WorldWideScience

Sample records for preparation program implementation

  1. Implementing a standardized testing program: preparing students for the NCLEX-RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Phyllis; Koehn, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The undergraduate nursing faculty of a large Midwestern university initiated a program of standardized computerized testing for two purposes: to provide students experience with standardized computerized testing prior to taking the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and to increase the students' NCLEX-RN passing rate. This article chronicles the process of implementing a comprehensive testing program developed by the Assessment Technologies Institute (Overland Park, KS). Although the first class of students to have taken the entire testing package has just graduated, midprogram results have demonstrated potential as key indicators for identifying at-risk students. The trends in scores on standardized computerized tests, grades in prerequisite science courses, and grades in medical-surgical courses are used to identify students who are at risk for failure in the program and on the NCLEX-RN. Faculty advisors meet with these students to develop individual plans of study and to provide additional resources. The testing process is going on smoothly, and faculty members are learning to use the extensive information on students' test scores to further assist them in passing the NCLEX-RN.

  2. The effect of a Lean quality improvement implementation program on surgical pathology specimen accessioning and gross preparation error frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maxwell L; Wilkerson, Trent; Grzybicki, Dana M; Raab, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Few reports have documented the effectiveness of Lean quality improvement in changing anatomic pathology patient safety. We used Lean methods of education; hoshin kanri goal setting and culture change; kaizen events; observation of work activities, hand-offs, and pathways; A3-problem solving, metric development, and measurement; and frontline work redesign in the accessioning and gross examination areas of an anatomic pathology laboratory. We compared the pre- and post-Lean implementation proportion of near-miss events and changes made in specific work processes. In the implementation phase, we documented 29 individual A3-root cause analyses. The pre- and postimplementation proportions of process- and operator-dependent near-miss events were 5.5 and 1.8 (P < .002) and 0.6 and 0.6, respectively. We conclude that through culture change and implementation of specific work process changes, Lean implementation may improve pathology patient safety.

  3. Creating Next Generation Teacher Preparation Programs to Support Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards in K-12 Schools: An Opportunity for the Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, E. E.; Egger, A. E.; Julin, S.; Ronca, R.; Vokos, S.; Ebert, E.; Clark-Blickenstaff, J.; Nollmeyer, G.

    2015-12-01

    A consortium of two and four year Washington State Colleges and Universities in partnership with Washington's Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), the Teachers of Teachers of Science, and Teachers of Teachers of Mathematics, and other key stakeholders, is currently working to improve science and mathematics learning for all Washington State students by creating a new vision for STEM teacher preparation in Washington State aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics and Language Arts. Specific objectives include: (1) strengthening elementary and secondary STEM Teacher Preparation courses and curricula, (2) alignment of STEM teacher preparation programs across Washington State with the NGSS and CCSS, (3) development of action plans to support implementation of STEM Teacher Preparation program improvement at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) across the state, (4) stronger collaborations between HEIs, K-12 schools, government agencies, Non-Governmental Organizations, and STEM businesses, involved in the preparation of preservice STEM teachers, (5) new teacher endorsements in Computer Science and Engineering, and (6) development of a proto-type model for rapid, adaptable, and continuous improvement of STEM teacher preparation programs. A 2015 NGSS gap analysis of teacher preparation programs across Washington State indicates relatively good alignment of courses and curricula with NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas and Scientific practices, but minimal alignment with NGSS Engineering practices and Cross Cutting Concepts. Likewise, Computer Science and Sustainability ideas and practices are not well represented in current courses and curricula. During the coming year teams of STEM faculty, education faculty and administrators will work collaboratively to develop unique action plans for aligning and improving STEM teacher preparation courses and curricula at their institutions.

  4. OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaryupina, M.B.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the problem and the need for monitoring of the government program effectiveness, conceptual model of monitoring during the implementation of the state program. Also the author presented a software module for monitoring of implementation of the government programs and gave a description of the main elements of an effective monitoring system of implementation of the government program.

  5. Preparing for successful surgery: an implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Manuel; Larsen, Brad

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the implementation of a mind-body program for surgical patients in a community hospital, assessing patient participation, patient perception, and program impact on anxiety, pain, and quality of sleep during the perioperative period. Two hundred thirty patients having total hip replacement, total knee replacement, hysterectomy, or colectomy participated in this investigation. One hundred fifteen patients were assigned to the control group before the start of the mind-body program and received routine care. The subsequent 115 patients were assigned to the intervention group and were given an audio CD (containing guided imagery, affirmations, and relaxation music) and a brochure three to seven days before surgery. The brochure recommended that patients listen to the CD twice a day before and after surgery. Anxiety, pain at rest, pain with movement, quality of sleep, and program participation were assessed for the first two postoperative days, and patient perception of the program was assessed at the end of the two days. Anxiety scores were lower in the intervention group on the evening of surgery. Despite a trend toward lower pain scores in the intervention group, no difference between the intervention and control groups reached statistical significance, including quality of sleep. Of patients in the intervention group, 74% listened to the CD at least once after surgery, and 37% listened to the program three or more times. Most patients who used the CD at least once rated it as helpful, and 87% said they would use it for future operations. Patient response to a perioperative mind-body program was favorable. Most patients listened to the program CD at least once, and a third used the CD repeatedly, as recommended. The majority of patients who used the CD felt it had been helpful and would use it again. Program participants experienced less anxiety on the night of surgery.

  6. CAS Readjusts Implementation of Its Talent Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan

    2002-01-01

    @@ CAS has decided to readjust the way of implementing its Century Program (or Hundred-Talents Program), to give more independence to research institutes in head hunting and guarantee the support for the Program recruits on a selective basis.

  7. Effective Preparation Program Features: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Gary M.; Whiteman, Rodney S.

    2016-01-01

    This article is a summary of a report prepared for the University Council for Educational Administration Program Improvement Project for the Wallace Foundation. This explores the research base for educational leadership preparation programs, specifically examining literature on program features. The review covers context, candidates, faculty,…

  8. Coal preparation. Energy program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, M.Y.

    1975-06-01

    This is one of several special reports prepared in conjunction with a broad state-of-the-art study on underground coal mining. This report is essentially a review of the current technology of coal preparation and future research needs in this field. (GRA)

  9. Michigan School Readiness Program: Implementation Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    In operation since 1988, the Michigan School Readiness Program (MSRP) provides high-quality preschool programs for children who may be at risk of becoming educationally disadvantaged and who may have needs for special assistance. This manual provides guidelines for implementing all aspects of the program, including applying for funding, recruiting…

  10. Status of Assistive Technology Instruction in University Personnel Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Margaret E.; Ault, Melinda Jones

    2012-01-01

    The reauthorization of IDEA mandates that students with a disability must be considered for assistive technology (AT). However, in order to implement the mandate, teachers and related service personnel must be knowledgeable about many aspects of AT. The purpose of this study was to gauge the extent to which personnel preparation programs believe…

  11. Ontario's emergency department process improvement program: the experience of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotteau, Leahora; Webster, Fiona; Salkeld, Erin; Hellings, Chelsea; Guttmann, Astrid; Vermeulen, Marian J; Bell, Robert S; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Rowe, Brian H; Nigam, Amit; Schull, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, Lean manufacturing principles have been applied to health care quality improvement efforts to improve wait times. In Ontario, an emergency department (ED) process improvement program based on Lean principles was introduced by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care as part of a strategy to reduce ED length of stay (LOS) and to improve patient flow. This article aims to describe the hospital-based teams' experiences during the ED process improvement program implementation and the teams' perceptions of the key factors that influenced the program's success or failure. A qualitative evaluation was conducted based on semistructured interviews with hospital implementation team members, such as team leads, medical leads, and executive sponsors, at 10 purposively selected hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Sites were selected based, in part, on their changes in median ED LOS following the implementation period. A thematic framework approach as used for interviews, and a standard thematic coding framework was developed. Twenty-four interviews were coded and analyzed. The results are organized according to participants' experience and are grouped into four themes that were identified as significantly affecting the implementation experience: local contextual factors, relationship between improvement team and support players, staff engagement, and success and sustainability. The results demonstrate the importance of the context of implementation, establishing strong relationships and communication strategies, and preparing for implementation and sustainability prior to the start of the project. Several key factors were identified as important to the success of the program, such as preparing for implementation, ensuring strong executive support, creation of implementation teams based on the tasks and outcomes of the initiative, and using multiple communication strategies throughout the implementation process. Explicit incorporation of these factors into the

  12. Effective Teaching: Preparation and Implementation. Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Gilbert H.; Wiseman, Dennis G.; Touzel, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Schools today have transcended from the chalkboard to the whiteboard and are populated by students who are not frightened to use the technology of this new age of learning. During this period of dynamic change, teachers must be ready to meet the challenges of preparing students for a global society characterized by diversity and ever-increasing…

  13. Implementing an effective wellness program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, N. [Bruce Power Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Bruce Power is one of the largest nuclear sites in the world, with more than 3,700 employees. The utility strives to be one of Canada's most dynamic and innovative teams. The values of Bruce Power include: safety first; profit through progress; openness; respect and recognition; and professional and personal integrity. With respect to health and safety, Bruce Power strives to have zero medically treated injuries. Details of the healthy workplace committee were presented as well as details of the health and wellness program. Charts of health and mental health screening strategies were presented. Other programs include: an excellent benefits package; flexible working hours; family care days; banked time; an electronic suggestion box; and station condition records. It was noted that there is a strong external focus on health and safety as well. Details of community involvement and sponsorship were presented, along with details of on-site fitness facilities and fitness membership subsidies. Details of the National Quality Institute certification were also provided, including physical environment; lifestyle behaviours; and psycho-social environment. The importance of strong leadership in encouraging feedback, team talk and continuous leadership development was emphasized. Strategies to strengthen leadership include new hiring criteria for managers; management days; first line manager academy; a mentoring program; and task observation and coaching. Communication strategies include articles in weekly newspapers; monthly safety meeting video segments; posters and electronic signs; and voice mail messages from the chief executive officer. Details of the Eat Smart and Weight Challenge certification were provided. The management at human resources faces the challenge of continual change, demographics, and the fact that wellness is difficult to measure. tabs., figs.

  14. Parent Experience of Implementing Effective Home Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Iona

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to describe parent views about implementing effective home programs to inform practice recommendations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 parents of children with cerebral palsy (2 fathers and 8 mothers) who had participated in a home program by using a partnership-based approach. Transcripts…

  15. Genetic Parallel Programming: design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheang, Sin Man; Leung, Kwong Sak; Lee, Kin Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel Genetic Parallel Programming (GPP) paradigm for evolving parallel programs running on a Multi-Arithmetic-Logic-Unit (Multi-ALU) Processor (MAP). The MAP is a Multiple Instruction-streams, Multiple Data-streams (MIMD), general-purpose register machine that can be implemented on modern Very Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSIs) in order to evaluate genetic programs at high speed. For human programmers, writing parallel programs is more difficult than writing sequential programs. However, experimental results show that GPP evolves parallel programs with less computational effort than that of their sequential counterparts. It creates a new approach to evolving a feasible problem solution in parallel program form and then serializes it into a sequential program if required. The effectiveness and efficiency of GPP are investigated using a suite of 14 well-studied benchmark problems. Experimental results show that GPP speeds up evolution substantially.

  16. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  17. C++ PROGRAM IMPLEMENTING THE ABELIAN GROUP ABSTRACT

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz L., Edgar; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a C++ Program implementing the Commutative or Abelian Group Algebraic Concept. The whole Program code that manages abelian class objects as a new data abstract type, TAD, using concepts such as operators overcharge is shown. Implementation has been carried out in a Dev C++ 4.1 compiler, a GNU compiler with GLP licence. El artículo presenta un programa en C++ que implementa el concepto algebraico de grupo conmutativo o abeliano. Se muestra todo el código del programa q...

  18. 75 FR 48934 - Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC19 Coral Reef Conservation Program... Implementation Guidelines for the Coral Reef Conservation Program. SUMMARY: This document provides NOAA's revised Grant Program Implementation Guidelines (Guidelines) for the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP or...

  19. Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Implementing Procedures Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This implementing procedures document (IPD) was prepared for use in implementing tasks under the standard review plan update and development program (SRP-UDP). The IPD provides comprehensive guidance and detailed procedures for SRP-UDP tasks. The IPD is mandatory for contractors performing work for the SRP-UDP. It is guidance for the staff. At the completion of the SRP-UDP, the IPD will be revised (to remove the UDP aspects) and will replace NRR Office Letter No. 800 as long-term maintenance procedures.

  20. Implementing a Schoolwide Information Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Helen; Henley, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how library media specialists can get teachers' support and cooperation to implement a schoolwide information literacy program. Highlights include national or state curriculum standards in language arts, social studies, science, and math; and an example of a poetry unit for language arts that includes information literacy and language…

  1. Program for implementing software quality metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yule, H.P.; Riemer, C.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes a program by which the Veterans Benefit Administration (VBA) can implement metrics to measure the performance of automated data systems and demonstrate that they are improving over time. It provides a definition of quality, particularly with regard to software. Requirements for management and staff to achieve a successful metrics program are discussed. It lists the attributes of high-quality software, then describes the metrics or calculations that can be used to measure these attributes in a particular system. Case studies of some successful metrics programs used by business are presented. The report ends with suggestions on which metrics the VBA should use and the order in which they should be implemented.

  2. Studying the implementation of public programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, R.K.

    1980-02-01

    This report describes and critically assesses approaches that have been employed to study the implementation of public programs. Implementation is defined as the process by which new policies and/or practices are installed in organizations. The report was produced because of the increased interest among researchers and policy makers alike in the linkages between policy and outcome. The study of implementation has barely begun, and it was recognized that methodological issues of a particularly complex nature arise because of certain unique characteristics of the implementation processes: (1) they involve a series of decisions that occur over a long period of time, with no clear beginning or end points; (2) their outcomes have direct or indirect implications that are too complex for single-factor theories; (3) they involve a large number of participants; and (4) they involve situations that are rather unique in terms of agency context, historical moment in time, and other key elements. The approach employed in the report was to examine the methods that have been used in a number of exemplary studies of implementation. These studies are commonly cited in publications and informally in research circles. Descriptive material from each study was used to address three questions: (1) How is evidence collected in studies of implementation; (2) How is evidence analyzed; (3) What are the reasons for believing the conclusions from such studies. The report concludes with recomendations for the conduct of future studies of implementation.

  3. Restructuring Principal Preparation in Illinois: Perspectives on Implementation Successes, Challenges, and Future Outlook. Executive Summary. IERC 2015-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, Brenda K.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Hart, Holly; White, Bradford R.; Huynh, Michelle Hanh

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current mixed methods study--the Illinois Principal Preparation Implementation Review Project (I-PREP)--are to describe how the new policy is being implemented, learning which aspects of the implementation have been challenging and why they present challenges, and how programs are addressing challenges and realizing improvements…

  4. Restructuring Principal Preparation in Illinois: Perspectives on Implementation Successes, Challenges, and Future Outlook. IERC 2015-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, Brenda K.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Hart, Holly; White, Bradford R.; Huynh, Michelle Hanh

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current mixed methods study--the Illinois Principal Preparation Implementation Review Project (I-PREP)--are to describe how the new policy is being implemented, learning which aspects of the implementation have been challenging and why they present challenges, and how programs are addressing challenges and realizing improvements…

  5. Implementation of Complex Projects Using Constraint Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag Strak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the implementation of the complex projects, all planned activities and resources must be taken into account. In general, it is necessary to assign the resources to the activities, but to also avoid simultaneous engagement of resources for multiple activities. In order to solve these problems, various techniques and methods are used. Mathematic and integer programming, genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, or taboo search are just some of the techniques used for solving this problem. Constraint programming comes from artificial intelligence i.e. papers from this area that occurred in 1960s and 1970s. Constraints exist in every segment of human environment. They represent a natural medium for expressing relations that exist in the physical world. Fulfilment of constraints is used in many different areas. Problems such as scheduling, allocations etc. are typical examples of constraints problems, where the basic concept of constraint programming can be applied. This paper considered implementation of the Bor Regional Development Project. Development of constraint programming was followed by the development of appropriate tools. B-Prolog was used in this paper. Many systems, including B-Prolog, enable interface with classic object-oriented languages, such as C++ or Java. One of the greatest advantages is the possibility of simple modelling, even for beginners in planning and implementation of the project.

  6. RAY TRACING IMPLEMENTATION IN JAVA PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aybars UĞUR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper realism in computer graphics and components providing realism are discussed at first. It is mentioned about illumination models, surface rendering methods and light sources for this aim. After that, ray tracing which is a technique for creating two dimensional image of a three-dimensional virtual environment is explained briefly. A simple ray tracing algorithm was given. "SahneIzle" which is a ray tracing program implemented in Java programming language which can be used on the internet is introduced. As a result, importance of network-centric ray tracing software is discussed.

  7. Pressure Safety Program Implementation at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lower, Mark [ORNL; Etheridge, Tom [ORNL; Oland, C. Barry [XCEL Engineering, Inc.

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC. In February 2006, DOE promulgated worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. These regulations, which are provided in 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, establish requirements for worker safety and health program that reduce or prevent occupational injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE contractors and their workers with safe and healthful workplaces at DOE sites. The regulations state that contractors must achieve compliance no later than May 25, 2007. According to 10 CFR 851, Subpart C, Specific Program Requirements, contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health programs that at a minimum includes provisions for pressure safety. In implementing the structured approach for pressure safety, contractors must establish safety policies and procedures to ensure that pressure systems are designed, fabricated, tested, inspected, maintained, repaired, and operated by trained, qualified personnel in accordance with applicable sound engineering principles. In addition, contractors must ensure that all pressure vessels, boilers, air receivers, and supporting piping systems conform to (1) applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (2004) Sections I through XII, including applicable code cases; (2) applicable ASME B31 piping codes; and (3) the strictest applicable state and local codes. When national consensus codes are not applicable because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc., contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local codes. This report documents the work performed to address legacy pressure vessel deficiencies and comply

  8. SOFTWARE TRAINING AIDS DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PRACTICE OF TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy G. Gritchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the theoretical and practical aspects of software training aids development and implementation in professional preparation practice of technological education teacher. The myriad opportunities of new information technologies are described; the characteristic features of modern software training tool (STT are revealed; the main algorithmic structure circuits of training programs construction (linear, cyclic, with hyperlinks, to the labels, which enable the development of STT variety and functionality are given; the methodology of STT creating is described based on the analysis of the technology teacher preparation in HEE content, MITE didactic functions and selection criteria of educational software for this area of specialist’s preparation.

  9. Corporate wellness programs: implementation challenges in the modern american workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G; Cavico, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Being healthy is important for living well and achieving longevity. In the business realm, furthermore, employers want healthy employees, as these workers tend to be more productive, have fewer rates of absenteeism, and use less of their health insurance resources. This article provides an overview of corporate "wellness" efforts in the American workplace and the concomitant challenges which employers will confront in implementing these programs. Consequently, employers and managers must reflect upon wellness policies and objectives, consult with professionals, and discuss the ramifications thereof prior to implementation. The authors herein explore how employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead "healthy" lifestyles as well as ones that impose costs on employees who lead "unhealthy" lifestyles. The distinctive contribution of this article is that it proactively explores wellness program implementation challenges and also supplies "best practices" in the modern workplace, so employers can be better prepared when they promulgate wellness policies, and then take practical steps to help their employees become healthier and thereby help to reduce insurance costs. The article, moreover, addresses how wellness policy incentives-in the form of "carrots" as well as penalties-in the form of "sticks" could affect employees, especially "non-healthy" employees, as well as employers, particularly legally. Based on the aforementioned challenges, the authors make practical recommendations for employers and managers, so that they can fashion and implement wellness policies that are deemed to be legal, ethical, and efficacious.

  10. Molecular implementation of simple logic programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Tom; Kaplan, Shai; Shapiro, Ehud

    2009-11-01

    Autonomous programmable computing devices made of biomolecules could interact with a biological environment and be used in future biological and medical applications. Biomolecular implementations of finite automata and logic gates have already been developed. Here, we report an autonomous programmable molecular system based on the manipulation of DNA strands that is capable of performing simple logical deductions. Using molecular representations of facts such as Man(Socrates) and rules such as Mortal(X) system can answer molecular queries such as Mortal(Socrates)? (Is Socrates Mortal?) and Mortal(X)? (Who is Mortal?). This biomolecular computing system compares favourably with previous approaches in terms of expressive power, performance and precision. A compiler translates facts, rules and queries into their molecular representations and subsequently operates a robotic system that assembles the logical deductions and delivers the result. This prototype is the first simple programming language with a molecular-scale implementation.

  11. AES ALGORITHM IMPLEMENTATION IN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa DEFTA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Information encryption represents the usage of an algorithm to convert an unknown message into an encrypted one. It is used to protect the data against unauthorized access. Protected data can be stored on a media device or can be transmitted through the network. In this paper we describe a concrete implementation of the AES algorithm in the Java programming language (available from Java Development Kit 6 libraries and C (using the OpenSSL library. AES (Advanced Encryption Standard is an asymmetric key encryption algorithm formally adopted by the U.S. government and was elected after a long process of standardization.

  12. Community-based positive youth development program in Hong Kong: views of the program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ng, Catalina S M; Law, Moon Y M

    2017-02-01

    Based on the data collected from the Tier 1 Program of a community-based positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S.) in 2013, the current study explored the perspectives of 634 program implementers who implemented the Tier 1 Program in Hong Kong. Upon the completion of the program, the program implementers responded to a validated client satisfaction scale (Form B). The results showed that the program implementers perceived the program, implementers and benefits of the program in a positive manner. However, there were no differences among perceived program content, implementers and effectiveness across the three grades. Consistent with previous studies, perceived program predicted effectiveness of the program. Nevertheless, program implementers did not predict program effectiveness. Once again, the present findings indicated that the Tier 1 Program was well received by the program implementers.

  13. 36 CFR 230.21 - Implementation of the program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Implementation of the program... Implementation of the program. (a) The Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program is implemented through the..., Cooperative Agreements, and Other Agreements Handbook (FSH 1509.11). The Forest Service Manual and...

  14. Target developments program to prepare LMJ campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, R; Bachelet, F; Botrel, R; Breton, O; Chicanne, C; Dauteuil, C H; Durut, F; Fleury, E; Guillot, L; Hermerel, C; Jeannot, L; Legaie, O; Legay, G; Martin, M; Reneaume, B; Theobald, M; Vincent-Viry, O, E-mail: remy.collier@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Direction des Applications Militaires, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-08-01

    To carry out laser plasma experiments on CEA laser facilities, a R and D program was set up and is still under way to deliver complex targets. For a decade, specific developments are also dedicated to 'Ligne d'Integration Laser' (LIL) in France and Omega facilities (USA). To prepare the targets intended for the first experiments on the Laser 'Megajoule' (LMJ) facility, new developments are required, such as cocktail hohlraum fabrication, gas barrier coating and foam shells developments. For fusion experiments on LMJ, an important program is also under way to elaborate the Cryogenic Target Assembly (CTA), to fill and transport the CTA and to study the conformation process of the DT layer.

  15. 14 CFR 120.117 - Implementing a drug testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementing a drug testing program. 120... AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAM Drug Testing Program Requirements § 120.117 Implementing a drug testing.... (4) A part 145 certificate holder who has your own drug testing program Obtain an Antidrug and...

  16. EFL Teacher Preparation Programs in Saudi Arabia. Trends and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazmi, Sultan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) teacher education programs in Saudi Arabia and argues that available program options are in adequate for EFL teacher preparation. Recommendations are offered for improving EFL teacher education programs. (Author/VWL)

  17. Development and Implementation of An Administrative Internship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Wermuth

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot program to prepare teachers seeking New York state certification as school district administrators, by assigning them as administrative interns to a school district. The superintendent of a large urban school district and the director of a college program to prepare school district administrators partnered to design a pilot experiential course in which candidates for a master’s degree and state certificate would have an opportunity to develop skills and learn by experiencing situations that support new learning (Kolb, 1984, to take the place of an existing internship course for eight candidates. The dual purpose was to provide an authentic learning experience for the candidates and to provide actionable information for the superintendent for improvement of the district instructional program. To identify areas of academic concern, the candidates reviewed the New York State District Report Card1, conducted research, and interviewed district personnel in order to be able tomake actionable suggestions and recommendations to the superintendent that might result in academic improvement. Findings and recommendations to inform district improvement efforts and for improvement of the existing course were presented to the superintendent and his administrative staff. Recommendations are included.

  18. Corporate Wellness Programs: Implementation Challenges in the Modern American Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahaudin G. Mujtaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Being healthy is important for living well and achieving longevity. In the business realm, furthermore, employers want healthy employees, as these workers tend to be more productive, have fewer rates of absenteeism, and use less of their health insurance resources. This article provides an overview of corporate “wellness” efforts in the American workplace and the concomitant challenges which employers will confront in implementing these programs. Consequently, employers and managers must reflect upon wellness policies and objectives, consult with professionals, and discuss the ramifications thereof prior to implementation. The authors herein explore how employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead “healthy” lifestyles as well as ones that impose costs on employees who lead “unhealthy” lifestyles.The distinctive contribution of this article is that it proactively explores wellness program implementation challenges and also supplies “best practices” in the modern workplace, so employers can be better prepared when they promulgate wellness policies, and then take practical steps to help their employees become healthier and thereby help to reduce insurance costs. The article, moreover, addresses how wellness policy incentives—in the form of “carrots” as well as penalties—in the form of “sticks” could affect employees, especially “non-healthy” employees, as well as employers, particularly legally. Based on the aforementioned challenges, the authors make practical recommendations for employers and managers, so that they can fashion and implement wellness policies that are deemed to be legal, ethical, and efficacious.

  19. Putting the pieces together: an integrated model of program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkel, Cady; Mauricio, Anne M; Schoenfelder, Erin; Sandler, Irwin N

    2011-03-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that variability in implementation of prevention programs is related to the outcomes achieved by these programs. However, while implementation has been conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, few studies examine more than a single dimension, and no theoretical framework exists to guide research on the effects of implementation. We seek to address this need by proposing a theoretical model of the relations between the dimensions of implementation and outcomes of prevention programs that can serve to guide future implementation research. In this article, we focus on four dimensions of implementation, which we conceptualize as behaviors of program facilitators (fidelity, quality of delivery, and adaptation) and behaviors of participants (responsiveness) and present the evidence supporting these as predictors of program outcomes. We then propose a theoretical model by which facilitator and participant dimensions of implementation influence participant outcomes. Finally, we provide recommendations and directions for future implementation research.

  20. Successful Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System Programs Implemented in the Navy - NESDI #494

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    2014 SUCCESSFUL MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTED IN THE NAVY—NESDI #494 Prepared by: Edwin Chiang, P.E...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER SUCCESSFUL MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTED IN THE NAVY—PROJECT #494 5b. GRANT NUMBER...installations as lessons learned for complying with municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) regulatory requirements. An evaluation of business practices

  1. 24 CFR 984.301 - Program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8 AND PUBLIC HOUSING FAMILY SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Program Operation § 984.301 Program... in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, operation of a local FSS program must begin within 12 months of... funding that establishes the obligation to operate an FSS program. Operation means that activities such as...

  2. Food Safety Programs Based on HACCP Principles in School Nutrition Programs: Implementation Status and Factors Related to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Wendy Bounds; Carr, Deborah; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the extent to which school nutrition (SN) programs have implemented food safety programs based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles, as well as factors, barriers, and practices related to implementation of these programs. Methods: An online survey was…

  3. Food Safety Programs Based on HACCP Principles in School Nutrition Programs: Implementation Status and Factors Related to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Wendy Bounds; Carr, Deborah; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the extent to which school nutrition (SN) programs have implemented food safety programs based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles, as well as factors, barriers, and practices related to implementation of these programs. Methods: An online survey was…

  4. Lessons learned from preparing the ALARA implementation guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dewhey [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    This study has its significance because Korea successfully conducted the first-of-a kind in -depth ALARA study with ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The BNL ALARA Center, where used to deposit, circulate and disseminate the related ALARA information was under the auspice of the nuclear regulatory commission (NRC) and department of energy (DOE) in the aspects of ALARA and dose reduction. The KINS is planning regularly and continuously to update the ALARA database system, which has established as a hypertext database system on the ALARA home page at KINS from a result of the study. We wish that the system would be widely utilized by and beneficial to users who are connected to the system by the Internet, and help the users in accumulating new and innovative ALARA information. We hope that the techniques obtained from the in-depth study of the US nuclear power plant will be maximally utilized by the Korean nuclear power plant personnel. Last but the least, ALARA implementation Guidelines KINS prepared would be utilized as a milestone in getting an idea of 'reasonable' efforts to implement ALARA principle onto Korean radiation protection infrastructure in practice. (author). 16 refs.

  5. Implementation of a robot for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs in the Pharmacy Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Paz Pacheco Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the implementation of a robot for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs in the Pharmacy Service and to be able to analyze the added value to pharmacotherapy. Methods: The implementation was carried out in June 2012 at a tertiary level Hospital, taking place in two periods: 1- test period with the installation of the robot, with technical configuration of the equipment and validation of 29 active ingredients and the integration of electronic prescribing software with the robot application (9 months. 2- Usage period (22 months. On the other hand, training was given to pharmacists and nurses. The robot uses image recognition, barcode identification and gravimetric controls for proper operation. These checks provide information about the error ratio in the preparation, with a margin of ± 10%, which after a pilot study was restricted to a range of ±4%. The robot was programmed to recognize bags, infusion pumps, syringes and vials. The added value was assessed for 31 months by identifying preparation´s errors. Results: 11,865 preparations were made by the robot, which meant approximately 40% of all antineoplastic prepared from 29 different active ingredients. 1.12% (n=133 of the errors were identified by the robot and therefore didn´t reach the patient (negative desviation - 4%. These errors were corrected manually. Conclusion: The implementation of a robot in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs allows to identify errors therefore preventing them to arrive to the patient. This promotes safety and quality of the process, reducing the exposure to cytotoxic drugs from the manipulator

  6. [Implementation of a robot for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs in the Pharmacy Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Ramos, María de la Paz; Arenaza Peña, Ainhoa Elisa; Santiago Pérez, Alejandro; Bilbao Gómez-Martino, Cristina; Zamora Barrios, María Dolores; Arias Fernández, María Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    To describe the implementation of a robot for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs in the Pharmacy Service and to be able to analyze the added value to pharmacotherapy. The implementation was carried out in June 2012 at a tertiary level Hospital, taking place in two periods: 1- test period with the installation of the robot, with technical configuration of the equipment and validation of 29 active ingredients and the integration of electronic prescribing software with the robot application (9 months). 2- Usage period (22 months). On the other hand, training was given to pharmacists and nurses. The robot uses image recognition, barcode identification and gravimetric controls for proper operation. These checks provide information about the error ratio in the preparation, with a margin of ± 10%, which after a pilot study was restricted to a range of ±4%. The robot was programmed to recognize bags, infusion pumps, syringes and vials. The added value was assessed for 31 months by identifying preparation's errors. 11,865 preparations were made by the robot, which meant approximately 40% of all antineoplastic prepared from 29 different active ingredients. 1.12% (n=133) of the errors were identified by the robot and therefore didn't reach the patient (negative desviation - 4%). These errors were corrected manually. The implementation of a robot in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs allows to identify errors therefore preventing them to arrive to the patient. This promotes safety and quality of the process, reducing the exposure to cytotoxic drugs from the manipulator. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementing Immediate Postpartum Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Lisa G; Cordes, Sarah; Cwiak, Carrie A; Goedken, Peggy; Jamieson, Denise J; Kottke, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    To understand the most important steps required to implement immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) programs in different Georgia hospitals and the barriers to implementing such a program. This was a qualitative study. We interviewed 32 key personnel from 10 Georgia hospitals working to establish immediate postpartum LARC programs. Data were analyzed using directed qualitative content analysis principles. We used the Stages of Implementation to organize participant-identified key steps for immediate postpartum LARC into an implementation guide. We compared this guide to hospitals' implementation experiences. At the completion of the study, LARC was available for immediate postpartum placement at 7 of 10 study hospitals. Participants identified common themes for the implementation experience: team member identification and ongoing communication, payer preparedness challenges, interdependent department-specific tasks, and piloting with continuing improvements. Participants expressed a need for anticipatory guidance throughout the process. Key first steps to immediate postpartum LARC program implementation were identifying project champions, creating an implementation team that included all relevant departments, obtaining financial reassurance, and ensuring hospital administration awareness of the project. Potential barriers included lack of knowledge about immediate postpartum LARC, financial concerns, and competing clinical and administrative priorities. Hospitals that were successful at implementing immediate postpartum LARC programs did so by prioritizing clear communication and multidisciplinary teamwork. Although the implementation guide reflects a comprehensive assessment of the steps to implementing immediate postpartum LARC programs, not all hospitals required every step to succeed. Hospital teams report that implementing immediate postpartum LARC programs involves multiple departments and a number of important steps to consider. A

  8. Implementing Comprehensive Guidance Program Evaluation Support: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.; Hubert, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Article shares ideas learned from the challenges of implementing a program evaluation infrastructure for a comprehensive developmental, guidance, and counseling program (CDGC). The benefits of continuous program evaluation for staff and students were evident in this urban school district. Developing support for sustainable program evaluation…

  9. Positive youth development programs for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: evaluation based on program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ng, Catalina S M; Law, Moon Y M

    2017-02-01

    As program implementers' views are seldom included in program evaluation and there are few related studies in different Chinese communities, this study examined the perceptions of the program implementers who implemented the Tier 2 Program of the P.A.T.H.S. Program in Hong Kong. The Tier 2 Program was designed to promote the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. In the community-based P.A.T.H.S. Project, 400 program implementers completed a subjective outcome evaluation form (Form D) for program implementers. Consistent with the previous findings, program implementers generally held positive views towards the program, implementers, and program effectiveness and their views towards these three domains did not differ across grades. In line with the hypotheses, perceived program quality and perceived implementer quality predicted program effectiveness. The present findings provided an alternative perspective showing that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the program implementers and they regarded the program to be beneficial to the program participants.

  10. Implementing a teleo-reactive programming system

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the teleo-reactive programming paradigm for controlling autonomous agents, such as robots. Teleo-reactive programming provides a robust, opportunistic method for goal-directed programming that continuously reacts to the sensed environment. In particular, the TR and TeleoR systems are investigated. They influence the design of a teleo-reactive system programming in Python, for controlling autonomous agents via the Pedro communications architecture. To demonstrate the syste...

  11. Deaf teacher candidates in hearing classrooms: a unique teacher preparation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D S; Lytle, R R

    2000-03-01

    An undergraduate teacher education program at Gallaudet University prepares deaf students in "regular" education. This includes a required full-time internship with hearing students (assisted by sign language interpreters). Graduates then continue in a master's degree program in deaf education, thus acquiring dual certification. Several studies indicate that these deaf candidates progress through the same developmental stages as hearing candidates and that they develop high expectations for deaf learners. Issues related to implementing such a program are discussed.

  12. Implementing an Art Program for Children in a Homeless Shelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Donalyn; MacGillivray, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative research study designed to analyze the implementation of an art program for children in a homeless shelter. Using a socio-cultural lens and the framework of resilience theory, teacher researchers implemented community-art programs for children residing in a family emergency shelter. Data collection included…

  13. Career Education Program for Exceptional Students: An Implementation Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Samuel B.; Cole, Jack

    This document provides guidelines for designing, implementing, and evaluating the effectiveness of a district-specific career education program for special education students. Part I lists 10 activities to design, implement, and evaluate a cost-effective career education program. Examples are included of the outcome of each activity. Activities…

  14. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Fornari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods: Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results: The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions: Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established.

  15. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  16. Establishing Instructional Technology Benchmarks for Teacher Preparation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Pamela Taylor; Little, Wesley

    1996-01-01

    Examines technology use in teacher preparation, emerging state and national standards for educators and technology, and benchmarks for teacher preparation programs (including faculty preparation), and notes the importance of creating school-business partnerships to help finance this costly venture. (SM)

  17. 41 CFR 301-73.101 - How must we prepare to implement ETS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... implement ETS? 301-73.101 Section 301-73.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Service and Travel Management Service § 301-73.101 How must we prepare to implement ETS? You must prepare to implement ETS as expeditiously as possible by— (a) Developing a migration plan and schedule to...

  18. Distributed implementation of functional program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasel, J.H.; Douglass, R.J.; Michelsen, R.; Hudak, P.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential of the functional model, particularly as it pertains to architecture. In Section 2, we describe the graph-reduction operational model of computation and its relation to AI problems. In Section 3, we discuss a class of architectures that implement graph reduction and a prototype implementation in this class being developed at Los Alamos. Finally, we speculate on the applicability of graph reduction to some other classes of architecture.

  19. Video streaming: implementation and evaluation in an undergraduate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul N; Glover, Pauline

    2008-02-01

    Video streaming technology enables video content, held on the web sites, to be streamed via the web. We report the implementation and evaluation of video streaming in an undergraduate nursing program in a metropolitan university in Australia. Students (n=703) were emailed a survey with a 15% response rate. We found that 91% (n=74) of respondents stated that video streaming assisted their learning. Forty-six percent(n=50) of students had difficulty accessing video streaming (particularly at the beginning of the study period). Over a 97-day period there were 8440 "hits" to the site from 1039 different internet protocol (IP) addresses. There were 4475 video streaming sessions undertaken by users. Video streaming was used for reviewing previously attended lectures (52%, n=56), examination preparation (34%, n=37), viewing missed lectures (27%, n=29) and class preparation (9%, n=10). Our experience with the introduction of video streaming has met with general enthusiasm from both students and teaching staff. Video streaming has particular relevance for rural students.

  20. The Relationships between Faculty Preparation Programs and Teaching Assistant Development Programs. Preparing Future Faculty. Occasional Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Stacey Lane

    This paper examines the relationship between teaching assistant (TA) development programs and faculty preparation programs, the commonalities between the two types of program, and the issues to be considered when making the transition from the former to the latter. It notes that many institutions adopted TA training programs in the 1980s in…

  1. On implementation of an endodontic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Margaretha

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the uptake of research findings by practitioners is unpredictable, yet until they are adopted, advances in technology and clinical research cannot improve health outcomes in patients. Despite extensive research there is limited knowledge of the processes by which changes occur and ways of measuring the effectiveness of change of practice. The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate aspects of an educational intervention in clinical endodontic routines and new instrumentation techniques in a Swedish County Public Dental Service. Special reference was made to the establishment of changed behaviour in practice, the process of change, and the clinical effects. Although a high level of competence in root canal treatment procedures is required in general dental practice, a number of Swedish studies have revealed inadequate root-fillings quality and associated periapical inflammation in general populations. It is suggested that the adoption of the nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation (NiTiR) technique would improve the cleaning and shaping of root canals and the quality of the root-filling. However, there is limited knowledge of the effectiveness of the technique when applied in general dental practice. In two of four consecutive studies, the subjects were employees of a county Public Dental Service. The aim was to investigate the rate of adoption of clinical routines and the NiTiR technique: the output, and the qualitative meaning of successful change in clinical practice. In the other two studies the aim was to investigate treatment effect and the cost-effectiveness of root canal treatment in a general population: the outcome. Four hundred employees (dentists, dental assistants, administrative assistants and clinical managers) of a Swedish County Public Dental Service were mandatorily enrolled in an educational and training program over two years. Change of practice was investigated in a post-education survey. The NiTiR technique was

  2. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF GERBANGMASTRA PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Ode Mustafa Muchtar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to describe and analyze the effect of public-private partnerships and community participation on successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program in Kolaka regency of South East Sulawesi Province. This study is conducted using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. This paper finds that public-private partnerships affect the community participation and successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program. It also uncovers that community participation affects the successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program. Furthermore, it reveals that the implementation of public-private partnership that are supported by community participation have an impact on the successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program.Keywords: Public-private partnerships, community participation, Gerbangmastra programJEL classifications: H80, O21.AbstrakPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan dan menganalisis pengaruh kemitraan pemerintah-swasta dan partisipasi dari masyarakat terhadap keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra di Kabupaten Kolaka Propinsi Sulawesi Tenggara. Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan menggunakan kombinasi metode kuantitatif yaitu metode regresi analisis jalur dan kualitatif berupa metode deskriptif analitik. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kemitraan antara pemerintah-swasta memiliki pengaruh terhadap partisipasi masyarakat dan keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra. Sementara itu partisipasi dari masyarakat berpengaruh terhadap keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra. Pelaksanaan kemitraan pemerintah-swasta yang didukung oleh partisipasi masyarakat berpengaruh terhadap keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra di daerah tersebut.Kata kunci: Kemitraan pemerintah-swasta, partisipasi masyarakat, program GerbangmastraJEL classifications: H80, O21.

