WorldWideScience

Sample records for preparation students receive

  1. Virginia Tech student receives Student Leadership Award

    OpenAIRE

    Dickerson, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The Outstanding Undergraduate Student Leader Award is one of 10 University Student Leadership Awards given annually by Virginia Tech's Department of Student Activities in the Division of Student Affairs to recognize outstanding members, extraordinary achievements by an organization, advisers, volunteerism, and service-learning experiences.

  2. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international......A. Friesel. Preparing Students for Globalization Working with International Teams with Projects // Electronics and Electrical Engineering. - Kaunas: Technologija, 2019. - No. 6(102). - P. 111-114. This paper summarizes the activities, contents and overall outcomes of our experiences...... with international students studying at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering (in short - IHK); in particular students coming for one semester exchange program under Erasmus-programme. IHK's participation in EU-supported programmes like EIE-Surveyor and ELLEIEC, both ERASMUS thematic networks, have...

  3. Preparing Student Mobility through Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, Marta; Jeanneau, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, going to a foreign country has become all the more significant for Higher Education (HE) students, as concepts such as internationalisation and intercultural competencies have gained a more prominent role in HE. For students to fully benefit from this experience, it is paramount to prepare them for their stay in a foreign country…

  4. Preparing Students for Studying Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    This study is situated in the fields of language education, study abroad (SA) and intercultural communication. The interest in SA is increasing on the part of students, administrators, educators, and business companies for the learning opportunities that it offers. However, SA students are not always prepared to maximize their learning…

  5. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international...... semesters demonstrates the success of this form of education. Equally, the growing number of projects coming from industry demonstrates their positive interest in these kinds of skills for their future employees. Bibl. 6, tabl. 1 (in English; abstracts in English, Russian and Lithuanian)....

  6. Legal Protections Gay Students Must Receive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses practical guidance on schools' legal rights and responsibilities with respect to students, programs, and curriculum. Like all other individuals, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are guaranteed equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and free speech and association under the…

  7. Legal Protections Gay Students Must Receive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses practical guidance on schools' legal rights and responsibilities with respect to students, programs, and curriculum. Like all other individuals, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are guaranteed equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and free speech and association under the…

  8. Preparing Graduate Students as Science Communicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K.; Gutstein, J.

    2012-12-01

    Our presentation introduces our interdisciplinary curriculum that teaches graduate students at our R-1 university to translate their research to general audiences. We also discuss the challenges we have faced and strategies we have employed to broaden graduate education at our campus to include preparation in science communication. Our "Translating Research beyond Academia" curriculum consists of three separate thematically based courses taught over the academic year: Education and Community Outreach, Science Communication and Writing, Communicating with Policy- and Decision-makers. Course goals are to provide professional development training so that graduate students become more capable professionals prepared for careers inside and outside academia while increasing the public understanding of science and technology. Open to graduate students of any discipline, each course meets weekly for two hours; students receive academic credit through a co-sponsoring graduate program. Students learn effective strategies for communicating research and academic knowledge with the media, the general public, youth, stakeholders, and decision- and policy-makers. Courses combine presentations from university and regional experts with hands-on work sessions aimed towards creating effective communications, outreach and policy plans, broader impacts statements, press releases, blogs, and policy briefs. A final presentation and reflections are required. Students may opt for further training through seminars tailored to student need. Initial results of our analyses of student evaluations and work indicate that students appreciate the interdisciplinary, problem-based approach and the low-risk opportunities for learning professional development skills and for exploring non-academic employment. Several students have initiated engaged work in their disciplines, and several have secured employment in campus science communication positions. Two have changed career plans as a direct result of

  9. Midwifery students receiving the newborn at birth: A pilot study of the impact of structured training in neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Angela; Sweet, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The experience of midwifery students in receiving the newborn at birth, before and after structured training in neonatal resuscitation: A pilot study. The practice of receiving the newborn, including neonatal resuscitation is an essential component of midwifery. Anecdotal evidence suggests preparation for the task is ad hoc within midwifery curricula, leading to student's anxiety. This paper reports impacts of neonatal resuscitation training upon levels of knowledge, preparedness, and anxiety for midwifery students receiving the newborn. Midwifery students participated in an online questionnaire before and after neonatal resuscitation training. The responses collected were subjected to descriptive analysis. Of 10 students invited, 6 completed the pre and post course questionnaires. Knowledge of the responsibility in receiving the newborn and instigation of resuscitation increased after attending the course. Steps to prepare to receive the newborn and clinical signs for initial assessment remained static. Students felt more prepared to receive the newborn after the course but did not improve in their preparation to initiate resuscitation. Anxiety levels remained static. Structured neonatal resuscitation training and strategies to ensure application of skills learnt should be embedded into midwifery curricula. Midwifery students' experience in receiving the newborn and neonatal resuscitation is worthy of further study.

  10. Student Preparation for the International Environmental Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Meehan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have strategies for exposing students to international experiences, but little is reported on their implementation. One example of an implemented activity is the multidisciplinary research project for undergraduate environment students, at RMIT University, that both prepares students to work in the environment profession and…

  11. Preparing Students for Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Richard; Peterson, Amelia; Weinstein, Emily

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aspects in our lives is learning how to have mutual, caring romantic relationships. Yet while schools and many other industries in this country devote tremendous attention and resources to preparing the young for work, they do remarkably little to prepare them for generous, self-respecting sex and love. Educators and…

  12. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald J.; Grossman, Pamela L.; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, whereas others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  13. Preparing Students for the Electronic Cottage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Sally L.; Burdin, Joel

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on Alvin Toffler's "electronic cottage" concept as a way of helping counselors become aware of futuristic thinking patterns, changing work roles and patterns in society, and techniques for preparing students for these changes. (Author/ABB)

  14. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  15. The Student Mathematics Portfolio: Value Added to Student Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes key elements for educators to successfully implement a student mathematics portfolio in an undergraduate mathematics course. This article offers practical advice for implementing a student mathematics portfolio in a freshman precalculus course. We look at the potential value added to student class preparation and compare our…

  16. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  17. Characteristics of Students Receiving Counselling Services at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisher, Alan J.; De Beer, Jeremy P.; Bokhorst, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to document the correlates of receiving counseling services at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Results reveal that non-English speakers, humanities students, undergraduates, first-year students, students who were eligible to receive financial assistance, and students from outside Cape Town were significantly…

  18. Doctoral student receives grant to analyze housing choice voucher

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2005-01-01

    Kimberly Mitchell, of Blacksburg, Va., a second-year doctoral student in Virginia Tech's College of Architecture and Urban Studies Environmental Design and Planning Program, has been awarded an Early Doctoral Student Research Grant by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Mitchell's research, "Whose Choice Is It Really? An Analysis of Property Owner and Manager Characteristics and Their Impact on Housing Choice Voucher Acceptance," will investigate the impact of individu...

  19. How do medical students prepare for flipped classrooms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM; de Kleijn, R.A.M.; ten Cate, TJ; van Rijen, HVM; Westerveld, HE

    A flipped classroom, an approach abandoning traditional lectures and having students come together to apply acquired knowledge, requires students to come to class well prepared. The nature of this preparation is currently being debated. Watching web lectures as a preparation has typically been

  20. Chinese Students' Perceptions of the Value of Test Preparation Courses for the TOEFL iBT: Merit, Worth, and Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jia; Cheng, Liying

    2015-01-01

    Test preparation for high-stakes English language tests has received increasing research attention in the language assessment field; however, little is known about what aspects of test preparation students attend to and value. In this study, we considered the perspectives of 12 Chinese students who were enrolled in various academic programs in a…

  1. Subsequent Success in a Mathematics Course by Students Who Received a Grade in Intermediate Algebra (Math 253) for the Fall, 2002 Semester at Saddleback College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sworder, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a typical California community college Intermediate Algebra course in preparing students for success in the transfer level mathematics courses for which Intermediate Algebra was the prerequisite. The subsequent mathematics course taken by each of the 986 students who received a grade…

  2. A Comparison of Service Delivery Models for Special Education Middle School Students Receiving Moderate Intervention Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Mason, Keely S.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to improve academic performance for students receiving special education services, a large urban school district in Tennessee has implemented Integrated Service Delivery Model. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of students receiving instruction in self-contained classrooms to the performance of students…

  3. Differences in Mathematics Scores Between Students Who Receive Traditional Montessori Instruction and Students Who Receive Music Enriched Montessori Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Maureen Ann

    2007-01-01

    While a growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance the value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized. If research of students in the school system indicates that learning through the arts can benefit the ‘whole’ child, that math achievement scores are significantly higher for those students studying music, and if Montessori education produces a more academically accomplished child, then what is the potential for the child wh...

  4. Differences in Mathematics Scores Between Students Who Receive Traditional Montessori Instruction and Students Who Receive Music Enriched Montessori Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Maureen Ann

    2007-01-01

    While a growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance the value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized. If research of students in the school system indicates that learning through the arts can benefit the ‘whole’ child, that math achievement scores are significantly higher for those students studying music, and if Montessori education produces a more academically accomplished child, then what is the potential for the child wh...

  5. Preparing Today's Nursing Students for Tomorrow's Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Federal directives, nursing and nursing education associations, as well as accrediting bodies emphasize the importance of integrating health information technology and EHRs into nursing practice. Additionally, informatics is a required competency of baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing education's efforts to enhance students' learning in the area of electronic documentation is at its peak. The goal of enabling nurses to make healthcare safer, more effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable can only be achieved if a variety of technologies are clearly integrated into nursing education. Therefore, some schools have developed educational innovations to incorporate academic EHRs. As the mental health setting is unique, extraordinary attention has to be provided during the education of electronic documentation. Nursing education efforts must focus on interventions that provide resources that enhance the participant's knowledge and skills related to electronic documentation in a variety of clinical settings. Additionally, implementing academic EHRs in clinical settings offers nursing educators an opportunity to note the benefits. The state of nursing education depends on the accessibility to utilize academic EHRs in the nursing curriculum within the clinical setting to effectively prepare students for real-word practice.

  6. Simulation Pedagogy With Nurse Practitioner Students: Impact of Receiving Immediate Individualized Faculty Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sheila; Conelius, Jaclyn

    2015-01-01

    Family nurse practitioner (FNP) students must achieve basic competency in managing patients' primary care needs across the lifespan. Students in the FNP program have simulations integrated throughout their clinical theory courses to increase practice time with various patient cases. Students who received individualized faculty feedback immediately after self-evaluation of simulation performance showed statistically significantly increased knowledge (as evidenced by higher grades in course examinations and preceptor evaluations) than a control group of students who received feedback in a group class via a rubric grading guide 2-4 weeks after all students completed their individual simulations.

  7. Examining Life Goals and School Attendance Rates of Afghan Students Receiving Higher Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    This research is a descriptive study carried out to examine the relations between life goals and school attendance levels among Afghan students receiving higher education in Turkey. In total there were 198 Afghan students that participated in the study. Among which 159 were male and 39 female. All of these students were studying in 16 Turkish…

  8. Differences in Mathematics Scores between Students Who Receive Traditional Montessori Instruction and Students Who Receive Music Enriched Montessori Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Maureen Ann

    2007-01-01

    While a growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance the value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized. If research of students in the school system indicates that learning through the arts can benefit the "whole" child, that math achievement scores are significantly…

  9. Ready or not? Expectations of faculty and medical students for clinical skills preparation for clerkships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Wenrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preclerkship clinical-skills training has received increasing attention as a foundational preparation for clerkships. Expectations among medical students and faculty regarding the clinical skills and level of skill mastery needed for starting clerkships are unknown. Medical students, faculty teaching in the preclinical setting, and clinical clerkship faculty may have differing expectations of students entering clerkships. If students' expectations differ from faculty expectations, students may experience anxiety. Alternately, congruent expectations among students and faculty may facilitate integrated and seamless student transitions to clerkships. Aims: To assess the congruence of expectations among preclerkship faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students for the clinical skills and appropriate level of clinical-skills preparation needed to begin clerkships. Methods: Investigators surveyed preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students early in their basic clerkships at a North American medical school that focuses on preclerkship clinical-skills development. Survey questions assessed expectations for the appropriate level of preparation in basic and advanced clinical skills for students entering clerkships. Results: Preclinical faculty and students had higher expectations than clerkship faculty for degree of preparation in most basic skills. Students had higher expectations than both faculty groups for advanced skills preparation. Conclusions: Preclinical faculty, clerkship faculty, and medical students appear to have different expectations of clinical-skills training needed for clerkships. As American medical schools increasingly introduce clinical-skills training prior to clerkships, more attention to alignment, communication, and integration between preclinical and clerkship faculty will be important to establish common curricular agendas and increase integration of student learning. Clarification of skills

  10. Roles of Principals in the Preparing Students to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Bingul, Murat

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the impacts of school leaders on the school curriculums of preparing students to life. Even if the school leaders and teachers are expert in their area related to the functions of the schools, it seems that schools are failing in the preparation of the students to life. The school leaders may play an important role to…

  11. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  12. In Their Words: Student Preparation and Perspectives on US Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    US universities are admitting higher percentages of international students, bringing into focus concerns with how to best support them once they are at the university. However, less attention has been paid to the preparation they undertake before matriculation. This study looks at how students are prepared before arrival and how this preparation…

  13. Engineering students receive donated equipment for EcoCAR Challenge project

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Student members of the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team of Virginia Tech (HEVT) recently received donated auto parts worth $87,000 from lithium ion battery manufacturer A123 Systems as part of the North America EcoCAR Challenge.

  14. Preparing College Students to Teach an Environmental Problem Solving Curriculum to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    An NSF-funded project-based program was implemented by Clarkson University in 2000 to increase the interest and knowledge of middle school students in science, math and technology through the solution of an environmental problem that is relevant to their local school community. Clarkson students developed curricula for 7th and 8th grade science and technology classes and then worked with the middle school students throughout the year to reduce to transform solid waste into healthy soil for plant growth. The solution to this problem provided a vehicle to teach fundamental science and math content as well as the process of doing science and solving problems. Placing college science and engineering students in the classroom proved to be a great mechanism for engaging students in science topics and providing mentoring experiences that differ greatly from those that a practicing professional can provide. It is clear, however, that the students must be well prepared for this experience to maximize the benefits of university - school district partnership programs. The objective of this presentation will be to describe the training program that has been developed to prepare Clarkson students to work effectively in middle school classrooms. The Clarkson students are trained for their classroom experiences during the summer before they enter the classroom. They receive three credits for the training, curriculum development, and teaching efforts. It is expected that the students have the necessary background in science and technology to teach themselves the content and environmental relevance of the problem they will be teaching. Lectures and workshops focus on how to transform this knowledge into a project-based curriculum that meets the needs of the teachers, while also exciting the students. Lecture/workshops include: team work; components of an effective class and teacher; project planning and management; problem solving process; inquiry based learning, deductive

  15. University Preparation for Native American Students: Theory and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Jeanna; Chiste, Katherine Beaty

    1986-01-01

    Describes a summer program at the University of Lethbridge designed to improve the retention and graduation rates of Native American students, most of whom are adult reentry students with incomplete secondary school preparation; covers program theory, cultural background, staffing, student screening, curriculum, and outcomes. (JHZ)

  16. Preparing Students for After-College Life: The Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelli K.

    2012-01-01

    Historical context informs the work of student affairs professionals and others in higher education in striking the right balance in helping prepare students for life after college, but significant new pressures face students, their mentors, and educational institutions today. This chapter discusses the contexts that shape the work of student…

  17. Are We Still Receiving a Colored Education? Education of Black Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Marjorie

    With the 1964 Civil Rights Act, school segregation was to come to an end, but it may be that black students are still receiving a "colored" education. There are inequities and prejudices in U.S. institutions, and these have tremendous influences on how African Americans are perceived and accepted. The nation's African American students are…

  18. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  19. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  20. Preparing Students for College... and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; Mero, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    In many ways, Roxbury Preparatory Charter School is typical of Boston's Mission Hill area: the student body is composed entirely of students of color, most of whom live in single-parent households. More than 68% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals. What is not typical is that for the fourth consecutive year, Roxbury Prep, which…

  1. Help Students Prepare for High School Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Christopher; Connor, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety! Stress! Fear! Everyone lives in a time of escalating accountability in terms of state, district, and city-wide examinations that measure student growth in the acquisition of skills and content area knowledge. All students feel increased pressure to constantly demonstrate improved levels of academic performance. For students with cognitive…

  2. Online Discussion Assignments Improve Students' Class Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T.

    2010-01-01

    To increase the number of students who read the text before class and to promote student interaction centering on text material, I developed an online discussion assignment as a required component of a cognitive psychology course. Across 2 studies, this assignment had a limited effect on examination performance, but students completing online…

  3. Collaboration between students and teachers to accumulate a collection of anatomical preparations of high quality in order to loan them to students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friker, Jutta

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2002 the Veterinary Medicine Faculty of Munich University (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität a project was started to involve students to build up a collection of anatomical preparations. The goal of this plan was to obtain long term preserved preparations for storage in boxes of plastic in order to loan them to students. The question to solve was whether it is possible and efficient to engage students. The cadavers were provided from the section hall. We used only material from animals without clinical symptoms. The students were provided with a list of themes to choose from, or they could submit a proposal. Before starting the preparation, as a first step, the basic material was conserved in a special non-toxic solution, developed at the institute of anatomy. Students could perform the preparations during the semester as well as in semester holidays. Scientific assistants helped the students throughout the project. The period specified to assemble the preparations was one semester plus semester holiday. Over the last two years we have received preparations of different quality. About one third of the preparations were of high quality and suitable for long term preservation. Approximately thirty percent of the students required two semesters to finish their preparations. The remaining preparations had to be rejected because students did not complete their project or the preparations were unsuitable for use. Students are very fascinated with this project. Every semester we accept only half of the applicants due to the overwhelming student interest. In summary, it is shown that the collaboration between the students and teachers can help to expand the learning and teaching tools. Students and teachers benefit from this teamwork. Although some preparations have to be eliminated, the students are able to apply their knowledge while gaining experience with the scalpel and tweeters.

  4. Special Education Services Received by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders from Preschool through High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Wagner, Mary; Christiano, Elizabeth R A; Shattuck, Paul; Yu, Jennifer W

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about how special education services received by students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) differ by age, disability severity, and demographic characteristics. Using three national datasets, the Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), the Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study (SEELS), and the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), this study examined the age trends in special education services received by students with ASDs from preschool through high school. Elementary-school students with ASDs had higher odds of receiving adaptive physical education, specialized computer software or hardware, and special transportation, but lower odds of receiving learning strategies/study skills support than their preschool peers. Secondary-school students had lower odds of receiving speech/language or occupational therapy and of having a behavior management program, but higher odds of receiving mental health or social work services than their elementary-school peers. Both disability severity and demographic characteristics were associated with differences in special education service receipt rates.

  5. Oregon Students Help Prepare Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Tom

    1973-01-01

    Describes a field-biology research project conducted at Coos Bay, Oregon by high school students attending the summer sessions at Terramar Field Science Facility during the summer of 1972. Discusses the value of this type of environmental survey for both the students and the community. (JR)

  6. Community Colleges: Preparing Students for Diverse Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    Postgraduation outcomes for community college students are complex. In addition to traditional job placement and earnings information, transferring to a 4-year institution is a positive first-destination outcome. Furthermore, community college students may have education and career goals that do not include earning a degree. Community college…

  7. Student USMLE Step One Preparation and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    This study investigated factors associated with medical students performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step One examination. The USMLE Step One emphasizes basic mechanisms and principles that are typically covered in the first 2 years of medical school. The study examined the relationship among student performance…

  8. Are Teacher and Principal Candidates Prepared to Address Student Cyberbullying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Bonner, Jessica L.; Styron, Jennifer L.; Bridgeforth, James; Martin, Cecelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the preparation of teacher and principal candidates to address problems created in K-12 settings as a result of cyberbullying. Participants included teacher and principal preparation students. Findings indicated that respondents were familiar with the most common forms of cyberbullying and its impact on…

  9. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  10. Intercultural Preparation for Future Mobile Students: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, Ana; Golubeva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Higher education (HE) student mobility offers the opportunity to acquire, among other things, intercultural experience. Nevertheless, it is crucial to prepare students and give them the tools to reflect on their experiences before, during and after study abroad. In this pedagogical paper, we present and discuss "Perceptions of self and…

  11. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  12. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  13. Preparing Students for Critical-Thinking Applications on Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jacquelyn Kaye

    2010-01-01

    Student performance on critical-thinking applications on standardized tests in a southwestern U.S. state has been low for several years. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore how one school district prepared students for critical-thinking applications on standardized tests. The study was informed by cognitivism and…

  14. Perfection of physical preparation of students by facilities of boxing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylovskiy O.V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The question of physical preparedness of students of the unspecialized institutes of higher of I-IV of courses is considered. Offered and grounded idea of the use of facilities of boxing in form educational trainings employments. They are used for perfection of physical preparation of students as an alternative to the lessons on physical education. For the students of experimental group more considerable increase of indexes of physical preparedness is marked by comparison to a control group.

  15. (Academic) preparation of/for students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Engstrøm, Emma; Sandermann, Weibke

    of both cases include the methodological empirical approach, emphasis on the process of ‘othering’, ethnocentrism and ethno- racial representations. The first case deals with pre-departure preparation inspired by MUD (memory, understanding and doing) principles, while the second deals with the ongoing in...

  16. An elective pharmaceutical care course to prepare students for an advanced pharmacy practice experience in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhase, Ellen M; Miller, Monica L; Ogallo, William; Pastakia, Sonak D

    2013-04-12

    OBJECTIVE. To develop a prerequisite elective course to prepare students for an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Kenya. DESIGN. The course addressed Kenyan culture, travel preparation, patient care, and disease-state management. Instructional formats used were small-group discussions and lectures, including some Web-based presentations by Kenyan pharmacists on disease states commonly treated in Kenya. Cultural activities include instruction in conversational and medical Kiswahili and reading of a novel related to global health programs. ASSESSMENT. Student performance was assessed using written care plans, quizzes, reflection papers, a formulary management exercise, and pre- and post-course assessments. Student feedback on course evaluations indicated that the course was well received and students felt prepared for the APPE. CONCLUSION. This course offered a unique opportunity for students to learn about pharmacy practice in global health and to apply previously acquired skills in a resource-constrained international setting. It prepares students to actively participate in clinical care activities during an international APPE.

  17. Documentation associated with the WESF preparation for receiving 25 cesium capsules from the Applied Radiant Energy Corporation (ARECO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, M.W.

    1996-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to compile all documentation associated with facility preparation of WESF to receive 25 cesium capsules from ARECO. The WESF validated it`s preparedness by completing a facility preparedness review using a performance indicator checklist.

  18. STS-29 crewmembers receive briefing on Student Experiment (SE) 83-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers receive briefing on Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' from student experimenter John C. Vellinger and sponsor Mark S. Deusser. Vellinger (right) explains operation of an incubator used in his experiment to crewmembers, seated around table, and other support personnel in audience. Clockwise from Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer (hands together at left) are MS James F. Buchli (glasses), Commander Michael L. Coats, Pilot John E. Blaha, MS James P. Bagian, Vellinger, and Deusser. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  19. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  20. Preparing Students for the AP Economics Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Sally; Ashmead, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The first step in teaching-to-understand economics is not teaching "the rules," but working with fundamental economic models from the outset. Many of the concepts in economics are illustrated through models. Students must: (1) be able to draw these models; (2) understand the assumptions of the models; and (3) use the models for analysis.…

  1. Instructional Innovations: Preparing Students for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Norman

    1994-01-01

    Forward-looking educators are teaching students to be flexible, creative thinkers by using cooperative learning, authentic assessments, interdisciplinary units taught to heterogeneous groups. Principals should facilitate appropriate staff development, build master planning schedule providing for team planning periods, allow staff members to attend…

  2. Undergraduate Accounting Students: Prepared for the Workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers-Clark, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore and investigate student perceptions as to what generic skills they considered were important for accountants and to what extent these skills were developed by their programme of study. Design/methodology/approach: Data gathered from 357 UK undergraduate accounting degree graduates were used to develop insights…

  3. Preparing Students for the Environmental Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Lil Fox; Wolfson, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing curricula in environmental programs is finding ways to cover the social, scientific, and communication content needed by professionals in the field. The authors describe a sequence of writing, critical thinking, and civic engagement experiences during the junior and senior years. Students practice communicating…

  4. Barriers to Accessing Tutoring Services among Students Who Received a Mid-Semester Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciscell, Galen; Foley, Leslie; Luther, Kate; Howe, Robin; Gjsedal, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    For this focus group study we recruited from a population of 345 university students who had been informed of their poor academic performance in at least one course, but who had not utilized peer tutoring in the semester they received the warning, in order to determine if stigma played a role in their decision not to seek help. We learned from…

  5. The IEP Meeting: Perceptions of Parents of Students Who Receive Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Wade W.

    2008-01-01

    The author investigated parental perceptions of the individualized education program (IEP) meeting among 51 parents of students who were receiving special education services from 1 family support service agency. Survey questions pertained to the following areas: (a) IEP meeting experiences, (b) knowledge level of special education law, (c)…

  6. Managing and Collecting Student Accounts and Loans: A Desk Reference for Educational Receivables Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezerman, David R.; DeSantis, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    This handy desk reference will help readers and their institutions develop and maintain a professional environment that will maximize efficiencies and provide the necessary skills to properly manage operations and portfolios while ensuring that students receive fair and equitable service and opportunities. Written for business officers, financial…

  7. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  8. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  9. PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF STUDENTS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Hentonen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem and the essence of training students for inclusive education in terms of higher education. The implementation of inclusive education is seen in several ways: the traditional school attendance by students with disabilities, learning at home and distance learning. The need for a barrier-free environment in the educational institutions represented by the basic requirements for the training of students for inclusion, providing mastery of pedagogical knowledge, promoting the development of creativity, the ability to generate new ideas, the implementation of a humanistic position that is based on ownership, dialogue, understanding and acceptance of the child with special abilities for granted. Competence approach is the methodological basis of training future teachers to work with children in the conditions of inclusive education. On the basis of this approach, the article presents a set of competencies that can successfully carry out the work with children and families in the conditions of inclusive education. The main competence of professional readiness of students for Inclusive Educ ation: monitoring,  diagnostic and informative.  Mon itoring competence involves tracking the process of training and education of children in inclusive education. Diagnostic ability to work with this category of   children   and   their   parents.   The   content   knowledge  of  the  problems  of  training  and  educ ation, understanding of the content of inclusive ed ucation, acquisition of knowledge and skills in wor king with children with special needs.

  10. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  11. Students and Institutions Protecting Whiteness as Property: A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Student Affairs Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study is based on interviews with White students graduating from a student affairs preparation program as well as a literature review of whiteness in education. Applying "critical race theory," the author examined the ways that students and institutions protected whiteness. Institutions and those within them concerned with equity must have…

  12. Preparing Vietnamese student teachers for teaching with a student-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Dekker, R.; Goedhart, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Vietnamese curriculum reform which trends toward a student-centered approach requires Vietnamese teacher educators to prepare student teachers for teaching using this approach. In this article, we present a case study of three Vietnamese student teachers working in groups in a methods course to

  13. Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    and construction. Health Sciences – Thinking about medical school? Join us in this workshop to discuss how doctors diagnose and treat diseases...science educators’ academy: Benefits of inquiry- based teaching for educators and their students. Manuscript in preparation. Kuehler, C. P., Marle, P. D...Henry, R. M. (2012). CSI- chocolate science investigation and the case of the recipe rip-off: Using forensic science to engage students. Manuscript

  14. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development......This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  15. Preparing design students for strategic design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen; Schiønning Mortensen, Bo; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with how the visual approach from a design process can help inform companies about future opportunities at a strategic level. The paper follows an innovation project where design students worked with five companies at a 1-day workshop and with one company through a 2-week project...... the innovation project and reflects on which new knowledge, methods and techniques designers should be aware of when participating in multidisciplinary strategic processes and new educational initiatives. This paper shows how the design profession’s traditional visual tools and methods for concept development...... can be used to facilitate discussions for companies facing strategic challenges. It also underlines the importance of rethinking design skills and communication when moving into strategic processes....

  16. A profile of students receiving counselling services at a university in post-apartheid South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Brett; Payne, Jarrod

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a profile of students seeking counselling at a racially diverse university in post-apartheid South Africa as a means to demonstrate the importance of routinely collecting and analysing student counselling data at university-based centres across the country. Student data were extracted from the only two counselling centres based at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg that provided services to 831 students during 2008. The 26 243 students that did not seek counselling during this period formed the comparison group. These data were analysed using logistic regression. Black, female and students within the 21-25 year age category were more likely to receive counselling, and presenting problems varied by population group. Given the country's past and continued levels of social asymmetry, we argue that the development of standardised university-based reporting systems able to describe the characteristics and presenting problems of students seeking counselling across South African universities should be prioritised by its higher education sector. Timely access to information of this kind is crucial to the generation of evidence-based mental health interventions in a population that is especially important to the country's development vision.

  17. Thesis and Dissertation Writing: Preparing ESL Students for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program created to assist students of English as a Second Language in their preparation for thesis and dissertation writing by focusing on the thesis proposal as an important part of that process. Notes that they often experience difficulty meeting the demands of the kind of writing required at this level and often are unaware of the…

  18. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. D. C.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; van Beukelen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from conve

  19. Thesis and Dissertation Writing: Preparing ESL Students for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program created to assist students of English as a Second Language in their preparation for thesis and dissertation writing by focusing on the thesis proposal as an important part of that process. Notes that they often experience difficulty meeting the demands of the kind of writing required at this level and often are unaware of the…

  20. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  1. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. D. C.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; van Beukelen, P.

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from

  2. Preparing Students for Higher Education: The Role of Proactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertshuis, Susan; Jung, Moon; Cooper-Thomas, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Proactivity is important to individual success, particularly where individuals face significant obstacles and where formal support may be lacking or difficult to access. The study tracks mature students over a one-semester university preparation course designed for returners to learning. Measures of proactivity included proactive personality,…

  3. Preparing to Receive and Handle Martian Samples When They Arrive on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis M.

    2017-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10F+ derivative NPR 'Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials', JSC is charged with 'The curation of all extraterrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions. 'The Directive goes on to define Curation as including'...documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach."

  4. Preparing Fourth-Year Medical Students to Teach During Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Richard J; Bardach, Naomi S; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Gillum, Leslie A; Haber, Lawrence A; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet S

    2006-01-01

    Interns are expected to teach medical students, yet there is little formal training in medical school to prepare them for this role. To enhance the teaching skills of our graduating students we initiated a 4-hour “teaching to teach” course as part of the end of the fourth-year curriculum. Course evaluations demonstrate that students strongly support this program (overall ratings 2000 to 2005: mean = 4.4 [scale 1 to 5], n = 224). When 2004 course participants were surveyed during the last month of their internship, 84%“agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “The teaching to teach course helped prepare me for my role as a teacher during internship” (2005: mean 4.2 [scale 1 to 5], n = 45, response rate 60%). A course preparing fourth-year students to teach during internship is both feasible and reproducible, with a minimal commitment of faculty and resident time. Participants identify it as an important addition to their education and as useful during internship. PMID:16704402

  5. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles....... Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  6. The Role of Educators in Preparing the Confident Graduate Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geri Dickey, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With large numbers of non-BSW graduates gravitating toward MSW programs of study, BSWs must demonstrate their ability to handle the rigor of graduate school in order to remain competitive in the classroom and field. This study utilized an online survey of MSW students (N=107 from four different universities to examine how well students believe their particular undergraduate degree program prepared them to meet the academic demands of the MSW programs. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed and results indicate BSW graduates feel more prepared than non-BSWs to complete their MSW program. The exception for BSWs was found in areas of research and statistics when compared specifically to those with psychology bachelor degrees.

  7. Preparing Business Language Students to Meet Employer Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Lear, Darcy

    2012-01-01

    Situated within the growing body of work on languages for specific purposes and community service-learning, this article explores the place of specific professional skills in the business language curriculum. It argues that the integration of explicit curricular content related to professional correspondence (emails, letter of recommendation requests, and cover letter content) will better prepare students for the work place without compromising the rigor of the traditional humanities discipli...

  8. Engaging Diverse Students Through International Collaboration and Professional Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feineman, M. D.; Nyblade, A.; Webb, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The AfricaArray-Bushveld REU is a partnership between the Pennsylvania State University and the University of the Witwatersrand. The primary goal is to engage a diverse cohort of students in international scientific collaboration through a program of training, field work, and laboratory and/or computational analysis. At least 50% of the student participants each year are from under-represented minorities. Students spend 2-3 weeks at Penn State, then 3 weeks in South Africa, followed by another 2-3 weeks in the US. The introductory 2-3 week session at Penn State is devoted to ethics and safety training, the human history, culture, and geologic history of South Africa, and Earth Science Literacy. Upon arriving in South Africa, the students are placed into field groups with students, post-docs, and faculty from Wits and other African nations participating in the AfricaArray Geophysics Field School. Each disciplinary group includes at least 1 mentor from the US and 1 from South Africa. Students spend time collecting rock samples for geochemical analysis, installing and servicing seismometers, and/or collecting data from the shallow subsurface using a variety of geophysical techniques. All students attend lectures by faculty at Wits, receive training in proper use and maintenance of scientific instrumentation, and interact with industry representatives. The culmination of this part of the REU is a day of oral presentations, where all students (REU and AfricaArray Geophysics Field School) share their experiences and data. After returning to the US, students engage in geochemical analysis, processing of seismic data, and modeling geophysical data. In addition to faculty mentors, the students work closely with graduate students and post-docs. All participate in mentor-led discussions about future career paths and graduate school options. As a capstone to the REU, each student writes a conference abstract and gives a poster presentation of their research. Each abstract

  9. Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Begeny, Suzanne

    2010-03-01

    As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education.

  10. Analysis of Anxiety Levels of Nursing Students While Preparing Their Thesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur SARUHAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out as a descriptive study in order to determine the anxiety levels of third and last year students of Ege University School of Nursing while preparing their thesis and the factors affecting this. The research was performed with 142 students from third and last year students studying at Ege University School of Nursing. Data was collected using a questionnaire prepared by the researchers and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. It was determined that, 52,1% of the students were above the age of 23 years, 53,5% were last year students, 44,4% stayed in dormitory, 61,3% indicated that they experienced anxiety problems while determining the subject of thesis, and 38,7% got sufficient assistance from their supervisor. State anxiety average was 49,11± 12,23 and Trait anxiety average was 45,14± 7,8. Age groups, year of their study, staying with parents or receiving help from the supervisor were determined not to be effective in anxiety levels. Guiding and supporting attitudes of the teaching staff were thought to be helpful in increasing self-confidence of young people by reducing anxiety.

