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Sample records for preparation premedication parental

  1. Premedication, preparation, and surveillance.

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    Bell, G D

    2002-01-01

    peppermint oil, as well as the value of variable-stiffness colonoscopes, in reducing the need for intravenous sedation is discussed. Case reports of hyponatraemic encephalopathy and hypocalcaemic tetany as complications of oral bowel preparation are presented, as is the challenge associated with adequate bowel preparation in diabetic patients.

  2. [Clinical substantiation of nootropic preparation use for premedication in outpatient stomatology].

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    Novikova, S G

    2008-01-01

    The clinico-pharmacological description of nooclerin is given. The premedication effectiveness in patients with various individual typological features in out-patient stomatologic treatment was studied.

  3. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement.

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    Safran, Daniel

    This paper examines the potential impact of parent involvement in the formal education of their children and suggests ways that teacher education can be restructured to prepare teachers to work with parents. This paper attempts to answer five questions: (1) Why should parents be involved in the formal education of their children? (2) Why should…

  4. DEXMEDETOMIDINE: AS NOVEL PREMEDICATION

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    Priti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation causes intense autonomic reflex responses such as tachycardia, hypertension and a rise in intraocular pressure (IOP. Rise in IOP is further compounded by the use of succinylcholine. Various drugs used to attenuate the rise in IOP are pre-treatment with non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, lignocaine, narcotics, nifedipine and nitroglycerine, but none is found to abolish it completely. To obtain haemodynamic response lignicaine, opiods, nitroprusside, nitroglycerine, vearpamil, nifedipine, esmolol, clonidine etc. have been used. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether dexmedetomidine an α2 agonist could attenuate the rise in IOP after succinylcholine and intubation. Simultaneously, its effect on attenuation of haemodynamic response (Heart rate and MAP to laryngoscopy and intubation was also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty patients without pre-existing eye disease undergoing general anesthesia was randomly premedicated by iv dexmedetomidine 0.6μg or saline. Heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, IOP (using Schioetz tonometer was measured before, after the premedication, after thiopental, after succinylcholine, immediately after intubation and then every minute for 3 minutes. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential statics using chi-square test, z- test and Wilcoxon sign rank test was done. Software used in the analysis was SPSS 17.0 version and Graph Pad Prism 5.0. Data was reported as mean value ± SD & p-value < 0.05 was considered as level of significance. RESULTS: Succinylcholine and intubation increased IOP in both the groups. However, in the dexmedetomidine group, it was not significantly different from baseline values (z value=0. 93, p=0. 358 and was significantly lower than in the control group (z =6. 644, p=0. 000. After intubation the MAP in the control group (z=17. 4, p=0. 000 was higher than that in the dexmedetomidine group (z=8, p=0. 000 and exceeded the baseline value

  5. Evaluation of Intranasal Midazolam as an Anesthetic Premedication in Preschool Children

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    Sh Behdad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preoperative psycho emotional preparation of patients is one of the principle purposes of anesthesia which can be achieved by administration of premedications. Children should receive premedication before entering the operating room due to their dependence on parents and the fear and anxiety of separation from parents. Different drugs are administered for this purpose, but considering children's sensitivity, it is wise to use the most effective and comfortable medication with least side effects. Midazolam is a rapid onset, short acting and water soluble benzodiazapine which can be administered by oral, intravenous, intramuscular, rectal or intranasal routes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the result of intranasal midazolam administration (0.2 mg/kg as a premedication in children aged 2-6 years.( Min dose and enough time Methods: In this randomized prospective study, 100 children aged between 2-6 years old in class ASA 1 and candidates of surgery were divided into two groups; case and control. The control group received several nasal drops of normal saline, while the case group received 0.2 mg/kg nasal midazolam 20 minutes before anesthesia induction. Results: Twenty minutes after administration of the nasal drops, 14% in the control group and 68% in the case group were alert and calm. (P value=0.0 . Mask acceptance during induction of anesthesia in control and case group was 14%and 72%, respectively (P value >0.00 The recovery time in the case group was longer (P value >0.5, but no complications (nausea, vomiting, respiratory and cardiovascular problems were seen in either group. Conclusion: Nasal midazolam with its anxiolytic, tranquilizing effects and no respiratory or cardiovascular complications is a safe drug and being better than parenteral drugs is acceptable by children.

  6. Comparison between intranasal dexmedetomidine and intranasal midazolam as premedication for brain magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric patients: A prospective randomized double blind trial

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    Ayushi Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Intranasal dexmedetomidine results in more successful parental separation and yields a higher sedation level at the time of induction of anesthesia than intranasal midazolam as premedication, with negligible side effects. However, its onset of action is relatively prolonged.

  7. Oral benzodiazepine premedication in minor gynaecological surgery.

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    Male, C G; Johnson, H D

    1984-05-01

    Clobazam 20 mg, diazepam 10 mg, lorazepam 2 mg and oxazepam 30 mg were compared in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial as oral premedication for 150 patients undergoing minor gynaecological surgery. All drugs and placebo significantly decreased anxiety when assessed by the patient on a 10-cm linear analogue rating scale 60 min after premedication. Diazepam 10 mg induced significantly more drowsiness when assessed by a trained observer 60 min after premedication than clobazam 20 mg, oxazepam 30 mg and placebo (P less than 0.01). Lorazepam 2 mg caused significantly more drowsiness 2 h (P less than 0.001) and 4 h (P less than 0.01) after operation, and significantly impaired psychomotor function after operation compared with the other four agents. The data suggest that clobazam 20 mg, diazepam 10 mg, oxazepam 30 mg or placebo offer advantages over lorazepam 2 mg for oral premedication in minor gynaecological surgery where early discharge after operation is preferred.