  3. Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals: Needs, Strategies, Programs, and Online Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Dunbar, R. W.; Beane, R. J.; Bruckner, M.; Bralower, T. J.; Feiss, P. G.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geoscience faculty, departments, and programs play an important role in preparing future geoscience professionals. One challenge is supporting the diversity of student goals for future employment and the needs of a wide range of potential employers. Students in geoscience degree programs pursue careers in traditional geoscience industries; in geoscience education and research (including K-12 teaching); and opportunities at the intersection of geoscience and other fields (e.g., policy, law, business). The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project has documented a range of approaches that departments use to support the development of geoscience majors as professionals (serc.carleton.edu/departments). On the Cutting Edge, a professional development program, supports graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing an academic career through workshops, webinars, and online resources (serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep). Geoscience departments work at the intersection of student interests and employer needs. Commonly cited program goals that align with employer needs include mastery of geoscience content; field experience; skill in problem solving, quantitative reasoning, communication, and collaboration; and the ability to learn independently and take a project from start to finish. Departments and faculty can address workforce issues by 1) implementing of degree programs that develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students need, while recognizing that students have a diversity of career goals; 2) introducing career options to majors and potential majors and encouraging exploration of options; 3) advising students on how to prepare for specific career paths; 4) helping students develop into professionals, and 5) supporting students in the job search. It is valuable to build connections with geoscience employers, work with alumni and foster connections between students and alumni with similar career interests, collaborate with

  4. Implementation of Health Fitness Exercise Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, David E., Ed.

    This monograph includes the following articles to aid in implementation of fitness concepts: (1) "Trends in Physical Fitness: A Personal Perspective" (H. Harrison Clarke); (2) "A Total Health-Fitness Life-Style" (Steven N. Blair); (3) "Objectives for the Nation--Physical Fitness and Exercise" (Jack H. Wilmore); (4) "A New Physical Fitness Test"…

  5. Preparing Teachers for Technology Integration: Programs, Competencies, and Factors from the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin; Townsend, Latricia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of recent literature about preparing teachers for technology integration. The review found six types of training programs are commonly implemented: pre-service training, long-term courses, short-term workshops and institutes, coaching/mentoring, learning communities, and product/assessment approaches. The review…

  6. The Pre-Service Preparation of School Administrators: A Description and Assessment of the OISE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Paul T.; Cousins, J. Bradley

    Issues in preservice preparation of Canadian school administrators, with a focus on the effectiveness of a principal certification course implemented by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), are described. A review of current preservice practices in Canada concludes that traditional programs are issues oriented and lack conceptual…

  7. Acoustic valve leak detection: Initial program development, implementation & experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicker, G.L. [Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Acoustic valve leak detection is one of the many test techniques employed in modern power plants with active predictive maintenance programs. In 1994, a valve leak detection program was implemented within Baltimore Gas and Electric`s Fossil Energy Division. Within two years, the program resulted in energy savings in excess of one million dollars. The leak detection program has become an essential technology that has reduced plant heat rate losses, prevented unnecessary valve maintenance and increased plant awareness of potential losses. This paper describes program development, implementation and test methodology of Baltimore Gas and Electric`s acoustic leak detection program. Key topics include equipment description, program measurements, methodology and leak identification methods. The paper also will include discussion on the practical approach of equipment selection and program philosophies.

  8. Implementation contexts of a Tuberculosis Control Program in Brazilian prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Gonçalves Dutra de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the influence from context characteristics in the control of tuberculosis in prisons, and the influence from the program implementation degrees in observed effects.METHODS A multiple case study, with a qualitative approach, conducted in the prison systems of two Brazilian states in 2011 and 2012. Two prisons were analyzed in each state, and a prison hospital was analyzed in one of them. The data were submitted to a content analysis, which was based on external, political-organizational, implementation, and effect dimensions. Contextual factors and the ones in the program organization were correlated. The independent variable was the program implementation degree and the dependent one, the effects from the Tuberculosis Control Program in prisons.RESULTS The context with the highest sociodemographic vulnerability, the highest incidence rate of tuberculosis, and the smallest amount of available resources were associated with the low implementation degree of the program. The results from tuberculosis treatment in the prison system were better where the program had already been partially implemented than in the case with low implementation degree in both cases.CONCLUSIONS The implementation degree and its contexts – external and political-organizational dimensions – simultaneously contribute to the effects that are observed in the control of tuberculosis in analyzed prisons.

  9. Self-assessment program implementation plan. Revision A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quets, A.L.

    1991-10-23

    This implementation plan identifies and describes the tasks that must be completed in order to successfully implement a Self-Assessment (SA) Program. The purpose of the Self-Assessment Program is to comply with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) directives and orders, Federal, State, and local regulations, operate the Pinellas Plant according to best management practices, and achieve excellence in all operating areas. The Self-Assessment Program will be applied to the Pinellas Plant facility which includes buildings, grounds, equipment, operations, and activities under the control of line management. Furthermore, all applicable disciplines under environmental protection, safety, health and management will be covered by the program. The Self-Assessment Program has been designed to accomplish the following tasks: define the scope of the Self-Assessment Program; assign organizational roles and responsibilities; address EH and S functional elements and management issues; develop a Self-Assessment program charter and policy; identify all applicable EH and S codes, regulations and standards; develop self-assessment procedures and instructions; generate a Self-Assessment Manual; develop a master schedule for facility appraisals and audits; design checklists and report formats for recording appraisal data; implement an assessment tracking and reporting system; implement a root cause analysis and corrective action system; implement a trend analysis and lessons learned system; and establish a formal training program.

  10. Secondary Data Analyses of Conclusions Drawn by the Program Implementers of a Positive Youth Development Program in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. H. Siu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes is designed for adolescents with significant psychosocial needs, and its various programs are designed and implemented by social workers (program implementers for specific student groups in different schools. Using subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (Form C at 207 schools, the program implementers were asked to aggregate data and write down five conclusions (n = 1,035 in their evaluation reports. The conclusions stated in the evaluation reports were further analyzed via secondary data analyses in this study. Results showed that the participants regarded the Tier 2 Program as a success, and was effective in enhancing self-understanding, interpersonal skills, and self-management. They liked the experiential learning approach and activities that are novel, interesting, diversified, adventure-based, and outdoor in nature. They also liked instructors who were friendly, supportive, well-prepared, and able to bring challenges and give positive recognition. Most of the difficulties encountered in running the programs were related to time constraints, clashes with other activities, and motivation of participants. Consistent with the previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the participants and that it was beneficial to the development of the program participants.

  11. Implementing a Peer Mentoring Model in the Clemson Eportfolio Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Gail L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the implementation of the ePortfolio Program in 2006, Clemson University has incorporated peer review for the formative feedback process. One of the challenges with this large-scale implementation has been ensuring that all work is reviewed and constructive feedback is provided in a timely manner. In this article, I discuss the strategies…

  12. Implementing and Evaluating the National Healthy School Program in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklander, Molly K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to trace development of the National Healthy School Program (NHSP) from a global concept to implementation at the local school level in England with a view toward clarifying and, more importantly, determining if implementation is proceeding as planned, as evidenced by the presence of process evaluation. The NHSP is…

  13. Integrating Technology into Teacher Preparation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Leroy; Hayes, Mike; Eakles, David; Murley, Tim

    During the spring of 1992, a partnership between Western Kentucky University, Jostens' Learning Corporation, and three school districts was formed for the purpose of developing an implementation model for the integration of technology into teacher education. Following integrated instruction on the university campus and the partnership schools,…

  14. Implementation evaluation of the Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program: organizational factors associated with successful implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Reardon, Caitlin M; Sperber, Nina; Robinson, Claire H; Fickel, Jacqueline J; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2017-06-01

    The Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program provided telephone-based coaching for six lifestyle behaviors to 5321 Veterans at 24 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities. The purpose of the study was to conduct an evaluation of the TLC program to identify factors associated with successful implementation. A mixed-methods study design was used. Quantitative measures of organizational readiness for implementation and facility complexity were used to purposively select a subset of facilities for in-depth evaluation. Context assessments were conducted using interview transcripts. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was used to guide qualitative data collection and analysis. Factors most strongly correlated with referral rates included having a skilled implementation leader who used effective multi-component strategies to engage primary care clinicians as well as general clinic structures that supported implementation. Evaluation findings pointed to recommendations for local and national leaders to help anticipate and mitigate potential barriers to successful implementation.

  15. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan Abigail A; Mihalic Sharon F; Argamaso Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. Methods This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST) drug preventio...

  16. Evaluation Methodologies for Estimating the Likelihood of Program Implementation Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Roger; Decker, Phillip J.; Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our best efforts as evaluators, program implementation failures abound. A wide variety of valuable methodologies have been adopted to explain and evaluate the "why" of these failures. Yet, typically these methodologies have been employed concurrently (e.g., project monitoring) or to the post-hoc assessment of program activities.…

  17. National Streamflow Information Program: Implementation Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains a nationwide network of about 7,500 streamgages designed to provide and interpret long-term, accurate, and unbiased streamflow information to meet the multiple needs of many diverse national, regional, state, and local users. The National Streamflow Information Program (NSIP) was initiated in 2003 in response to Congressional and stakeholder concerns about (1) the decrease in the number of operating streamgages, including a disproportionate loss of streamgages with a long period of record; (2) the inability of the USGS to continue operating high-priority streamgages in an environment of reduced funding through partnerships; and (3) the increasing demand for streamflow information due to emerging resource-management issues and new data-delivery capabilities. The NSIP's mission is to provide the streamflow information and understanding required to meet national, regional, state, and local needs. Most of the existing streamgages are funded through partnerships with more than 850 other Federal, state, tribal, and local agencies. Currently, about 90 percent of the streamgages send data to the World Wide Web in near-real time (some information is transmitted within 15 minutes, whereas some lags by about 4 hours). The streamflow information collected at USGS streamgages is used for many purposes: *In water-resource appraisals and allocations - to determine how much water is available and how it is being allocated; *To provide streamflow information required by interstate agreements, compacts, and court decrees; *For engineering design of reservoirs, bridges, roads, culverts, and treatment plants; *For the operation of reservoirs, the operation of locks and dams for navigation purposes, and power production; *To identify changes in streamflow resulting from changes in land use, water use, and climate; *For streamflow forecasting, flood planning, and flood forecasting; *To support water-quality programs by allowing

  18. Implementing sustainable development programs in Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, H.

    1994-12-31

    Achieving sustainable development requires a revision of the present view of the nature of the city as an environment, and its relation to a larger ecosystem of which it is an essential part. The environmental health of a wilderness area is inextricably related to the environmental, and economic, health of the great urban centers. The vitality of dense metropolitan areas, where population and economic activities are concentrated, is key to the preservation of productive farm lands, wildlife habitat, and open spaces. The social and economic crisis which grips many metropolitan centers, with attendant flight of industry and development to the so-called {open_quotes}greenfields,{close_quotes} fundamentally spreads a broader crisis to our common ecosystem. This crisis is marked by the obliteration of habitat necessary for biodiversity, loss of fertile farm land, and the contamination of air, water and land, as an unescapable effect of the sprawl created by flight from the urban centers. The removal of false conceptual distinctions between the city and nature, distinctions that are unfortunately at the heart of so much of American environmental philosophy, is key to the concept of `sustainable development.` This article sets forth how the City of Chicago is implementing this understanding of the nature of the urban environment, in pursuit of sustainable development within the city.

  19. Focus Group Evaluation from the Perspective of Program Implementers: Findings Based on the Secondary 2 Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine focus groups comprising 23 program implementers recruited from nine schools were conducted to evaluate the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes. Qualitative findings showed that a majority of the program implementers regarded the program as beneficial to the program participants in different psychosocial domains. The program implementers also described the program positively and positive metaphors were used to represent the program. In conjunction with the previous research findings, the present study provides further support for the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. in promoting holistic development among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong.

  20. Small College Teacher Preparation Program Evaluations: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saynes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The methods of evaluating teacher preparation programs are becoming increasingly more reliant on student test data. These test data driven formats, however, are not appropriate for small colleges. Small colleges are currently left off the Tennessee Report Card on the Effectiveness of Teacher Training Programs because the colleges did not produce…

  1. Fusing Organizational Theory, Policy, and Leadership: A Depiction of Policy Learning Activities in a Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2017-01-01

    This pedagogy-practice article portrays three instructional activities that were implemented with aspiring leaders and refined over four rounds of teaching the course in a northeastern state's principal preparation program (PPP). After describing each activity, I share lessons learned regarding the pedagogy of principal preparation. I make the…

  2. Coastal change analysis program implemented in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Nelson, G.A.; Sapkota, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper images from 1990 to 1996 and collateral data sources were used to classify the land cover of the Mermentau River Basin (MRB) within the Chenier Plain of coastal Louisiana. Landcover classes followed the definition of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coastal Change Analysis Program; however, classification methods had to be developed as part of this study for attainment of these national classification standards. Classification method developments were especially important when classes were spectrally inseparable, when classes were part of spatial and spectral continuums, when the spatial resolution of the sensor included more than one landcover type, and when human activities caused abnormal transitions in the landscape. Most classification problems were overcome by using one or a combination of techniques, such as separating the MRB into subregions of commonality, applying masks to specific land mixtures, and highlighting class transitions between years that were highly unlikely. Overall, 1990, 1993, and 1996 classification accuracy percentages (associated kappa statistics) were 80% (0.79), 78% (0.76), and 86% (0.84), respectively. Most classification errors were associated with confusion between managed (cultivated land) and unmanaged grassland classes; scrub shrub, grasslands and forest classes; water, unconsolidated shore and bare land classes; and especially in 1993, between water and floating vegetation classes. Combining cultivated land and grassland classes and water and floating vegetation classes into single classes accuracies for 1990, 1993, and 1996 increased to 82%, 83%, and 90%, respectively. To improve the interpretation of landcover change, three indicators of landcover class stability were formulated. Location stability was defined as the percentage of a landcover class that remained as the same class in the same location at the beginning and the end of the monitoring period. Residence stability was

  3. A distributed implementation of a mode switching control program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdgaard, Michael; Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Ravn, Anders P.

    1995-01-01

    according to the schedule, and a final one monitors the system for exceptions that shall lead to a halt. The implementation uses four transputers with a distribution of phases of the automatons over the individual processors. The main technical result of the paper is calculations that illustrate how......A distributed implementation of a mode switched control program for a robot is described. The design of the control program is given by a set of real-time automatons. One of them plans a schedule for switching between a fixed set of control functions, another dispatches the control functions...

  4. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Fenerator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLACE, B.G.

    1999-11-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 1998a) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and (300501) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements are discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Waste Minimization (WMinn ) Assessments (WMAs); Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification.

  5. Analysis and Implement of Broadcast Program Monitoring Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jin Bao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the radio and TV industry and the implementation of INT (the integration of telecommunications networks, cable TV networks and the Internet, the contents of programs and advertisements is showing massive, live and interactive trends. In order to meet the security of radio and television, the broadcast of information have to be controlled and administered. In order to master the latest information of public opinion trends through radio and television network, it is necessary research the specific industry applications of broadcast program monitoring. In this paper, the importance of broadcast monitoring in public opinion analysis is firstly analysed. The monitoring radio and television programs broadcast system architecture is proposed combining with the practice, focusing on the technical requirements and implementation process of program broadcast, advertisement broadcast and TV station broadcast monitoring. The more efficient information is generated through statistical analysis, which provides data analysis for radio and television public opinion analysis.

  6. Initial Implementation of a Couples-Focused Employment Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Zaveri; Alan Hershey

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the initial implementation of the Couples Employment (CE) project in Baltimore, Maryland, a voluntary intervention to simultaneously address employment, financial literacy, and relationship issues, to capitalize on the ways that success in each might affect the other. Initial experiences highlighted the importance of defining a program model integrating family stability and economic success; identifying a strong program director; achieving an appropriate staff mix; and ma...

  7. Design and implementation of modular software for programming mobile robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Iocchi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a software development toolkit for programming mobile robots, that has been used on different platforms and for different robotic applications. We address design choices, implementation issues and results in the realization of our robot programming environment, that has been devised and built from many people since 1998. We believe that the proposed framework is extremely useful not only for experienced robotic software developers, but also for students approaching robotic research projects.

  8. Implementation of CONCEIVER++: An Object-Oriented Program Understanding System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor F.Z. Sani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Understanding on computer program is a complex cognitive activity. It is ability and also a difficult task especially for novice programmer. The object-oriented languages has widely used in education and industry recently. In programming it is important to have such software which can aid programmers or students to code the program. But, available program understanding systems using the plan based approach usually are developed for non-object-oriented programming languages. Reviewed from the available system also showed that none of the plan formalisms used is for an object-oriented language. Specifically, problem arises when the existing system is not usable for teaching programming purposes. Program understanding system with plan for object-oriented does not exist was the main reason why this research is being carried out. Approach: Method used on developed the program understanding system named CONCEIVER++ is Unified Approach (UA. The process involved from UA for developing and testing the system is iterative development and continuous testing. The process must be iterate and reiterate until satisfied with the system. In order to test the quality assurance of the system is by choosing the black box testing strategies. Results: The object-oriented program understanding system has been successfully implemented. The implementation is tested with an example of Java programming code. The binary search tree for control flow graph and linked list for plan has been generated. Results of understanding the meaning or semantic of the program codes also has been produced. The black box testing had shows that all statements of line of code of the example program have been recognized and the correctness output has been checked. Conclusion: The understanding module of CONCEIVER++, which are code/CFG processor, plan processor and recognition engine has been tested. All line of codes (or nodes has been recognized and got correct meaning

  9. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagan Abigail A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. Methods This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST drug prevention program with fidelity. Regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing four dimensions of fidelity: adherence, dosage, quality of delivery, and student responsiveness. Results Although most sites faced common barriers, such as finding room in the school schedule for the program, gaining full support from key participants (i.e., site coordinators, principals, and LST teachers, ensuring teacher participation in training workshops, and classroom management difficulties, most schools involved in the project implemented LST with very high levels of fidelity. Across sites, 86% of program objectives and activities required in the three-year curriculum were delivered to students. Moreover, teachers were observed using all four recommended teaching practices, and 71% of instructors taught all the required LST lessons. Multivariate analyses found that highly rated LST program characteristics and better student behavior were significantly related to a greater proportion of material taught by teachers (adherence. Instructors who rated the LST program characteristics as ideal were more likely to teach all lessons (dosage. Student behavior and use of interactive teaching techniques (quality of delivery were positively related. No variables were related to student participation (student responsiveness. Conclusion Although difficult, high implementation fidelity by community-based organizations can be achieved. This study suggests some important factors that

  10. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalic, Sharon F; Fagan, Abigail A; Argamaso, Susanne

    2008-01-18

    Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST) drug prevention program with fidelity. Regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing four dimensions of fidelity: adherence, dosage, quality of delivery, and student responsiveness. Although most sites faced common barriers, such as finding room in the school schedule for the program, gaining full support from key participants (i.e., site coordinators, principals, and LST teachers), ensuring teacher participation in training workshops, and classroom management difficulties, most schools involved in the project implemented LST with very high levels of fidelity. Across sites, 86% of program objectives and activities required in the three-year curriculum were delivered to students. Moreover, teachers were observed using all four recommended teaching practices, and 71% of instructors taught all the required LST lessons. Multivariate analyses found that highly rated LST program characteristics and better student behavior were significantly related to a greater proportion of material taught by teachers (adherence). Instructors who rated the LST program characteristics as ideal were more likely to teach all lessons (dosage). Student behavior and use of interactive teaching techniques (quality of delivery) were positively related. No variables were related to student participation (student responsiveness). Although difficult, high implementation fidelity by community-based organizations can be achieved. This study suggests some important factors that organizations should consider to ensure fidelity, such as

  11. 75 FR 63480 - Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance... Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), Public Law 111-3. Section 614... Security Act and for child health assistance expenditures under the Children's Health Insurance Program...

  12. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was <$1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementing an Inservice Program in Positive Discipline Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Richard; Martray, Carl

    Collaborative planning between Western Kentucky University and a local junior high school resulted in a successful new program for student discipline that was accepted and implemented by teachers and administrators. Inservice training was provided in positive discipline strategies, based on Glasser's reality therapy, over a two-year (1974-76)…

  14. Implementing Quality Service-Learning Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Lauren Weiner; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case comparative study at Western Community College and the University of the Coast explored through a constructive lens the characteristics that lead to sustainable, high quality service-learning programs and how they are implemented at institutions of higher education. The researchers determined that both Western Community College and…

  15. Implementing Quality Service-Learning Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Lauren Weiner; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case comparative study at Western Community College and the University of the Coast explored through a constructive lens the characteristics that lead to sustainable, high quality service-learning programs and how they are implemented at institutions of higher education. The researchers determined that both Western Community College and…

  16. Learning Computer Programming: Implementing a Fractal in a Turing Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hernane B. de B.; Zebende, Gilney F.; Moret, Marcelo A.

    2010-01-01

    It is common to start a course on computer programming logic by teaching the algorithm concept from the point of view of natural languages, but in a schematic way. In this sense we note that the students have difficulties in understanding and implementation of the problems proposed by the teacher. The main idea of this paper is to show that the…

  17. Implementing a Moral Education Program through Attitude Change Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard L.; Casper, Daniel

    1979-01-01

    Major theories of attitude change are explained: stimulus-response and reinforcement theory, functional theory, social judgment theory, and consistency theory. These theories are applied to the problems of influencing staff toward implementing a program of moral education. (Author/SJL)

  18. A Framework for Implementing TQM in Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide a TQM framework that stresses continuous improvements in teaching as a plausible means of TQM implementation in higher education programs. Design/methodology/approach: The literature survey of the TQM philosophies and the comparative analysis of TQM adoption in industry versus higher education provide the…

  19. Implementation of a Regional Program of Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, S. A.; Serikov, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and implementation of an educational administrative program in the Cheliabinsk Oblast region of post-Soviet Russia. The system attempted to assign appropriate responsibilities at the local level while maintaining a unified national system of education. Briefly discusses other problems concerning educational support and…

  20. A Framework for Implementing TQM in Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide a TQM framework that stresses continuous improvements in teaching as a plausible means of TQM implementation in higher education programs. Design/methodology/approach: The literature survey of the TQM philosophies and the comparative analysis of TQM adoption in industry versus higher education provide the…

  1. Implementing Probabilistic Abductive Logic Programming with Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2008-01-01

    A class of Probabilistic Abductive Logic Programs (PALPs) is introduced and an implementation is developed in CHR for solving abductive problems, providing minimal explanations with their probabilities. Both all-explanations and most-probable-explanations versions are given. Compared with other...... probabilistic versions of abductive logic programming, the approach is characterized by higher generality and a flexible and adaptable architecture which incorporates integrity constraints and interaction with external constraint solvers. A PALP is transformed in a systematic way into a CHR program which serves...

  2. A discharge planning program in orthopaedics: experiences in implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt-Hensrud, N; Severson, M; Hansen, D C; Holland, D E

    2001-01-01

    The acute care orthopaedic registered nurse plays a key role in assessing and communicating the continuing care needs of patient's and their families, coordinating community resources, and formulating a timely discharge plan to maximize rehabilitation and recovery. Developing and maintaining a staff nurse's discharge planning knowledge and skills can be a challenging endeavor. Discharge Planning Coordinators at a tertiary medical center developed and implemented a Discharge Planning Mentorship Program, an educational pilot program designed to enhance the knowledge and skill level of select nurses in the orthopaedic specialty practice, thus maximizing expert resources at the bedside. Program implementation and evaluation of role preparation, practice changes, and actualization challenges are discussed in this article. Overall, participants demonstrated increased skill in articulating and problem solving a patient's postdischarge needs, devised creative strategies to enhance communication between multiple levels of care, and developed a greater knowledge of community resources and reimbursement mechanisms for continuing care.

  3. Overcoming Molehills and Mountains Implementing a New Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salute, Joan; McDougal, John; Stephens, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the challenges and accomplishments of implementing a new program. The purpose of the presentation is to: (1) Share the challenges that were encountered formulating a new program concurrent with formulating & implementing new spacecraft development projects: (a) Immature mission concepts put on the fast track (b) Need to reconcile ambitious objectives with cost and budget reality (c) Changes of major stakeholders (d) Timing, timing, timing (e) Changing ground rules, assumptions, and risk tolerance (f) The role of centers, (2) Share the successes to date despite the challenges (3) Demonstrate how interdependencies between the program, projects, NASA HQ environment, and external political forces affect the process, and how expectations must be managed while dealing with external factors and great change.

  4. Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

  5. Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

    2011-04-11

    Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

  6. Implementation of SQLite database support in program gama-local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Petras

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The program gama-local is a part of GNU Gama project and allows adjustment of local geodetic networks. Before realization of this project the program gama-local supported only XML as an input. I designed and implemented support for the SQLite database and thanks to this extension gama-local can read input data from the SQLite database. This article is focused on the specifics of the use of callback functions in C++ using the native SQLite C/C++ Application Programming Interface. The article provides solution to safe calling of callback functions written in C++. Callback functions are called from C library and C library itself is used by C++ program. Provided solution combines several programing techniques which are described in detail, so this article can serve as a cookbook even for beginner programmers.  This project was accomplished within my bachelor thesis.

  7. Taiwan Teacher Preparation Program Evaluation: Some Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tze-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences and changes of recent Taiwan teacher preparation program evaluation (TTPPE) as one of the national evaluation projects conducted by the Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan. The main concerns are what kind of ideology is transformed through the policy by means of evaluation, and what…

  8. A Proposal for Improving Administrative Preparation and Certification Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsonis, William A.

    Administration is the process of working with and through others to efficiently accomplish organizational goals by planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. The basic skills required by an effective administrator are technical, human, and conceptual. A strong school administrator preparation and certification program resembles the classical…

  9. A Proposal for Improving Administrative Preparation and Certification Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsonis, William A.

    Administration is the process of working with and through others to efficiently accomplish organizational goals by planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. The basic skills required by an effective administrator are technical, human, and conceptual. A strong school administrator preparation and certification program resembles the classical…

  10. Reforming Preparation Programs for Leadership Improvement: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Byng, June; Garza, Encarnacion; Thompson, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a case of how changes in standards for principal certification--as required by the State Board of Educator Certification since its establishment in 1995--were meant to promote changes in principal preparation programs in the state of Texas. The examination considers whether the changes were significant in terms of intended…

  11. Meeting the Pepsi Challenge: Preparing Evaluation Programs for Scholastic Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Mona S.

    This document provides guidelines for preparing evaluation programs for scholastic improvement. The philosophy underlying assessment and accountability is discussed, with specific reference to the positive and negative aspects of assessment. The design of a curriculum evaluation model is presented, including goal identification, data gathering,…

  12. Reforming Preparation Programs for Leadership Improvement: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Byng, June; Garza, Encarnacion; Thompson, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a case of how changes in standards for principal certification--as required by the State Board of Educator Certification since its establishment in 1995--were meant to promote changes in principal preparation programs in the state of Texas. The examination considers whether the changes were significant in terms of intended…

  13. On the Preparation and Implementation of Research Budget in Agricultural Institutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia; LI; Hezhong; DONG

    2014-01-01

    Over the years,more attention has been focused on the implementation than on the preparation of the research budget in the agricultural institutes of China,resulting in the unscientific and unreasonable budgeting of research funds. The practical implementation of the research funds has also been adversely affected. In this paper,the problems as well as the root causes of those problems in the budgeting and implementation of research funds were analyzed,and corresponding solutions and suggestions were also presented.

  14. Oil program implementation plan FY 1996--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document reaffirms the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy commitment to implement the National Oil Research Program in a way to maximize assurance of energy security, economic growth, environmental protection, jobs, improved economic competitiveness, and improved US balance of trade. There are two sections and an appendix in this document. Section 1 is background information that guided its formulation and a summary of the Oil Program Implementation Plan. This summary includes mission statements, major program drivers, oil issues and trends, budget issues, customers/stakeholders, technology transfer, measures of program effectiveness, and benefits. Section 2 contains more detailed program descriptions for the eight technical areas and the NIPER infrastructure. The eight technical areas are reservoir characterization; extraction research; exploration, drilling, and risk-based decision management; analysis and planning; technology transfer; field demonstration projects; oil downstream operations; and environmental research. Each description contains an overview of the program, descriptions on main areas, a discussion of stakeholders, impacts, planned budget projections, projected schedules with Gantt charts, and measures of effectiveness. The appendix is a summary of comments from industry on an earlier draft of the plan. Although changes were made in response to the comments, many of the suggestions will be used as guidance for the FY 1997--2001 plan.

  15. The Implementation of Full ATLAS Detector Simulation Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is one of the most sophisticated and huge detectors ever designed up to now.A detailed,flexible and complete simulation program is needed in order to study the characteristics and possible problems of such a challenging apparatus and to answer to all raising questions in terms of physics,design optimization,etc.To cope with these needs we are implementing an application based on the simulation framework FADS/Goofy(Framework for ATLAS Detector Simulation /Geant4-based Object-Oriented Folly)in the Geant4 environment.The user's specific code implementation is presented in detalils for the different applications implemented until now,from the various components of the ATLAS spectrometer top some particular testbeam facilities,particular emphasis is put in describing the simulation of the Muon Spectrometer and its subsystems as a test case for the implementation of the whole detector simulation program:the intrinsic complexity in the geometry description of the Muon System is one of the more demanding problems that are faced.The magnetic field handling,the physics impact in the event processing in presence of backgrounds from different sources and the implementation of different possible generators(including Pythia) are also discussed.

  16. Preparing Youth for the 21st Century Knowledge Economy: Youth Programs and Workforce Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Graham R.; Ferrari, Theresa M.

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the idea of preparing youth for the workforce has taken on new meaning. The shift to a knowledge economy has brought widespread concern that young people are entering the workforce without the skills employers value most, such as communication, critical thinking, leadership, and teamwork skills. As youth programs evaluate how…

  17. Behavior and Classroom Management: Are Teacher Preparation Programs Really Preparing Our Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Andrea; McKenna, John William; Haring, Christa D.

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that many teachers are underprepared for the behaviors that their students may bring to the classroom, resulting in challenges to teaching and learning. The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior management content included in preservice teacher preparation programs for general education and special education teachers.…

  18. Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually.

  19. Standard Review Plan Maintenance Program implementing procedures document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The implementing Procedures Document (IPD) was developed by the Inspection Program Projects Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, with assistance from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, for the Standard Review Plan Maintenance Program (SRP-MP). The SRP-MP was established to maintain the Standard Review Plan (SRP) on an on-going basis. The IPD provides guidance, including an overall approach and procedures, for SRP-MP tasks. The objective of the IPD is to ensure that modifications to SRP need to reflect current NRC requirements and guidance are identified and that a consistent methodology is used to develop and revise SRP sections.

  20. Implementation of the Danish return-to-work program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aust, Birgit; D. Nielsen, Maj Britt; Grundtvig, Gry

    2015-01-01

    of the Danish RTW program, however, large variations existed between municipalities. Establishment of well-functioning interdisciplinary RTW teams might require more time and resources, while ensuring early assessment and more frequent cooperation with employers might need more general adjustments in the Danish...... management system to an acceptable degree, ie, establishment of RTW teams, participation of RTW team members in the training courses, and following the general procedures of the program. However, the level of implementation varied considerably between the municipalities, particularly with respect to fidelity...... (defined as implementation consistent with the principles of the interdisciplinary RTW process). Five municipalities had high and eight had low fidelity scores. Similar large differences were found with regard to dose-delivered, particularly in the quality of cooperation with beneficiaries, employers...

  1. Importance of implementing program Screening Neonatal Hemoglobinopathies in Cape Verde

    OpenAIRE

    Leonel Barbosa Goncalves

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are hereditary blood diseases, the most frequent sickle cell anemia. To date not have curative treatment, unless bone marrow transplant, which has yet been carried out experimentally. The implementation of screening programs of hemoglobinopathies in health services in Cape Verde is shown to be of great relevance and importance to public health, as it will allow early detection and treatment associated with hemoglobinopathies. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(1.000): 87-88

  2. Lessons Learned in Regional Sediment Management: The Mobile District Demonstration Program; Technical Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The goal of the US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile Districts (CESAM) Regional Sediment Management (RSM) technical program was to develop and apply...documents the lessons learned from the RSM technical program implementation by the US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District, Mobile, AL.

  3. Pile Structure Program, Projected Start Date : January 1, 2010 (Implementation).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Chris; Corbett, Catherine [Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership; Ebberts, Blaine [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2009-07-27

    The 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion includes Reasonable and Prudent Alternative 38-Piling and Piling Dike Removal Program. This RPA directs the Action Agencies to work with the Estuary Partnership to develop and implement a piling and pile dike removal program. The program has since evolved to include modifying pile structures to enhance their habitat value and complexity by adding large woody debris. The geographic extent of the Pile Structure Program (PSP) includes all tidally-influenced portions of the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam; however, it will focus on the mainstem. The overarching goal of the PSP is to enhance and restore ecosystem structure and function for the recovery of federally listed salmonids through the active management of pile structures. To attain this goal, the program team developed the following objectives: (1) Develop a plan to remove or modify pile structures that have lower value to navigation channel maintenance, and in which removal or modification will present low-risk to adjacent land use, is cost-effective, and would result in increased ecosystem function. (2) Determine program benefits for juvenile salmonids and the ecosystem through a series of intensively monitored pilot projects. (3) Incorporate best available science and pilot project results into an adaptive management framework that will guide future management by prioritizing projects with the highest benefits. The PSP's hypotheses, which form the basis of the pilot project experiments, are organized into five categories: Sediment and Habitat-forming Processes, Habitat Conditions and Food Web, Piscivorous Fish, Piscivorous Birds, and Toxic Contaminant Reduction. These hypotheses are based on the effects listed in the Estuary Module (NOAA Fisheries in press) and others that emerged during literature reviews, discussions with scientists, and field visits. Using pilot project findings, future implementation will be adaptively managed

  4. Design and implementation of population-based specialty care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botts, Sheila R; Gee, Michael T; Chang, Christopher C; Young, Iris; Saito, Logan; Lyman, Alfred E

    2017-09-15

    The development, implementation, and scaling of 3 population-based specialty care programs in a large integrated healthcare system are reviewed, and the role of clinical pharmacy services in ensuring safe, effective, and affordable care is highlighted. The Kaiser Permanente (KP) integrated healthcare delivery model allows for rapid development and expansion of innovative population management programs involving pharmacy services. Clinical pharmacists have assumed integral roles in improving the safety and effectiveness of high-complexity, high-cost care for specialty populations. These roles require an appropriate practice scope and are supported by an advanced electronic health record with disease registries and electronic surveillance tools for care-gap identification. The 3 specialty population programs described were implemented to address variation or unrecognized gaps in care for at-risk specialty populations. The Home Phototherapy Program has leveraged internal partnerships with clinical pharmacists to improve access to cost-effective nonpharmacologic interventions for psoriasis and other skin disorders. The Multiple Sclerosis Care Program has incorporated clinical pharmacists into neurology care in order to apply clinical guidelines in a systematic manner. The KP SureNet program has used clinical pharmacists and data analytics to identify opportunities to prevent drug-related adverse outcomes and ensure timely follow-up. Specialty care programs improve quality, cost outcomes, and the patient experience by appropriating resources to provide systematic and targeted care to high-risk patients. KP leverages an integration of people, processes, and technology to develop and scale population-based specialty care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Program Evaluation: A Study of the Impact of a Workforce Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Stephanie Strevels

    2010-01-01

    The Kentucky 4-H Reality Store, a workforce preparation program was established to educate youth about the importance of budgeting, setting goals, planning for careers, considering the future, preventing teen pregnancy, and abstaining from drug misuse. The program which has been administered to over 45,000 adolescents each year has never been…

  6. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.

  7. Implementation of psychiatric-focused lifestyle medicine programs in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Nishi, Daisuke; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Su, Kuan-Pin; Bannatyne, Amy; Oliver, Georgina; Kua, Ee-Heok; Ng, Chee Hong

    2015-12-01

    Lifestyle-focused health programs are growing in interest throughout Western society, and a range of lifestyle factors are known to enhance both physical and mental health. However, it remains largely unknown as to whether this approach is salient for the Asian context. The major components of integrative lifestyle-focused health programs to enhance mental and physical health are considered to include the evidence-based adoption of physical activity and exercise, dietary modification, general psychoeducation, adequate relaxation/sleep and social interaction, use of mindfulness techniques, the reduction of substance use, attention of intersecting environmental factors, and the potential use of motivation and goal-setting techniques. This paper outlines an overview of the evidence underpinning these elements, and discusses potential barriers and challenges, and what logistical considerations may need to be addressed in the implementation of such programs within the context of Asian cultures.

  8. Implementation of the Principles of Tpm in Field of Maintenance Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimíra Schindlerová

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Total Productive Maintenance (TPM is one of the ways to ensure efficient production processes. TPM is primarily associated with the management of maintenance of production equipment. This article deals with the possible implementation of total productive maintenance in other field of maintenance of working means, and it the maintenance of preparations. Experience from practice shows that TPM approaches may be suitable for the maintenance management in this field. In this article are stated the conclusions drawn from the implementation of the principles of TPM in a concrete enterprise having available about 14,400 preparations.

  9. Assessment of required resources for implementation of national breast cancer screening program in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Nemanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High values of standardized mortality and morbidity rates of standardized cancer mortality in Serbia, especially colorectal, cervical and breast cancer led to creation of national programs for their early detection and engagement of the international support for their implementation. Objective. Assessment of required resources (time, personnel, financial to implement the National program for screening of breast cancer in the Republic of Serbia. Methods. Three possible scenarios have been prepared (optimistic, realistic and pessimistic based on the expected coverage by screening of women aged 45 to 69 years, and time, personnel and financial feasibility estimates were made for a two-year screening cycle. Results. Time aspect of feasibility even under conditions of “relaxation” of the assumption on the number of working days during the year did not question feasibility of any of the scenarios. Personnel feasibility is only possible in the pessimistic scenario, while the financial feasibility only makes sense in optimistic scenario as the least unfavorable solution due to economies of scale. Conclusion. Establishment of the initial base of skilled radiologists and radiology technicians and the system for their continuous medical education as well as allocation of specific MoH budget line for screening program expenditures, along with donated mammographs and good organization and coordination, may provide unobstructed implementation of the National program for early detection of breast cancer in the Republic of Serbia.

  10. Ready from Day One: An Examination of One Principal Preparation Program's Redesign in Collaboration with Local School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, W. Sean; Valadez, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a newly implemented model of principal preparation at a public university in the southwestern United States. The authors begin by identifying a number of innovative practices currently being carried out within educational administration programs across the United States. Informed by the context of these national models, the…

  11. Implementation analysis of lean enablers for managing engineering programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arnim, Joachim; Oehmen, Josef; Rebentisch, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research to improve the applicability of the Lean Enablers and consists of two parts. The first is a case study of a very successful project management maturity improvement initiative at Siemens Industry Sector’s Industry Automation division in the US. It views the initiative...... from the perspective of the Lean Enablers [Oehmen 2012] and is based on information from [Sopko 2012a], [Sopko 2012b], [Sopko 2010], [Sopko 2009], interviews, internal documentation, and the used MSP program management methodology [UK 2011]. The analysis of Lean Enablers incorporated in the MSP...... framework reveals the potential of Lean Enablers being applied in change programs. Incorporating the knowledge gained in the case study, the second part shows the development of a framework for the implementation of Lean Enablers....