  11. Preparing minority undergraduate students for successful science careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akundi, Murty

    2008-03-01

    Xavier University of Louisiana is well known for being number one in graduating the most minority students in physical and biological sciences. The reason for this success is built on the concept of Standards with Sympathy in the Sciences (Triple S). This is an outgrowth of over twenty years of planning and development by the Xavier science faculty to devise a program for preparing and retaining students in the sciences and engineering. Xavier has been successfully conducting for over ten years, Summer Science Academy (SSA) for middle and high school students; Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars and Howard Hughes Biomedical programs for in-coming freshmen. Recently, through a grant from NSF, we have developed the Experiential Problem-solving and Analytical Reasoning (EPsAR) summer bridge program for in-coming freshmen who were given conditional admission to the university (i.e., those students who scored below the acceptable range for placement into degree mathematics courses). In this program, EPsAR participants will be engaged in problem-solving and critical thinking activities for eight hours per day, five days per week, for six weeks. Additionally, an interdisciplinary approach is taken to convey the mathematical skills learned to relate to physics, chemistry, biology, and computer science. Sixty-six students have participated in the last two years in the EPsAR program. During the first year 23 of 28 students successfully bi-passed the algebra review course and were placed into a degree credit course in mathematics. In the second year, thirty-one (31) of the 38 were advanced to a higher-level mathematics course. Twenty-three (23) out of 38 went on to degree credit math course. To retain students in the sciences peer tutoring in all the science disciplines are made available to students throughout the day for 5 days per week. Faculty and students are available to give guidance to the needed students. The University has established a

  12. Educational Supports Received by Middle School Students with Disabilities in Regular Classrooms. Do they correspond to what the law says?

    OpenAIRE

    Flores Barrera, Vasthi Jocabed; García Cedillo, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Mexican´s laws guarantee educational rights of disabled people, including the right of infrastructure, technological and scholarship supports, orientation and training, among others. The objective of this research was to identify the relationship between the educative supports that disabled students should receive in middle school and those that they actually receive. Two case studies were conducted with second grade middle school students diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome and intellectual d...

  13. Changing the face of STEM: Preparing Students for Research and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Emina A.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) was awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) Grant, intended to prepare URM students for graduate programs in biomedical and/or behavioral fields. This has allowed us to bring high-caliber researchers to NEIU and engage undergraduate and graduate students in their research as well as career pathways. It has also afforded us to do something that we have found essential to attracting and supporting URM students in STEM: engaging in outreach to the community. Our scholars started to mentor elementary and high school students from neighboring communities in the city. NEIU is a public state university located in metropolitan Chicago, IL. As a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), ranked by U.S. News and World Report as the most ethnically diverse university in the Midwest, NEIU embraces diversity and a nontraditional atmosphere. The funding we received has allowed our young scholars to attend research conferences in their area of expertise, present research results, and network with prestigious researchers at neighboring and far-away institutions. However, this alone is not enough to attract them to the STEM disciplines. We understand the desire of URM students to give back to their communities and they must see careers in STEM as a viable path to do so in their future. We also know the importance of offering students from the local community early exposure to science and seeing future scientists from their community talk about research. In this talk, I will share how we have used the MARC Grant to prepare our students for careers in STEM and the success that we have seen thus far with our approach.

  14. Preparing students for graduate study: an eLearning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintz, Christine; Posey, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the development and preliminary evaluation of an eLearning program intended to provide incoming nursing students with the basic knowledge, skills and abilities needed to succeed in graduate-level, online coursework. Using Mayer's principles (2008) for the effective design of multimedia instruction, an open-access, self-directed, online program was developed. The Graduate School Boot Camp includes five online modules focused on learning strategies and time management, academic writing, technology, research, and library skills. To motivate and engage learners, the program integrates a fun, graphical sports theme with audiovisual presentations, examples, demonstrations and practice exercises. Learners begin with a self-assessment based on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire or MSLQ (Pintrich et al., 1993). To assess change in knowledge levels before and after completing the program, learners take a pre-test and post-test. Preliminary findings indicate that the students found the information relevant and useful. They enjoyed the self-paced, multimedia format, and liked the option to return to specific content later. This innovative program offers a way to prepare students proactively, and may prove useful in identifying students at risk and connecting them with the appropriate resources to facilitate successful program completion.

  15. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  16. Examination of the Life Satisfactions Levels of Students Receiving Education in Sports Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Bora ÖZKARA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine of life satisfaction levels of students receiving education in sports science according to some variabl es. To this aim, individual info form and Turkish form of life satisfaction questionnaire , developed by Diener, Emmos, Larsen and Griffin (1985 and adapted to Turkish by Kokler (1991 4, were administered ,as a online, to 25 4 students from Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Afyon Kocatepe University, Dumlupınar University and Karadeniz Technical University with voluntary participation. Depending on the data on gender, smoking, universities,alchool using and family income were app lied Kolmogorov - Smirnov normality test. The tests results indicated that the data are not normally distributed. Depending on the data; for gender, smoking, alchool using Mann - Whitney U test, for universities and family income Kruskal - Wallis tests were use d at the level of α=0.05 significance.The result showed that there was no significant differences on genders ((Z 0.05 ; - 1,616; P>0.05, smoking (Z 0.05 ; - 1,556; P>0.05 and universities (X 2 (3; 0,.370; P>0.05 according to life satisfaction levels. On the o ther hand; alchool using (Z 0.05 ; - 2,008; P<0.05 and family income (X 2 (3; 10,257; P<0.05 scores were found significant depending on life satisfaction levels .

  17. Absenteeism rates in students receiving services for CDs, LDs, and EDs: a macroscopic view of the consequences of disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Sean M; Hosp, John L

    2008-01-01

    Elevated levels of absenteeism have been reported for students receiving special education services, especially students with learning disabilities (LDs) and emotional disturbances (EDs). In contrast, little is known about absenteeism rates associated with students with communication disorders (CDs). Archival records of student attendance for the 1997-2001 academic years from a mid-sized urban school district in the Intermountain West were used to examine absenteeism rates in students receiving services for CDs, LDs, and EDs. Two cohort samples were generated (K-4th grade and 5th-9th grade). Students with CDs displayed absenteeism rates that were comparable to those of students receiving general education. Significant group and group x grade effects were found. Students in the LD and ED groups displayed elevated levels of absenteeism, especially at Grade 9. The outcomes of this study support the characterization of the socioemotional concomitants associated with CDs as being typologically different and exerting a weaker influence on student's health levels than those associated with either LDs or EDs.

  18. Education catching up with science: preparing students for three-dimensional literacy in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ijsbrand M; Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Delouche, Pamina; Bidabe, Marissa; Schneeberger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The large number of experimentally determined molecular structures has led to the development of a new semiotic system in the life sciences, with increasing use of accurate molecular representations. To determine how this change impacts students' learning, we incorporated image tests into our introductory cell biology course. Groups of students used a single text dealing with signal transduction, which was supplemented with images made in one of three iconographic styles. Typically, we employed realistic renderings, using computer-generated Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures; realistic-schematic renderings, using shapes inspired by PDB structures; or schematic renderings, using simple geometric shapes to represent cellular components. The control group received a list of keywords. When students were asked to draw and describe the process in their own style and to reply to multiple-choice questions, the three iconographic approaches equally improved the overall outcome of the tests (relative to keywords). Students found the three approaches equally useful but, when asked to select a preferred style, they largely favored a realistic-schematic style. When students were asked to annotate "raw" realistic images, both keywords and schematic representations failed to prepare them for this task. We conclude that supplementary images facilitate the comprehension process and despite their visual clutter, realistic representations do not hinder learning in an introductory course.

  19. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice.

  20. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Helen; Marzano, David; Lanham, Michael; Stein, Tamara; Curran, Diana; Hammoud, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Background The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions) had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System. PMID:25430640

  1. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Morgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose: We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods: The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results: Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System.

  2. Assessment of indoor radon doses received by the students in the Azad Kashmir schools, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Rahman, S U; Rahman, Said; Matiullah; Shahzad, M Ikram; Ahmed, Navid; Iqbal, Javid; Ahmed, Basharat; Ahmed, Tanveer; Akhtar, Nadeem

    2010-12-01

    Several epidemiological studies conducted on thousands of underground miners suggest that long- term exposure to high radon concentration can increase the risk of lung cancer. Keeping in view the importance of the subject, numerous studies throughout the world have been carried out to measure indoor radon concentration and its resulting doses at occupational and non-occupational sites. The purpose of the current study was to measure indoor radon concentration and its resulting doses received by the students of Azad Kashmir government schools. For this purpose, CR-39 radon detectors were installed in 80 carefully selected schools. The detectors were placed at a height of 3-5 ft. (depending upon average height of students in particular class) from the ground. After exposure of 90 d detectors were etched for 9 h in 6 M NaOH at 70°C and the observed track densities were related to radon concentrations. The measured indoor radon concentration ranged from 22 ± 9 to 228 ± 3 Bq m(-3) with a mean value of 78 ± 5 Bq m(-3). Based on the measured indoor radon data, the annual effective doses were found to vary from 0.55 ± 0.04 to 0.71 ± 0.03 mSv y(-1). The overall mean effective dose for the studied area was found to be 0.63 ± 0.04 mSv y(-1). Reported values for radon concentrations and corresponding doses are lower than ICRP recommended limits for workplaces.

  3. An Imperative for Leadership Preparation Programs: Preparing Future Leaders to Meet the Needs of Students, Schools, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the structure, philosophy, and curriculum of educational leadership preparation programs and the importance of preparing schools leaders to address the unique needs of students and communities. In particular, it will address how programs can be enhanced by integrating organizational research and philosophies from educational,…

  4. A collaboration of student nurse coaches and students with mental illnesses in a college preparation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nancye L

    2010-01-01

    With refined diagnostic tools, earlier recognition, new pharmacological and other treatment modalities, individuals living with mental illnesses are able to experience considerable recovery. Some individuals require support and guidance to build confidence and to manage in everyday situations. Previous to their illness, many had been functioning and able to meet their needs in most aspects of their lives, including academics, but, following illness, lacked confidence or skill to continue their education. This pilot program was designed to socialize students with a mental illness to life at college. To develop the pilot concept, college departments including nursing faculty and community mental health personnel collaborated together. Potential students attended informational sessions where those interested, applied for entry into the pilot. Each student was paired with a coach, a third year nursing student, with whom they established and evaluated goals geared towards registering independently in a college course the following semester. Evaluation of the program was measured in terms of attendance, registration in a college course for the following semester or job readiness, and focus group evaluation sessions. By the end of the semester, 12 of the 13 students completed the program. With support and guidance of their coaches, students gained confidence, developed a social support network and learned skills needed to be able to navigate the college system. This type of college preparation program is effective in assisting students with mental illness to access college courses and it is recommended that there be further similar programs offered as an orientation at the college level for students with mental illness in preparation for their registration and attendance at college. To minimize cost factors and gain administrative support, practitioners wishing to replicate this study would do well to consider sources of funding, as well as resource personal or volunteers

  5. A cognitive behavioral course for at-risk senior nursing students preparing to take the NCLEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Susan G; Mastorovich, Melissa L; Liberto, Terri L; Gerwick, Michele

    2010-01-01

    For some nursing students, the stress of preparing for and taking the NCLEX can lead to maladaptive behaviors such as poor test performance and inadequate preparation. A different approach to NCLEX preparation for at-risk seniors is described. A 3-credit course that combines cognitive behavioral techniques, metacognitive strategies, test-taking strategies, and simulated NCLEX experience with practice questions is presented. Students also develop an individualized plan of preparation from graduation until they take the NCLEX.

  6. Assessor or Assessee: How Student Learning Improves by Giving and Receiving Peer Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Liu, Xiongyi; Steckelberg, Allen L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the quality of peer assessment and the quality of student projects in a technology application course for teacher education students. Forty-three undergraduate student participants completed the assigned projects. During the peer assessment process, students first anonymously rated and commented on…

  7. The Integrate Student Portal: Online Resources to Prepare Students for the Workforce of a Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Manduca, C. A.; Egger, A. E.; Macdonald, H.

    2014-12-01

    The InTeGrate Student Portal is a suite of web pages that utilize InTeGrate resources to support student success by providing undergraduates with tools and information necessary to be proactive in their career choices and development. Drawn from various InTeGrate workshops and programming, the Portal organizes these resources to illuminate a variety of career opportunities and pathways to both traditional and non-traditional jobs that support a sustainable future. Informed from a variety of sources including employers, practitioners, faculty, students, reports, and articles, the pages explore five facets: (1) sustainability across the disciplines, (2) workforce preparation, (3) professional communication, (4) teaching and teaching careers, and (5) the future of green research and technology. The first three facets explore how sustainability is integrated across disciplines and how sustainability and 'green' jobs are available in a wide range of traditional and non-traditional workplaces within and beyond science. They provide students guidance in preparing for this sustainability workforce, including where to learn about jobs and how to pursue them, advice for strengthening their job applications, and how to build a set of skills that employers seek. This advice encompasses classroom skills as well as those acquired and strengthened as part of extracurricular or workplace experiences. The fourth facet, aimed at teaching assistants with little or no experience as well as at students who are interested in pursuing teaching as a career, provides information and resources about teaching. The fifth facet explores future directions of technology and the need for innovations in the workforce of the future to address sustainability issues. We seek your input and invite you to explore the Portal at: serc.carleton.edu/integrate/students/

  8. Decision Making for Chinese Students to Receive Their Higher Education in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chiangnan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines Chinese students' decision making considerations for coming to the U.S. for their higher education. Due to the large number of Chinese students in the U.S, it is an interesting topic for educators and researchers to explore the decision making considerations Chinese students choose for studying abroad. International student…

  9. Analyzing Musical Self-Esteem and Performance Anxiety Levels of Students Receiving Professional Music Education at Different Institutions in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otacioglu, Sena Gürsen

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to establish which variables cause the interrelations between musical self-esteem and performance-anxiety levels of students receiving professional music education at different institutions to vary. In relation to this framework, "musical self-esteem" and "performance anxiety" scores of students…

  10. Before Student Teaching: How Undergraduate Students in Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Programs Describe Their Early Classroom-Based Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Christine; La Paro, Karen M.; Johnson, Amy V.

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-based experiences, alternatively known as practica, are an integral component of undergraduate teacher preparation programs, which provide students essential opportunities to apply knowledge in practice. Though much is known about student teaching, much less is known about students' earlier classroom-based experiences. This…

  11. Preparing Students with Disabilities in an Urban School for Success in Supported and Competitive Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Valerie S.

    2010-01-01

    In schools that serve students with varying disabilities, community-based education has become an important element in preparing students for competitive and supported employment. Because of the constant change in demographics and the overall competitiveness of the job market, it is essential that schools are prepared to find ways of infusing…

  12. Preparing Students for College and Career: California Multiple Pathways. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Eric

    2009-01-01

    To prepare students for success in life, the twenty-first-century American high school needs to shift its focus from preparing for college or career to achieving college and career readiness for every student. One of the most comprehensive efforts towards this goal is the "multiple pathways" initiative in California, which is a reform…

  13. Pre-University Prepared Students: A Programme for Facilitating the Transition from Secondary to Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The expectations of first-year students are becoming more widely researched and understood. How to realign perceptions and prepare students for the transition from secondary school to tertiary education is less well considered. This paper presents an account of a pre-university preparation programme embedded in the senior years of secondary…

  14. Small Voices, Big Impact: Preparing Students for Learning and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jennifer L.; McGarry, Lorraine S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, two teachers from a public school in the United States describe their beliefs about the importance of using student voice as a foundation for increasing student efficacy, recognizing student individuality, and addressing curriculum standards. Sharing examples from their classrooms, the authors illustrate how student voice can help…

  15. Achieving fruit, juice, and vegetable recipe preparation goals influences consumption by 4th grade students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski Tom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Including children in food preparation activities has long been recommended as a method to encourage children's consumption, but has not been evaluated. Goal setting is also a common component of behavior change programs. This study assessed the impact of attaining goals to prepare fruit-juice or vegetable recipes on student fruit and vegetable consumption as part of a 10-week fruit and vegetable intervention for fourth grade students. Methods At six of the 10 sessions, students (n = 671 selected a fruit-juice or vegetable recipe to prepare at home before the next session. Students returned parent-signed notes reporting their child's goal attainment. Baseline and post consumption were assessed with up to four days of dietary recalls. Analyses included regression models predicting post consumption from the number of fruit-juice or vegetable recipe preparation goals attained, controlling for baseline consumption. Results In general, girls and Hispanic students achieved the most recipe preparation goals. For students with highest baseline fruit-juice consumption, post fruit-juice consumption was higher by about 1.0 serving for those achieving 2 or 3 fruit-juice recipe preparation goals. Post vegetable consumption was highest for students reporting the highest baseline vegetable consumption and who achieved two or three vegetable recipe preparation goals. In general, recipe goal setting was a useful procedure primarily for those with high baseline consumption. Conclusion This is one of the first reports demonstrating that home recipe preparation was correlated with dietary change among children.

  16. Programmatic-methodical providing of preparation of student commands on basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troyan V.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic directions of perfection of sporting preparation of student team are considered on basketball. The terms of effective education of personality of student are selected. The positive and subzero aspects of forms of physical preparation of sportsmen are rotined. The ways of rational development and use of natural capabilities of sportsman are certain in his professional and public activity. It is presented programmatic-methodical providing of training process of student commands in the institutes of higher of Russia.

  17. The Prevalence and Comorbidity of Specific Phobias in College Students and Their Interest in Receiving Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Richard W.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the prevalence of specific phobias and social phobias is believed to be high in the general adult population, little data exists regarding the prevalence of these fears among college students. This paper describes an epidemiological study that surveyed 813 college students regarding the severity of fears experienced toward 12 objects and…

  18. The Prevalence and Comorbidity of Specific Phobias in College Students and Their Interest in Receiving Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Richard W.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the prevalence of specific phobias and social phobias is believed to be high in the general adult population, little data exists regarding the prevalence of these fears among college students. This paper describes an epidemiological study that surveyed 813 college students regarding the severity of fears experienced toward 12 objects and…

  19. Usage of Credit Cards Received through College Student-Marketing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John M.; Staten, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides benchmark measures of college student credit card usage by utilizing a pooled sample of over 300,000 recently opened credit card accounts. The analysis compares behavior over 12 months of account history for three groups of accounts: those opened by young adults through college student marketing programs; those opened through…

  20. Medical Student Use of Facebook to Support Preparation for Anatomy Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D.; Bickerdike, Suzanne R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of Facebook to support students is an emerging area of educational research. This study explored how a Facebook Page could support Year 2 medical (MBChB) students in preparation for summative anatomy assessments and alleviate test anxiety. Overall, Facebook analytics revealed that in total 49 (19.8% of entire cohort) students posted a…

  1. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  2. Teacher Preparation to Deliver Inclusive Services to Students with Disabilities: TQ Connection Issue Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. Inclusion of students with disabilities in general education environments has a long history in special education law;…

  3. A Dual Approach to Fostering Under-Prepared Student Success: Focusing on Doing and Becoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Suzanne C.; Eshbach, Barbara E.; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    A paired course model for under-prepared college students incorporates a dual instructional approach, academic skill building and lifelong learning development, to help students do more academically and become stronger lifelong learners. In a reading support course, students improved their reading skills and applied them directly to the paired…

  4. Using Social Justice Vignettes to Prepare Students for Social Action Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell Storms, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    One of the learning goals for social justice education courses is to prepare students for social action engagement. Teaching students about issues related to social justice is complex. Prior studies have found a positive relationship between student enrollment in social justice education courses and action-oriented outcomes. While these findings…

  5. Linking Theory with Practice: A Longitudinal Analysis of Student Portfolios in Principal Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeppel, Robert; Logan, Joyce P.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation analyses five years of data from student portfolios required as part of a principal preparation programme. Portfolios serve as continuous student progress assessment from programme entry to exit, evaluation of each student's understanding and application of Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) and National…

  6. Assessing and Monitoring Student Progress in an E-Learning Personnel Preparation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyen, Edward L.; Aust, Ronald J.; Bui, Yvonne N.; Isaacson, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-learning in special education personnel preparation focuses on student assessment in e-learning environments. It includes a review of the literature, lessons learned by the authors from assessing student performance in e-learning environments, a literature perspective on electronic portfolios in monitoring student progress, and the…

  7. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  8. Preparing Students for Success in Hybrid Learning Environments with Academic Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel; Dickinson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes institutional and andragogical best practices for preparing students to succeed in hybrid courses through the programming of academic resource centers, offers information on how to create peer support systems for students, and outlines some of the common pitfalls for students encountering a hybrid course for the first time.

  9. Using Technology To Prepare All Students for Success in Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin

    This paper discusses uses of TI-73 graphing calculators for middle school mathematics students. It indicates that with the appropriate use of the TI-73, students can develop understanding about variables and basic concepts of algebra, and explore mathematical topics. Background on middle school students' difficulties with those subjects is…

  10. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  11. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  12. Preparing Students for Flipped or Team-Based Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Peter; Clark, Michele; Restall, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching methods such as Flipped Learning and Team-Based Learning require students to pre-learn course materials before a teaching session, because classroom exercises rely on students using self-gained knowledge. This is the reverse to "traditional" teaching when course materials are presented during a lecture, and students are…

  13. Efficacy of Video-Assisted Instruction on Knowledge and Performance of Dental Students in Access Cavity Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mandana; Shantiaee, Yazdan; Rasekhi, Javid; Zadsirjan, Saeede; Mojtahed Bidabadi, Maryam; Khayat, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The conventional method of teaching endodontics has some drawbacks. Due to the small size of the oral cavity, students cannot closely observe the clinical procedure. Use of new teaching modalities such as the intraoral camera may obviate this problem. This study assessed the effect of video-assisted clinical instruction in dentistry (VACID) on dental student’s knowledge and performance in access cavity preparation during endodontic treatment. Methods and Materials: In this interventional study, twenty six undergraduate students were equally divided into two groups and received instructions on access cavity preparation via conventional demonstration (CD) or VACID using intraoral camera plus conventional demonstration. Students’ knowledge was assessed before and after the demonstration. The scores obtained by students were compared between the two groups. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U test. Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups in knowledge and performance scores of students about pulp chamber removal, under-extension, over-extension, gouging, perforation or finding the main and extra canals. However, use of intraoral camera significantly reduced the number of student visits to instructors for problem solving (P=0.001). Conclusion: VACID is an effective educational method and as efficient as conventional demonstration in endodontics; as a result it can be used in combination with conventional teaching. PMID:27790265

  14. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 14314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  15. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement. Working Paper 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  16. Our Move: Using Chess to Improve Math Achievement for Students Who Receive Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, David C.; Fish, Wade W.

    2011-01-01

    This causal-comparative study evaluated a 30-week chess instructional program implemented within special education math classes for students in the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades in a suburban middle school located in the southwestern United States. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was utilized to compare the adjusted means for the comparison…

  17. Similarities between Students Receiving Dress Code Violations and Discipline Referrals at Newport Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Nikki

    2007-01-01

    Background: Looking at dress code violations and demographics surrounding kids breaking the rules. Purpose: To see if there is a connection between dress code violations and discipline referrals. Setting: Jr. High School; Study Sample: Students with dress code violations for one week; Intervention: N/A; Research Design: Correlational; and Control…

  18. Career Planning without a Regular Diploma: A Study of High School Students Who Received "Special" Diplomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Wright, Demetress LaGale

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand by our society and legislature to educate all students equitably in an inclusive general education setting. Societal trends vary as time progresses, but this does not eliminate the growing debate regarding diploma options, exit requirements and future career planning for high school graduates. What does a future look like…

  19. 38 CFR 21.4201 - Restrictions on enrollment; percentage of students receiving financial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Bachelor of Science) in electrical engineering, MA (Master of Arts) in English, etc. (ii) NCD (noncollege... learning and graduate schools may be counted in general curricula such as BA (Bachelor of Art) and BS (Bachelor of Science) only until the normal point at which the school requires the student to declare...

  20. Benefits General Education Students Receive from Inclusion Classes and Social Skills Training Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Denise Marie

    2012-01-01

    Social inclusion has become an increasingly relevant issue in public school education during the past several years. Differences between social skills in students who were educated in inclusion elementary school classrooms and those who were not placed in inclusion classrooms were examined. Teachers were asked to rate the social skills of students…

  1. Benefits General Education Students Receive from Inclusion Classes and Social Skills Training Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Denise Marie

    2012-01-01

    Social inclusion has become an increasingly relevant issue in public school education during the past several years. Differences between social skills in students who were educated in inclusion elementary school classrooms and those who were not placed in inclusion classrooms were examined. Teachers were asked to rate the social skills of students…

  2. [Elaboration enrich cereals gruels fast preparation for the students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭkov, V G; Bakumenko, O E; Doronin, A F

    2008-01-01

    Reviews results research on the appraisal actual mode of life and actual nutrition student's in the result established breach consumption organism important food substances - carbo-hydrates, fiber foods, vitamins and mineral substances. Establishment level intellectual, physical loading, bad habits, in the result that at the student's reviews oridin different diseases. Science basis need introduce in the retion student's food substances promoting foudation and preservation health.

  3. Preparing High School Students for the Interdisciplinary Nature of Modern Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Preparing students for the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology will require changes in curriculum, instruction, assessments, and teacher professional development in order to support teaching for conceptual understanding and for making cross-disciplinary connections.

  4. A Cavity Preparation Evaluation System in the Skill Assessment of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Huiru; Jin, Shufeng; Sun, Jianping; Dai, Yanmei

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a computerized, laser-scanning Cavity Preparation Skill Evaluation System (CPSES) with conventional teachers' eye-hand grading assessment of dental students' Class I cavity preparation evaluations. Thirty-eight cavity preparations of lower left first molars made by junior dental students at a dental school in China were tested from September 2013 to November 2014. The outline and retention form, smoothness, depth, wall angulation, and cavity margin index of the preparations were evaluated by CPSES and then by teachers' eye-hand grading. The mean difference in scores for each method was considered, as was the variability of scores within each method. Compared with the teachers' eye-hand grading method, CPSES provided objective evaluation results that had statistically significant differences (pcavity preparation skills and encourage students in their self-paced learning and independent practice.

  5. Using human simulation to prepare physical therapy students for acute care clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Nicki J; Panzarella, Karen J; Melzer, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The acute care setting requires a unique skill set for all health care providers, including Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. This study explores high-fidelity human simulation (HFHS) training in a DPT education program to achieve learning objectives specific to preparation of DPT students for acute care clinical practice. Twenty-three DPT students participated in a HFHS acute care experience, provided feedback about the learning experience, and completed a survey regarding preparedness for clinical practice. Student feedback was interpreted to gain content validity of the learning experience, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey results. In this pilot study, students identified four learning objectives met during the simulation experience: interprofessional communication, preparation of the treatment environment, patient safety, and discharge planning. Following the experience, 91.5% of the students reported more confidence in interprofessional communication, and 67% were more knowledgeable in discharge disposition. All students agreed that simulations should be part of the curriculum, and 95.2% reported simulation valuable in preparation for clinical practice. As a result of HFHS training in the DPT program, students' educational objectives were met, and simulation was deemed valuable in integrating prior learning and providing an enhanced understanding of the acute care setting. The findings support continued investigation of the effectiveness of simulation to prepare DPT students for acute care clinical practice.

  6. Preparing Students for a Diverse Workplace: Strategies to Improve Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Deana; Dail, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The curriculum for kinesiology students typically includes foundation courses focused on the scientific principles underlying human movement. Modifications for gender, age, and physical ability are also commonly included in these courses. Rarely addressed, however, are students' dispositions toward diverse groups. This article examines several…

  7. Preparation for Computer Usage in Social Work: Student Consumer Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurius, Paula S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of students in a large master's program in social work investigated student training in and experience with computers and attitudes about computer applications for human service activities. The value of the findings in curriculum planning, practica development, computer resources management, and faculty and agency involvement are…

  8. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  9. Reflective Ethical Inquiry: Preparing Students for Life. IDEA Paper #54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualters, Donna M.; McDaniels, Melissa; Cohen, Perrin

    2013-01-01

    Although universities often teach ethics courses, they do not always teach students how to apply ethical course content to ethical dilemmas they encounter on a day-to-day basis. The Awareness-Investigation-Responding (AIR) model of ethical inquiry bridges this gap by scaffolding the reflective process and empowering students to make more caring,…

  10. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  11. How IELTS Preparation Courses Support Students: IELTS and Academic Socialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanxian; Badger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IELTS scores are widely used in combination with academic results as a way of judging whether non-English background students should be admitted to degree-level courses in Anglophone contexts. However, successful study at university requires more than language competence and intellectual ability and international students often seem to start from…

  12. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

  13. Preparing Students with Learning Disabilities for Large-Scale Writing Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Colwell, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for teachers to better prepare 3rd through 12th grade students with learning disabilities for large-scale writing assessments. The variation across large-scale writing assessments and the multiple needs of struggling writers indicate the need for test preparation to be embedded within a comprehensive,…

  14. Preparing School Personnel to Assist Students with Life-Threatening Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Genevieve H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of and preparation for life-threatening food allergies will enable school personnel to better respond to students who have severe allergic reactions. Given the high incidence of food-related anaphylaxis in public places, teachers and school personnel should be aware of and prepared to handle severe food allergy reactions. (SM)

  15. Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Peggy; Warde, Beverly; Rody, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Given federal mandates, public school districts have adopted inclusive practices with the expectation that general education teachers can accommodate students with disabilities. For teacher preparation programs to prepare future teachers for this reality, it is important to understand the composition of a "typical" general education…

  16. How Well Does A-Level Mathematics Prepare Students for the Mathematical Demands of Chemistry Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    332 undergraduate chemistry students were surveyed in order to establish whether they had found A-level Mathematics and/or Further Mathematics to be good preparation for their degree. Perceptions of both subjects were found to be positive, with more than 80% of participants describing Mathematics or Further Mathematics as good preparation. In…

  17. The Impact of Preparing Faculty in the Effective Use of Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Mark E.; Matkin, Gina S.; Gambrell, Kem M.; Harding, Heath E.

    2010-01-01

    Companies increasingly rely on teams to improve productivity, and consequently employers expect colleges and universities to prepare graduates to effectively work in teams. To help with this need, instructors must be equipped to prepare students to fully capitalize on the power of teamwork. This study examines the effect of college instructor…

  18. Teaching Students with Disabilities: A Web-Based Examination of Preparation of Preservice Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer; O'Neill, Sue; Carter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    With increasing expectations that preservice teachers will be prepared to teach students with special needs in regular classrooms, it is timely to review relevant units in teacher education courses. Units relevant to special education/inclusion in primary undergraduate teacher preparation courses in Australian tertiary institutions, delivered in…

  19. The education received by nursing students regarding nursing older people: a scoping literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Sanna; Salminen, Leena; Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-03-01

    The situation of an ageing population is a priority for all levels of society globally, particularly related to the subsequent increased demand for care. Nurses are often the primary source of this care; therefore, research is required to develop the curricula of nursing education, to help them meet this demand. The primary aim was to analyse empirical studies that have tackled nursing students' education concerning nursing older people. This analysis was targeted at generating an overall picture of the research in this field in order to determine the areas that require further study. A scoping literature review was conducted through systematic searches in the following electronic databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLINE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Education Resources Information Center (ERIC). These searches were limited to studies with an available abstract, in English, which were conducted between 1999 and 2012. Two researchers independently applied the same inclusion and exclusion criteria to select the studies for analysis. In total, 66 articles were included in the analyses. The results were validated by the research team. The primary research areas identified included both the learning outcomes and the implementation of nurses' education in caring for older people. Students' general attitudes towards older people and ageing dominated the studies regarding learning outcomes. There was a large variation in the description of the validity and trustworthiness of the studies, with most being only at a moderate level. A limited number of studies examining the specific learning outcomes and factors influencing the implementation of education exist. Vague reporting about the validity and trustworthiness of the studies limits the use of their findings. More well-designed studies are needed to guide educational strategies to improve students' competence in nursing older people and to promote this

  20. Impact of Digital Tooth Preparation Evaluation Technology on Preclinical Dental Students' Technical and Self-Evaluation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, David G; Kwon, So Ran; Blanchette, Derek; Aquilino, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of digital tooth preparation imaging and evaluation technology on dental students' technical abilities, self-evaluation skills, and the assessment of their simulated clinical work. A total of 80 second-year students at one U.S. dental school were assigned to one of three groups: control (n=40), E4D Compare (n=20), and Sirona prepCheck (n=20). Students in the control group were taught by traditional teaching methodologies, and the technology-assisted groups received both traditional training and supplementary feedback from the corresponding digital system. Three outcomes were measured: faculty technical score, self-evaluation score, and E4D Compare scores at 0.30 mm tolerance. Correlations were determined between the groups' scores from visual assessment and self-evaluation and between the visual assessment and digital scores. The results showed that the visual assessment and self-evaluation scores did not differ among groups (p>0.05). Overall, correlations between visual and digital assessment scores were modest though statistically significant (5% level of significance). These results suggest that the use of digital tooth preparation evaluation technology did not impact the students' prosthodontic technical and self-evaluation skills. Visual scores given by faculty and digital assessment scores correlated moderately in only two instances.

  1. Introduction and preparation of an objective structured clinical examination in family medicine for undergraduate students at the University of Split.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakarija-Grković, Irena; Šimunović, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    To describe the implementation of the first Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) conducted at the University of Split School of Medicine. Twenty-one clinical skills relevant to general practice were selected and described in a Handbook for students. Assessment sheets were created. After performing an inventory of available resources, teaching models were purchased and practical classes arranged. A Centre for Clinical Competencies was established, where the first OSCE at the University of Split School of Medicine was conducted in March 2011. Attendance by students to the practical classes and the OSCE was 100%. Positive feedback was received by students, who requested extra lessons in clinical skills training. Despite not setting a minimal pass rate, the average OSCE score was 27 out of 30 points. Organization of clinical skills training and assessment was demanding, requiring many hours of preparation and numerous staff involvement but was ultimately very rewarding. Both practical classes and the OSCE were very well received by students, who seemed to be empowered by this experience. Copyright 2012 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  2. Microteaching as a self-learning tool. Students' perceptions in the preparation and exposition of a microlesson in a tissue engineering course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Campos-Sánchez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Microteaching is a didactic tool of recent application to undergraduate and postgraduate students as a way to promote self-learning. In this work we compared the perceptions of the students who provide instruction in tissue engineering using microteaching and the perceptions of the same students when they receive such instructions. Two similar questionnaires with items related to the preparation and exposition of a microlesson were used to investigate the perception of 56 students before and after the microteaching session. In our results, students significantly prefer to use specific objectives, textbooks and Internet information when they are preparing a microlesson as compared to the situation when they receive it. On the other hand, the use of a pre-programmed index during the exposition and the reduction of the use of PowerPoint software are significantly more preferred by the students after receiving the microlesson. No statistical differences were found for the rest of the options analyzed. These results show that the self-assessment generated in the microteaching session, which is linked to the feedback related to the self-learning process, makes microteaching a technique not only useful for self-learning but also an important tool to promote self-regulation across the curriculum.