  8. Effects of premedication of midazolam or clonidine on perioperative anxiety and pain in children.

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    Cao, Jianping; Shi, Xueyin; Miao, Xiaoyong; Xu, Jia

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare clinical effects of oral midazolam and clonidine premedication in children. In a prospective randomized double blind trial, 45 children between 2-8 years old received either oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg (group M) or clonidine at 2 microg/kg (group C 2) or 4 microg/kg (group C4). The level of sedation, quality of parental separation, mask acceptance and thermodynamics were recorded. Postoperative analgesia, and perioperative side effects were assessed. In comparison to group M, the scores of sedation, parental separation and mask acceptance were significantly higher in group C2 and group C4 (p clonidine premedication can therefore provide better preoperative sedation and postoperative analgesia with few adverse effects.

  9. Rectal premedication in pediatric anesthesia: midazolam versus ketamine

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    Moshirian N

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premedication is widely used in pediatric anesthesia to reduce emotional trauma and ensure smooth induction. The rectal route is one of the most commonly accepted means of drug administration. The aim of our study was to investigate and compare the efficacy of rectally administered midazolam versus that of ketamine as a premedication in pediatric patients.Methods: We performed a prospective randomized double-blinded clinical trial in 64 children, 1 to 10 years of age, randomly allocated into two groups. The midazolam group received 0.5 mg/kg rectal midazolam and the ketamine group received 5 mg/kg rectal ketamine. The preoperative sedation scores were evaluated on a three-point scale. The anxiolysis and mask acceptance scores were evaluated separately on a four-point scale, with ease of parental separation, based on the presence or lack of crying, evaluated on a two-point scale. Results: Neither medication showed acceptable sedation (>75%, with no significant difference in sedation score between the two groups (P=0.725. Anxiolysis and mask acceptance using either midazolam or ketamine were acceptable, with  midazolam performing significantly better than ketamine (P=0.00 and P=0.042, respectively. Ease of parental separation was seen in both groups without significant difference (P=0.288 and no major adverse effects, such as apnea, occurred in either group.Conclusions: Rectal midazolam is more effective than ketamine in anxiolysis and mask acceptance. Although they both can ease separation anxiety in children before surgery, we found neither drug to be acceptable for sedation.

  10. 22 CFR 96.48 - Preparation and training of prospective adoptive parent(s) in incoming cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... adequate prior training or have prior experience as parent(s) of children adopted from abroad. (h) The... least ten hours (independent of the home study) of preparation and training, as described in paragraphs... and children with a history of multiple caregivers may experience, before and after their adoption; (6...

  11. A comparison of midazolam and clonidine as an oral premedication in pediatric patients

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    Sequeira Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg versus oral clonidine (4 μg/kg as a premedication in pediatric patients aged between 2-12 years with regard to sedation and anxiolysis. Methods: Sixty pediatric patients belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologists class I and II between the age group of 2-12 years scheduled for elective surgery were randomly allocated to receive either oral midazolam (group I 30 min before induction or oral clonidine (group II 90 min before induction of anesthesia. The children were evaluated for levels of sedation and anxiety at the time of separation from the parents, venepuncture, and at the time of mask application for induction of anesthesia. Results: After premedication, the percentage of children who were sedated and calm increased in both the groups. The overall level of sedation was better in the children in the clonidine group, but children in the midazolam group had a greater degree of anxiolysis at times of venepuncture and mask application. In addition, midazolam did not cause significant changes in hemodynamics unlike clonidine where a significant fall in blood pressure was noted, after premedication, but preinduction. Conclusion: We conclude that under the conditions of the study, oral midazolam is superior to clonidine as an anxiolytic in pediatric population. Clonidine with its sedative action especially at the time of separation from parents along with its other perioperative benefits cannot be discounted.

  12. Efficacy of midazolam as oral premedication in children in comparison to triclofos sodium

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    Kolathu Parambil Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The perioperative behavioural studies demonstrate that children are at greater risk of experiencing turbulent anaesthetic induction and adverse behavioural sequelae. We aimed to compare the efficacy of midazolam 0.5 mg/kg with triclofos sodium 100 mg/kg as oral premedication in children undergoing elective surgery. Methods: In this prospective, randomised and double-blind study, sixty children posted for elective lower abdominal surgery were enrolled. The patients were randomly divided into midazolam group (Group M and triclofos sodium group (Group T of thirty each. Group M received oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg 30 min before induction, and Group T received oral triclofos sodium 100 mg/kg 60 min before induction. All children were evaluated for level of sedation after premedication, behaviour at the time of separation from parents and at the time of mask placement for induction of anaesthesia. Mann–Whitney U-test was used for comparing the grade of sedation, ease of separation and acceptance of face mask. Results: Oral midazolam produced adequate sedation in children after premedication in comparison to oral triclofos (P = 0.002. Both drugs produced successful separation from parents, and the children were very cooperative during induction. No adverse effects attributable to the premedicants were seen. Conclusions: Oral midazolam is superior to triclofos sodium as a sedative anxiolytic in paediatric population.

