudinal study yielded several noteworthy findings: Participants who were classified in the any/high non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a discontinuous pattern of non-medical use of prescription medications over time, indicating that non-medical use of prescription medications is a relatively sporadic behavior that does not persist

  12. Awareness of basic life support among medical, dental, nursing students and doctors

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    Shanta Chandrasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the awareness of Basic Life Support (BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges. A cross-sectional study was conducted by assessing responses to 20 selected basic questions regarding BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges. After excluding the incomplete response forms the data was analysed on 1,054 responders. The results were analysed using an answer key prepared with the use of the Advanced Cardiac Life Support manual. Out of 1,054 responders 345 were medical students, 75 were medical interns, 19 were dental students, 59 were dental interns, 105 were homeopathy interns, 319 were nursing students, 72 were doctors, 29 were dentists, 25 were nursing faculty and six were homeopathy doctors. No one among them had complete knowledge of BLS. Only two out of 1054 (0.19% had secured 80 - 89% marks, 10 out of 1054 (0.95% had secured 70 - 79% marks, 40 of 1054 (4.08% had secured 60 - 69% marks and 105 of 1054 (9.96% had secured 50 - 59% marks. A majority of them, that is, 894 (84.82% had secured less than 50% marks. Awareness of BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges is very poor.

  13. Decolonising medical curricula through diversity education: lessons from students.

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    Nazar, Mahdi; Kendall, Kathleen; Day, Lawrence; Nazar, Hamde

    2015-04-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) expects that medical students graduate with an awareness of how the diversity of the patient population may affect health outcomes and behaviours. However, little guidance has been provided on how to incorporate diversity teaching into medical school curricula. Research highlights the existence of two different models within medical education: cultural competency and cultural humility. The Southampton medical curriculum includes both models in its diversity teaching, but little was known about which model was dominant or about the students' experience. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were carried out with medical students at the University of Southampton. Data were analysed thematically using elements of grounded theory and constant comparison. Students identified early examples of diversity teaching consistent with a cultural humility approach. In later years, the limited diversity teaching recognised by students generally adopted a cultural competency approach. Students tended to perceive diversity as something that creates problems for healthcare professionals due to patients' perceived differences. They also reported witnessing a number of questionable practices related to diversity issues that they felt unable to challenge. The dissonance created by differences in the largely lecture based and the clinical environments left students confused and doubting the value of cultural humility in a clinical context. Staff training on diversity issues is required to encourage institutional buy-in and establish consistent educational and clinical environments. By tackling cultural diversity within the context of patient-centred care, cultural humility, the approach students valued most, would become the default model. Reflective practice and the development of a critical consciousness are crucial in the improvement of cultural diversity training and thus should be facilitated and encouraged. Educators can adopt a

  14. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvère; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (pmentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Conclusions Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students. PMID:22989620

  15. Anxiety and depression in medical students related to desire for and expectations from a medical career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglu, N; Seker, M

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we aimed to analyse the anxiety and depression levels of medical student's related to their desire for a career in medicine and expectations from that career. In a cross-sectional design, students from the first two years of medical school filled-out a questionnaire consisting of demographics, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS) and questions about their medical career decision. The mean anxiety score was 7.66 +/- 3.21 and the mean depression score was 5.77 +/- 3.45. According to cut-off levels, 20.3% of medical students had anxiety, 29.3% had depressive symptoms. Males and second year students had significantly high levels of depression (p Students who were pressured to become doctors and who expected to gain much money were both more anxious and more depressed (p expectations from a medical education have significant effects on anxiety and depression levels of medical students. Guidance for affected students is important and this is the responsibility of medical educators and faculties.

  16. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What do medical students think?

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    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Amélia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement of clinical practice. Purposes: This work aimed to study the relevance given by Portuguese medical students to a core of scientific skills, and their judgment about their own ability to execute those skills. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students attending the first, fourth and sixth years of medical course in the same period. An assessment istrument, exploring the importance given by Portuguese medical students to scientific skills in high school, to clinical practice and to their own ability to execute them, was designed, adapted and applied specifically to this study. Results: Students' perceptions were associated with gender, academic year, previous participation in research activities, positive and negative attitudes toward science, research integration into the curriculum and motivation to undertake research. The viewpoint of medical students about the relevance of scientific skills overall, and the ability to execute them, was independently associated with motivation to be enrolled in research. Conclusions: These findings have meaningful implications in medical education regarding the inclusion of a structural research program in the medical curriculum. Students should be aware that clinical practice would greatly benefit from the enrollment in research activities. By developing a solid scientific literacy future physicians will be able to apply new knowledge in patient care.