  3. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  4. Preparing Graduates for Work in the Creative Industries: A Collaborative Learning Approach for Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of collaborative learning strategies in higher education is growing as educators seek better ways to prepare students for the workplace. In design education, teamwork and creativity are particularly valued; successful collaborative learning depends on knowledge sharing between students, and there is increasing recognition that…

  5. Preparing Attitude Scale to Define Students' Attitudes about Environment, Recycling, Plastic and Plastic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Cagri; Aydinli, Bahattin; Bakar, Fatma; Alboga, Yunus

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce an attitude scale in order to define students? attitudes about environment, recycling, plastics, plastic waste. In this study, 80 attitude sentences according to 5-point Likert-type scale were prepared and applied to 492 students of 6th grade in the Kastamonu city center of Turkey. The scale consists of…

  6. Moving toward a Global Community: An Analysis of the Internationalization of Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Scott Andrew; Lee, Jenny J.; Cantwell, Brendan; McClellan, George; Woodard, Dudley B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Student affairs could potentially play a vital role in the internationalization of colleges and universities, but the extent to which international issues are included in the preparation of future student affairs administrators has remained relatively unknown. As such, a team of researchers sought to investigate the extent of internationalization…

  7. Tour Guide Robots: An Integrated Research and Design Platform to Prepare Engineering and Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting research and design questions occur at the intersections of traditional disciplines, yet most coursework and research programs for undergraduate engineering students are focused on one discipline. This leads to underutilization of the potential in better preparing students through multidisciplinary projects. Identifying this…

  8. Supporting Students' Preparation for the Viva: Their Pre-Conceptions and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the pre-conceptions of doctoral students about the final examination, the viva voce and hence there is a shortage of evidence to underpin activities designed to prepare them for this experience. The present paper, which is based upon data from a wide range of focus groups of pre-viva students, seeks to…

  9. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  10. Curriculum Type and Sophomore Students' Preparation Time for the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Boyd F.; Cariaga-Lo, Liza

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen medical students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum reported that on average they spent twice as much time preparing for step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination as did 52 students in the traditional lecture-based curriculum at the same school. Different learning approaches were also employed. (SLD)

  11. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…

  12. Listening, Grammar, Reading, Writing: Preparing Foreign Students for English and the TOEFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Mary Ellen; Pyle, Michael A.

    The Santa Fe Community College (Gainesville, Florida) offers courses to prepare students for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The two classes--one intermediate and one advanced--meet three times a week for three hours each session. Grammar explanations are presented during the first two classes each week, and students are offered…

  13. Preparing Graduates for Work in the Creative Industries: A Collaborative Learning Approach for Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of collaborative learning strategies in higher education is growing as educators seek better ways to prepare students for the workplace. In design education, teamwork and creativity are particularly valued; successful collaborative learning depends on knowledge sharing between students, and there is increasing recognition that…

  14. Preparing Students in Foster Care for Emancipation, Employment, and Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Tracey G.

    2015-01-01

    Students preparing to emancipate from the foster care system face multiple challenges. For many formerly fostered teens, outcomes are relatively poor. Others have shown incredible resilience in the face of adversity. School psychologists can help address obstacles to postsecondary success for students living in foster care preventively while they…

  15. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MetLife, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers" was conducted by Harris Interactive and is the twenty-seventh in a series sponsored annually by MetLife since 1984 to give voice to those closest to the classroom. This MetLife Survey examines the priority that all students graduate from high school prepared…

  16. An analysis of high-performing science students' preparation for collegiate science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Karen

    This mixed-method study surveyed first year high-performing science students who participated in high-level courses such as International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), and honors science courses in high school to determine their perception of preparation for academic success at the collegiate level. The study used 52 students from an honors college campus and surveyed the students and their professors. The students reported that they felt better prepared for academic success at the collegiate level by taking these courses in high school (pstudent GPA with honors science courses (n=55 and Pearson's r=-0.336), while AP courses (n=47 and Pearson's r=0.0016) and IB courses (n=17 and Pearson's r=-0.2716) demonstrated no correlation between perception of preparation and GPA. Students reported various themes that helped or hindered their perception of academic success once at the collegiate level. Those themes that reportedly helped students were preparedness, different types of learning, and teacher qualities. Students reported in a post-hoc experience that more lab time, rigorous coursework, better teachers, and better study techniques helped prepare them for academic success at the collegiate level. Students further reported on qualities of teachers and teaching that helped foster their academic abilities at the collegiate level, including teacher knowledge, caring, teaching style, and expectations. Some reasons for taking high-level science courses in high school include boosting GPA, college credit, challenge, and getting into better colleges.

  17. Effectively Preparing College Bound Students for College-Level Mathematics: University Math Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Visit with any university math faculty member throughout the United States, and you will soon hear how the freshman students are not prepared to be successful in introductory college algebra classes. The opinions are varied regarding why the students are unsuccessful; however, the concern and frustration is universal. According to American College…

  18. Internationalising the Student Experience: Preparing Instructors to Embed Intercultural Skills in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Anita S.; Kennedy, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The Internationalising the Student Experience Project was devised and piloted as a teaching innovation to improve the intercultural awareness of instructors and, subsequently, that of their domestic and international students. In this article we claim that instructor preparation in the use of the Alliance Building and Cultural Mapping tools of the…

  19. Tour Guide Robots: An Integrated Research and Design Platform to Prepare Engineering and Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting research and design questions occur at the intersections of traditional disciplines, yet most coursework and research programs for undergraduate engineering students are focused on one discipline. This leads to underutilization of the potential in better preparing students through multidisciplinary projects. Identifying this…

  20. Pacesetting Schools Share Successful Strategies to Prepare Students for the Future. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Pacesetting high schools, middle grades schools and technology centers have changed classroom and other practices to prepare students to meet postsecondary requirements and rising workplace needs. The strategies include raising expectations, project-based learning, guidance and advisement, improving students' reading and writing skills,…

  1. Preparation for Full Time Employment: A Capstone Experience for Students in Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Gregory T.; Cannon, Karen J.; Stedman, Nicole L.; Telg, Ricky W.

    2011-01-01

    This practice paper describes the development and implementation of a senior capstone course for communication and leadership development for undergraduate students. The resulting course is a unique combination of experiential skill development and career preparation. The success of this course provides students with an important and meaningful…

  2. System for Preparing High School Learners and Students for Self-Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzitis, Guntis

    2000-01-01

    Presents advice on how to promote student self-learning. Finds that it can be achieved by using specially prepared didactic material, specific recommendations for intellectual work, and general techniques of self-education in independent student work. (Author/CCM)

  3. Problem-based learning at the receiving end: a 'mixed methods' study of junior medical students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudsley, Gillian; Williams, Evelyn M I; Taylor, David C M

    2008-11-01

    Qualitative insights about students' personal experience of inconsistencies in implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) might help refocus expert discourse about good practice. This study explored how junior medical students conceptualize: PBL; good tutoring; and less effective sessions. Participants comprised junior medical students in Liverpool 5-year problem-based, community-orientated curriculum. Data collection and analysis were mostly cross-sectional, using inductive analysis of qualitative data from four brief questionnaires and a 'mixed' qualitative/quantitative approach to data handling. The 1999 cohort (end-Year 1) explored PBL, generated 'good tutor' themes, and identified PBL (dis)advantages (end-Year 1 then mid-Year 3). The 2001 cohort (start-Year 1) described critical incidents, and subsequently (end-Year 1) factors in less effective sessions. These factors were coded using coding-frames generated from the answers about critical incidents and 'good tutoring'. Overall, 61.2% (137), 77.9% (159), 71.0% (201), and 71.0% (198) responded to the four surveys, respectively. Responders perceived PBL as essentially process-orientated, focused on small-groupwork/dynamics and testing understanding through discussion. They described 'good tutors' as knowing when and how to intervene without dominating (51.1%). In longitudinal data (end-Year 1 to mid-Year 3), the main perceived disadvantage remained lack of 'syllabus' (and related uncertainty). For less effective sessions (end-Year 1), tutor transgressions reflected unfulfilled expectations of good tutors, mostly intervening poorly (42.6% of responders). Student transgressions reflected the critical incident themes, mostly students' own lack of work/preparation (54.8%) and other students participating poorly (33.7%) or dominating/being self-centred (31.6%). Compelling individual accounts of uncomfortable PBL experiences should inform improvements in implementation.

  4. A Dual Approach to Fostering Under-Prepared Student Success: Focusing on Doing and Becoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C. Shaffer, MsEd, MEd

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A paired course model for under-prepared college students incorporates a dual instructional approach, academic skill building and lifelong learning development, to help students do more academically and become stronger lifelong learners. In a reading support course, students improved their reading skills and applied them directly to the paired content course. They also developed lifelong learning attributes through increased self-knowledge (using the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory, reflection, and coaching. Students showed significant gains in lifelong learning, an 85% success rate in the paired content course, and a higher retention rate than students outside the project with similar SAT critical reading scores.

  5. Preparing Computing Students for Culturally Diverse E-Mediated IT Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marc; French, Tim; Maple, Carsten; Zhang, Sijing

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present an account of an undergraduate team-based assignment designed to facilitate, exhibit and record team-working skills in an e-mediated environment. By linking the student feedback received to Hofstede's classic model of cultural dimensions we aim to show the assignment's suitability in revealing the student's multi-cultural…

  6. Preparing Adapted Physical Educators to Teach Students with Autism: Current Practices and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sean; Judge, Joann P.; Block, Martin E.; Kwon, Eun Hye

    2016-01-01

    For many students with autism spectrum disorder, physical education is the responsibility of an adapted physical education specialist. In this study, we examined the training focused on teaching students with autism spectrum disorder received by a sample of 106 adapted physical education specialists. Competencies necessary on a course to train…

  7. Developing Research-Ready Skills: Preparing Early Academic Students for Participation in Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Morris, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Engaging lower-division undergraduates in research experiences is a key but challenging aspect of guiding talented students into the geoscience research pipeline. UNAVCO conducted a summer internship program to prepare first and second year college students for participation in authentic, scientific research. Many students in their first two years of academic studies do not have the science content knowledge or sufficient math skills to conduct independent research. Students from groups historically underrepresented in the geosciences may face additional challenges in that they often have a less robust support structure to help them navigate the university environment and may be less aware of professional opportunities in the geosciences.UNAVCO, manager of NSF's geodetic facility, hosted four students during summer 2015 internship experience aimed to help them develop skills that will prepare them for research internships and skills that will help them advance professionally. Students spent eight weeks working with UNAVCO technical staff learning how to use equipment, prepare instrumentation for field campaigns, among other technical skills. Interns also participated in a suite of professional development activities including communications workshops, skills seminars, career circles, geology-focused field trips, and informal interactions with research interns and graduate student interns at UNAVCO. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges of engaging students early in their academic careers and outline the unique role such experiences can have in students' academic careers.

  8. Preparing for Distance Learning: Designing An Online Student Orientation Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane D. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the analysis undertaken to design a 1-credit-hour online orientation course for students new to online learning. An instructional design team, as a part of an advanced instructional design course, worked with a university-based client. The client identified specific problem areas encountered by novice students of online courses and the team designed a comprehensive program to meet those needs. Analysis of the data revealed surprising differences in expectations between instructors of online courses and their students of what an orientation to online learning should include. The team also conducted a task analysis to aid in further identifying the skills, knowledge and attitudes required by students for success in online courses. Findings indicated that there is a need for online learners to understand the time commitment required of an online course and possess or develop strong time management skills. Because of small sample size, results cannot be generalized beyond the respondents. The authors found a mismatch in the perception of instructor technical skills versus student technical skill. Based on their findings, the paper provides recommendations on the appropriate design, development and implementation of an orientation to online learning.

  9. Student Perception of Online Learning in ESL Bilingual Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Mayra C.; Schumacher, Gail; Stelter, Nicole; Riley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies are changing delivery options for post-graduate teacher education. Many practicing teachers who return to school to prepare to educate English learners choose distance learning. This article explores teachers' perceived satisfaction with the quality of online courses, with the collaborative tasks required in these, and the…

  10. Engaging Students in Career Planning and Preparation through Ementoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkel, Doreen H.

    2011-01-01

    Following a developmental model of career planning and preparation, an ementoring program was devised for first semester freshmen to (1) heighten career awareness and stimulate career exploration in food and agricultural sciences; (2) expand interest and willingness to follow career opportunities beyond the regional geographic area; and (3)…

  11. Students aggress against professors in reaction to receiving poor grades: an effect moderated by student narcissism and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory evidence about whether students' evaluations of teaching (SETs) are valid is lacking. Results from three (3) independent studies strongly confirm that "professors" who were generous with their grades were rewarded for their favor with higher SETs, while professors who were frugal were punished with lower SETs (Study 1, d = 1.51; Study 2, d = 1.59; Study 3, partial η(2) = .26). This result was found even when the feedback was manipulated to be more or less insulting (Study 3). Consistent with laboratory findings on direct aggression, results also indicated that, when participants were given a poorer feedback, higher self-esteem (Study 1 and Study 2) and higher narcissism (Study 1) were associated with them giving lower (more aggressive) evaluations of the "professor." Moreover, consistent with findings on self-serving biases, participants higher in self-esteem who were in the positive grade/feedback condition exhibited a self-enhancing bias by giving their "professor" higher evaluations (Study 1 and Study 2). The aforementioned relationships were not moderated by the professor's sex or rank (teaching assistant vs.professor). Results provide evidence that (1) students do aggress against professors through poor teaching evaluations, (2) threatened egotism among individuals with high self-esteem is associated with more aggression, especially when coupled with high narcissism, and (3) self-enhancing biases are robust among those with high self-esteem.

  12. DIFFERENCES IN THE PREPARATION OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES OF HIGH AND LOW IN DEALING WITH NATIONAL EXAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Fitria

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To pass the examination, the most important thing to be considered by the students is the examination preparation. There are so many kinds of examination faced by the students, one of it is national examination. Therefore, the national examination should be prepared well by the students, school, and parents since it is a tool to measure students competency of achievement which held by education unit in order to obtain learning confession and it is a requirement of finishing education level. This research is aimed to describe and differentiate the preparation of students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement in facing national examination. This is a comparative quantitative descriptive approach supported with interview. The target of the research is students of SMA Adabiah Padang, with 327 students as the population. There are 80 students placed as sample. The research finding reveals that (1 physical preparation of students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement in facing national examination is in well prepared category (2 psychology preparation for both students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement is in well prepared category, (3 the preparation in mastering the learning material for both students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement is in well prepared category,(4 the analysis of t test result reveals that there is a significant difference between students with high learning achievement and the students with low learning achievement of SMA Adabiah Padang.Keywords: Preparation National Examination, Students Learning Achievement.

  13. Graduate Student Placement: An Examination of Experience and Career Barriers in a Student Affairs Professional Preparation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This quantitative descriptive study examined the job placement success and challenges of graduate students in a higher education and student affairs professional preparation program at a mid-size public institution in the U.S. Specifically, this study investigated the impact of curricular standards in the form of supervised practice (i.e., internships and graduate assistantships on the job placement rate of recent alumni. In addition, perceived barriers in the job search process were investigated and examined comparatively by gender. Findings suggest that current curricular standards may not be sufficient for successful placement and that men and women do not differ significantly with respect to perceived barriers in their job search process. Implications for practice include a re-evaluation of curricular standards for student affairs professional preparation programs and a greater understanding of what factors and barriers contribute to successful graduate student placement.

  14. Preparing To Serve Students in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    In celebration of The American College Personnel Association's seventy-fifth anniversary, Senior Scholars developed a project to: determine the trends that will affect high education in the next century; identify the impact these trends will have on student experience; identify research needed to respond to trends; and identify Emerging Scholars…

  15. Addressing Perceived Skill Deficiencies in Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jay; Mitchell, Donald, Jr.; Eckerle, Kayle; Martin, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    This article explores existing literature on perceived skill deficiencies among entry-level student affairs practitioners. Through a review of recent literature, seven perceived skill deficiencies were identified, including budgeting and financial management, strategic planning, research and assessment, legal knowledge and standards, supervision,…

  16. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  17. An Analysis of Students' Preparation for the Virtual Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph; Hong, Ng Lai; Ling, Ng Lai

    2001-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at a private college in Malaysia that identified factors that helped learners successfully use information and communication technology in a virtual learning environment. Topics include skills and attitudes of students; awareness of information available on the Internet; access to the Internet; and perceived…

  18. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  19. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    . Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  20. Successful Study Abroad: Tips for Student Preparation, Immersion, and Postprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Julia; Brubaker, Cate

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses components that can make study abroad programs more effective so that students successfully improve their language and culture competency and gain a more sophisticated understanding of the host culture. First, the authors offer ideas for language instructors at home on how to integrate culture learning into the classroom and…

  1. Impacting student anxiety for the USMLE Step 1 through process-oriented preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E. Strowd

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standardized examinations are the key components of medical education. The USMLE Step 1 is the first of these important milestones. Success on this examination requires both content competency and efficient strategies for study and review. Students employ a wide variety of techniques in studying for this examination, with heavy reliance on personal study habits and advice from other students. Nevertheless, few medical curricula formally address these strategies. Methods: In response to student-generated critique at our institution, a five-part seminar series on process-oriented preparation was developed and implemented to address such concerns. The series focused on early guidance and preparation strategies for Step 1 and the many other important challenges in medical school. Emphasis was placed on facilitating conversation and mentorship opportunities between students. Results & Conclusions: A profoundly positive experience was reported by our medical students that included a decreased anxiety level for the Step 1 examination.

  2. Utilizing Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning in Educator Preparation Programs for Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Colby

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this results-oriented era of accountability, educator preparation programs are called upon to provide comprehensive data related to student and program outcomes while also providing evidence of continuous improvement. Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning (CASL is one approach for fostering critical inquiry about student learning. Graduate educator preparation programs in our university used collaborative analysis as the basis for continuous improvement during an accreditation cycle. As authors of this study, we sought to better understand how graduate program directors and faculty used collaborative analysis to inform practice and improve programs. Our findings suggested that CASL has the potential to foster collective responsibility for student learning, but only with a strong commitment from administrators and faculty, purposefully designed protocols and processes, fidelity to the CASL method, and a focus on professional development. Through CASL, programs have the ability to produce meaningful data related to student and program outcomes and meet the requirements for accreditation.

  3. Supporting Geoscience Students at Two-Year Colleges: Career Preparation and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Layou, K.; Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-year colleges play an important role in developing a competent and creative geoscience workforce, teaching science to pre-service K-12 teachers, producing earth-science literate citizens, and providing a foundation for broadening participation in the geosciences. The Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) project has developed web resources for geoscience faculty on the preparation and support of students in two-year colleges (2YCs). Online resources developed from two topical workshops and several national, regional, and local workshops around the country focus on two main categories: Career Preparation and Workforce Development, and Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges. The Career Preparation and Workforce Development resources were developed to help faculty make the case that careers in the geosciences provide a range of possibilities for students and to support preparation for the geoscience workforce and for transfer to four-year programs as geoscience majors. Many two-year college students are unaware of geoscience career opportunities and these materials help illuminate possible futures for them. Resources include an overview of what geoscientists do; profiles of possible careers along with the preparation necessary to qualify for them; geoscience employer perspectives about jobs and the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes they are looking for in their employees; employment trends in sectors of the economy that employ geoscience professionals; examples of geotechnician workforce programs (e.g. Advanced Technological Education Centers, environmental technology programs, marine technician programs); and career resources available from professional societies. The website also provides information to support student recruitment into the geosciences and facilitate student transfer to geoscience programs at four- year colleges and universities, including sections on advising support before

  4. Integrating Research and Education: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullis, J.

    2003-12-01

    The link between research and teaching at all levels is increasingly recognized, and can be an attractive as well as an effective part of a graduate program in geoscience. At Brown we have a strong partnership between our department and the university's teaching center. The Sheridan Center for the Advancement of College Teaching provides resources and programs to help grad students improve their effectiveness as TAs and their qualifications for obtaining a teaching-related job, as well as to promote and facilitate improved teaching by faculty. Departments are encouraged to designate faculty and grad student liaisons to the Center and to take advantage of Center programs (including seminars on topics such as Persuasive Communication, Cognitive Diversity, Developing a Syllabus, Assessment, and Teaching Portfolios) and resources (such as books, tapes and videos and Individual Teaching Consultations), as well as to develop their own discipline-specific programs. The Geol. Sci. Dept. has been an active participant in Center activities from the start, but we have also developed our own activities and programs. Each year two geo faculty and two grad students serve as official liaisons to the Center, in addition to organizing and running a variety of programs within the department, including: orientation sessions for new graduate students and first-time TAs, `micro-teaching' practise sessions with constructive feedback for new TAs, mid-semester discussion and feedback sessions for current and more experienced TAs, as well as lunch meetings for all interested faculty and grad students to discuss aspects of teaching. These activities have increased the awareness and effectiveness of teaching and learning in our department, for example promoting faculty and TAs to implement syllabi with stated goals, in-class active learning exercises, small group projects, a greater number and variety of writing assignments, and greater diversity in assessment. The effectiveness of our

  5. Quantitative comparison of mathematical models to measure surface area of canine teeth prepared to receive full veneer crowns in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn eCollins

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed in order to determine if mathematical modeling of the canine teeth in dogs could be utilized to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of crown surface area that could be used in both a research and clinical setting.Materials and methods: Actual surface area (aSA calculations for 32 stone dies of clinical crown preparations were acquired utilizing a tridimensional (3D laser scanner and 3D computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM software applications. These calculations were used as a control. Seventeen unique mathematical models from 8 geometric shapes were used to calculate estimated surface area (eSA of each stone die. Linear association and agreement between eSA and aSA calculations were assessed with multiple statistical methods. Results: All methods of eSA showed a significant linear association with aSA. Five of the mathematical models [right elliptical frustum (H3, right elliptical cone (G3, right pyramidal cone (A3, right circular frustum (F2 and right circular cone (E1] were superior to the other 12 models.Conclusions: The H3 mathematical model based on the right elliptical frustum provided the most accurate estimate of crown surface area of dog teeth. However, H3 requires the use of laser scans and a 3D CAD software program. As a result, this model would be recommended for research applications. The E1 mathematical model was similar in accuracy to H3 and, given it requires only two measurements and a comparatively simple equation for calculation, this method would be recommended for clinical chair-side use.

  6. A 1-week simulated internship course helps prepare medical students for transition to residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laack, Torrey A; Newman, James S; Goyal, Deepi G; Torsher, Laurence C

    2010-06-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is inherently stressful, with potentially negative consequences for both interns and patients. We describe Internship Boot Camp, an innovative course specifically designed to prepare fourth-year medical students for the transition from medical school to internship. An intensive 1-week course, Internship Boot Camp has simulated, longitudinal patient-care scenarios that use high-fidelity medical simulation, standardized patients, procedural task trainers, and problem-based learning to help students apply their knowledge and develop a framework for response to the challenges they will face as interns. In March 2007, 12 students participated in the course as an elective in their final year of medical school, and the other 28 students in their class did not. After beginning internship and 5 to 7 months after the completion of Internship Boot Camp, all 40 former students were asked to complete a blinded survey about their preparation for internship. The overall response rate for the survey was 80%. Of responders to an open-ended question about the aspects of medical school training that best prepared them for internship, 89% (8 of 9) of course participants listed "Internship Boot Camp." The next highest response ("subinternship") was given by 45% (9 of 20) of nonparticipants and 33% (3 of 9) of course participants. Internship Boot Camp is a unique learning environment that is recalled by participants as the most helpful, of all components of their medical school education, in preparation for internship.

  7. Rationale for using integrated enzymatic preparation for receiving food fibers from secondary resources of vegetable material processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimov A. V.

    2016-09-01

    presence of enzyme medicine is рН equal to 6.0. The received results allow set the rational modes of enzyme medicine effect (temperature and рН necessary for carrying out enzymatic hydrolysis of secondary resources of aubergines, vegetable marrows and onion processing.

  8. Why Students Do Not Prepare for Math Placement Exams: Student Perspectives. CCRC Research Brief. Number 57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Maggie P.; Bickerstaff, Susan; Hodara, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Drawn from surveys completed by 122 students enrolled in developmental math at four community colleges and from seven student focus groups with a total of 34 developmental math students at those same colleges, this research brief illuminates student experiences with and perspectives on the math assessment and placement process. Findings suggest…

  9. Voluntary peer-led exam preparation course for international first year students: Tutees' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Daniel; Eckart, Wolfgang; Karimian-Jazi, Kianush; Amr, Ali; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-06-18

    While the number of international students has increased over the last decade, such students face diverse challenges due to language and cultural barriers. International medical students suffer from personal distress and a lack of support. Their performance is significantly lower than non-international peers in clinical examinations. We investigated whether international students benefit from a peer-led exam preparation course. An exam preparation course was designed, and relevant learning objectives were defined. Two evaluations were undertaken: Using a qualitative approach, tutees (N = 10) were asked for their thoughts and comments in a semi-structured interview at the end of the semester. From a quantitative perspective, all participants (N = 22) were asked to complete questionnaires at the end of each course session. International students reported a range of significant benefits from the course as they prepared for upcoming exams. They benefited from technical and didactic, as well as social learning experiences. They also considered aspects of the tutorial's framework helpful. Social and cognitive congruence seem to be the key factors to success within international medical students' education. If tutors have a migration background, they can operate as authentic role models. Furthermore, because they are still students themselves, they can offer support using relevant and understandable language.

  10. Preparing for the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Guide for students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mohammed M S

    2013-04-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) has become an accepted method for evaluating clinical competence. Limited references are available for students and residents to help them prepare adequately for such examinations. In this review an outline on how to prepare, approach, and behave during the OSCE is presented. Students should prepare by repeated practice keeping in mind that the exam is usually divided into history and physical examination stations. Candidates should pay close attention to all given instructions and rules of the exam. During the encounter, proper interaction, and good communication with the patient and family are critical for a successful exam. At the end of the OSCE, candidates should avoid rushing the patient or asking for their mark. To conclude, careful preparation for the OSCE is needed to improve the likelihood of a successful outcome.

  11. Preparing Students for the Ethical Challenges of Global Citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelyn Flammia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach to teaching ethical intercultural communication. This approach helps students become aware of their own ethnocentric attitudes and helps them move beyond those perspectives to develop a mindful approach to intercultural communication. The paper begins by introducing the concept of mindful communication and the challenges of developing of a code of ethical behavior for communicating across cultures. Then, strategies for reconciling cultural relativism and universalism are offered. Finally, the paper provides a set of guidelines for ethical behavior in intercultural encounters.

  12. Engaging the students of today and preparing the catchment hydrologists of tomorrow: student-centered approaches in hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ngambeki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As hydrologists confront the future of water resources on a globalized, resource-scarce and human-impacted planet, the educational preparation of future generations of water scientists becomes increasingly important. Although hydrology inherits a tradition of teacher-centered direct instruction – based on lecture, reading and assignment formats – a growing body of knowledge derived from engineering education research suggests that modifications to these methods could firstly improve the quality of instruction from a student perspective, and secondly contribute to better professional preparation of hydrologists, in terms of their abilities to transfer knowledge to new contexts, to frame and solve novel problems, and to work collaboratively in uncertain environments. Here we review the theoretical background and empirical literature relating to adopting student-centered and inductive models of teaching and learning. Models of student-centered learning and their applications in engineering education are introduced by outlining the approaches used by several of the authors to introduce student-centered and inductive educational strategies into their university classrooms. Finally, the relative novelty of research on engineering instruction in general and hydrology in particular creates opportunities for new partnerships between education researchers and hydrologists to explore the discipline-specific needs of hydrology students and develop new approaches for instruction and professional preparation of hydrologists.

  13. Engaging the students of today and preparing the catchment hydrologists of tomorrow: student-centered approaches in hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngambeki, I.; Thompson, S. E.; Troch, P. A.; Sivapalan, M.; Evangelou, D.

    2012-01-01

    As hydrologists confront the future of water resources on a globalized, resource-scarce and human-impacted planet, the educational preparation of future generations of water scientists becomes increasingly important. Although hydrology inherits a tradition of teacher-centered direct instruction - based on lecture, reading and assignment formats - a growing body of knowledge derived from engineering education research suggests that modifications to these methods could firstly improve the quality of instruction from a student perspective, and secondly contribute to better professional preparation of hydrologists, in terms of their abilities to transfer knowledge to new contexts, to frame and solve novel problems, and to work collaboratively in uncertain environments. Here we review the theoretical background and empirical literature relating to adopting student-centered and inductive models of teaching and learning. Models of student-centered learning and their applications in engineering education are introduced by outlining the approaches used by several of the authors to introduce student-centered and inductive educational strategies into their university classrooms. Finally, the relative novelty of research on engineering instruction in general and hydrology in particular creates opportunities for new partnerships between education researchers and hydrologists to explore the discipline-specific needs of hydrology students and develop new approaches for instruction and professional preparation of hydrologists.

  14. Individual Characteristics of Students with and without Disabilities Who Received a Waiver for the Requirements Necessary to Earn a Standard Diploma: A Study of One System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, David Jay

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of individual characteristics to include disability status, age, gender, and race-ethnicity on receiving a waiver from one or more of the requirements for receipt of the standard diploma among students with and without disabilities. Student data was drawn from a large, international…

  15. Best practices in NCLEX-RN readiness preparation for baccalaureate student success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Karen H; Sewell, Jeanne P; Clark, Deborah J

    2008-01-01

    Success for first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN has implications for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. As the passing standard for the NCLEX-RN has risen, some programs have experienced a corresponding decrease in their graduates' first-time pass rates. This article describes one baccalaureate program's journey from low first-time NCLEX-RN pass rates in 2001 to greater student and program success using a data-based, analytical approach. Although passing an exit exam was a program requirement for 20 years, the change to computerized testing and more in-depth test preparation has enhanced opportunities for success for students and reduced stress among faculty. The resulting best practices for preparing students for NCLEX-RN success are described.

  16. Medical students` perceptions of supporting pharmacology learning in English by key information prepared in Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ياسين, تيم; مروان, حجلة ابو; ريجينالد, سيكويرا

    2017-07-16

    We explored medical students` perceptions of supporting pharmacology self-learning in English by focused materials prepared in Arabic. This study targeted third-year medical students at the Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain (n= 183). During the endocrine and metabolism subunit, which is taught in English, slides containing focused information in Arabic preceded detailed English ones. At the end of the subunit, students` perceptions were explored by a questionnaire and focus group discussions. Most participants reported that this intervention made pharmacology learning easier, improved confidence in drug selection, knowledge of adverse drug reactions, detection of response to medications and occurrence of adverse reactions. Most respondents thought that this intervention would help them during the clinical phase of their study and in communicating drug therapy to patients in Arabic. Supporting pharmacology learning in a foreign language with instructional materials prepared in a native language improved students self-reported learning and satisfaction.

  17. Preparing Nursing Students for Leadership Using a Disaster-Related Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sherrill; Farra, Sharon; Dempsey, Anita; Arms, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers and severity of disasters across the globe require nurses to be prepared to provide leadership in disaster situations. To address this need, a combination of didactic and simulation exercises was used to provide a daylong experience emphasizing application of nursing leadership skills in disasters to senior baccalaureate students. Evaluation of learning outcomes demonstrated significant improvement in student self-efficacy related to leadership in disasters.

  18. An Appreciative Inquiry into the Preparation of Undergraduate Education Studies Students to Value and Embrace Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This study is a qualitative appreciative inquiry into how students of an undergraduate Ed. and Training programme are prepared for diversity. The setting for the study is the School of Education Studies at Dublin City University and the research involves a review of programmes and moudule intentions and qualitative data collected from final year students, academic staff and alumni of the programme. The study includes a literature review that examines the conceptualisation of diversity and ...

  19. Clinical Boot Camp: An Innovative Simulation Experience to Prepare Nursing Students for Obstetric and Pediatric Clinicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogewood, Connie; Smith, Tedra; Etheridge, Sherita; Britt, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric and pediatric patients require unique specialized care not included in traditional adult health education. To prepare nursing students for clinical rotations beginning the second week of class, faculty developed an innovative one-day simulation seminar, the OB/PEDS Boot Camp, in which groups of students rotated through six stations of obstetric and pediatric simulation exercises. This article provides insight on the development and implementation of the OB/PEDS Boot Camp.

  20. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  1. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  2. Dental students' opinions of preparation assessment with E4D compare software versus traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamil, Lindsey M; Mennito, Anthony S; Renné, Walter G; Vuthiganon, Jompobe

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dental students' opinions regarding the utilization of a new grading software program for student self-assessment and a faculty-grading tool in a preclinical course. Using surface mapping technology, this program, called E4D Compare, yields a digital model of a student's preparation that is color-coded to show deficient areas. The program has now been used for two years at the James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina, and the students previously assessed with E4D Compare have now entered into the dental clinics. For this study, students were asked to complete an anonymous survey for the investigators to evaluate students' attitudes and opinions on the effectiveness of this software in their preclinical courses to determine if this type of feedback helped them develop clinical skills. The survey also sought to collect students' opinions on the traditional objective criteria-based grading system. The survey was distributed to all members of the Classes of 2014 and 2015; it yielded a 59 percent response rate for the two classes, with a total of eighty-one students responding. Overall, the majority of students preferred the E4D Compare grading system over traditional hand-grading methods. The grading system provided instant, objective, and visual feedback that allowed students to easily see where their deficiencies were and encouraged them to work towards an ideal final product.

  3. Special Education Teacher Preparation in Classroom Management: Implications for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Regina M.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Special education teachers' skills with classroom organization and behavior management affect the emergence and persistence of behavior problems as well as the success of inclusive practice for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Adequate special education teacher preparation and strong classroom organization and behavior…

  4. Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donna Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success. Donna Elizabeth Williams, 2011: Applied Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University, Abraham S. Fischler School of Education. ERIC Descriptors: Learning Disabilities, Community Based Instruction, Academic Advising, Career Counseling, Career Planning. This…

  5. Preparing an L2 Role-Play: How Students Manage L2 Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edstrom, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable variation in the implementation of role-play activities in second language (L2)/foreign language (FL) classroom settings, and little information is available about how students actually manage them, particularly with regards to overcoming their L2 deficits. This study examines the preparation of role-plays by university…

  6. Rationale for Students Preparation and Entrepreneurship Education in the Face of Global Economic Crisis in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Nwite

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for students preparation in job creation through entrepreneurship education was examined. Problems of unemployment among Nigerian university graduates and challenges to entrepreneurship in the face of global economic crisis were also highlighted. The persistent problem of unemployment among University graduates and its attendant…

  7. Intercultural Communication Apprehension and Emotional Intelligence in Higher Education: Preparing Business Students for Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Lisa T.; Kelly, Stephanie; MacDonald, Patrick; Primm, Charles; Holmes, Whitney

    2013-01-01

    Given the expanding globalized workforce, business educators continue to seek new ways to prepare students for intercultural encounters. Although immersion in other cultures is the optimal strategy, this method is not always feasible. As such, educators seek other mechanisms to simulate intercultural experiences. This study examines emotional…

  8. Bring Workplace Assessment into Business Communication Classrooms: A Proposal to Better Prepare Students for Professional Workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han

    2010-01-01

    To help students better understand and be better prepared for professional workplaces, the author suggests that business communication teachers examine and learn from workplace assessment methods. Throughout the article, the author discusses the rationale behind this proposal, reviews relevant literature, reports interview findings on workplace…

  9. Intercultural Communication Apprehension and Emotional Intelligence in Higher Education: Preparing Business Students for Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Lisa T.; Kelly, Stephanie; MacDonald, Patrick; Primm, Charles; Holmes, Whitney

    2013-01-01

    Given the expanding globalized workforce, business educators continue to seek new ways to prepare students for intercultural encounters. Although immersion in other cultures is the optimal strategy, this method is not always feasible. As such, educators seek other mechanisms to simulate intercultural experiences. This study examines emotional…

  10. Teaching Note-CASA Volunteerism: Preparing MSW Students for Public Child Welfare Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrick, Jill Duerr; Durst, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to reform public child welfare systems across the nation, Title IV-E child welfare training programs were established over 2 decades ago. Participating students typically engage in a customized educational experience as part of their MSW program that prepares them to work in the field of child welfare upon graduation. This article…

  11. Employment Preparation and Life Skill Development Initiatives for High School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Jacqueline M.; Huber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Employment preparation and life skill development are crucial in assisting students identified as having emotional and behavioral disabilities with successfully transitioning to adulthood following high school. This article outlines four initiatives that a school counselor developed with other school personnel to promote work skills, life skills,…

  12. Teaching Note-CASA Volunteerism: Preparing MSW Students for Public Child Welfare Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrick, Jill Duerr; Durst, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to reform public child welfare systems across the nation, Title IV-E child welfare training programs were established over 2 decades ago. Participating students typically engage in a customized educational experience as part of their MSW program that prepares them to work in the field of child welfare upon graduation. This article…

  13. A Study of Faculty Views of Statistics and Student Preparation beyond an Introductory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehler, Kirsten; Taylor, Laura; Smith, Jessalyn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to better understand the role of statistics in teaching and research by faculty from all disciplines and their perceptions of the statistical preparation of their students. This study reports the findings of a survey administered to faculty from seven colleges and universities regarding the use of statistics in…

  14. The Mathematics Education Debates: Preparing Students to Become Professionally Active Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mika

    2010-01-01

    The Mathematics Education Debate is an assignment designed for and implemented in an undergraduate mathematics methods course for prospective secondary school mathematics teachers. For the assignment, students read and analyze current research and policy reports related to mathematics education, prepare and present their positions, offer…

  15. Preparing Public Relations and Advertising Students for the 21st Century: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Robert A.