  13. Efficacy of midazolam as oral premedication in children in comparison to triclofos sodium.

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    Radhika, Kolathu Parambil; Sreejit, Melveetil S; Ramadas, Konnanath T

    2016-06-01

    The perioperative behavioural studies demonstrate that children are at greater risk of experiencing turbulent anaesthetic induction and adverse behavioural sequelae. We aimed to compare the efficacy of midazolam 0.5 mg/kg with triclofos sodium 100 mg/kg as oral premedication in children undergoing elective surgery. In this prospective, randomised and double-blind study, sixty children posted for elective lower abdominal surgery were enrolled. The patients were randomly divided into midazolam group (Group M) and triclofos sodium group (Group T) of thirty each. Group M received oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg 30 min before induction, and Group T received oral triclofos sodium 100 mg/kg 60 min before induction. All children were evaluated for level of sedation after premedication, behaviour at the time of separation from parents and at the time of mask placement for induction of anaesthesia. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing the grade of sedation, ease of separation and acceptance of face mask. Oral midazolam produced adequate sedation in children after premedication in comparison to oral triclofos (P = 0.002). Both drugs produced successful separation from parents, and the children were very cooperative during induction. No adverse effects attributable to the premedicants were seen. Oral midazolam is superior to triclofos sodium as a sedative anxiolytic in paediatric population.

  14. RANDOMIZED DOUBLE BLIND CLINICAL TRIAL OF INTRAMUSCULAR DEXMEDETOMIDINE V/S MIDAZOLAM AS PREMEDICATION IN PAEDIATRIC SURGICAL PATIENTS

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    Anmol

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE A genuine attempt was made to find ideal drug for premedication in paediatric surgical patients. Dexmedetomidine a newer, highly selective alpha-2 agonist was compared to midazolam via intramuscular route. Setting: Institute-Department of Anaesthesiology, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences. METHODS Dexmedetomidine group (Group D with the conventional Midazolam group (Group M was compared for premedication in cases of paediatric surgical patients. A total of sixty patients, scheduled for elective surgery of duration 15 to 90 minutes, were enrolled and randomly assigned in a double blind manner to Group D and Group M. Intramuscular Dexmedetomidine (1.5 mcg/kg in Group D or midazolam (0.05 mg/kg in Group M, as a premedication in preoperative room was given and sedation score with Ramsay sedation scale and parent separation anxiety score were recorded. After 45 mins, patient was shifted in the operation room and a standard technique of anaesthesia was applied to all patients. Mask acceptance score, wake up score, demand of post-op analgesia, time for first analgesia requirement were recorded. RESULTS Our study comparing dexmedetomidine with midazolam premedication found a stable heart rate and blood pressure with comparable sedative effects, (90% vs 56%, P value 0.0074 concluded that dexmedetomidine group had better sedative effect. Parent separation anxiety score was better with dexmedetomidine group compared to midazolam group with p value 0.0419 (93% vs 70%. Mask acceptance was better with dexmedetomidine group compared to midazolam group with p value 0.0153 (90% vs 60%. Wake up score were compared and dexmedetomidine was better than midazolam with p value 0.0001 (93% vs 46%. CONCLUSION Premedication with low-dose intramuscular dexmedetomidine resulted in better sedation, lower anxiety levels during parent separation, better mask acceptance and wake up behaviour as compared with low-dose intramuscular midazolam.

  15. Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication

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    Lalit Kumar Raiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range.

  16. Midazolam premedication in children: a pilot study comparing intramuscular and intranasal administration.

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    Lam, Christy; Udin, Richard D; Malamed, Stanley F; Good, David L; Forrest, Jane L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of intramuscular and intranasal midazolam used as a premedication before intravenous conscious sedation. Twenty-three children who were scheduled to receive dental treatment under intravenous sedation participated. The patients ranged in age from 2 to 9 years (mean age, 5.13 years) and were randomly assigned to receive a dose of 0.2 mg/kg of midazolam premedication via either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All patients received 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen inhalation sedation and local anesthetic (0.2 mL of 4% prilocaine hydrochloride) before venipuncture. The sedation level, movement, and crying were evaluated at the following time points: 10 minutes after drug administration and at the times of parental separation, passive papoose board restraint, nitrous oxide nasal hood placement, local anesthetic administration, and initial venipuncture attempt. Mean ratings for the behavioral parameters of sedation level, degree of movement, and degree of crying were consistently higher but not significant in the intramuscular midazolam group at all 6 assessment points. Intramuscular midazolam was found to be statistically more effective in providing a better sedation level and less movement at the time of venipuncture than intranasal administration. Our findings indicate a tendency for intramuscular midazolam to be more effective as a premedication before intravenous sedation.