  17. Medical student perspectives on geriatrics and geriatric education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Anita S; Tiberius, Richard

    2010-10-01

    To ascertain medical students' perspectives on geriatrics. Interpretative phenomenological analysis. An allopathic, Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited, former Donald W. Reynolds Foundation grant recipient, U.S. medical school. Thirty fourth-year medical students who completed geriatric educational activities in all 4 years of medical school. Two researchers independently reviewed verbatim transcripts from five focus groups and identified themes using the constant comparative method. Seventeen themes that elaborate on students' perspectives on geriatrics were identified. Students reported not feeling appropriately engaged in geriatrics, despaired at the futility of care, were depressed by the decline and death of their patients, were frustrated by low reimbursement rates and low prestige despite fellowship training, were concerned about patients' unrealistic expectations and opportunities for litigation, felt unsure how to handle ethical dilemmas, and found communicating with older adults to be enjoyable but time consuming and challenging. They felt they had too much exposure to geriatrics in medical school. Current attitude scales fail to capture some of the dimensions uncovered in this study, whereas students did not mention other dimensions commonly included in attitude scales. Regarding curriculum development, students may find an integrated preclinical geriatric curriculum to be more relevant to their careers than a stand-alone curriculum. Clinical clerkships might be in a better position to emphasize the positive aspects of geriatrics and develop strategies to address students' negative attitudes. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. E-learning program for medical students in dermatology

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    Cristiana Silveira Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop a e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning. Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0 + 0.8 than those who only participated in classes (7.75+1.8, p <0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that an associated online course might improve the learning of medical students in dermatology.

  19. Three innovative curricula for addressing medical students' career development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Anita M; Taylor, Anita D; Pokorny, Anita P

    2011-01-01

    Medical students make specialty decisions that are critically important to their long-term career satisfaction and overall well-being. The dynamic of larger class sizes set against stagnant numbers of residency positions creates an imperative for students to make and test specialty decisions earlier in medical school. Ideally, formal career advising begins in medical school. Medical schools typically offer career development programs as extracurricular offerings. The authors describe three curricular approaches and the innovative courses developed to address medical students' career development needs. The models differ in complexity and cost, but they share the goals of assisting students to form career identities and to use resources effectively in their specialty decision processes. The first model is a student-organized specialties elective. To earn course credit, students must complete questionnaires for the sessions, submit results from two self-assessments, and report on two physician informational interviews. The second model comprises two second-year career development courses that have evolved into a longitudinal career development program. The third model integrates career topics through a doctoring course and advising teams. The authors discuss challenges and lessons learned from implementing each of the programs, including marshaling resources, achieving student buy-in, and obtaining time in the curriculum. Invoking a curricular approach seems to normalize the tasks associated with career development and puts them on par in importance with other medical school endeavors.

  20. Stress study in 1st year medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Ranade, Amita; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Dhanumali, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    As stress is a very common feature in medical students, we performed a cross-sectional study in 1st year medical students to know the prevalence of stress in students, severity of stress & to find the symptoms associated with stress. A pre-designed & pre-tested questionnaire was distributed to 60 students (31 girls & 29 boys) randomly selected. After analyzing the data in the questionnaires, we found that major cases of stress were stress of school performance, stress of school/le...

  1. Changing opinions about research by Saudi medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulaban, Ahmad; Alharbi, Abdulrahman; BinDajam, Osama; Al Jarbou, Mohammed; Alharbi, Hatem; Alanazi, Faiz; Aldamiri, Khalid; Althobaiti, Ahmed; Al Sayyari, Abdulla

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and compare the opinions and attitudes of medical students toward medical research in five Saudi universities and examine the changes observed in these opinions and attitudes in one of these universities over a period of time. This is a cross-sectional study conducted among medical students in five Saudi universities. This study was based on a survey undertaken in 2015. The survey consisted of five questions inquiring about the opinions and attitudes of medical students toward medical research. The same survey was carried out 8 years earlier in one of these universities (King Abdulaziz University [KAU]), and the results obtained during the two periods (2007 and 2015) were compared. A convenient sample of 924 students was selected from five Saudi universities. Ninety-five (10.3%) of the medical students were not aware of the usefulness and importance scientific research will have on their future careers. A total of 409 (44.3%) stated that they had no knowledge on how to conduct scientific research. On the other hand, a vast majority of medical students (98.1%) expressed a willingness and interest to participate in scientific research if provided with an opportunity. The percentage of students from KAU strongly agreeing to participate in research rose from 33.1% in 2007 to 81.5% in 2015 (P=0.001). Of all the students surveyed, 431 (46.6%) had participated in scientific research as undergraduates. Most students in five Saudi universities expressed enthusiasm for participating in a research project, but only a few of them had sufficient knowledge on basic research. There was considerable improvement in students' perception of research in KAU when comparing their responses in 2007 to those in 2015.