  12. Dynamics of the public concern and risk communication program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaryabova, Victoria; Israel, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The public concern about electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure varies due to different reasons. A part of them are connected with the better and higher quality of information that people receive from science, media, Internet, social networks, industry, but others are based on good communication programs performed by the responsible institutions, administration and persons. Especially, in Bulgaria, public concern follows interesting changes, some of them in correlation with the European processes of concern, but others following the economic and political processes in the country. Here, we analyze the dynamics of the public concern over the last 10 years. Our explanation of the decrease of the people's complaints against EMF exposure from base stations for mobile communication is as a result of our risk communication program that is in implementation for >10 years.

  13. 77 FR 31499 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Operating Permits Program; Commonwealth of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Program; Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Administrative Changes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... clarity of the rules contained in the Commonwealth's Implementation Plan and Operating Permits Program...

  14. Using information management to implement a clinical resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, A H

    1997-12-01

    This article provides a consultant's account of a 250-bed community hospital's experience in implementing the Clinical Resource Management (CRM) program, a four-stage process of using information to identify opportunities for improvement, developing an effective resource management team, implementing process improvement activities, and measuring the impact on outcomes of care. CASE STUDY EXAMPLE--CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: The chair of the departments of internal medicine and family practice selected congestive heart failure for in-depth study. A task force focused on treatment and patient disposition in the emergency room (ER), where most of the nonelective admissions originated. A set of standardized ER orders was developed that emphasized rapid and effective diuresis through the initiation of a progressive diuretic dosing schedule directly linked to patient response. Factors critical to the success of the CRM program included allocating adequate time to promote and sell the value and importance of the program, as well as securing the support of both information systems and physicians. The main barriers to success involved limitations in the information system infrastructure and delays attributable to committee review. Short-term results from the CRM program were encouraging, with average lengths of stay reduced by 0.5 days and average costs of care reduced by 12% for the ten diagnoses studied with no adverse results. Nonstudy diagnoses showed no notable improvement. Recognizing the growing importance of information management not only for clinical decision support but for accommodating all the necessary internal and external reporting requirements will require a significant commitment and investment in technology and personnel resources.

  15. Effects of three types of retirement preparation program: A qualitative study of civil servants in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leandro-França, C.; van Solinge, H.; Henkens, K.; Giardini Murta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of retirement planning programs are relatively scarce. Retirement preparation and planning programs may assist individuals to smooth the transition to retirement and subsequent adjustment. This qualitative study examines the effects of three retirement preparation progra

  16. Report: EPA Prepared to Implement Strategic Human Capital Management Activities But Challenges Remain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2004-P-00024, September 20, 2004. EPA’s headquarters and regional offices are prepared to implement strategic human capital management activities, but an alignment of office-level activities to the Agency’s Strategy for Human Capital is lacking.

  17. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  18. Preparing Students for College: The Implementation and Impact of the Early College High School Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Glennie, Elizabeth; Willse, John; Arshavsky, Nina; Unlu, Fatih; Bartz, Deborah; Silberman, Todd; Scales, W. David; Dallas, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As implemented in North Carolina, Early College High Schools are small, autonomous schools designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and are prepared for postsecondary education. Targeted at students who are underrepresented in college, these schools are most frequently located on college campuses and are intended…

  19. School Nutrition Directors' Perspectives on Preparing for and Implementing USDA's New School Meal Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Bethany A.; Amin, Sarah A.; Taylor, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) new school meals regulations went into effect in July 2012. The purpose of this research was to explore school nutrition director's (SNDs) perspectives and attitudes about the new regulations and to identify strategies used to prepare for and subsequently implement the regulations.…

  20. The Implementation of an Intercultural Competence Syllabus to Prepare Study-Abroad Students for Global Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kural, Faruk; Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the outcome of the implementation of a process-oriented model of an intercultural competence (IC) and English as a lingua franca (ELF)-awareness development syllabus to prepare government-sponsored Turkish international sojourners for global communication in English L1 countries. Based on social constructivist research…

  1. The Implementation of an Intercultural Competence Syllabus to Prepare Study-Abroad Students for Global Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kural, Faruk; Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the outcome of the implementation of a process-oriented model of an intercultural competence (IC) and English as a lingua franca (ELF)-awareness development syllabus to prepare government-sponsored Turkish international sojourners for global communication in English L1 countries. Based on social constructivist research…

  2. Program to prepare school level supervisors for professional pedagogical guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isdarey Hernández González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Doing an appropriate professional pedagogical guidance becomes a social problem of top priority, due to the fact that when students get to Ninth Grade they face, for the first time, the chance to select a school to continue his studies. However, there are barriers around this social task; like the lack of schools staff preparation and particularly that of the school level supervisors who should lead the School Grade Boards, among its functions are to plan actions for labour and vocational development and also for the professional pedagogical guidance. This article is a result of a research activity carried out by the author who is a Ph. D. Candidate on Pedagogical Sciences. This investigation has as an objective to propose a developmental program to increase the school level supervisors preparation on the professional pedagogical guidance in Junior High School. This program is conceived as a system and starts with an upgrade course, goes on with workshops and ends with a training course. Its main axis is the research method acquisition. This program was carried out through pedagogical practice and showed its efficiency.

  3. Strategic Challenges of PMTCT Program Implementation in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcha, Taye T; Lecerof, Susanne S; Jeppsson, Anders R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the achievement of the prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) program and to describe the strategic challenges of its implementation in the the Oromia region, Ethiopia. PMTCT program reports were collected over a period of 12 months from 25 zones of Oromia region. The health facilities in these zones include 28 hospitals and 84 health centers. The reports were analyzed with regard to international and national policies, guidelines, and priorities. Meanwhile, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the government and an nongovernmental organization (NGO). The reports showed that 72 277 (47%) pregnant women who attended antenatal care were tested for HIV. Although 1461 (65%) HIV-positive women walked away without intervention, 1579 (71%) babies born to HIV-positive mothers did not access prophylactic medicine. Interviews with key informants revealed that stakeholders' inertia to coordinated action, disconnect between the regional office and service providers at the grassroots, and an unclear national policy on HIV were major challenges to the program. Addressing policy issues and setting clear purposes for all partners need a committed local leadership and program ownership at regional and federal levels.

  4. An Imperative for Leadership Preparation Programs: Preparing Future Leaders to Meet the Needs of Students, Schools, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the structure, philosophy, and curriculum of educational leadership preparation programs and the importance of preparing schools leaders to address the unique needs of students and communities. In particular, it will address how programs can be enhanced by integrating organizational research and philosophies from educational,…

  5. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLACE, B.G.

    2000-11-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 2000) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994) and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) (48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 48 CFR 970.5204-78). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements is discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification; and Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs).

  6. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLACE, B.G.

    2000-11-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 2000) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994) and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) (48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 48 CFR 970.5204-78). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements is discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification; and Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs).

  7. The Lassen Astrobiology Intern Program - Concept, Implementation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Dueck, S. L.; Davis, H. B.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kubo, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The program goal was to provide a hands-on astrobiology learning experience to high school students by introducing astrobiology and providing opportunities to conduct field and lab research with NASA scientists. The program sought to increase interest in interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, math and related careers. Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP), Red Bluff High School and the Ames Team of the NASA Astrobiology Institute led the program. LVNP was selected because it shares aspects of volcanism with Mars and it hosts thermal springs with microbial mat communities. Students documented volcanic deposits, springs and microbial mats. They analyzed waters and sampled rocks, water and microorganisms. They cultured microorganisms and studied chemical reactions between rocks and simulated spring waters. Each student prepared a report to present data and discuss relationships between volcanic rocks and gases, spring waters and microbial mats. At a "graduation" event the students presented their findings to the Red Bluff community. They visited Ames Research Center to tour the facilities and learn about science and technology careers. To evaluate program impact, surveys were given to students after lectures, labs, fieldwork and discussions with Ames scientists. Students' work was scored using rubrics (labs, progress reports, final report, presentation). Students took pre/post tests on core astrobiology concepts. Parents, teachers, rangers, Ames staff and students completed end-of-year surveys on program impact. Several outcomes were documented. Students had a unique and highly valued learning experience with NASA scientists. They understood what scientists do through authentic scientific work, and what scientists are like as individuals. Students became knowledgeable about astrobiology and how it can be pursued in the lab and in the field. The students' interest increased markedly in astrobiology, interdisciplinary studies and science generally.

  8. State-Mandated Principal Preparation Program Redesign: Impetus for Reform or Invitation to Chaos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing criticism of practicing educational leaders has led to additional critiques of the university programs in which they are prepared. In response, many states have mandated statewide university preparation program redesign. The articles in this special issue describe five unique cases of principal preparation program redesign--including…

  9. The School Leadership Program Communication Hub: Building Actionable Knowledge about Improving Leadership Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myran, Steve; Sanzo, Karen; Clayton, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Recent critics of university-based educational leadership preparations programs have alleged that the programs are out of touch with the contemporary practices of PK-12 school leaders. These complaints about preparation programs have resulted in new and innovative ways to prepare leaders, including the federally funded United States Department of…

  10. Implementing a prenatal oral health program through interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeffrey T; Quinonez, Rocio B; Kerns, Amanda K; Chuang, Alice; Eidson, R Scott; Boggess, Kim A; Weintraub, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    Interprofessional collaboration has become a critical component of accreditation standards in dentistry and medicine. This article reports on implementation in an academic setting of a prenatal oral health program (pOHP) that addresses coordinated care, accreditation standards, and new clinical practice guidelines. The pOHP is an educational intervention for third-year medical students, residents, and faculty members to deliver preventive oral health information and referral to a dental home for pregnant women. At the same time, senior dental students and faculty members are introduced to prenatal oral health principles and delivery of comprehensive oral health care to pregnant women. A systems-based approach was used to guide the pOHP implementation during the 2012-13 academic year. Participants were 96 third-year medical students (50% of the total in an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship) and all 81 fourth-year dental students. During that academic year, 126 dental referrals were made to the School of Dentistry, and 55 women presented for care, resulting in 50% (n=40) of dental students participating in the clinical experience and delivery of simple to complex oral health procedures. The prenatal period is a frequently missed opportunity to address oral health care. The pOHP is an interprofessional collaboration model designed to educate dental and medical providers and provide a system of referral for comprehensive clinical care of pregnant patients, including educating women about their oral health and that of their children. Such programs can help meet interprofessional accreditation standards and encourage implementation of practice guidelines.

  11. Open Groups: Adaptations in Implementing a Parent Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna-Jean P. Brock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Programs that focus on positive parenting have been shown to improve parental attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, and increase parent and child bonding. These programs are typically conducted in a closed group format. However, when individual or community needs are more immediate, programmers sometimes opt for an open group format. To determine the effectiveness of this adaptation to an open group format, the present study compared both groups on parental outcomes. Methods: Both closed and open group formats were offered and implemented between January 2009 and December 2012. Participants for both formats were recruited through similar means and the format placement for each family was determined by the immediacy of the need for an intervention, the time lapse until a new cycle would begin, and scheduling flexibility. Chi-Square analyses were conducted to determine demographic differences between the two groups and gain scores were calculated from the pre- and post-test AAPI-2 scales within a mixed MANOVA to determine group for-mat effectiveness. Results: Though open groups contained higher risk families; parental out-come improvements were significant for both groups. All participants, regardless of group membership, demonstrated the same statistically significant improvements following completion of the program. Conclusion: Findings provide support for adapting group formats when necessary to fit community and individual needs.

  12. Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) pollution prevention program implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Place, B.G., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-31

    This plan documents the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program. The subject implementation plan has been updated to reflect the Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 contract structure in which Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) is the management and integration contractor. The P2/WMin Program scope includes FDH as the principal PHMC contractor, and B&W Hanford Company (BWHC), Duke Engineering & Services Hanford, Inc. (DESH), Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, (LMHC), Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC), Rust Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (RFSH), and DynCorp Tri-Cities Services, Inc. (DYN) as PHMC contractors, as well as subcontracting enterprise companies, such as Fluor Daniel Northwest, Inc. (FDNW), Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. (LMSI), and Rust Federal Services Northwest (RFS), which provide engineering, operation, construction, maintenance, and computer services for the Hanford Site. The P2/WMin Program scope also includes all other subcontractor-affiliated enterprise companies, such as B&W Protec, Inc. (BWP), DE&S Northwest, Inc. (DESNW), and SGN Eurisys Services Corp. (SESC).

  13. When Intentions and Reality Clash: Inherent Implementation Difficulties of an Induction Program for New Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresko, Barbara; Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia

    2009-01-01

    New teachers are often required to go through an induction program in order to become fully certified. Induction programs are varied and the overall picture regarding their implementation is uneven. The present paper addresses the gap between program policy and implementation regarding various aspects of the Israeli teacher induction program. Data…

  14. Preparing Teachers to Use GIS: The Impact of a Hybrid Professional Development Program on Teachers' Use of GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Steven; Haviland, Don; Moore, William; Tran, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This article reports the findings of a 3-year study of a hybrid professional development program designed to prepare science and mathematics teachers to implement GIS in their classrooms. The study was conducted as part of the CoastLines Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers project funded by the National Science Foundation. Three cohorts of teachers participated in the program, with each participant receiving 40 h of synchronous online instruction and 80 h of in-person instruction and support over an 8-month period. Data from surveys of participants both before and after the program were analyzed using correlation, ordinary least squares, and ordered logit regression analyses. The analyses revealed increases in the self-reported frequency of GIS use and enhanced feelings of preparation, competence, community, and comfort with respect to using GIS for instruction. A composite index of all impact variables was positively influenced as well. The statistical analyses found a strong relationship between self-reported feelings of preparation and use of GIS. Some support was found for the idea that feelings of competence, community, and comfort were related to the teachers' sense of preparation. The findings suggest that a robust hybrid model of teacher professional development can prepare teachers to use GIS in their classrooms. More research is needed to understand how hybrid models influence the sociopsychological and other dimensions that support teachers' feelings of preparation to implement GIS.

  15. Preparing Teachers to Use GIS: The Impact of a Hybrid Professional Development Program on Teachers' Use of GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Steven; Haviland, Don; Moore, William; Tran, Michael

    2016-12-01

    This article reports the findings of a 3-year study of a hybrid professional development program designed to prepare science and mathematics teachers to implement GIS in their classrooms. The study was conducted as part of the CoastLines Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers project funded by the National Science Foundation. Three cohorts of teachers participated in the program, with each participant receiving 40 h of synchronous online instruction and 80 h of in-person instruction and support over an 8-month period. Data from surveys of participants both before and after the program were analyzed using correlation, ordinary least squares, and ordered logit regression analyses. The analyses revealed increases in the self-reported frequency of GIS use and enhanced feelings of preparation, competence, community, and comfort with respect to using GIS for instruction. A composite index of all impact variables was positively influenced as well. The statistical analyses found a strong relationship between self-reported feelings of preparation and use of GIS. Some support was found for the idea that feelings of competence, community, and comfort were related to the teachers' sense of preparation. The findings suggest that a robust hybrid model of teacher professional development can prepare teachers to use GIS in their classrooms. More research is needed to understand how hybrid models influence the sociopsychological and other dimensions that support teachers' feelings of preparation to implement GIS.

  16. [Psychological support for road accident participants: the program implementation outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuczewska-Wośko, Aleksandra; Biłyj, Dorota; Tomczyk, Jarosław

    2009-01-01

    Road accident belongs to one of the categories of traumatic events, and can cause posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The most common psychological consequences of road traffic accidents are the emotional disorders, cognitive deficits (disorders concentration of attention and memory function), impaired social relationships, troubles with performing work duties and physical symp-toms of stress. The article discusses the program of psychological support given to the participants of road accidents, conducted in Wroclaw, its theoretical assumptions and the mode of its implementation. Basic theoretical assumptions of the program are inter alia based on the theories of H. Selye and R. Lazarus. The authors of this article also refer to the so-called therapeutic process of education designed by Everly and Rosenfeld, who recommend that the process of developing self-responsibility be used for therapeutic purposes. This requires clarifying the exact nature of the problem, and then looking for possible remedies. The program is open to all road accident participants (victims, perpetrators, witnesses) and their families. Classes are designed to combine theory (lectures) and practice (exercises). Anxiety and cognitive processes, as well as relaxation training, interpersonal training (eg, assertiveness) and kinesiology are the major areas of activities. Psychological support provided for road accident participants is of intervention--and preventive nature; intervention, as it relates to the consequences ofa specific stressogenic event, namely a road accident; preventive, as it serves the overriding purpose--the improvement of road safety. This article presents the main findings of the program, the results of the survey evaluation, and proposals to develop psychological operations aimed at the road accidents participants.

  17. Feared, Forgotten, or Forbidden: Sexual Orientation Topics in Secondary Teacher Preparation Programs in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Gary; Jennings, Todd

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the coverage of sexual orientation topics within 77 public university secondary teacher preparation programs across seven US states, and represented programs preparing 8,300-11,500 teachers annually. Findings indicated that 40% of programs did not address sexual orientation as a diversity topic. Further, even programs that did…

  18. The Work Disability Prevention CIHR Strategic Training Program: program performance after 5 years of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Patrick; Hong, Quan Nha; Imbeau, Daniel; Lippel, Katherine; Guzman, Jaime; Maceachen, Ellen; Corbière, Marc; Santos, Brenda R; Anema, Johannes R

    2009-03-01

    The Work Disability Prevention (WDP) Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program was developed in 2001 and is a unique program in the world. The main objective of this program is to help future researchers develop transdisciplinary knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding WDP. The purpose of this paper is to present a descriptive portrait of the program's performance over the past 5 years, as well as the trainees' and alumni's perspectives on the WDP CIHR Training Program. Data on the program's performance were collected from documents in the program records. The trainees' opinions on the WDP training program were obtained through focus groups and telephone interviews. The data collected were compiled and divided into themes to summarize the qualitative findings pertaining to each question. From 2003 to 2007, five successive summer sessions have been offered, involving 44 high-caliber applicants from nine countries, 34 mentors and collaborators, 29 guest speakers and 15 stakeholders. Overall, trainees appreciated the networking, the opportunity to interact with people from different disciplines and countries, the openness, and the international perspective and uniqueness of the program. The least appreciated aspects concerned mainly the e-learning course, evaluations and information on optional courses. The coordination and logistics were judged appropriate and several topics were suggested to improve the program quality. In general, the program implementation went well, with good participation from mentors, speakers and stakeholders; the program was appreciated by the trainees and alumni. This paper underscores the importance of the international perspective, the transdisciplinarity and the scientific networking established through the program.

  19. [Implementation of a rational standard of hygiene for preparation of operating rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Scheithauer, S; Moerer, O; Pütz, H; Sliwa, B; Schmidt, C E; Russo, S G; Waeschle, R M

    2015-10-01

    The assurance of high standards of care is a major requirement in German hospitals while cost reduction and efficient use of resources are mandatory. These requirements are particularly evident in the high-risk and cost-intensive operating theatre field with multiple process steps. The cleaning of operating rooms (OR) between surgical procedures is of major relevance for patient safety and requires time and human resources. The hygiene procedure plan for OR cleaning between operations at the university hospital in Göttingen was revised and optimized according to the plan-do-check-act principle due to not clearly defined specifications of responsibilities, use of resources, prolonged process times and increased staff engagement. The current status was evaluated in 2012 as part of the first step "plan". The subsequent step "do" included an expert symposium with external consultants, interdisciplinary consensus conferences with an actualization of the former hygiene procedure plan and the implementation process. All staff members involved were integrated into this management change process. The penetration rate of the training and information measures as well as the acceptance and compliance with the new hygiene procedure plan were reviewed within step "check". The rates of positive swabs and air sampling as well as of postoperative wound infections were analyzed for quality control and no evidence for a reduced effectiveness of the new hygiene plan was found. After the successful implementation of these measures the next improvement cycle ("act") was performed in 2014 which led to a simplification of the hygiene plan by reduction of the number of defined cleaning and disinfection programs for preparation of the OR. The reorganization measures described led to a comprehensive commitment of the hygiene procedure plan by distinct specifications for responsibilities, for the course of action and for the use of resources. Furthermore, a simplification of the plan, a

  20. Implementing a Drug Formulary for California's Workers' Compensation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O; Buttorff, Christine; Meza, Erika; Taylor, Erin Audrey; Mulcahy, Andrew W

    2017-06-01

    California Assembly Bill 1124 required the state's Division of Workers' Compensation in the Department of Industrial Relations to establish a drug formulary for all injured workers covered by the state's workers' compensation program. Such formularies serve to reinforce safe and effective prescribing patterns for practitioners and payers. In California, the formulary will need to be consistent with the Medical Treatment Utilization Schedule guidelines that define medically appropriate care for California's injured workers, create incentives to encourage prescribing of medically appropriate drugs, and reduce the administrative burdens associated with utilization review and medical necessity disputes. The objective of this study is to support the Division of Workers' Compensation in establishing the formulary. The authors compare and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of four existing formularies and the formulary used by California's Medicaid program. The authors then analyze the issues involved in structuring the drug formulary for California to be consistent with the treatment guidelines, explore related policies that should be addressed in implementing the formulary, and offer recommendations.

  1. Laptop Computers in Teacher Preparation: Lessons Learned from the University of South Florida Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ann E.; Feyten, Carine M.; Venable, Melissa; Hilbelink, Amy; Hogarty, Kristine Y.; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Lang, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the successful laptop implementation in the College of Education at the University of South Florida (USF). The pilot initiative began with one cohort of preservice teachers in 2003; since then, the program has expanded throughout the college. Through a chronological outline of the issues, formative evaluations,…

  2. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata V; Lemay, Kate S; Magin, Parker J; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-09-28

    Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence. A comprehensive evaluation of the training program was undertaken. Tailored training comprising a self-directed pre-work manual, practical workshop (using real patients), and practice scenarios, was developed and delivered by an inter-professional team (pharmacists, GPs). Supported by practical and written assessment, the training focused on the principles of BP management, BP measurement skills, and adherence strategies. Pharmacists' experience of the training (expectations, content, format, relevance) was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Immediate feedback was obtained via a questionnaire comprising Likert scales (1 = "very well" to 7 = "poor") and open-ended questions. Further in-depth qualitative evaluation was undertaken via semi-structured interviews several months post-training (and post service implementation). Seventeen pharmacists were recruited, trained and assessed as competent. All were highly satisfied with the training; other than the 'amount of information provided' (median score = 5, "just right"), all aspects of training attained the most positive score of '1'. Pharmacists most valued the integrated team-based approach, GP involvement, and inclusion of real patients, as well as the pre-reading manual, BP measurement workshop, and case studies (simulation). Post-implementation the interviews highlighted that comprehensive training increased pharmacists' confidence in providing the service, however, training of other pharmacy staff and patient recruitment strategies were highlighted as a need in future. Structured, multi-modal training involving simulated and inter-professional learning is effective in preparing

  3. Experimental Implementation of the Secondary 3 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S.: Observations Based on the Co-Walker Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Classroom observations based on the Co-Walker Scheme were conducted in 34 schools in order to examine the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 3 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in the Experimental Implementation Phase. Results showed that the overall level of program adherence was generally high (with an average of 82.8% and the mean ratings of the 13 items examining the implementation quality were all on the high side. Student participation and involvement, and the degree of achievement of the objectives, were the two significant predictors of both overall implementation quality and success of implementation, whereas lesson preparation was the third significant predictor of overall implementation quality. In conjunction with other process evaluation findings, the present study supports that the implementation quality of the Project P.A.T.H.S. is good.

  4. Implementation Of The National Program Comunity Empowerment Plan Strategic Community Development RESPEK Case Studi In Sota Disctrict Merauke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Tjilen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine how the preconditions of policy implementation to support policy implementation Respect Program and how communication between organizations resources executive attitudes and bureaucratic structures that occur in the implementation of policy in the Respect program Sota District Merauke. The method used is descriptive qualitative research. Source of data obtained are from interviews observation and documentation of research focusing on the implementation of the Respect in Sota District. The results showed precondition Respect program delivery policy implementation in general fall into the category of pretty but still so many things that need to be addressed. Dissemination activities have been carried out but implementation at the village level results are not optimal. Community participation is still passive and complementary. Communication between organizations constrained limits of authority between provincial and district governments resources available adequate but are constrained by the rules of the rules that limit. The attitude of the implementing agencies in accordance with the requirements and have high motivation fragmentation does not cause bottlenecks in policy. Bureaucratic structure has been prepared in accordance with the PTO but is still constrained in the monitoring and evaluation system is not running properly.

  5. Integrating English as a Second Language into Special Education Teacher Personnel Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Hudson, Roxanne F.

    2010-01-01

    Preparing educators who are culturally responsive and prepared to meet the needs of English-language learners is a national priority. Consequently, many teacher preparation programs are being encouraged to include English as a second-language content in their programs of study. The following case study describes the development and implementation…

  6. Evaluation of Project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 2 Program by the Program Implementers: Findings Based on the Experimental Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 49 schools (N = 8,167 students participated in the Secondary 2 Program of the Experimental Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes. After completion of the Tier 1 Program, 270 instructors completed the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form B to assess their views of the program, their own performance, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the schools to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a “reconstructed”” overall profile on the perceptions of the program implementers. Results showed that high proportions of the instructors had positive perceptions of the program and their own performance, and over 90% of the instructors regarded the program as helpful to the program participants. These findings are consistent with the subjective outcome evaluation findings based on the perspective of the program participants.

  7. Evaluation of project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 2 Program) by the program implementers: findings based on the Experimental Implementation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F; Lung, Daniel W M

    2008-05-23

    A total of 49 schools (N = 8,167 students) participated in the Secondary 2 Program of the Experimental Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes). After completion of the Tier 1 Program, 270 instructors completed the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form B) to assess their views of the program, their own performance, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the schools to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a "reconstructed" overall profile on the perceptions of the program implementers. Results showed that high proportions of the instructors had positive perceptions of the program and their own performance, and over 90% of the instructors regarded the program as helpful to the program participants. These findings are consistent with the subjective outcome evaluation findings based on the perspective of the program participants.

  8. Bibliography of marine radiation ecology prepared for the Seabed Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, V.S.

    1980-02-01

    References on the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms have been obtained from a number of sources. Many were obtained from reviews and other publications. Although the primary purpose of preparing this bibliography was to obtain information related to the nuclear wastes Seabed Disposal Biology Program of Sandia Laboratories, freshwater organisms are included as a matter of convenience and also with the belief that such a bibliography would be of interest to a wider audience than that restricted to the Seabed Program. While compilation of a list in an area broad in scope is often somewhat arbitrary, an attempt was made to reference publications that were related to field or laboratory studies of wild species of plants and animals with respect to radiation effects. Complete information concerning each reference are provided without excessive library search. Since one often finds references listed in the literature that are incompletely cited, it was not always possible to locate the reference for verification or completion of the citation. Such references are included where they appeared to be of possible value. When known, a reference is followed with its Nuclear Science Abstract designation, or rarely other abstract sources. Those desiring additional information should check Nuclear Science Abstracts utilizing the abstract number presented or other abstracting sources. In addition, the language of the article, other than English, is given when it is known to me.

  9. Innovative Noyce Program for Preparing High School Physics Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Eric; Kosheleva, Olga; Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2011-10-01

    The ``Robert Noyce Scholarships for Teaching Miners'' program at the University of Texas at El Paso currently consists of 14 mathematics majors minoring in secondary education, most of whom are preparing for the Mathematics-Physics Certification. From the time of their selection (junior year), till after they begin teaching, participants in this program will have financial support consisting of a 10,000 per year scholarship during the last two years in college. Programmatic support during these two years consists of four, half-day workshops emphasizing: 1) inquiry-based teaching, 2) mathematics & science integration, and 3) actual inquiry in the form of a senior research project. The workshops are facilitated by a team of university faculty and school district partners (EPISD and YISD). These district partners help with the workshops, but also mentor the scholars when placed at their classroom observation and student teacher sites. Once the scholars graduate and receive certification, they will experience unique induction year support: being hired in pairs or small groups and placed together in the same school. This placement with classmates combined with the mentoring of the same district personnel with whom they are familiar is hypothesized to be uniquely effective.

  10. Free for All: A Case Study Examining Implementation Factors of One-to-One Device Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sarah K.; Rennie, Ellie

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant investment in school one-to-one device programs, little is known about which aspects of program implementation work and why. Through a comparison of two implementation models, adopter-diffusion and saturation, and using existing data from the One Laptop per Child Australia laptop program, we explored how factors of…

  11. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  12. Implementation lessons: the importance of assessing organizational "fit" and external factors when implementing evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demby, Hilary; Gregory, Alethia; Broussard, Marsha; Dickherber, Jennifer; Atkins, Shantice; Jenner, Lynne W

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, the demand for evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs has increased, but practitioners often struggle to replicate and implement them as designed in real-world community settings. The purpose of this article is to describe the barriers and facilitators encountered during pilot year attempts to implement an evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention program within three types of organizations: (1) small community-based organizations; (2) a school-based organization; and (3) a large decentralized city-sponsored summer youth program. We frame our discussion of these experiences within the context of a systemic, multilevel framework for implementation consisting of (1) core implementation components; (2) organizational components; and (3) external factors. This article explores the organizational and external implementation factors we experienced during the implementation process, describes our lessons learned throughout this process, and offers strategies for other practitioners to proactively address these factors from the start of program planning. These findings may provide useful insight for other organizations looking to implement multi-session, group-level interventions with fidelity.

  13. Effects of Education Programs on Evidence-Based Practice Implementation for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jae Youn; Jang, Keum Seong; Kim, Nam Young

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of an education program for evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation of clinical nursing. EBP knowledge/skill, attitude, and belief; information search ability; and EBP implementation were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Furthermore, the effect on implementation was maintained at week 4 and week 8, indicating that the education program practically promotes the EBP implementation of nurses. Results confirm that the education program for EBP implementation is critical and the continuous education program is an essential part of EBP implementation. Also, to promote EBP implementation and disseminate it to nursing organizations, an immediate concern should be the cultivation of mentors for EBP and fortification of the belief and ability regarding EBP implementation. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):363-371.

  14. Inorganic Thin-film Sensor Membranes with PLD-prepared Chalcogenide Glasses: Challenges and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Schöning

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Chalcogenide glasses offer an excellent “challenge” for their use and implementation in sensor arrays due to their good sensor-specific advantages in comparison to their crystalline counterparts. This paper will give an introduction on the preparation of chalcogenide glasses in the thin-film state. First, single microsensors have been prepared with the methods of semiconductor technology. In a next step, three microsensors are implemented onto one single silicon substrate to an “one chip” sensor array. Different ionselective chalcogenide glass membranes (PbSAgIAs2S3, CdSAgIAs2S3, CuAgAsSeTe and TlAgAsIS were prepared by means of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD process. The different sensor membranes and structures have been physically characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and video microscopy. The electrochemical behavior has been investigated by potentiometric measurements.

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Preparations for Additional Protocol Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, Janie [ORNL; Cain, Ronald A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The United States Additional Protocol (AP) with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) entered into force (EIF) January 6, 2009. In anticipation of the EIF, the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243) began the initial DOE AP data call on November 3, 2008. This paper describes the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) preparation, organization, and development efforts to successfully implement the AP and complete the AP data call. ORNL had 35 days to identify declarable activities and finalize the declaration line items (DLIs) for submission to NA-243. To be able to respond within the required time frame, many preparation activities at ORNL were necessary, such as determining the AP coordinator (APC) and team roles; conducting site awareness training; creating the ORNL Standards-Based Management System (SBMS) procedure Reporting of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities; training personnel; and defining site implementation software tools. Identifying, updating, compiling, reviewing, and submitting the DLIs to NA-243 were all critical activities for successfully implementing the AP and completing the AP data call at ORNL.

  16. Developing strategies to be added to the protocol for antenatal care: An exercise and birth preparation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Amélia Miquelutti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe the implementation process of a birth preparation program, the activities in the protocol for physical and birth preparation exercises, and the educational activities that have been evaluated regarding effectiveness and women's satisfaction. The birth preparation program described was developed with the following objectives: to prevent lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence and anxiety; to encourage the practice of physical activity during pregnancy and of positions and exercises for non-pharmacological pain relief during labor; and to discuss information that would help women to have autonomy during labor. METHODS: The program comprised the following activities: supervised physical exercise, relaxation exercises, and educational activities (explanations of lumbopelvic pain prevention, pelvic floor function, labor and delivery, and which non-pharmacological pain relief to use during labor provided regularly after prenatal consultations. These activities were held monthly, starting when the women joined the program at 18–24 weeks of pregnancy and continuing until 30 weeks of pregnancy, fortnightly thereafter from 31 to 36 weeks of pregnancy, and then weekly from the 37th week until delivery. Information and printed materials regarding the physical exercises to be performed at home were provided. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01155804. RESULTS: The program was an innovative type of intervention that systematized birth preparation activities that were organized to encompass aspects related both to pregnancy and to labor and that included physical, educational and home-based activities. CONCLUSIONS: The detailed description of the protocol used may serve as a basis for further studies and also for the implementation of birth preparation programs within the healthcare system in different settings.

  17. Developing strategies to be added to the protocol for antenatal care: An exercise and birth preparation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelutti, Maria Amélia; Cecatti, José Guilherme; Makuch, Maria Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the implementation process of a birth preparation program, the activities in the protocol for physical and birth preparation exercises, and the educational activities that have been evaluated regarding effectiveness and women's satisfaction. The birth preparation program described was developed with the following objectives: to prevent lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence and anxiety; to encourage the practice of physical activity during pregnancy and of positions and exercises for non-pharmacological pain relief during labor; and to discuss information that would help women to have autonomy during labor. METHODS: The program comprised the following activities: supervised physical exercise, relaxation exercises, and educational activities (explanations of lumbopelvic pain prevention, pelvic floor function, labor and delivery, and which non-pharmacological pain relief to use during labor) provided regularly after prenatal consultations. These activities were held monthly, starting when the women joined the program at 18–24 weeks of pregnancy and continuing until 30 weeks of pregnancy, fortnightly thereafter from 31 to 36 weeks of pregnancy, and then weekly from the 37th week until delivery. Information and printed materials regarding the physical exercises to be performed at home were provided. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01155804. RESULTS: The program was an innovative type of intervention that systematized birth preparation activities that were organized to encompass aspects related both to pregnancy and to labor and that included physical, educational and home-based activities. CONCLUSIONS: The detailed description of the protocol used may serve as a basis for further studies and also for the implementation of birth preparation programs within the healthcare system in different settings. PMID:26017787

  18. Implementation of the Secondary 3 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S.: observations based on the co-walker scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ma, Cecilia M S

    2012-01-17

    The present study was conducted to explore the implementation quality of the Secondary 3 Program of the Tier 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) in the third year of the Full Implementation Phase. Classroom observations of 182 units in 129 schools were conducted. Results showed that the overall level of program adherence was 73.9%. Thirteen aspects concerning program delivery were significantly correlated. Multiple regression analyses revealed that overall implementation quality was significantly predicted by student participation and involvement, strategies to enhance student motivation, use of positive and supportive feedback, degree of achievement of the objectives, and lesson preparation. Success of implementation was significantly predicted by student participation and involvement, classroom control, use of positive and supportive feedback, opportunity for reflection, degree of achievement of the objectives and time management. The present findings generally suggest that the implementation quality of Project P.A.T.H.S. was high.

  19. Constructing an Online MCAT Preparation Program as an Alternative to On-Site Preparation for Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre, Berengaria; Perez, Norma A.; Smith, Sarah Toombs

    2017-01-01

    Based on a successful five-week summer program, we constructed an online alternative to prepare Hispanic students to take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). We used input from student premed advisors, students, a faculty mentor, a Verbal Reasoning coach, and the program administrator. Online activities were provided to support the student…

  20. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  1. Implementation of solar-reflective surfaces: Materials and utility programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, S.; Akbari, H.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1992-06-01

    This report focuses on implementation issues for using solar-reflective surfaces to cool urban heat islands, with specific examples for Sacramento, California. Advantages of solar-reflective surfaces for reducing energy use are: (1) they are cost-effective if albedo is increased during routine maintenance; (2) the energy savings coincide with peak demand for power; (3) there are positive effects on environmental quality; and (4) the white materials have a long service life. Important considerations when choosing materials for mitigating heat islands are identified as albedo, emissivity, durability, cost, pollution and appearance. There is a potential for increasing urban albedo in Sacramento by an additional 18%. Of residential roofs, we estimate that asphalt shingle and modified bitumen cover the largest area, and that built-up roofing and modified bitumen cover the largest area of commercial buildings. For all of these roof types, albedo may be increased at the time of re-roofing without any additional cost. When a roof is repaired, a solar-reflective roof coating may be applied to significantly increase albedo and extend the life of the root Although a coating may be cost-effective if applied to a new roof following installation or to an older roof following repair, it is not cost-effective if the coating is applied only to save energy. Solar-reflective pavement may be cost-effective if the albedo change is included in the routine resurfacing schedule. Cost-effective options for producing light-colored pavement may include: (1) asphalt concrete, if white aggregate is locally available; (2) concrete overlays; and (3) newly developed white binders and aggregate. Another option may be hot-rolled asphalt, with white chippings. Utilities could promote solar-reflective surfaces through advertisement, educational programs and cost-sharing of road resurfacing.

  2. Administrators' ratings of competencies needed to prepare preservice teachers for oral deaf education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartz, Maribeth N; Litchfield, Sharon K

    Deaf education teacher preparation programs must prepare teachers to staff an increasing number of oral programs. A survey was conducted to determine which competencies administrators of deaf education programs rate as important for teachers in oral programs and to compare ratings of these competencies by oral school administrators to ratings made by administrators of comprehensive deaf and hard of hearing programs. Between the two groups of administrators, six areas of agreement about competencies were found. There were notable differences in the range of ratings between the two groups. These differences were attributed to the roles teachers assume in the two types of programs and the focus of instruction in each type of program.

  3. Evaluation of Project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 1 Program by the Program Implementers: Findings Based on the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 207 schools (N = 35,735 students participated in the Secondary 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. in the full implementation phase (2006/07 school year. After completion of the Tier 1 Program, 1,250 instructors completed a subjective outcome evaluation form (Form B to assess their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Utilizing the consolidated reports submitted to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form an overall profile of the perceptions of the program participants. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to the program participants and the workers. These findings complement the subjective outcome evaluation findings based on the perspective of the program participants.

  4. Using Implementation and Program Theory to Examine Communication Strategies in National Wildlife Federation's Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Dain; Dann, Shari L.

    2004-01-01

    Our evaluative approach used implementation theory and program theory, adapted from Weiss (1998) to examine communication processes and results for a national wildlife habitat stewardship education program. Using a mail survey of 1427 participants certified in National Wildlife Federation's (NWF) Backyard Wildlife Habitat (BWH) program and a study…

  5. Implementation of "Heart Smart:" A Cardiovascular School Health Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Ann M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    "Heart Smart," a research-based health promotion program for elementary schools, was tested in four elementary schools. The program's objectives, strategies, curriculum, and other components are described. (Author/MT)

  6. Measuring implementation of a school-based violence prevention program : Fidelity and teachers' responsiveness as predictors of proximal outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultes, Marie Therese; Stefanek, Elisabeth; van de Schoot, Rens; Strohmeier, Dagmar; Spiel, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    When school-based prevention programs are put into practice, evaluation studies commonly only consider one indicator of program implementation. The present study investigates how two different aspects of program implementation - fidelity and participant responsiveness - jointly influence proximal ou

  7. Loyalty Program in the Pharmacy. Case of Construction and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Woś

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the process of construction the loyalty programs between pharmaceutical market that is shaped warehouse, pharmacy and patient. The examples of this loyalty programs in this article has confirm the opinion about programs as efficiency in the pharmaceutical environment in Poland.