  17. Midazolam Premedication in Children: A Pilot Study Comparing Intramuscular and Intranasal Administration

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    Lam, Christy; Udin, Richard D; Malamed, Stanley F; Good, David L; Forrest, Jane L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of intramuscular and intranasal midazolam used as a premedication before intravenous conscious sedation. Twenty-three children who were scheduled to receive dental treatment under intravenous sedation participated. The patients ranged in age from 2 to 9 years (mean age, 5.13 years) and were randomly assigned to receive a dose of 0.2 mg/kg of midazolam premedication via either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All patients received 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen inhalation sedation and local anesthetic (0.2 mL of 4% prilocaine hydrochloride) before venipuncture. The sedation level, movement, and crying were evaluated at the following time points: 10 minutes after drug administration and at the times of parental separation, passive papoose board restraint, nitrous oxide nasal hood placement, local anesthetic administration, and initial venipuncture attempt. Mean ratings for the behavioral parameters of sedation level, degree of movement, and degree of crying were consistently higher but not significant in the intramuscular midazolam group at all 6 assessment points. Intramuscular midazolam was found to be statistically more effective in providing a better sedation level and less movement at the time of venipuncture than intranasal administration. Our findings indicate a tendency for intramuscular midazolam to be more effective as a premedication before intravenous sedation. PMID:16048152

  18. INTRANASAL DEXMEDETOMIDINE VS. INTRANASAL MIDAZOLAM FOR PREMEDICATION OF PAEDIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

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    Revi N

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM Preoperative anxiety is one of the most common problems faced by anyone practising paediatric anaesthesia. Various drugs have been used in various routes to get a calm but cooperative child before induction of anaesthesia. Midazolam and dexmedetomidine have already proved their value in paediatric premedication. This study was conducted to compare the effects of these two drugs given intranasally. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 children falling under the inclusion criteria were assigned to groups of 50 each. They received either intranasal midazolam 0.2 mg/kg (group M or intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 mcg/kg (Group D as premedication. They were compared with regards to the sedation status, anxiety levels and cardiovascular status every 10 minutes, at parental separation and at face mask application. RESULTS The mean sedation score obtained at all-time intervals, at parental separation and more importantly at mask induction were much lower for the midazolam group compared to the dexmedetomidine group. The mean anxiety levels, in general, were lower in the midazolam group, but they attained statistical significance only at 10 minutes and at mask induction. The heart rate measured up to 20 minutes after drug administration did not show much difference between both groups, but at 30 minutes, 40 minutes and at parental separation, heart rate was found to be lower in the dexmedetomidine group. CONCLUSION Intranasal dexmedetomidine and intranasal midazolam are equally effective in providing satisfactory parental separation, but intranasal midazolam produced superior conditions for mask acceptance than intranasal dexmedetomidine.

  19. Measuring Parent Time Scarcity and Fatigue as Barriers to Meal Planning and Preparation: Quantitative Scale Development

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    Storfer-Isser, Amy; Musher-Eizenman, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the psychometric properties of 9 quantitative items that assess time scarcity and fatigue as parent barriers to planning and preparing meals for their children. Methods: A convenience sample of 342 parents of children aged 2-6 years completed a 20-minute online survey. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine the…

  20. Pre-Medical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians

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    Long, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has examined the science and mathematics competencies that the graduating physician will need, and has asked which of these should be achieved during undergraduate study. The recommendations emphasize competency -- what the learner should be able to ``do'' at the end of the learning experience -- rather than dictating specific courses. Because the scientific content of modern medical practice is evolving, new science competencies are desirable for the entering medical student. An example is statistics, an increasingly prominent foundation for database and genomic analysis but which is not yet uniformly recommended as preparation for medical school. On the other hand, the committee believes that the value of a broad liberal arts education is enduring, and science coursework should not totally consume a premedical student's time. Thus if we recommend new areas of science and mathematics competency for pre-meds, we must find other areas that can be trimmed or combined. Indeed, at present there are some science topics mandated for premedical study, which may not be essential. For these reasons, the committee aims to state premedical recommendations in ways that can be met either through traditional disciplinary courses, or through innovative and/or interdisciplinary courses. Finally, we acknowledge that practice of medicine requires grounding in scientific principles and knowledge and in the practice of critical inquiry. These principles may be learned and practiced in undergraduate study through work in the physical

  1. Effect of Oral Midazolam Premedication on Children's Co-operation Before General Anesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry.

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    Kaviani, Nasser; Shahtusi, Mina; Haj Norousali Tehrani, Maryam; Nazari, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Premedication is expedient in reducing the psychological trauma from recalling the unpleasant pre-anesthetic phases, hence, inducing a trouble-free anesthesia. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of oral midazolam in co-operation of the subjects before general anesthesia and in recalling the pre-anesthetic phases, performed on children candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia. In this prospective clinical trial study, 62 healthy non-cooperative children, candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia, were randomly divided into study and control groups. The children received 20ml orange juice, 20 minutes before starting the anesthesia. The juice of the test group contained 0.5mg/kg of midazolam and that of the control group included no medication. The induction and the maintenance process of anesthesia were similar in both groups. The manner of subjects when separated from parents, their cooperation during intravenous catheterization, and recalling the pre-anesthetic events were recorded. Data were analyzed by adopting chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. Most of the children in the test group had a comfortable separation from parents, restful IV catheterization and 90% of the subjects did not recall the pre-anesthetic events. Under the circumstances of this study, it could be concluded that 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam premedication is effective for comfortable separation of children from parents and restful IV catheterization and also forgetting the pre-anesthetic events.