    In 1993, the Task Force on Integrated Communications reported that public relations and advertising students would better be prepared to enter a changing communications industry through an "integrated" curriculum. This paper is a case study of how one university has attempted to meet that challenge. The work has resulted in the development of an…

  16. Preparing Students for Democratic Life: The Rediscovery of Education's Civic Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Keith; Dedrick, John; Gish, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores why, despite repeated affirmations of the importance of civic education in undergraduate education, preparing students to understand and play an active role in democratic life is, for the most part, a marginal and episodic part of the undergraduate experience. After describing various factors that have contributed to its…

  17. A Quantitative Correlational Study of Teacher Preparation Program on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, Jacob Blackstone

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to identify the relationship between the type of teacher preparation program and student performance on the seventh and eighth grade mathematics state assessments in rural school settings. The study included a survey of a convenience sample of 36 teachers from Colorado and Washington school…

  18. Inventing Motivates and Prepares Student Teachers for Computer-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogger-Frey, I.; Kappich, J.; Schwonke, R.; Holzäpfel, L.; Nückles, M.; Renkl, A.

    2015-01-01

    A brief, problem-oriented phase such as an inventing activity is one potential instructional method for preparing learners not only cognitively but also motivationally for learning. Student teachers often need to overcome motivational barriers in order to use computer-based learning opportunities. In a preliminary experiment, we found that student…

  19. Different Paths to a Common Goal: Preparing Students for Civic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delander, Brady; Millard, Maria

    2014-01-01

    While many Americans might agree on the importance of preparing young people for citizenship in a democracy, civic education has been in decline. Results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress show students across all grade levels have a less-than-adequate grasp of the skills and knowledge necessary to engage as citizens. In…

  20. Bring Workplace Assessment into Business Communication Classrooms: A Proposal to Better Prepare Students for Professional Workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han

    2010-01-01

    To help students better understand and be better prepared for professional workplaces, the author suggests that business communication teachers examine and learn from workplace assessment methods. Throughout the article, the author discusses the rationale behind this proposal, reviews relevant literature, reports interview findings on workplace…

  1. How Do Different Types of Schools Prepare Students for Life at Cambridge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Adamson, Clara; Mercer, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Twenty students from different educational backgrounds within the UK were interviewed to investigate how well they considered their secondary school education had prepared them for the educational and social demands of an "elite" university and life within its most traditional colleges. The study asked them how they perceived students…

  2. Students' Views of A-Level Mathematics as Preparation for Degree-Level Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    As part of a large-scale survey of over 4000 undergraduates at British universities, 238 economics students reported on their experiences of studying post-compulsory secondary mathematics qualifications (A-levels) and the preparation they provided for their degrees. Participants were positive about their experience of post-compulsory mathematics…

  3. Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donna Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success. Donna Elizabeth Williams, 2011: Applied Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University, Abraham S. Fischler School of Education. ERIC Descriptors: Learning Disabilities, Community Based Instruction, Academic Advising, Career Counseling, Career Planning. This…

  4. IELTS Preparation Course and Student IELTS Performance: A Case Study in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhengdong, Gan

    2009-01-01

    Since the University Grants Committee (UGC) selected the academic module of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) as the common English proficiency assessment for graduating undergraduate degree students in 2002, almost all the tertiary institutions in Hong Kong have offered IELTS preparation courses that aim at providing…

  5. Professional Preparation of Students of Social Pedagogy in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincová, Jana; Andrysová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the professional preparation of future teachers of social pedagogy (social educators) in the context of current tasks which the social pedagogy in the Czech Republic still has. Based on the results of the research which aims to present the professional characteristics of students of social pedagogy, we propose an innovation of…

  6. How Do Different Types of Schools Prepare Students for Life at Cambridge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Adamson, Clara; Mercer, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Twenty students from different educational backgrounds within the UK were interviewed to investigate how well they considered their secondary school education had prepared them for the educational and social demands of an "elite" university and life within its most traditional colleges. The study asked them how they perceived students…

  7. Undergraduate Taiwanese Students' Perceptions of Using Computer-Mediated Communication in a TOEIC Preparation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shu-hui April

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate Taiwanese undergraduate students' perception of using computer-mediated communication (CMC) in a TOEIC preparation course and determine if using an online format motivates them to succeed. As a result, five factors are addressed in the study, namely, attitude, motivation, study habit, feedback, and…

  8. Preparing students to be doctors: introduction of a sub-internship program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robb, W B

    2011-04-05

    Preparing graduates for the transformation from medical student to doctor provides medical schools with a real challenge. Medical educators advocate a process of graduated delegation of responsibility in the clinical years of medical school. This is best exemplified in the North American system of sub-internship programmes; an educational approach which European medical schools have been slow to adopt. This study reports on the introduction of an intensive two-week surgical sub-internship for final medical year students. "Sub-interns" were asked to complete pre and post sub-internship online questionnaires assessing their readiness to perform clinical and practical skills, attitudes towards the program, and how well it prepared students for internship. Forty-nine students completed a questionnaire pre sub-internship and 47 completed the post-questionnaire. Student confidence towards practical and clinical skills and their first day at work increased over the two weeks. Mean Iikert scores for all 6 practical and clinical skills improved post sub-internship. The introduction of a surgical sub-internship is timely and welcomed by medical students. Its development helps bridge the gap in responsibilities between medical student and doctor.

  9. The Convergence Angle of Full-coverage Crown Preparations Made by Dental Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Baghai Naini

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A clinically feasible convergence angle in full-coverage crown preparations, meeting the requirements for proper retention and resistance forms, has always been a matter of interest for laboratory and clinical researches. This study aims to evaluate the angle in teeth prepared by both under- and post-graduate students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Faculty of dentistry, Department of Prosthodontics.Materials and Methods: Samples consisted of 196 prepared teeth for full-coverage crown restoration by third year postgraduate and fifth year undergraduate students in the Department of Prosthodontics. Two images were obtained from each die by a scanner and both bucco-lingual and mesio-distal convergence angles were measured, by two different assessors, via Auto CAD 14 software. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance.Results: There were statistically significant differences between the teeth prepared by un-der- and post-graduate students in mesio-distal convergence angles of all maxillary teeth, except for canines. Significant differences were found between bucco-lingual convergence angles of the maxillary canines and molars.Conclusion: The recently recommended convergence angles are more clinically feasible compared to the classic 4 to 10 degrees that was previously suggested for all teeth. It also seems that clinical experience does not necessarily lead to a decrease in convergence an-gles during preparation.

  10. Using multimedia modules to better prepare students for introductory physics lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhou Chen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that introductory physics students rarely, if ever, read the textbook prior to coming to lecture. In this study, we report results from a curriculum intervention in a large enrollment introductory physics class that addresses this problem. In particular, we introduced web-based multimedia learning modules (MLMs as a “prelecture assignment” designed to better prepare students before coming to lecture. We used student performance on “preflight questions” that they answer prior to lecture as a measure of their before-lecture understanding of the physics concepts. We found significant improvement in student performance and on the vast majority of these preflight questions as compared to that from previous semesters in which MLMs were not available. We found significant improvement for all students, independent of their background or ability level.

  11. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  12. Dental Students' Perceptions of Digital Assessment Software for Preclinical Tooth Preparation Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Carly F; Sheinbaum, Justin M; Tamada, Yasushi; Chandiramani, Raina; Lian, Lisa; Lee, Cliff; Da Silva, John; Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi

    2017-05-01

    Objective self-assessment is essential to learning and continued competence in dentistry. A computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) learning software (prepCheck, Sirona) allows students to objectively assess their performance in preclinical prosthodontics. The aim of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of CAD/CAM learning software for preclinical prosthodontics exercises. In 2014, all third-year dental students at Harvard School of Dental Medicine (n=36) were individually instructed by a trained faculty member in using prepCheck. Each student completed a preclinical formative exercise (#18) and summative examination (#30) for ceramometal crown preparation and evaluated the preparation using five assessment tools (reduction, margin width, surface finish, taper, and undercut) in prepCheck. The students then rated each of the five tools for usefulness, user-friendliness, and frequency of use on a scale from 1=lowest to 5=highest. Faculty members graded the tooth preparations as pass (P), marginal-pass (MP), or fail (F). The survey response rate was 100%. The tools for undercut and taper had the highest scores for usefulness, user-friendliness, and frequency of use. The reduction tool score was significantly lower in all categories (psoftware as significantly more useful.

  13. Preparing Students from a 21st Century Demographic for the Geoscience Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, D. I.; Velasco, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Preparing students for the workforce at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) represents a unique challenge as over half our undergraduate majors are the first in their family to attend college, most have rarely ventured beyond the highly urbanized border region, over 75% are Hispanic, and few know any practicing geoscientists outside the university community. One of our most successful activities for preparing students for the workforce is our annual student research colloquium that will be held for the 25th consecutive year in spring 2011. The colloquium encourages our undergraduate and graduate students, as well as students from the local community college, to present their research to professional geoscientists. They also interact with these geoscientists in a number of other social activities that extend over a 2-3 day period. Formal feedback is provided to the Department by these professionals to help us improve the skills and knowledge base of our students for the workforce. We also invite geoscientists from our local community to talk to undergraduates in a variety of formal and informal settings. Another successful program includes an NSF funded program to give undergraduate students research experience during the academic year, called Pathways, that prepares them for professional life beyond UTEP. Furthermore, we require students who complete internships at the start of their junior or senior year to make presentations to lower division students. Based on suggestions from our alumni, we have begun to implement class projects that expose students to “real world” type problems, including writing work plans and estimating budgets for proposed field work. For example, our senior seminar in environmental science requires students to write and present environmental assessments of selected “fictitious” (but plausible) projects that focus on the border region. Local professionals assist the students with organizing and writing these assessments and

  14. Evaluation of senior Brazilian dental students about mouth preparation and removable partial denture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Arcelino Farias; Duarte, Antônio Ricardo Calazans; Shiratori, Fábio Kenji; de Alencar e Silva Leite, Pedro Henrique; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge of senior dental students about mouth preparation and removable partial denture (RPD) design. Two hundred sixty-six senior students from eleven dental schools in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, comprised the sample. The subjects examined two partially edentulous casts mounted on a semiadjustable articulator, answered a questionnaire regarding the treatment plan, and drew the RPD design. The casts consisted of Kennedy Class III, modification 1 maxillary arch and Class II mandibular arch. Ninety percent of the students believed that mouth preparation should be performed although no one was able to name all necessary procedures. For the maxillary arch, 12 percent of the denture designs were completely appropriate, 51 percent were partially appropriate, and 37 percent were inappropriate. For the mandibular arch, the results were 3 percent, 40 percent, and 57 percent, respectively.

  15. Influence of Ethics Education on Moral Reasoning among Pre-Service Teacher Preparation and Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salopek, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    This comparative case study examines the influence of ethics education on moral reasoning among pre-service teacher preparation and social work students. This study specifically investigates the ethical values of students enrolled in a teacher preparation and social work education program by their fourth year of study; the degree of ethical…

  16. Investigating Differences in Personality Traits and Academic Needs among Prepared and Underprepared First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Dawn K.; Grant, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Research has discovered that underprepared students are more likely to exhibit an external locus of control and low self-efficacy than those considered prepared. What differences exist between prepared and underprepared college students that may account for the variation in college performance? The objective of this study was to explore…

  17. Methods Used by Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy to Prepare Student Pharmacists for Careers in Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seena L; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A; Clifford, Kalin M; Summa, Maria A; Willson, Megan N; Boyle, Jaclyn A; Peeters, Michael J

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To identify the methods used by US colleges and schools of pharmacy to prepare student pharmacists for academic careers. Method. An 18-item survey instrument was developed and distributed to US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Representatives were asked about faculty responsibilities, experiences in academia currently offered to student pharmacists, and representatives' perception of their student pharmacists' preparedness for careers in academia, including barriers in current programming. Results. Representatives from 96 colleges/schools responded. The vast majority (96%) provided academia-focused advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), 40% provided didactic coursework in academia, 28% offered a longitudinal research track, and 42% offered academia-focused independent studies. Teaching methods and creating learning objectives were the most common pedagogical content, while assessment activities were diverse. Time was the most prevalent barrier to providing training for academic careers; however, degree of student pharmacist interest, faculty inexperience, and lack of leadership support were also commonly reported. Conclusions: Colleges and schools of pharmacy vary in the extent to which they prepare student pharmacists for careers in academia. Advanced pharmacy practice experiences were the most common method of training offered. Standardization of training for academia may better promote this career path to student pharmacists.

  18. Student Preparation and the Power of Visual Input in Veterinary Surgical Education: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Koch, Bodil Cathrine; Berendt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, veterinary educational institutions have implemented alternative teaching methods, including video demonstrations of surgical procedures. However, the power of the dynamic visual input from videos in relation to recollection of a surgical procedure has never been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate how veterinary surgical students perceived the influence of different educational materials on recollection of a surgical procedure. Furthermore, we investigated if surgical technique was associated with a certain method of recollection or use of educational material. During a basic surgical skills course, 112 fourth-year veterinary students participated in the study by completing a questionnaire regarding method of recollection, influence of individual types of educational input, and homework preparation. Furthermore, we observed students performing an orchiectomy in a terminal pig lab. Preparation for the pig lab consisted of homework (textbook, online material, including videos), lecture, cadaver lab, and toy animal models in a skills lab. In the instructional video, a detail was used that was not described elsewhere. Results show that 60% of the students used a visual dynamic method as their main method of recollection and that video was considered the most influential educational input with respect to recollection of a specific procedure. Observation of students' performance during the orchiectomy showed no clear association with students' method of recollection but a significant association (p=.002) with educational input. Our results illustrate the power of a visual input and support prior findings that knowledge is constructed from multiple sources of information.

  19. Methods Used by Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy to Prepare Student Pharmacists for Careers in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy-Boarman, Eliza A.; Clifford, Kalin M.; Summa, Maria A.; Willson, Megan N.; Boyle, Jaclyn A.; Peeters, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To identify the methods used by US colleges and schools of pharmacy to prepare student pharmacists for academic careers. Method. An 18-item survey instrument was developed and distributed to US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Representatives were asked about faculty responsibilities, experiences in academia currently offered to student pharmacists, and representatives’ perception of their student pharmacists’ preparedness for careers in academia, including barriers in current programming. Results. Representatives from 96 colleges/schools responded. The vast majority (96%) provided academia-focused advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), 40% provided didactic coursework in academia, 28% offered a longitudinal research track, and 42% offered academia-focused independent studies. Teaching methods and creating learning objectives were the most common pedagogical content, while assessment activities were diverse. Time was the most prevalent barrier to providing training for academic careers; however, degree of student pharmacist interest, faculty inexperience, and lack of leadership support were also commonly reported. Conclusions: Colleges and schools of pharmacy vary in the extent to which they prepare student pharmacists for careers in academia. Advanced pharmacy practice experiences were the most common method of training offered. Standardization of training for academia may better promote this career path to student pharmacists. PMID:28289296

  20. Preparing for Fiscal Leadership in Student Affairs: The Senior Student Affairs Officer Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Stephanie C.; Williams, Terry E.

    2010-01-01

    Success within today's challenging economic environment mandates that senior student affairs officers in higher education possess a sophisticated financial and budgetary skill set. Limited research addresses avenues through which professionals might best acquire the financial acumen needed. To address this gap, 19 senior student affairs officers…

  1. Preparing for Fiscal Leadership in Student Affairs: The Senior Student Affairs Officer Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Stephanie C.; Williams, Terry E.

    2010-01-01

    Success within today's challenging economic environment mandates that senior student affairs officers in higher education possess a sophisticated financial and budgetary skill set. Limited research addresses avenues through which professionals might best acquire the financial acumen needed. To address this gap, 19 senior student affairs officers…

  2. An innovative blended learning approach using virtual patients as preparation for skills laboratory training: perceptions of students and tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ronny; Bosse, Hans Martin; Simon, Anke; Nikendei, Christoph; Huwendiek, Sören

    2013-02-12

    Currently only a few reports exist on how to prepare medical students for skills laboratory training. We investigated how students and tutors perceive a blended learning approach using virtual patients (VPs) as preparation for skills training. Fifth-year medical students (N=617) were invited to voluntarily participate in a paediatric skills laboratory with four specially designed VPs as preparation. The cases focused on procedures in the laboratory using interactive questions, static and interactive images, and video clips. All students were asked to assess the VP design. After participating in the skills laboratory 310 of the 617 students were additionally asked to assess the blended learning approach through established questionnaires. Tutors' perceptions (N=9) were assessed by semi-structured interviews. From the 617 students 1,459 VP design questionnaires were returned (59.1%). Of the 310 students 213 chose to participate in the skills laboratory; 179 blended learning questionnaires were returned (84.0%). Students provided high overall acceptance ratings of the VP design and blended learning approach. By using VPs as preparation, skills laboratory time was felt to be used more effectively. Tutors perceived students as being well prepared for the skills laboratory with efficient uses of time. The overall acceptance of the blended learning approach was high among students and tutors. VPs proved to be a convenient cognitive preparation tool for skills training.

  3. Preparing students in two-year colleges for geoscience degrees and careers: Workshop results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2012-12-01

    Building a strong and diverse geoscience workforce is a critical national challenge. Two-year colleges (2YCs) play an important role in increasing both the number and diversity of geoscience graduates. A workshop on Preparing Students from Two-year Colleges for Geoscience Degrees and Careers was held in Tacoma, WA in July 2012 to discuss the successes and challenges of programs, strategies, and activities that support career preparation of 2YC students for geoscience careers, either as geotechnical graduates or as geoscience majors at four-year colleges and universities, and to make recommendations for future efforts. At the workshop several successful partnerships between employers and two-year colleges as well as between two-year colleges and four-year institutions were discussed as potential models that could be replicated with adaptations for local employment needs. Participants shared successful techniques for supporting 2YC students in their career path such as internships, early opportunities for participating in research, joint fieldtrips with transfer institutions, and supportive curriculum alignment between two and four-year institutions. Professional organizations have much to offer including information about career options, networking opportunities, and more. Participants discussed strategies for supporting geoscience workforce development at 2YCs such as making connections between 2YCs and local employers, identifying geoscience students at 2YCs who are planning to transfer and building relationships with 4YCs, establishing internship programs, supporting student geoscience clubs, and developing a repository of geoscience employment information targeted to 2YC students. Participants recognized significant barriers to incorporating career training and information into the geoscience curriculum at two-year colleges. These barriers include a predominance of non-geoscience students in classes, lack of support or rewards for improving or increasing the

  4. Preparing Student Nurses for the Future of Wound Management: Telemedicine in a Simulated Learning Enviroment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sytter; Rethmeier, Anita

    2015-01-01

    was to integrate the concept of telemedicine for wound care into a simulation-based class for undergraduate student nurses and to evaluate their experiences with this integrated learning method. Methods: Five medium-fidelity mannequins were used in a simulated learning environment consisting of a simulated....... Findings: Students found the concept of telemedicine relevant and enjoyable, and the challenges and benefits of telemedicine clearly emerged in the simulated learning environment. Conclusions: Based on student evaluations and the need to prepare students for “real-life” telemedicine for wound management......, the simulated learning environment seems to be a constructive didactic method. The simulated learning environment should also be tested with postgraduate nurses with less experience in telemedicine....

  5. Dental students' self-assessment of operative preparations using CAD/CAM: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A; Levine, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA)'s accreditation standards for dental schools state that "graduates must demonstrate the ability to self-assess." Therefore, dental schools have developed preclinical and clinical self-assessment (SA) protocols aimed at fostering a reflective process. This study comparing students' visual SA with students' digital SA and with faculty assessment was designed to test the hypothesis that higher agreement would occur when utilizing a digital evaluation. Twenty-five first-year dental students at one dental school participated by preparing a mesial occlusal preparation on tooth #30 and performing both types of SAs. A faculty evaluation was then performed both visually and digitally using the same evaluation criteria. The Kappa statistic was used to measure agreement between evaluators. The results showed statistically significant moderate agreement between the faculty visual and faculty digital modes of evaluation for occlusal shape (K=0.507, p=0.002), proximal shape (K=0.564, p=0.001), orientation (K=0.425, p=0.001), and definition (K=0.480, p=0.001). There was slight to poor agreement between the student visual and faculty visual assessment, except for preparation orientation occlusal shape (K=0.164, p=0.022), proximal shape (K=-0.227, p=0.032), orientation (K=0.253, p=0.041), and definition (K=-0.027, p=0.824). This study showed that the students had challenges in self-assessing even when using CAD/CAM and the digital assessment did not improve the amount of student/faculty agreement.

  6. Career Preparation: An Often Omitted Element of the Advisor-Graduate Student Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, D. A.

    2001-05-01

    Most graduate research advisors care about the education of their graduate students. However, they often define "graduate education" so narrowly that it consists only of solving a research problem. This narrow definition is consistent with their principal goal as geoscientists, to understand the Earth better, and with the reward system typical of research universities, with its emphasis on research. As a result, most advisors usually well prepare students to be researchers in research universities. Research, however, is only part of a faculty member's duties. Commonly omitted is mentoring in the teaching and service duties of a faculty member. Students interested in teaching, in positions in other academic institutions, or in careers outside of academia may be perceived as questioning the advisors' career values and may not be encouraged in these interests. Graduate students should take an active role in their education. In addition to seeking information on career preparation from the campus career center and teaching center and from books, newsmagazines, newspapers, and seminars, students should also seek mentors who have demonstrated an interest in what the student is interested in: teaching and service, as well as research, or in careers outside academia. These mentors may be the students' committee members, other faculty members, or other professional geoscientists. With a broad base of information and some personal decisions, students will have a rationale for exploring careers. The questions students ask can now be more specific: How do they gain the requisite breadth in knowledge and the beneficial skills, beyond the depth of the research experience, and how do they gain opportunities to practice these skills? In short, how can they experience, and preferably practice, what professional geoscientists do in particular careers? If necessary, graduate students can work together to answer these questions by inviting experts to offer workshops in the department

  7. Preparation for workplace adversity: Student narratives as a stimulus for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Julie; McAllister, Margaret

    2017-07-01

    Nursing students are not always well prepared for the kind of adverse events they may experience in the workplace and yet it seems apparent that future students could benefit from learning about such experiences so that they can be avoided, or their impact minimised. This research aimed to identify nursing students' experiences of adversity, collaborate with students to discern important lessons for future students in their experiences, and make recommendations for other educators on how to use these adversity stories as lessons. Seven Australian nursing students were interviewed using critical incident technique consisting of 7 questions. This paper focuses on the responses to the questions: "Does this story's message have a place in the curriculum?" and "How would you teach this lesson?" Data were analysed using critical discourse analysis. Four recurring discourses emerged including: power relationships are a two-way street; learn from mistakes to prevent mistakes; begin cultural consciousness-raising in first year, first semester; and become critically self-aware. Narratives derived from original stories of adversity may be a valuable source of learning about the realities of the workplace but to benefit fully, educators need to assist students to notice and analyse embedded messages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Global health intervention from North to South: (Academic) preparation of students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Rasmussen, Louise Mubanda

    2018-01-01

    Global health intervention from North to South: (Academic) preparation of students By Rashmi Singla & Louise Mubanda Rasmussen, Roskilde University, Denmark This chapter discusses how to conduct before- intervention preparation of students based on a pioneer course collaboration between...... the subjects Health Promotion and International Development Studies at Roskilde University. The focus is on agents of intervention from the Global North with Global South targets. The theoretical framework of the course includes, among others approaches from cultural psychological (Valsiner), critical...... psychiatry/ psychology (Fernando), culture-centered health communication (Dutta) and medical anthropology (Farmer, Nguyen & Lock). The course is framed around a critical conceptualization of globalisation covering spatial and ideological dimensions (Fassin). Today’s practice of global health interventions...

  9. Use of focus groups to elicit student perception of NCLEX-RN preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Mary K; Strom, Jan; Reiss, Penny J

    2010-09-01

    Focus groups are an appropriate data collection method when one wants to listen to and gather information from a homogenous group of participants. Faculty members from a baccalaureate program used this technique to learn more about their students' perceptions of NCLEX-RN preparation practices. Themes were identified that could lead to more controlled study and ways to effectively remediate those at risk for failure.

  10. Preparation for high-acuity clinical placement: confidence levels of final-year nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Joanne Porter, Julia Morphet, Karen Missen, Anita Raymond School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Churchill, VIC, Australia Aim: To measure final-year nursing students’ preparation for high-acuity placement with emphasis on clinical skill performance confidence. Background: Self-confidence has been reported as being a key component for effective clinical performance, and confident students are more likely to be more effective nurses. Clinical skill performance is reported to be the most influential source of self-confidence. Student preparation and skill acquisition are therefore important aspects in ensuring students have successful clinical placements, especially in areas of high acuity. Curriculum development should aim to assist students with their theoretical and clinical preparedness for the clinical environment. Method: A modified pretest/posttest survey design was used to measure the confidence of third-year undergraduate nursing students (n = 318 for placement into a high-acuity clinical setting. The survey comprised four questions related to clinical placement and prospect of participating in a cardiac arrest scenario, and confidence rating levels of skills related to practice in a high-acuity setting. Content and face validity were established by an expert panel (α = 0.90 and reliability was established by the pilot study in 2009. Comparisons were made between confidence levels at the beginning and end of semester. Results: Student confidence to perform individual clinical skills increased over the semester; however their feelings of preparedness for high-acuity clinical placement decreased over the same time period. Reported confidence levels improved with further exposure to clinical placement. Conclusion: There may be many external factors that influence students’ perceptions of confidence and preparedness for practice. Further research is recommended to identify causes of poor self-confidence in final-year nursing

  11. Landscape architecture student Christina Hicks receives recognition in James River Green Building Council's 2009 Green Spaces Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2009-01-01

    Christina Hicks of Stafford, Va., a fifth-year landscape architecture student, is the Honor Winner of the 2009 James River Green Building Council's (JRGBC) Green Spaces Competition in the student division.

  12. Training the intern: The value of a pre-intern year in preparing students for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Anna; Fancourt, Nicholas; Robinson, Elizabeth; Wilkinson, Tim; Bagg, Warwick

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical and professional development that occurs during a New Zealand trainee intern year in preparation for the first house officer role. A quantitative questionnaire was distributed to all trainee interns (year 6) and year 5 medical students in New Zealand at the end of the 2007 academic year. This survey assessed self-reported competency and performance across clinical, professional and role development domains. Response rate was 65% (457/702). Compared to year 5 students, trainee interns reported significantly greater competence and performance levels across all three domains. The greatest improvement occurred in the independent performance of procedural skills (trainee interns: 77%, year 5: 35%, p interns: 94%, year 5: 56%, p intern year, 92% of students felt prepared to be a junior doctor, versus only 53% at the end of their 5th year (p intern year is important in preparing graduates for the intern role. The year affords increased responsibility and practical experience, whilst retaining an educational focus, facilitating the move from competence towards performance. Preparedness for practice was substantially higher following the New Zealand trainee intern year than has been reported with other pre-intern placements.

  13. Are My Grades a Reflection of Me?: Black College Students' Attributions and Interpretations of Grades Received in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Diana Nicole

    2013-01-01

    In the school achievement and motivation literature of African American students, one major theme of the literature is a supposed inconsistency or discrepancy in African American students' value and expectations for their academic achievement and their actual levels of achievement. The discrepancy between Black students' achievement ideologies and…

  14. School Accommodation and Modification Ideas for Students Who Receive Special Education Services. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c49

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Some students with disabilities who receive special education services need accommodations or modifications to their educational program in order to participate in the general curriculum and to be successful in school. While the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its regulations do not define accommodations or modifications,…

  15. TV Trouble-Shooting Manual. Volumes 3-4. Part 1: Block Diagram of Colour TV Receiver and Signal Flow. Student and Instructor's Manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryozo

    These volumes are, respectively, the self-instructional student manual and the teacher manual that cover the first set of training topics in this course for television repair technicians. Both volumes contain the following two sections: (1) Functional Block Diagram of a Colour TV Receiver, including information on the video reproduction circuit,…

  16. School Accommodation and Modification Ideas for Students Who Receive Special Education Services. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c49

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Some students with disabilities who receive special education services need accommodations or modifications to their educational program in order to participate in the general curriculum and to be successful in school. While the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its regulations do not define accommodations or modifications,…

  17. Using the TA to Prepare Graduate Students for Research and Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kenneth

    One of the most underused components of the physics graduate program is the time spent being a teaching assistant (TA). Often the TA duties consist of grading and trying to help undergraduates survive a physics course. How those duties are accomplished is left to each TA. The most common TA preparation, if it exists, has a narrow focus on the class being taught. Preparation consists of describing, or perhaps practicing, specific teaching skills and gaining familiarity with the equipment used in the laboratory portion of the class. Instead TAs can be integrated into the entire course in which they function so that they learn the course as a system. This means treating a course in the same way one approaches a research project with the TAs as members of the research team headed by a faculty advisor. TA preparation is broadened and support includes the management, teamwork, and communication skills necessary. This makes the TAs more efficient and effective teachers while explicitly connecting the TA experience to the ``soft'' skills they need in their own research careers whether in industry, national laboratories, or academia. This talk describes such a program, functioning for over 20 years at the University of Minnesota, that takes no more time than the usual TA but results in graduate students that are more satisfied with their TA experience, are better prepared to function in research groups, and provide a better classroom experience for their undergraduate students.

  18. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students' STEM preparation and career pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Christopher S; Svoboda, Ryan C; Harackiewicz, Judith M; Hulleman, Chris S; Hyde, Janet S

    2017-01-31

    During high school, developing competence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally. Given the importance of STEM careers as drivers of modern economies, this deficiency in preparation for STEM careers threatens the United States' continued economic progress. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term effects of a theory-based intervention designed to help parents convey the importance of mathematics and science courses to their high-school-aged children. A prior report on this intervention showed that it promoted STEM course-taking in high school; in the current follow-up study, we found that the intervention improved mathematics and science standardized test scores on a college preparatory examination (ACT) for adolescents by 12 percentile points. Greater high-school STEM preparation (STEM course-taking and ACT scores) was associated with increased STEM career pursuit (i.e., STEM career interest, the number of college STEM courses, and students' attitudes toward STEM) 5 y after the intervention. These results suggest that the intervention can affect STEM career pursuit indirectly by increasing high-school STEM preparation. This finding underscores the importance of targeting high-school STEM preparation to increase STEM career pursuit. Overall, these findings demonstrate that a motivational intervention with parents can have important effects on STEM preparation in high school, as well as downstream effects on STEM career pursuit 5 y later.

  19. Meeting the Challenges of European Student Mobility: Preparing Italian Erasmus Students for Business Lectures in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiciottoli, Belinda Crawford

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of European students are taking advantage of Erasmus mobility programs to study in a foreign country. This has brought to the forefront their special needs as L2 learners, which presents some unique challenges for EAP/ESP researchers and practitioners working in European universities. A case in point is represented by problems…

  20. Preparing nursing students for the future: an innovative approach to clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ann E; Noone, Joanne; Voss, Heather; Mathews, Launa Rae

    2013-07-01

    A clinical education model was developed and implemented by nursing faculty in the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education undergraduate curriculum to improve clinical learning for preparation of nurses to practice in the 21st century. This clinical education model, developed though collaborative work by nursing practice and education representatives throughout the state, moves away from a "random access opportunity" model of clinical education reliant on "total patient care" experiences to an intentional design of clinical learning activities based on course competencies appropriate to student level. Five elements of the model were proposed: case-based, concept-based, intervention skill-based, focused direct client care and integrative experiences. Different elements are dominant in early, middle and late clinical experiences to best support the developmental level of the student. Expectations for faculty, students and clinical staff were also developed to enhance best practices in clinical learning. Preparation of clinical partners for a change in clinical learning and student accountability are essential for optimal learning. This paper provides an overview of the model with clinical application examples for each element with a particular emphasis on case-based, concept-based and integrative clinical experiences.

  1. Role-play as a pedagogical method to prepare students for practice: The students’ voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Westrup

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we discuss how and why role-play supports students in gaining insights into complex leadership situations. We give voice to the students by illustrating their experiences in a role-playing activity involving a human resource management issue designed, performed, and evaluated as part of a management program. The results show that the role-playing supports the students by stimulating them to understand the issue from various perspectives, hence performing an overall change of perspectives. The role-playing exercise also enabled the students to create a collective understanding of the situation. The active social interactions and conversations of role-playing contributed to establishing a sense of community among the students. We argue that role-play could be a viable and forceful pedagogical method whereby teachers give their students the opportunity to prepare for practice. However, to implement role-play as an alternative method of learning requires that the method is a part of the institutional learning space.

  2. The Design of Reflective Tasks for the Preparation of Student Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Viafara

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of student-teachers to face the beginning in their profession requires from us, teacher educators, enriching discussions to share what we know and to build more solid grounds in our area. On the following pages, I describe how, in the specific context of a public university, I have designed and implemented a set of tasks within a reflective framework to support student- teachersʼ learning in their practicum. In this regard, a detailed explanation of how journal writing, conferences, focused reflection on tasks and responses to observation notes is included. Likewise, the experience of a student teacher working with tasks to solve a difficulty in the practicum, contributes to illustrate how reflective exercises support her development.