  8. Implemented or not implemented? Process evaluation of the school-based obesity prevention program DOiT and associations with program effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nassau, Femke; Singh, Amika S; Hoekstra, Trynke; van Mechelen, Willem; Brug, Johannes; Chinapaw, Mai J M

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates if and to what extent the Dutch Obesity Intervention in Teenagers (DOiT) program was implemented as intended and how this affected program effectiveness. We collected data at 20 prevocational education schools in the Netherlands. We assessed seven process indicators: recruitment, reach, dosage, fidelity, satisfaction, effectiveness and continuation. Data collection involved teacher questionnaires (n= 110), adolescent questionnaires and adiposity measures (n= 938). Using multi-level confirmatory factor analyses, we applied an innovative method to obtain explorative implementation index scores. The percentage of accomplished activities ranged from 9% (for 'closure meeting') up to 93% (for 'obtaining support within the school for adoption'). The percentage of lessons delivered decreased from 74 to 18% towards the end of the program. Fidelity to the teacher manual ranged from 85 to 26%. In general, teachers were satisfied with the DOiT lessons and teaching materials. Despite teachers' satisfaction with the DOiT lessons and teaching materials, degree of program implementation was lower than expected, especially towards the end of the program. Further, some evidence was found for an association between a higher implementation index score and program effectiveness, but more research is needed to test the validity of the implementation index.

  9. Current status of implementation of IFRS in the preparation of financial statements of peruvian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Alfredo Diaz Becerra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For investors and other users of financial information to be able to act with full transparency and reliability it is necessary, among other things, that it be prepared according to a regulatory framework that is based on international standards that in turn adapt to new requirements of the global economy. The high level of globalization of the world economy has led the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS to become the highest international standards applicable throughout the world and in the case of Peru, these standards have been made mandatory in preparing the financial statements of companies incorporated under the scope of the General Corporate law. Thus, the main purpose of this research , having an exploratory design, is ro have an initial approach on the compliance with the, implementation of IFRS in the preparation and presentation of financial statements of Peruvian companies that are not under the supervision of the National Supervisory Commission for Companies and Securities (CONASEV. To this end, first ít presents a general review of the theoretical framework of financial reporting and secondly, an analysis of the Peruvian Setting Accounting Standards related to the preparation and presentation of financial statements. The third part of this work presents and describes the methodological aspects used in the development of this research, for which it has developed a survey that includes eighteen closed questions and two open ended questions, structured according to our main and specific objectives of this research. The survey was distributed to a sample of companies selected from the universe defined in the research. The results are set out in the fourth section of the article, entitled, research results and which analyzes the responses to each of the survey questions. Finally, we present the conclusions and recommendations that can be reached, highlighting among the main ones, a high incidence of tax and legal aspects

  10. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlie

  11. Teachers' Readiness to Implement Nutrition Education Programs: Beliefs, Attitudes, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perikkou, Anastasia; Kokkinou, Eleni; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes about school food environments and their readiness to implement school-based nutrition programs were investigated. A total of 1,436 primary-school teachers filled out a questionnaire on their demographic and professional characteristics and their attitudes, beliefs, and barriers for implementing health educational programs. The…

  12. The Key Implementation Technology of Client/Server's Asynchronous Communication Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces the implementation method,key technology and flowchart of Client/Server's asynchronous communication programs on Linux or Unix,and further explains a few problems to which should pay attention for improving CPU's efficiency in implementing asynchronous communication programs.

  13. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limburg, van Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Gemert-Pijnen, van Julia E.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlier

  14. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlie

  15. Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

    2008-12-15

    In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

  16. Experiencing Educational Leadership Preparation Program Redesign in Alabama: One University's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Frances; Reames, Ellen H.

    2013-01-01

    Calls for changing educational leadership preparation have led many state policy makers to initiate program redesign efforts; the governor of Alabama constituted a working group to examine the situation and develop recommendations. This article details the school leadership preparation program redesign process in Alabama from the perspective of…

  17. Teacher Education Preparation Program for the 21st Century. Which Way Forward for Kenya?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katitia, David Melita Ole

    2015-01-01

    Teacher quality is always cited as the most significant efficiency of teacher preparation programs. This paper discusses the aspects of Teacher education factor that influences student achievement. There has always been an increased interest in examining the preparation program for the 21st century in Kenya and recommending the way forward for our…

  18. Strategies toward the Inclusion of Environmental Education in Educator Preparation Programs: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crim, Courtney; Moseley, Christine; Desjean-Perrotta, Blanche

    2017-01-01

    A national study was conducted to investigate the inclusion of environmental education (EE) into educator preparation programs across the United States. Responses from teacher educators in institutions of higher education indicated that the infusion of EE into educator preparation programs is limited and varies greatly across the nation. Findings…

  19. A Study Examining the Dimensionality of Core Competencies Measure in Teacher Preparation Programs: Challenges and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizil, Ruhan Circi; Briggs, Derek; Seidel, Kent; Green, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The evidence that teacher preparation programs have an impact on teacher quality is often limited. Progress in research on this topic will remain rather limited in its influence on practice until more proximal measures of teacher education outcomes can be established. The dearth of variables to measure the impact of teacher preparation programs on…

  20. Sexual Orientation Topics in Elementary Teacher Preparation Programs in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd; Sherwin, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This investigation is a descriptive study documenting the inclusion of sexual orientation (gay and lesbian) topics in a sample of 65 public university elementary teacher preparation programs across the USA (representing the preparation of 14,000-19,000 new teachers annually). Findings indicate that only 55.6% of programs address sexual orientation…

  1. Factorial validity of a subjective outcome evaluation tool for implementers of a positive youth development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Yu, Lu

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the dimensionality of the subjective outcome evaluation tool assessing the views of program implementers in the context of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. For illustration purpose, both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the factor structure of the instrument. Subjective outcome evaluation findings were collected from 1,170 program implementers who implemented the Grade 7 level program. A validated subjective outcome evaluation scale was used to assess the views of the program implementers. Conceptually, the scale was designed to assess program implementers' perceptions about program content, implementer qualities, and program effectiveness after completion of the program. Exploratory factor analyses showed that 3 factors were abstracted from the scale and they were stable across 2 random subsamples. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that there was support for a higher-order factor model containing 3 primary factors and 1 second-order factor, and that evidence supporting factorial invariance was found. The 3 subscales were also shown to be reliable with acceptable internal consistency. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses provided support for the factorial validity of the subjective outcome evaluation tool designed for program implementers in the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Promotores Programs to Improve Latino Health Outcomes: Implementation Challenges for Community-based Nonprofit Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C; Holtz, Kristen D; Stringer, Kimberly

    2012-05-01

    Promotores are community lay health workers, who provide outreach and services to Latinos. Little research on the promotores programs exists and the focus of this article is to identify the challenges faced by community-based nonprofits when implementing promotores programs. To explore this type of program telephone interviews were conducted with ten promotores academic experts and nonprofit executives. The results suggest that implementation challenges fall into three major categories: the lack of standardized information on promotores programs, labor issues, and organizational costs. Future recommendations are made which highlight promotores recruitment and retention strategies, and the development of a clearinghouse of programmatic implementation information for community-based nonprofits.

  3. WE-D-207-01: Background and Clinical Implementation of a Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberle, D. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in

  4. Implementation and Outcomes of Forensic Housing First Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Liat S; Henwood, Benjamin F; Gilmer, Todd P

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study used administrative data from 68 supportive housing programs and evaluative and qualitative site visit data from a subset of four forensic programs to (a) compare fidelity to the Housing First model and residential client outcomes between forensic and nonforensic programs and (b) investigate whether and how providers working in forensic programs can navigate competing Housing First principles and criminal justice mandates. Quantitative findings suggested that forensic programs were less likely to follow a harm reduction approach to substance use and clients in those programs were more likely to live in congregate settings. Qualitative findings suggested that an interplay of court involvement, limited resources, and risk environments influenced staff decisions regarding housing and treatment. Existing mental health and criminal justice collaborations necessitate adaptation to the Housing First model to accommodate client needs.

  5. Implementation of the External Quality Assessment Program in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marcos Kneip; Menezes, Maria Elizabeth; Correa, José Abol

    2017-02-15

    The External Quality Assessment (EQA) in Brazil is performed by the National Health Ministry for diseases that are under supervision of Public Health Department. In addition to the government program, the Brazilian Society of Clinical Analysis and the Brazilian Society of Medical Pathology are allowed to provide their programs under the Supervision of National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (ANVISA) that regulates laboratories to perform EQA programs.

  6. The Effects of Situated Learning Through a Community Partnership in a Teacher Preparation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Meyers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the value of using an alternative approach to college course instruction in an off-campus location, an agency for individuals with developmental disabilities. The situated learning model is an alternative to the traditional college course instructional approach for preservice teachers. This model immerses students in the actual setting where they can practice the skills and apply the concepts emphasized in the curriculum. Through a partnership between the college, the community agency, and a public school, graduate students in the special education program developed and implemented a life-skills curriculum for individuals with developmental disabilities, at the same time learning essential principles of delivering instruction. The school-aged students who participated in the study were from a racially mixed urban school district, while the adult clients from the community agency attended the program at the end of their community-based workday. Based on the results of surveys and focus group discussions, participants in the study indicated that the situated learning model of instruction in a community setting better prepared them in the acquisition and application of their teaching skills, and built their competence in developing educational programs for individuals with disabilities.

  7. The process of implementing a rural VA wound care program for diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Gayle E; Raugi, Gregory J; Rowberg, Donald

    2007-10-01

    Delivering and documenting evidence-based treatment to all Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) foot ulcer patients has wide appeal. However, primary and secondary care medical centers where 52% of these patients receive care are at a disadvantage given the frequent absence of trained specialists to manage diabetic foot ulcers. A retrospective review of diabetic foot ulcer patient records and a provider survey were conducted to document the foot ulcer problem and to assess practitioner needs. Results showed of the 125 persons with foot ulcers identified through administrative data, only, 21% of diabetic foot patients were correctly coded. Chronic Care and Microsystem models were used to prepare a tailored intervention in a VA primary care medical center. The site Principal Investigators, a multidisciplinary site wound care team, and study investigators jointly implemented a diabetic foot ulcer program. Intervention components include wound care team education and training, standardized good wound care practices based on strong scientific evidence, and a wound care template embedded in the electronic medical record to facilitate data collection, clinical decision making, patient ordering, and coding. A strategy for delivering offloading pressure devices, regular case management support, and 24/7 emergency assistance also was developed. It took 9 months to implement the model. Patients were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Process and outcome evaluations are on-going.

  8. Implementation and Sustainability of the Russian Federation Ministry of Defense Nuclear Personnel Reliability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LataPhD, Vasiliy [Aspect Conversion; Coates, Cameron W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Through a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy and the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) a Personnel Reliability Program (PRP) for the nuclear handlers within the RF MOD is at the stage of implementation. Sustaining the program is of major significance for long term success. This paper will discuss the elements of the RF PRP and the equipment needs for implementation. Program requirements, documentation needs, training, and assurances of appropriate equipment use will be addressed.

  9. Beliefs, Attitudes, and Reflections of EFL Pre-service Teachers when Exploring Critical Literacy Theories to Prepare and Implement Critical Lessons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Gutierrez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language teaching and learning is an issue of high relevance nowadays in Colombia. Unfortunately, language teaching has often been reduced to the mastery of language structures, disregarding the vast number of possibilities that language teaching provides to involve students in the discussion and analysis of issues that affect their everyday life. Shifting language teaching toward this goal, however, has to start in language teacher preparation programs. To gain a better understanding of the implication of this shift, this study explored the beliefs, attitudes, and reflections of three student-teachers, from a foreign language teaching program at a public university, towards the exploration of critical literacy theories, and the design and implementation of critical lessons. Data collected included audio-recordings of group discussions and individual interviews with the three participants, their reflections in different stages, lesson plans, and class observations of their lesson implementation. Results from this study suggest that exposing future EFL teachers to critical literacy approaches to language teaching can have different effects on their perspectives towards education and their teaching practice. Thus, their beliefs and attitudes towards Critical Literacy Theories can be continuously transformed as they face various situations in the exploration and implementation of these theories. Key words: pre-service EFL teachers, Critical Literacies, Language teacher preparation programs, Teaching practicum.

  10. Guidelines for Implementing a Real Estate Cooperative Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Thomas R.

    Background information and guidelines are provided for the development of cooperative education programs for real estate industry personnel. The first section outlines the operation of cooperative education programs and presents two organizational plans: the alternating plan, where students attend class full-time and work full-time during…

  11. Developing Goals, Planning, And Implementing A Positive PR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubia, Dorothy E.

    1973-01-01

    Author feels it is in the interest of the educational institution to channel those apparent desires to communicate into positive communication and a resultant public relations program that brings about programs and policies of benefit to, and desired by, our publics. (Author/GB)

  12. Implementation of a Speech Improvement Program at the Kindergarten Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert A.

    Evaluated was a speech improvement program for kindergarten students in which speech improvement lessons were summarized for teachers, and the services of itinerant speech therapists were shared by classroom teachers. Teacher and therapist agreed upon specific speech lessons which were conducted on a weekly basis. Program development involved…

  13. [Development of a web-based senescence preparation education program for successful aging for middle-aged adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Mi

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a web-based senescence preparation education program to promote successful aging. This program was developed based on Network-Based Instructional System Design (NBISD) model, using the following 5 processes: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. The program was operated for 10 weeks from March 17 to May 25, 2008. There were 4 menu bars, introduction, related data, lecture room, and communication on the main page. In the operation of this program, HTML, ASP, JAVA Script, Namo web editor, Edit Plus, Front Page and multimedia technology were applied. The program content consisted of understanding elderly people, physical health, activity & exercise, nutrition, medication use, psychological health, intellectual health, understanding death, welfare system and leisure activity. This program could be a useful means to provide senescence preparation information to middle-aged adults. Also, it is expected to offer individualized learning opportunities to many learners in various settings. Nurses should further develop and facilitate various learning strategies including web- based programs for elder care.

  14. Serving a diverse population: the role of speech-language pathology professional preparation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sharon R; Gonzalez, Lori S

    2002-01-01

    A national survey of 228 program directors was conducted to determine how master's level professional preparation programs are meeting the challenge of preparing speech-language pathologists to provide quality services to an increasingly diverse population. A total of 91 respondents provided information regarding their programs' efforts to address diversity by increasing the diversity of speech-language pathology professionals, preparing students in research for diverse populations, and providing students with the didactic knowledge and clinical experience required to serve diverse populations. Results indicated that professional preparation programs continue to lag in their enrollment of minority students, but there are efforts actively to recruit and retain students from diverse groups. Much variation in preparation in research was found across programs. Graduate students are being presented with information concerning diversity issues, but clinical experiences vary greatly according to the geographic location of the preparation program and individual practicum placements. Implications of these findings for speech-language pathology preparation programs and other allied health programs are discussed.

  15. Edit distance for marked point processes revisited: An implementation by binary integer programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    We implement the edit distance for marked point processes [Suzuki et al., Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos 20, 3699–3708 (2010)] as a binary integer program. Compared with the previous implementation using minimum cost perfect matching, the proposed implementation has two advantages: first, by using the proposed implementation, we can apply a wide variety of software and hardware, even spin glasses and coherent ising machines, to calculate the edit distance for marked point processes; second, the proposed implementation runs faster than the previous implementation when the difference between the numbers of events in two time windows for a marked point process is large.

  16. Implementation Plan for the Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    The primary purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Knowledge Management (KM) Program is to capture, share, disseminate, and ensure the ability to apply the knowledge created by the major nuclear energy Research and Development (R&D) programs. In support of the KM program, the Implementation Plan for the Office of NE KM Program outlines the knowledge management and distributed data environment that is required for its success. In addition to enumerating some strategic goals and objectives, this document characterizes the initial program and identifies computer-based areas of investment required for increased knowledge sharing and collaboration. It identifies and addresses investments already in existence and describes how these investments can be further enhanced and implemented to support a distributed KM program. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is leading the effort to identify and address these investments through the implementation of a distributed KM program that includes participants from ten of the major DOE national laboratories.

  17. Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program for Adolescents with Greater Psychosocial Needs: Integrated Views of Program Implementers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes was designed and implemented by school social workers and teachers. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (n = 2,542 in 49 schools, program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings. With reference to 245 conclusions included in the 49 evaluation reports, secondary data analyses showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive. In addition, difficulties encountered and recommendations for program improvement were highlighted. In conjunction with previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received and was perceived to be beneficial to the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs.

  18. Evaluation of a positive youth development program for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: integrated views of program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ma, Cecilia M S; Sun, Rachel C F

    2010-10-01

    To help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) was designed and implemented by school social workers and teachers. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (n = 2,542) in 49 schools, program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings. With reference to 245 conclusions included in the 49 evaluation reports, secondary data analyses showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive. In addition, difficulties encountered and recommendations for program improvement were highlighted. In conjunction with previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received and was perceived to be beneficial to the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs.

  19. Implementing an Assessment Clinic in a Residential PTSD Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan McDowell

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creating useful treatment plans can help improve services to consumers of mental health services. As more evidence-based practices are implemented, deciding what treatment, at what time, for whom becomes an important factor in facilitating positive outcomes. Readiness for trauma-focused treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD such as Cognitive Processing Therapy or Prolonged Exposure Therapy may influence whether an individual can successfully complete either protocol. In addition, components of adjunctive therapies such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or Dialectical Behavior Therapy may be useful in moving a particular patient toward readiness and successful completion of treatment. Psychological assessment adds valuable data to inform these types of treatment decisions. This paper describes the implementation of a psychological assessment clinic in a residential PTSD treatment setting. Barriers to implementation, use of the data, and Veterans’ reactions to the feedback provided to them are included.

  20. Implementing an Evidence Based Preceptorship Program in a Military Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-05

    want to act in good conscience, always trying to reach their goals without compromising their personal code of ethics . As Concrete Utilitarians ...Translate research into practice/evidence-based practice Clinical excellence Knowledge management Education and training Leadership, Ethics ...management Education and training Leadership, Ethics , and Mentoring: Health policy Recruitment and retention Preparing tomorrow’s leaders Care of

  1. IMPLEMENTATION OF WORK LIFE QUALITY PROGRAMS WITH THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Granja Coutinho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The research studies the implementation of Quality of Working Life (QWL programs using project management techniques. Quality of Work Life projects have undergone a constant increase in scope to the point where they currently involve such diverse themes as change in dietary habits, exercise, stress management, socio environmental responsibility, and adult education. The major focus of this research is to analyze the processes and knowledge areas of project management being used to deal with this increased scope. The managerial processes identified were divided into categories of preparation, structuring, execution, and conclusion. The knowledge areas studied were: communication, risks, human resources, and acquisitions. The firms studied included mid to large sized firms located in the north, southeast and south of Brazil. We interviewed managers, directors, CEOs, plant managers, and line managers as part of this effort. The results suggest that the project management practices used were ad hoc and based on day to day needs. They also suggest that sound project management practices are applicable to QWL programs in the firms we studied.

  2. Specialized Preparation for Middle Level Teachers: A National Review of Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Penny B.; Faulkner, Shawn A.; Cook, Chris M.; Miller, Nicole C.; Thompson, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    Since William Alexander's (1963, 1995) call for attention to the need for specialized middle level teacher preparation in 1963, 45 states have created requirements for middle level certification, licensure, or endorsement (Association for Middle Level Education [AMLE], 2014) which have led to institutions of teacher preparation creating routes…

  3. R-Technology of Programming:Basic Notions and Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a kind of visual programming,which is called R-technology of programming,The R-technology is independent of any programming language or operating system and the R-chart is in accord with international standard(ISO 8631H).The package of R-technology has been applied to the high level languages such as PASCAL.C,ASSEMBLER,FORTRAN,PL/1,MODULA-2 and RTRAN,This package is applied to computers ranging from mainframes(IBM370) and minis(VAX) to micros(IBM/PC).

  4. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  5. Implementation of Portfolio Assessment in a Competency-based Dental Hygiene Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.; Holt, Lorie P.; Overman, Pamela R.; Schmidt, Colleen R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a portfolio assessment program in the dental hygiene program at the University of Missouri School of Dentistry. Tables provide examples of program competencies and related portfolio entries, the complete scoring rubric for portfolios, and the student portfolio evaluation survey. Concludes that although portfolio…

  6. Implementation of diabetes prevention programs in rural areas: Montana and south-eastern Australia compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Prasuna; Hernan, Andrea L; Vanderwood, Karl K; Arave, Diane; Niebylski, Mark L; Harwell, Todd S; Dunbar, James A

    2011-06-01

    To identify the key elements that enabled the Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Project (GGT DPP) and the Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention (CDDP) programs successful establishment and implementation in rural areas, as well as identifying specific challenges or barriers for implementation in rural communities. Focus groups were held with the facilitators who delivered the GGT DPP in Australia and the Montana CDDP programs in the USA. Interview questions covered the facilitators' experiences with recruitment, establishing the program, the components and influence of rurality on the program, barriers and challenges to delivering the program, attributes of successful participants, and the influence of community resources and partnerships on the programs. Four main themes emerged from the focus groups: establishing and implementing the diabetes prevention program in the community; strategies for recruitment and retention of participants; what works in lifestyle intervention programs; and rural-centred issues. The results from this study have assisted in determining the factors that contribute to developing, establishing and implementing successful diabetes prevention programs in two rural areas. Recommendations to increase the likelihood of success of programs in rural communities include: securing funding early for the program; establishing support from community leaders and developing positive relationships with health care providers; creating a professional team with passion for the program; encouraging participants to celebrate their small and big successes; and developing procedures for providing post-intervention support to help participants maintain their success. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  7. Turkish Physics Teachers' Views about the 2007 Physics Teaching Program and its Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercan, Fatih Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    The renewal of the secondary school physics teaching program was initiated in 2008, however, there is limited research investigating physics teachers' enactment of the teaching program in their classes. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe teachers' views about the official teaching program and its implementation. The…

  8. 77 FR 46632 - Closed Captioning of Internet Protocol-Delivered Video Programming: Implementation of the Twenty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... distributors of video programming delivered using Internet protocol (IP). Pursuant to Section 203 of the CVAA... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 79 Closed Captioning of Internet Protocol-Delivered Video Programming: Implementation... captioning of Internet protocol-delivered video programming and apparatus closed captioning...

  9. The use of virtual reality for preparation and implementation of JET remote handling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, S. E-mail: ssanders@jet.uk; Rolfe, A.C

    2003-09-01

    The use of real time 3-D computer graphic models for preparation and support of remote handling operations on JET has been in use since the mid 1980s. A complete review has been undertaken of the functional requirements and benefits of VR for remote handling and a subsequent market survey of the present state-of-the-art of VR systems has resulted in the implementation of a new system for JET. The VR system is used in two discrete modes: in on-line mode the remote handling equipment Electro-mechanical hardware is connected to the VR system and provides input for the VR system to update a real time 3-D display of the equipment inside the torus. This mode supplements the video camera system and assists with camera control and warnings of impending or potential collisions. In Off-line mode the operator manipulates the VR system model with no connections to the remote handling equipment. This mode is used during preparation of RH operational strategies, checking of operational feasibility and operations procedures. Various VR systems were evaluated against a detailed technical specification that covered visualisation function and performance, user interface design and base model input/creation capabilities. The cheapest of those systems that satisfied the technical requirements was selected.

  10. 76 FR 64124 - Implementation of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... for Discussion This meeting will allow stakeholders to provide feedback regarding their perceptions of... company? 4. In addition to ``abuse of the program,'' should there be other restrictions to entry into the...

  11. Enrollment trends in deaf education teacher preparation programs, 1973-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, David

    2010-01-01

    The number of deaf education teacher preparation programs and the number of program graduates were tabulated from reference issues of the American Annals of the Deaf beginning in 1973 and progressing every third year through 2009. Programs and graduates reached their highest levels from the mid-1970s through mid-1980s. In 2006 and 2009, only about one fourth as many students were majoring in deaf education in relation to the general U.S. college population as in 1973, 1976, and 1979. Yet because the population of children identified as deaf and hard of hearing has also declined, the ratio of program graduates to deaf children has stayed relatively balanced for the past 20 years. Current challenges faced by teacher preparation programs include increases in interpreter preparation programs and programs for teaching American Sign Language, as well as the changing nature of the role of teacher of the deaf.

  12. Implementation of a Compiler for the Functional Programming Language PHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    additional problems associated with using LISP to teach techniques of functional programming. Modem LISP dialects do not support all aspects of...pedagogical nightmare to teach .[Ref. l:p. 0-1] The goal of teaching functional programming would rapidly be overtaken by the necessity of explaining the...and simplify parsing the grammer . * Modified : 12/26/86 Flattened tree output changed t7 abstraz:t * syntax tree form. JC 01/10/87 Corrections to comply

  13. Implementing Effective Affordability Constraints for Defense Acquisition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    between 1999 and 2009. Since several of those programs advertised themselves as employing the CAIV concept, the IDA team was able to draw on that...and mutable to yield to stereotyped or routinized processes. The processes associated with CAIV are tools that can help achieve powerful results if...Vehicle (EELV). Each of these FPPs, as well as four other prominent programs that advertised use of CAIV, will be reviewed in this appendix to help to

  14. Program and aspect metrics for MATLAB : design and implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Paulo Alexandre da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Engenharia de Informática MATLAB is an programming language supported by an interactive software for high performance dedicated to the numerical calculation. MATLAB integrates numerical analysis, matrix computation, signal processing and construction of charts an friendly-use environment, where operations on matrices are simplified by using MATLAB, contrary to what happens in traditional programming. In MATLAB language the basic element of information are mat...

  15. Issues and dilemmas in preparation and implementation of the spatial plan of the municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disadvantages of the Serbian planning system and dilemmas about the role of spatial planning in Serbia mainly is reflected at the local level of spatial planning. The focus of the spatial plan of the municipality from the strategic to regulatory role has been shifted by the changes of legal basis. In this paper the key issues and dilemmas in the practice of preparation and implementation of the spatial plan of the municipality in Serbia are pointed out. The review of the three key issues of importance for the direct implementation of planning solutions and concepts: identification of the construction zone, the establishment of rules for the protection, arrangement and construction of physical (natural, landscape and functional entities and settlements, and elaboration of arrangement scheme for the settlement are presented. It has still not made clear what the arrangement scheme for the settlement should represent, so that in practice there is wide variety of schemes, usually completely unenforceable. Good examples of arrangement schemes elaboration within spatial plan of the municipality have been presented and analyzed. Suggestions for improving the content of the strategic and regulatory elements of the spatial plan of the municipality, as well as recommendations to the basic content of the arrangement scheme for settlement as a part of this spatial plan are proposed.

  16. Health and Physical Education Teacher-Preparation Implementation of Clinical Practices: Integrating Academic Content to Real-World Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Bradford; Linker, Jenny; Deutsch, Joe; Hahne, Kristen; Douglas, Marty M.

    2016-01-01

    We live in a rapidly changing world with technology as an essential part of our lives and an important component in contemporary education. Preparing teachers for the future requires that university professors understand what it means to teach and learn in the digital age. Teacher preparation programs need to create intentional learning…

  17. Health and Physical Education Teacher-Preparation Implementation of Clinical Practices: Integrating Academic Content to Real-World Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Bradford; Linker, Jenny; Deutsch, Joe; Hahne, Kristen; Douglas, Marty M.

    2016-01-01

    We live in a rapidly changing world with technology as an essential part of our lives and an important component in contemporary education. Preparing teachers for the future requires that university professors understand what it means to teach and learn in the digital age. Teacher preparation programs need to create intentional learning…

  18. Using Current Resources to Implement Wellness Programming for Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirignano, Sherri M.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is a nationwide effort to include preschool-aged children in wellness efforts for the prevention of obesity. National resources include guidelines, best practices, and tip sheets to assist in the implementation of these interventions. The Let's Move! Child Care Checklist is a resource that can be used to assess the level at…

  19. Model for the evaluation of implementation programs and professional pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical care research of professional services has largely focused on patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Research studies have been, for the most part, conducted in controlled conditions prior to full scale implementation. There appears to be a dearth of process and evaluation of implementation reported. Conducting implementation research or adding implementation measures to an impact study, adds external validity to service and patient outcomes. Evaluations are required for all aspects of implementation including indicators of movement through the implementation stages (formative and summative implementation process evaluation), measures of influencing factors (barriers and facilitators) and change in factors over time (implementation impact), assessment of strategies and/or the implementation program, and overall measures to generate a level of implementation (implementation outcomes). The level of implementation of a professional pharmacy service can be estimated from the level of service delivery (reach and fidelity) and level as a service provider (integration and strength of support in the service environment). The model may be used for evaluating professional pharmacy services and for evaluating implementation programs.

  20. Understanding barriers to implementation of an adaptive land management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Susan K; Morris, Julie K; Sanders, J Scott; Wiley, Eugene N; Brooks, Michael; Bennetts, Robert E; Percival, H Franklin; Marynowski, Susan

    2006-10-01

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages over 650,000 ha, including 26 wildlife management and environmental areas. To improve management, they developed an objective-based vegetation management (OBVM) process that focuses on desired conditions of plant communities through an adaptive management framework. Our goals were to understand potential barriers to implementing OBVM and to recommend strategies to overcome barriers. A literature review identified 47 potential barriers in six categories to implementation of adaptive and ecosystem management: logistical, communication, attitudinal, institutional, conceptual, and educational. We explored these barriers through a bureau-wide survey of 90 staff involved in OBVM and personal interviews with area managers, scientists, and administrators. The survey incorporated an organizational culture assessment instrument to gauge how institutional factors might influence OBVM implementation. The survey response rate was 69%. Logistics and communications were the greatest barriers to implementing OBVM. Respondents perceived that the agency had inadequate resources for implementing OBVM and provided inadequate information. About one-third of the respondents believed OBVM would decrease their job flexibility and perceived greater institutional barriers to the approach. The 43% of respondents who believed they would have more responsibility under OBVM also had greater attitudinal barriers. A similar percentage of respondents reported OBVM would not give enough priority to wildlife. Staff believed that current agency culture was hierarchical but preferred a culture that would provide more flexibility for adaptive management and would foster learning from land management activities. In light of the barriers to OBVM, we recommend the following: (1) mitigation of logistical barriers by addressing real and perceived constraints of staff, funds, and other resources in a participatory manner; (2) mitigation of

  1. Understanding barriers to implementation of an adaptive land management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S.K.; Morris, J.K.; Sanders, J.S.; Wiley, E.N.; Brooks, M.; Bennetts, R.E.; Percival, H.F.; Marynowski, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages over 650,000 ha, including 26 wildlife management and environmental areas. To improve management, they developed an objective-based vegetation management (OBVM) process that focuses on desired conditions of plant communities through an adaptive management framework. Our goals were to understand potential barriers to implementing OBVM and to recommend strategies to overcome barriers. A literature review identified 47 potential barriers in six categories to implementation of adaptive and ecosystem management: logistical, communication, attitudinal, institutional, conceptual, and educational. We explored these barriers through a bureau-wide survey of 90 staff involved in OBVM and personal interviews with area managers, scientists, and administrators. The survey incorporated an organizational culture assessment instrument to gauge how institutional factors might influence OBVM implementation. The survey response rate was 69%. Logistics and communications were the greatest barriers to implementing OBVM. Respondents perceived that the agency had inadequate resources for implementing OBVM and provided inadequate information. About one-third of the respondents believed OBVM would decrease their job flexibility and perceived greater institutional barriers to the approach. The 43% of respondents who believed they would have more responsibility under OBVM also had greater attitudinal barriers. A similar percentage of respondents reported OBVM would not give enough priority to wildlife. Staff believed that current agency culture was hierarchical but preferred a culture that would provide more flexibility for adaptive management and would foster learning from land management activities. In light of the barriers to OBVM, we recommend the following: (1) mitigation of logistical barriers by addressing real and perceived constraints of staff, funds, and other resources in a participatory manner; (2) mitigation of

  2. Learning in Context: Technology Integration in a Teacher Preparation Program Informed by Situated Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy L.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Binns, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation explores the effectiveness of a teacher preparation program aligned with situated learning theory on preservice science teachers' use of technology during their student teaching experiences. Participants included 26 preservice science teachers enrolled in a 2-year Master of Teaching program. A specific program goal was to…

  3. An Empirical Investigation of a Post-Baccalaureate Internship Teacher Preparation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staropoli, Charles J.

    This document presents both a descriptive and evaluative report of a postbaccalaureate internship program. The stated objective of this program was to prepare baccalaureate graduates in fields other than education to become elementary school teachers. It is indicated that the program was characterized by formal course work in methods and…

  4. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Food Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the food services program requirements in the hospitality/tourism industry. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their…

  5. National study of an early parenting intervention: implementation differences on parent and child outcomes: parenting program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jan M; Berthelsen, Donna; Williams, Kate E; Abad, Vicky

    2010-12-01

    Sing & Grow is a 10-week group music therapy intervention to promote positive parenting and child development for marginalized parents of birth to 3-year-old children. This paper examined whether changes from pre to post intervention varied according to implementation site, when the intervention was taken to scale nationally. Outcomes for 850 participants were compared for the site where the program was first established against three new locations; one site where implementation processes were more favorable relative to the other two sites. Overall, the findings provided only limited support for differential outcomes by site of implementation. Participants showed significant improvements in parent-reported parenting and child outcomes from pre to post that were similar across all sites. For clinician-reported outcomes, improvements over time were generally greater in the original site and the well-supported site compared to the sites where there were more implementation difficulties. These differences were partly accounted for by differences in the characteristics of participants receiving programs in different sites and differences in the clinicians' ratings of program quality and the levels of support and training provided. However, confounding by the source of measurement requires cautious interpretation of clinician data. This study further highlights the potential for music therapy as an early parenting intervention, and the need for more rigorous evaluations in this field.

  6. Family Literacy for Language Minority Families: Issues for Program Implementation. NCBE Program Information Guide Series, No. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, Margaret; And Others

    Considerations in designing and implementing family literacy programs for the limited-English-speaking population are examined and some solutions are illustrated in one federally-funded program for Latino families, Project FLAME (Family Literacy: Aprendiendo, Mejorando, Educando/Learning, Bettering, Educating). An introductory section looks at the…

  7. Sustained Implementation of Evidence-based Programs in Disadvantaged Communities: A Conceptual Framework of Supporting Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Lauren M; Turner, Karen M T

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a review of the empirical literature for studies evaluating factors that facilitate and create barriers to sustained program implementation in disadvantaged communities. It outlines study methodology and sustainment outcomes and proposes a conceptual model that involves implementation sustainment support for providers delivering evidence-based health and family services in disadvantaged communities. Sustained program implementation in the community setting is a significant issue as only 43% of studies reported successfully sustained programs. The review identified 18 factors that facilitate success and create barriers to program sustainment. The factors are synthesized into three themes; program characteristics, workplace capacity, and process and interaction factors. The majority of factors map onto commonly cited sustainability influences in implementation science. However, there was an additional focus for studies included in this review on the importance of factors such as program burden, program familiarity and perceived competence in program skills, workplace support for the program, staff mobility and turnover, supervision and peer support, and ongoing technical assistance. The need to use a conceptual framework and develop measures to guide and evaluate capacity building in EBP implementation and sustainment in low-resource community settings is highlighted.

  8. [Intervention programs in hospital nutrition: actions, design, components and implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Porben, S; Barreto Penié, J

    2005-01-01

    Metabolic, Nutrient and Feeding Intervention Programs must become the methodological tool for dealing with the health problem posed by disease-associated-malnutrition on one side, and the "Bad Practices" affecting the nutritional status of the patient, on the other one. Programs like these ones should prescribe clear policies and actions in the three domains of contemporary medical practice: assistance, research and education. The fullfillment of these Program's objectives, and the relization of the implicit benefits, will only be possible if a methodological platform that armonically integrates elements of Continuous Education, Cost Analysis, Recording and Documentation, and Quality Control and Assurance, is created. The experience acumulated after the inception and conduction of the Intervention Program at the Clinical-Surgical "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital (Havana City, Cuba) has served to demostrate that it is feasible not only to create a theoretical and practical body to satisfy the aforementioned goals, but, also, to export it to another institutions of the country, in view of the fact that minimal investments for adquiring the resources needed to deploy such Program, as well as for training and capacitation of medic and paramedic personel in the corresponding Recording & Documentation and Feeding & Nutrition Good Practices might result in short-term economical and medical care benefits.

  9. The Impact of Personal and Program Characteristics on the Placement of School Leadership Preparation Program Graduates in School Leader Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Edward J.; Hollingworth, Liz; An, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of personal and program characteristics on the placement of graduates of principal preparation programs in assistant principal, principal, and school leadership positions. Research Design: This study relies on Texas principal production data from 1993 through 2007 matched to employment…

  10. Responding to the call for globalization in nursing education: the implementation of the transatlantic double-degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Cynthia A; Erämaa, Sirkka; Helembai, Kornélia; McCartan, Patrick J; Turtiainen, Tarja

    2014-01-01

    Increased demand for nurses worldwide has highlighted the need for a flexible nursing workforce eligible for licensure in multiple countries. Nursing's curricular innovation mirrors the call for reform within higher education including globalization of curricula (E. J. S. Hovenga, 2004; D. Nayyar, 2008; B. J. G. Wood, S. M. Tapsall, & G. N. Soutar, 2005), increased opportunities for student mobility exchanges, dialogue between different academic traditions, and mutual understanding and transparency between universities (J. González & R. Wagenaar, 2005). The European Union (EU) and United States have combined efforts to achieve these objectives by creating the Atlantis program in 2007 (U.S. Department of Education, 2011). This article describes experiences of four nursing programs participating in an Atlantis project to develop a double-degree baccalaureate program for undergraduate nursing students. Early learnings include increasing awareness and appreciation of essential curricular and performance competencies of the baccalaureate-prepared professional nurse. Challenges include language competency; variations in curriculum, cultural norms, student expectations, and learning assessment; and philosophical differences regarding first-level professional nurse preparation as specialist versus generalist. The Transatlantic Double Degree program has successfully implemented the double-degree program. Members have gained valuable insights into key issues surrounding the creation of a more uniform, yet flexible, educational standard between our countries.

  11. Using organization theory to understand the determinants of effective implementation of worksite health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Bryan J; Lewis, Megan A; Linnan, Laura A

    2009-04-01

    The field of worksite health promotion has moved toward the development and testing of comprehensive programs that target health behaviors with interventions operating at multiple levels of influence. Yet, observational and process evaluation studies indicate that such programs are challenging for worksites to implement effectively. Research has identified several organizational factors that promote or inhibit effective implementation of comprehensive worksite health promotion programs. However, no integrated theory of implementation has emerged from this research. This article describes a theory of the organizational determinants of effective implementation of comprehensive worksite health promotion programs. The model is adapted from theory and research on the implementation of complex innovations in manufacturing, education and health care settings. The article uses the Working Well Trial to illustrate the model's theoretical constructs. Although the article focuses on comprehensive worksite health promotion programs, the conceptual model may also apply to other types of complex health promotion programs. An organization-level theory of the determinants of effective implementation of worksite health promotion programs.

  12. A feasibility study on the implementation of the Red/Yellow/Green Program

    OpenAIRE

    Cowart, Richard Oriece

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The implementation of the Red/Yellow/Green Program is the Navy's newest source selection improvement program. The RYG Program provides the Contracting Officer with a means of selecting the contractor which offers the best overall value to the Government, by considering the contractor's past performance rather than the lowest price. The RYG Program classifies contractors according to their past quality performance using an automated Nav...

  13. Virginia Alternative Assessment Program: Implementation Manual (Revised 2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires state programs to adopt standards for all children, including those with disabilities, in state and district-wide assessments with the provision of appropriate and necessary accommodations. For students who cannot participate in state and district-wide assessments, the law requires that…

  14. Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-01-01

    Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. IEP-2005: Writing and Implementing Individualized Education Programs (IEPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Edward

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to provide guidelines to develop appropriate Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for children with disabilities based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act amendments of 2004 (IDEA-2004) or Public Law 108-446. These guidelines are intended to result in IEPs that are streamlined, focused, and reasonably…

  16. Implementing an Indigenous Community Education Program: A Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialek, Hilton; Nabokov, Peter

    Four rural communities in northern Maine were the setting for a pilot program in Indian adult education that featured a new kind of instructional model. Developed by the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO), it featured peer instruction, strict performance orientation, and insistance on mastery of certain skills. A HumRRO representative…

  17. Implementing a high-fidelity simulation program in a community college setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuoriniemi, Pamela; Schott-Baer, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    Despite their relatively high cost, there is heightened interest by faculty in undergraduate nursing programs to implement high-fidelity simulation (HFS) programs. High-fidelity simulators are appealing because they allow students to experience high-risk, low-volume patient problems in a realistic setting. The decision to purchase a simulator is the first step in the process of implementing and maintaining an HFS lab. Knowledge, technical skill, commitment, and considerable time are needed to develop a successful program. The process, as experienced by one community college nursing program, is described.