  2. Internet use and its addiction level in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhayay N

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Namrata Upadhayay,1 Sanjeev Guragain2 1Department of Physiology; 2Department of Pharmacology, Gandaki Medical College, Pokhara Lekhnath, Nepal Objective: To compare the Internet addiction levels between male and female medical students.Methods: One hundred medical students (male: 50, female: 50 aged 17–30 years were included in a cross-sectional study. A standardized questionnaire was used to assess their Internet addiction level. Additionally, a self-designed questionnaire was used to identify the various purposes of Internet use among the students. The Internet addiction score (based on the Internet Addiction Test was compared between male and female students by using the Mann–Whitney U test (p≤0.05. After knowing their addiction level, we interviewed students to know if Internet use had any bad/good impact on their life. Results: The Internet Addiction Test scores obtained by the students were in the range of 11–70. Out of 100 students, 21 (male: 13, female: 8 were found to be slightly addicted to the Internet. The remaining 79 students were average online users. There was no significant difference between male and female students in the addiction level (score. However, males were more addicted than females. The major use of Internet was to download and watch movies and songs and to communicate with friends and family (76/100. Some students (24/100 used the Internet to assess information that helped them in their educational and learning activities. Some students mentioned that overuse of the Internet lead to insufficient amounts of sleep and affected their concentration levels in the classroom during lectures.Conclusion: Medical students are experiencing problems due to Internet overuse. They experience poor academic progress and lack of concentration while studying. The main use of the Internet was for entertainment and to communicate with friends and family. Keywords: addiction, Internet, medical students, entertainment

  3. Subjective experience of depressed mood among medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    should: (i) reduce the experience of time pressure and interruptions at work ... students are more vulnerable to depression and suicide than their counterparts .... lack of preparation for the shift from more academic work to more clinical work.

  4. Are Belgian military students in medical sciences better educated in disaster medicine than their civilian colleagues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Lievers, J; Dieltiens, G; Sabbe, M B

    2016-10-01

    Historically, medical students have been deployed to care for disaster victims but may not have been properly educated to do so. A previous evaluation of senior civilian medical students in Belgium revealed that they are woefully unprepared. Based on the nature of their military training, we hypothesised that military medical students were better educated and prepared than their civilian counterparts for disasters. We evaluated the impact of military training on disaster education in medical science students. Students completed an online survey on disaster medicine, training, and knowledge, tested using a mixed set of 10 theoretical and practical questions. The results were compared with those of a similar evaluation of senior civilian medical students. The response rate was 77.5%, mean age 23 years and 59% were males. Overall, 95% of military medical students received some chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training and 22% took part in other disaster management training; 44% perceived it is absolutely necessary that disaster management should be incorporated into the regular curriculum. Self-estimated knowledge ranged from 3.75 on biological incidents to 4.55 on influenza pandemics, based on a 10-point scale. Intention to respond in case of an incident ranged from 7 in biological incidents to 7.25 in chemical incidents. The mean test score was 5.52; scores improved with educational level attained. A comparison of survey data from civilian senior medical master students revealed that, except for influenza pandemic, military students scored higher on knowledge and capability, even though only 27% of them were senior master students. Data on willingness to work are comparable between the two groups. Results of the question/case set were significantly better for the military students. The military background and training of these students makes them better prepared for disaster situations than their civilian counterparts. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  5. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on resident physicians. Further study is needed better understand how tablet computers and other mobile devices may assist in medical education and patient care.

  6. Uneasy subjects: medical students' conflicts over the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    In this article I report on an investigation of the pharmaceutical industry's influence in medical education. Findings are based on fifty semi-structured interviews with medical students in the United States and Canada conducted between 2010 and 2013. Participant responses support the survey-based literature demonstrating that there is clear and pervasive influence of the pharmaceutical industry in medical education. They also challenge the theory that medical students feel entitled to industry gifts and uncritically accept industry presence. I investigate how medical students who are critical of the pharmaceutical industry negotiate its presence in the course of their medical education. Findings suggest that these participants do not simply absorb industry presence, but interpret it and respond in complex ways. Participants were uncomfortable with industry influence throughout their medical training and found multifaceted ways to resist. They struggled with power relations in medical training and the prevailing notion that industry presence is a normal part of medical education. I argue that this pervasive norm of industry presence is located in neoliberal structural transformations within and outside both education and medicine. The idea that industry presence is normal and inevitable represents a challenge for students who are critical of industry. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Student nurses and the electronic medical record: a partnership of academia and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Anna Mary; Kavanagh, Joan; Gregorich, Tom; Shumway, Julia; Campbell, Yolanda; Stafford, Susan

    2011-12-01

    The advent of the electronic medical record has brought a new challenge to nursing education. Although most nursing students are proficient in data entry and computer skills, they often do not comprehend how the information they enter becomes a vital component of interdisciplinary team communication. Furthermore, the electronic medical record becomes a repository for information that can be retrieved for the purpose of decision support. Developed by the Cleveland Clinic, the Deans' Roundtable, and University Hospitals of Cleveland, the Student Nurse Portal provides a means of assisting the student to understand how data entered into the computer transforms into information and knowledge, resulting in the wisdom that enables healthcare workers to provide optimal patient care. Current courses present the purpose of the electronic medical record and its roleas a powerful communication tool, but future courses will also help the student develop data entry and retrieval skills. Hosted on the Cleveland Clinic servers and available to students around-the-clock from any computer with Internet access, students have found the Student Nurse Portal to be a valuable tool in preparing for the use of the electronic medical record during their clinical experiences.