  3. Preparing prelicensure and graduate nursing students to systematically communicate bad news to patients and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeanne; Bolick, Beth Nachtsheim

    2014-01-01

    Communicating bad news, otherwise known as difficult conversations, is a complex communication skill that requires didactic learning and practical application. Students learn that what may be interpreted as bad news is determined by the recipient and not by the person who is delivering the news. Learning a systematic approach, such as the SPIKES (Setting, Perception, Invitation, Knowledge, Empathy, Strategy/Summary) mnemonic, prepares prelicensure and graduate nursing students for difficult conversations with patients and families in the clinical setting. Role-playing commonly includes clinical scenarios, and using video recording and playback of the encounters in such scenarios is one method of learning the systematic approach to communicating bad news. Follow-up practice after application in the clinical setting and feedback from faculty and mentors are essential for nursing students to achieve competence in this complex set of communication skills.

  4. Are students who have been educated in an outcomes-based approach prepared for university mathematics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Engelbrecht

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the political changes of 1994 in South Africa, the decision was taken to replace the traditional skills-based education system at primary and secondary school level (Grades 1 - 12 with an outcomes-based education system (OBE. The OBE approach, referred to as Curriculum 2005, was introduced into schools in 1998. The implementation of the OBE system did not occur without problems, giving rise to revised initiatives and a fair amount of criticism. The 2009 intake of students at universities is the first group of students that had been subjected to the OBE approach for their entire school career. This is also the first group of students for whom some form of mathematics was compulsory up to Grade 12 level in the form of mathematics or mathematical literacy. These students were characterised by the fact that their mathematics marks for Grade 12 were exceptionally high and that many more students qualified for university entrance. This article reports on the impact of this new education system on the mathematics prepared-ness of students entering university. The study involves an empirical analysis of the students in the first-year mathematics course for engineering students at the University of Pretoria as well as an analysis of a questionnaire completed by experienced lecturers at this university. The question addressed in this article is how the 2009 intake of students cope with mathematics at university level with regard to Performance General attributes Mathematical attributes Content-related attributesResults indicate a decrease in mathematics performance of these students at university level and that the inflated matric marks result in unjustified expectations. However, it is not unusual for marks to decrease from school to university and there is still too little evidence for serious concern. The study also indicates that these students seem to be better equipped with regard to personal attributes such as self-confidence and

  5. Success in introductory college physics: The role of gender, high school preparation, and student learning perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean Chi-Jen

    Physics is fundamental for science, engineering, medicine, and for understanding many phenomena encountered in people's daily lives. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between student success in college-level introductory physics courses and various educational and background characteristics. The primary variables of this study were gender, high school mathematics and science preparation, preference and perceptions of learning physics, and performance in introductory physics courses. Demographic characteristics considered were age, student grade level, parents' occupation and level of education, high school senior grade point average, and educational goals. A Survey of Learning Preference and Perceptions was developed to collect the information for this study. A total of 267 subjects enrolled in six introductory physics courses, four algebra-based and two calculus-based, participated in the study conducted during Spring Semester 2002. The findings from the algebra-based physics courses indicated that participant's educational goal, high school senior GPA, father's educational level, mother's educational level, and mother's occupation in the area of science, engineering, or computer technology were positively related to performance while participant age was negatively related. Biology preparation, mathematics preparation, and additional mathematics and science preparation in high school were also positively related to performance. The relationships between the primary variables and performance in calculus-based physics courses were limited to high school senior year GPA and high school physics preparation. Findings from all six courses indicated that participant's educational goal, high school senior GPA, father's educational level, and mother's occupation in the area of science, engineering, or computer technology, high school preparation in mathematics, biology, and the completion of additional mathematics and science courses were

  6. A Study of the Problem Solving Abilities of Seventh Grade Students Who Receive Anchored Problem Solving Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, Sara Anne

    Current mathematics education emphasizes the importance of a problem solving mindset in the classroom. Students need to know how they are going to use what they are learning in real life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of anchored problem solving instruction on middle school students' mathematical abilities. The researcher…

  7. School Counselors' Attitudes towards Providing Services to Students Receiving Section 504 Classroom Accommodations: Implications for School Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Dawn M.; Paradise, Louis V.; Green, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Questions have arisen regarding counselor's capabilities in assisting students with special needs (Milsom & Akos, 2003; Studer & Quigney, 2005). This study examined school counselors' training and attitudes toward providing services to students with learning disabilities who qualified for services only under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.…

  8. Enlarging the `knowledge toolbox': helping students prepare for an innovation-driven world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Physics students graduate from their course of studies to enter the ``world of work.'' While for many years that transition meant joining a large corporation for a life-long career, this is no longer the case. Today's graduates will find their career with a series of organizations - often start-ups and small to mid-sized organizations - whose future depends on the ability to rapidly leverage technical knowledge into useful products and services. This session will discuss the value of preparing physics students to be innovators and entrepreneurs, both as a strategy to prepare them for future careers, as well as an opportunity to fully engage students in seeing the relevance of physics to ``real world'' challenges. The session will feature three case studies: 1) embedding core knowledge and skills within a technical content course; 2) building learning experiences around a team-based start-up exploration; 3) engaging an entire department in considering how to comprehensively include innovation & entrepreneurship themes in the curriculum. The session will conclude with information about how faculty members and institutions can access resources for adopting this approach to their course offerings.

  9. Toward Achievement in the "Knowledge Economy" of the 21st Century: Preparing Students through T-STEM Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Alberto; Jones, Don; Ruiz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Schools are constantly engaged in implementing reform strategies to prepare students for postsecondary education leading to their career choices. Challenges here involve education initiatives addressing programs not strategically planned, educators not prepared for transition, and no follow-up support beyond initial implementation stages. This…

  10. A Developmental Perspective on Workplace Readiness: Preparing High School Students for Success. Research Brief, Publication #2009-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippman, Laura; Keith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Attention has been focused for decades on the need to improve high school students' preparation for the workplace. Employers report that nearly half of their entry-level employees are inadequately prepared and lack basic communication and critical thinking skills as well as a work ethic. Although a postsecondary credential is considered necessary…

  11. Toward Achievement in the "Knowledge Economy" of the 21st Century: Preparing Students through T-STEM Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Schools are constantly engaged in implementing reform strategies to prepare students for post-secondary education leading to their career choices. Challenges here involve education initiatives addressing programs not strategically planned, educators not prepared for transition, and no follow-up support beyond initial implementation stages. This…

  12. The Student Writing Archive Project (SWAP): Designing a Searchable Database of Student Writing and Teacher Commentary for English Teacher Preparation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher candidates have few opportunities during their teacher preparation coursework to investigate practices associated with eliciting and responding to student writing. This article describes an attempt to address this problem with a searchable online digital archive of student writing, with and without teachers' written feedback, as well…

  13. Preparing Students for Geologic Research with a Junior-level Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R.; Bailey, C. M.; Hancock, G. S.; Johnson, G. H.; Owens, B. E.

    2001-12-01

    A required research project for all seniors is a cornerstone of the undergraduate geology program at the College of William and Mary. To help prepare students for this experience, junior geology majors take a required one-credit course, Introduction to Geologic Research. The main goals of the course are to help students define their individual research project and to develop basic research and presentation skills. Specific objectives are to introduce the process of geologic research and to have students discuss and defend geologic research with peers and faculty and give formal oral and written presentations of the research proposal. The major products of the course include a research bibliography, a 10-15 page proposal and an oral presentation and defense of the proposed research. The course is team-designed and -taught, with the five faculty members coming to a consensus about course content and assignments. All students undertake the same set of activities allowing all faculty and students to know and contribute to all proposed research. Individual class sessions include brief faculty research presentations and approaches to research problems, along with basic skills such as evaluation of research proposals, effective searching and analysis of primary literature, compelling graphics, informal research proposal defense and responding to questions raised, effective writing, effective oral presentations, and a final oral presentation and defense of the proposed research. We emphasize classroom activities with lectures kept to a minimum. For example, to learn to develop effective graphics, students evaluate figures taken from past senior theses and the published literature, individually plot given data, and then compare the resulting graphs. A discussion of the choices involved in creating figures along with suggestions by faculty completes the assignment. Assignments about specific skills (e.g., literature searching) are coupled with assignments that build toward

  14. An investigation on the level of dental senior students knowledge about endocarditis prophylaxis incases with cardiac disease receiving dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhraee AH

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Dental practices such as oral, periodontal and endodontic surgeries cause damages to"nthe intraoral tissues, so having knowledge of the dental procedures that necessiciate endocarditis prophylaxis"nis of high importance."nPurpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge level of dental senior students in"nTehran dental faculties about endocarditis,"nMaterials and Methods: In this cross- sectional descriptive- analytic study, 253 senior students of four"ndentistry faculties in Tehran took part as follows: Tehran University: 71 students (M:42, F:29, Shahid"nBeheshti University: 74 students (M:40, F:34, Shahed University: 35 students (M:35, F:38, Azad University:"n73 students (M:35, F:38. The questionnaire used in this research consisted of three parts as follows: part one:"ninformation on cardiac diseases, part two: dental procedures requiring endocarditis prophylaxis, part three:"nantibiotic diet in endocarditis prophylaxis. Sex and place of education of the students were also studied in"ndetail. For statistical analysis, Chi-square test was used."nResults: On the basis of the sex, the correct answers of the female respondents of different universities were"nranked as: Azad University: 72.5%, Tehran University: 71.1%, Shahid Beheshti: 57%, ShahedUniversity:"n55.7%. In the same way, the male respondents were reported as: Tehran Universitys: 71.6%, Azad University:"n66.2%, Shahed University: 57.3%, Shahid Behesti University: 52.1%, On the basis of the place of education,"nthe following results were reported: Tehran University students managed to answer 71.3% , Azad University,"nShahed University and Shahid Beheshti University students could answer 69.5%, 56.5% and 54.6%,"nrespectively. All these differences were statistically significant, indicating that first ranked students have more"ninformation than the students of other schools."nConclusion: It is recommended to develop more practical training programme in dental schools on

  15. Intensive Training Academy During Winter Breaks (Winternships) at a Two-Year Hispanic Serving Institution to Prepare STEM Students for Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J. C.; Sim, A. M.; Usher, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    College of the Desert, in partnership with California State University San Bernardino, both Hispanic serving institutions, with the support of a 3-year grant through the NASA Curriculum Improvements Partnership Award for the Integration of Research (CIPAIR) has provided training for community college students, especially those from underrepresented groups, to better prepare them for summer internships opportunities at four-year schools and national laboratories. The Winternships provided an enhanced alternative learning environment for students pursuing degrees in the STEM fields through faculty and peer mentoring in guided undergraduate research activities. All activities associated with undergraduate research were covered including literature searches, hands-on laboratory and field research, collection and analysis of data, culminating in oral and written presentations at College of the Desert and regional student conferences. In addition, students received assistance in searching for summer internships in their area of interest, completing applications, and guidance on follow-up communication with the programs to which they applied. During the funding period, 44 students participated in the Winternship activity in which all submitted a minimum of 3 applications for summer internship opportunities. Results presented will include student success at receiving summer internships, examples of projects completed during the summer and winter activities, and impact on student success. Adaption of this program to other community colleges and into a sophomore level research experience course will be described. This activity has now been funded through the NSF Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) Program for an additional five years in a partnership with California State University at San Bernardino.

  16. A model for preparing faculty to teach model C clinical nurse leader students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Sherry; McKeon, Leslie

    2014-07-01

    Model C clinical nurse leader (CNL) programs are complex because they must meet the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing, as well as the graduate level competencies outlined in the white paper Competencies and Curricular Expectations for Clinical Nurse Leader Education and Practice. Faculty assigned to teach in these programs may be experts in education or areas of clinical specialty, but they may not have a clear understanding of the CNL role to teach and mentor CNL students. This article describes a faculty development model that includes an introduction to the CNL role, course mapping of the essentials, integration of CNL professional values into clinical evaluation, consultation with practicing model C graduates, and participation in a comprehensive CNL certification review course. The model was effective in preparing faculty to teach and mentor students in a model C CNL program.

  17. The Use of Video Analysis in a Personnel Preparation Program for Teachers of Students Who Are Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elaine; Trief, Ellen; Lengel, James

    2010-01-01

    Video analysis affords the observer the opportunity to capture and analyze videos of teaching practices, so that the observer can review, analyze, and synthesize specific examples of teaching in authentic classroom settings. The student teaching experience is the prime opportunity during the personnel preparation program in which student teachers…

  18. Preparing to Teach Newcomer Students: The Significance of Critical Pedagogy and the Study of Ideology in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Lilia I.

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, the number of school-aged linguistic-minority students in the United States has increased dramatically. Society at large and public schools in particular must be prepared to respond to these students' needs. In public education, the bulk of this responsibility falls on teachers, who are called upon to apply educational policies…

  19. Does Teaching Practice Effectively Prepare Student-Teachers to Teach Creative and Performing Arts? The Case of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannathoko, Magdeline C.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher Education involves the policies and procedures designed to equip teachers with the knowledge and skills they require to teach effectively. Teaching practice (TP) is an integral part in teacher education because it allows student-teachers to apply the theories into practice. Effective preparation of student-teachers in practical subjects…

  20. South African Students' Perceptions of the Role of a Gap Year in Preparing Them for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Students often drop out of university because they were not yet ready for higher education studies. This article reports on research done on the perceptions of a group of students of the role that their gap year had played in preparing them for higher education studies. The research approach was qualitative. Data was gathered by means of 34…

  1. Directing students to profound open-book test preparation : The relationship between deep learning and open-book test time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne-Penninga, M.; Kuks, J.B.; Hofman, W.H.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Considering the growing amount of medical knowledge and the focus of medical education on acquiring competences, using open-book tests seems inevitable. A possible disadvantage of these tests is that students underestimate test preparation. Aims: We examined whether students who used a d

  2. Understanding the Needs of All the Stakeholders: Issues of Training and Preparation for Health Work Students and Their Clinical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmanshof, Louise; Moore, Keri

    2016-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is vital for preparing health-work students for practice. WIL activities have multiple stakeholders, each with their own set of expectations and requirements, both explicit and implicit. Negotiations to provide these learning experiences for students happen at many levels and those at the coalface are often unaware…

  3. South African Students' Perceptions of the Role of a Gap Year in Preparing Them for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Students often drop out of university because they were not yet ready for higher education studies. This article reports on research done on the perceptions of a group of students of the role that their gap year had played in preparing them for higher education studies. The research approach was qualitative. Data was gathered by means of 34…

  4. The Relative Benefits Found for Students with and without Learning Disabilities Taking a First-Year University Preparation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Maureen J.; Kennett, Deborah J.; Lewis, Tanya; Lund-Lucas, Eunice

    2011-01-01

    Positive outcomes have been reported for university preparation courses for students without disabilities. Little is known about whether these courses can offer the same benefit to students with learning disabilities and whether the inclusion of psychosocial factors, in addition to academic skills, would benefit both groups. First-level students…

  5. Preparing for fieldwork: Students' perceptions of their readiness to provide evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' perceptions of their confidence to use research evidence to complete a client case analysis assignment in preparation for participation in fieldwork and future practice. A convenience sample of 42 entry-level occupational therapy Masters students, included 41 females and one male, ages 24 to 35. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was used. Students participated in a problem-based learning approach supported by educational technology. Measures included a pre- and post-semester confidence survey, a post-semester satisfaction survey, and an assignment rubric. Based on paired t-tests and Wilcoxin Signed Ranks Tests, statistically significant differences in pre- and post-test scores were noted for all 18 items on the confidence survey (pstudents' confidence were noted for verbal and written communication of descriptive, assessment, and intervention evidence, along with increased confidence to effectively use assessment evidence. Results suggest that problem-based learning methods were significantly associated with students' perceptions of their confidence to use research evidence to analyze a client case. These results cannot necessarily be generalized due to the limitations of using non-standardized measures with a convenience sample, without a control group, within the context of a single course as part of one academic program curriculum.

  6. Determining nursing student knowledge, behavior and beliefs for breast cancer and breast self-examination receiving courses with two different approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Mevlude; Iseri, Ozge; Etikan, Ilker

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine nursing student knowledge, behavior and beliefs for breast cancer and breast self-examination receiving courses with a traditional lecturing method (TLM) and the Six Thinking Hats method (STHM). The population of the study included a total of 69 second year nursing students, 34 of whom received courses with traditional lecturing and 35 of whom received training with the STHM, an active learning approach. The data of the study were collected pre-training and 15 days and 3 months post-training. The data collection tools were a questionnaire form questioning socio-demographic features, and breast cancer and breast self-examination (BSE) knowledge and the Champion's Health Belief Model Scale. The tests used in data analysis were chi-square, independent samples t-test and paired t-test. The mean knowledge score following traditional lecturing method increased from 9.32 ± 1.82 to 14.41 ± 1.94 (Pstudents trained according to STHM (pstudents trained according to TLM. In both training groups, the knowledge of breast cancer and BSE, and the perception of confidence increased similarly. In order to raise nursing student awareness in breast cancer, either of the traditional lecturing method or the Six Thinking Hats Method can be chosen according to the suitability of the teaching material and resources.

  7. On Teaching Energy: Preparing Students Better for their Role as Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.; Lyford, M. E.; Buss, A.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying energy to an expanding population with a rising standard of living and maintaining human and natural systems is an increasingly difficult task. Thus, energy is often listed as one of the grand challenges facing humankind. Energy‘s grand challenges are many, complex, multifaceted and of variable scale. It is not surprising then that their solutions must be multi-dimensional as well. Historically, energy solutions have focused on energy science (a multidisciplinary topic spanning biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, and math), technology or economics. In the real world, focusing solely on these aspects of energy has rarely produced energy projects that are just and fair. Sustainable, equitable and effective energy projects are only created when additional perspectives are considered, e.g. environment, culture, social institutions, politics, etc. The natures of these other perspectives are determined largely by the social context of any particular energy issue. For example, petroleum production has had vastly different impacts in Norway than it does in Nigeria. Thus, solutions to energy issues are, in fact, multidimensional functions. Given this complexity, preparing students to deal with the energy issues they will face in the future requires an instructional approach that integrates a multidisciplinary science approach with technology and social context. Yet this alone will not ensure that students leave the classroom with the skills necessary to equitably, effectively and logically deal with energy issues. Rather, teaching energy also requires sound pedagogy. Effective pedagogy ensures student success in the classroom and facilitates transfer of classroom knowledge to real world situations. It includes, but also goes beyond, employing classroom strategies that promote deep and lasting learning. In this arena, it fosters the development of a skill set that enables students to transfer classroom knowledge to real world issues. It prepares students

  8. Mimewrighting: Preparing Students for the Real World of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    READING, WRITING, & ENACTING SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL LITERATURE: Mimewrighting applies the art of mime as an interpretive springboard to integrate conceptual understanding across all content areas. Mimewrighting guides students to read and express complex ideas in carefully crafted movement integrations, mediating experience, so that students obtain an intuitive grasp of difficult and abstract ideas. THE PROBLEM: Reading science writing presents obstacles for middle and high school students, to the point that many students are turned OFF to science altogether. A typical science abstract, written for colleagues, is as densely packed with concept-laden words as a black hole is densely packed with matter- and just as mysterious. What reads to a science colleague as a richly crafted paragraph, from which a myriad of elegantly interrelated concepts can unfold to point to the significance and context of the study at hand, reads as jabberwocky nonsense to the uninitiated student. So, how do we turn such kids (and teachers) back ON to the inquiry-driven desire to seek out challenging and educative experiences? How do we step up to the national challenge to prepare ALL students adequately for the REAL-WORLD demands of science, technology, engineering, math, (STEM) and communications? How do we help kids read, write, and understand scientific and technical literature? AN UNCONVENTIONAL ANSWER: Mimewrighting applies the classic art of mime to unpack the meaning of science writing. We help students view the text as sequences of action, scenarios that can be enacted theatrically for understanding. HOW DOES IT WORK? READ ALOUD, MIME ALONG: It's as simple as read aloud and mime along. And as complex, in that it requires taking the time to acknowledge each concept packed into the passage. Three opening sentences might involve twenty minutes of mimewrighting activity to ensure that students apprehend the patterns, perceive the relationships, and comprehend the dynamics of such a

  9. Comparison of nutritional status of rural and urban school students receiving midday meals in schools of Bengaluru, India: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalini, C N; Murthy, N S; Shalini, S; Dinesh, R; Shivaraj, N S; Suryanarayana, S P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of the mid day meal program by assessing the nutritional status of school students aged 5-15 years receiving midday meals in rural schools and compare them with those in urban schools in Bengaluru, India. This cross sectional study involved a sample of 4378 students from government and aided schools. Weight and height were measured and compared with ''means'' and ''percentiles'' of expected standards as endorsed by the Indian Association of Pediatrics. Regression coefficients were also estimated to assess the rate of growth. In all age groups and in both sexes, the observed mean weight and height were below the expected standards. The study findings showed that 13.8% and 13.1% of the studied students were underweight and stunted, respectively (below the third percentile for weight and height for age). A higher proportion of rural students were below the third percentile for both weight and height compared with urban students (weight: 16.3% and 11.5%; height: 17.0% and 10.0%; P rate of growth of height for weight showed a declining trend with increasing age in all the groups. The authors believe that the magnitude of the burden of undernourished students as seen in this study would have been much greater in the absence of the midday meal program. Greater involvement of the private sector to assist the government would help augment nutrition in children and indirectly impact school performance, attendance and literacy.

  10. Serious Events in Older Ontario Residents Receiving Bowel Preparations for Outpatient Colonoscopy with Various Comorbidity Profiles: A Descriptive, Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M Ho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyethylene glycol-based bowel preparations (PEGBPs and sodium picosulfate (NaPS are commonly used for bowel cleansing before colonoscopy. Little is known about adverse events associated with these preparations, particularly in older patients or patients with medical comorbidities.

  11. Are we preparing health services administration students to respond to bioterrorism and mass casualty management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Shannon H; Houser, Howard W

    2006-01-01

    Bioterrorism/natural disaster events add significant specialized demands and disrupt normal operation of the health system, often for an indefinite period of time. Health administration leaders should be educationally prepared for and informed about these potential events, but few receive this knowledge via their academic preparation in health administration. This study examined the existence of coverage of bioterrorism topics in health administration curricula and characteristics of bioterrorism coverage in current health administration programs through a self-completed survey among AUPHA graduate and undergraduate program members. Of the total survey respondents, only 32% of programs have current coverage of bioterrorism. The main reasons for nothavingbioterrorism coverage were not having enough resources; not having enough time to develop course/materials; and not thinking it is necessary to add these courses/materials. To prepare better and to inform future health administrators regarding major disruptive circumstances, advocacy and documentation are important to develop and implement bioterrorism awareness. Possibly, suggested minimum curricular requirements, content, and mechanisms for inclusion can be developed in the near future. Health administration educators should address the new reality and demonstrate that their graduates can function and lead in crises and situations disruptive to normal commerce.

  12. Immigrant and Refugee Students across "Receiving" Nations: To What Extent Can Educators Rely on PISA for Answers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Massive population shift is a current global reality--especially given some of the latest development on European shores; some are calling it a humanitarian crisis. Although the United States (US) receives a large number of immigrants (documented and not) and about 70,000 refugees each year, it is certainly not the only nation to do so.…

  13. Determinants of Participation and Expenditure Patterns of Private Tuition Received by Primary School Students in Penang, Malaysia: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Juliana; Tan, Andrew K. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the censored Tobit model is applied on primary data collected amongst parents of primary school students in Penang, Malaysia to examine the determinants of participation and expenditures on private tuition (PT). Results of the marginal effects indicate that socio-demographic characteristics--ethnicity, household income,…

  14. Determinants of Participation and Expenditure Patterns of Private Tuition Received by Primary School Students in Penang, Malaysia: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Juliana; Tan, Andrew K. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the censored Tobit model is applied on primary data collected amongst parents of primary school students in Penang, Malaysia to examine the determinants of participation and expenditures on private tuition (PT). Results of the marginal effects indicate that socio-demographic characteristics--ethnicity, household income,…

  15. Perceived Ethnic Discrimination by Teachers and Ethnic Minority Students' Academic Futility: Can Parents Prepare Their Youth for Better or for Worse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hondt, Fanny; Eccles, Jacquelynne S; Van Houtte, Mieke; Stevens, Peter A J

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the interplay of perceived ethnic discrimination by teachers, parents' ethnic socialization practices, and ethnic minority students' sense of academic futility. Since discrimination creates barriers beyond control of the individual, the first research goal is to examine the association of perceived ethnic discrimination by teachers with ethnic minority students' sense of academic futility. The second research goal is to focus on the role of perceived parental ethnic socialization (e.g., cultural socialization and preparation for bias) to get a better understanding of the interaction between family level factors and the potentially negative consequences of ethnic teacher discrimination. A multilevel analysis on 1181 ethnic minority students (50.6 % girls; mean age = 15.5), originating from migration, in 53 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) shows that the frequent perception of ethnic discrimination by teachers is associated with stronger feelings of academic futility, and if these students also received high levels of parents' ethnic socialization, they perceive even stronger feelings of futility. The group of ethnic minority students, who perceive frequent ethnic teacher discrimination, is a group at risk, and parents' ethnic socialization does not seem able to change this.

  16. Non-Formal Education for a Culturally Isolated Student in a Remote Area: The Case of a Thai Student Who Received Learning Assistance via the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how a language minority student developed through flexible online learning assistance for the entrance examination of a Japanese public high school. The simple camera function of a digital tablet helped the isolated Thai student attain success in developing academic skills and self-esteem. The case also shows the insight…

  17. Writing Intensive Undergraduate Field Camp and Education: Expanding the Classroom and Preparing Students for the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, M. T.; McGehee, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    There has always been a strong perception within the geoscience community that a capstone field course was the pinnacle of an undergraduate geoscience degree. Such a course draws from the student's accumulated knowledge base, using information from multiple sub-disciplines to solve "real-world" problems. Since 2006, there has been a 92% increase in students attending field camps (Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2014 - AGI). But, the number of field camps has significantly declined. In 1995, 35% of geoscience departments offered a summer field course but by 2006 that number had dropped to 15% (Status Report on Geoscience Summer Field Camps - AGI) and since 2009, the number of field camps listed in the Geology.com directory has dropped from 100 to about 75. This decline is despite the fact that 88% of industry professionals believe fieldwork should "be an integral and required part of undergraduate programs" (Petcovic, et al., 2014). In 2012, in order to meet the growing needs of industry and better prepare our students, Texas A&M University-Kingsville developed an in-house, unique set of field courses that expand the limits of the classroom. We have two required courses. One is similar to a traditional field camp except that it contains a writing intensive component. The six-credit course runs for seven weeks. Prior to camp, students are required to write an introduction (geologic history section) on the study area. We spend two weeks in the field, mapping daily (Big Bend National Park), and then return to Kingsville. Students then have two weeks to finish a fully referenced paper, including their edited introduction, methods, observations, interpretations, discussion and conclusions and once complete, they begin the introduction for the next area. This is another two-week field session, in central Texas. After this, we return the first paper which has been edited for content by geoscience faculty and for grammar by an English instructor. Students spend the next

  18. Student preparation and the power of visual input in veterinary surgical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Koch, Bodil Cathrine

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, veterinary educational institutions have implemented alternative teaching methods, including video demonstrations of surgical procedures. However, the power of the dynamic visual input from videos in relation to recollection of a surgical procedure has never been evaluated. The aim...... in a terminal pig lab. Preparation for the pig lab consisted of homework (textbook, online material, including videos), lecture, cadaver lab, and toy animal models in a skills lab. In the instructional video, a detail was used that was not described elsewhere. Results show that 60% of the students used a visual...... but a significant association (p = .002) with educational input. Our results illustrate the power of a visual input and support prior findings that knowledge is constructed from multiple sources of information....

  19. The key role of a transition course in preparing medical students for internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Alan R; Harleman, Elizabeth; O'sullivan, Patricia S; Maa, John

    2011-07-01

    Among the core transitions in medical education is the one from medical school to residency. Despite this challenging transition, the final year of medical school is known as lacking structure and clarity. The authors examine the preparation of medical students for the professional and personal challenges of internship in the context of transition courses. They first describe the development of a residency transition course, offered since 2001 at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine (UCSF), exploring aspects of a needs assessment, course goals and content, core competencies, and course implementation. They then critically analyze the course, judging it successful based on high subjective satisfaction scores and increased perceived preparedness data. Next, the authors discuss the national context of transition courses, perspectives of various stakeholders, and lessons learned from the UCSF experience. Finally, they consider future directions, suggesting that internship transition courses be a standard part of the medical school curriculum.

  20. Methods of the professional-applied physical preparation of students of higher educational establishments of economic type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliar E.I.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Is considered the directions of professionally-applied physical preparation of students with the prevailing use of facilities of football. Are presented the methods of professionally-applied physical preparation of students. It is indicated that application of method of the circular training is rendered by an assistance development of discipline, honesty, honesty, rational use of time. Underline, that in teaching it is necessary to provide a short cut to mastering of the planned knowledge, abilities and skills, improvement of physical qualities.

  1. Comparison of nutritional status of rural and urban school students receiving midday meals in schools of Bengaluru, India: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C N Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study was to assess the impact of the mid day meal program by assessing the nutritional status of school students aged 5-15 years receiving midday meals in rural schools and compare them with those in urban schools in Bengaluru, India. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study involved a sample of 4378 students from government and aided schools. Weight and height were measured and compared with ′′means′′ and ′′percentiles′′ of expected standards as endorsed by the Indian Association of Pediatrics. Regression coefficients were also estimated to assess the rate of growth. Results: In all age groups and in both sexes, the observed mean weight and height were below the expected standards. The study findings showed that 13.8% and 13.1% of the studied students were underweight and stunted, respectively (below the third percentile for weight and height for age. A higher proportion of rural students were below the third percentile for both weight and height compared with urban students (weight: 16.3% and 11.5%; height: 17.0% and 10.0%; P < 0.05 for both weight and height. Only 2.4% and 3.1% were above 97 th percentile for weight and height. The rate of growth of height for weight showed a declining trend with increasing age in all the groups. Discussion: The authors believe that the magnitude of the burden of undernourished students as seen in this study would have been much greater in the absence of the midday meal program. Conclusion: Greater involvement of the private sector to assist the government would help augment nutrition in children and indirectly impact school performance, attendance and literacy.

  2. Preparing students to practice evidence-based dentistry: a mixed methods conceptual framework for curriculum enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palcanis, Kent G; Geiger, Brian F; O'Neal, Marcia R; Ivankova, Nataliya V; Evans, Retta R; Kennedy, Lasonja B; Carera, Karen W

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a mixed methods conceptual framework for evidence-based dentistry to enhance the curriculum at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry. A focus of recent curriculum reform has been to prepare students to integrate evidence-based dentistry into clinical practice. The authors developed a framework consisting of four conceptual phases to introduce curriculum innovation: 1) exploration of the phenomenon; 2) development of two new instruments; 3) data collection, analysis, outcomes, and evaluation; and 4) application to curricular reform. Eight sequential procedural steps (literature review; focus group discussions; development of themes; survey design; internal review; data collection, analysis, and evaluation; development of recommendations with external review; and implementation of recommendations for curricular enhancement) guided the curricular enhancement. Faculty members supported the concept of teaching evidence-based dentistry to facilitate major curriculum reform, and course directors incorporated evidence-based teaching to prepare scientist-practitioners who meet dental performance standards. The new curriculum implemented following completion of the study is in its third year. Much of its structure is based on evidence-based teaching methodologies, and approximately one-third of the content consists of small groups researching clinical problems with applied science and discussing the findings. The framework described in this article proved useful to guide revision of predoctoral clinical education at one dental school and may be useful in other settings.

  3. Connecting learners: The role of biotechnology programme in preparing students for the industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saruan, Nadiah; Sagran, Avinash; Fadzil, Kamal Solhaimi; Razali, Zuliana; Ow Phui San, Rebecca; Somasundram, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth of biotechnology requires a wide range of expertise within the industry. Education is the primary platform for students to gain information and knowledge on biotechnology. In Malaysia where biotechnology is relatively new, education programs and courses must be tailored to meet the demands of the industry. A combination of theoretical knowledge as well as practical and industrial training is essential to ensure graduates are prepared for their career in the fields of biotechnology. Results from this study show that university students lack literacy on biotechnology information and access to facilities provided by the universities. This may be a significant contributing factor to the lack of knowledge and information amongst graduates. Furthermore comparative analysis on the biotechnology program in Malaysian universities with that of other countries show the need to restructure the program by offering more specialized courses as well as soft skills and business subjects. This is to meet the demands of the related professionals as well as the various branches that exist in the biotechnology industry. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Collaborative and Social Learning using Virtual Worlds: Preparing Students for Virtually Anything

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Erenli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available "Teams, increasingly more than individuals, are charged with the most challenging and mission-critical projects. Leaders need to evaluate and motivate from a distance. And the makeup of teams is increasingly complex – they´re bigger, more diverse, more geographically distributed, composed more of specialists than generalists, and much more dependent on technology than in the past. And difficult economic times only accent these challenges." This statement made by Reeves and Read in their Book “Total Engagement” perfectly summarizes the challenge we as University of Applied Sciences and especially our degree program "Project Management and Information Technology" face while preparing students for their work life. While the use of e-mail and video-conferencing systems substantially supports the members of ever more globalized project teams, we have witnessed that the developments regarding Virtual Worlds and Communities may have a big impact on project management in the future. The paper shows what approach was chosen to take the skills already adopted by the “virtual natives” e.g. our students, what tasks were given to them to improve those skills and what lessons learned were made by the teaching stuff.

  5. RN-BSN Students' Perceptions of the Differences in Practice of the ADN- and BSN-Prepared RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, April D; Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study explored RN-BSN students' perceptions of practice differences between nurses prepared with an ADN and BSN. Five themes were identified in 20 students' discussion posts: "a nurse is a nurse" at the bedside, beyond the bedside, BSN wanted, digging deeper, and appraisal. Results illustrate the need for educators to assist nurses in translating the differentiated educational competencies to the practice role of the bedside RN.

  6. Using a Web-Based Resource to Prepare Students for Fieldwork: Evaluating the Dark Peak Virtual Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Julia

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on development of a Dark Peak website and its use to prepare first-year geography students for a one-day physical geography field course in the south Pennines. The Virtual Tour (VT) component of the website is the main focus of this paper. Pre- and post-fieldwork evaluations of the first version of the VT by 195 students are…

  7. Using a Web-Based Resource to Prepare Students for Fieldwork: Evaluating the Dark Peak Virtual Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Julia

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on development of a Dark Peak website and its use to prepare first-year geography students for a one-day physical geography field course in the south Pennines. The Virtual Tour (VT) component of the website is the main focus of this paper. Pre- and post-fieldwork evaluations of the first version of the VT by 195 students are…

  8. Preparing students to work effectively in interprofessional health and social care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Keith; Seenan, Chris; Morlan, Gordon; Smith, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has 'learning to work effectively in interprofessional teams' as one of its central learning outcomes. Whilst much is made in IPE of allocating health and social care students into interprofessional teams and setting them a task to complete, it has proved difficult to find a fair and equitable method of assessing how effective each individual has been in contributing to the task. This difficulty is compounded when the module is delivered predominantly online. This paper describes the recent push to establish meaningful educational outcomes for those involved in delivering IPE to pre-registration health and social care students. It then describes the use of a web-based peer assessment tool (Web PA) developed at Loughborough and Hull Universities (UK) which has been adapted by Glasgow Caledonian University (UK) for assessing the outcome of contributing effectively to IPE-related online group tasks. The paper outlines how the process of web-based peer assessment operates in theory and how it has been received in practice. An illustration is given that shows how the process successfully discriminates between those that are working effectively in interprofessional teams and those that are not. The value of the process is discussed.