  18. Springfield/L-COG Energy Plan Implementation Program, Internal Energy Management Project: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane Council of Governments (Or.); Tumidaj, Les

    1985-09-01

    The Internal Energy Management Project was developed as a component of the Springfield/L-COG Energy Plan Implementation Program. The project also took advantage of the ground work laid by the Lane Council of Governments through the Lane County Electric Energy Planning Program. This program, conducted in 1982 and 1983, developed detailed recommendations for Lane County cities concerning energy management and planning. Based on these recommendations, many jurisdictions committed themselves to implement energy management programs. Initially, the participating cities included Springfield, Veneta, Oakridge, Creswell, and Lowell. Two other local governments - Florence and Lane County - requested assistance once the project commenced.

  19. LEAD SAFE YARDS: DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A MONITORING, ASSESSMENT, AND OUTREACH PROGRAM FOR YOUR COMMUNITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA has developed a technology transfer handbook on how to plan and implement a residential soil lead monitoring, assessment, mitigation and outreach program for residential communities. The handbook provides guidance on 1) identifying potentially impacted communities, 2) c...

  20. Knowledge of diabetic patients about their disease before and after implementing a diabetes education program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liudmila Miyar Otero; Maria Lúcia Zanetti; Michelle Daguano Ogrizio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, prospective and comparative study is to evaluate the knowledge that diabetic patients have about their disease before and after implementing a Diabetes Education Program...

  1. Implementation of the parametric variation method in an EMTP program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdyk, Andrzej; Holbøll, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    of parameters in an electric system. The proposed method allows varying any parameter of a circuit, including the simulation settings and exploits the specific structure of the ATP-EMTP software. In the implementation of the method, Matlab software is used to control the execution of the ATP solver. Two...... examples are shown, for both time domain and frequency domain studies, where the sensitivity of maximum overvoltages at transformer terminals and the admittance resonances in a radial of an offshore wind farm to a change of the collection grid cable parameters is investigated....

  2. Implementation of a Tailored Kiosk-Based Injury Prevention Program in Pediatric Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This study identified behavioral and organizational barriers and facilitators related to the implementation of a clinic-based pediatric injury prevention program. Safe N′ Sound (SNS), an evidence-based tailored injury prevention program designed for pediatric primary care, was implemented in five pediatric clinics in North Carolina. Office managers participated in structured interviews; health care providers participated in focus groups. Waiting room observations were conducted in participati...

  3. On the implementation of the Biological Threat Reduction Program in the Republic of Uzbekistan

    OpenAIRE

    Tuychiev, Laziz; Madaminov, Marifjon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the implementation of the Biological Threat Reduction Program (BTRP) of the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency in the Republic of Uzbekistan since 2004. Introduction The Biological Threat Reduction Program (BTRP) has been being implemented in the Republic of Uzbekistan since 2004 within the framework of the Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Uzbekistan and the Government of the United States of America Concerning Cooperation in the Area of the Promotion ...

  4. A Case Study on the Implementation of a Positive Youth Development Program (Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong: Learning from the Experimental Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation of the implementation of a positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. was part of a large study undertaken comprehensively to explore how effective the Tier 1 Program was in practice and how the results can shed light on future developments. Utilizing a case study approach, individual and focus group interviews were conducted in 2007 to examine the factors that influence the process and quality of implementation of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The focus of this study was on how the implementers of a school made use of the experience gained in the Experimental Implementation Phase (EIP in 2005/06 to improve the program implementation quality in the Full Implementation Phase (FIP in 2006/07. Results showed that the program implementation in the FIP was generally high and the program was well received by the implementers. Factors that facilitated the implementation of the program were identified, including the adoption of an incremental change strategy, the incorporation of the program into both formal and informal curricula, positive perceptions of the program among staff and agency social workers, sufficient school administrative support, excellent cooperation between the school and the social work agency, presence of a dedicated school contact person and instructors who engaged themselves in continuous quality improvement of the implementation, and an emphasis on application of what had been learned. Difficulties encountered by the school in the process of implementation were also observed. Based on the present findings, key process variables that facilitate or impede the implementation of positive youth development programs are discussed. Implications for future program implementation are also discussed.

  5. Programs for school principal preparation in East Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karstanje, P.; Webber, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - This paper is intended to provide an overview of trends in European education and to offer a framework for considering the elements of school management. Design/methodology/approach - This paper reports elements of the planning and implementation of a graduate-level leadership development

  6. Development and implementation of a rail current optimization program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, T.L.; Dharamshi, R. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kim, K.; Zhang, J.; Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Feng, Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1997-01-01

    Efforts are underway to automate the operation of a railgun hydrogen pellet injector for fusion reactor refueling. A plasma armature is employed to avoid the friction produced by a sliding metal armature and, in particular, to prevent high-Z impurities from entering the tokamak. High currents are used to achieve high accelerations, resulting in high plasma temperatures. Consequently, the plasma armature ablates and accumulates material from the pellet and gun barrel. This increases inertial and viscous drag, lowering acceleration. A railgun model has been developed to compute the acceleration in the presence of these losses. In order to quantify these losses, the ablation coefficient, {alpha}, and drag coefficient, C{sub d}, must be determined. These coefficients are estimated based on the pellet acceleration. The sensitivity of acceleration to {alpha} and C{sub d} has been calculated using the model. Once {alpha} and C{sub d} have been determined, their values are applied to the model to compute the appropriate current pulse width. An optimization program was written in LabVIEW software to carry out this procedure. This program was then integrated into the existing code used to operate the railgun system. Preliminary results obtained after test firing the gun indicate that the program computes reasonable values for {alpha} and C{sub d} and calculates realistic pulse widths.

  7. Implementation and Web-Based Learning: The Unimplemented Program Yields Few Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper turns away from Web-based learning content and addresses a universal concern of technology-based learning, namely, program implementation. Without the necessary attention to curriculum alignment, implementation planning and support, Web-based learning initiatives can fall victim to competing priorities. Here, we present the ATLAS model…

  8. Program Evaluation on the Implementation of a Middle School Concept in Private Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James Chapman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of implementing a middle school concept in three private Christian schools using Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP model of program evaluation. The National Middle School Survey was used to measure faculty and administrative perceptions of both the value and actual implementation of middle school…

  9. Parallel Implementation of a Semidefinite Programming Solver based on CSDP in a distributed memory cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, I.D.; de Klerk, E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the algorithmic framework and practical aspects of implementing a parallel version of a primal-dual semidefinite programming solver on a distributed memory computer cluster. Our implementation is based on the CSDP solver and uses a message passing interface (MPI), and the Sc

  10. Mindfulness in Practice: Considerations for Implementation of Mindfulness-Based Programming for Adolescents in School Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Molly Steward

    2014-01-01

    Schools are considered one of the primary settings in which prevention and intervention initiatives can be implemented successfully, reaching a large number of young people. Especially when promoting social and emotional learning (SEL), many adolescents benefit from universal programs implemented in the school context. This chapter embeds…

  11. Mindfulness in Practice: Considerations for Implementation of Mindfulness-Based Programming for Adolescents in School Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Molly Steward

    2014-01-01

    Schools are considered one of the primary settings in which prevention and intervention initiatives can be implemented successfully, reaching a large number of young people. Especially when promoting social and emotional learning (SEL), many adolescents benefit from universal programs implemented in the school context. This chapter embeds…

  12. The Use of Portfolios in Coordinated School Health Programs: Benefits and Challenges to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Seraphine Pitt; Torrens, Anna; George, Valerie; Brown, Kelli McCormack

    2007-01-01

    Background: Coordinated school health programs (CSHP) frequently struggle with how to adequately evaluate implementation. The CSHP framework provides flexibility in how it is implemented; however, this flexibility makes it a challenge to effectively evaluate. Portfolios have been used as a technique for evaluating progress and achievement. This…

  13. Factors Associated with Differences in Patterns of Program Implementation: A Three Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Eva D.; And Others

    Purposes of this study were: (1) to examine patterns of implementation of an innovative educational program with a built-in staff development component over a period of three years; (2) to compare patterns of implementation of the Adaptive Learning Environments Model's (ALEM) three types of teaching skills, including generic, adaptive, and program…

  14. Assessment of program implementation for the Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living (MCHL) Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to assess program implementation (PI) using an implementation score composed of process evaluation (PE) components reach, dose delivered, dose received, and fidelity. This 9-month, multi-site nutrition intervention consisted of two treatment groups (N=319). Sixteen site...

  15. Parallel Implementation of a Semidefinite Programming Solver based on CSDP in a distributed memory cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, I.D.; de Klerk, E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the algorithmic framework and practical aspects of implementing a parallel version of a primal-dual semidefinite programming solver on a distributed memory computer cluster. Our implementation is based on the CSDP solver and uses a message passing interface (MPI), and the Sc

  16. Real-time Kernel Implementation Practice Program for Embedded Software Engineers' Education and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshio; Matsumoto, Masahide; Seo, Katsuhiko; Chino, Shinichiro; Sugino, Eiji; Sawamoto, Jun; Koizumi, Hisao

    A real-time kernel (henceforth RTK) is in the center place of embedded software technology, and the understanding of RTK is indispensable for the embedded system design. To implement RTK, it is necessary to understand languages that describe RTK software program code, system programming manners, software development tools, CPU on that RTK runs and the interface between software and hardware, etc. in addition to understanding of RTK itself. This means RTK implementation process largely covers embedded software implementation process. Therefore, it is thought that RTK implementation practice program is very effective as a means of the acquisition of common embedded software skill in addition to deeper acquisition of RTK itself. In this paper, we propose to apply RTK implementing practice program to embedded software engineers educational program. We newly developed very small and step-up type RTK named μK for educational use, and held a seminar that used μK as a teaching material for the students of information science and engineers of the software house. As a result, we confirmed that RTK implementation practice program is very effective for the acquisition of embedded software common skill.

  17. Development and implementation of a writing program to improve resident authorship rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, Amber Bradley; Hoge, Stephanie C; Cribb, Ashley; Manasco, Kalen B

    2015-09-01

    The development, implementation, and evaluation of a writing program with a formalized writing project as a component of postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residencies are described. The writing program at Georgia Regents Medical Center/University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, a collaborative and jointly funded program, was initiated in the 2010-11 residency year. The goals of the program are to teach residents to communicate effectively, apply leadership skills, employ project management skills, and provide medication- and practice- related education and training. The program combines both writing experiences and mentorship. At the beginning of the residency year, trainees are presented with opportunities to participate in both research projects and writing projects. Specifically, opportunities within the writing program include involvement in review articles, case reports, drug information rounds, book chapters, letters to the editor, and high-quality medication-use evaluations for potential publication. The writing project is highly encouraged, and completion of a manuscript to be submitted for publication is expected by graduation. Nine papers were published by 8 of 18 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years before program implementation. A total of 23 publications were published by 18 (72%) of the 25 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years after implementation of the writing program. Implementation of a formal writing program increased the overall publication rate of residents. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Implementation and Evaluation of a University-Based Outreach Laboratory Program in Electrical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, Chris R.

    2010-01-01

    In the current climate of shortages of high-quality engineering graduates, exacerbated by reduced high school enrollments in physics and mathematics, engineering faculties are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of K-12 outreach programs. Such programs can result in students being better prepared for and better informed about engineering…

  19. Perspectives of Implementers on the Student Teacher Practicum Program of a Philippine University: Inputs for Program Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso N. Mazo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the perspectives of the 316 program implementers of the Student Teacher Practicum Program in the Leyte Normal University, Tacloban City. Using the descriptive survey method the inquiry focused on the importance, objectives, relevance, and competencies of the program. The Statistical Program for Social Sciences (SPSS was used to test the level of significance between the perspectives of “in-campus” and “off-campus” respondents. The implementers construed the program as Very Important, Very Effective in attaining its objectives, Very Relevant, and the competencies Very Useful. The null hypotheses were not rejected on the aspects of importance, attaining the objectives and competencies while on the aspect of relevance it was rejected.

  20. Evaluation of Prerequisite Programs Implementation and Hygiene Practices at Social Food Services through Audits and Microbiological Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayoa, Roncesvalles; Yánez, Nathaly; Díez-Leturia, María; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Vitas, Ana Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Prerequisite programs are considered the most efficient tool for a successful implementation of self-control systems to ensure food safety. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of these programs in 15 catering services located in Navarra and the Basque Country (regions in northern Spain), through on-site audits and microbiological analyses. The implementation of the prerequisite program was incomplete in 60% of the sample. The unobserved temperature control during both the storage and preparation of meals in 20% of the kitchens reveals misunderstanding in the importance of checking these critical control points. A high level of food safety and hygiene (absence of pathogens) was observed in the analyzed meals, while 27.8% of the tested surfaces exceeded the established limit for total mesophilic aerobic microorganisms (≤100 CFU/25 cm²). The group of hand-contact surfaces (oven door handles and aprons) showed the highest level of total mesophilic aerobic microorganisms and Enterobacteriaceae, and the differences observed with respect to the food-contact surfaces (work and distribution utensils) were statistically significant (P food workers' hands, lower levels of microorganisms were observed in the handlers wearing gloves (that is, for Staphylococcus spp we identified 43 CFU/cm2 on average compared with 4 CFU/cm2 (P food handlers, through specific activities such as informal meetings and theoretical-practical sessions adapted to the characteristics of each establishment.

  1. A Comparative Study of Leadership Preparation Programs in Gama (Brazil) and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Gatewood, Mara Rubia Fonseca; McNeal, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the relationship, if any, between leadership preparation programs types and how well school administrators are prepared to set a widely shared vision, develop a school culture, effectively manage school operations and resources, collaborate with faculty and community members, act with integrity and…

  2. Declining Support for Higher-Education Leadership Preparation Programs: An Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, James G.

    2009-01-01

    University-based leadership preparation programs no longer enjoy a near monopoly on the right to prepare school principals and other administrative leaders, and now compete with a growing number of alternative providers. This article utilizes the new institutionalism literature to analyze this shift. Practitioners and policymakers demanded reforms…

  3. Program Evaluation of the "PREPaRE" School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Serwacki, Michelle L.; Brock, Stephen E.; Savage, Todd A.; Woitaszewski, Scott A.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study details a program evaluation of the "PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum" ("PREPaRE"), conducted in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2011. Significant improvements in crisis prevention and intervention attitudes and knowledge were shown among 875 "Crisis Prevention…

  4. Change and Challenge: The Influence of Technology Integration in Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Emily Cinque

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which teacher-preparation programs prepare teachers to integrate technology. It described the relationship between teachers' level of confidence and current practice of applying technology to instruction. In particular, three questions were addressed: (a) To what extent do teacher-preparation…

  5. Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Implications for Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Peggy; Warde, Beverly; Rody, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Given federal mandates, public school districts have adopted inclusive practices with the expectation that general education teachers can accommodate students with disabilities. For teacher preparation programs to prepare future teachers for this reality, it is important to understand the composition of a "typical" general education…

  6. From Implementation to Outcomes to Impacts: Designing a Comprehensive Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebby, S.

    2015-12-01

    Funders are often interested in learning about the impact of program activities, yet before the impacts are determined, educational evaluations should first examine program implementation and outcomes. Implementation evaluation examines how and the extent to which program activities are delivered as intended, including the extent to which activities reached the targeted participants. Outcome evaluation is comprised of a systematic examination of the effects that a program has on program participants, such as changes in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors. In this presentation, presenters will share insights on evaluating the implementation, outcomes, and impacts associated with an online science curriculum for K-2 students. The science curriculum was designed to provide students with access to science concepts and skills in an interactive and innovative environment, and teachers with embedded, aligned, and on-demand professional development. One of the most important—and challenging—steps in this evaluation was to select outcomes that were well-defined, measurable, and aligned to program activities, as well as relevant to program stakeholders. An additional challenge was to measure implementation given limited access to the classroom environment. This presentation will include a discussion of the process evaluators used to select appropriate implementation indicators and outcomes (teacher and student), design an evaluation approach, and craft data collection instruments. Although examples provided are specific to the K-2 science intervention, the best practices discussed are pertinent to all program and event evaluations. Impact evaluation goes beyond implementation and outcome evaluation to inform whether a program is working or not. It requires a comparison group to inform what outcomes would have been in the absence of the intervention. As such, this presentation will also include a discussion of impacts, including how impacts are defined

  7. AUTOMATION OF PLC PROGRAMMING WHEN IMPLEMENTING ALGORITHMS OF GUARANTEEING CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Levinskyi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During developing programs for programmable logic controllers (PLCs the concept of model-oriented design is increasingly used. In particular, usage of Simulink PLC Coder is giving the opportunity to get SCL program codefrom Simulink model which contains certain dynamic elements. Then, for example, this SCL code can be transformed to functional blocks of the Simatic S7-300 (VIPA 300 PLC. This significantly reduces the timerequired to develop code in the language of SCL and reduces requirements for specialists’ qualification when developing control systems. In this article we provide an example of PLC programming automation whenimplementing algorithms of guaranteeing control (AGC. For certain types of technological processes it is typical to contain monotonically increasing function of the effectiveness with fixed one-way restriction in regulations. Forexample, in the grinders, presses, extruders the load current of the drive is stabilized using the change of feed. Energy efficiency of these plants will increase with increasing of the set point (SP to the controller of the drive loadcurrent stabilization loop. However, an increase in SP increases the probability of triggering appropriate protection, for example, as a result of random changes in the properties of raw materials. Therefore, to avoid this accident, thepower of driving motors is often unreasonably overrated. And in this case they are used with currents equal to the half of rated.Systems of guaranteeing control (SGC are used to solve the contradiction between the need to improvethe efficiency and increasing probability of an accident.

  8. DEVELOPING COMPETENCES AT THE BASIC EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efim L. Kon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article holds suggested approaches to the solutions of some private tasks within the actual problem – the realization of competence-based approach to higher education within third generation of the Federal state educational standards. The competence model of a graduate is analyzed. The formal methods of the competence component structure and forming tools for different kinds of the students class work and self work interaction description are offered. The suggested approaches are on a probation stage of Bachelors and Masters basic education programs on 210700 «The infocommunication technologies and communication systems» designing and realization process at Perm National Research Polytechnical University. 

  9. Implementation analysis of lean enablers for managing engineering programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arnim, Joachim; Oehmen, Josef; Rebentisch, Eric

    2014-01-01

    from the perspective of the Lean Enablers [Oehmen 2012] and is based on information from [Sopko 2012a], [Sopko 2012b], [Sopko 2010], [Sopko 2009], interviews, internal documentation, and the used MSP program management methodology [UK 2011]. The analysis of Lean Enablers incorporated in the MSP......This paper presents research to improve the applicability of the Lean Enablers and consists of two parts. The first is a case study of a very successful project management maturity improvement initiative at Siemens Industry Sector’s Industry Automation division in the US. It views the initiative...

  10. CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

  11. An Implementation Research Approach to Evaluating Health Insurance Programs: Insights from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna D. Rao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the distinguishing features of implementation research is the importance given to involve implementers in all aspects of research, and as users of research. We report on a recent implementation research effort in India, in which researchers worked together with program implementers from one of the longest serving government funded insurance schemes in India, the Rajiv Aarogyasri Scheme (RAS in the state of undivided Andhra Pradesh, that covers around 70 million people. This paper aims to both inform on the process of the collaborative research, as well as, how the nature of questions that emerged out of the collaborative exercise differed in scope from those typically asked of insurance program evaluations. Starting in 2012, and over the course of a year, staff from the Aarogyasri Health Care Trust (AHCT, and researchers held a series of meetings to identify research questions that could serve as a guide for an evaluation of the RAS. The research questions were derived from the application of a Logical Framework Approach (“log frame” to the RAS. The types of questions that emerged from this collaborative effort were compared with those seen in the published literature on evaluations of insurance programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. In the published literature, 60% of the questions pertained to output/outcome of the program and the remaining 40%, relate to processes and inputs. In contrast, questions generated from the RAS participatory research process between implementers and researchers had a remarkably different distribution – 81% of questions looked at program input/processes, and 19% on outputs and outcomes. An implementation research approach can lead to a substantively different emphasis of research questions. While there are several challenges in collaborative research between implementers and researchers, an implementation research approach can lead to incorporating tacit knowledge of program implementers

  12. Utilizing Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning in Educator Preparation Programs for Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Colby

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this results-oriented era of accountability, educator preparation programs are called upon to provide comprehensive data related to student and program outcomes while also providing evidence of continuous improvement. Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning (CASL is one approach for fostering critical inquiry about student learning. Graduate educator preparation programs in our university used collaborative analysis as the basis for continuous improvement during an accreditation cycle. As authors of this study, we sought to better understand how graduate program directors and faculty used collaborative analysis to inform practice and improve programs. Our findings suggested that CASL has the potential to foster collective responsibility for student learning, but only with a strong commitment from administrators and faculty, purposefully designed protocols and processes, fidelity to the CASL method, and a focus on professional development. Through CASL, programs have the ability to produce meaningful data related to student and program outcomes and meet the requirements for accreditation.

  13. Energy consumption model over parallel programs implemented on multicore architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Isidro-Ramirez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In High Performance Computing, energy consump-tion is becoming an important aspect to consider. Due to the high costs that represent energy production in all countries it holds an important role and it seek to find ways to save energy. It is reflected in some efforts to reduce the energy requirements of hardware components and applications. Some options have been appearing in order to scale down energy use and, con-sequently, scale up energy efficiency. One of these strategies is the multithread programming paradigm, whose purpose is to produce parallel programs able to use the full amount of computing resources available in a microprocessor. That energy saving strategy focuses on efficient use of multicore processors that are found in various computing devices, like mobile devices. Actually, as a growing trend, multicore processors are found as part of various specific purpose computers since 2003, from High Performance Computing servers to mobile devices. However, it is not clear how multiprogramming affects energy efficiency. This paper presents an analysis of different types of multicore-based architectures used in computing, and then a valid model is presented. Based on Amdahl’s Law, a model that considers different scenarios of energy use in multicore architectures it is proposed. Some interesting results were found from experiments with the developed algorithm, that it was execute of a parallel and sequential way. A lower limit of energy consumption was found in a type of multicore architecture and this behavior was observed experimentally.

  14. Mindfulness Based Programs Implemented with At-Risk Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlett, Kristen; Scrandis, Debra

    2016-01-01

    This review examines studies on mindfulness based programs used with adolescents at-risk for poor future outcomes such as not graduating from high school and living in poverty. The keywords used include mindfulness, at-risk and adolescents in each database to search CINAHL (10 items: 2 book reviews, 3 Dissertations, and 5 research articles), Medline EBSCO (15 research articles), and PubMed (10 research articles). Only primary research articles published between 2009- 2015 in English on mindfulness and at-risk adolescents were included for the most current evidence. Few studies (n= 11) were found that investigate mindfulness in at-risk adolescents. These studies used various mindfulness programs (n = 7) making it difficult to generalize findings for practice. Only three studies were randomized control trials focusing mostly on male students with low socioeconomic status and existing mental health diagnoses. There is a relationship between health behaviors and academic achievement. Future research studies on mindfulness based interventions need to expand to its effects on academic achievement in those youth at-risk to decrease problematic behaviors and improve their ability to be successful adults.

  15. Implementing women's cancer screening programs in American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Paula M; Orians, Carlyn E; Liebow, Edward; Joe, Jennie R; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Erb, Julie; Kenyon, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provides funding to tribes and tribal organizations to implement comprehensive cancer screening programs using a program model developed for state health departments. We conducted a multiple-site case study using a participatory research process to describe how 5 tribal programs implemented screening services, and to identify strategies used to address challenges in delivering services to American Indian and Alaska Native women. We analyzed data from semistructured interviews with 141 key informants, 16 focus groups with 132 program-eligible women, and program documents. Several challenges regarding the delivery of services were revealed, including implementing screening programs in busy acute-care environments, access to mammography, providing culturally sensitive care, and providing diagnostic/treatment services in rural and remote locations. Strategies perceived as successful in meeting program challenges included identifying a "champion" or main supporter of the program in each clinical setting, using mobile mammography, using female providers, and increasing the capacity to provide diagnostic services at screening sites. The results should be of interest to an international audience, including those who work with health-related programs targeting indigenous women or groups that are marginalized because of culture, geographic isolation, and/or socioeconomic position.

  16. Multicultural Conflict Resolution: Development, Implementation and Assessment of a Program for Third Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Benjamin C.; Pulvino, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Presents an intervention that outlines the formulation, implementation, and assessment of one counselor's attempt to increase student skills in the area of conflict resolution through a 6-week, curriculum-based, conflict resolution program for third-graders. Program evaluation indicates that it was successful in challenging students'…

  17. Measuring outcomes in orthopaedics: implementation of an outcomes program in an outpatient orthopaedic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodts, Mary F; Glanzman, Renée; Gray, Adam; Johnson, Randal; Viellieu, Dennis; Hachem, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    With increased demand to provide quality care for patients, orthopaedic practices will need to develop ways to efficiently collect and manage data to support the care that they provide. An outcomes management program must be efficient and consistent to provide good data. This article describes the implementation of an outcomes program at one large private orthopaedic practice within an academic medical setting.

  18. Implementing Writing Assessment in a Degree Completion Program: Key Issues and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Allred, Ellen R.; Hunt, Rob

    2010-01-01

    This article details the advantages and challenges of implementing writing assessment in a degree completion program; it describes the steps involved in the writing assessment process. Study results demonstrate that graduates from a degree completion program generally have adequate writing skills; nevertheless, many could improve their…

  19. Implementing Experiential Action Learning in International Management Education: The Global Business Strategic (GLOBUSTRAT) Consulting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Shyam; Agrawal, Jagdish; Krickx, Guido

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical foundations and implementation challenges and outcomes of a unique "hands-on" global consulting program that is integrated into an international EMBA program for mid-career and senior American and European managers. It details the challenges for the integration of experiential action learning, double-loop…

  20. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  1. Development of a Scale for Evaluating the Pedagogical Formation Program Implemented with Turkish Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiguzel, Oktay Cem

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to develop a scale to evaluate the Pedagogical Formation Program implemented at a Turkish state university. Participants were 221 prospective teachers enrolled in the Pedagogical Formation Program in the 2010-2011 academic year. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the scale items which revealed four factors…

  2. 77 FR 16676 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Operating Permits Program; Commonwealth of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Program; Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Administrative Changes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... contained in the Commonwealth's Implementation Plan and Operating Permits Program. They do not change the... Clean Air Act (CAA or Act), the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is regarded as a state. Generally the...

  3. 77 FR 16795 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Operating Permits Program; Commonwealth of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Program; Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Administrative Changes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... clarity of the rules contained in the Commonwealth's Implementation Plan and Operating Permits Program... Regulations'' section of this Federal Register, EPA is approving the Commonwealth's SIP submittal as a direct...

  4. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  5. A Conceptual Framework for the Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Formal Mentoring Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, LuAnn Ricketts

    1993-01-01

    Data from a survey of executive development directors were the basis for this mentoring program framework, consisting of (1) program development (protege and mentor selection, training, and linkage); (2) implementation (career and psychosocial functions); and (3) evaluation (formal and informal outcomes assessment). (SK)

  6. A Transition Program for Underprepared Students in General Chemistry: Diagnosis, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Shawn P.; Hogrebe, Mark C.; Spees, William M.; Handlin, Larry B.; Noelken, Greg P.; Riley, Julie M.; Frey, Regina F.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an online exam to diagnose students who are underprepared for college-level general chemistry and implemented a program to support them during the general chemistry sequence. This transition program consists of extended-length recitations, peer-led team-learning (PLTL) study groups, and peer-mentoring groups. We evaluated this…

  7. Evaluating the Implementation of a Training Program for Improving Quality Service: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Ketly Dieudonne

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to implement a comprehensive training program to build employees' knowledge, skills, and attitudes in order to improve quality service at ABC Restaurant because of a surge in customer complaints. The purpose of this study was to develop a training program that included an employee handbook as a training tool, a handbook designed…

  8. Process Evaluation of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Implementation in a New Jersey Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yeon; Feldman, Charles; Wunderlich, Shahla M.; Aletras, Stefanie C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides funding to elementary schools for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) to encourage healthy eating. The purpose of this study was to examine factors facilitating or challenging the program's successful implementation in one New Jersey school. Methods: Researchers conducted an…

  9. Implementing Experiential Action Learning in International Management Education: The Global Business Strategic (GLOBUSTRAT) Consulting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Shyam; Agrawal, Jagdish; Krickx, Guido

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical foundations and implementation challenges and outcomes of a unique "hands-on" global consulting program that is integrated into an international EMBA program for mid-career and senior American and European managers. It details the challenges for the integration of experiential action learning, double-loop…

  10. Results of a multidisciplinary program for patients with fibromyalgia implemented in the primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Bloten, H.; Oeseburg, B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of unknown origin with a high prevalence. Multimodal approaches seem to be the treatment of choice in fibromyalgia. A multidisciplinary program was developed and implemented for patients with fibromyalgia in the primary care setting. The program included education

  11. A Transition Program for Underprepared Students in General Chemistry: Diagnosis, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Shawn P.; Hogrebe, Mark C.; Spees, William M.; Handlin, Larry B.; Noelken, Greg P.; Riley, Julie M.; Frey, Regina F.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an online exam to diagnose students who are underprepared for college-level general chemistry and implemented a program to support them during the general chemistry sequence. This transition program consists of extended-length recitations, peer-led team-learning (PLTL) study groups, and peer-mentoring groups. We evaluated this…

  12. Social Emotional Learning: Implementation of Sustainability-Oriented Program in Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsone, Baiba

    2016-01-01

    This article is focused on the description of the content and the implementation process of an originally developed, culturally appropriate and sustainable social and emotional learning program in Latvia. The article also includes the teachers' self-reflected experience illustrated through the perspective of the program's sample activities. The…

  13. Eco-School in Kindergartens: The Effects, Interpretation, and Implementation of a Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincera, Jan; Kroufek, Roman; Simonova, Petra; Broukalova, Lenka; Broukal, Vaclav; Skalík, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of a Czech pilot project in implementing the Eco-School program in kindergartens. The evaluation applied a mixed design that included pre/post testing of children using picture-based questionnaires, and interviews with the teachers responsible for conducting the program. The findings revealed a significant increase…

  14. Preparing an Intercultural Program for University Studies Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbihl, Helene

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on how to teach intercultural communicative competence to learners of English as a foreign language enrolled in a university exchange program in Europe, and help them become "intercultural speakers." The intercultural speaker can be defined as an intermediary between his or her own culture and the other's culture.…

  15. An Analysis of Academic Programs Preparing Nursing Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepura, Barbara A.; Tilbury, Mary S.

    Key elements of the master's level programs offering majors and/or minors in nursing administration and accredited by the National League for Nursing were assessed. The focus was admission and graduation stipulations and curriculum content. Courses were classified according to content and categorized as either administration, research,…

  16. A Model for Using Triadic Supervision in Counselor Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Gerard; Hein, Serge F.; Getz, Hildy

    2009-01-01

    The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2001) has approved the use of triadic supervision as an alternative to individual supervision in clinical instruction. However, literature describing this mode of supervision is very limited. A model for triadic supervision is described, including presession planning,…

  17. Implementation of a General Web Application Program Interface for Geoinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pytel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available C++ language was used for creating web applications at the department of Mapping and Cartography for many years. Plenty of projects started to be very large-scale and complicated to maintain. Consequently, the traditional way of adding functionality to a Web Server which previously has been used (CGI programs started being usefulness. I was looking for some solutions - particularly open source ones. I have tried many languages (solutions and finally I chose the Java language and started writing servlets. Using the Java language (servlets has significantly simplified the development of web applications. As a result, developing cycle was cut down. Because of Java JNI (Java Native Interface it is still possible to use C++ libraries which we are using. The main goal of this article is to share my practical experiences with rewriting typical CGI web application and creating complex geoinformatic web application.

  18. IMPLEMENTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: AN ALTERNATIVE FOR URBAN RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauni Hamid

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Revitalizing slum-area has been recognized as one of the most complicated parts in urban resettlement program. With such a context we need a particular mode of communication to initiate and generate the project based on people's own aspiration. There are problem characteristics here, which are usually executed by Information Technology (IT. It is a potential to overcome the problem by using IT based on its ability to manage abundant information with various variables. At least there are three prospective opportunities in applying IT in this area. Firstly, it is the role of visualization, where computer can execute several visual features of the projects, which will be more representative than the previous ones. Secondly, it is the role of IT in generating the customization process to everyone involved in the projects. The last is the role of IT as executing tool for project's database management.

  19. Value of Solar. Program Design and Implementation Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mike [Solar Electric Power Association, Washington, D.C. (United States); McLaren, Joyce [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cory, Karlynn [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidovich, Ted [Solar Electric Power Association, Washington, D.C. (United States); Sterling, John [Solar Electric Power Association, Washington, D.C. (United States); Makhyoun, Miriam [Solar Electric Power Association, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present an analysis that assesses the potential market type that might form in the United States under a VOS rate, given current national average solar costs and various incentive scenarios, for the most populous city in each state. Three hypothetical VOS tariffs were developed, based on assumptions of avoided fuel costs, avoided capacity, environmental benefits, and line losses, to represent a of range of possible VOS rates. The levelized cost of solar in 50 locations is calculated using NREL’s System Advisor Model (SAM) using input assumptions regarding system size, resource quality, avoided capacity (aka capacity factor) and a variety of incentives. Comparing the solar costs with the hypothetical VOS rates illustrates the various market types that may form under a VOS program, in different locations.

  20. Developing an active implementation model for a chronic disease management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrethe Smidth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Introduction and diffusion of new disease management programs in healthcare is usually slow, but active theory-driven implementation seems to outperform other implementation strategies. However, we have only scarce evidence on the feasibility and real effect of such strategies in complex primary care settings where municipalities, general practitioners and hospitals should work together. The Central Denmark Region recently implemented a disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD which presented an opportunity to test an active implementation model against the usual implementation model. The aim of the present paper is to describe the development of an active implementation model using the Medical Research Council’s model for complex interventions and the Chronic Care Model.Methods: We used the Medical Research Council’s five-stage model for developing complex interventions to design an implementation model for a disease management program for COPD. First, literature on implementing change in general practice was scrutinised and empirical knowledge was assessed for suitability. In phase I, the intervention was developed; and in phases II and III, it was tested in a block- and cluster-randomised study. In phase IV, we evaluated the feasibility for others to use our active implementation model. Results: The Chronic Care Model was identified as a model for designing efficient implementation elements. These elements were combined into a multifaceted intervention, and a timeline for the trial in a randomised study was decided upon in accordance with the five stages in the Medical Research Council’s model; this was captured in a PaTPlot, which allowed us to focus on the structure and the timing of the intervention. The implementation strategies identified as efficient were use of the Breakthrough Series, academic detailing, provision of patient material and meetings between providers. The active

  1. Developing an active implementation model for a chronic disease management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrethe Smidth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Introduction and diffusion of new disease management programs in healthcare is usually slow, but active theory-driven implementation seems to outperform other implementation strategies. However, we have only scarce evidence on the feasibility and real effect of such strategies in complex primary care settings where municipalities, general practitioners and hospitals should work together. The Central Denmark Region recently implemented a disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD which presented an opportunity to test an active implementation model against the usual implementation model. The aim of the present paper is to describe the development of an active implementation model using the Medical Research Council’s model for complex interventions and the Chronic Care Model.Methods: We used the Medical Research Council’s five-stage model for developing complex interventions to design an implementation model for a disease management program for COPD. First, literature on implementing change in general practice was scrutinised and empirical knowledge was assessed for suitability. In phase I, the intervention was developed; and in phases II and III, it was tested in a block- and cluster-randomised study. In phase IV, we evaluated the feasibility for others to use our active implementation model.Results: The Chronic Care Model was identified as a model for designing efficient implementation elements. These elements were combined into a multifaceted intervention, and a timeline for the trial in a randomised study was decided upon in accordance with the five stages in the Medical Research Council’s model; this was captured in a PaTPlot, which allowed us to focus on the structure and the timing of the intervention. The implementation strategies identified as efficient were use of the Breakthrough Series, academic detailing, provision of patient material and meetings between providers. The active

  2. Developing an active implementation model for a chronic disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidth, Margrethe; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Introduction and diffusion of new disease management programs in healthcare is usually slow, but active theory-driven implementation seems to outperform other implementation strategies. However, we have only scarce evidence on the feasibility and real effect of such strategies in complex primary care settings where municipalities, general practitioners and hospitals should work together. The Central Denmark Region recently implemented a disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which presented an opportunity to test an active implementation model against the usual implementation model. The aim of the present paper is to describe the development of an active implementation model using the Medical Research Council's model for complex interventions and the Chronic Care Model. We used the Medical Research Council's five-stage model for developing complex interventions to design an implementation model for a disease management program for COPD. First, literature on implementing change in general practice was scrutinised and empirical knowledge was assessed for suitability. In phase I, the intervention was developed; and in phases II and III, it was tested in a block- and cluster-randomised study. In phase IV, we evaluated the feasibility for others to use our active implementation model. The Chronic Care Model was identified as a model for designing efficient implementation elements. These elements were combined into a multifaceted intervention, and a timeline for the trial in a randomised study was decided upon in accordance with the five stages in the Medical Research Council's model; this was captured in a PaTPlot, which allowed us to focus on the structure and the timing of the intervention. The implementation strategies identified as efficient were use of the Breakthrough Series, academic detailing, provision of patient material and meetings between providers. The active implementation model was tested in a randomised trial

  3. School personnel perspectives on their school's implementation of a school-based suicide prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bradley D; Kataoka, Sheryl H; Hamilton, Alison B; Schultz, Dana; Ryan, Gery; Vona, Pamela; Wong, Marleen

    2010-07-01

    Youth suicide is a national public health priority, with policymakers highlighting schools as an ideal setting in which to deliver suicide prevention programs. Over the past decade, the number of schools implementing such programs has grown substantially, yet little is known about how successfully such programs are being implemented. This study examines the implementation of a district-wide suicide prevention program through key informant interviews with school personnel. Schools with higher rates of implementing district protocols for at-risk students had an organized system to respond to at-risk students, a process for effectively responding to students who were at-risk for suicide, and strong administrative support. In contrast, schools that had lower rates of implementing district protocols relied on a handful of individuals for suicide prevention activities and had limited administrative support. Attention to organizational factors leading to successful implementation of school-based suicide prevention programs may enhance the role of schools in national adolescent suicide prevention efforts.

  4. Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Lending and implementation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popelka, A. [Tysak Engineering, Acton, MA (United States); Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V. [Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    1997-08-01

    The government of Ukraine, through the State Committee of Energy Conservation (State Committee), is considering the implementation of energy efficiency measures in state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The State Committee entered into a Memorandum of Cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct an assessment of the institutional buildings sector efficiency potential. This assessment will be used to support a potential loan by the World Bank for implementing a buildings efficiency improvement program in Kyiv. This report provides an assessment of the options for structuring the lending scenarios and the implementation of the program. Components to the lending structure are options for the disbursement of funds, options for the loan service, and other financial options and considerations. Program implementation includes management structures, reporting, installation activities, and post-installation activities such as training and verification.

  5. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1993.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1992-09-01

    The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) was developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in accordance with Public Law 96-501, the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act). The purpose of the Program is to guide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other Federal agencies in carrying out their responsibilities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife of the Columbia River Basin. The Annual Implementation World Plan (AIWP) presents BPA`s plans for implementing the Program during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The FY 1993 AIWP emphasizes continuation of 143 ongoing or projecting ongoing Program projects, tasks, or task orders, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. The FY 1993 AIWP also contains three new Program projects or tasks that are planned to start in FY 1993.