  8. Characteristics of test anxiety among medical students and congruence of strategies to address it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Encandela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students may experience test anxiety associated with ‘high stakes’ exams, such as Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination. Methods: We collected qualitative responses about test anxiety at three points in time from 93 second-year medical students engaged in studying for and taking Step 1. Results: Causes of test anxiety as reported by students were related to negative self-talk during preparation for the exam. Effects of anxiety had to do with emotional well-being, cognitive functioning, and physical well-being. Strategies included socializing with others and a variety of cognitive and physical approaches. Comparison of individuals’ strategies with causes and effects showed some congruence, but substantial incongruence between the types of strategies chosen and the reported causes and effects of test anxiety. Discussion: Students’ adoption of a ‘menu’ of strategies rather than one or two carefully selected strategies suggest inefficiencies that might be addressed by interventions, such as advisor-directed conversations with students and incorporating student self-assessment and strategies for managing anxiety within courses on test-taking. Such interventions are in need of further study. An annotated list of evidence-based strategies would be helpful to students and educators. Most important, test anxiety should be viewed by medical educators as a ‘real’ experience, and students would benefit from educator support.

  9. Students' conceptions of the medical profession; an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwhof, M G H; Rademakers, J J D J M; Kuyvenhoven, M M; Soethout, M B M; ten Cate, Th J

    2005-12-01

    Students' beliefs and attitudes towards the medical profession have been studied in relation to career choices, but most research has been restricted to either predetermined aspects or to a limited number of specialties. This study aimed at getting unprompted insight in the students' perceptions of their future profession in dimensions that may be determinants of study success and career choice. Undergraduate and graduated medical students were interviewed and asked to characterize the medical profession in general and four contrasting specialties in particular. Grounded Theory methodology was used to analyse the data. Participants were medical students at the start of their training (n = 16), during clerkships (n = 10) and after graduation (n = 37). Beginning students perceive the medical profession in limited dimensions: the activities of a physician, their relationship to patients and the physician's knowledge, skills and personality. They do not see many differences between specialties, in contrast with students with clinical experience and graduate students. Undergraduate students' perception is focussed more on social aspects of the profession compared to graduates.

  10. Measuring medical students' empathy using direct verbal expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yera; Cho, A Ra; Kim, Sun

    2016-09-01

    Empathy is an important trait in physicians and a key element in the physician-patient relationship. Accordingly, one of the goals in medical education is developing empathy in students. We attempted to practically assess medical students' empathy through their direct verbal expressions. The medical students' empathy was measured using the modified Pencil-and-Paper Empathy Rating Test by Winefield and Chur-Hansen (2001). The students took 15 minutes or so to complete the scale, and it was then scored by one of two trained evaluators (0 to 4 points for each item, for a total score of 40). The subjects were 605 medical students, and the data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, independent t-test, and one-way analysis of variance in SPSS version 21.0. The students' empathy scores were low (mean, 12.13; standard deviation, 2.55); their most common responses (78.6%) registered as non-empathetic. Differences in empathy were observed by gender (female students>male students; t=-5.068, pmedical college; t=-1.935, p=0.053), and academic level (pre-medical 1 year empathy enhancement training programs with practical content.

  11. Students and Institutions Protecting Whiteness as Property: A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Student Affairs Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study is based on interviews with White students graduating from a student affairs preparation program as well as a literature review of whiteness in education. Applying "critical race theory," the author examined the ways that students and institutions protected whiteness. Institutions and those within them concerned with equity must have…

  12. Preparing Vietnamese student teachers for teaching with a student-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Dekker, R.; Goedhart, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Vietnamese curriculum reform which trends toward a student-centered approach requires Vietnamese teacher educators to prepare student teachers for teaching using this approach. In this article, we present a case study of three Vietnamese student teachers working in groups in a methods course to

  13. Learning style preferences among pre-clinical medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aye Aye Mon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Generally, different students employ different learning styles dur-ing their studies and medical students are exposed to diverse methods of teaching. Therefore, understanding students’ learning style preference is an important consideration for a high quality and effective teaching and learning process.The aim of the study was to study the variation of learning styles among pre-clinical medical students of SEGi University, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was performed by using VARK (Visual, Audio, Reading and Kinaesthetic questionnaire version 7.2 to assess the learning style preference of 98 (n=98 pre-clinical medical students in SEGi University. The questionnaire consists of 16 items which identify four different learning styles: visual, aural, reading/writing and kin-esthetic. Descriptive statistics were used to identify the learning styles of students. 61 students preferred multimodal as their learning style, out of which 43 (70% of them were female stu-dents and 18 (30% were male students. 37 students preferred unimodal as their learning style out of which 22 (59% of them were female students and 15 (41% were male students. In addi-tion, female students had more diverse preferences than male students by having 10 out of the other 11 possible combinations in multimodal learning style of preference, whereas the male stu-dents only had 5 out of the 11 combinations. In this study, there was no significant gender difference in the percentages of males and female students who preferred unimodal and multimodal styles of information presentation (P= 0.263; α=0.05. To con-clude, the majority of students of both genders had chosen quad-modal as their learning style preference. The results of this study can provide useful information for improving the quality of the teaching and learning experiences of students.