  9. School for Schooling's Sake. The Current Role of the Secondary School in Occupational Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rupert N.

    For a large portion of its student body, the school makes no conscious effort to prepare for the transition from school to employment. Instead, the school concentrates on preparing students for more school. About 20 percent of high school students receive some form of vocational education, but under pressure from the Congress, schools are…

  10. What's the Matter with Food?: A Hands-On Action Research Study on the Effect of Using Food Preparation To Teach Students with Autism about the Three States of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Nicole

    This investigation studied the effectiveness of using food preparation to teach students with Autism about the three states of matter. A hands-on learning approach was used within the home and careers classroom. One class of five students, three boys and two girls, all diagnosed with Autism, participated in a five day academic unit about the three phases of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. The class received hands-on learning science instruction using food through various differentiated activities. Results indicate that students express focus when using food to learn. In addition, this study acknowledges that hands-on learning in science enhances the learning process of students with Autism. One of the main reasons is that students enjoy learning when this teaching style is used in the classroom, and students that enjoy what they are learning are more likely to be engaged and motivated to learn. After using this approach, all the students in the study increased their scores from the pre-assessments to the post-assessments. Students expressed through actions and words that they enjoyed using hands-on experiences to learn in the classroom. Implications for practice indicate that a variety of manipulatives are needed to teach students with Autism. Future research would help uncover additional information about student motivation and learning in the home and careers classroom.

  11. Entering the (Postgraduate) Field: Underrepresented Students' Acquisition of Cultural and Social Capital in Graduate School Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; McCoy, Dorian L.

    2016-01-01

    Examining the role of humanities graduate preparation programs in facilitating underrepresented undergraduate students' socialization to the field (social context) of graduate education, this critical multisite case study finds that these programs are crucial to bidirectional anticipatory socialization for graduate education, where one gains new…

  12. Improving Science, Technology and Mathematics Students' Achievement: Imperatives for Teacher Preparation in the Caribbean Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunkola, Babalola J.

    2012-01-01

    The concerns of this article are the unacceptable status of Science, Technology and Mathematics (STM) Education in the Caribbean and how to improve the students' achievement in the subjects involved through the instrumentality of better preparation of teachers by the Colleges and University faculties training teachers in the region. The index for…

  13. Developing a "Self-Directed Learning Preparation Skills Scale for Primary School Students": Validity and Reliability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Gülten Feryal; Selvi, Kiymet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop "Self-Directed Learning Preparation Skills Scale" for primary school students. Data were gathered according to the principles of descriptive research method. In order to develop this scale, draft items were developed through review of literature, interviews done with teachers, parents and students…

  14. Professional Attributes in Teacher Preparation for Teaching Students with Hearing Impairment: Implications for Inclusive Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, V. C.; Eskay, M. K.; Ugwuanyi, L.; Igbo, J. N.; Obiyo, N. O.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive survey research study assessed the professional attributes of teacher preparation for teaching students with hearing impairment. It discussed the role of teaching competence in ensuring the smooth delivery of lessons to children with special needs, especially the hearing-impaired. THAQ (Teaching Hearing-impaired Assessment…

  15. The functional model of optimization of the special physical preparation of students in the period of flying practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirpenko V.N.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is considered approaches to optimization special physical preparation of students during the period of flying practice. For the construction of functional model of such system new information IDEF technology is utillized (ICAM Definition. The feature of technology is gradual introduction all large levels of working out in detail (decoupligs. It is marked that it is expedient to carry out a decouplig before functions which will realize leaders of physical preparation and instructor of flying preparation. It is well-proven that on the stage of research of function a fundamental place is occupied by a functional design. The result of optimization of maintenance of teaching is systematization of knowledge, abilities, facilities of development and support professionally of meaningful qualities of students. The hierarchical levels of process of systematization of maintenance of teaching are recommended. It is offered directions of realization of functional model through conditioning optimization of pedagogical activity of teacher.

  16. Academic achievement in first-year Portuguese college students: the role of academic preparation and learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Paula; Guisande, Adelina M; Almeida, Leandro S; Páramo, Fernanda M

    2009-06-01

    This paper analyses the role of academic preparation and learning strategies in the prediction of first-year Portuguese college students' academic achievement, considering students' sex and academic field attended. A sample of 445 first-year college students (68.5% female) from the University of Minho (25.8% enrolled in economics, 35.3% in science/technology, and 38.9% in humanities degrees) participated in the study. Students answered a questionnaire on learning strategies in the classroom at the end of the first semester, which consisted of 44 items organized in five dimensions: comprehensive approach, surface approach, personal competency perceptions, intrinsic motivation, and organization of study activities. Academic achievement (grade point average at the end of first year) and academic preparation (students' higher education access mark) were obtained through the academic records of the university. Results showed that academic preparation was the strongest predictor of first-year academic achievement, and only marginal additional variance was explained by learning strategies as assessed by the self-reported questionnaire. There were sex and academic field differences, but these variables do not seem strong enough to affect the results, although the different percentages of variance captured by each model and the different weights associated to higher education access mark, stimulate the use of these and/or other personal and contextual variables when analysing the phenomenon.

  17. Faculty needs, doctoral preparation, and the future of teacher preparation programs in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Johnson, Harold; Antia, Shirin D

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to obtain and analyze data on the need for, and desired characteristics of, faculty in deaf education at American institutions of higher education (IHEs), and to assess the present and projected status of doctoral-level teacher preparation programs in deaf education at American IHEs. Program directors and coordinators provided information on current and projected faculty openings, the number of active doctoral students, faculty research interests, program strengths, and needs in the field. Results indicated a pending shortage due to faculty retirements and a paucity of doctoral-level graduates. Most faculty listed literacy and language as a primary research interest as well as a program strength. The ability to generate new knowledge through research was found to be less desirable for future faculty than teaching ability. Suggestions for improving doctoral preparation and moving the field to evidence-based practices are provided.

  18. An Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA)-Based Framework to Prepare Fourth-Year Medical Students for Internal Medicine Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnicki, D Michael; Aiyer, Meenakshy K; Cannarozzi, Maria L; Carbo, Alexander; Chelminski, Paul R; Chheda, Shobhina G; Chudgar, Saumil M; Harrell, Heather E; Hood, L Chad; Horn, Michelle; Johl, Karnjit; Kane, Gregory C; McNeill, Diana B; Muntz, Marty D; Pereira, Anne G; Stewart, Emily; Tarantino, Heather; Vu, T Robert

    2017-06-20

    The purpose of the fourth year of medical school remains controversial. Competing demands during this transitional phase cause confusion for students and educators. In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released 13 Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (CEPAERs). A committee comprising members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine applied these principles to preparing students for internal medicine residencies. The authors propose a curricular framework based on five CEPAERs that were felt to be most relevant to residency preparation, informed by prior stakeholder surveys. The critical areas outlined include entering orders, forming and answering clinical questions, conducting patient care handovers, collaborating interprofessionally, and recognizing patients requiring urgent care and initiating that care. For each CEPAER, the authors offer suggestions about instruction and assessment of competency. The fourth year of medical school can be rewarding for students, while adequately preparing them to begin residency, by addressing important elements defined in the core entrustable activities. Thus prepared, new residents can function safely and competently in supervised postgraduate settings.

  19. Preparing students for the ethical challenges on international health electives: A systematic review of the literature on educational interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Anika; Knights Née Jones, Felicity; Fyfe, Molly; Alagarajah, Janagan; Baraitser, Paula

    2016-09-01

    International health electives pose specific ethical challenges for students travelling from to low and middle income countries. We undertook a systematic review of the literature on interventions to prepare students to identify ethical issues addressed, educational approaches and to collate evidence on the effectiveness of different strategies. We searched nine electronic databases of peer-reviewed literature and identified grey literature through key word searches; supplemented through citation mapping and expert consultation. Articles that described ethical training conducted by universities or professional bodies were included for review. We reviewed forty-four full text articles. Ten sources of published literature and seven sources of grey literature met our inclusion criteria. We identified thirteen ethical situations that students should be prepared to manage and eight generic skills to support this process. Most interventions were delivered before the elective, used case studies or guidelines. Some suggested ethical principles or a framework for analysis of ethical issues. Only two papers evaluated the intervention described. Our paper collates a small but growing body of work on education to prepare students to manage ethical issues. Ethical training should have elements that are delivered before, during and after the elective. Interventions should include case studies covering thirteen ethical issues identified here, linked to ethical principles and a process for responding to ethical issues. We suggest that evaluations of interventions are an important area for future research.

  20. Student Engagement in Law School: Preparing 21st Century Lawyers. Annual Survey Results, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) documents dimensions of quality in legal education and provides information about law student participation in effective educational activities that law schools and other organizations can use to improve student learning. The insights into the law school student experience reported in this study…

  1. How physical education teacher education majors should be prepared to teach students with hearing loss: a national needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccagnini, Kathleen J

    A national needs assessment survey is described that gathered information on current practices in physical education in both center-based schools for the deaf and mainstream programs serving deaf and hard of hearing students, grades K-12. The manner in which deaf and hard of hearing students are being served in physical education programs, the depth and breadth of curricula, and the credentials needed to teach are described. The study compares similarities and differences among physical education programs in center-based deaf institutions and mainstream schools. In summary, the study identifies areas of concentration needed in curriculum, and methods of teaching appropriate for student teacher candidates. This information has value for physical education programs that are considering revising their curricula to prepare teacher candidates who wish to work with deaf students.

  2. The pipeline training program in maternal and child health: interdisciplinary preparation of undergraduate students from underrepresented groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Rhyner, Paula M; Lund, Shelley

    2010-05-01

    The Preparing Academically Successful Students in Maternal and Child Health (MCH PASS) training program provided financial support and specialized training to occupational therapy (OT) and speech-language pathology (SLP) undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in maternal and child health. The project assisted undergraduate trainees to matriculate into graduate programs in their respective fields and facilitated application into long-term maternal and child health training programs. Sixteen trainees (8 OT and 8 SLP) participated in an undergraduate training program with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaming, family mentoring, leadership development, public health and population-based research. Instruction occurred in community and classroom settings through didactic instruction and small group discussions. Fifteen of the trainees applied to and were accepted in graduate programs in their respective fields. Two trainees applied to a long-term MCH training program. Students reported increased knowledge about programs that serve women and children, the effects of poverty on health, interdisciplinary teaming and the daily routines of families who have a child with a special health care need. The MCH PASS program provided a unique opportunity for undergraduate students in OT and SLP to learn about public health with an emphasis on maternal and child health. The specialized preparation enabled students to understand better the health concerns of underserved families whose children have special health care needs.

  3. Microteaching as a Self-Learning Tool. Students' Perceptions in the Preparation and Exposition of a Microlesson in a Tissue Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Sánchez, Antonio; del Carmen Sánchez-Quevedo, María; Crespo-Ferrer, Pascual Vicente; García-López, José Manuel; Alaminos, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Microteaching is a didactic tool of recent application to undergraduate and postgraduate students as a way to promote self-learning. In this work we compared the perceptions of the students who provide instruction in tissue engineering using microteaching and the perceptions of the same students when they receive such instructions. Two similar…

  4. Preparing for an Academic Career Workshops: Resources for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, R. W.; MacDonald, R.

    2004-12-01

    The professional development program, "On the Cutting Edge", offers annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Goals are to prepare participants to become more effective teachers, stronger candidates for academic positions, and more aware of the realities of academic jobs. Insights that participants especially hope to gain from these workshops include feedback on the application process, especially an understanding of how search committees work; the different realities of balancing teaching, research, and personal life in a range of academic institutions; and expectations for tenure. The ten-person leadership team represents, by design, a wide range of academic career paths and institutions, and provides approximately 1:6 leader: participant ratio. Specific sessions include research on learning, an introduction to course and lab design, effective teaching and assessment strategies, developing a teaching statement, time management and early career faculty success, and moving research forward into new settings. Optional workshop sessions and discussions include the following topics: dual-career couples; families and careers; teaching portfolios; effective negotiation strategies; tenure and promotion; effective field trips; getting started in undergraduate research; opportunities in K-12 education; career options beyond faculty positions. Highlights of the workshop are faculty panel discussions about career paths and the academic job search. By workshop end, participants complete a goal setting and action planning activity. Two years of evaluation data suggest our goals are being met. Participants particularly appreciate the practical ideas and the opportunity to interact with, and learn from, a diverse leadership team and other participants.

  5. Preparing Social Work Students for International Interdisciplinary Practice: A Teaching Model and Its Impact on Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Zubaroglu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To promote international social work education and prepare MSW graduates for international careers, several teaching models have been developed, including intensive teaching in international settings, hybrid teaching with study abroad components, and applied learning through service learning and international internships. Benefits of international social work education range from increased knowledge and skills in addressing global issues through policy and advocacy, to significant improvements in multi-cultural competence and awareness upon participation in structured cultural immersion programs. Current challenges for social workers in international development careers point to the need for an interdisciplinary approach to best address complex global social issues. This paper proposes an international interdisciplinary teaching model that aims to prepare social work students for international development practice. Based on a pilot study of the proposed model, students showed significant increases in the self-efficacy of interdisciplinary international knowledge and skills.

  6. Efficacy of Video-Assisted Instruction on Knowledge and Performance of Dental Students in Access Cavity Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Naseri, Mandana; Shantiaee, Yazdan; Rasekhi, Javid; Zadsirjan, Saeede; Mojtahed Bidabadi, Maryam; Khayat, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The conventional method of teaching endodontics has some drawbacks. Due to the small size of the oral cavity, students cannot closely observe the clinical procedure. Use of new teaching modalities such as the intraoral camera may obviate this problem. This study assessed the effect of video-assisted clinical instruction in dentistry (VACID) on dental student’s knowledge and performance in access cavity preparation during endodontic treatment. Methods and Materials: In this inter...

  7. Changing the way that I am: students experience of educational preparation for advanced nursing roles in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Andrea; Aranda, Kay F; De Goeas, Sharon M; Lindley, Penny J

    2013-09-01

    The redesign of the healthcare workforce in the United Kingdom (UK) has resulted in the rapid introduction of more 'advanced' community nursing roles. This presents varying challenges for universities seeking to prepare practitioners for these roles. This paper reports on a qualitative study conducted at one university in England which sought to explore the educational experiences of students preparing for and engaging in advanced nursing roles. Data was collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews. This study found that educational preparation for advanced nursing roles in the community is varied and complex and involved a number of claims, concerns and issues, captured in three themes: 1. Re-inventing roles; 2. Re-creating selves; and 3. Re-engaging with learning. The findings reveal how those in advanced roles work across occupational boundaries and manage conflicts, using differentiated and complex sources and forms of knowledge and skills. Learning occurs in non-linear ways and is a good example of expansive or sideways learning. There is a need for further research on the type of curriculum and methods to best support students preparing for these roles and further study on the impact on patient experience and outcomes.

  8. Preparing TESOL Students for the ESOL Classroom: A Cross-Cultural Project in Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-López-Portillo, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Intercultural communication classes for TESOL students give them a solid foundation for their work with their own ESOL students. This article presents the cross-cultural project that TESOL students have to complete in a required intercultural communication class at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the case study that was used to…

  9. Aligning High School and College Instruction: Preparing Students for Success in College Level Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Across the United States, students are entering college with a need for improvement in basic mathematics and communication skills. In 2008, the Florida Legislature passed Senate Bill 1908 which changed the expectations for the senior year of high school for many students. Students who score within certain levels on the mandatory high school…

  10. College Student Engagement and Early Career Earnings: Differences by Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Academic Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shouping; Wolniak, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the 2001 cohort of applicants to the Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program, the authors examined scaled measures of academic and social engagement in relation to labor market earnings to test whether the economic value of student engagement among high-achieving students of color differs by student characteristics.…

  11. Do Teacher Characteristics Matter? New Results on the Effects of Teacher Preparation on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla-Acevedo, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Research fairly consistently demonstrates that teachers are an important measurable factor in student learning, yet few teacher characteristics are shown to be consistently related to student achievement. Using a state administrative dataset that matches individual students to their teachers over time, I find that math teachers' undergraduate…

  12. Using interactive online role-playing simulations to develop global competency and to prepare engineering students for a globalised world

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dominik; Wold, Kari; Moore, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    The world is changing significantly, and it is becoming increasingly globalised. This means that countries, businesses, and professionals must think and act globally to be successful. Many individuals, however, are not prepared with the global competency skills needed to communicate and perform effectively in a globalised system. To address this need, higher education institutions are looking for ways to instil these skills in their students. This paper explains one promising approach using current learning principles: transnational interactive online environments in engineering education. In 2011, the TU Dortmund and the University of Virginia initiated a collaboration in which engineering students from both universities took part in one online synchronous course and worked together on global topics. This paper describes how the course was designed and discusses specific research results regarding how interactive online role-playing simulations support students in gaining the global competency skills required to actively participate in today's international workforce.

  13. Rx for NCLEX-RN success: reflections on development of an effective preparation process for senior baccalaureate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Karen S; Ambrose, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights the process employed to support and facilitate student preparation for NCLEX-RN success at a baccalaureate institution that experienced a decline in pass rates subsequent to increased enrollment. The multifaceted approach emphasizes individualized attention; strategies to augment student self-confidence, enhancement of critical thinking skills, self-assessment of test-taking abilities, development of a feasible study plan utilizing learned effective study techniques; and the acknowledgment of barriers and identification of specific methods to overcome them. In place since spring 2006, consistently improved measurable outcomes are evident without the added student stress of consequences for failing to attain a benchmark score on an end-of-program examination.

  14. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonjoo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a discipline-based career course on perceptions of career barriers, career search self-efficacy, and career preparation behavior of nursing students. Differences in career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior by the students' levels of career barriers were also examined. The study used a modified one-group, pretest-posttest design. The convenience sample consisted of 154 undergraduate nursing students in a university. The discipline-based career course consisted of eight sessions, and was implemented for 2 hours per session over 8 weeks. The data were collected from May to June in 2012 and 2013 using the following instruments: the Korean Career Indecision Inventory, the Career Search Efficacy Scale, and the Career Preparation Behavior Scale. Descriptive statistics, paired t test, and analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. Upon the completion of the discipline-based career course, students' perceptions of career barriers decreased and career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased. Career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased in students with both low and high levels of career barriers. The difference between the low and high groups was significant for career search self-efficacy but not for career preparation behavior. The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Students improve patient care and prepare for professional practice: an interprofessional community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth Susan; Thorpe, Lucy Nichola

    2014-06-01

    We report on an education model that enables students to contribute to practice while experiencing the realities of complex team-working in the community. The study considers how interprofessional learning impacts on patient care and service delivery. A qualitative study using a realist approach. The views of practice-staff, patients and facilitators on how student team learning impacted on practice was obtained through focus groups, interviews and an e-questionnaire and compared to student analysis as feedback forms. Staff from six Primary Health Care Teams (n = 23) stated that the student teams had offered solutions to improve the quality of patient care and on organisational systems. The positive value of the student work was confirmed by the course facilitators (n = 8). In addition, practitioners were propelled to maintain high professional standards. Patients (n = 23) recalled benefits directly attributable to the student work confirmed by the 434 student feedback forms. Undergraduate interprofessional student teams in mid-training can support and help practice teams, and this subsequently benefits patient care. This practice-based interprofessional learning model offers learning, which is theory-based, and supports positive student contributions. This learning fits today's requirements for positive outcomes from education when mapped against the Kirkpatrick or the NHS (UK) education outcomes framework.

  16. Infusing the Core Curriculum with Societally Relevant Issues and Preparing Faculty to Work with Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellito, L. J.; Straw, B.; Sexton, J. M.; Hoyt, W.

    2016-12-01

    The way we teach our courses has an impact on student experience, and ultimately, student interest and persistence in geoscience majors and career paths. With that in mind, the primary goal of the InTeGrate implementation program in the University of Northern Colorado Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science is to promote retention in the Earth Science major through interventions that impact student classroom experience. We used two approaches to accomplish this. 1) We developed interdisciplinary curricular activities that are based on societally-relevant issues, engage students in problem-solving, and that prompt students to consider the relationships between science, society, and sustainability. We implemented these activities in core earth science courses and in a general education scientific writing course. 2) Our Earth and Atmospheric Science faculty participated in diversity and equity awareness training. In this presentation, we share our initial assessment of the effectiveness of new curricular activities and the effectiveness of a workshop developed for faculty that promotes awareness of teaching styles and behaviors that promote inclusion of students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences. Our results suggest that incorporating a societally-relevant component to activities improves student interest in the material and provides them with experience in interdisciplinary analysis and problem solving. The implementation of sustainability issues into a general education scientific writing course has a demonstrated impact on student perception of climate change and sustainability. Faculty report that they are more aware of teaching styles that promote inclusion of students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences.

  17. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonjoo Park, RN, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students.

  18. Are you prepared to S.A.V.E. your nursing student from suicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C S

    1998-02-01

    According to the most recently available data presented in the Statistical Abstract of the United States 1994 (United States Bureau of the Census, 1994), 17,100 young Americans (15 to 44 years old) died in 1991 due to suicide. At no other time during the life span were suicide rates so high. Suicide among college and university students is estimated by some to be 50% higher than for other Americans of comparable age (Westefeld & Pattilo, 1987). Not only is suicide considered by many authors to be the number one health problem on the nation's campuses (Mathiasen, 1988), but the suicide rate for this population has tripled over the past 25 years (Hardin & Weast, 1989). Professional nursing students could perhaps be at an even higher risk for suicide than other college students. Manicini, Lavecchia, and Clegg point out that "[n]ursing students are more doubtful than other college students about their academic performance. They encounter stress in adjusting to a rigorous program of theory and practice. The reality is often far different from a prospective student's image of it" (cited in Lampkin, Cannon, & Fairchild, 1985, p. 148). Because of the longevity of contact hours spent with nursing students in both lecture and clinical milieus, nursing faculty are in a uniquely favorable position to identify and assess those students who appear to be at risk for suicide. In addition, as most nurse educators provide supportive relationships, rich with caring and trust for their students, distressed students are usually open to talking to a faculty member. If a suicidal risk is found during the assessment interview, the faculty member should then provide an immediate referral for further psychiatric evaluation and intervention. To assist faculty in the quick recall of the essential components of this helping process the acronym S.A.V.E. is used: 1. S: Suicidal behaviors. 2. A: Assessment interview. 3. V: Value student. 4. E: Evaluation-Referral.

  19. Practically prepared? Pre-intern student views following an education package: a response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowlut N

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Naeem DowlutSchool of Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine, London, UKI read with interest the paper authored by McKenzie and Mellis regarding the delivery and student feedback of an educational package, as part of the pre-internship module, designed to improve clinical skills, including procedural skills, of final-year medical students.1 The educational package was delivered prior to students commencing their clinical attachment component of the module and consisted of didactic-, group-, and case-based teaching sessions. Given the significant improvements in the self-reported confidence of students following the pre-internship module, and from my own experience, I agree with the authors that an intensive educational program is highly valuable at improving the skills and confidence of students prior to commencing clinical practice. In the UK, the General Medical Council requires UK medical schools to integrate “student assistantships” into the final year of medical school, before the medical student transitions into a practicing first-year postgraduate doctor (“Foundation Year 1”or “F1”.2 Depending on the medical school, the student assistantship is of varying length and is intended to closely integrate students into the health care team so that they may obtain more practical experience of a newly qualified doctor’s role. During this assistantship, students should perform a diverse set of supervised practical procedures on patients, ranging from measurement of body temperature to catheterization and skin suturing.2 It has been shown that student assistantship model does improve the student’s preparedness for clinical practice.3,4View the original paper by McKenzie and Mellis.

  20. Improving Preparation for College Physics of Minority Students Aspiring to Science-Related Careers: Investigation of Student Difficulties and Development of Appropriate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Mark Linn

    This dissertation reports on a project, begun in 1976 by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, to improve the performance of minority undergraduates in physics and other science courses required for admission to engineering, medicine, and other technical professions. The project has two main elements. The first is an investigation of specific conceptual and reasoning difficulties encountered by the students in the study of physics and physical science. This investigation forms the basis of an empirical assessment of the students' academic needs. The second is the use of this assessment in developing a curriculum specifically designed to help students overcome the difficulties they experience in introductory science courses. The research and curriculum development have taken place in the context of a special physics course to help prepare minority college students for science-related majors. Specific difficulties encountered by the students as they work through the subject matter of the course have been identified and grouped into three categories: difficulty with basic concepts, difficulty with scientific representations, and difficulty with scientific reasoning. Curriculum development has focused on helping students overcome these difficulties. The dissertation gives the results of the investigation and presents samples of the curriculum with a discussion of the principles of its design. The dissertation also illustrates how the close association of investigation of difficulties, development of curriculum, and teaching of the course has provided an environment that allows continuous feedback on the design of instructional materials and facilitates the tasks of testing, evaluation, and revision. The effectiveness of the project is discussed in terms of student achievement at the University of Washington and curriculum adoption by other institutions. It appears that the goal of increasing minority representation in the sciences through action

  1. Improving Algebra Preparation: Implications from Research on Student Misconceptions and Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welder, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    Through historical and contemporary research, educators have identified widespread misconceptions and difficulties faced by students in learning algebra. Many of these universal issues stem from content addressed long before students take their first algebra course. Yet elementary and middle school teachers may not understand how the subtleties of…

  2. An Examination of the Relationship between SkillsUSA Student Contest Preparation and Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Pellock, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) assert they are assisting students in developing leadership, teamwork, citizenship, problem solving, communication, and academic skills for workplace success, but with limited research on their outcomes, are these empty claims? With integration of academics being a major Career and Technical…

  3. Parents as Partners for Preparing Deaf Students for Bi-Bi Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, Carol J.; Metzger, Melanie A.

    This paper describes Bilingual-Bicultural (BiBi) instructional programs for students with hearing impairments and proposes a model for BiBi instruction which uses parents as partners with instructors to develop the linguistic abilities of hearing-impaired students. In the model, traditionally spoken languages are conveyed via cued speech instead…

  4. A Tri-Country Marketing Project--Preparing Students for the Realities of a Global Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ina; Knight, Peter; Butt, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    With rapidly increasing globalization, business students are required to understand complex global markets and adapt to the rapid changes in the global landscape. This paper discusses a project where students from International Marketing courses in Pakistan, the United States, and France used an interactive platform as a base to jointly explore…

  5. Athletic Training Educators' Pedagogical Strategies for Preparing Students to Address Sudden Death in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Educational training programs both impart knowledge and allow students to practice skills to gain clinical competence. Objective: Understand the educational training provided to athletic training students regarding sudden death in sport beyond exertional heat stroke. Design: An exploratory, qualitative study using telephone interviews and…

  6. Digital Literacy in the Marketing Curriculum: Are Female College Students Prepared for Digital Jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Karen E.; Wilder, Kelly; Mishra, Aneil K.

    2017-01-01

    Employers seeking to capitalize on current marketing graduates' technological savvy may find a disappointing gap between their expectations and students' digital preparedness. This study examines these issues by investigating female students' attitudes and expectations with regard to using digital tools in marketing coursework and in a future…

  7. Preparing Students with Learning Disabilities for Postsecondary Education: Issues and Future Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stan F.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Issues are discussed in the transition of students with learning disabilities from high school to employment or postsecondary education, focusing on the importance of providing instructional and counseling services to help students become self-sufficient, independent thinkers who can self-advocate and be responsible for their actions. (Author/JDD)

  8. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S.; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as…

  9. Effectiveness of University Bridging Programs in Preparing Students for University Education: A Case from East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssempebwa, Jude; Eduan, Wilson; Mulumba, Fawz Nassir

    2012-01-01

    Study abroad brings several advantages to students, universities, countries, and academe. However, across countries with incongruent preuniversity education structures, some students are denied admission to foreign universities, due to gaps in their admissibility. Some institutions offer university bridging programs, to enhance the admissibility…

  10. Raising Students' Intercultural Awareness and Preparing Them for Intercultural Business (Communication) by E-Mail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Marinel; Verckens, Jan Pieter

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on an assignment which tries to raise students' intercultural awareness. The assignment, an intercultural e-mail project, was developed during the past 2 academic years for the course Introduction to Intercultural Communication for 1st-year students of Business Communication of the Radboud University (Nijmegen,…

  11. Entrepreneurship Education for Students: How Should Universities Prepare for the Challenge of Teaching Entrepreneurship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Dafna; Malach-Pines, Ayala

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on factors that influence the appropriateness of entrepreneurship studies to the needs and expectations of management students in Israel, where entrepreneurs are considered cultural heroes. The results of the authors' research revealed great interest in entrepreneurship studies among most of the students surveyed. However,…

  12. A Tri-Country Marketing Project--Preparing Students for the Realities of a Global Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ina; Knight, Peter; Butt, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    With rapidly increasing globalization, business students are required to understand complex global markets and adapt to the rapid changes in the global landscape. This paper discusses a project where students from International Marketing courses in Pakistan, the United States, and France used an interactive platform as a base to jointly explore…

  13. Preparing Students with Disabilities for College Success: A Practical Guide to Transition Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stan F., Ed.; Madaus, Joseph W., Ed.; Dukes, Lyman L., III, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    For students with mild to moderate, non-visible disabilities, navigating a college education without the support team they had in high school can be challenging. Help students become effective self-advocates and maximize their postsecondary possibilities with this cutting-edge book, which balances current research with the most practical guidance…

  14. A Qualitative Exploration of Higher Self-Efficacy String Students Preparing for a Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jennifer Cahill

    2013-01-01

    This study examined and qualitatively described the music practice behaviors, strategies, and thoughts of four high school string students who indicated a high string playing self-efficacy. Concepts of practice, motivation, achievement, and self-efficacy were linked together to analyze tendencies and summarize strategies. These students were…

  15. Innovation in internship preparation: an operative anatomy course increases senior medical students' knowledge and confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Nikki; Brunsvold, Melissa; Kabbani, Loay; Lin, Jules; Stansfield, Brent; Mueller, Dean; Minter, Rebecca M

    2013-08-01

    An operative anatomy course was developed within the construct of a surgical internship preparatory curriculum. This course provided fourth-year medical students matching into a surgical residency the opportunity to perform intern-level procedures on cadavers under the guidance of surgical faculty members. Senior medical students performed intern-level procedures on cadavers with the assistance of faculty surgeons. Students' confidence, anxiety, and procedural knowledge were evaluated both preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative data were compared both collectively and based on individual procedures. Student confidence and procedural knowledge significantly increased and anxiety significantly decreased when preoperative and postoperative data were compared (P < .05). Students reported moderate to significant improvement in their ability to perform a variety of surgical tasks. The consistent improvement in confidence, knowledge, and anxiety justifies further development of an operative anatomy course, with future assessment of the impact on performance in surgical residency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Course Offerings in the Fourth Year of Medical School: How U.S. Medical Schools Are Preparing Students for Internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnicki, D Michael; Gallagher, Susan; Willett, Laura; Kane, Gregory; Muntz, Martin; Henry, Daniel; Cannarozzi, Maria; Stewart, Emily; Harrell, Heather; Aiyer, Meenakshy; Salvit, Cori; Chudgar, Saumil; Vu, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The fourth year of medical school remains controversial, despite efforts to reform it. A committee from the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine examined transitions from medical school to internship with the goal of better academic advising for students. In 2013 and 2014, the committee examined published literature and the Web sites of 136 Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited schools for information on current course offerings for the fourth year of medical school. The authors summarized temporal trends and outcomes when available.Subinternships were required by 122 (90%) of the 136 schools and allow students to experience the intern's role. Capstone courses are increasingly used to fill curricular gaps. Revisiting basic sciences in fourth-year rotations helps to reinforce concepts from earlier years. Many schools require rotations in specific settings, like emergency departments, intensive care units, or ambulatory clinics. A growing number of schools require participation in research, including during the fourth year. Students traditionally take fourth-year clinical electives to improve skills, both within their chosen specialties and in other disciplines. Some students work with underserved populations or seek experiences that will be henceforth unavailable, whereas others use electives to "audition" at desired residency sites. Fourth-year requirements vary considerably among medical schools, reflecting different missions and varied student needs. Few objective outcomes data exist to guide students' choices. Nevertheless, both medical students and educators value the fourth year of medical school and feel it can fill diverse functions in preparing for residency.

  17. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E., E-mail: Ariel.hirsch@bmc.org

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  18. Preparation of students with disabilities to graduate into professions in the South African context of higher learning: Obstacles and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibonokuhle Ndlovu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persons with disabilities continue to be excluded from professions in South Africa despite legislation on non-discrimination and equity. Objectives: We sought to identify both the opportunities and obstacles that students with disabilities face in professional degrees. Method: Selected texts from the South African and international literature were analysed and synthesised. Results: Students with disabilities are afforded opportunities to graduate into professions through the current climate of transformation, inclusion and disability policies, various support structures and funding. These opportunities are mitigated by obstacles at both the higher education site and at the workplace. At university, they may experience difficulties in accessing the curriculum, disability units may be limited in the support they can offer, policies may not be implemented, funding is found to be inadequate and the built environment may be inaccessible. Fieldwork poses additional obstacles in terms of public transport which is not accessible to students with disabilities; a lack of higher education support extended to the field sites, and buildings not designed for access by people with disabilities. At both sites, students are impacted by negative attitudes and continued assumptions that disability results from individual deficit, rather than exclusionary practices and pressures. Conclusion: It is in the uniqueness of professional preparation, with its high demands of both theory and practice that poses particular obstacles for students with disabilities. We argue for the development of self-advocacy for students with disabilities, ongoing institutional and societal transformation and further research into the experiences of students with disabilities studying for professional degrees.