  6. Exam Preparation: The Influence of Action Control, Procrastination and Examination Experience on Students' Goal Intention and Implementation Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the framework of the intention-behavior-gap analysis in relation to exam preparation I examined whether intention--subdivided into goal and implementation intention--is influenced directly by the determinants action control, procrastination and examination experience which is consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior and…

  7. Exam Preparation: The Influence of Action Control, Procrastination and Examination Experience on Students' Goal Intention and Implementation Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the framework of the intention-behavior-gap analysis in relation to exam preparation I examined whether intention--subdivided into goal and implementation intention--is influenced directly by the determinants action control, procrastination and examination experience which is consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior and…

  8. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eJohnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan’s disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens, although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program’s effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  9. Program and Teacher Characteristics Predicting the Implementation of Banking Time with Preschoolers Who Display Disruptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Amanda P; Wolcott, Catherine Sanger; Whittaker, Jessica Vick; Locasale-Crouch, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the relationship among baseline program and teacher characteristics and subsequent implementation of Banking Time. Banking Time is a dyadic intervention intended to improve a teacher's interaction quality with a specific child. Banking Time implementation was examined in the current study using a sample of 59 teachers and preschool children displaying disruptive behaviors in the classroom (~three children per classroom). Predictors included preschool program type, teacher demographic characteristics (personal and professional), and teacher beliefs (self-efficacy, authoritarian beliefs, and negative attributions about child disruptive behavior). Multiple measures and methods (i.e., teacher report, consultant report, independent observations) were used to assess implementation. We created three implementation composite measures (dosage, quality, and generalized practice) that had high internal consistencies within each composite but were only modestly associated with one another, suggesting unique constructs of implementation. We found that type of preschool program was associated with dosage and quality. Aspects of teacher demographics related to all three implementation composites. Teacher beliefs predicted dosage and generalized practice. Results suggest that the factors that predict the implementation of Banking Time vary as a function of the type of implementation being assessed.

  10. NEPA implementation: The Department of Energy`s program to manage spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in its management of spent nuclear fuel. The DOE strategy is to address the short-term safety concerns about existing spent nuclear fuel, to study alternatives for interim storage, and to develop a long-range program to manage spent nuclear fuel. This paper discusses the NEPA process, the environmental impact statements for specific sites as well as the overall program, the inventory of DOE spent nuclear fuel, the alternatives for managing the fuel, and the schedule for implementing the program.

  11. Positive School and Classroom Environment: Precursors of Successful Implementation of Positive Youth Development Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C. F. Sun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study was based on a school where the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. was integrated into the formal curriculum. In this case study, an interview with the school principal, vice-principal, and social worker was conducted in order to understand their perceptions of administrative arrangements and issues in the school, implementation characteristics, program effectiveness, program success, and overall impression. Results showed that several positive school and classroom attributes were conducive to program success, including positive school culture and belief in students' potentials, an inviting school environment, an encouraging classroom environment, high involvement of school administrative personnel, and systematic program arrangement.

  12. The Implementation of One-Week-One-Article Program in a Reading Class: A Reflective Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Rahmatullah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents my reflections on the implementation of one-week-one-article program. Fifty-three students participated in this program. Every week they presented the article they had read. I found that the majority of students actively participated in this program, showing seriousness in understanding the content of the article, the pronunciation of difficult words, and the flow of the presentation. This program at least promoted three aspects: students’ motivation, cooperative learning, and their critical thinking. Even though this program was conducted for university students, it is likely to be working with students of junior and senior secondary school with some modification

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE REGIONAL LEGAL BASE REGULATING DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I. Dobrolyubova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The budget legislation stipulates that starting from the budget cycle of 2016, all Russian regions should form their budgets based on public (state programs. The article presents the results of the analysis of regional legal acts and regulations aimed at assessing readiness on the part of the regions to implement program budgeting practices and identifying regional specifics of such regulation. The analysis allowed to identify regional approaches to setting procedures and regulating the contents of regional public programs, evaluate the relations between program development and regional budget planning procedures, define specific approaches to monitoring and evaluating performance of regional public programs.

  14. An Approach for Dynamic Optimization of Prevention Program Implementation in Stochastic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuncheol; Prabhu, Vittal

    The science of preventing youth problems has significantly advanced in developing evidence-based prevention program (EBP) by using randomized clinical trials. Effective EBP can reduce delinquency, aggression, violence, bullying and substance abuse among youth. Unfortunately the outcomes of EBP implemented in natural settings usually tend to be lower than in clinical trials, which has motivated the need to study EBP implementations. In this paper we propose to model EBP implementations in natural settings as stochastic dynamic processes. Specifically, we propose Markov Decision Process (MDP) for modeling and dynamic optimization of such EBP implementations. We illustrate these concepts using simple numerical examples and discuss potential challenges in using such approaches in practice.

  15. Implementation of a worksite educational program focused on promoting healthy eating habits

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitra Tanagra; Dimitris Panidis; Yannis Tountas; Elina Remoudaki; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the effectiveness of a short-term educational-counseling worksite program focused on lipid intake, by monitoring the possible change on nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Methods: an 8-week educational program based on the Health Belief Model was implemented in a honey packaging and sales company in Greece. 20 out of the 29 employees initially enrolled completed the program. Knowledge level and eating habits were evaluated prior and after the intervention by the “Nu...

  16. Design and Implementation of an Application. Programming Interface for Volume Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Selldin, Håkan

    2002-01-01

    To efficiently examine volumetric data sets from CT or MRI scans good volume rendering applications are needed. This thesis describes the design and implementation of an application programming interface (API) to be used when developing volume-rendering applications. A complete application programming interface has been designed. The interface is designed so that it makes writing application programs containing volume rendering fast and easy. The interface also makes created application progr...

  17. Implementation of a training program to improve pharmacy services for high-risk neonatal and maternal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mary E; Jakubecz, Michael A; Link, Nicholas A

    2013-01-15

    A training program aimed at increasing pharmacists' role in the care of high-risk maternal, neonatal, and pediatric patients is described. In preparation for the planned expansion of a large Ohio hospital's maternal and neonatal critical care services, the pharmacy department developed a training program to increase the knowledge and skill sets of staff pharmacists, especially those who lacked residency training. The program also supported the department's transition to an integrated patient-centered pharmacy practice model. Clinical practice guidelines, policy statements, and other sources were used to develop a series of 57 one-hour lectures on a wide range of topics in maternal-neonatal critical care. The lectures were delivered one morning each week, every other week, over 30 months, with additional case-based homework assigned; a passing score (80%) on all module examinations and homework assignments was required for continued course participation. Trainees who completed the voluntary program earned a certificate from the department head and continuing-education credit from the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy, and they were eligible to engage in expanded rounding and patient counseling activities. The program appeared to have a positive impact on patient satisfaction and efforts to reduce medication misadventures in the neonatal intensive care unit. The implementation of a training program to educate non-residency-trained pharmacists in selected areas of maternal, neonatal, and pediatric health care helped enable the expansion of pharmacy services to include admission, daily, and discharge counseling.

  18. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Tourist Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This career preparation curriculum outline for the hospitality/tourism industry is intended to provide secondary and postsecondary learning outcomes for completion of program requirements. The guide is organized into four sections. Section one presents an overview of the program, of the philosophy of career education, and of the organization and…

  19. Strategy implementation for the CTA Atmospheric monitoring program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doro Michele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA is the next generation facility of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. It reaches unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. CTA detects Cherenkov light emitted within an atmospheric shower of particles initiated by cosmic-gamma rays or cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere. From the combination of images the Cherenkov light produces in the telescopes, one is able to infer the primary particle energy and direction. A correct energy estimation can be thus performed only if the local atmosphere is well characterized. The atmosphere not only affects the shower development itself, but also the Cherenkov photon transmission from the emission point in the particle shower, at about 10–20 km above the ground, to the detector. Cherenkov light on the ground is peaked in the UV-blue region, and therefore molecular and aerosol extinction phenomena are important. The goal of CTA is to control systematics in energy reconstruction to better than 10%. For this reason, a careful and continuous monitoring and characterization of the atmosphere is required. In addition, CTA will be operated as an observatory, with data made public along with appropriate analysis tools. High-level data quality can only be ensured if the atmospheric properties are consistently and continuously taken into account. In this contribution, we concentrate on discussing the implementation strategy for the various atmospheric monitoring instruments currently under discussion in CTA. These includes Raman lidars and ceilometers, stellar photometers and others available both from commercial providers and public research centers.

  20. Training School Personnel to Implement a Universal School-Based Prevention of Depression Program under Real-World Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, P.H.; Dadds, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    The present study evaluated the impact of a universal prevention of depression program [the Resourceful Adolescent Program (RAP)] when implemented under real-world conditions in a school setting. Prior research has found the RAP program to be beneficial for high-school students when the program was implemented by university staff selected,…

  1. How Can Catholic Higher Education Help K-12 Catholic Schools and School Systems Prepare for and Maximize Participation in Parental Choice Programs? "A Reflection on the 2013 Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference on Catholic School Financing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Susan Ferguson reflects on the Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference of 2013 and the breakout group talk titled "Helping the Church Prepare for and Implement Publicly Funded Programs." The main point of the talk asked: "How Can Catholic Higher Education Help K-12 Catholic Schools and School Systems Prepare for and…

  2. Implementation of the thinking skills for work program in a psychosocial clubhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Susan R; Schiano, Diane; Mueser, Kim T; Wolfe, Rosemarie

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive remediation programs aimed at improving role functioning have been implemented in a variety of different mental health treatment settings, but not in psychosocial clubhouses. This study sought to determine the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of providing a cognitive remediation program (the Thinking Skills for Work program), developed and previously implemented in supported employment programs at mental health agencies, in a psychosocial club-house. Twenty-three members with a history of difficulties getting or keeping jobs, who were participating in a supported employment program at a psychosocial clubhouse, were enrolled in the Thinking Skills for Work program. A neurocognitive battery was administered at baseline and 3 months later after completion of the computer cognitive training component of the program. Hours of competitive work were tracked for the 2 years before enrollment and 2 years following enrollment. Other work-related activities (school, volunteer) were also tracked for 2 years following enrollment. Twenty-one members (91%) completed 6 or more computer cognitive training sessions. Participants demonstrated significant improvements on neurocognitive measures of processing speed, verbal learning and memory, and executive functions. Sixty percent of the members obtained a competitive job during the 2-year follow-up, and 74% were involved in some type of work-related activity. Participants worked significantly more competitive hours over the 2 years after joining the Thinking Skills for Work program than before. The findings support the feasibility and promise of implementing the Thinking Skills for Work program in the context of supported employment provided at psychosocial clubhouses.

  3. APALS program status: preproduction flight test results and production implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvizd, James J.; Dieffenbach, Otto W.

    1996-05-01

    The APALS system is a precision approach and landing system designed to enable low visibility landings at many more airports than now possible. Engineering development of the APALS system began October 1992 culminating in the pre- production Advanced Development Model (ADM) system currently undergoing flight testing. The paper focuses on the Cat III accuracy and integrity requirements defined by ICAO, Annex 10 and the required navigation performance (RNP) tunnel concept. The resulting ADM architecture developed to meet them is described. The primary measurement is made with the aircraft's weather radar and provides range and range rate information to the ADM necessary to update the precision navigation state vector. The system uses stored terrain map data as references for map matching with synthetic aperture radar with synthetic aperture radar maps. A description of the pre-production flight test program is included. Testing is being conducted at six different airports around the country demonstrating system performance in various environmental conditions (precipitation, heavy foliage, sparse terrain, over water and turbulence). ADM flight test results of 131 successful CAT II hand-flown approaches at ALbuquerque, NM and Richmond, VA are presented. Detailed statistical analysis of these results indicate that the APALS system meets the RNP for Cat III.

  4. Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

  5. China's Primary Programs of Terrestrial Ecosystem Restoration: Initiation, Implementation, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Runsheng; Yin, Guiping

    2010-03-01

    China has undertaken several major programs of terrestrial ecosystem restoration (ERPs) in recent years, including the Natural Forest Protection Program (NFPP) and the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP). There have been reports on the implementation of these programs, their preliminary impacts, and the problems encountered in carrying them out; a great deal has been learned from these studies. Nonetheless, China’s ERPs are not limited to the NFPP and the SLCP. Because a complete documentation and a timely update of these major efforts are still missing from the literature, it is difficult to gauge the scope of these programs and the scale of their impacts. In addition, a more thorough and critical analysis of both the general ERP policy and the specific technical measures used in implementing the ERPs remains urgently needed. The purpose of this article is to tackle these tasks. Overall, with the huge government investments in the ERPs, tremendous progress has been made in implementing them. To complete them successfully and to fundamentally improve the targeted ecosystems, however, it is essential for China to have a more balanced and comprehensive approach to ecological restoration. This approach must include: adopting better planning and management practices; strengthening the governance of program implementation; emphasizing the active engagement of local people; establishing an independent, competent monitoring network; and conducting adequate assessments of program effectiveness and impact.

  6. Program Implementers' Evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: Findings Based on Different Datasets over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper integrates the evaluation findings based on program implementers in nine datasets collected from 2005 to 2009 (244 schools and 7,926 implementers. Using consolidated data with schools as the unit of analysis, results showed that program implementers generally had positive perceptions of the program, themselves, and benefits of the program, with more than four-fifths of the implementers regarding the program as beneficial to the program participants. The subjective outcome evaluation instrument was found to be internally consistent. Multiple regression analyses revealed that perceived qualities of the program and program implementers predicted perceived effectiveness of the program. In conjunction with evaluation findings based on other sources, the present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in Hong Kong.

  7. Program implementers' evaluation of the project P.A.T.H.S.: findings based on different datasets over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ma, Cecilia M S

    2012-01-01

    This paper integrates the evaluation findings based on program implementers in nine datasets collected from 2005 to 2009 (244 schools and 7,926 implementers). Using consolidated data with schools as the unit of analysis, results showed that program implementers generally had positive perceptions of the program, themselves, and benefits of the program, with more than four-fifths of the implementers regarding the program as beneficial to the program participants. The subjective outcome evaluation instrument was found to be internally consistent. Multiple regression analyses revealed that perceived qualities of the program and program implementers predicted perceived effectiveness of the program. In conjunction with evaluation findings based on other sources, the present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) in Hong Kong.

  8. Organization and implementation of a cardio-oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Manuela; Ribeiro, Leonor; Magalhães, Andreia; Sousa, Ana Rita; Nobre Menezes, Miguel; Jorge, Marília; Costa, Luís; Pinto, Fausto José

    2016-09-01

    Considerable advances in cancer therapies in recent decades have reshaped the prognosis of cancer patients. There are now estimated to be over 20 million cancer survivors in the USA and Europe, numbers unimaginable a few years ago. However, this increase in survival, along with the aging of the patient population, has been accompanied by a rise in adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when there is a previous history of heart disease. The incidence of cardiotoxicity continues to grow, which can compromise the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Cardiotoxicity associated with conventional therapies, especially anthracyclines and radiation, is well known, and usually leads to left ventricular dysfunction. However, heart failure represents only a fraction of the cardiotoxicity associated with newer therapies, which have diverse cardiovascular effects. There are few guidelines for early detection, prevention and treatment of cardiotoxicity of cancer treatments, and no well-established tools for screening these patients. Echocardiography is the method of choice for assessment of patients before, during and after cancer treatment. It therefore makes sense to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to these patients, involving cardiologists, oncologists and radiotherapists, collaborating in the development of new training modules, and performing clinical and translational research in a cardio-oncology program. Cardio-oncology is a new frontier in medicine and has emerged as a new medical subspecialty that concentrates knowledge, understanding, training and treatment of cardiovascular comorbidities, risks and complications in patients with cancer in a comprehensive approach to the patient rather than to the disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation of a heart failure readmission reduction program: a role for medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Pearson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congestive heart failure (CHF is one of the leading causes of hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Due to the substantial costs associated with these readmissions, several interventions to reduce CHF readmissions have been developed and implemented. Methods:To reduce CHF readmissions at our community teaching hospital, the Smooth Transitions Equal Less Readmission (STELR program was developed. Utilizing the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle for quality improvement, resident physicians tracked patients enrolled in the STELR program. The resident contribution to the program was substantial in that they were able to quantify the improvement in both physician practices and patient readmissions. This provided insight into program areas requiring further modification, which the hospital would not have obtained without resident participation. Results: The readmission rate for patients diagnosed with heart failure decreased from 32% prior to program implementation, to 24% hospital wide (including patients who were not tracked in the STELR program, and 21% among patients tracked by the residents. Conclusion: This effective CHF readmission reduction program requires less financial resources compared to government funded programs. The resident involvement in the STELR program helped to assess and improve the program and also allowed the residents to gain an awareness of the resources available to their patients to facilitate their transition home. The program exposed the residents to systems-based practice, a fundamental element of their residency training and, more generally, community care.

  10. Successful Bullying Prevention Programs: Influence of Research Design, Implementation Features, and Program Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryanna Hahn Fox

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bullying prevention programs have been shown to be generally effective in reducing bullying and victimization. However, the effects are relatively small in randomized experiments and greater in quasi-experimental and age-cohort designs. Programs that are more intensive and of longer duration (for both children and teachers are more effective, as are programs containing more components. Several program components are associated with large effect sizes, including parent training or meetings and teacher training. These results should inform the design and evaluation of anti-bullying programs in the future, and a system ofaccreditation of effective programs.

  11. Model for implementing cognitive behavioural therapy for smartphone app based smoking cessation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alsharif

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Smoking cessation programs are widely implemented to assist smokers in the process of quitting smoking. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT is a psychological approach that is increasingly used in smoking cessation programs. CBT has also been implemented for smoking cessation programs and has been successful in helping smokers to quit. Another advantage of CBT is that it can be combined with different tools and technologies and hence made to deliver effective health intervention programs. The recent advancements in smartphone technologies have been widely explored to develop smoking cessation apps as tools to assist with quitting smoking. However, most existing smartphone apps lack follow-up and adherence to clinical guidelines for treatment. To date, there are no studies which have explored implementing CBT modules into smoking cessation apps. Therefore, there is a need for implementing behavioural change mechanisms in smoking cessation apps to help smokers quit effectively. In this study, we propose a new approach that combines mobile health technology and CBT methods to provide an effective smoking cessation program. The ubiquitous presence of smartphones and the various communication benefits they provide are utilized by our proposed system to provide a CBT paradigm into smoking cessation app systems and hence enhance their success potential. Currently, the proposed system is at the implementation stage, which is soon to be followed by a clinical trial to study the impact of this system on smoking cessation.

  12. Reductions in employee productivity impairment observed after implementation of web-based worksite health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Jordan; Schwartz, Steven; Giuseffi, Danielle L; Wang, Chun; Nevedal, Dana; Bedrosian, Richard

    2011-12-01

    To assess changes in employee productivity impairment observed after the implementation of several Web-based health promotion programs. Health risk assessments and self-report measures of productivity impairment were administered on-line to more than 43,000 participants of Web-based health promotion programs. Reductions in productivity impairment were observed after 1 month of program utilization. Productivity impairment at 90- and 180-day follow-ups also decreased relative to baseline. Improvements in employee health were associated with reductions in employee productivity impairment. The use of Web-based health promotion programs was associated with reductions in productivity impairment and improvements in employee health. After the implementation of Web-based health promotion programs, reductions in productivity impairment may be observed before reductions in direct health care costs.

  13. Constraint Solver Techniques for Implementing Precise and Scalable Static Program Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ye

    As people rely on all kinds of software systems for almost every aspect of their lives, how to ensure the reliability of software is becoming more and more important. Program analysis, therefore, becomes more and more important for the software development process. Static program analysis helps...... developers to build reliable software systems more quickly and with fewer bugs or security defects. While designing and implementing a program analysis remains a hard work, making it both scalable and precise is even more challenging. In this dissertation, we show that with a general inclusion constraint...... solver using unification we could make a program analysis easier to design and implement, much more scalable, and still as precise as expected. We present an inclusion constraint language with the explicit equality constructs for specifying program analysis problems, and a parameterized framework...

  14. Implementing Health-Promoting Leadership in Municipal Organizations: Managers’ Experiences with a Leadership Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Larsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze how line and middle managers experience and describe barriers and enablers in the implementation of a health-promoting leadership program in municipal organizations. A qualitative case study design was applied to examine the leadership program in a case involving implementation of an organizational health intervention. Data were mainly collected using semi-structured interviews with line and middle managers participating in the leadership program. Interviews with senior managers, notes from meetings/workshops, and written action plans were used as complementary data. The interview data were analyzed using a thematic analysis, and the complementary data using a summative content analysis. The findings show that the interviewed line and middle managers experienced this leadership program as a new approach in leadership training because it is based primarily on employee participation. Involvement and commitment of the employees was considered a crucial enabler in the implementation of the leadership program. Other enablers identified include action plans with specific goals, earlier experiences of organizational change, and integration of the program content into regular routines and structures. The line and middle managers described several barriers in the implementation process, and they described various organizational conditions, such as high workload, lack of senior management support, politically initiated projects, and organizational change, as challenges that limited the opportunities to be drivers of change. Taken together, these barriers interfered with the leadership program and its implementation. The study contributes to the understanding of how organizational-level health interventions are implemented in public sector workplaces.

  15. DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsha Keister

    2001-02-01

    DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program

  16. The Work Disability Prevention CIHR Strategic Training Program: Program Performance After 5 Years of Implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loisel, P.; Hong, Q.N.; Imbeau, D.; Lippel, K.; Guzman, J.; MacEachen, E.; Corbiere, M.; Santos, B.R.; Anema, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Work Disability Prevention (WDP) Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program was developed in 2001 and is a unique program in the world. The main objective of this program is to help future researchers develop transdisciplinary knowledge, skills and atti

  17. Lessons learned from the field: key strategies for implementing successful on-the-bill financing programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. [Johnson Consulting Group, Frederick, MD (United States); Willoughby, G.; Shimoda, W. [Hawaiian Electric Company, Honolulu, HI (United States); Volker, M. [Midwest Energy, Hayes, KS (United States)

    2012-01-15

    On-the-bill financing programs have generated interest among utility program designers as a way to reduce the upfront cost associated with installing energy efficiency measures. This paper highlights the key lessons learned from program evaluations completed for two diverse programs: Midwest Energy and Hawaiian Electric Company. This paper documents the ways in which these utilities designed and implemented these innovative programs designed to promote installations of energy efficiency measures in the residential market. These programs will also describe the internal challenges faced by these utilities in developing the internal systems and resources necessary to manage the applications, billing records, and documentation required to manage these program activities. This paper also compares the approaches used by Midwest Energy and Hawaiian Electric based on two recently completed process evaluations. Midwest Energy debuted its HowSmart Program in 2007 to provide renters and landlords a mechanism to pay for a variety of energy efficiency improvements. Full program implementation began in 2008. Hawaii Electric developed the SolarSaver Pilot Program in 2007 to encourage installations of solar water heaters and has been operational for 2 years. In both programs, the utility provides the upfront capital as a way to encourage the investment in these energy efficiency improvements. This paper compares the results from both programs based on their second year of program operations. This paper will identify some 'best practices' to consider for this type of program as well as learn more about benefits provided by these unique on-the-bill-financing programs.

  18. Implementing the CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program: Wisdom From the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Elizabeth A.; Boehm, Jennifer E.; DeGroff, Amy; Glover-Kudon, Rebecca; Preissle, Judith

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Colorectal cancer, as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women in the United States, represents an important area for public health intervention. Although colorectal cancer screening can prevent cancer and detect disease early when treatment is most effective, few organized public health screening programs have been implemented and evaluated. From 2005 to 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded 5 sites to participate in the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP), which was designed to reach medically underserved populations. METHODS The authors conducted a longitudinal, multiple case study to analyze program implementation processes. Qualitative methods included interviews with 100 stakeholders, 125 observations, and review of 19 documents. Data were analyzed within and across cases. RESULTS Several themes related to CRCSDP implementation emerged from the cross-case analysis: the complexity of colorectal cancer screening, the need for teamwork and collaboration, integration of the program into existing systems, the ability of programs to use wisdom at the local level, and the influence of social norms. Although these themes were explored independently from 1 another, interaction across themes was evident. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal cancer screening is clinically complex, and its screening methods are not well accepted by the general public; both of these circumstances have implications for program implementation. Using patient navigation, engaging in transdisciplinary teamwork, assimilating new programs into existing clinical settings, and deferring to local-level wisdom together helped to address complexity and enhance program implementation. In addition, public health efforts must confront negative social norms around colorectal cancer screening. PMID:23868482

  19. [Poverty and social policy: the implementation of complementary programs for the Bolsa Família Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cláudia Roberta Bocca; Magalhães, Rosana

    2012-05-01

    The Bolsa Família Program involves the transfer of income and the implementation of complementary programs to foster human capital development and empower the beneficiaries. To analyze the implementation of complementary programs in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, a review of documents and secondary data was conducted, focus groups of beneficiaries studied and semi-structured interviews were staged with governmental, nongovernmental stakeholders and beneficiaries. The design, coverage and evaluation of the complementary programs have been weak, and beneficiaries were even unaware of vocational training courses. The program administrators acknowledged the failings and the fact that the courses offered by Próximo Passo are not adapted to local demand, even though they were conceived as a vocational training strategy aimed at creating construction jobs in the Growth Acceleration Program and the tourist industry in the city. Considering that the social inclusion perspective is linked to access to public policies, the supply and follow-up of these activities by government agencies and civil society organizations are essential for the effectiveness of the fight against poverty and hunger, aimed at contributing to the so-called "exit routes" from the Bolsa Família Program.

  20. Process Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: Findings Based on the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes, observers carried out process evaluation in the form of systematic observations of 22 units in 14 randomly selected schools. Results showed that the overall level of program adherence was generally high (range: 45–100%, with an average of 86.3%. High implementation quality of the program in the areas of student interest, student participation and involvement, classroom control, use of interactive delivery method, use of strategies to enhance student motivation, use of positive and supportive feedbacks, instructors’ familiarity with the students, degree of achievement of the objectives, time management, lesson preparation, overall implementation quality, and success of implementation was also found. The present findings are consistent with those observations based on the experimental implementation phase, suggesting that the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum was generally high.

  1. Poverty Reduction for Extremely Poor Households of Malang City by the Implementation of Program Keluarga Harapan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmy Haliim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is based on the low access of poor families to basic education and health care in Malang City that have an impact on social welfare and poverty problem. To overcome these problems, Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia through Malang City Government and Social Department of Malang City implements Program Keluarga Harapan (PKH in the form of conditional cash transfers to the Extremely Poor Households (RTSM. The result showed that the implementation of PKH has been implemented properly and according to the procedure and the number of RTSM recipients of PKH from year to year has decreased. Nevertheless, this program implementation does not significantly impact the number of poor people in the city of Malang in general.

  2. Implementing HIV Testing in Substance Use Treatment Programs: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Claire A; Seal, Stella M; Savage, Christine

    People who use drugs are at increased risk for HIV acquisition, poor engagement in health care, and late screening for HIV with advanced HIV at diagnosis and increased HIV-related morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. This systematic review evaluates current evidence about the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing HIV testing in U.S. substance use treatment programs. The literature search identified 535 articles. Full text review was limited to articles that explicitly addressed strategies to implement HIV testing in substance use programs: 17 met criteria and were included in the review; nine used quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method designs to describe or quantify HIV testing rates, acceptance by clients and staff, and cost-effectiveness; eight organization surveys described barriers and facilitators to testing implementation. The evidence supported the effectiveness and feasibility of rapid, routine, and streamlined HIV testing in substance use treatment programs. Primary challenges included organizational support and sustainable funding.

  3. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

  4. Preparation for Full Time Employment: A Capstone Experience for Students in Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Gregory T.; Cannon, Karen J.; Stedman, Nicole L.; Telg, Ricky W.

    2011-01-01

    This practice paper describes the development and implementation of a senior capstone course for communication and leadership development for undergraduate students. The resulting course is a unique combination of experiential skill development and career preparation. The success of this course provides students with an important and meaningful…

  5. Challenges to Change: Institutionalizing a New University-Wide Faculty Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Pamela; Gunersel, Adalet Baris

    2014-01-01

    In implementing a university-wide programmatic innovation to prepare graduate students to become more effective instructors in their future careers as university educators, a faculty development center encountered various types of resistance, ranging from the structural to the cognitive to the affective. Elaborating upon models of organizational…

  6. Long Live Love+: Evaluation of the Implementation of an Online School-Based Sexuality Education Program in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Sanne; Mevissen, Fraukje; de Waal, Esri; Kok, Gerjo

    2017-01-01

    Schools are a common setting for adolescents to receive health education, but implementation of these programs with high levels of completeness and fidelity is not self-evident. Programs that are only partially implemented (completeness) or not implemented as instructed (fidelity) are unlikely to be effective. Therefore, it is important to…

  7. Attitudinal Perspectives: A Factor to Implementation of a Dual Language Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Whitacre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The central focus of this study was to determine the overall perceptions of school administrators, and the district bilingual coordinator on transferring theory to classroom practice, implementation, as viewed by those involved in the implementation process of the Gómez and Gómez Model of Dual Language Education. Responses were solicited from administrative personnel involved in the implementation of the Gómez and Gómez Model of Dual Language. Results revealed overall administrative attitudes were positive to the theoretical ideology and mixed as related to the actual implementation of the dual language program. The greatest areas of concern were; what to do when students enter the program who are either not Spanish dominant or who have not been in a dual language program. The second area of concern was with how to effectively evaluate teachers as they are observed for implementation of the dual langue program. Lastly, most administrators felt there was a lack of faculty proficient in Spanish.

  8. Physician practice responses to financial incentive programs: exploring the concept of implementation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie; Lemak, Christy Harris

    2012-01-01

    To develop a framework for studying financial incentive program implementation mechanisms, the means by which physician practices and physicians translate incentive program goals into their specific office setting. Understanding how new financial incentives fit with the structure of physician practices and individual providers' work may shed some insight on the variable effects of physician incentives documented in numerous reviews and meta-analyses. Reviewing select articles on pay-for-performance evaluations to identify and characterize the presence of implementation mechanisms for designing, communicating, implementing, and maintaining financial incentive programs as well as recognizing participants' success and effects on patient care. Although uncommonly included in evaluations, evidence from 26 articles reveals financial incentive program sponsors and participants utilized a variety of strategies to facilitate communication about program goals and intentions, to provide feedback about participants' progress, and to assist-practices in providing recommended services. Despite diversity in programs' geographic locations, clinical targets, scope, and market context, sponsors and participants deployed common strategies. While these methods largely pertained to communication between program sponsors and participants and the provision of information about performance through reports and registries, they also included other activities such as efforts to engage patients and ways to change staff roles. This review covers a limited body of research to develop a conceptual framework for future research; it did not exhaustively search for new articles and cannot definitively link particular implementation mechanisms to outcomes. Our results underscore the effects implementation mechanisms may have on how practices incorporate new programs into existing systems of care which implicates both the potential rewards from small changes as well as the resources which may be

  9. Evaluation of Project P.A.T.H.S. by the program implementers: findings based on the extension phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F

    2013-01-01

    A total of 236 schools participated in the Project P.A.T.H.S. in the 2010/2011 school year. After completion of the Tier 1 Program, subjective outcome evaluation data were collected from 3275 program implementers. Based on the consolidated findings based on schools as units, results showed that participants had positive perceptions of the program, implementers, and benefits of the program. More than four-fifths of the implementers regarded the program as helpful to the program participants. Multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived qualities of the program and the program implementers predicted perceived effectiveness of the program. Grade differences were not significant. The present study provides additional support for the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong.

  10. Remodularizing Java Programs for Improved Locality of Feature Implementations in Source Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Explicit traceability between features and source code is known to help programmers to understand and modify programs during maintenance tasks. However, the complex relations between features and their implementations are not evident from the source code of object-oriented Java programs....... Consequently, the implementations of individual features are difficult to locate, comprehend, and modify in isolation. In this paper, we present a novel remodularization approach that improves the representation of features in the source code of Java programs. Both forward- and reverse restructurings...... are supported through on-demand bidirectional restructuring between feature-oriented and object-oriented decompositions. The approach includes a feature location phase based of tracing program execution, a feature representation phase that reallocates classes into a new package structure based on single...

  11. Implementing a mentoring program : an application to the production platforms offshore Campeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Garcia, G.; Cataneda-Roldan, M.A. [Pemex Exploration and Production, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2001-06-01

    A mentoring program was implemented at the Pemex Exploration and Production facilities offshore Campeche to focus on the higher level in a core group of engineers in charge of offshore oil production facilities. This mentoring program consisted of a well organized plan to enroll people into learning courses to broaden their scope of knowledge and to improve their performances. The scope of the mentoring program included seven main managerial areas including planning, exploration, industrial safety, finance, administration, production and maintenance. This effort has resulted in the implementation of business-oriented behaviour between the professionals and has improved the safety of the working environment. All participants expressed satisfaction with the program. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  12. How the CATCH eat smart program helps implement the USDA regulations in school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Mitchell, Paul; Dwyer, Johanna; Elder, John; Clesi, Ann; Snyder, Patricia

    2003-08-01

    This article describes the implementation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program (NSLP) standards in school lunch menus in 56 intervention and 20 control schools from the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) 5 years after the main trial, compared with 12 schools previously unexposed to CATCH. School food service personnel completed questionnaires to assess CATCH guideline implementation, demographic data, behavioral constructs, training, program material use, and participation in competing programs. Five days of menus and recipes were collected from school cafeteria staff, averaged, and compared to USDA School Meal Initiative (SMI) standards. Significant differences between intervention and unexposed schools were found for training and knowledge of CATCH and in mean percentage energy from fat and carbohydrates. Intervention schools most closely met USDA SMI recommendations for fat. Thus, the CATCH Eat Smart Program assisted school cafeterias in meeting USDA guidelines 5 years postimplementation.

  13. Evaluating a Health Educational First aid Program with the Implementation of Synchronous Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponirou, Paraskevi; Diomidous, Marianna; Mantas, John; Kalokairinou, Athena; Kalouri, Ourania; Kapadochos, Theodoros; Tzavara, Chara

    2014-01-01

    The education in First Aid through health education programs can help in promoting the health of the population. Meanwhile, the development of alternative forms of education with emphasis on distance learning implemented with e-learning creates an innovative system of knowledge and skills in different population groups. The main purpose of this research proposal is to investigate the effectiveness of the educational program to candidates educators about knowledge and emergency preparedness at school. The study used the Solomon four group design (2 intervention groups and 2 control groups). Statistical analysis showed significant difference within the four groups. Intervention groups had improved significantly their knowledge showing that the program was effective and that they would eventually deal with a threatening situation with right handlings. There were no statistical significant findings regarding other independent variables (p>0,05).The health education program with the implementation of synchronous distance learning succeeded to enhance the knowledge of candidates educators.

  14. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Description of the Design and Implementation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention Program Addressing Needs of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Begnoche, Wendy L.; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Harris, Margaret M.; Dean, Janice

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a school-based obesity prevention program, the successes associated with its implementation, and challenges with development and application of the program's curriculum base. The program is described, including purpose and goals, content and structure of the curriculum, type and training of…

  16. Childbirth care after the implementation of the Carioca Stork Program: the perspective of nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Elisa Fernandes Lima; Leila Justino da Silva; Marianne de Lira Maia; Adriana Lenho de Figueiredo Pereira; Marcele Zveiter; Tânia Maria de Almeida Silva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to describe the actions recommended by the Carioca Stork Program for assistance to pregnant women and identifywhether the implementation of this program had repercussions on the assistance from the perspective of the nursingteam. Methods: descriptive study with a qualitative approach, conducted in a public maternity hospital. Semi-structuredinterviews were conducted with four obstetric nurses and seven nursing auxiliaries who work at the obstetric center of thismaternity hospital. ...

  17. A road map for designing and implementing a biological monitoring program

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Joel H.; Melinda G. Knutson; Newman, Ken B.; Silverman, Emily D; William L Thompson

    2016-01-01

    Designing and implementing natural resource monitoring is a challenging endeavor undertaken by many agencies, NGOs, and citizen groups worldwide. Yet many monitoring programs fail to deliver useful information for a variety of administrative (staffing, documentation, and funding) or technical (sampling design and data analysis) reasons. Programs risk failure if they lack a clear motivating problem or question, explicit objectives linked to this problem or question, and a comprehensive concept...

  18. Integrating occupational safety and health information into vocational and technical education and other workforce preparation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A; Stephenson, Carol Merry; Okun, Andrea H; Palassis, John; Biddle, Elyce

    2005-03-01

    The high rates of injury among young workers are a pressing public health issue, especially given the demand of the job market for new workers. Young and new workers experience the highest rates of occupational injuries of any age group. Incorporating occupational safety and health (OSH) information into the more than 20 000 vocational and other workforce preparation programs in the United States might provide a mechanism for reducing work-related injuries and illnesses among young and new workers. We assessed the status of including OSH information or training in workforce preparation programs and found there is an inconsistent emphasis on OSH information.

  19. Social Capital Development within a Novice District-Grown Principal Preparation Program: A Case Study of the DCPS Patterson Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Allison

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade district-managed principal preparation programs have become common as a means for school leadership preparation (Leithwood, Seashore-Lewis, Anderson, & Wahlstrom, 2004; Turnbull, Riley, & MacFarlane, 2015), but evaluations of these programs are relatively rare. This dissertation evaluates one such program, the Mary Jane…

  20. Implementing a competency-based electronic portfolio in a graduate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, Maureen E; Riza, Lyn; Maciag, Tony; Worden, Christine; Delaney, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Use of electronic portfolios (e-portfolios) has been advocated to demonstrate nursing student accomplishments as well as to document program and course outcomes. This use of e-portfolios incorporates information technology, thus aligning the educational process in professional degree programs to 21st-century teaching and learning scholarship. Here we describe a project to explore the feasibility of transitioning from documenting student competencies in hard-copy binders to e-portfolios. To make this transition in an efficient manner in our graduate nursing program, we used the Plan, Do, Study, Act quality-improvement model. An interdisciplinary team of nursing faculty and educational computing consultants developed a professional e-portfolio template and implemented a pilot program for 10 students enrolled in our nurse educator specialty. This program was executed by assessing university resources, evaluating the technological competence of both students and faculty, and through the interdisciplinary team members' commitment to provide ongoing support for the program.

  1. Implementation of a new advanced graduate education program in oral implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, German O; Weber, Hans Peter; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2012-10-01

    The academic program for the Harvard School of Dental Medicine's Advanced Graduate Program in Oral Implantology is based on scientific evidence applied to educational quality, translational research, patient care, and service. The objective of the program is to enable highly motivated individuals with proven scholarship and excellence in patient care to achieve academic leadership in the clinical and scientific fields of implant dentistry and tissue regeneration. A detailed curriculum describing the academic program, as well as a business plan (which included a management plan describing the organizational structure, financial implications, and market forces) and implementation and communication plans, were developed before moving forward. With careful academic and business planning, the result was a vibrant implant program, in which all placements and restorations of implants are coordinated with regard to practice management. The program is integrated into the existing clinical care model and has been financially self-sustaining from its inception. Six students have participated in the last two years. On average, each student performed seventy-nine procedures on twenty-nine patients, generating over $46,000 in production. The curriculum includes didactics, hands-on clinical learning, and research activities. Research is a critical component as well. The results demonstrate that the time taken to develop a detailed curriculum and business plan for a new academic program, which anticipated and resolved potential barriers to success, was instrumental in the successful implementation of an oral implantology residency program.