  14. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications Among Medical Students in Greece: Prevalence of and Motivation for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazisis, Georgios; Tsakiridis, Ioannis; Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Apostolidou, Eirini; Spachos, Dimitrios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2017-08-04

    Non-medical use of prescription medications has risen to unprecedented levels over the past decade worldwide; however, studies assessing misuse across medical students are sparse. The purpose of this study was to1) estimate the lifetime and the past-year prevalence of non-medical use of prescription medications among medical students in Greece 2) identify the motivation for use. 591 medical students completed an anonymous, self-administered, web-based survey assessing lifetime and past-year prevalence of non-medical use of four classes of prescription drugs (opioid painkillers, tranquillizers, sleeping and stimulant medications). According to the motivation to use the responders were classified into three subtypes (selftreatment, recreational, and mixed). The prevalence of lifetime use was 10.7% for at least one of the four prescription drug classes and 9% of the respondents reported lifetime misuse of multiple categories of prescription drugs. The past-year prevalence was approximately 7.7% for at least one of the four prescription drug classes, while the majority misused the drugs "1-2 times per year". Senior students used tranquilizers more than junior students. Self-treatment and mixed subtypes of tranquillizers misuse was more prevalent among women than men while the self-treatment subtype was the most prevalent subtype in all the four drug classes. This is the first study investigating non-medical use of prescription medications among Greek medical students and indicates a high prevalence of misuse of some categories of prescription drugs, mostly for self-treatment purposes.

  15. The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students' Belief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    It has been postulated that psychiatric education could lead to a ... with mentally ill patients, even in general practice. Stigma and ... inclusion criteria and in order to ensure fairly large ..... the finding among medical students in Malaysia.

  16. Registrars teaching undergraduate medical students: A pilot study at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Registrars play a vital role in teaching undergraduate (UG) medical students. ... Despite numerous attempts, the response rate to the study was very poor, with only ... in this manner outweighed that obtained by self-study/attendance of lectures.

  17. Drug Use Pattern Among Medical Students in a Nigerian University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % (38/246), tobacco 15% ..... alcohol abuse found that people who are highly religious are less likely to use ... in Malaysia reported that 41.9% of the medical students .... Segal B. Adolescent initiation into drug-taking behavior:.

  18. Association between sleep hygiene and sleep quality in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, Cameron A; Seely, Darbi L; Palermo, Tonya M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether subjective sleep quality was reduced in medical students, and whether demographics and sleep hygiene behaviors were associated with sleep quality. A Web-based survey was completed by 314 medical students, containing questions about demographics, sleep habits, exercise habits, caffeine, tobacco and alcohol use, and subjective sleep quality (using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Correlation and regression analyses tested for associations among demographics, sleep hygiene behaviors, and sleep quality. As hypothesized, medical students' sleep quality was significantly worse than a healthy adult normative sample (t = 5.13, p sleep quality in medical students was predicted by several demographic and sleep hygiene variables, and future research directions are proposed.

  19. Variation of semen parameters in healthy medical students due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation of semen parameters in healthy medical students due to exam ... period when compared to samples donated at the beginning of the semester. Conclusion Stress levels of donors might prove to be clinically relevant and important ...

  20. Medical Students' Personal Determinants of Overcoming Strategies in Difficult Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veretelnikova Yu.Ya.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the research was to study conditionality of overcoming strategies in difficult situations of social interaction by personal representations of attitude to others among medical students. Material and methods. 134 first-year students of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky took part in the comparative diagnostic study. Results. Comparison of average indices of various strategies evidence in coping behaviour allowed revealing statistically significant dependence of coping behaviour modi in difficult situations of social interaction upon types of personal representations of attitude toward others and gender features of forming effective strategies of coping behaviour among medical students. Conclusion. Correlation between coping behaviour modi in difficult situations of social interaction and typology of personal representations of attitudes toward others among medical students was marked.

  1. Pretoria medical students' perspectives on assessable attributes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pretoria medical students' perspectives on assessable attributes of ... in the New Millennium‿, was published by the Annals of Internal Medicine in February 2002. ... of this Charter's principles and responsibilities in the South African context.

  2. Medical students' experience and perceptions of their final rotation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    led by consultants, and sessions devoted to interpersonal and microcommunication ... Objective. To evaluate medical students' perceptions of their final psychiatry rotation of 7 weeks. Methods. .... relationships between factors and individual.