  19. Preparing students for higher education and careers in agriculture and related fields: An ethnography of an urban charter school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kesha Atasha

    This study explored the preparation of students for higher education and careers in agriculturally-related fields at an urban charter high school. The data were collected through interviews, observations, and field notes. The data were analyzed by qualitative methodology with phenomenology as the theoretical framework. Findings indicated that administrators thought it was important to incorporate agricultural science courses into urban school curricula. They stated that agricultural science courses gave urban students a different way of looking at science and helped to enhance the science and technology focus of the school. Further, agricultural science courses helped to break urban students' stereotypes about agriculture and helped to bring in more state funding for educational programs. However they thought that it was more challenging to teach agricultural science in urban versus rural schools and they focused more on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related careers. The students had mixed views about higher education and careers in agriculture. This was based on their limited knowledge and stereotypes about agricultural majors and career options. The students highlighted several key reasons why they chose to enroll in agricultural science courses. This included the benefits of dual science credits and the ability to earn an associate degree upon successful completion of their program. Students also loved science and appreciated the science intensive nature of the agricultural courses. Additionally, they thought that the agricultural science courses were better than the other optional courses. The results also showed that electronic media such as radio and TV had a negative impact on students' perceptions about higher education and careers in agriculturally-related fields. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  20. A Research Preparatory Program for First-Year College Students: Student Selection and Preparation Lead to Persistence in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiduc, Rachael R.; Drane, Denise; Beitel, Greg J.; Flores, Luke C.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences may increase persistence in STEM majors. We describe a research program that targets first-year students selected for their curiosity and attitudes towards science. We explain the implementation of the program over 3 years and present evaluation data using a group of matched controls. Participants and controls…

  1. Preparing ESL Students for "Real" College Writing: A Glimpse of Common Writing Tasks ESL Students Encounter at One Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Julia; Dunkelblau, Helene

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of English as a Second Language (ESL) courses to the "real world" of college writing is an ongoing issue for those who teach ESL. Ideally, ESL composition classes should help students make connections between what they learn about writing and the ways they might need to write later on in their academic careers. Unfortunately, as with…

  2. From beta-blockers to boot camp: Preparing students for the NCLEX-RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W; Johnson, Amy Nagorski

    2009-01-01

    Although it is thought that reviewing essential materials and learning how to answer computer-generated questions are optimal preparations for NCLEX-RN, strategies that build knowledge, self-confidence, and professionalism of the nurse taking the exam are equally important. A senior seminar course that guides formal NCLEX-RN preparation is presented in this article with specific course strategies and a blueprint of seminar content that can be adapted to the nursing curriculum.

  3. THE MISTAKES AND THEIR REASONS OF THE FRENCH PREPARATION CLASS STUDENTS WHO MAKE THEM IN THE STUDIES OF DICTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıfat GÜNDAY

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available : It is tried to research the reasons of mistakes which the french preparation class students made, determining the difficulties that they come across in the studies of dictation in the content of writing lessons. To determine the difficulties, a preliminary and a terminal test were practiced on an intermediate grade text dictation to the preparation class students and the datas were obtained from these test results. The mistakes are considered as a unity without doing a discrimination of important or unimportant case (mistake/error. It is examined the mistakes that it is frequently came across, under the main titles, as noun, pronoun, adjective, verb, adverb and idiom, preposition and conjunction, article. Also, it is mentioned to the mistakes which are based on that they were learnt before and the sounds couldn’t be recognized in terms of phonetics. It is observed that these caused a lot of mistakes which the students don’t know sufficiently the fonctions of elements in syntax and their connections among each others. In the firts part, the numbers of the mistakes are given under the main titles such as nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs and idioms, prepositions and conjunctions and articles. Nouns: While the average number of mistakes per student was 19.2 (38.4 % in the preliminary test, it reduced to 9.7 (19.4% in the terminal test. The mistakes of students decreased 49.5 %. Pronouns: While the average number of mistakes per student was 3.9 (21.6 % in the preliminary test, it reduced to 2 (11.1% in the terminal test. The mistakes of students decreased 49%. Adjectives: While the average number of mistakes per student was 6.3 (25.2 % in the preliminary test, it reduced to 3.1 (12.4 % in the terminal test. The mistakes of students decreased 49%. Verbs: While the average number of mistakes per student was 14.2 (33.8 % in the preliminary test, it reduced to 8.3 (19.8 % in the terminal test. The mistakes of students decreased 41

  4. Implementing a standardized testing program: preparing students for the NCLEX-RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Phyllis; Koehn, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The undergraduate nursing faculty of a large Midwestern university initiated a program of standardized computerized testing for two purposes: to provide students experience with standardized computerized testing prior to taking the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and to increase the students' NCLEX-RN passing rate. This article chronicles the process of implementing a comprehensive testing program developed by the Assessment Technologies Institute (Overland Park, KS). Although the first class of students to have taken the entire testing package has just graduated, midprogram results have demonstrated potential as key indicators for identifying at-risk students. The trends in scores on standardized computerized tests, grades in prerequisite science courses, and grades in medical-surgical courses are used to identify students who are at risk for failure in the program and on the NCLEX-RN. Faculty advisors meet with these students to develop individual plans of study and to provide additional resources. The testing process is going on smoothly, and faculty members are learning to use the extensive information on students' test scores to further assist them in passing the NCLEX-RN.

  5. Assessment of midwifery student preparation for performing the role of breast cancer educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Agnieszka Maria; Korzynska-Pietas, Magdalena; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grazyna Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Our research project aimed at presenting midwifery student self-assessment of performing the role of breast cancer prevention educator. Investigations were carried out in 2011 at the Medical University of Lublin in Poland, and Katolieke Hogeschool of Kortrijk in Belgium, after obtaining approval of the ethical committee of Polish Midwives Association (III/EC/2011/PMA). The project involved a total of 155 midwifery students, made up of 95 from Poland, and 60 from Belgium. Relations between opposing characteristics were tested with Chi-square (x2) test for independent traits. To assess the dependence relation between the examined variables Pearson's corrected coefficient was used. Data base and statistics were carried out with computer software STATISTICA 9.0 (StatSoftPoland). Student knowledge on prevention against breast cancer was unsatisfactory.The students place of residence determined their self-estimation of personal knowledge of breast cancer prevention and diagnosing methods to assess the incidence of the disease, this knowledge being better with the students of Lublin. Better self-estimation in the students of Lublin of their personal knowledge on factors rising the risk of breast cancer, such as alimentation method, application of oral contraceptives and breast feeding was found than in Belgian students.

  6. Students come to medical schools prepared to cheat: a multi-campus investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolja Taradi, Sunčana; Taradi, Milan; Knežević, Tin; Đogaš, Zoran

    2010-11-01

    To investigate high school cheating experiences and attitudes towards academic misconduct of freshmen at all four medical schools in Croatia, as a post-communist country in transition, with intention of raising awareness of academic (dis)honesty. Students were given an anonymous questionnaire containing 22 questions on the atmosphere of integrity at their high school, self-reported educational dishonesty, their evaluation of cheating behaviour, and on their expectations about the atmosphere of integrity at their university. All schools of medicine of Croatian universities (Zagreb, Rijeka, Split and Osijek). Descriptive statistics and differences in students' self-reported educational dishonesty, perception of cheating behaviour, and perception of the high school integrity atmosphere. Of the 761 freshmen attending the four medical schools, 508 (67%) completed the questionnaire: 481 Croatian and 27 international students. Of the Croatian respondents, almost all (>99%) self-reported engaging in at least one behaviour of educational dishonesty, and 78% of respondents admitted to having frequently cheated in at least one form of assessed academic misconduct. Only three students admitted to having reported another student for cheating. For most of the questions, there was no significant difference in the responses among Croatian students. However, significant differences were found in most responses between Croatian students and their international counterparts, who were significantly less likely to engage in dishonest behaviours. No individual factor was found to correlate with the incidence of self-admitted dishonest behaviour. Frequent cheaters evaluated academic dishonesty significantly more leniently than those who did not cheat. Academic dishonesty of university students does not begin in higher education; students come to medical schools ready to cheat.

  7. Preparation for the Profession: An Examination of the Triangulation among University of Utah Journalism Educators, Their Students, and the Salt Lake Valley Media Practitioners Who Hire Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Adam Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Journalism educators must make critical decisions about their undergraduate curricula, determining how to best prepare their students for professional careers. Present scholarship indicates that a disconnect exists in what journalism students think they ought to know and/or be able to do upon graduation, what educators think they must teach their…

  8. Evaluation of tooth preparations for Class II cavities using magnification loupes among dental interns and final year BDS students in preclinical laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khyati Narula

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Magnifying loupes help the dental students to have better vision, thus improved dexterity with hands while preparing the tooth for restoration. However, dental students have to get adapted to the loupes for the ease of using loupes. Using loupes frequently may help them to get adapted to the loupes.

  9. Preparing Students for Class: A Clinical Trial Testing the Efficacy between Multimedia Pre-Lectures and Textbooks in an Economics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jose J.; Chiang, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Motivating students to come prepared to class is often a futile exercise. The consequences are magnified as more instructors adopt the flipped classroom teaching model, in which students are expected to come to class with some knowledge of the material. This paper analyzed the implementation of a pedagogical tool that addresses this problem:…

  10. Preparing Students for Middle School Through After-School STEM Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Nancy P.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory; Newell, Alana D.; Burnett, Christopher A.

    2016-09-01

    The middle school years are a crucial time for cultivating students' interest in and preparedness for future STEM careers. However, not all middle school children are provided opportunities to engage, learn and achieve in STEM subject areas. Engineering, in particular, is neglected in these grades because it usually is not part of science or mathematics curricula. This study investigates the effectiveness of an engineering-integrated STEM curriculum designed for use in an after-school environment. The inquiry-based activities comprising the unit, Think Like an Astronaut, were intended to introduce students to STEM careers—specifically engineering and aerospace engineering—and enhance their skills and knowledge applicable related to typical middle school science objectives. Results of a field test with a diverse population of 5th grade students in nine schools revealed that Think Like an Astronaut lessons are appropriate for an after-school environment, and may potentially help increase students' STEM-related content knowledge and skills.

  11. Get Them Thinking! Use Media Literacy to Prepare Students for State Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Sue Lockwood

    2005-01-01

    The importance of media literacy, which involves the ability to critically examine the messages delivered by mass media, and the need to integrate it into students' curriculum, is emphasized. Guidelines on how this can best be done are presented.

  12. Developing Creativity Ecosystems: Preparing College Students for Tomorrow's Innovation Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Eileen; Thomas, Ben; DeLaRosby, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Eileen Hulme, Ben Thomas, and Hal DeLaRosby argue for the importance of creativity as a learning outcome and challenge higher education to produce students capable of becoming the innovative leaders the twenty-first-century economy requires.

  13. Preparing Students for Middle School Through After-School STEM Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Nancy P.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory; Newell, Alana D.; Burnett, Christopher A.

    2016-12-01

    The middle school years are a crucial time for cultivating students' interest in and preparedness for future STEM careers. However, not all middle school children are provided opportunities to engage, learn and achieve in STEM subject areas. Engineering, in particular, is neglected in these grades because it usually is not part of science or mathematics curricula. This study investigates the effectiveness of an engineering-integrated STEM curriculum designed for use in an after-school environment. The inquiry-based activities comprising the unit, Think Like an Astronaut, were intended to introduce students to STEM careers—specifically engineering and aerospace engineering—and enhance their skills and knowledge applicable related to typical middle school science objectives. Results of a field test with a diverse population of 5th grade students in nine schools revealed that Think Like an Astronaut lessons are appropriate for an after-school environment, and may potentially help increase students' STEM-related content knowledge and skills.

  14. Preparing Students to Take Responsibility for Learning: The Role of Non-Curricular Learning Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey Paul

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Standardized test-based accountability measures often result in overemphasis on knowing facts and cast students into passive roles. Such schooling yields neither the learning nor the learners the modern world requires and can exhaust and demoralize teachers. We assert that students must assume greater responsibility for their learning in order to attain deep understanding and transferable skills that benefit them throughout their lives. Curriculum and instruction must therefore pay greater attention to developing skills that allow students to take such ownership of their learning. We identify and discuss three foundational skills that enable students to assume more responsibility for learning: self-regulation, collaboration, and academic mindsets. After reviewing current research on factors contributing to these non-curricular learning skills and exploring their importance within school contexts and beyond, we discuss the need for more classroom-based research on interventions aimed at their development.

  15. Using grey literature to prepare pharmacy students for an evolving healthcare delivery system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Happe, Laura E; Walker, Desiree'

    2013-01-01

    .... Pre- and post-course survey instruments were used for the assessment. Students reported healthcare delivery systems topics to be moderately relevant to the profession of pharmacy on both the pre- and post-course survey instruments...

  16. Using grey literature to prepare pharmacy students for an evolving healthcare delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Laura E; Walker, Desiree'

    2013-05-13

    To assess the impact of using "grey literature" (information internally produced in print or electronic format by agencies such as hospitals, government, businesses, etc) rather than a textbook in a course on healthcare delivery systems on students' perception of the relevance of healthcare delivery system topics and their ability to identify credible sources of this information. A reading from the grey literature was identified and assigned to the students for each topic in the course. Pre- and post-course survey instruments were used for the assessment. Students reported healthcare delivery systems topics to be moderately relevant to the profession of pharmacy on both the pre- and post-course survey instruments. Students' knowledge of current and credible sources of information on healthcare delivery system topics significantly improved based on self-reports and scores on objective assessments (phealthcare delivery systems can be used to ensure that information in the pharmacy school curriculum is the most current and credible information available.

  17. The Legal Implications of Storing Student Data: Preparing for and Responding to Data Breaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Katie

    2017-01-01

    This chapter outlines the varying threats that IR professionals face when securely storing and managing data, as well as the regulatory structure in place to control data management. Advice is offered on how best to structure and manage student data.

  18. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  19. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  20. Preparing Students for Research: Synthesis of Substituted Chalcones as a Comprehensive Guided-Inquiry Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyvyan, James R.; Pavia, Donald L.; Lampman, Gary M.; Kriz, George S., Jr.

    2002-09-01

    A guided inquiry experiment involving the synthesis and characterization of substituted benzalacetophenones (chalcones) is described. The chalcones are produced in the aldol condensation of substituted benzaldehydes with substituted acetophenones. Each student is assigned a different target chalcone and conducts online and printed literature searches on the target. After completing the synthesis and purification of their product, the students compare their data with those found in the literature.

  1. Assessment of Understanding: Student Teachers' Preparation, Implementation and Reflection of a Lesson Plan for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhler, Martin Vogt

    2017-05-01

    Research finds that student teachers often fail to make observable instructional goals, without which a secure bridge between instruction and assessment is precluded. This is one reason that recent reports state that teacher education needs to become better at helping student teachers to develop their thinking about and skills in assessing pupils' learning. Currently in Europe, the Lesson Study method and the Content Representation tool, which both have a specific focus on assessment, have started to address this problem. This article describes and discusses an intervention in which Lesson Study was used in combination with Content Representation in student teachers' field practice. Empirical materials from one group of student teachers were analyzed to illustrate how the student teachers worked with assessment during the planning of a lesson, how they implemented it in a research lesson, and how they used the gathered observations to make claims about assessment aims. The findings suggest that the student teachers placed greater emphasis on assessment through the intervention. However, it is also found that more attention should have been dedicated to the planning phase and that the group did not manage to keep a research focus throughout the Lesson Study process. This suggests that it properly would be beneficial with several planning sessions prior to the research lesson, as well as having an expert teacher leading the Lesson Study.

  2. How well does midwifery education prepare for clinical practice? Exploring the views of Swedish students, midwives and obstetricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schytt, Erica; Waldenström, Ulla

    2013-02-01

    midwifery education in many countries has been adapted to the academic system by a stronger focus on research methodology and scientific evidence. This development has often taken place without extending the programs. We were interested in exploring views about current content of midwifery education in Sweden with a focus on clinical competencies and the new research components. to investigate views about Swedish midwifery education held by students prior to graduation and after 1 year of practice, and by experienced midwives and obstetricians, with special focus on clinical competency. nationwide surveys conducted between June 2007 and January 2008, and 1 year later (follow-up of students). self-administered questionnaires completed by 171 (83%) students and 121 (59%) of these participants after 1 year of midwifery practice, and by 162 (54%) midwives and 108 (40%) obstetricians with at least 5 years of clinical experience. The responders were asked to assess predefined intrapartum competencies, which components of the education were allocated too little and too much time, and how well the education prepared for clinical practise overall. Content analysis of open-ended questions and descriptive analyses was used. most students, midwives and obstetricians were 'very' or 'fairly' satisfied with how the education prepared midwives for clinical practice and 1.8%, 4.7% and 17.6%, respectively, were dissatisfied. About half of the obstetricians and one-third of the experienced midwives rated new midwives' ability to identify deviations from normal progress as low or lacking, compared with 10% of the students. A majority found that too little time, of the 60 weeks programme, was allocated to intrapartum care and medical complications and too much time to research and writing a minor thesis. although few were dissatisfied with how midwifery education prepared for clinical practice in general, the majority of participants would have liked more time for medical complications

  3. Measurement of the levels anxiety, self-perception of preparation and expectations for success using an objective structured clinical examination, a written examination, and a preclinical preparation test in Kerman dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Mahsa; Zadeh, Nazila Lashkari; Agahi, Raha Habib; Navabi, Nader; Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Nassab, Amir Hossein Gandjalikhan

    2017-01-01

    Examinations have an important role in evaluating students' learning outcomes and their mastery of a subject. Passing or failing an examination can have far-reaching consequences for the students. Therefore, it is not surprising that international studies consistently show that dental students report examinations and grades among the highest ranking stressors in dental schools. The aim of this research was to measure the levels of anxiety, self-perception of preparation and expectations for success using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), a written examination and a preclinical preparation test, and to examine the effects of the three predictive variables on the outcomes of assessments. The present research is a cross-sectional study. The population under consideration was students of Kerman Dental School in 2013. Examination anxiety was measured with Spielberger's state anxiety inventory. Preparation for the assessment (I am fully prepared = 4, I am prepared = 3, I'm not prepared = 2, I'm not fully prepared = 1) and expectation to succeed (I am quite successful = 4, I am successful = 3, I'm not successful = 2, I'm not quite successful = 1) were quantified with Likert scale. The questionnaire was completed during an OSCE, a written examination, a preclinical crown and bridge preparation test and a nonexamination situation. The study population consisted of 138 4(th), 5(th), and 6(th) year Kerman dental students (65 males and 73 females). The results showed that all the assessment methods induced a significant increase in state anxiety compared to baseline levels with the highest anxiety levels reported during an OSCE (62.4 ± 8.1, P = 0.04) and a written examination (48.8 ± 9.2, P = 0.04). The preparation levels in females were significantly higher than those in males in OSCE (P = 0.03) and written (P = 0.04). State anxiety was high in all the three assessment methods. OSCE induced more anxiety than other assessment formats. However, anxiety was

  4. PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF A NEW TEACHER CONTENT, AN IMPORTANT PREREQUISITE FOR THE SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TASK OF TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvezdan Arsić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Success in any type of activity depends on thorough preparation. Processing of new teaching facilities, or the acquisition of new knowledge in the whole course of the educational process is one of the most important prerequisites for success in the implementation of the tasks of teaching. When it comes to this problem, the analysis of available pedagogical-psychological and didactic and methodical literature, indicates that it mainly talks about the preparation of teachers, which is certainly needed. However, the implementation of teaching together and actively participating teachers and students , and the modern conception of school based on the students' activities. The above observations lead us to the conclusion that preparing students for teaching is equally important as the preparation of teachers, although it is somewhat more specific, given their status in the classroom.

  5. Mathematics for secondary education project (Matem-UNA: perception of students about of the courses received and the profesional careers they selected for higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucía Alfaro Arce

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the opinions of students who have enrolled in the Precalculus course offered by the MATEM project. The aim is to systematize the views expressed by the students enrolled in MATEM, which are related to general aspects of the project, and also to know the professional areas these students select when entering to the university. The information for this study was collected through two questionnaires administered to the participating students during 2005-2009. The most relevant results are the following: the students listed benefits from MATEM such as the opportunity to practice for their Mathematics test (Ministry of Education exam, obtaining new knowledge and developing mathematical and reasoning skills. Most students would recommend others to participate in the project. Regarding the careers that students pursue, it was found a preference for higher studies in public universities at Costa Rica; these majors include mathematics courses in their curriculum (Engineering, Economics, Statistics, Medicine, among others.

  6. Web-Based Resources to Help Students and Faculty Prepare to use Information Technology in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    Teaching in the field is undergoing a revolution as new information technologies are being used to support a wide range of instructional activities in geology, oceanography, ecology, and related disciplines. In particular, the use of ruggedized laptop and palmtop computers with integrated GPS, GIS, data management, imaging and note-taking software presents a fundamentally new way to map and collect other data in the field. By bringing information technologies into the field, it is now possible to integrate many types of data such as digital elevation maps, air photo and satellite imagery, a variety of geophysical and geochemical databases (e.g. chemical anomaly maps, aeromagnetics, gravity). This allows students to engage much deeper levels of decision-making, problem-solving, and critical-thinking while still in the field setting. This technology also allows instructors to more closely monitor the progress of student projects in the field, and to assess the process as well as the products of student field work. For professional geologists, data acquisition and interpretation using digital technology in the field will rapidly become the industry standard, and now is the time to begin to prepare students to regularly use these new capabilities. To address the new possibilities of teaching with information technology in the field, a workshop was convened in February 2007 at Montana State University to aggregate and disseminate the practical advice and experience of geoscience instructors already using this technology. The outcome of this workshop is a website that contains advice on "best practices" in using these information technologies in field instruction including sections on: definition of learning goals, thinking skills and problem solving strategies, student and faculty preparation, selecting hardware and software, data resources, logistical consideration, GPS and learning, taking e-notes, mobile collaborations, and examples of field exercises. This website

  7. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as measured by exam scores, when the course is converted to a more active flipped format. The context is a physical chemistry course catering to life science majors in which approximately half of the lecture material is placed online and in-class problem-solving activities are increased, while total class time is reduced. We find that exam performance significantly improves by nearly 12% in the flipped-format course, due in part to students interacting with course material in a more timely and accurate manner. We also find that the positive effects of the flipped class are most pronounced for students with lower grade point averages and for female students.

  8. The Hartnell Astronomy Short Course: Bolstering the Scientific Research Preparation of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metevier, A. J.; Joggerst, C. C.; Moth, P.; Lotz, J.; Pollack, L.; Noeske, K.; Lopez, L.; Laver, C.; Rubin, K.; Ammons, M.; Laird, E.; Newton, A.

    2010-12-01

    Community college students who express an interest in science and engineering have excellent learning opportunities in the classroom, but rarely have access to forefront research experiences. To address this need, we developed the Hartnell Astronomy Short Course to provide Hartnell community college students with an authentic research experience on their home campus. Hartnell is a federally designated Hispanic Serving Institution, and thus draws a population of students that are underrepresented in the sciences. The one-week, intensive short course centered on an innovative inquiry activity in which student investigators used telescope images and spectra to study their own questions about fundamental galaxy properties, the differences between "normal" and "active" galaxies, and evidence for dark matter, with guidance from instructor-advisors. We supported the inquiry activity with lectures and laboratory activities on light and spectra, cosmology, and extragalactic topics, as well as community-building and career-oriented activities. Over the four years in which the short course was taught (2004 - 2007), over 60 students were served.

  9. Preparing School Counseling Students to Aid Families: Integrating a Family Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paylo, Matthew John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the value of integrating family systems theory into a school counseling curriculum is explored. Some programs have historically placed school counselors in a difficult position by not adequately preparing them for the demands of incorporating family systems and community collaboration into clinical practice. The rationale for…

  10. Preparing Special Education Teachers to Use Educational Technology to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Teresa; Georgina, David

    2014-01-01

    New standards require teachers to integrate the use of technology in their teaching and preparing teachers at the preservice level to integrate technology into the classroom is key. The way in which this is accomplished varies across institutions though often a technology tools course stands as an individual course with the hope professors are…

  11. The Implementation of an Intercultural Competence Syllabus to Prepare Study-Abroad Students for Global Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kural, Faruk; Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the outcome of the implementation of a process-oriented model of an intercultural competence (IC) and English as a lingua franca (ELF)-awareness development syllabus to prepare government-sponsored Turkish international sojourners for global communication in English L1 countries. Based on social constructivist research…

  12. Preparing student teachers to integrate ICT in classroom practice: a synthesis of qualitative evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tondeur, J.; van Braak, J.; Guoyuan, S.; Voogt, Joke; Fisser, Petra; Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study reviewed qualitative studies that focused on strategies to prepare pre-service teachers to integrate technology into their lessons. A meta-ethnography approach was utilized to locate, critically appraise, and synthesize the results of these studies. Based on an extensive search in the Web

  13. Experience, Knowledge and Attitudes: Are Paramedic Students Prepared to Care for Older Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Linda; Jennings, Paul; Williams, Brett

    2016-01-01

    As the population ages, so does the number of older patients encountered by paramedics. It is vital that paramedics are adequately prepared to meet the unique and growing needs of these patients. Experience and education play key roles in the formation of attitudes that impact behavior, and ultimately patient care. The aim of this study was to…

  14. The Implementation of an Intercultural Competence Syllabus to Prepare Study-Abroad Students for Global Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kural, Faruk; Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the outcome of the implementation of a process-oriented model of an intercultural competence (IC) and English as a lingua franca (ELF)-awareness development syllabus to prepare government-sponsored Turkish international sojourners for global communication in English L1 countries. Based on social constructivist research…

  15. Emotional maladjustment and suicide risk among high school students during the period of preparation for final exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letfullina Kh.R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the present stage of studying the effect of final exam (USE to the psycho-emotional state of high school students. The article presents the results of study structural and dynamic characteristics of emotional maladjustment and suicide risk among high school students during the period of preparation for final exam. The sample consisted of 27 boys and 33 girls aged 16-18 years studying in state budgetary educational institution city of Moscow "School №293 named after A. T. Tvardovskii". Status of the emotional sphere of the subjects and the level of suicide risk were assessed using Teilor's Manifest Anxiety Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Questionnaire suicide risk. The obtained data were subjected to mathematical and statistical analysis (T-test Wilcoxon, the rank correlation coefficient of Spearman. The research allowed to identify four specific psychological stages of preparation for final exam, described the dynamics of indicators of emotional maladjustment and suicidal risk at each stage.

  16. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  17. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  18. Text Linguistics in Research Papers Prepared by University Students: Teaching through Lesson Plans and Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Albarrán-Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research project revolves around the properties of text linguistics under a qualitative approach.  The author analyzed drafts of a research paper by two university students as well as lesson plans and textbooks of high school Spanish Language and Literature courses and lesson plans of courses from the Licentiate degree in Education.  According to the information from the drafts, students struggle with coherence and cohesion in writing; however, they succeed in choosing the correct language for the type of writing.  Difficulties are most likely due to fact that this topic is not included in secondary education plans and is not commonly addressed in textbooks or university classes.  In conclusion, teachers should include the properties of text linguistics in their lesson plans in order to help students overcome these difficulties.

  19. An Inquiry "Warm-Up" Activity: Preparing Students for an Active Classroom Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active learning community that engages in inquiry activities will employ strategies and structures that students from traditional classrooms may find unfamiliar or uncomfortable. These include group work, voicing questions, shifting from one part of an activity to another (and sometimes shifting groups at the same time), presenting informally to the group, and many others. In addition, the role of the instructor as facilitator rather than teacher may not be familiar to students. As inquiry activities become incorporated into the regular classroom curriculum at Maui Community College (through collaboration with the Professional Development Program as part of the Akamai Workforce Initiative), a need emerged to give students a "warm-up" early in the semester to help them practice these participation structures. This activity was designed to be used on the very first day of class, to be easy and accessible to students, and to give them practice with these features of inquiry activities that they would see again throughout the semester. In addition, the activity introduces the engineering technology concepts of requirements, trade-offs, and limitations. It is important to note that this activity is not in and of itself an inquiry activity; in fact the content and processes featured in the activity are not particularly challenging nor are they the main focus. Instead, this is a "warm-up" for inquiry, so that students gain some comfort with the unconventional features of inquiry activities. The particular activity presented is for 20-30 students in a ˜90 minute lab period, and highlights different imaging technologies of cameras; however, it is easily adaptable to other requirements, to different technology, or other needs.

  20. Using Technology to Prepare Students for the Challenges of Global Citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Sadri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world, everyone must recognize that it is nearly impossible to separate many domestic and international problems and managing international challenges will take the efforts of all nations. As a result, each and every person must think like a global citizen and practice mindfulness in daily life. Using the complex interdependence model as a basis for examining citizen diplomacy, this paper suggests ways that new media can be used to introduce students to a global perspective on the world. Further, it provides faculty members with a set of guidelines for structuring projects that task students with the challenge of taking positive action to effect political and societal change.

  1. A Course Exploration: Guiding Instruction to Prepare Students as Change Agents in Educational Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L. Church, EdD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the premise of teacher identity development through course experiences directed at inquiry and social awareness. The course exploration examines the use of various strategies used to help promote educators as change agents. Pre-service students enrolled in a one-year master’s program with teaching credential participated in a yearlong course designed to engage them in guided inquiry while making connections between theory and practice. Evaluation of the projects and student perceptions of their work suggest that guided inquiry into educational issues builds critical thinking skills and a sense of purpose, leadership, and service through shaping teacher identity.

  2. Application of NX Siemens PLM software in educational process in preparing students of engineering branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadchikova, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the results of the introduction of computer-aided design NX by Siemens Plm Software to the classes of a higher education institution. The necessity of application of modern information technologies in teaching students of engineering profile and selection of a software product is substantiated. The author describes stages of the software module study in relation to some specific courses, considers the features of NX software, which require the creation of standard and unified product databases. The article also gives examples of research carried out by the students with the various software modules.

  3. Continuity of practices in the preparation of the students in the specialty «Geoecology»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Галай

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuity of different internships at Belarussian State University, Geographical department, Geoecological specialisation is observed in the article. The students do field training (topographical, meteorological, geomorphological, hydrological, etc. during the 1st and 2nd years at the geographical station «Zapadnaya Berezina» in Volozhinsk district, Minsk region. They examine not only separate natural constituents, but also natural complexes. During the landscape-ecological field training the students estimate human impact and relative stability of the landscape on the natural boundary. Environmental technologic training is various: students master and independently apply the techniques of complex geoecological research of local natural economic geosystems, study geoecological basis of technological processes of manufacturing, determine important ecological aspects of enterprise activities. Pollutant emission into the open air is one of the most important ecological aspects. Students take into account a danger factor of an enterprise, examine emission sources and analyze their temporary variations. When students analyze sewage, they pay attention to substance release, its physicochemical composition and sewage works. Students also deal with different kinds of waste products and their volume, their recycling. Air, water, waste, etc. statistic report forms are given to the students for defining the impact of enterprises on the environment. The importance of school practice is underlined in the article. Moreover, the graduates of the department work at schools, lyceums, colleges, universities. Externship is also discussed in the article as it is aimed at creation of professional competence. The students do an internship in the committees and inspections of the Ministry of natural resources and environment protection, national parks and wildlife reserves, scientific research laboratories of «Landscape ecology»,

  4. Evaluating the impact of a pre-rotation workshop on student preparation for clinical advanced pharmacy practice experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina MS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This pilot study was designed to evaluate the impact of a pre-rotation workshop (PRW on pharmacy students’ clinical skills and preparation for clinical Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE involving direct patient care. Methods: Randomized controlled trial of an educational intervention with Institutional Review Board approval. PRW activities designed to simulate rotation activities around five competencies, patient charts, medication histories, SOAP notes, patient presentations, and professionalism. Endpoints were evaluated using clinical rotation preceptors’ evaluation of performance and students’ performance on objective structured clinical exams (OSCE.Results: Eight fourth-year students and eight GPA matched controls (20% of the total class were selected to voluntarily participate. The PRW demonstrated a positive impact on students’ clinical skills and preparation for rotations by improving OSCE performance. However, no significant differences were found between groups when comparing preceptor evaluations of skills on rotations. These results are limited by the small sample size, potential OSCE “test-wiseness” effects, lack of OSCE evaluator blinding to study groups, potential case specificity effects due to the limited number of cases used on the OSCE and possible lack of sensitivity of the rotation evaluation tool to capture true differences among the experimental and control group participants.Conclusion: The PRW was successful at advancing students’ clinical skills and preparation for rotations and may be considered as a tool to help bridge didactic to clinical experiences in the Pharm.D. curriculum.

  5. Connecting Learners: The Role of Biotechnology Programme in Preparing Students for the Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saruan, Nadiah; Sagran, Avinash; Fadzil, Kamal Solhaimi; Razali, Zuliana; Ow Phui San, Rebecca; Somasundram, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth of biotechnology requires a wide range of expertise within the industry. Education is the primary platform for students to gain information and knowledge on biotechnology. In Malaysia where biotechnology is relatively new, education programs and courses must be tailored to meet the demands of the industry. A combination of…

  6. Connecting Learners: The Role of Biotechnology Programme in Preparing Students for the Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saruan, Nadiah; Sagran, Avinash; Fadzil, Kamal Solhaimi; Razali, Zuliana; Ow Phui San, Rebecca; Somasundram, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth of biotechnology requires a wide range of expertise within the industry. Education is the primary platform for students to gain information and knowledge on biotechnology. In Malaysia where biotechnology is relatively new, education programs and courses must be tailored to meet the demands of the industry. A combination of…

  7. Preparing University Students to Lead K-12 Engineering Outreach Programmes: A Design Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Anika B.; Greene, Howard; Post, Paul E.; Parkhurst, Andrew; Zhan, Xi

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an engineering outreach programme designed to increase the interest of under-represented youth in engineering and to disseminate pre-engineering design challenge materials to K-12 educators and volunteers. Given university students' critical role as facilitators of the outreach programme, researchers conducted a two-year…

  8. Students' Conceptual Structure, Search Process, and Outcome while Preparing a Research Proposal: A Longitudinal Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennanen, Mikko; Vakkari, Pertti

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on analyzing undergraduate students' information needs in terms of conceptual understanding of the topic they propose to study and its consequences for the search process and outcome. Highlights include the ASK (anomalous states of knowledge) hypothesis; subject knowledge and searching; Kuhlthau's model; conceptual structure; knowledge…

  9. The Preparation of Pre-Service Student Teachers' Competence to Work in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sylvia Y. F.; Cheng, May M. H.; Wong, Angel K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Competence to work in schools is an important dimension of professional competence, although it is often a neglected dimension of teacher development. This article reports a qualitative study that examined student teachers' learning experiences in initial teacher education (ITE) in relation to competence to work in schools. In-depth interviews…

  10. Research Linking Teacher Preparation and Student Performance: Teacher Education Yearbook XII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith M., Ed.; Dangel, Julie Rainer, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The case studies, research, and projects presented here strike at the very heart of effective teaching. The specific practices to improve student performance will spark classroom discussion and improve teacher practice. After a foreword by Frances van Tassell and an introduction by Edith M. Guyton and Julie Rainer Dangel, this book is divided into…

  11. Engineering, Support, and Management Services: Construction Industry Series: Preparation Level: Student Manual and Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The guide is an outline of training experiences designed to lead a student to at least entry-level proficiency in engineering, support, and management service jobs within the construction industry. Teaching units cover construction drafting, architectural drawing, engineering drafting, estimating, expediting and scheduling, surveying, testing and…

  12. Re-Viewing Student Teamwork: Preparation for the "Real World" or Bundles of Situated Social Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Christopher; Moerman, Lee; Gibbons, Belinda; Dean, Bonnie Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Research in Australian business education continues to emphasise the importance of students learning teamwork as an integral part of the undergraduate curriculum. However, entrenched conceptual and practical confusion as to what the term "teamwork" means and how it ought to be enacted remains a vexed issue capable of distorting and…

  13. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  14. Tomorrow Belongs to Those Who Prepare for It Today: Gerontology Doctoral Students Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Carr, Dawn C.; Reynolds, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    This research seeks to examine the characteristics and goals of students enrolled in gerontology doctoral education. The authors seek to identify the unique characteristics of scholars enrolled in the interdisciplinary study of aging and elicit discussion on the ways in which these scholars will contribute to the growth and development of the…

  15. Education Catching up with Science: Preparing Students for Three-Dimensional Literacy in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, IJsbrand M.; Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Delouche, Pamina; Bidabe, Marissa; Schneeberger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The large number of experimentally determined molecular structures has led to the development of a new semiotic system in the life sciences, with increasing use of accurate molecular representations. To determine how this change impacts students' learning, we incorporated image tests into our introductory cell biology course. Groups of students…

  16. The Impact of the Principles of Accounting Experience on Student Preparation for Intermediate Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Linda G.