  2. The implementation of a discovery-oriented science education program in a rural elementary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Martha Sue

    2000-10-01

    This study focused on the implementation of a discovery-oriented science education program at a rural elementary school in Mississippi. The instructional leadership role of the principal was examined in the study through identification and documentation of processes undertaken by the principal to implement a discovery-oriented science education program school. The goal of the study was to develop a suggested approach for implementing a discovery-oriented science education program for principals who wish to become instructional leaders in the area of science education at their schools. Mixed methods were used to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Subjects for the study consisted of teachers, students, and parents. Data were collected through field observation; observations of science education being taught by classroom teachers; examination of the principal's log describing actions taken to implement a discovery-oriented science education program; conducting semi-structured interviews with teachers as the key informants; and examining attitudinal data collected by the Carolina Biological Supply Company for the purpose of measuring attitudes of teachers, students, and parents toward the proposed science education program and the Science and Technology for Children (STC) program piloted at the school. To develop a suggested approach for implementing a discovery-oriented science education program, data collected from field notes, classroom observations, the principal's log of activities, and key informant interviews were analyzed and group into themes pertinent to the study. In addition to descriptive measures, chi-square goodness-of-fit tests were used to determine whether the frequency distribution showed a specific pattern within the attitudinal data collected by the Carolina Biological Supply Company. The pertinent question asked in analyzing data was: Are the differences significant or are they due to chance? An alpha level of .01 was selected to determine

  3. How To Implement a Tech Prep Program Based on the Rhode Island Model. Tech Prep Associate Degree Program. Technical Programs. Business/Office Administration Programs. Allied Health/Dental Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Coll. of Rhode Island, Warwick.

    This implementation guide contains information based on experiences that occurred during the development and implementation of the Rhode Island Tech Prep Model. It is intended to assist educators in addressing challenges and obstacles faced by the program early in the planning process. It begins with a rationale for tech prep. Rhode Island…

  4. Factors associated with the implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Dias Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if characteristics of managers, schools, and curriculum are associated with the implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in elementary and high schools. METHODS Cross-sectional study, with random sample of 263 school managers. Data were collected between 2012 and 2013 by a program that sends forms via internet. A closed self-filling questionnaire was applied online. Statistical analysis included Chi-square tests and logistic regression models. The outcome variable was the presence of program for drug abuse prevention inserted in the daily life and educational program of the school. The explanatory variables were divided into: demographic data of the manager; characteristics of the school and of the curriculum; health education; and drug use in the school. RESULTS We found that 42.5% (95%CI 36.1–49.1 of the evaluated schools had programs for drug abuse prevention. With the multiple logistic regression model, we observed that the more time the manager has worked with education, the chance of the school having a program increased at about 4.0%. Experimenting with innovative teaching techniques also increased at about six times the chance of the school developing a program for drug abuse prevention. The difficulties in the implementation of the programs were more present in state and municipal schools, when compared with private schools, due to, for instance: lack of teaching materials, lack of money, and competing demands for teaching other subjects. CONCLUSIONS The implementation of programs for drug abuse prevention in the city of Sao Paulo is associated with the experience of the manager in education and with the teaching strategies of the school.

  5. Effectiveness of a parent-implemented intervention program for young children with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a parent-implemented intervention on children's speech-language development and parents' interaction styles. Seventeen children with cleft palate (CP) and their mothers participated in all sessions of a parent-implemented intervention program. Nine children with CP and their mothers who did not receive the intervention were included to examine the full effectiveness of the program. The intervention program consisted of four phases, pre-intervention test, parent training, parent-implemented intervention at children's home for 3 months, and post-intervention test. Children's language and speech measures and maternal measures from pre- and post-intervention tests were compared between groups (intervention vs. no intervention). Children who received a parent-implemented intervention exhibited significant improvement in language measures based on standardized tests and quantitative language and speech measures from spontaneous utterances. The children in the intervention group showed a significantly greater extent of change in expressive vocabulary size, number of total words, and mean length of utterance than did those who did not receive the intervention. Mothers who received the training showed a significantly decreased number of different words, increased responsiveness, and decreased non-contingent utterances for children's communication acts compared to those who did not receive the training. The results of the study support the effectiveness of parent-implemented early intervention on positive changes in children's speech-language development and mothers' use of communication strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparing the Next Generation of Earth Scientists: An Examination of 25 Federal Earth Science Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, A. M.; Goldstein, A.; Manduca, C. A.; Pyle, E. J.; Asher, P. M.; White, L. D.; Riggs, E. M.; Cozzens, S.; Glickson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Federal agencies play a key role in educating the next generation of earth scientists, offering programs that attract students to the field, support them through formal education, and provide training for an earth science career. In a time of reduced budgets, it is important for federal agencies to invest in education programs that are effective. A National Research Council committee examined 25 federal earth science education programs and described ways to evaluate the success of these programs and opportunities for leveraging federal education resources. Although the programs cover a wide range of objectives and audiences, they are part of a system of opportunities and experiences that attract individuals to the field and prepare them for employment. In this conceptual framework, individuals become aware of earth science, then engage in learning about the Earth and the nature of earth science, and finally prepare for a career by acquiring specialized knowledge, skills, and expertise and by exploring different employment options. The federal education programs considered in this report provide a range of opportunities for raising awareness of earth science (e.g., USDA 4-H Club), nurturing that interest to engage students in the field (e.g., USGS Youth Internship Program), and preparing students for earth science careers (NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates, DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships). These efforts can also contribute toward the development of a robust earth science workforce by connecting programs and providing pathways for students to move through informal and formal education to careers. The conceptual framework shows how the various education opportunities fit together and where connections are needed to move students along earth science pathways. The framework can also be used by federal agencies to identify gaps, overlaps, and imbalances in existing programs; to identify potential partners in other agencies or organizations

  7. Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, E.K.

    1997-10-15

    During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

  8. National Implementation of an Evidence-Based HIV Prevention and Reproductive Health Program for Bahamian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Valerie; Kaljee, Linda; Deveaux, Lynette; Lunn, Sonja; Rolle, Glenda; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of behavioral prevention interventions have been demonstrated through longitudinal, randomized controlled trials to reduce sexual risk behaviors. Many of these interventions have been made available at little cost for implementation on a public health scale. However, efforts to utilize such programs typically have been met with a…

  9. An Evaluative Review of School Accreditation Implementation Program in Indonesian Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryati, Sri

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically reviews and evaluates the implementation of School Accreditation Program for the period of 2013 with a particular reference to Central Java Schools, consisting of Kindergarten (TK) Elementary School (SD), Junior High School (SMP) and Senior High School (SMA) (Note 1). The aim of the review is to see to what extent they can…

  10. Research Challenges: Implementing Standardized Outcome Measures in a Decentralized, Community-Based Residential Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Linda S.; Little, Liza; Grimard, Andre R.

    2009-01-01

    With residential treatment services under pressure to produce outcome data, the process of executing research in such settings presents considerable challenges. This paper describes how a large, decentralized, community-based residential treatment program in southern and central Maine designed and implemented a research outcome process study using…

  11. The Wildlife Habitat Education Program: Moving from Contest Participation to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kevin; Elmore, R. Dwayne; Harper, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Do members participating in the Wildlife Habitat Education Program (WHEP) apply knowledge gained by implementing wildlife management practices at the local level? 4-H members who participated in the National WHEP Contest from 2003-2005 and 2007-2011 completed an evaluation at the end of each contest. The evaluation asked participants if they…

  12. The Measurement, Analysis and Implementation of a Corporate Image Program: The Case of a Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeck, Matt A.; Buchanan, Gary W.

    1987-01-01

    Measured a psychiatric hospital's image, using qualitative and quantitative methods. Used data from the consumer public to illustrate the development and implementation of an image program stressing multi-public awareness, preference and utilization of the hospital's services vis-a-vis the hospital's mission statement. This study demonstrated…

  13. 77 FR 38463 - Implementation of National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012) Amendments to Pectin on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ...: The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 (OFPA) (7 U.S.C. 6501-6522) authorizes the establishment of... / Thursday, June 28, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 Implementation of National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012)...

  14. 78 FR 32183 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Implementation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 246 RIN 0584-AE21 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Implementation of the Electronic Benefit Transfer- Related Provisions of Public Law 111-296; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  15. The Effects of Implementing a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on Office Discipline Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cheryl Denise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Support) program had a positive significant effect in decreasing office discipline referrals in a local elementary school. A sample independent t-Test was used to examine data on the school's average office discipline referrals for two years…

  16. Implementing a Service Learning Model for Teaching Research Methods and Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patrick; Kim, Wooksoo; Robinson, Adjoa

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to teach students the basic knowledge of research methods and the realities of conducting research in the context of agencies in the community, faculty developed and implemented a service learning model for teaching research and program evaluation to foundation-year MSW students. A year-long foundation course was designed in which one…

  17. Instrument and Survey Analysis Technical Report: Program Implementation Survey. Technical Report #1112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical document provides guidance to educators on the creation and interpretation of survey instruments, particularly as they relate to an analysis of program implementation. Illustrative examples are drawn from a survey of educators related to the use of the easyCBM learning system. This document includes specific sections on…

  18. Development and Implementation of Worksite Health and Wellness Programs: A Focus on Non-Communicable Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Briggs, Paige; Cahalin, Brendan L; Myers, Jonathan; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of worksite health and wellness programs (WHWPs) in the United States (US) hold promise as a means to improve population health and reverse current trends in non-communicable disease incidence and prevalence. However, WHWPs face organizational, economic, systematic, legal, and logistical challenges which have combined to impact program availability and expansion. Even so, there is a burgeoning body of evidence indicating WHWPs can significantly improve the health profile of participating employees in a cost effective manner. This foundation of scientific knowledge justifies further research inquiry to elucidate optimal WHWP models. It is clear that the development, implementation and operation of WHWPs require a strong commitment from organizational leadership, a pervasive culture of health and availability of necessary resources and infrastructure. Since organizations vary significantly, there is a need to have flexibility in creating a customized, effective health and wellness program. Furthermore, several key legal issues must be addressed to facilitate employer and employee needs and responsibilities; the US Affordable Care Act will play a major role moving forward. The purposes of this review are to: 1) examine currently available health and wellness program models and considerations for the future; 2) highlight key legal issues associated with WHWP development and implementation; and 3) identify challenges and solutions for the development and implementation of as well as adherence to WHWPs.

  19. A Bottom-Up Approach for Implementing Electronic Portfolios in a Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Heejung; Wilder, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to generate a bottom-up approach for the program-wide implementation of electronic portfolios, this article first reports on the ways in which teacher candidates perceived the benefits and setbacks of this experience, after an initial course. Second, this article reports on whether and how the teacher candidates continued to develop…

  20. "School within a School": Examining Implementation Barriers in a Spanish/English Transitional Bilingual Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNicolo, Christina Passos

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways that general education and bilingual teachers make sense of a Spanish/English transitional bilingual program housed at one elementary school in a Midwestern school district. An in-depth examination of perceptions and attitudes unmasks key factors regarding the implementation and interpretation of bilingual programs…

  1. Olweus Bullying Prevention Program: Components Implemented by Elementary Classroom and Specialist Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Heather; Molnar-Main, Stacie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated implementation fidelity of programmatic activities of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) among 2,022 teachers, 88.5% female, from 88 elementary schools located in Pennsylvania. Results indicated that the majority of respondents had attended the school kick-off event, posted the rules in the classroom, and explained the…

  2. Implementation and Assessment of a Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Undergraduate Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daphne Q. -D.; Higgs, David C.; Statham, Anne; Schleiter, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside has developed and implemented an innovative, multidisciplinary undergraduate curriculum in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics (MBB). The objective of the MBB program is to give students a hands-on facility with molecular biology theories and laboratory techniques, an…

  3. Design and Implementation of a Research-Informed Water Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ruthanne; Coe, Alice; Klaver, Irene; Dickson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Informed by the results of a baseline research study of regional citizen knowledge and understanding concerning watershed issues, a team of university faculty and classroom teachers designed and implemented a water conservation education program to address lacking areas of watershed knowledge. The authors developed age-appropriate, hands-on…

  4. 33 CFR 385.13 - Projects implemented under additional program authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Projects implemented under additional program authority. 385.13 Section 385.13 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMMATIC REGULATIONS FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE...

  5. Sporting programs for inactive population groups : factors influencing implementation in the organized sports setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, Linda; Veenhof, Cindy; Schipper-van Veldhoven, Nicolette; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organized sports sector has received increased attention as a setting to promote health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) to the general population. For significant public health impact, it is important that successful HEPA programs are widely adopted, implemented and continued as

  6. Implementation and Assessment of a Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Undergraduate Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daphne Q. -D.; Higgs, David C.; Statham, Anne; Schleiter, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside has developed and implemented an innovative, multidisciplinary undergraduate curriculum in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics (MBB). The objective of the MBB program is to give students a hands-on facility with molecular biology theories and laboratory techniques, an…

  7. Implementing a Service Learning Model for Teaching Research Methods and Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patrick; Kim, Wooksoo; Robinson, Adjoa

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to teach students the basic knowledge of research methods and the realities of conducting research in the context of agencies in the community, faculty developed and implemented a service learning model for teaching research and program evaluation to foundation-year MSW students. A year-long foundation course was designed in which one…

  8. Olweus Bullying Prevention Program: Components Implemented by Elementary Classroom and Specialist Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Heather; Molnar-Main, Stacie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated implementation fidelity of programmatic activities of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) among 2,022 teachers, 88.5% female, from 88 elementary schools located in Pennsylvania. Results indicated that the majority of respondents had attended the school kick-off event, posted the rules in the classroom, and explained the…

  9. Development and implementation of the Saskatchewan Leadership Program: Leading for healthcare transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutwiri, Betty; Witt, Christine; Denysek, Christina; Halferdahl, Susan; McLeod, Katherine M

    2016-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Leadership Program (SLP) was developed based on the LEADS framework and aligned with Lean management to build leadership renewal and sustainability conducive to transformational change in the Saskatchewan health system. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the SLP, including experiences and lessons learned.

  10. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  11. Implementation Fidelity in Adolescent Family-Based Prevention Programs: Relationship to Family Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Aalborg, Annette E.; Plasencia, Ana V.; Keagy, Carolyn D.

    2010-01-01

    Reliability and validity of intervention studies are impossible without adequate program fidelity, as it ensures that the intervention was implemented as designed and allows for accurate conclusions about effectiveness (Bellg AJ, Borrelli B, Resnick B "et al." Enhancing treatment fidelity in health behavior change studies: best practices…

  12. The Effects of Implementing a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on Office Discipline Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cheryl Denise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Support) program had a positive significant effect in decreasing office discipline referrals in a local elementary school. A sample independent t-Test was used to examine data on the school's average office discipline referrals for two years…

  13. Parenting Interventions Implementation Science: How Delivery Format Impacts the Parenting Wisely Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katie L.; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul R.; Robertson, Caroline I. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the implementation and effectiveness of Parenting Wisely, an Internet-based parenting skills intervention. The study assesses whether parents benefit from Parenting Wisely participation and whether the delivery format influences program effectiveness. Method: This study uses a quasi-experimental design.…

  14. Perceptions, circumstances and motivators that influence implementation of zoonotic control programs on cattle farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis-Iversen, J.; Cook, A.J.; Watson, E.; Nielen, M.; Larkin, L.; Wooldridge, M.; Hogeveen, H.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of disease control programs on farms requires an act of behavioral change. This study presents a theoretical framework from behavioral science, combined with basic epidemiological principles to investigate and explain the control of zoonotic agents on cattle farms. A pathway to

  15. Perceptions, circumstances and motivators that influence implementation of zoonotic control programs on cattle farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis-Iversen, J.; Cook, A.J.; Watson, E.; Nielen, M.; Larkin, L.; Wooldridge, M.; Hogeveen, H.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of disease control programs on farms requires an act of behavioral change. This study presents a theoretical framework from behavioral science, combined with basic epidemiological principles to investigate and explain the control of zoonotic agents on cattle farms. A pathway to di

  16. Processes, barriers and facilitators to implementation of a participatory ergonomics program among eldercare workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Lindberg, Naja Klærke; Ravn, Marie Højbjerg

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the processes of a participatory ergonomics program among 594 eldercare workers with emphasis on identified risk factors for low back pain and solutions, and reveal barriers and facilitators for implementation. Sixty-nine per cent of the identified risk factors wer...

  17. A general framework for implementing NLO calculations in shower Monte Carlo programs. The POWHEG BOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alioli, Simone [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Nason, Paolo [INFN, Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Oleari, Carlo [INFN, Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Milano-Bicocca Univ. (Italy); Re, Emanuele [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology

    2010-02-15

    In this work we illustrate the POWHEG BOX, a general computer code framework for implementing NLO calculations in shower Monte Carlo programs according to the POWHEG method. Aim of this work is to provide an illustration of the needed theoretical ingredients, a view of how the code is organized and a description of what a user should provide in order to use it. (orig.)

  18. Plans for Implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program in Fiscal Year 1986.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1985-10-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program is an effort to enhance, protect, and mitigate losses of those fish and wildlife which have been affected by the development, operation, and management of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The implementation plan is organized to address the action items assigned to BPA in Section 1500 of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (1984). These action items generally relate to one or more specific measures in the Program. The following information is listed for each project: budget summary, projects, obligation plan, and work plan and milestones.

  19. PLDI 2006. Proceedings of the 2006 ACM SIGPLAN Conferenceon Programming Language Design and Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 2006 ACM Conference on Programming Language Design and Implementation (PLDI 2006) was held June 10-16, 2006 in Ottawa, Canada. PLDI 2006 is sponsored by the ACM Special Interest Group on Programming Languages (SIGPLAN), in cooperation with the ACM Special Interest Group on Software Engineering...... performed admirably. In addition, a fourth expert outside review was solicited for nearly every paper. A few papers received five reviews. PC members declared conflicts of interest in reviewing papers following the ACM guidelines, presented to the PC as follows: "Each member of the Program Committee...

  20. As-Built documentation of programs to implement the Robertson and Doraiswamy/Thompson models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenziano, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The software which implements two spring wheat phenology models is described. The main program routines for the Doraiswamy/Thompson crop phenology model and the basic Robertson crop phenology model are DTMAIN and BRMAIN. These routines read meteorological data files and coefficient files, accept the planting date information and other information from the user, and initiate processing. Daily processing for the basic Robertson program consists only of calculation of the basic Robertson increment of crop development. Additional processing in the Doraiswamy/Thompson program includes the calculation of a moisture stress index and correction of the basic increment of development. Output for both consists of listings of the daily results.

  1. Process evaluation of the implementation of the Unplugged Program for drug use prevention in Brazilian schools

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, Pollyanna F. P.; Joselaine I. Cruz; R. Schneider, Daniela; Sanudo, Adriana; Zila M. Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background Most Brazilian schools do not have a continuous program for drug use prevention. To address this gap, the Ministry of Health adapted the European evidence-based program Unplugged to improve the drug use prevention efforts of Brazilian public schools. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of program implementation in three Brazilian cities among middle school students between 6th and 9th grade (11 to 14 years old). Methods Mixed methods were used in this process evaluati...

  2. Development and implementation of a dam safety program for Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Ninel S.; McLean, Angela D. [Manitoba infrastructure and transportation, Winnipeg, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Responsibility for the operation and maintenance of provincial dams has been transferred, at the province's initiative, to Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation (MIT). MIT used the 2007 CDA guidelines as reference in the development of a dam safety program for provincial dams in response to the lack of provincial legislation for the regulation and management of dams in Manitoba. This paper presented the work of the MIT to develop and implement a management system, with emphasis on the planning and implementation elements. MIT focused on both the prioritization of work and the implementation of an inspection program. To develop a prioritization scheme, a risk assessment was performed with the estimation of risk based on the impact of an event occurring and integrating the quality of the controls in place. Multiple account analysis (MAA) was also used to develop a second prioritization plan.

  3. Dissemination and implementation science in program evaluation: A telemental health clinical consultation case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G; Connors, Elizabeth H; Blizzard, Angela; Coble, Kelly; Gloff, Nicole; Pruitt, David

    2017-02-01

    Increased attention has been placed on evaluating the extent to which clinical programs that support the behavioral health needs of youth have effective processes and result in improved patient outcomes. Several theoretical frameworks from dissemination and implementation (D&I) science have been put forth to guide the evaluation of behavioral health program implemented in the context of real-world settings. Although a strong rationale for the integration of D&I science in program evaluation exists, few examples exist available to guide the evaluator in integrating D&I science in the planning and execution of evaluation activities. This paper seeks to inform program evaluation efforts by outlining two D&I frameworks and describing their integration in program evaluation design. Specifically, this paper seeks to support evaluation efforts by illustrating the use of these frameworks via a case example of a telemental health consultation program in pediatric primary care designed to improve access to behavioral health care for children and adolescents in rural settings. Lessons learned from this effort, as well as recommendations regarding the future evaluation of programs using D&I science to support behavioral health care in community-based settings are discussed.

  4. Rationale and implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention warm-up programs in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    The sex disparity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk and the subsequent adverse effects on knee joint health, psychosocial well-being, and financial costs incurred have produced a surge in research on risk factors and interventions designed to decrease this disparity and overall incidence. Biomechanical and neuromuscular differences have been identified throughout the trunk and lower extremity that may increase noncontact ACL injury risk in female athletes. Evidence demonstrates that many risk factors are modifiable with intervention programs and that athletic performance measures can be enhanced. No universally accepted ACL injury prevention program currently exists, and injury prevention programs are diverse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs introduced in a warm-up format offer multiple benefits, primarily, improved compliance based on improved practicality of implementation. However, drawbacks of warm-up style formats also exist, most notably that a lack of equipment and resources may preclude measurable improvements in athletic performance that foster improved compliance among participants. The purpose of this review is to analyze the current literature researching possible biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors in noncontact ACL injury in female athletes and the most effective means of implementing critical elements of a program to decrease ACL injury risk in female athletes while improving athletic performance. Hip and hamstring training, core stabilization, plyometrics, balance, agility, neuromuscular training with video and verbal feedback to modify technique, and stretching appear to be essential components of these programs. Further research is critical to determine ideal training program volume, intensity, duration, and frequency.

  5. Successful implementation and results of an HPV vaccination program in Geneva Canton, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, Emilien; Petignat, Patrick; Sudre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We describe a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program implemented since 2007 in Geneva Canton, Switzerland, that used school services, a public hospital, and private physicians as vaccination providers. We assessed program performance with the evolution of immunization coverage during the first four years of program implementation. We measured vaccination coverage of the target population using individual records of vaccination status collected by service providers and transmitted to the Geneva Canton Medical Office. The target population was 20,541 adolescent girls aged 11-19 years as of September 1, 2008, who resided in the canton when the program began. As of June 30, 2012, HPV vaccination coverage was 72.6% and 74.8% in targeted cohorts for three and two doses, respectively. The global coverage for three doses increased by 27 percentage points from December 2009 to June 2012. Coverage for girls aged 16-18 years at the beginning of the program reached 80% or more four years into the program. High coverage by this HPV vaccination program in Geneva was likely related to free vaccination and easy access to the vaccine using a combination of delivery services, including school health services, a public hospital, and private physicians, covering most eligible adolescent girls.

  6. Implementing and evaluating a program to facilitate chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: a mixed methods program evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Manca, Donna Patricia; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Kandola, Kami; Aguilar, Carolina; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sopcak, Nicolette; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Meaney, Christopher; Faria, Vee; Baxter, Julia; Moineddin, Rahim; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Green, Lee; Cave, Andrew; Grunfeld, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background The objectives of this paper are to describe the planned implementation and evaluation of the Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Primary Care (BETTER 2) program which originated from the BETTER trial. The pragmatic trial, informed by the Chronic Care Model, demonstrated the effectiveness of an approach to Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (CDPS) involving the use of a new role, the prevention practitioner. The desired goals of t...

  7. Development, implementation and management of a drug testing program in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    To combat the rising use of drugs in the workplace many American companies have implemented drug testing programs and are testing employees and job applicants for use of illegal drugs. In addition, on September 15, 1986, Executive Order No.12564 was issued by President Reagan, which requires all federal agencies to develop programs and policies, one of the goals of which is to achieve a drug-free federal workplace. Included in this Executive Order is the requirement that federal agencies implement drug testing has become a prevalent practice as a means to detect and deter drug use in the workplace. Before a drug testing program is implemented, it is imperative that policies and procedures are developed that (1) ensure the accuracy of test results, (2) protect the validity and integrity of the specimen, (3) guarantee due process, and (4) maintain confidentiality. To make certain that these prerequisites were met in the government drug testing programs, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was directed to develop technical and scientific guidelines for conducting such programs. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. The design and implementation of insect resistance management programs for Bt crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Graham P; Greenplate, John

    2012-01-01

    Cotton and corn plants with insect resistance traits introduced through biotechnological methods and derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been widely adopted since they were first introduced in 1996. Because of concerns about resistance evolving to these Bt crops, they have been released with associated IRM programs that employ multiple components and reflect the input of academic, industrial and regulatory experts. This paper summarizes the current status of Bt crop technologies in cotton and corn, the principles of IRM for Bt crops and what they mean for the design of IRM programs. It describes how these IRM programs have been implemented and some of the key factors affecting successful implementation. Finally, it suggests how they may evolve to properly steward these traits in different geographies around the world. The limited number of reported cases of resistance after more than 15 years of intensive global use of Bt crops suggest that this exercise has been broadly successful. Where resistance issues have been observed, they have been associated with first generation technologies and incomplete or compromised IRM programs (i.e., inadequate structured refuge). Next generation technologies with multiple pyramided modes of action, together with the implementation of IRM strategies that are more dependent upon manufacturing and less dependent upon grower behavior, such as seed mixes, should further enhance IRM programs for Bt crops.

  9. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  10. A Policy Analysis of the implementation of a Reproductive Health Vouchers Program in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuya Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innovative financing strategies such as those that integrate supply and demand elements like the output-based approach (OBA have been implemented to reduce financial barriers to maternal health services. The Kenyan government with support from the German Development Bank (KfW implemented an OBA voucher program to subsidize priority reproductive health services. Little evidence exists on the experience of implementing such programs in different settings. We describe the implementation process of the Kenyan OBA program and draw implications for scale up. Methods Policy analysis using document review and qualitative data from 10 in-depth interviews with facility in-charges and 18 with service providers from the contracted facilities, local administration, health and field managers in Kitui, Kiambu and Kisumu districts as well as Korogocho and Viwandani slums in Nairobi. Results The OBA implementation process was designed in phases providing an opportunity for learning and adapting the lessons to local settings; the design consisted of five components: a defined benefit package, contracting and quality assurance; marketing and distribution of vouchers and claims processing and reimbursement. Key implementation challenges included limited feedback to providers on the outcomes of quality assurance and accreditation and budgetary constraints that limited effective marketing leading to inadequate information to clients on the benefit package. Claims processing and reimbursement was sophisticated but required adherence to time consuming procedures and in some cases private providers complained of low reimbursement rates for services provided. Conclusions OBA voucher schemes can be implemented successfully in similar settings. For effective scale up, strong partnership will be required between the public and private entities. The government’s role is key and should include provision of adequate funding, stewardship and looking for

  11. Preparing LGBTQ-Allies and Combating Homophobia in a U. S. Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Interns in a US teacher education program were surveyed regarding their attitudes towards diversity, particularly issues of sexuality, their feelings of "cultural competence" around diversity, and the repertoires of practices and resources they feel prepared to draw on in their work with middle and high schools students (11-18 year…

  12. Lights, Camera, Action: Advancing Learning, Research, and Program Evaluation through Video Production in Educational Leadership Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Militello, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes specific uses of digital video production in the field of educational leadership preparation, advancing a three-part framework that includes the use of video in (a) teaching and learning, (b) research methods, and (c) program evaluation and service to the profession. The first category within the framework examines videos…

  13. The Changing Landscape of Principal Preparation: An Analysis of Statewide Longitudinal Program Component Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Watson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article examines comparative survey results for 16 principal preparation programs located in the Midwestern state of Missouri across a four-year time period from 2008 to 2012. The authors are founding members of a statewide Higher Education Evaluation Committee (HEEC), which has been meeting on a monthly basis since 2005, comprised of faculty…

  14. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  15. A Qualitative Assessment of the My True Body Bariatric Surgery Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tracy; Mamary, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: The My True Body (MTB) group intervention incorporates cognitive restructuring and social support into bariatric surgery preparation. Purpose: To identify and describe program components that support long-term behavioral modifications and influence confidence in healthy weight maintenance. Methods: Semistructured telephone interviews…

  16. 45 CFR 1388.5 - Program criteria-preparation of personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... disabilities and family members, and a variety of learning experiences, as well as reflecting the cultural... training programs. (d) Preservice training must be integrated into all aspects of the UAP, including... incorporate cultural diversity and demonstrate cultural competence. Trainees must be prepared to address...

  17. Preparing LGBTQ-Allies and Combating Homophobia in a U. S. Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Interns in a US teacher education program were surveyed regarding their attitudes towards diversity, particularly issues of sexuality, their feelings of "cultural competence" around diversity, and the repertoires of practices and resources they feel prepared to draw on in their work with middle and high schools students (11-18 year…

  18. A Qualitative Assessment of the My True Body Bariatric Surgery Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tracy; Mamary, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: The My True Body (MTB) group intervention incorporates cognitive restructuring and social support into bariatric surgery preparation. Purpose: To identify and describe program components that support long-term behavioral modifications and influence confidence in healthy weight maintenance. Methods: Semistructured telephone interviews…

  19. Pre-Service Bilingual Teachers and Their Invisible Scars: Implications for Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Arribalzaga, Matilde A.; Murillo, Luz A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how language "autobiographies" are used in a teacher preparation program (TEP) as a healing pedagogy to understand the impact longstanding traditions of symbolic violence in education have had on Latino students who are in the process of becoming teachers. Writing about themselves and their education experience…

  20. Value-Added Models for Teacher Preparation Programs: Validity and Reliability Threats, and a Manageable Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Heiser, Lawrence A.; McCormick, Jazarae K.; Forgan, James

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes standardized student assessments are increasingly used in value-added evaluation models to connect teacher performance to P-12 student learning. These assessments are also being used to evaluate teacher preparation programs, despite validity and reliability threats. A more rational model linking student performance to candidates who…

  1. Ten Ways to Incorporate Technology into a TESOL Teacher Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigsfeld, Andrea; Giouroukakis, Vicky; Cohan, Audrey; Walsh, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive approach for integrating technology into a TESOL teacher preparation program is described. Ten specific ways to assure constructivist technology use in teacher education are highlighted. These techniques have been synthesized into a compact model with three pillars: (a) electronic assessment system (e-portfolios for individual…

  2. Does a smoking prevention program in elementary schools prepare children for secondary school?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, M.R.; Spruijt, R.; Dijkstra, N.S.; Willemsen, M.C.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    A smoking prevention program was developed to prepare children in elementary school for secondary school. This study assessed the effects on smoking in secondary school. Methods: In 2002, 121 schools in The Netherlands were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention gro

  3. The influence of the systematic birth preparation program on childbirth satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akca, Aysu; Corbacioglu Esmer, Aytul; Ozyurek, Eser Sefik; Aydin, Arife; Korkmaz, Nazli; Gorgen, Husnu; Akbayir, Ozgur

    2017-05-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of a systematic multidisciplinary birth preparation program on satisfaction with childbirth experience. A secondary aim was to detect factors that affect the childbirth satisfaction. In this prospective study, 77 pregnant women who completed the 4-month birth preparation program (Group 1) and 75 women in the control group (Group 2) were asked to fill out two questionnaires with face-to-face interviews within 48 h after labor. One of the questionnaires was the translated form of Salmon's Item List German (SIL-Ger), and SIL-Ger scores ≥70 was accepted as a satisfactory experience. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of sociocultural and intrapartum characteristics, and obstetric outcome parameters. The women who received antenatal education experienced significantly less pain (p = 0.01), had a better communication with midwife or obstetrician during delivery (p = 0.001), and participated more actively in decision-making before, during, and after childbirth (p birth preparation program and the level of pain perceived during labor were found to have a significant effect on the birth satisfaction. Systematic birth preparation program improves satisfaction with childbirth experience by enabling women to communicate better with healthcare providers and to participate in decision-making during labor, as well as by decreasing the perception of labor pain.

  4. A Quantitative Correlational Study of Teacher Preparation Program on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, Jacob Blackstone

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to identify the relationship between the type of teacher preparation program and student performance on the seventh and eighth grade mathematics state assessments in rural school settings. The study included a survey of a convenience sample of 36 teachers from Colorado and Washington school…

  5. University Strategic Planning: A Process for Change in a Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Federico R.; Zamora, Roberto; Hernandez, Rosalinda; Menchaca, Velma

    2017-01-01

    This study describes a strategic planning process used for developing an educational leadership program that prepares principals for leading 21st century schools. The plan is based on recommendations received from the External reviewers representing Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the Texas Education Agency, survey responses received…

  6. Coaching Teachers on Instruction: Developing Instructional Leadership Capacity within a Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franey, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the role of the school site principal has shifted from a focus on school management to one on school leadership. Integral to this new focus is the ability of the principal to be an instructional leader, tasked with improving the instructional practices of teachers. Many principal preparation programs have adopted new…

  7. Revisioning a School Administrator Preparation Program: A North Carolina Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a descriptive case study of the process used at one of North Carolina's public universities to respond to a state-mandated "revisioning" directive for educational leadership preparation programs. The case provides an overview of the state educational leadership policy context, discussion of state and local support…

  8. Teachers' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the Art Education Preparation Program in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHaddad, Ghadeer

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate how pre-service, beginners, and advanced art teachers in Kuwait viewed their teacher preparation program by describing and evaluating its effectiveness. To examine the issues of art teacher training and current teaching, this study used quantitative and qualitative research approaches. The study included a…

  9. An Alternative Preparation Program in Early Childhood Education: Description and Comparison of Alternative and Traditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Students entering traditional and nontraditional early childhood teacher preparation programs completed the Educational Attitudes Inventory, Teacher Certification Test, and Efficacy Scale. Mean personal teaching efficacy scores were significantly higher for traditional students. Nontraditional students tended to be males, minorities, and older,…

  10. CSPAP Professional Preparation: Takeaways from Pioneering Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Russell L.; Castelli, Darla M.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2017-01-01

    As comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) professional development becomes increasingly available to current K-12 physical education teachers, this special feature shifts attention to the preparation of future PE teachers and teacher educators for CSPAP. The purpose of this concluding article is to summarize the undergraduate- and…

  11. Resistance to Racial/Ethnic Dialog in Graduate Preparation Programs: Implications for Developing Multicultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget Turner; Gayles, Joy Gaston

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to understand how individuals experienced multicultural courses in graduate preparation programs. The researchers conducted focus groups with 37 current and former graduate students in student affairs. Participants reported resistance to multicultural dialog, both in their direct experiences and through their perceptions of…

  12. Cuidate: implementation of a culturally based sexual risk reduction program for Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feutz, Kristi; Andresen, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Birth rates for adolescents have been declining in the United States since 1991 for all races. However, the rate for Hispanic teens still remains significantly higher than those for White teens. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that community-based organizations implement evidence-based programs to address the risky sexual behaviors of adolescents. Cuidate is an evidence-based sexual risk reduction program designed specifically for Hispanic adolescents ages 13-18 years. The program uses Hispanic cultural beliefs to influence the use of abstinence and condoms as culturally accepted practices. The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of Cuidate at a federally funded community health center to reduce the sexual risk behaviors of the adolescent Hispanic population it serves.

  13. Processes, barriers and facilitators to implementation of a participatory ergonomics program among eldercare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Lindberg, Naja Klærke; Ravn, Marie Højbjerg; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Søgaard, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the processes of a participatory ergonomics program among 594 eldercare workers with emphasis on identified risk factors for low back pain and solutions, and reveal barriers and facilitators for implementation. Sixty-nine per cent of the identified risk factors were physical ergonomic, 24% were organisational and 7% were psychosocial risk factors. Most solutions were organisational (55%), followed by physical (43%) and psychosocial solutions (2%). Internal factors (e.g. team or management) constituted 47% of the barriers and 75% of the facilitators. External factors (e.g. time, financial resources, collaboration with resident or relatives) constituted 53% of the barriers and 25% of the facilitators. This study revealed the processes and implementation of a participatory ergonomics program among eldercare workers. The findings can be transferred to workers, workplaces, health and safety professionals, and researchers to improve future participatory ergonomics programs.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center Space Transportation Directorate Risk Management Implementation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Luis Alberto; Kross, Denny (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The US civil aerospace program has been a great contributor to the creation and implementation of techniques and methods to identify, analyze, and confront risk. NASA has accomplished mission success in many instances, but also has had many failures. Anomalies have kept the Agency from achieving success on other occasions, as well. While NASA has mastered ways to prevent risks, and to quickly and effectively react and recover from anomalies or failures, it was not until few years ago that a comprehensive Risk Management process started being implemented in some of its programs and projects. A Continuous Risk Management (CRM) cycle process was developed and has been promoted and used successfully in programs and projects across the Agency.

  15. Analysis of National Forest Programs for REDD+ Implementation in six South and Southeast Asia countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, A.J.; Inoue, M.; Shivakoti, G.P.; Nath, T.K.; Jashimuddin, M.; Zoysa, M.D.; Kaskoyo, H.; Pulhin, J.M.; Peras, R.J.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study. To facilitate REDD+ implementation and identify relevant attributes for robust REDD+ policies, this study evaluated and synthesized information from national forest programs in South and Southeast Asian countries. Area of study: Data was collected from six countries: Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Philippines, India and Thailand. Methods: The data sources for the evaluation was an in-depth desk review of relevant documents and focus group discussion among experts from each study country. Main Results: We found out that diverse factors may influence program feasibility and the ability to achieve ‘triple benefits’: the nature of the forest targeted by the policy, the characteristics of the population affected by the policy, attributes of the policy instrument and the different actors involved. Research highlights: We argue that national policies and programs targeted for REDD+ implementation should focus on the identified features to achieve REDD+ goals. (Author)

  16. Designing and implementing INTREPID, an intensive program in translational research methodologies for new investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plottel, Claudia S; Aphinyanaphongs, Yindalon; Shao, Yongzhao; Micoli, Keith J; Fang, Yixin; Goldberg, Judith D; Galeano, Claudia R; Stangel, Jessica H; Chavis-Keeling, Deborah; Hochman, Judith S; Cronstein, Bruce N; Pillinger, Michael H

    2014-12-01

    Senior housestaff and junior faculty are often expected to perform clinical research, yet may not always have the requisite knowledge and skills to do so successfully. Formal degree programs provide such knowledge, but require a significant commitment of time and money. Short-term training programs (days to weeks) provide alternative ways to accrue essential information and acquire fundamental methodological skills. Unfortunately, published information about short-term programs is sparse. To encourage discussion and exchange of ideas regarding such programs, we here share our experience developing and implementing INtensive Training in Research Statistics, Ethics, and Protocol Informatics and Design (INTREPID), a 24-day immersion training program in clinical research methodologies. Designing, planning, and offering INTREPID was feasible, and required significant faculty commitment, support personnel and infrastructure, as well as committed trainees.

  17. Implementation of New Pairing Technique for Studying the Effectiveness of Pairs on Persona and Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARSIMARJEET KHURANA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study in which persona for the category of paired and solo students were compared on the parameter like program clarity, presentation, satisfaction level and confidence level, also the effectiveness of pairs in a JAVA programming language and the impact of pairs on each other. In this study same programs were given to all the category of paired and solo students. Finding reported in this paper are that pairing students were more likely to turn in working programs, and these programs were correctly implemented with more required features as compared to solo students. It has been observed that pairing of intelligent, average and poor with themselves has not shown significant differences but we have seen significant differences with combination of pairs.

  18. Teachers' implementation of reform-oriented instructional strategies in science: Lessons from two professional development programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nicole D.