  2. PREMEDICATION PROTOCOLS IN DENTAL PRACTICE IN NON-ALLERGIC PATIENTS.

    OpenAIRE

    Angelina Kisselova; Adriana Krasteva; Assya Krasteva

    2011-01-01

    The aim is to present some of the most prescribed premedication schemes prior to an upcoming dental analgesia in non-allergic patients. These schemes we would like to be proved as “standard protocols” in dental practice.

  3. Postbaccalaureate premedical programs to promote physician-workforce diversity.

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    Andriole, Dorothy A; McDougle, Leon; Bardo, Harold R; Lipscomb, Wanda D; Metz, Anneke M; Jeffe, Donna B

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need for enhanced health-professions workforce diversity to drive excellence and to improve access to quality care for vulnerable and underserved populations. In the current higher education environment, post-baccalaureate premedical programs with a special focus on diversity, sustained through consistent institutional funding, may be an effective institutional strategy to promote greater health professions workforce diversity, particularly physician-workforce diversity. In 2014, 71 of the 200 programs (36%) in a national post-baccalaureate premedical programs data base identified themselves as having a special focus on groups underrepresented in medicine and/or on economically or educationally disadvantaged students. Three post-baccalaureate premedical programs with this focus are described in detail and current and future challenges and opportunities for post-baccalaureate premedical programs are discussed.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Fentanyl and Midazolam as a Premedication in Children Undergoing Inguinal Hernial Surgery

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    MH Abdollahi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Premedication with midazolam can occasionally result in increased pediatric anxiety. In this study, we compared the effects of intravenous midazolam and fentanyl as pediatric premedication in children posted for inguinal hernia surgery. Methods: In this double blind randomized clinical trial study, sixty pediatric patients were randomly allocated to two study groups. Anesthesia was similar in both groups. Sedation score by Richmond agitation sedation scale was repeatedly measured on arrival to the preoperative part of the operating room, during drug administration, separation of the child from parent for transfer to the operating room, induction of anesthesia, time of transfer to the recovery room and discharge from the recovery room. Post-operative nausea and vomiting was also recorded. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS 15 and P value<0.05 was considered meaningful. Results: Baseline characteristics of the two study groups were similar. Mean RASS at separation of patients from parents; the time between the study drug administrations till separation from parents, induction of anesthesia and end of operation and need for additional drug during separation was significantly lower in the midazolam group. Opioid need in the fentanyl group was higher. Other findings were similar in the two groups. Conclusion: Use of fentanyl instead of midazolam as a premedication is not a priority in children posted for surgery.

  5. Comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine for premedication in pediatrics patients: A randomized double-blind study

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    Bhat, Ravi; Santhosh, M.C.B.; Annigeri, Venkatesh M.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Goal of premedication in pediatric anesthesia are relieving pre and postoperative anxiety, good parental separation, and smooth induction of anesthesia. Anxiety can produce aggressive reactions, increased distress, increased postoperative pain and postoperative agitation. The benzodiazepine, midazolam, is the most frequently used premedication in pediatric anesthesia. Midazolam has a number of beneficial effects when used as premedication in children: Sedation, fast onset, and limited duration of action. Though midazolam has a number of beneficial effects, it is far from an ideal premedicant having untoward side effects such as paradoxical reaction, respiratory depression, cognitive impairment, amnesia, and restlessness. Dexmedetomidine is a newer α-2-agonist, which can be used as premedicant. Aims: To compare the level of sedation, parental separation, mask acceptance, postoperative recovery of intranasal premedication with dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine combination in pediatric patients. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized double-blind study. Subjects and Methods: After written informed consent from the patient's parents or legal guardian, 54 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged between 1 and 6 years, scheduled to undergo elective minor surgery were enrolled. In group D patient received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine intranasally and in group DK received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine intranasally. Patients were assessed every 10 min for the level of sedation, parenteral separation, heart rate, and oxygen saturation by an independent observer. Mask acceptance and postoperative agitation were noted using an appropriate scale. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson Chi-square analysis to determine differences between two groups with respect to separation anxiety and acceptance of the anesthesia mask. Percentages used to represent frequencies. The level of significance was set at P< 0

  6. The role of anxiolytic premedication in reducing preoperative anxiety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Jennifer K

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of preoperative anxiety with anxiolytic premedication is associated with improved preoperative outcomes in surgical patients. The objective of the authors\\' study was to evaluate the percentage of surgical patients that are prescribed premedication for preoperative anxiety before their anticipated surgical procedure. A prospective study was carried out by theatre nursing staff in the theatre reception bay of a university teaching hospital. A questionnaire was designed to record the number of patients that described symptoms consistent with preoperative anxiety. The number of patients that had been offered anxiolytic premedication for preoperative anxiety was also recorded. Consent was obtained from 115 consecutive surgical patients (male, n=52; female, n=63). Of these, 66% (n=76) reported anxiety before their surgical procedure (male: n=27, female: n=49). Premedication with a low-dose benzodiazepine was prescribed by an anaesthetist in 4% of cases (n=5). Patients that received premedication preoperatively reported effective relief of their anxiety symptoms This study demonstrates that preoperative patient anxiety is highly prevalent. The authors\\' findings suggest that premedication with anxiolytic pharmacological therapy may be an underused therapeutic resource for managing preoperative patient anxiety.