    2012-01-01

    Both students and instructors alike will generally agree that intermediate accounting courses are among the most difficult and demanding in an accounting or finance curriculum, and perhaps even on the college campus. Intermediate accounting contains subject matter which requires a higher level of thinking and a greater ability to process prior…

  17. Contributing Factors to Student Success in Anatomy and Physiology: Lower outside Workload and Better Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David E.; Hannum, Lynn; Gupta, Sat

    2004-01-01

    A study of students of a traditional two-semester Anatomy and Physiology class was made to determine factors that contributed to success in the coursework. The test established a co-relation between the amount of study in mathematics and science done previously in school and final grades in the subject.

  18. Should Mobile Learning Be Compulsory for Preparing Students for Learning in the Workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Richard; Joynes, Viktoria

    2015-01-01

    From the contexts of current social, educational and health policy, there appears to be an increasingly inevitable "mobilisation" of resources in medicine and health as the use mobile technology devices and applications becomes widespread and culturally "normed" in workplaces. Over the past 8 years, students from the University…

  19. Voluntourism and global health: preparing dental students for responsible engagement in international programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Benzian, Habib; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2013-10-01

    Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) estimates that nearly 25 percent of its predoctoral dental students have expressed an interest in global health, including traveling abroad to conduct research or to volunteer in a project. This article addresses the important differences between "voluntourism" (combined volunteering and tourism) and responsible engagement in global health, reports on a pilot workshop at HSDM to promote responsible volunteering, and provides a recommendation on how to address these issues in the context of a dental curriculum. The pilot Workshop for Ethical Volunteering in Global Health was designed as a discussion-based, interactive program that included lectures, small-group activities, and personal reflection. The aim of the workshop was to provide students with a systematic approach to ethical volunteering, critically reflecting on their motivation and attitudes related to conventional models of volunteering and facilitating alignment with principles of global health. Students participated in an anonymous written survey at the start and the close of the workshop. After the workshop, survey results demonstrated a significant increase in understanding the value of applying principles of global health when volunteering in order to avoid negative and unintended impacts on communities. All of the students reported that the workshop influenced the way they view volunteering in dentistry.

  20. Keeping It Real: A Toledo Public School Prepares Students for College and Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In this article, author Jennifer Dubin offers a look into the innovations taking place in the Toledo Technology Academy (TTA), a career-tech school within the public school system in Toledo, Ohio. TTA teaches students in grades 7 through 12 using a science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum, in addition to the traditional…

  1. Tomorrow Belongs to Those Who Prepare for It Today: Gerontology Doctoral Students Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Carr, Dawn C.; Reynolds, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    This research seeks to examine the characteristics and goals of students enrolled in gerontology doctoral education. The authors seek to identify the unique characteristics of scholars enrolled in the interdisciplinary study of aging and elicit discussion on the ways in which these scholars will contribute to the growth and development of the…

  2. "Teaching Experience Preferred?" Preparing Graduate Students for Teaching Opportunities beyond North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Suzanne Le-May

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, graduate students applying for academic positions in post-secondary education have increasingly been asked to include a statement of teaching interests, a teaching philosophy, or a teaching dossier with their applications. Even if a potential employer does not request any of these documents, many interviewees are expected…

  3. Enrollment Management with Academic Portfolio Strategies: Preparing for Environment-Induced Changes in Student Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A marketing model of enrollment management focusing on relationships between changes in the macroenvironment, target market student preferences, college marketing mix, and enrollment is presented. Application of the model illustrates how institutions can offset, enhance, or neutralize potential enrollment effects of job market changes through…

  4. Using Multimedia Modules to Better Prepare Students for Introductory Physics Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongzhou; Stelzer, Timothy; Gladding, Gary

    2010-01-01

    It is known that introductory physics students rarely, if ever, read the textbook prior to coming to lecture. In this study, we report results from a curriculum intervention in a large enrollment introductory physics class that addresses this problem. In particular, we introduced web-based multimedia learning modules (MLMs) as a "prelecture…

  5. Math Readiness and Preparation for Competitive College Majors and Careers: The Case of Black Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail E.

    This study examines factors that determine the enrollment of black students in the high school math courses (i.e., advanced algebra, trigonometry, calculus) that are necessary for competitive college and major field access. The data are from a local college survey of juniors and seniors who were enrolled in eight (8) local public and private…

  6. A Course Exploration: Guiding Instruction to Prepare Students as Change Agents in Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Kathy L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the premise of teacher identity development through course experiences directed at inquiry and social awareness. The course exploration examines the use of various strategies used to help promote educators as change agents. Pre-service students enrolled in a one-year master's program with teaching credential participated in a…

  7. Information Literacy for Social Workers: University at Albany Libraries Prepare MSW Students for Research and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Brustman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In a series of workshops, University at Albany librarians collaborate with the School of Social Welfare to impart information literacy skills to Master in Social Work students. The rationale, curriculum, and embedded ACRL information literacy standards are discussed. Also presented are assessments and a discussion of the challenges of implementation.

  8. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  9. A 5E Nature of Science Introduction: Preparing Students to Learn about Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilica, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Teachers often struggle with controversy when teaching biological evolution in American schools. Research indicates that curriculum with a nature of science (NOS) focus quells controversy (McComas 2004; Scharmann 2005; Staver 2003). This article presents a 5E NOS series that is a first step in a NOS curriculum that situates student understanding…

  10. Re-Viewing Student Teamwork: Preparation for the "Real World" or Bundles of Situated Social Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Christopher; Moerman, Lee; Gibbons, Belinda; Dean, Bonnie Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Research in Australian business education continues to emphasise the importance of students learning teamwork as an integral part of the undergraduate curriculum. However, entrenched conceptual and practical confusion as to what the term "teamwork" means and how it ought to be enacted remains a vexed issue capable of distorting and…

  11. A 5E Nature of Science Introduction: Preparing Students to Learn about Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilica, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Teachers often struggle with controversy when teaching biological evolution in American schools. Research indicates that curriculum with a nature of science (NOS) focus quells controversy (McComas 2004; Scharmann 2005; Staver 2003). This article presents a 5E NOS series that is a first step in a NOS curriculum that situates student understanding…

  12. Educating for Citizenship: A System Wide Responsibility for Preparing Students to Become Wise Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Civic engagement has been on the decline for 50 years, and even with the recent increase in voting in the primary presidential elections, youth participation in society remains low. Those students who do not complete high school have virtually no involvement in civic, political and community affairs. Such realities suggest a marked failure--within…

  13. Preparation and participation of undergraduate students to inform culturally sensitive research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jo Nell; Cagle, Carolyn Spence

    2009-07-01

    Most student work as research assistants occurs at the graduate level of nursing education, and little is known about the role of undergraduate students as research assistants (RAs) in major research projects. Based on our desire to study Mexican American (MA) cancer caregivers, we needed bilingual and bicultural RAs to serve as data collectors with women who spoke Spanish and possessed cultural beliefs that influenced their caregiving. Following successful recruitment, orientation, and mentoring based on Bandura's social learning theory [Bandura, A., 2001. Social learning theory: an agentic perspective. Annual Review of Psychology 52, 1-26] and accepted teaching-learning principles, RAs engaged in various behaviors that facilitated study outcomes. Faculty researchers, RAs, and study participants benefitted greatly from the undergraduate student involvement in this project. This article describes successful student inclusion approaches, ongoing faculty-RA interactions, and lessons learned from the research team experience. Guidelines discussed support the potential for making the undergraduate RA role a useful and unique learning experience.

  14. Preparing High School Students for the Interdisciplinary Nature of Modern Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Fostering interdisciplinary learning in biology will require significant changes in the way one teaches science to K-12 students. The perspective on interdisciplinary biology teaching and learning in this essay is based on the author's experiences as a former research cell biologist, high school science teacher, and developer of secondary science…

  15. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  16. Complicity with the Neocolonial Project in Education: A Deconstruction of Student Affairs Preparation Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Student affairs scholars have yet to explore neocolonialism. Scholars within the field rely on the foundational documents of the profession to guide policy and practice, without interrogating the widespread history of the colonial project. However, neocolonialism involves forces of domination and control through social, political, economic, and…

  17. Education Catching up with Science: Preparing Students for Three-Dimensional Literacy in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, IJsbrand M.; Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Delouche, Pamina; Bidabe, Marissa; Schneeberger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The large number of experimentally determined molecular structures has led to the development of a new semiotic system in the life sciences, with increasing use of accurate molecular representations. To determine how this change impacts students' learning, we incorporated image tests into our introductory cell biology course. Groups of students…

  18. Assistive Technology for Students with Visual Impairments: Challenges and Needs in Teachers' Preparation Programs and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Parker, Amy T.; Smith, Derrick W.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of 165 teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas to examine their perceptions of their knowledge of assistive technology. The results showed that they had significant deficits in knowledge in 55 (74.32%) of the 74 assistive technology competencies that were examined and that 57.5% of them lacked…

  19. Preparing Students for Education, Work, and Community: Activity Theory in Task-Based Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chris; MacPherson, Seonaigh; Sawkins, Tanis

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes how sociocultural and activity theory were applied in the design of a publicly funded, Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)-based English as a Second Language (ESL) credential program and curriculum for immigrant and international students in postsecondary institutions in British Columbia, Canada. The ESL Pathways Project…

  20. How to Prepare Secondary School Students for a College-Level Class in Diplomatic History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Peter P.

    1990-01-01

    Before tackling college level courses in U.S. diplomatic history, students shoud be well-grounded in facts about American isolationism, expansionism, the Monroe Doctrine, major wars, relations with the major powers, the Open Door policy, the Cold War, and Vietnam--all national security manifestations. Open-minded instruction is essential. (MLH)

  1. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  2. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  3. Research Linking Teacher Preparation and Student Performance: Teacher Education Yearbook XII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith M., Ed.; Dangel, Julie Rainer, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The case studies, research, and projects presented here strike at the very heart of effective teaching. The specific practices to improve student performance will spark classroom discussion and improve teacher practice. After a foreword by Frances van Tassell and an introduction by Edith M. Guyton and Julie Rainer Dangel, this book is divided into…

  4. Complicity with the Neocolonial Project in Education: A Deconstruction of Student Affairs Preparation Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Student affairs scholars have yet to explore neocolonialism. Scholars within the field rely on the foundational documents of the profession to guide policy and practice, without interrogating the widespread history of the colonial project. However, neocolonialism involves forces of domination and control through social, political, economic, and…

  5. Using Classroom Competitions to Prepare Students for the Competitive Business World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Fay Y.; Kincade, Doris H.; Frasier, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how a university, collaborating with industry, integrated research with active learning (e.g., collaboration in teams and competitions) for fashion majors. The redesigned introductory course uses two strategies: team competitions and a genius bar to guide students, give ongoing feedback, and judge final competitions. Active…

  6. Intervention for High School Latino Students in Preparing for College: Steps for Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eric; Rhodes, Kent; Aguirre, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Several factors contribute to a disproportionately lower Latino participation in college education. Foremost among those factors are policies that encourage quick job placement over career development, lack of understanding of the benefits of a college degree, lower expectations for Latino students, poor financial planning, and lack of guidance. A…

  7. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  8. Enrollment Management with Academic Portfolio Strategies: Preparing for Environment-Induced Changes in Student Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A marketing model of enrollment management focusing on relationships between changes in the macroenvironment, target market student preferences, college marketing mix, and enrollment is presented. Application of the model illustrates how institutions can offset, enhance, or neutralize potential enrollment effects of job market changes through…

  9. Parallel Courses: Preparing Native and Non-Native Students for Freshman Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Frederick K.; Moser, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Describes a method of teaching basic writing to native and nonnative students that emphasizes a regression to the most basic elements of writing. Considers what writing content, rhetorical techniques, grammar exercises, and proofreading methods are most effective for the two groups. (TB)

  10. Preparing Your Students for Careers in Science and Engineering: How Is Your State Doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Cottle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    With one glance at the starting salaries of new bachelor's degree recipients in Fig. 1, a teacher or parent can see the career fields to which their high school students interested in the best economic opportunities might aspire: several engineering fields (chemical, electrical, mechanical), computer science, physics, and mathematics.

  11. The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh: Preparing Students for Transition to Professional Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh gives graduate students the opportunity to serve as management consultants to nonprofit organizations. This article describes the learning objectives, logistics, and outcomes of the Nonprofit Clinic. Bloom's 1956 taxonomy of learning objectives is employed to assess learning outcomes.

  12. Out-of-school science-teaching preparation for elementary teacher-education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Maura Lobos

    This quasi-longitudinal ethnographic research examined the elementary teacher-education science teaching training at two out-of-school science sites (a science museum and nature center). Elementary teacher-education students who were required to teach about 30 hours of science reported learning hands-on teaching methods, presentation skills, classroom management and confidence to teach science from having taught at an out-of-school science institution. To a smaller degree, teacher-education students experienced an increase in scientific knowledge. Practicing teachers who once had science teaching training at the out-of-school sites claim the experience had a direct influence on their current science teaching practices. A majority of the practicing teachers in the study incorporated what they learned from the out-of-school teaching into their current teaching. A science attitude survey revealed significantly higher science attitudes from having had the out-of-school science teaching experience compared to those that did not. The significant growth found in science efficacy could not be attributed to the out-of-school science teaching experience. Teacher-education students enrolled in science methods courses who had an out-of-school science teaching experience and those who did not both experienced significant science efficacy growth. Elementary teacher-education students who had science majors or minors had significantly higher science attitudes and science efficacy as compared to those without science backgrounds. Collaborations between teacher-education programs and out-of-school settings and other science institutions promoting literacy in science should be encouraged and studied. Suggestions for restructuring the ways in which science and science methods are taught to elementary teacher-education students and other suggestions for improving science teaching are discussed.

  13. Practically prepared? Pre-intern student views following an education package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Susan; Mellis, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Graduating medical students enter their internship with varied levels of practical experience in procedural skills. To address this problem, many medical schools have introduced intensive skill training courses immediately prior to graduation. This study examines the impact of a pre-intern (PrInt) education package, consisting of a short intensive course, followed by a one-month clinical attachment. In September 2014, all PrInt students (n = 53) at the Central Clinical School (Sydney, NSW, Australia) attended three days of intensive training. This included a didactic introduction, case-based scenarios, and interactive workshops. This was followed by four weeks of targeted, experiential learning during a clinical attachment (PrInt term). Immediately prior to training and following PrInt, all students were invited to complete a six-domain questionnaire containing 40 subscale closed questions to assess their knowledge, experience, and confidence in key practical skills essential for a successful internship. A total of 41/53 (77%) students completed an identical questionnaire prior to PrInt, and 37/53 (70%) immediately following PrInt. Respondents reported statistically significant increases in their experience, ability, knowledge, and confidence in a number of domains. The key changes were the following: knowledge of pharmacy skills (mean improvement = 26.48, confidence interval 95% [CI 95%] = 17.29-35.66, p ≤ 0.0001) and management of procedural skills (mean = 24.46, CI 95% = 16.58-32.34, p ≤ 0.0001). Despite the positive overall increase in most domains, some subscale results remained low following the educational package; only 44% students had inserted a nasogastric tube; only 44% reported confidence in commencing patients on warfarin; and only 42% in managing a hospital emergency. Surprisingly, there was a slight decline both in confidence in communicating with members of the hospital team (10%) and in awareness of the causes of hypoglycemia (7%). Final year

  14. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  15. Preparing to prescribe: How do clerkship students learn in the midst of complexity?

    OpenAIRE

    McLellan, Lucy; Yardley, Sarah; Norris, Ben; De Bruin, Anique; Tully, Mary P; Dornan, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing tasks, which involve pharmacological knowledge, clinical decision-making and practical skill, take place within unpredictable social environments and involve interactions within and between endlessly changing health care teams. Despite this, curriculum designers commonly assume them to be simple to learn and perform. This research used mixed methods to explore how undergraduate medical students learn to prescribe in the 'real world'. It was informed by cognitive psychology, socioc...

  16. Librarian involvement in a nutrition undergraduate research course: preparing nutrition students for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan C; Penumetcha, Meera

    2010-01-01

    Given the foundational importance of literature searching skills to later stages of research and, ultimately, evidence-based practice, the authors wanted to assess a unique strategy for teaching such skills. This pilot study describes the results of an undergraduate nutrition research course in which a librarian lead several class sessions. The goal of this study was to assess students' perceptions, attitudes and use of research literature and resources before and after a course partially taught by a librarian. Twenty-seven students enrolled in an undergraduate Introduction to Research course at Georgia State University were given pre- and post-test questionnaires at the beginning and end of a course that included three librarian-led class sessions. Most of the results indicate that the repeated involvement of a librarian enriched this particular undergraduate research course. By the end of the course, students were more comfortable in libraries and with using library resources; they used the campus library more frequently; they were more confident in their ability to find high-quality information on nutrition-related topics and identify strengths and weaknesses of different information sources; and they felt they gained skills that will help them achieve their educational and career goals.

  17. Overcoming the Critical Shortage of STEM - Prepared Secondary Students Through Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas; Berry, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    In developing understanding of technological systems - modeling and simulation tools aid significantly in the learning and visualization processes. In design courses we sketch , extrude, shape, refine and animate with virtual tools in 3D. Final designs are built using a 3D printer. Aspiring architects create spaces with realistic materials and lighting schemes rendered on model surfaces to create breathtaking walk-throughs of virtual spaces. Digital Electronics students design systems that address real-world needs. Designs are simulated in virtual circuits to provide proof of concept before physical construction. This vastly increases students' ability to design and build complex systems. We find students using modeling and simulation in the learning process, assimilate information at a much faster pace and engage more deeply in learning. As Pre-Engineering educators within the Career and Technical Education program at our school division's Technology Academy our task is to help learners in their quest to develop deep understanding of complex technological systems in a variety of engineering disciplines. Today's young learners have vast opportunities to learn with tools that many of us only dreamed about a decade or so ago when we were engaged in engineering and other technical studies. Today's learner paints with a virtual brush - scenes that can aid significantly in the learning and visualization processes. Modeling and simulation systems have become the new standard tool set in the technical classroom [1-5]. Modeling and simulation systems are now applied as feedback loops in the learning environment. Much of the study of behavior change through the use of feedback loops can be attributed to Stanford Psychologist Alfred Bandura. "Drawing on several education experiments involving children, Bandura observed that giving individuals a clear goal and a means to evaluate their progress toward that goal greatly increased the likelihood that they would achieve it."

  18. Alberta's new health research paradigms: Are graduate students being prepared for interdisciplinary team research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Katherine; Riddell, Meghan; Weller, Carol; Coltan, Lavinia I; Benzies, Karen; Olson, David M

    2010-06-01

    Strategic prioritization of research agendas to address health problems with a large social and economic burden has increased the demand for interdisciplinary research. Universities have addressed the need for interdisciplinary research in their strategic documents. However, research training to equip graduates for careers in interdisciplinary research teams has not kept pace. We offer recommendations to graduate students, universities, health services organizations, and health research funders designed to increase the capacity for interdisciplinary research team training, and provide an example of an existing training program.

  19. Alaska's Secondary Science Teachers and Students Receive Earth Systems Science Knowledge, GIS Know How and University Technical Support for Pre- College Research Experiences: The EDGE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C. L.; Prakash, A.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska's secondary school teachers are increasingly required to provide Earth systems science (ESS) education that integrates student observations of local natural processes related to rapid climate change with geospatial datasets and satellite imagery using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. Such skills are also valued in various employment sectors of the state where job opportunities requiring Earth science and GIS training are increasing. University of Alaska's EDGE (Experiential Discoveries in Geoscience Education) program has provided training and classroom resources for 3 cohorts of inservice Alaska science and math teachers in GIS and Earth Systems Science (2005-2007). Summer workshops include geologic field experiences, GIS instruction, computer equipment and technical support for groups of Alaska high school (HS) and middle school (MS) science teachers each June and their students in August. Since 2005, EDGE has increased Alaska science and math teachers' Earth science content knowledge and developed their GIS and computer skills. In addition, EDGE has guided teachers using a follow-up, fall online course that provided more extensive ESS knowledge linked with classroom standards and provided course content that was directly transferable into their MS and HS science classrooms. EDGE teachers were mentored by University faculty and technical staff as they guided their own students through semester-scale, science fair style projects using geospatial data that was student- collected. EDGE program assessment indicates that all teachers have improved their ESS knowledge, GIS knowledge, and the use of technology in their classrooms. More than 230 middle school students have learned GIS, from EDGE teachers and 50 EDGE secondary students have conducted original research related to landscape change and its impacts on their own communities. Longer-term EDGE goals include improving student performance on the newly implemented (spring 2008) 10th grade

  20. Playing to our human strengths to prepare medical students for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We are living in an age where artificial intelligence and astounding technological advances are bringing truly remarkable change to healthcare. Medical knowledge and skills which form the core responsibility of doctors such as making diagnoses may increasingly be delivered by robots. Machines are gradually acquiring human abilities such as deep learning and empathy. What, then is the role of doctors in future healthcare? And what direction should medical schools be taking to prepare their graduates? This article will give an overview of the evolving technological landscape of healthcare and examine the issues undergraduate medical education may have to address. The experience at The University of Hong Kong will serve as a case study featuring several curricular innovations that aim to empower medical graduates with the capabilities to thrive in the future.

  1. Keeping Score: Direct Student Lending. An Evaluation Prepared for the Iowa College Student Aid Commission and the Iowa Student Loan Liquidity Corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, William

    This paper provides recommendations for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a demonstration program designed to assess direct lending as a replacement for the current federal student loan program. It offers a list of principles which the demonstration project should address. Recommendations include: (1) maintenance of student…

  2. Understanding the Leaking Pipeline: The Effects of Self-Efficacy and Student Choice on High School Mathematics Preparation and STEM Matriculation

    OpenAIRE

    Filer, Kimberly L

    2009-01-01

    This study examines social structural effects on student mathematics preparation and identification with a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) field, as well as the social psychological factors that may mediate those effects. Using demographic, academic, attitudinal, and school policy data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002) for over 14,000 students from a nationally representative sample, this research tests a model of mathematics course taking and...

  3. Preparing foundation-year students for medical studies in a problem-based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Massoud, Walid; Al-Banna, Nadia Ali

    2016-01-01

    - and post-test was high (2.38). Paired t-tests showed significant improvements (po.001) for each of the 4 factors. The four factors together explained 60.7% percent of variance in the data. Discussion: Students reported large improvements among learning skills required in a problem-based medical curriculum....... Cronbach's alpha was used to test for internal consistency and reliability of the collected data and Principal Component Exploratory Factor Analysis was performed. Paired t-test was used to examine differences between pre- and post-analysis data. Results: The internal consistency of the questionnaire...... was sufficient. Factor analysis identified four factors: 1) Ability to search for, share, and present information, 2) Ability to develop learning tools and express opinions, 3) Ability to use diverse learning sources, and 4) Ability to participate in discussion and reflect. Overall improvement between pre...

  4. Preparation of faculty members and students to be citizen leaders and pharmacy advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leigh Ann; Janke, Kristin K; Boyle, Cynthia J; Gianutsos, Gerald; Lindsey, Cameron C; Moczygemba, Leticia R; Whalen, Karen

    2013-12-16

    To identify characteristics and quality indicators of best practices for leadership and advocacy development in pharmacy education, a national task force on leadership development in pharmacy invited colleges and schools to complete a phone survey to characterize the courses, processes, and noteworthy practices for leadership and advocacy development at their institution. The literature was consulted to corroborate survey findings and identify additional best practices. Recommendations were derived from the survey results and literature review, as well as from the experience and expertise of task force members. Fifty-four institutions provided information about lecture-based and experiential curricular and noncurricular components of leadership and advocacy development. Successful programs have a supportive institutional culture, faculty and alumni role models, administrative and/or financial support, and a cocurricular thread of activities. Leadership and advocacy development for student pharmacists is increasingly important. The recommendations and suggestions provided can facilitate leadership and advocacy development at other colleges and schools of pharmacy.

  5. A transitional curriculum for preparing medical students for internship, does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a formative evaluation, we were supposed to find whether an innovative program has some merits to be continued or not. We also determined the critical points of the program. The evaluated program was a clinical pre-clerkship curriculum launched for departing to a less stressful medical clerkship. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the information contained in the students′ logbooks. Using Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure standardized questionnaire, we also assessed the students′ perception of learning environment within six clinical departments. Results: Totally, 64% of expected patient contacts, and teaching of more than 71% of required skills at 4 departments were carried out and students had more positive than negative perspective of their learning environments. Conclusion: The evaluand is a worthwhile program to be continued, though it needs some considerations for improvement.

  6. Evaluation of Veterinary Student Surgical Skills Preparation for Ovariohysterectomy Using Simulators: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emma K; Vallevand, Andrea; Farrell, Robin M

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of training intended to enhance students' performance on their first live-animal ovariohysterectomy (OVH). Cognitive task analysis informed a seven-page lab manual, 30-minute video, and 46-item OVH checklist (categorized into nine surgery components and three phases of surgery). We compared two spay simulator models (higher-fidelity silicone versus lower-fidelity cloth and foam). Third-year veterinary students were randomly assigned to a training intervention: lab manual and video only; lab manual, video, and $675 silicone-based model; lab manual, video, and $64 cloth and foam model. We then assessed transfer of training to a live-animal OVH. Chi-square analyses determined statistically significant differences between the interventions on four of nine surgery components, all three phases of surgery, and overall score. Odds ratio analyses indicated that training with a spay model improved the odds of attaining an excellent or good rating on 25 of 46 checklist items, six of nine surgery components, all three phases of surgery, and the overall score. Odds ratio analyses comparing the spay models indicated an advantage for the $675 silicon-based model on only 6 of 46 checklist items, three of nine surgery components, and one phase of surgery. Training with a spay model improved performance when compared to training with a manual and video only. Results suggested that training with a lower-fidelity/cost model might be as effective when compared to a higher-fidelity/cost model. Further research is required to investigate simulator fidelity and costs on transfer of training to the operational environment.

  7. Combining Multidisciplinary Science, Quantitative Reasoning and Social Context to Teach Global Sustainability and Prepare Students for 21st Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's seven billion humans are consuming a growing proportion of the world's ecosystem products and services. Human activity has also wrought changes that rival the scale of many natural geologic processes, e.g. erosion, transport and deposition, leading to recognition of a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Because of these impacts, several natural systems have been pushed beyond the planetary boundaries that made the Holocene favorable for the expansion of humanity. Given these human-induced stresses on natural systems, global citizens will face an increasing number of grand challenges. Unfortunately, traditional discipline-based introductory science courses do little to prepare students for these complex, scientifically-based and technologically-centered challenges. With NSF funding, an introductory, integrated science course stressing quantitative reasoning and social context has been created at UW. The course (GEOL1600: Global Sustainability: Managing the Earth's Resources) is a lower division course designed around the energy-water-climate (EWC) nexus and integrating biology, chemistry, Earth science and physics. It melds lectures, lecture activities, reading questionnaires and labs to create a learning environment that examines the EWT nexus from a global through regional context. The focus on the EWC nexus, while important socially and intended to motivate students, also provides a coherent framework for identifying which disciplinary scientific principles and concepts to include in the course: photosynthesis and deep time (fossil fuels), biogeochemical cycles (climate), chemical reactions (combustion), electromagnetic radiation (solar power), nuclear physics (nuclear power), phase changes and diagrams (water and climate), etc. Lecture activities are used to give students the practice they need to make quantitative skills routine and automatic. Laboratory exercises on energy (coal, petroleum, nuclear power), water (in Bangladesh), energy

  8. Follow-Up Survey of Students Who Received a Degree or Certificate from Napa Valley College in the 1983-1984 Academic Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Jack

    In winter 1983, a survey of Napa Valley College (NVC) graduates was conducted to determine the percentage of 1983-84 graduates who achieved their goal by the time they left NVC; graduate satisfaction with instructional quality and with the overall quality of NVC; graduate satisfaction with employment or transfer preparation; employment patterns;…

  9. Creating a Culture of High Expectations, Student Motivation and Instructional Support in Schools and Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Schoolwide support for higher achievement is essential. Students need a nurturing environment where they feel secure about learning, where the goal is success for every student and where students are confident they will receive mentoring and encouragement to prepare for their futures. Many schools are reinventing themselves to motivate students to…

  10. Psychophysiological activation during preparation, performance, and recovery in high- and low-anxious music students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Regina Katharina; Danuser, Brigitta; Wild, Pascal; Hildebrandt, Horst; Gomez, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive view of (a) the time dynamics of the psychophysiological responding in performing music students (n = 66) before, during, and after a private and a public performance and (b) the moderating effect of music performance anxiety (MPA). Heart rate (HR), minute ventilation (VE), and all affective and somatic self-report variables increased in the public session compared to the private session. Furthermore, the activation of all variables was stronger during the performances than before or after. Differences between phases were larger in the public than in the private session for HR, VE, total breath duration, anxiety, and trembling. Furthermore, while higher MPA scores were associated with higher scores and with larger changes between sessions and phases for self-reports, this association was less coherent for physiological variables. Finally, self-reported intra-individual performance improvements or deteriorations were not associated with MPA. This study makes a novel contribution by showing how the presence of an audience influences low- and high-anxious musicians' psychophysiological responding before, during and after performing. Overall, the findings are more consistent with models of anxiety that emphasize the importance of cognitive rather than physiological factors in MPA.

  11. Contents and features of forming students' culture of health of special medical group in the process of theoretical preparation on physical education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribok N.N.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of forming valued attitude is considered toward own health for students with the presence of diseases. New vision of maintenance of theoretical preparation is found on physical education of students at which rejections are marked in a state of health. An experimental on-line tutorial is offered, on the basis of analysis of the existent program, on physical education for the students of task medical force. It is set that the offered on-line tutorial is directed not only on liquidation of diseases but also on forming, strengthening and maintenance of own health in spiritual, psychical and physical aspects.

  12. An online module series to prepare pharmacists to facilitate student engagement in patient-centered care delivery: development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rosemin Kassam,1 Mona Kwong,1 John B Collins21Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CanadaIntroduction: Accreditation bodies across North America have adopted revised standards that place increased emphasis on experiential education and preceptors to promote and demonstrate patient-centered, pharmaceutical care practices to students. Since such practices are still evolving, challenges exist in recruiting skilled preceptors who are prepared to provide such opportunities. An online educational module series titled "A Guide to Pharmaceutical Care" (The Guide was developed and evaluated to facilitate this transition. The objectives of this paper are: (1 to describe the development of the modules; and (2 to present the evaluation results from its pilot testing.Methods: The Guide was developed as an online, self-directed training program. It begins by providing an overview of patient care (PC philosophy and practice, and then discusses the tools that facilitate PC. It also provides a range of tips to support students as they provide PC during their experiential learning. Pharmacists participating in the pilot study were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling techniques. A pre–post quantitative survey with additional open-ended questions was used to evaluate the modules.Results: The modules incorporated a variety of teaching strategies: self-reflection exercises, quizzes to review important concepts, quick tips, flash cards, and video clips to illustrate more in-depth learning. Thirty-two pharmacists completed the pre–post assessment and reported significant increases in their confidence because of this training. The most influenced outcome was "Application of techniques to facilitate learning opportunities that enable pharmacy students to practice pharmaceutical care competencies." They also indicated that the training clarified necessary changes in their

  13. A Capstone Course with a Comprehensive and Integrated Review of the Pharmacy Curriculum and Student Assessment as a Preparation for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Adina C.; Parihar, Harish S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To create a capstone course that provides a comprehensive and integrated review of the pharmacy curriculum with a broad range of assessment tools to evaluate student knowledge and skills as a final preparation prior to beginning fourth-year advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs).

  14. From the Great State to the Great Beyond: A Case Study of How the Study Abroad Experience Prepares Accounting Students to Work in a Global Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernsteiner, Aimee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the study abroad experience, as it relates to employment, from multiple perspectives in order to gain insight into how the study abroad experience prepares accounting students to work in a global economy. Studying abroad has been recognized at the national level as an important component to…

  15. From the Great State to the Great Beyond: A Case Study of How the Study Abroad Experience Prepares Accounting Students to Work in a Global Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernsteiner, Aimee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the study abroad experience, as it relates to employment, from multiple perspectives in order to gain insight into how the study abroad experience prepares accounting students to work in a global economy. Studying abroad has been recognized at the national level as an important component to…

  16. Passion and Preparation in the Basic Course: The Influence of Students' Ego-Involvement with Speech Topics and Preparation Time on Public-Speaking Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Joseph P.; Titsworth, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Authors of basic public-speaking course textbooks frequently encourage students to select speech topics in which they have vested interest, care deeply about, and hold strong opinions and beliefs. This study explores students' level of ego-involvement with informative and persuasive speech topics, examines possible ego-involvement predictors of…

  17. Passion and Preparation in the Basic Course: The Influence of Students' Ego-Involvement with Speech Topics and Preparation Time on Public-Speaking Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Joseph P.; Titsworth, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Authors of basic public-speaking course textbooks frequently encourage students to select speech topics in which they have vested interest, care deeply about, and hold strong opinions and beliefs. This study explores students' level of ego-involvement with informative and persuasive speech topics, examines possible ego-involvement predictors of…

  18. The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; Wamsley, Maria A; Azzam, Amin; Julian, Katherine; Irby, David M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-01-01

    Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of engagement, imagination, and alignment for identity formation. Through course requirements, learners engage and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners imagine personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to align with the broader educator community of practice. From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued engagement with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations (imagination), joined an educator-in-training community (engagement/imagination), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications (alignment). Learners identified engagement with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for imagining and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator

  19. Partnership-Ready Schools: Building Systems and Mindsets for the Achievement Schools to Receive and Utilize Community Organizations as Partners in Student Success

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Ansel

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the call for schools to leverage partnerships with community organizations as a means to provide services that will mitigate the effects of poverty in the pursuit of achieving ambitious academic outcomes has gained momentum. The Achievement Schools, a network of five neighborhood schools serving students in Memphis’ Frayser community, has prioritized the development of partnerships as a lever to turn around the academic performance of its schools by ensuring students’ no...

  20. Visit at CERN of representatives of the Department of Piacenza (Italy), received by Lucio Rossi and Ugo Amaldi and hosted by the DG. The department of Piacenza is the native land of Edoardo Amaldi, one of the founding fathers of CERN, and the Department is preparing the celebration of the centennial of his birth.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Visit at CERN of representatives of the Department of Piacenza (Italy), received by Lucio Rossi and Ugo Amaldi and hosted by the DG. The department of Piacenza is the native land of Edoardo Amaldi, one of the founding fathers of CERN, and the Department is preparing the celebration of the centennial of his birth.