    This dissertation reports findings from two studies that investigated the relationship between professional development and teachers' instructional practices in Science,Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). The first program, the Indiana Science Initiative (ISI) focused on K-8 teachers and their use of inquiry-based science instruction in conjunction with curricular modules provided by the ISI program. The second program, Research Goes to School (RGS), focused on high school STEM teachers and their use of problem-based learning (PBL) as they implemented curricular units that they developed themselves at the RGS summer workshop. In-service teachers were recruited from both programs. They were observed teaching their respective curricular materials and interviewed about their experiences in order to investigate the following research questions: 1. How do teachers implement the reform-oriented instructional strategies promoted by their professional development experiences with the ISI or RGS? 2. What are the challenges and supports that influence teachers' use of the reform-oriented instructional strategies promoted by their professional development experiences with the ISI or RGS? To investigate these questions the fidelity of implementation was it was conceptualized by Century, Rudnick, and Freeman (2010) was used as a theoretical framework. The study of the ISI program was conducted during the program's pilot year (2010-11). Five teachers of grades 3 through 6 were recruited from three different schools. Participants were observed as they taught lessons related to the modules and they were interviewed about their experiences. Based on analysis of the data from the observations, using a modified version of the Science Teacher Inquiry Rubric (STIR) (Bodzin & Beerer, 2003), the participants were found to exhibit partial fidelity of implementation to the model of inquiry-based instruction promoted by the ISI. Based on data from the interviews, the

  19. Implementation of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: Interim Evaluation Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S., 25 schools and three school social service units were randomly selected to participate in telephone interviews regarding the quality of the implementation process of the Tier 1 Program of the P.A.T.H.S. Project. In the telephone interviews, the participants described the responses of the students and the workers to the program, the perceived benefits of the program, their assessment of the positive and negative features of the program, as well as difficulties involved in the implementation process. Results showed that most workers perceived that the students had positive responses to the program and half of the workers had positive experiences about the program, although negative comments on the program design and difficulties in the implementation were also recorded. Nearly all workers (97.1% regarded the program to be beneficial to the students and most of them (78.6% had positive global evaluation of the project. In short, while the program implementers expressed concerns about the program design and the implementation process, they generally regarded the program as helpful to the students and they had positive global evaluation of the program.

  20. International Review of the Development and Implementation of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2012-02-28

    Appliance energy efficiency standards and labeling (S&L) programs have been important policy tools for regulating the efficiency of energy-using products for over 40 years and continue to expand in terms of geographic and product coverage. The most common S&L programs include mandatory minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) that seek to push the market for efficient products, and energy information and endorsement labels that seek to pull the market. This study seeks to review and compare some of the earliest and most well-developed S&L programs in three countries and one region: the U.S. MEPS and ENERGY STAR, Australia MEPS and Energy Label, European Union MEPS and Ecodesign requirements and Energy Label and Japanese Top Runner programs. For each program, key elements of S&L programs are evaluated and comparative analyses across the programs undertaken to identify best practice examples of individual elements as well as cross-cutting factors for success and lessons learned in international S&L program development and implementation. The international review and comparative analysis identified several overarching themes and highlighted some common factors behind successful program elements. First, standard-setting and programmatic implementation can benefit significantly from a legal framework that stipulates a specific timeline or schedule for standard-setting and revision, product coverage and legal sanctions for non-compliance. Second, the different MEPS programs revealed similarities in targeting efficiency gains that are technically feasible and economically justified as the principle for choosing a standard level, in many cases at a level that no product on the current market could reach. Third, detailed survey data such as the U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and rigorous analyses provide a strong foundation for standard-setting while incorporating the participation of different groups of stakeholders further strengthen the process

  1. Postpartum depression screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: program development, implementation, and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherry AS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Amanda S Cherry,1 Ryan T Blucker,1 Timothy S Thornberry,2 Carla Hetherington,3 Mary Anne McCaffree,3 Stephen R Gillaspy1 1Department of Pediatrics, Section of General and Community Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, 2Department of Psychology, Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, 3Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Objective: The aims of this project were to describe the development of a postpartum depression screening program for mothers of infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and assess the implementation of the screening program. Methods: Screening began at 14 days postpartum and was implemented as part of routine medical care. A nurse coordinator facilitated communication with mothers for increasing screen completion, review of critical self-harm items, and making mental health referrals. During the 18-month study period, 385 out of 793 eligible mothers completed the screen. Results: Approximately 36% of mothers had a positive screen that resulted in a mental health referral and an additional 30% of mothers had screening results indicating significant symptoms. Conclusion: Several barriers were identified, leading to adjustments in the screening process, and ultimately recommendations for future screening programs and research. Development of a postpartum depression screening process in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit involves support, training, implementation, and coordination from administrators, medical staff, new mothers, and mental health specialists. Several predictable challenges to program development require ongoing assessment and response to these challenges. Relevance: This study highlights the expanding role of the psychologist and behavioral health providers in health care to intervene as early as possible in the life of a child and family with medical complications through multidisciplinary program development and

  2. Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Firth, Kimberly; Smeeding, Sandra; Wolever, Ruth; Kaufman, Joanna; Delgado, Roxana; Bellanti, Dawn; Xenakis, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the development of mind-body skills can improve individual and family resilience, particularly related to the stresses of illness, trauma, and caregiving. To operationalize the research evidence that mind-body skills help with health and recovery, Samueli Institute, in partnership with experts in mind-body programming, created a set of guidelines for developing and evaluating mind-body programs for service members, veterans, and their families. The Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting outline key strategies and issues to consider when developing, implementing, and evaluating a mind-body focused family empowerment approach in a military healthcare setting. Although these guidelines were developed specifically for a military setting, most of the same principles can be applied to the development of programs in the civilian setting as well. The guidelines particularly address issues unique to mind-body programs, such as choosing evidence-based modalities, licensure and credentialing, safety and contraindications, and choosing evaluation measures that capture the holistic nature of these types of programs. The guidelines are practical, practice-based guidelines, developed by experts in the fields of program development and evaluation, mind-body therapies, patient- and family-centered care, as well as, experts in military and veteran's health systems. They provide a flexible framework to create mind-body family empowerment programs and describe important issues that program developers and evaluators are encouraged to address to ensure the development of the most impactful, successful, evidence-supported programs possible.

  3. Government-to-private sector energy programs: Identification of common elements leading to successful implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Keith M.

    This dissertation examines six distinct government energy programs implemented in the United States during the last three decades. A common element within these programs is an attempt by government to drive commercialization of energy technologies leading to changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. We seek to understand the factors that lead to success or failure of these programs with two goals in mind. The first is theoretical in that we test a hypothesis that market-based energy programs have substantially higher success rates than command-and-control programs. The second goal is operational in nature, in which we desire to identify common factors within energy programs that lead either to program success or to failure. We investigate and evaluate three market-based and three command-and-control energy programs. The market-based programs include the federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy and Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Control programs as well as Colorado's Amendment 37. The command-and-control programs include the federal Synthetic Fuels Corporation and Corn Based Ethanol programs as well as Colorado's Solar Electric Power program. We conduct the analysis of each program based on composite methodology derived from leading academics within the Policy Sciences. From our research findings, we conclude that both market-based and command-and-control programs can achieve their legislative goals and objectives, resulting in permanent changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. However, we also find that the economic efficiency is the differentiator between market-based and command-and-control programs. Market-based programs, because of the inherent flexibility, allow participants to react to changing economic and/or technical conditions. In contrast, command-and-control programs lack such flexibility and often result in economic inefficiency when economic conditions change. The financial incentives incorporated in the three command

  4. Provider-identified barriers and facilitators to implementing a supported employment program in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Bridget A; Ottomanelli, Lisa; O'Connor, Danielle R; Trainor, John K

    2017-03-08

    In a 5-year study, individual placement and support (IPS) significantly increased employment rate of United States Veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI), a historically underemployed population. In a follow-up study, data on barriers and facilitators to IPS implementation were identified. Over 24 months of implementation, 82 key medical and vocational staff underwent semi-structured interviews (n = 130). Interviews were digitally recorded and qualitatively analyzed (ATLAS.ti v0.7) using a constant comparative method to generate themes. Some barriers to implementation occurred throughout the study, such as Veterans' lack of motivation and providers' difficulty integrating vocational and medical rehabilitation. Other barriers emerged at specific stages, for example, early barriers included a large geographic service area and a large patient caseload, and late barriers included need for staff education. Facilitators were mostly constant throughout implementation and included leadership support and successful integration of vocational staff into the medical care team. Implementation strategies need to be adjusted as implementation progresses and matures. The strategies that succeeded in this setting, which were situated in a real-world context of providing IPS as a part of SCI medical care, may inform implementation of IPS for other populations with physical disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Key facilitators to IPS in SCI implementation are integrating vocational staff with expertise in IPS and SCI on clinical rehabilitation teams and providing leadership support. Ongoing barriers to IPS in SCI include patient specific and program administration factors such as caseload size and staffing patterns. Varying implementation strategies are needed to address barriers as they arise and facilitate successful implementation.

  5. OpenSHMEM-UCX : Evaluation of UCX for implementing OpenSHMEM Programming Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Matthew B [ORNL; Gorentla Venkata, Manjunath [ORNL; Aderholdt, William Ferrol [ORNL; Shamis, Pavel [ARM Research

    2016-01-01

    The OpenSHMEM reference implementation was developed towards the goal of developing an open source and high-performing Open- SHMEM implementation. To achieve portability and performance across various networks, the OpenSHMEM reference implementation uses GAS- Net and UCCS for network operations. Recently, new network layers have emerged with the promise of providing high-performance, scalabil- ity, and portability for HPC applications. In this paper, we implement the OpenSHMEM reference implementation to use the UCX framework for network operations. Then, we evaluate its performance and scalabil- ity on Cray XK systems to understand UCX s suitability for developing the OpenSHMEM programming model. Further, we develop a bench- mark called SHOMS for evaluating the OpenSHMEM implementation. Our experimental results show that OpenSHMEM-UCX outperforms the vendor supplied OpenSHMEM implementation in most cases on the Cray XK system by up to 40% with respect to message rate and up to 70% for the execution of application kernels.

  6. Implementation and Outcomes of a Community-Based Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program in Rural Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Daniel; Tommarello, Chaffee; Broce, Mike; Emmett, Mary; Pollard, Cecil

    2017-07-01

    To report on the implementation and clinical outcomes of a community-based pulmonary rehabilitation program in rural Appalachia. Three rural health centers and a large referral hospital worked together to establish pulmonary rehabilitation services based on AACVPR guidelines. Each site hired at least 1 respiratory therapist. To measure clinical outcomes, a retrospective medical record study compared pre- and post-program values for the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea level, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), negative inspiratory force (NIF), respiratory disease knowledge, St George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), BODE index (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise capacity), and smoking status. The percentages of persons completing the program and participating in maintenance exercise after the program were recorded. During the first 20 months of the program, 195 unduplicated persons with qualifying chronic lung diseases started the program. Of these, 111 (57%) completed the program. Mean improvements for all 6 measures were highly significant (P NIF, +11.3 cm H2O; knowledge test, +1.9; SGRQ, -6.2; BODE index, -1.1. Of the 23 smokers, 5 quit by the end of the program. Community-based pulmonary rehabilitation in rural health centers is feasible and achieves clinical outcomes similar to programs in large hospitals and academic centers. Furthermore, the addition of respiratory therapists to these primary care teams provides important collateral benefits for the evidence-based care of patients with chronic lung diseases.

  7. Scheme for implementing perfect remote state preparation with W-class state in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xue-Wen; Peng Zhao-Hui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a remote state preparation scheme with a three-qubit W-class state in cavity QED. It has been shown that a special single-qubit state and a special two-qubit entangled state can be remotely prepared perfectly. Furthermore, the classical information cost in this scheme is less than that in the corresponding teleportation scheme and only a single-qubit projective measurement is made by the sender. We also generalize this idea to the multiqubit W-class state.

  8. Do liquid-based preparations of urinary cytology perform differently than classically prepared cases? Observations from the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laucirica, Rodolfo; Bentz, Joel S; Souers, Rhona J; Wasserman, Patricia G; Crothers, Barbara A; Clayton, Amy C; Henry, Michael R; Chmara, Beth Anne; Clary, Karen M; Fraig, Mostafa M; Moriarty, Ann T

    2010-01-01

    The cytomorphology of liquid-based preparations in urine cytology is different than classic slide preparations. To compare the performance of liquid-based preparation specimens to classically prepared urine specimens with a malignant diagnosis in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytology. Participant responses between 2000 and 2007 for urine specimens with a reference diagnosis of high-grade urothelial carcinoma/carcinoma in situ/dysplasia (HGUCA), squamous cell carcinoma, or adenocarcinoma were evaluated. ThinPrep and SurePath challenges were compared with classic preparations (smears, cytospins) for discordant responses. There were 18 288 pathologist, 11 957 cytotechnologist, and 8086 "laboratory" responses available. Classic preparations comprised 90% (n = 34 551) of urine challenges; 9% (n = 3295) were ThinPrep and 1% (n = 485) were SurePath. Concordance to the general category of "positive-malignant" was seen in 92% of classic preparations, 96.5% of ThinPrep, and 94.6% of SurePath challenges (P Liquid-based preparations performed significantly better in urinary cytology challenges when evaluating malignant categories in the College of American Pathologists interlaboratory comparison program. The liquid-based preparation challenges also performed better for the exact reference interpretation of HGUCA, but no difference was observed for adenocarcinoma challenges. Cytotechnologists perform better than pathologists for all slide types, as well as those demonstrating HGUCA. These results suggest that liquid-based preparations facilitate a more accurate diagnosis than conventional preparations.

  9. The Dual Language Program Planner: A Guide for Designing and Implementing Dual Language Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth R.; Olague, Natalie; Rogers, David

    This guide offers a framework to facilitate the planning process for dual language programs, assuming at least a basic working knowledge of the central characteristics and essential features of dual language models. It provides an overview of the various models that serve linguistically diverse student populations, defining the term dual language…

  10. California's Early Assessment Program: Its Effectiveness and the Obstacles to Successful Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    The Early Assessment Program (EAP) has emerged as a national model for states seeking to design policies that increase the number of students who leave high school ready for college and careers. In addition, the two national consortia designing new assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards have recognized the EAP as a model for the…

  11. Implementing and Evaluating a Multicomponent Inpatient Diabetes Management Program: Putting Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Miguel; Pronovost, Peter; Dintzis, Joanne; Kemmerer, Theresa; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Chang, Yi-Ting; Efird, Leigh; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2013-01-01

    Background Strategies for successful implementation of hospitalwide glucose control efforts were addressed in a conceptual model for the development and implementation of an institutional inpatient glucose management program. Conceptual Model Components The Glucose Steering Committee incrementally developed and implemented hospitalwide glucose policies, coupled with targeted education and clinical decision support to facilitate policy acceptance and uptake by staff while incorporating process and outcome measures to objectively assess the effectiveness of quality improvement efforts. The model includes four components: (1) engaging staff and hospital executives in the importance of inpatient glycemic management, (2) educating staff involved in the care of patients with diabetes through structured knowledge dissemination, (3) executing evidence-based inpatient glucose management through development of policies and clinical decision aids, and (4) evaluating intervention effectiveness through assessing process measures, intermediary glucometric outcomes, and clinical and economic outcomes. An educational curriculum for nursing, provider, and pharmacist diabetes education programs and current glucometrics were also developed. Outcomes Overall the average patient-day–weighted mean blood glucose (PDWMBG) was below the currently recommended maximum of 180 mg/dL in patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia, with a significant decrease in PDWMBG of 7.8 mg/dL in patients with hyperglycemia. The program resulted in an 18.8% reduction in hypoglycemia event rates, which was sustained. Conclusion Inpatient glucose management remains an important area for patient safety, quality improvement, and clinical research, and the implementation model should guide other hospitals in their glucose management initiatives. PMID:22649859

  12. Implementation of smoking cessation treatment in VHA substance use disorder residential treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Elizabeth; Tavakoli, Sara; Wisdom, Jennifer; Hamlett-Berry, Kim

    2015-03-01

    Although the prevalence of tobacco use among individuals with substance use disorders remains high, smoking cessation (SC) has not been a focus of addiction treatment programs. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) policy requires tobacco use screening and the availability of evidence-based SC treatment in specialty care settings, including substance use disorder programs. As part of a larger quality improvement effort, this qualitative study examined how SC treatment is delivered in VHA substance use disorder residential treatment programs (SRTPs) and the barriers and opportunities for growth that exist within these settings. Twenty-five staff were interviewed across a sample of 15 SRTPs. Participants were asked to describe their knowledge and attitudes about SC treatment as well as organizational barriers and facilitators related to implementation of SC treatment in their programs. Content analysis was used to extract responses within and across programs. Participants endorsed SC as a general goal and reported that SRTPs responded to patients who requested help. However, many programs did not emphasize SC as an important part of recovery from substance use disorders and did not document, reevaluate, or consistently address tobacco use. The results identified critical gaps in the provision of SC treatment in VHA SRTPs. These findings suggest actionable opportunities to improve SC treatment in SRTPs, including providing training opportunities, developing or enforcing policies that support SC, implementing systems to track and report tobacco-related diagnoses and treatment, and obtaining leadership support for building a culture that encourages SC.

  13. Preparing Science Teachers: Strong Emphasis on Science Content Course Work in a Master's Program in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajhar, Edward A.; Blackwell, E.; Quesada, D.

    2010-05-01

    In South Florida, science teacher preparation is often weak as a shortage of science teachers often prompts administrators to assign teachers to science classes just to cover the classroom needs. This results is poor preparation of students for college science course work, which, in turn, causes the next generation of science teachers to be even weaker than the first. This cycle must be broken in order to prepare better students in the sciences. At St. Thomas University in Miami Gardens, Florida, our School of Science has teamed with our Institute for Education to create a program to alleviate this problem: A Master of Science in Education with a Concentration in Earth/Space Science. The Master's program consists of 36 total credits. Half the curriculum consists of traditional educational foundation and instructional leadership courses while the other half is focused on Earth and Space Science content courses. The content area of 18 credits also provides a separate certificate program. Although traditional high school science education places a heavy emphasis on Earth Science, this program expands that emphasis to include the broader context of astronomy, astrophysics, astrobiology, planetary science, and the practice and philosophy of science. From this contextual basis the teacher is better prepared to educate and motivate middle and high school students in all areas of the physical sciences. Because hands-on experience is especially valuable to educators, our program uses materials and equipment including small optical telescopes (Galileoscopes), several 8-in and 14-in Celestron and Meade reflectors, and a Small Radio Telescope installed on site. (Partial funding provided by the US Department of Education through Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program grant P120A050062.)

  14. Baseline data on distance education offerings in deaf education teacher preparation programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker, Deborah S

    2011-01-01

    Given that little is empirically known about the use of distance education within deaf education teacher preparation (DETP) programs, the purpose of the present study was to obtain baseline data on distance education activities in these programs. Using a census of the program coordinators of the 68 DETP programs in the United States, the researcher requested and gathered data by means of an 11-item online questionnaire. A 69% response rate was achieved (N = 47). It was found that more than half of the DETP programs offered distance education courses. Respondents indicated that asynchronous technology was used overwhelmingly more often than synchronous technology, with the Internet listed most often, followed by teleconferencing. Additional results provide information about the current status of distance education within the DETP field.

  15. An Evaluation of the Implementation Fidelity and Outcomes of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in Three Elementary Schools in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Barbara F.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a major concern in schools today. Many schools have implemented some type of bullying prevention program. The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is one of these programs. Evaluation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is typically done through the administration of the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire to students and…

  16. Training Workers Implementing Adolescent Prevention and Positive Youth Development Programs: What Have We Learned from the Literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Wai, C. L. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Although many studies are evaluating the effectiveness of adolescent prevention and positive youth development programs, training programs for workers implementing such programs are seldom examined. In this paper, such programs indexed in several databases were reviewed. The basic characteristics, objectives, content, theory, process, and…

  17. An Evaluation of the Implementation Fidelity and Outcomes of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in Three Elementary Schools in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Barbara F.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a major concern in schools today. Many schools have implemented some type of bullying prevention program. The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is one of these programs. Evaluation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is typically done through the administration of the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire to students and…

  18. Initiation and Implementation of Outreach Programs. Student Development Staff Papers, Volume V, Number 2, 1974-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mary; Delworth, Ursula

    This paper describes a five-stage process for the development, implementation, and evaluation of counseling outreach programs. State I takes the reader from the formulation of a germinal program idea through the procedures of assessing need for the program, assessing of agency resources, building a program planning team, and conducting a thorough…

  19. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1994-02-01

    This document is part of Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Fiscal Year 1994 (FY 1994) Annual Implementation Work Plan (AIWP) presents Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA`s) plan for implementation of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program). The purpose of the Program is to guide BPA and other federal agencies in carrying out their responsibilities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Phase I began the work of salmon recovery with certain fast-track measures completed in August 1991. Phase II dealt with Snake and Columbia river flow and salmon harvest and was completed in December 1991. Phase III dealt with system-wide habitat and salmon production issues and was completed in September 1992. Phase IV planning, focusing on resident fish and wildlife, began in August 1993, and was finished and adopted in November 1993. This report provides summaries of the ongoing and new projects for FY 1994 within the areas of juvenile migration, adult migration, salmon harvest, production and habitat, coordinated implementation, monitoring and evaluation, resident fish, and wildlife.

  20. Year 3 of Implementing the Common Core State Standards: States Prepare for Common Core Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentner, Diane Stark

    2013-01-01

    With the voluntary Common Core State Standards (CCSS), states have sought to establish clear, high expectations that are consistent across participating states and that signal what K-12 students should learn in mathematics and English language arts (ELA) to be prepared for college and careers. As of July 2013, the CCSS have been adopted by 45…

  1. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1988-09-01

    The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) was developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in accordance with Public Law 96-501. the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act). The purpose of the Program is to guide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other Federal agencies in carrying out their responsibilities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife of the Columbia River Basin. The Act explicitly gives BPA the authority and responsibility to use the BPA fund for these ends, to the extent that fish and wildlife are affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric generation in the Columbia River Basin. This document presents BPA's plans for implementing the Program during Fiscal Year (FY) 1989. BPA's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) reflects the primary goals of the Council's Action Plan (Section 1400 of the Program): to provide a solid, timely, and focused basis for budgeting and planning. In addition, BPA's Work Plan provides a means to judge progress and the success of Program implementation. This Work Plan has been organized and written to meet the specific needs of the Council's Action Plan, as described in Action Items 10.1-10.3 of the Program. The Work Plan includes schedules with key milestones for FY 1989 and beyond, and is organized to address the Action Items assigned to BPA in Section 1400 of the 1987 Program. All BPA-funded projects discussed in the FY 1989 Work Plan are listed in Tables 1 and 2 according to their current status. Table 1 (pp. 3-11) lists completed, ongoing, and deferred projects. Table 2 (pp. 12-13) lists all projects which BPA plans to fund as ''new'' projects in FY 1989. ''Ongoing'' status indicates that the project started in FY 1988 or before, and that it was still being implemented by BPA at the end of FY 1988. &apos

  2. NASIS data base management system - IBM 360/370 OS MVT implementation. 4: Program design specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The design specifications for the programs and modules within the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System (NASIS) are presented. The purpose of the design specifications is to standardize the preparation of the specifications and to guide the program design. Each major functional module within the system is a separate entity for documentation purposes. The design specifications contain a description of, and specifications for, all detail processing which occurs in the module. Sub-modules, reference tables, and data sets which are common to several modules are documented separately.

  3. Content knowledge development in a chemistry teacher preparation program: A current potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiyanti, Tuszie; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Vishnumolakala, Venkat

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential facets in teacher education program is the development of the teachers' content knowledge and it has been suggested by many scholars that the study to analyse the process of content knowledge development in teacher education program is necessary. Regarding this, the aim of this research is to evaluate the existing program of developing pre-service chemistry teachers' content knowledge, especially in the topic about the particulate nature of matter. The curriculum of content knowledge development was analysed using the forms of the curriculum evaluation (Akker, 1998; Goodlad, Klein, and Tye (1979); Treagust, 1987). Within this framework, the curriculum was evaluated in several aspects including the vision and intention of the curriculum as mentioned in the curriculum documents (intended curriculum), the users' interpretation and perception about the curriculum (perceived curriculum), the actual process of curriculum implementation (implemented curriculum), and the outcomes of the curriculum (achieved curriculum). According to the framework used for this study, the research combined qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and the interpretation including document analysis, classroom observation, interviews, and two-tier diagnostic test. Through this research we examined the coherence among those aspects. The results reveal that although the content knowledge development is explicitly intended in a curriculum, its implementation and lecturers' perceptions give influence in the results as appear in pre-service teachers' achievements. In general, this research provides basic information about the effectiveness of the program including the challenges and the potentials for a reconsideration of the program in the future.

  4. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1990.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1990-01-01

    The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) was developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in accordance with Public Law 96-501, the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act). The purpose of the Program is to guide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other Federal agencies in carrying out their responsibilities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife of the Columbia River Basin. The Act explicitly gives BPA the authority and responsibility to use the BPA fund for these ends, to the extent that fish and wildlife are affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric generation in the Columbia River Basin. This document presents BPA's plans for implementing the Program during Fiscal Year (FY) 1990. The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan (AIWP) reflects the primary goals of the Council's Action Plan (Section 1400 of the Program): to provide a solid, timely, and focused basis for budgeting and planning. In addition, the AIWP provides a means to judge progress and the success of Program implementation. The FY 1990 AIWP also follows the outline developed by the Policy Review Group (PRG) during Step 1 of initial cycle of the Implementation Planning Process (IPP), which is described in Section III. A number of new FY 1990 projects were still under review by the PRG as the AIWP went to press. These projects have been noted in Table 2, New FY 1990 Program Projects, and in the text of the AIWP. This AIWP has been organized and written to meet the specific needs of Program Action Items 10.1-10.3. The AIWP includes schedules with key milestones for FY 1990 and beyond, and addresses the Action Items assigned to BPA in Section 1400 of the 1987 Program. All BPA-funded Program projects discussed in the FY 1990 AIWP are listed in Tables 1 and 2 according to their status as of September 30, 1989. Table 1 (pp. 3-14) lists completed, ongoing

  5. National Implementation of an Evidence-Based HIV Prevention and Reproductive Health Program for Bahamian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Valerie; Kaljee, Linda; Deveaux, Lynette; Lunn, Sonja; Rolle, Glenda; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of behavioral prevention interventions have been demonstrated through longitudinal, randomized controlled trials to reduce sexual risk behaviors. Many of these interventions have been made available at little cost for implementation on a public health scale. However, efforts to utilize such programs typically have been met with a range of problems to be addressed, leading to the recognition that new processes must be identified and integrated into the emerging field of implementation science. A randomized, controlled trial conducted among Bahamian grade six students attending fifteen elementary schools found the sexual risk-reduction intervention "Focus on Youth in the Caribbean (FOYC) and Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together (CImPACT)" to be effective through three years of follow-up. Based on these results, the Bahamian Ministry of Education decided to implement FOYC-CImPACT throughout all government grade six classes in The Bahamas. This manuscript describes the considerations, approaches, and actions taken regarding national implementation of this evidence-based intervention. The implementation process included active data-gathering, observation and feedback components to inform subsequent intervention phases. This manuscript reviewed the success and challenges to date within this framework and described changes made to enable next stages of the national implementation effort.

  6. Implementation of a Nursing Peer-Review Program in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Jessica K

    2015-01-01

    Nursing peer review (NPR), a formal process by which nurses are referred for peer evaluation when patient care problems are identified, has gained acceptance as a method to improve nursing quality and safety. This article describes the development of a formal NPR program for acute care nurses, intended to validate and improve nursing practice. Nursing peer review is a systematic process of assessing and evaluating nursing care by peers against professional practice standards. The purpose of an NPR program is to provide a pathway whereby peers hold one another accountable for practice. Accountability is an important demonstrator of professionalism. Because nursing is a trusted profession, it is imperative that it demonstrate accountability. The NPR program was developed and implemented by a clinical nurse specialist. A literature review was conducted to assist program development including the processes of building an NPR committee and nurses for review. To trigger referrals to the NPR system, nursing indicators were identified. To diminish fear among nurses, education for staff members focused on the purpose and importance of the NPR process and the intent to strengthen practice. Nursing peer review committee members were also educated in the use of NPR principles including just culture, appreciative inquiry, and confidentiality. Upon implementation, nearly 200 referrals were received within the first 14 months; 85% met criteria for review. Nursing practice was identified as appropriate (ie, nursing actions were consistent with good practice) in 66% of the reviews. Trends in individual and system processes were identified for improvement. The clinical nurse specialist's role as NPR program coordinator provided an innovative way to impact nursing and organizational spheres of influence through program development and implementation. Future goals include sustaining/improving nursing awareness of the NPR process and identification of additional indicators to trigger

  7. Preface: The Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP Mission: Preparing for Its Scientific Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Foerster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The imaging spectroscopy mission EnMAP aims to assess the state and evolution of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, examine the multifaceted impacts of human activities, and support a sustainable use of natural resources. Once in operation (scheduled to launch in 2019, EnMAP will provide high-quality observations in the visible to near-infrared and shortwave-infrared spectral range. The scientific preparation of the mission comprises an extensive science program. This special issue presents a collection of research articles, demonstrating the potential of EnMAP for various applications along with overview articles on the mission and software tools developed within its scientific preparation.

  8. Classroom implementation of the practices learned in the Master of Chemistry Education program by the School District of Philadelphia's high school chemistry teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Uma Devi

    This dissertation reports the results of an exploratory case study utilizing quantitative and qualitative methodologies intended to ascertain the extent and differences of implementation of research-based instructional practices, learned in an intensive 26-month professional development, in their urban classrooms. Both the extent and differences in the implementation of practices were investigated in relation to the lesson design and implementation, content, and classroom culture aspects of research-based practices. Additionally, this research includes the concerns of the teachers regarding the factors that helped or hindered the implementation of research-based practices in their classrooms. Six graduates of the Master of Chemistry Education Program who were teaching a chemistry course in a high school in the School District of Philadelphia at the time of the study (2006-8), were the case. The teachers completed a concerns questionnaire with closed and open-ended items, and rated their perceptions of the extent of implementation of the practices in their urban classrooms. Additionally, the teachers were observed and rated by the researcher using a reform-teaching observation protocol and were interviewed individually. Also, the teachers submitted their lesson plans for the days they were observed. Data from these sources were analyzed to arrive at the findings for this study. The research findings suggest that the group of teachers in the study implemented the research-based practices in their classrooms to a low extent when compared to the recommended practices inherent to the MCE Program. The extents of implementation of the practices differed widely among the teachers, from being absent to being implemented at a high level, with inconsistent levels of implementation from various data sources. Further, the teachers expressed the depth of knowledge (gained in the MCE Program), formal laboratory exercises and reports, administrative support, self

  9. Vaccines for Children: Reexamination of Program Goals and Implementation Needed to Ensure Vaccination. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Program Evaluation and Methodology Div.

    This report presents: (1) a review of the evidence that vaccine cost has prevented children from being immunized on time; (2) an evaluation of the implementation of the Vaccines For Children (VFC) program, including whether this program, as implemented, is likely to meet the needs of the under-immunized children; and (3) some options for improving…

  10. Process evaluation of "Girls on the Run": exploring implementation in a physical activity-based positive youth development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachini, Aidyn L; Beets, Michael W; Ball, Annahita; Lohman, Mary

    2014-10-01

    Many positive youth development programs rely on physical activity as a primary program component. Referred to as physical activity-based youth development programs, these program designs have great potential for promoting healthy youth development. This study examined how one such physical activity-based positive youth development program was implemented in order to identify design features critical to maximizing positive youth outcomes. This mixed method, multi-site process evaluation of Girls on the Run (GOTR) utilized focus groups, site visits, and self-report implementation checklists. Implementation scores were calculated to assess implementation fidelity across twenty-nine sites, and qualitative data were inductively analyzed to identify factors influential for implementation. Results reveal variability in how GOTR was implemented. Five themes emerged from the data that represented factors serving as facilitators or barriers to programmatic implementation. These included contextual/environmental factors (e.g., parental involvement, relationships with school personnel), organizational factors (e.g., implementation support and responsiveness of staff), program-specific factors (e.g., curriculum design), coach factors (e.g., existing relationships with participants, responsiveness to participant's needs), and youth factors (e.g., behavioral and discipline issues). Study findings have implications for improving the design of physical activity-based and other positive youth development programs, with relevance to evaluators, program planners, youth development leaders, and others working with children and youth.

  11. Students' Reflections on the Relevance and Quality of Highly Ranked Doctoral Programs in Educational Administration: Beacons of Leadership Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, John R.; Torres, Mario S., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The manner by which colleges and universities prepare school leaders in doctoral programs is being called into question. One report is stirring much controversy for its unflattering portrayal of administrator preparation programs. In a 2005 report entitled "Educating School Leaders," former Columbia University president Art Levine characterizes…

  12. Where You Come from or Where You Go? Distinguishing between School Quality and the Effectiveness of Teacher Preparation Program Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, Kata; McCaffrey, Daniel; Sass, Tim R.; Lockwood, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the challenges and implications of controlling for school contextual bias when modeling teacher preparation program effects. Because teachers are not randomly distributed across schools, failing to account for contextual factors in achievement models could bias preparation program estimates. Including school fixed effects controls for…

  13. Grade-Level Overlap and Standards Mismatch between Nationally Recognized Programs That Prepare Teachers for Grades PreK-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, R. Clarke

    2016-01-01

    Two related questions are investigated regarding programs accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). First, to what extent do NCATE-recognized elementary teacher preparation programs, which have been approved by the Association for Child Education International (ACEI), prepare candidates to teach in…

  14. 77 FR 38611 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records-Study of Promising Features of Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... Teacher Preparation Programs'' (18-13-29). The National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional... Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records--Study of Promising Features of Teacher Preparation Programs AGENCY... Abt Associates to conduct a rigorous study of the effect on student learning of teachers who...

  15. Implementing Community-Based Diabetes Programs: The Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes affects a large and growing segment of the US population. Ethnic and racial minorities are at disproportionate risk for diabetes, with Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks showing a near doubling of risk relative to non-Hispanic whites. There is an urgent need to identify low cost, effective, and easily implementable primary and secondary prevention approaches, as well as tertiary strategies that delay disease progression, complications, and associated deterioration in function in patients with diabetes. The Chronic Care Model provides a well-accepted framework for improving diabetes and chronic disease care in the community and primary care medical home. A number of community-based diabetes programs have incorporated this model into their infrastructure. Diabetes programs must offer accessible information and support throughout the community and must be delivered in a format that is understood, regardless of literacy and socioeconomic status. This article will discuss several successful, culturally competent community-based programs and the key elements needed to implement the programs at a community or health system level. Health systems together with local communities can integrate the elements of community-based programs that are effective across the continuum of the care to enhance patient-centered outcomes, enable patient acceptability and ultimately lead to improved patient engagement and satisfaction. PMID:24390404

  16. Design and implementation of a programming circuit in radiation-hardened FPGA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Lihua; Han Xiaowei; Zhao Yan; Liu Zhongli; Yu Fang; Stanley L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel programming circuit used in our radiation-hardened field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip.This circuit provides the ability to write user-defined configuration data into an FPGA and then read it back.The proposed circuit adopts the direct-access programming point scheme instead of the typical long token shift register chain.It not only saves area but also provides more flexible configuration operations.By configuring the proposed partial configuration control register,our smallest configuration section can be conveniently configured as a single data and a flexible partial configuration can be easily implemented.The hierarchical simulation scheme,optimization of the critical path and the elaborate layout plan make this circuit work well.Also,the radiation hardened by design programming point is introduced.This circuit has been implemented in a static random access memory (SRAM)-based FPGA fabricated by a 0.5 μm partial-depletion silicon-on-insulator CMOS process.The function test results of the fabricated chip indicate that this programming circuit successfully realizes the desired functions in the configuration and read-back.Moreover,the radiation test results indicate that the programming circuit has total dose tolerance of 1 × 105 rad(Si),dose rate survivability of 1.5 × 1011 rad(Si)/s and neutron fluence immunity of 1 × 1014 n/cm2.

  17. Towards Implementation of a Generalized Architecture for High-Level Quantum Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, El-Mahdy M.; Ali, Hesham A.; Salem, Mofreh M.; Badawy, Mahmoud

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates a novel architecture to the problem of quantum computer programming. A generalized architecture for a high-level quantum programming language has been proposed. Therefore, the programming evolution from the complicated quantum-based programming to the high-level quantum independent programming will be achieved. The proposed architecture receives the high-level source code and, automatically transforms it into the equivalent quantum representation. This architecture involves two layers which are the programmer layer and the compilation layer. These layers have been implemented in the state of the art of three main stages; pre-classification, classification, and post-classification stages respectively. The basic building block of each stage has been divided into subsequent phases. Each phase has been implemented to perform the required transformations from one representation to another. A verification process was exposed using a case study to investigate the ability of the compiler to perform all transformation processes. Experimental results showed that the efficacy of the proposed compiler achieves a correspondence correlation coefficient about R ≈ 1 between outputs and the targets. Also, an obvious achievement has been utilized with respect to the consumed time in the optimization process compared to other techniques. In the online optimization process, the consumed time has increased exponentially against the amount of accuracy needed. However, in the proposed offline optimization process has increased gradually.

  18. Implementation of an integrity management program in a crude oil pipeline system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Maria; Tomasella, Marcelo [Oleoductos del Valle, General Roca (Argentina); Rossi, Juan; Pellicano, Adolfo [SINTEC S.A. , Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2005-07-01

    The implementation of an Integrity Management Program (IMP) in a crude oil pipeline system is focused on the accomplishment of two primary corporative objectives: to increase safety operation margins and to optimize available resources. A proactive work philosophy ensures the safe and reliable operation of the pipeline in accordance with current legislation. The Integrity Management Program is accomplished by means of an interdisciplinary team that defines the strategic objectives that complement and are compatible with the corporative strategic business plan. The implementation of the program is based on the analysis of the risks due to external corrosion, third party damage, design and operations, and the definition of appropriate mitigation, inspection and monitoring actions, which will ensure long-term integrity of the assets. By means of a statistical propagation model of the external defects, reported by high-resolution magnetic inspection tool (MFL), together with the information provided by corrosion sensors, field repair interventions, close internal surveys and operation data, projected defect depth; remaining strength and failure probability distributions were obtained. From the analysis, feasible courses of action were established, including the inspection and repair plan, the internal inspection program and both corrosion monitoring and mitigation programs. (author)

  19. Design and implementation of a programming circuit in radiation-hardened FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Wu; Xiaowei, Han; Yan, Zhao; Zhongli, Liu; Fang, Yu; Chen, Stanley L.

    2011-08-01

    We present a novel programming circuit used in our radiation-hardened field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip. This circuit provides the ability to write user-defined configuration data into an FPGA and then read it back. The proposed circuit adopts the direct-access programming point scheme instead of the typical long token shift register chain. It not only saves area but also provides more flexible configuration operations. By configuring the proposed partial configuration control register, our smallest configuration section can be conveniently configured as a single data and a flexible partial configuration can be easily implemented. The hierarchical simulation scheme, optimization of the critical path and the elaborate layout plan make this circuit work well. Also, the radiation hardened by design programming point is introduced. This circuit has been implemented in a static random access memory (SRAM)-based FPGA fabricated by a 0.5 μm partial-depletion silicon-on-insulator CMOS process. The function test results of the fabricated chip indicate that this programming circuit successfully realizes the desired functions in the configuration and read-back. Moreover, the radiation test results indicate that the programming circuit has total dose tolerance of 1 × 105 rad(Si), dose rate survivability of 1.5 × 1011 rad(Si)/s and neutron fluence immunity of 1 × 1014 n/cm2.

  20. Machine and Collection Abstractions for User-Implemented Data-Parallel Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magne Haveraaen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Data parallelism has appeared as a fruitful approach to the parallelisation of compute-intensive programs. Data parallelism has the advantage of mimicking the sequential (and deterministic structure of programs as opposed to task parallelism, where the explicit interaction of processes has to be programmed. In data parallelism data structures, typically collection classes in the form of large arrays, are distributed on the processors of the target parallel machine. Trying to extract distribution aspects from conventional code often runs into problems with a lack of uniformity in the use of the data structures and in the expression of data dependency patterns within the code. Here we propose a framework with two conceptual classes, Machine and Collection. The Machine class abstracts hardware communication and distribution properties. This gives a programmer high-level access to the important parts of the low-level architecture. The Machine class may readily be used in the implementation of a Collection class, giving the programmer full control of the parallel distribution of data, as well as allowing normal sequential implementation of this class. Any program using such a collection class will be parallelisable, without requiring any modification, by choosing between sequential and parallel versions at link time. Experiments with a commercial application, built using the Sophus library which uses this approach to parallelisation, show good parallel speed-ups, without any adaptation of the application program being needed.