  7. IS ATOMIZED INTRANASAL MIDAZOLAM A NOVEL SEDATIVE PREMEDICATION IN PAEDIATRIC PATIENTS?

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    Savitri D. Kabade

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The successful conduct of anaesthesia in children depends on adequate premedication, which not only comforts the anxious child but also comforts the parents or guardians. Atomized Intranasal Midazolam is quickly absorbed through the nasal mucosa, resulting in a rapid and reliable onset of action. Clonidine has several applications in paediatric anaesthesia as a premedication and as an adjuvant in general as well as regional anaesthesia. Thus, in search of a novel premedication technique, we conducted a study to compare the effectiveness of atomized intranasal midazolam with intranasal clonidine for preoperative sedation in paediatric patients undergoing elective surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS After obtaining Institutional Ethical Committee clearance and parent’s consent, a prospective, randomised, double-blinded clinical study was conducted in 78 children of ASA I and II, belonging to 2 - 10 years age, posted for various elective surgery. Group M (n= 39 received atomized intranasal midazolam (0.3 mg/kg and Group C (n= 39 received clonidine (4 mcg/kg instilled into both the nostrils. Sedation score (Ramsay, separation score, mask acceptance, recovery and vital parameters were recorded. Statistical analysis of data was done using IBM-SPSS version 21.0. RESULTS Mean sedation scores (± SD were higher in Group M than in Group C (at 5th minute 1.58 ± 0.55 in Group M and 1.15 ± 0.36 in Group C with P= 0.002, at 10th minute 2.34 ± 0.97 in Group M and 1.75 ± 0.71 in Group C with P= 0.008. Separation scores and mask acceptance were better with Group M than Group C. Haemodynamic parameters were similar in both the groups and no major adverse effects were noted. CONCLUSION Atomized intranasal midazolam produces superior sedation levels, child-parent separation and mask acceptance compared to intranasal clonidine in children.

  8. Group-based antenatal birth and parent preparation for improving birth outcomes and parenting resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Axelsen, Solveig Forberg

    2013-01-01

    To examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of group based antenatal education for improving childbirth and parenting resources compared to auditorium based education.......To examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of group based antenatal education for improving childbirth and parenting resources compared to auditorium based education....

  9. Comparative evaluation of midazolam and butorphanol as oral premedication in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg with oral butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg as a premedication in 60 pediatric patients with regards to sedation, anxiolysis, rescue analgesic requirement, and recovery profile. Materials and Methods: In a double blinded study design, 60 pediatric patients belonging to ASA class I and II between the age group of 2-12 years scheduled for elective surgery were randomized to receive either oral midazolam (group I or oral butorphanol (group II 30 min before induction of anesthesia. The children were evaluated for levels of sedation and anxiety at the time of separation from the parents, venepuncture, and at the time of facemask application for induction of anesthesia. Rescue analgesic requirement, postoperative recovery, and complications were also recorded. Results: Butorphanol had better sedation potential than oral midazolam with comparable anxiolysis at the time of separation of children from their parents. Midazolam proved to be a better anxiolytic during venepuncture and facemask application. Butorphanol reduced need for supplemental analgesics perioperatively without an increase in side effects such as nausea, vomiting, or unpleasant postoperative recovery. Conclusion: Oral butorphanol is a better premedication than midazolam in children in view of its excellent sedative and analgesic properties. It does not increase side effects significantly.

  10. The Influence of a Combined Butorphanol and Midazolam Premedication on Anesthesia in Psittacid Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Marie; Roach, Louise; Eatwell, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    Premedication is considered routine for domestic animal and human anesthesia but is rarely applied to avian patients, and few controlled studies exist to document effects of premedication in avian species. To determine the effects of a butorphanol and midazolam premedication on general anesthesia and quality of induction and recovery phases in psittacid species, 17 clinically healthy birds undergoing anesthesia were randomly allocated into either a premedicated or control group. Anesthetic parameters were subsequently compared. Induction time and isoflurane concentration required for anesthetic maintenance were reduced in the premedicated group. Induction quality scores were improved in the premedicated group and no adverse effects on anesthesia and cardiovascular stability were observed. Use of a combined butorphanol and midazolam premedication in clinically healthy psittacine birds appears safe and effective. Premedication provides a beneficial effect at induction and enables maintenance levels of anesthetic gas to be reduced.

  11. Premedical enrichment program at East Carolina University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, V D

    1999-04-01

    The Summer Program for Future Doctors, which started in 1978 at East Carolina University School of Medicine, prepares underrepresented-minority (URM), disadvantaged, and nontraditional students for admission to medical school. The annual eight-week program, sponsored by the school's Academic Support and Counseling Center and funded by the school, is a two-pronged program targeting both premedical and pre-matriculating students. The program has 24 openings per year, with priority accorded to students matriculating at the medical school the following fall. The program covers learning strategies, test-taking skills, reading and comprehension tests, MCAT preparation, contemporary issues in the medical environment, scientific writing, communication skills, and medical school applications. Students who have demonstrated strong performances and consistent improvement in the summer program are likely to gain admission to medical school and perform satisfactorily, especially in their first year. Data collected from 1994-1997 indicate that of the 69 participants, 51 (74%) had applied to medical school, and 24 (47%) of them had been admitted, with 15 of these (63%) being URMs. In these four years of the program, there were twice as many women as men among the 69 participants, of which 60% were African Americans, 20% whites, 13% Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, 3% Native Americans, and 2% Hispanics. Although most of these participants pursued medical education, 12 chose other health professions; 13 students were in or had completed graduate school in basic science programs; and seven had not yet completed their under graduate degrees, although most planned to apply to medical school within the next few years.