  3. Small Steps in Impacting Clinical Auscultation of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edem K. Binka MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if a training module improves the auscultation skills of medical students at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Second-year medical students completed pretests on 12 heart sounds followed by a 45-minute training module on clinical auscultation, with retesting immediately after the intervention and during their third-year pediatrics clerkship. The control group consisted of third-year medical students who did not have the intervention. There was a 23% improvement in the identification of heart sounds postintervention (P < .001. Diastolic and valvular murmurs were poorly identified pre- and post intervention. There was a 6% decline in accuracy of the intervention group in the following academic year. The intervention group was superior to the control group at identifying the tested heart sounds (49% vs 43%, P = .04. The accuracy of second-year medical students in identifying heart sounds improved after a brief training module.

  4. Attitudes and Views of Medical Students toward Science and Pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Adolfo; Paco, Ofelia

    2004-12-01

    To know opinions, attitudes and interest of medical students toward science and pseudoscience. A questionnaire was administered to 124 medical students of the San Marcos University in Lima, Peru. 173 students were surveyed. The response rate was 72%. Eighty-three percent (100/121) of respondents said that science is the best source of knowledge, 67% (82/123) said they were interested in science and technology news, 76% said they had not read any science magazine or book (other than medical texts and journals) in the last five years. Thirteen percent (16/124) of respondents said that astrology is "very scientific" and 40% (50/124) stated that it is "sort of scientific." 50% of respondents shared the opinion that some people possess psychic powers. Medical students' attitudes toward science are generally not favorable.

  5. Use of cognitive enhancers among medical students in Lithuania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aiste Lengvenyte; Robertas Strumila; Jurgita Grikiniene

    2016-01-01

      AIMS - The purpose of this study is to analyse the use of cognitive enhancers among medical students in Lithuania, determine the reasons for usage and evaluate the contributing factors such as socio...

  6. Use of cognitive enhancers among medical students in Lithuania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lengvenyte Aiste; Strumila Robertas; Grikiniene Jurgita

    2016-01-01

    AIMS – The purpose of this study is to analyse the use of cognitive enhancers among medical students in Lithuania, determine the reasons for usage and evaluate the contributing factors such as socio...

  7. A CROSS - SECTIONAL STUDY ON SELF MEDICATION PATTERN AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS AT KANNUR, NORTH KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Self medication is mainly symptomatic based and may lead to the masking of signs and symptoms of underlying disease. Medical students being exposed to the subjects in medicine are more prone for self medic ation. This raises the concerns of incorrect self - diagnosis, drug interaction, and use of drugs other than for the original indication. AIMS: To study the pattern of self medication among medical students and to determine the factors affecting it. METHODS AND MATERIAL: STUDY DESIGN & SETTING: A cross - sectional descriptive study done in a medical college. Study Duration: March 15 th to April 20 th 2013. Participants: Out of 400 students, 302 students who were willing to participate and available during study p eriod were enrolled in the study. R epresentation from all phases/batches of MBBS course was ensured, accounting to 77, 84, 63 and 78 students from first, second, third and final phase of MBBS. Data collection: By self administered pre - tested & validated qu estionnaire . Statistical analysis was done by applying proportions/percentages. RESULTS: Out of 302 participants, 25.8% were males & 74.2% were females. Practice of self medication was reported by 64.9% students. It was 16.9% in first phase students which shoot to 100% in final phase. Practice of self medication was higher in males while the frequency of self medication was higher in females. Seniors (89.8% and previous prescriptions (87.2% were the most common sources for reference. Fever (70.4%, commo n cold (67.8% and headache/bodyache (64.7% were the common reasons for self medication. Analgesics (79.6%, antipyretics (79.6% and anti - histaminic (72.4% were the most common drugs used for self medication. 30.1% of them took antibiotics and 9.7% seda tives without prescription. 80.1% (157 of those who took self medication said that they prescribed drugs for others also (friends/relatives. None of them suffered any adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: The

  8. The learning environment and medical student burnout: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Thomas, Matthew R; Harper, William; Massie, F Stanford; Power, David V; Eacker, Anne; Szydlo, Daniel W; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2009-03-01

    Little is known about specific personal and professional factors influencing student distress. The authors conducted a comprehensive assessment of how learning environment, clinical rotation factors, workload, demographics and personal life events relate to student burnout. All medical students (n = 3080) at five medical schools were surveyed in the spring of 2006 using a validated instrument to assess burnout. Students were also asked about the aforementioned factors. A total of 1701 medical students (response rate 55%) completed the survey. Learning climate factors were associated with student burnout on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 1.36-2.07; all P personal life event had a lower frequency of burnout (OR 0.70; P personal life events did not have a higher frequency of burnout than students who did not experience a negative personal life event. On multivariate analysis personal characteristics, learning environment and personal life events were all independently related to student burnout. Although a complex array of personal and professional factors influence student well-being, student satisfaction with specific characteristics of the learning environment appears to be a critical factor. Studies determining how to create a learning environment that cultivates student well-being are needed.

  9. Using Simulation to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Ability to Identify Medication Errors Involving the Top 100 Prescription Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayee, Rabia S; Awdishu, Linda; Namba, Jennifer

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To evaluate first-year pharmacy students' ability to identify medication errors involving the top 100 prescription medications. Design. In the first quarter of a 3-quarter pharmacy self-care course, a didactic lecture on the most common prescribing and dispensing prescription errors was presented to first-year pharmacy students (P1) in preparation for a prescription review simulation done individually and as a group. In the following quarter, they were given a formal prescription review workshop before a second simulation involving individual and group review of a different set of prescriptions. Students were evaluated based on the number of correctly checked prescriptions and a self-assessment of their confidence in reviewing prescriptions. Assessment. All 63 P1 students completed the prescription review simulations. The individual scores did not significantly change, but group scores improved from 79 (16.2%) in the fall quarter to 98.6 (4.7%) in the winter quarter. Students perceived improvement of their prescription checking skills, specifically in their ability to fill a prescription on their own, identify prescribing and dispensing errors, and perform pharmaceutical calculations. Conclusion. A prescription review module consisting of a didactic lecture, workshop and simulation-based methods to teach prescription analysis was successful at improving first year pharmacy students' knowledge, confidence, and application of these skills.

  10. Incorporating the principles of the patient- centered medical home into a student-run free clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddle MC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Megan C Riddle,1,* Jiahui Lin,3,* Jonathan B Steinman,2 Joshua D Salvi,2 Margaret M Reynolds,3 Anne S Kastor,3,† Christina Harris,4 Carla Boutin-Foster3 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 2Weill Cornell/Rockefeller/Sloan-Kettering Tri-Institutional MD–PhD Program, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, 4Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, LA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work †Anne S Kastor passed away on July 5, 2013. Abstract: As the health care delivery landscape changes, medical schools must develop creative strategies for preparing future physicians to provide quality care in this new environment. Despite the growing prominence of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH as an effective model for health care delivery, few medical schools have integrated formal education on the PCMH into their curricula. Incorporating the PCMH model into medical school curricula is important to ensure that students have a comprehensive understanding of the different models of health care delivery and can operate effectively as physicians. The authors provide a detailed description of the process by which the Weill Cornell Community Clinic (WCCC, a student-run free clinic, has integrated PCMH principles into a service-learning initiative. The authors assessed patient demographics, diagnoses, and satisfaction along with student satisfaction. During the year after a PCMH model was adopted, 112 students and 19 licensed physicians volunteered their time. A review of the 174 patients seen from July 2011 to June 2012 found that the most common medical reasons for visits included management of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, gastrointestinal conditions, arthritis, anxiety, and depression. During the year after the adoption of the PCMH model, 87

  11. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development......This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  12. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  13. Educational assessment of medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J Christian; Cusick, Seric; Scruggs, William; Henson, Travis W; Anderson, Craig L; Barajas, Graciela; Zlidenny, Alexander; McDonough, Joanne; Langdorf, Mark I

    2007-08-01

    Medical student ultrasound education is sparse. In 2002, we began the first medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound. To evaluate if medical students can learn and retain sonographic skills during a two- or four-week elective. We gave students an exam on the first and last days of the rotation. Six months later, students took the exam a third time. A control group was used for comparison. Over a 19-month period, we enrolled 45 students (25 on the two-week and 20 on the four-week elective). The four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two- week post-test score (81% vs 72%, p=0.003). On the six-month exam, the four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two-week post-test score (77% vs 69%, p=0.008). The control group did not statistically improve. Medical students can learn bedside ultrasound interpretation with clinical integration and retain the knowledge six months later.

  14. Educational Assessment of Medical Student Rotation in Emergency Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox, J Christian

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical student ultrasound education is sparse. In 2002, we began the first medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound. Objective: To evaluate if medical students can learn and retain sonographic skills during a two- or four-week elective. Methods: We gave students an exam on the first and last days of the rotation. Six months later, students took the exam a third time. A control group was used for comparison. Results: Over a 19-month period, we enrolled 45 students (25 on the two-week and 20 on the four-week elective. The four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two- week posttest score (81% vs. 72%, p=0.003. On the six-month exam, the four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two-week post-test score (77% vs 69%, p=0.008. The control group did not statistically improve. Conclusion: Medical students can learn bedside ultrasound interpretation with clinical integration and retain the knowledge six months later.

  15. Development of a Modified Korean East Asian Student Stress Inventory by Comparing Stress Levels in Medical Students with Those in Non-Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Kon; Kang, Seok Hoon; Lim, Sun-Hye; Yang, Jeong Hee; Chae, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Medical students are usually under more stress than that experienced by non-medical students. Stress testing tools for Korean medical students have not been sufficiently studied. Thus, we adapted and modified the East Asian Student Stress Inventory (EASSI), a stress testing tool for Korean students studying abroad, and verified its usefulness as a stress test in Korean university students. We also compared and analyzed stress levels between medical and non-medical students. A questionnaire survey was conducted on medical and non-medical students of a national university, and the responses of 224 students were analyzed for this study. Factor analysis and reliability testing were performed based on data collected for 25 adapted EASSI questions and those on the Korean version of the Global Assessment of Recent Stress Scale (GARSS). A correlation analysis was performed between the 13 modified EASSI questions and the GARSS, and validity of the modified EASSI was verified by directly comparing stress levels between the two student groups. The 13 questions adapted for the EASSI were called the modified EASSI and classified into four factors through a factor analysis and reliability testing. The Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between the modified EASSI and the Korean version of the GARSS, suggesting a complementary strategy of using both tests. The validity and reliability of the EASSI were verified. The modified Korean EASSI could be a useful stress test for Korean medical students. Our results show that medical students were under more stress than that of non-medical students. Thus, these results could be helpful for managing stress in medical students.