  12. Effect of clonidine premedication on haemodynamic responses to fibreoptic bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matot, I; Kuras, Y; Kramer, M R

    2000-03-01

    The usual haemodynamic response to fibreoptic bronchoscopy is an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. We therefore compared, in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study, the effect of two doses of oral clonidine premedication (150 microg or 300 microg) with placebo (control group) on the haemodynamic alterations in 62 patients who underwent elective fibreoptic bronchoscopy. Significant increases in blood pressure and heart rate were observed during fibreoptic bronchoscopy only in the control group. Clonidine 150 microg blunted the haemodynamic response to fibreoptic bronchoscopy (p premedicated with 300 microg clonidine. Throughout the study nine patients (75%) in the 300 microg clonidine group were treated at least once for hypotension. Compared with the control group, time to awakening was significantly longer only in patients premedicated with 300 microg clonidine. In conclusion, premedication with 150 microg oral clonidine attenuates haemodynamic responses to fibreoptic bronchoscopy, without causing excessive haemodynamic depression and sedation. These data encourage the administration of clonidine as premedication in patients undergoing fibreoptic bronchoscopy, particularly in those with, or at risk for, coronary artery disease.

  13. SUBLINGUAL BUPRENORPHINE VS MIDAZOLAM FOR PREMEDICATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A HASANI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preanesthetic medication may reduce the risks of adverse psychological and physiological sequel of induction in children. Administration of premedication by sublingual route may provide the best compromise because of relatively rapid absorption without causing pain. In this study sedative and anxitolytic effects of sublingual midazolam and buprenorphine in children were compared. Methods. In a randomized, controlled, double blind clinical trial, one hundred and fifty children aged between 4 to 10 years in first or second class of ASA scheduled for adenotonsillectomy were divided in three equal groups. These groups recieved sublingual bupronorphine 3 µg/kg, midazolam 0.2 mg/kg and no premedication respectively. Cardiorespiratory variables were recorded from the time of premedication to awakening from anesthesia. Anxiety and sedation scores and patients acceptance of mask at induction were recorded using four point rating scales. Time of spontaneous eye opening and postoperative emesis occurrence were also recorded. Findings. Children recieving sublingual midazolam or buprenorphine had similar sedation, anxiety and mask acceptance scores, but different from no premedication group (P < 0.0001. None of the children experienced respiratory depression or oxygen desaturation after drug administration and during postoperative period. Time of spontaneous eye opening was longer in the midazolam group (P < 0.0001.Emetic episodes were similar in all groups. Conclusion. Midazolam is extensively studied and demonstrated that the drug is highly effective in alleviating anxiety and increasing cooperation. We concluded that sublingual buprenorphine is as effective as sublingual midazolam in providing sedation and anxitolysis for pediatric premedication.

  14. [Research and development of evaluation criteria for premedical curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinyoung; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Yoon, Hyun-Bae; Kim, Do-Hwan; Yoo, Dong-Mi; Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Seung-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop criteria to evaluate a premedical curriculum to ultimately improve the quality of premedical education. The first draft of the evaluation criteria was developed through a literature review and expert consultation. The Delphi survey was conducted to ensure the validity of the draft. The final premedical curriculum criteria consisted of three evaluation areas (curriculum development, curriculum implementation, and curriculum outcome), five evaluation items (educational objective, organization of curriculum, instructional method, class management,and educational outcome), and 18 evaluation indicators. There should be further discussion on the evaluation questionnaire and the content for each evaluation indicator with regard to its practical application. Also, a concrete evaluation system, including evaluation standards and rating scales, should be developed.

  15. First-time parents are not well enough prepared for the safety of their infant.

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    Mirjam E J van Beelen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unintentional falls and poisonings are major causes of death and disability among infants. Although guidelines are available to prevent these injuries, safety behaviours are not performed by parents, causing unnecessary risks. Little is known about safety behaviours of first-time parents and whether they behave according to these guidelines. AIMS/OBJECTIVES/PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to compare safety behaviours of first-time parents with those of non-first-time parents and to determine correlates of unsafe behaviour of parents of infants. We used self-report questionnaires to assess safety behaviours in a cross-sectional study sample. METHODS: A total of 1439 parents visiting a preventive youth healthcare centre in the Netherlands were invited to complete a questionnaire with regard to the prevention of falls and poisonings. Parents were categorized into first-time parents and non-first-time parents. Correlates of parents' child safety behaviours were determined using multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS/OUTCOME: Most respondents were mothers (93.2%; 48.2% of families were first-time parents. The mean age of the infants was 7.2 months (SD 1.1; range 4-12, 51.8% were boys, and 34.5% of infants could crawl. First-time parents were more likely not to have a stair gate installed (OR 16.46; 95% CI 12.36-21.93; were more likely to store cleaning products unsafely (OR 4.55; 95% CI 3.59-5.76; and were more likely to store medicines unsafely (OR 2.90; 95% CI 2.31-3.63 than non-first-time parents. First-time parents were more likely to not have a window guard installed (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.08-2.15 (all P<0.05. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: First-time parents are not well prepared for the safety of their infant, causing unnecessary risks. The various parents' safety behaviours were influenced by different variables, for example, age of the infant, crawling of the infant, mother's educational level, mother's ethnicity, self