  16. Medical students call for national standards in anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farey, John E; Sandeford, Jonathan C; Evans-McKendry, Greg D

    2014-11-01

    The diminishing number of hours dedicated to formal instruction in anatomy has led to a debate within medical education as to the level required for safe clinical practice. We provide a review of the current state of anatomical education in Australian medical schools and state the case for national standards. In light of the review presented, council members of the Australian Medical Students' Association voted to affirm that consideration should be given to developing undergraduate learning goals for anatomy, providing a codified medical student position on the teaching of anatomy in Australian medical schools. Crucially, the position states that time-intensive methods of instruction such as dissection should be a rite of passage for medical students in the absence of evidence demonstrating the superiority of modern teaching methods. We believe the bodies with a vested interest in the quality of medical graduates, namely the Australian Medical Council, Medical Deans Australia & New Zealand, and the postgraduate colleges should collaborate and develop clear guidelines that make explicit the core knowledge of anatomy expected of medical graduates at each stage of their career with a view to safe clinical practice. In addition, Australian universities have a role to play in conducting further research into contemporary learning styles and the most efficacious methods of delivering anatomical education. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. [Good death: euthanasia in the eyes of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuře, Josef; Vaňharová, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Both in the general public and in the professional communities, very diverse notions of euthanasia can be found. At the same time determining of the precise semantics of euthanasia is one of the crucial prerequisites for subsequent meaningful ethical discussion of euthanasia. The paper analyzes an empirical study investigating the understanding of euthanasia by medical students. The aim of the conducted research was to identify the semantic definitions of euthanasia used by the first-year medical students.

  18. Association Between Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality in Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Brick, Cameron A.; Seely, Darbi L.; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether subjective sleep quality was reduced in medical students, and whether demographics and sleep hygiene behaviors were associated with sleep quality. A Web-based survey was completed by 314 medical students, containing questions about demographics, sleep habits, exercise habits, caffeine, tobacco and alcohol use, and subjective sleep quality (using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Correlation and regression analyses tested for associations among...

  19. Personality types and specialist choices in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Syed Imran; Khan, Muhammad Abid; Walsh, Kieran M; Borleffs, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    Research on the correlation between personality and students' specialty choice is helpful in their career counselling process and in predicting the future distribution of the specialties in a country. This study is the first of its kind in the Arab world. The research questions were: (1) What is the influence of gender on the personality profiles of medical students? (2) What are the personality profiles of students categorized according to their preferred specialist choices? (3) What are the preferred career choices of students categorized according to the stage of their medical education? A cross-sectional study was performed at King Khalid University Medical School including 590 students during the academic year 2010-2011. A long version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman personality questionnaire measuring five personality factors was used. Students were also asked for their specialty interests. Students were asked by means of a written questionnaire. Study response was 92.5%. Surgery was the single most popular specialty amongst both male and female students. Males had significantly higher scores on the 'impulsive sensation seeking' scale and students preferring a surgery specialty had the highest score on the 'impulsive sensation seeking', 'neuroticism-anxiety', 'aggression-hostility' and 'sociability' scales. Hospital-based, surgical and primary care specialties became more popular as students progressed through their undergraduate years. Different personality types have distinct preferences in medical students' choice of careers. Personality and specialty choice research can enhance career counselling of medical students and fresh graduates. This also has implications for predicting the specialty distribution of the future health careers.

  20. Why should medical students study Social Gerontology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Anthea; Hussain, Labib; D'Cruz, Jack Lilly; Tai, William Yee Seng; Zaidman, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) provides a core curriculum for all medical degrees in the UK. However, these guidelines do not provide in-depth, specific learning outcomes for the various medical specialties. Recognising our ageing population, the British Geriatrics Society in 2013 published their own supplementary guidelines to encourage and further direct teaching on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine in medical school curricula. Although teaching on Geriatric Medicine, a sub-discipline of Gerontology, has reassuringly increased in UK medical schools, there are convincing arguments for greater emphasis to be placed on the teaching of another sub-discipline: Social Gerontology. Considering the skills and knowledge likely to be gained from the teaching of Social Gerontology, in this paper we argue for the greater universal adoption of its teaching. This would help ensure that the doctors of tomorrow are better equipped to manage more successfully and holistically the growing cohort of older patients.