  16. [Adverse hemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy and their possible suppression with clonidine premedication. Comparison with intravenous and intramuscular premedication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málek, J; Knor, J; Kurzová, A; Lopourová, M

    1999-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomies have adverse haemodynamic effects which limit their use in risk patients with heart disease. This applies in particular to significant hypertension. The etiology is analysed in detail in a review of the literature. The authors confirmed in their work involving 21 patients the incidence of these effects and tried to suppress them by premedication with clonidine (CATAPRESAN, Boehringer). 21 patients were given 0.15 mg clonidine in an infusion 15 minutes before operation and 21 patients 0.15 mg clonidine by the i.m. route 60-90 min. before operation. Standard anaesthesia was administered. A highly significant drop in the incidence of hypertension was recorded during operation for systolic pressure (p premedication). Premedication with intravenous clonidine can be recommended as a routine procedure before laparoscopic cholecystectomies.

  17. PREMEDICATION PROTOCOLS IN DENTAL PRACTICE IN NON-ALLERGIC PATIENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Kisselova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to present some of the most prescribed premedication schemes prior to an upcoming dental analgesia in non-allergic patients. These schemes we would like to be proved as “standard protocols” in dental practice.

  18. Premedication for neonatal intubation: Current practice in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Mosalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite strong evidence of the benefits of rapid sequence intubation in neonates, it is still infrequently utilized in neonatal intensive care units (NICU, contributing to avoidable pain and secondary procedure-related physiological disturbances. Objectives: The primary objective of this cross-sectional survey was to assess the practice of premedication and regimens commonly used before elective endotracheal intubation in NICUs in Saudi Arabia. The secondary aim was to explore neonatal physicians′ attitudes regarding this intervention in institutions across Saudi Arabia. Methods: A web-based, structured questionnaire was distributed by the Department of Pediatrics, Umm Al Qura University, Mecca, to neonatal physicians and consultants of 10 NICUs across the country by E-mail. Responses were tabulated and descriptive statistics were conducted on the variables extracted. Results: 85% responded to the survey. Although 70% believed it was essential to routinely use premedication for all elective intubations, only 41% implemented this strategy. 60% cited fear of potential side effects for avoiding premedication and 40% indicated that the procedure could be executed more rapidly without drug therapy. Treatment regimens varied widely among respondents. Conclusion: Rates of premedication use prior to non-emergent neonatal intubation are suboptimal. Flawed information and lack of unified unit policies hampered effective implementation. Evidence-based guidelines may influence country-wide adoption of this practice.

  19. Chemistry courses as the turning point for premedical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Donald A; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

    2010-03-01

    Previous research has documented that negative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factor that discourages many students from continuing in premedical studies. This adverse impact affects women and students from under-represented minority (URM) groups disproportionately. To determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a large public university, we surveyed 1,036 students from three entering cohorts at the University of California, Berkeley. We surveyed students at the beginning of their first year at the university and again at the end of their second year. All subjects had indicated an interest in premedical studies at the time they entered the university. We conducted follow-up interviews with a stratified sub-set of 63 survey respondents to explore the factors that affected their level of interest in premedical studies. Using a 10-point scale, we found that the strength of interest in premedical studies declined for all racial/ethnic groups. In the follow-up interviews, students identified chemistry courses as the principal factor contributing to their reported loss of interest. URM students especially often stated that chemistry courses caused them to abandon their hopes of becoming a physician. Consistent with reports over more than 50 years, it appears that undergraduate courses in chemistry have the effect of discouraging otherwise qualified students, as reflected in their admission to one of the most highly selective public universities in the US, from continuing in premedical studies, especially in the case of URM students. Reassessment of this role for chemistry courses may be overdue.

  20. The biologist's apprentices: A role for undergraduate research in premedical science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Philip

    This manuscript represents a project in two parts. Part one describes the perceptions of physicians, scientists and undergraduate researchers concerning if/why participation in undergraduate research is preparative for aspiring physicians. These communities in large part perceive that scientific habits appropriated through participation in professional research laboratories orient premedical students to medical classroom and clinical practices. Reasons for these perceptions are described. Topics of discussion include how these perceptions support descriptions of the nature of identities in communities of practice by situated cognition theorists. Part two describes the University-based undergraduate research experiences of four premedical students as they appropriate these selfsame habits. Themes in habit appropriation through these experiences are described in each case and across case studies. Patterns in habit appropriation which support the cognitive apprenticeship model of learning are also discussed. Situations comprising these experiences are described and discussed in terms of the convergence of these students' concurrent and desired future identities with their lived experiences as legitimate peripheral participants in the scientific community of practice. Formal and informal structures in the scientific community at the disciplinary, institutional and local levels were found to regulate the means and outcomes of scientific habit formation. Interplay between nascent scientific identities, established identities and desired physician identities were found to be of particular import to scientific enculturation through undergraduate research.

  1. Effect of Oral Midazolam Premedication on Children’s Co-operation Before General Anesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Nasser; Shahtusi, Mina; Haj Norousali Tehrani, Maryam; Nazari, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Premedication is expedient in reducing the psychological trauma from recalling the unpleasant pre-anesthetic phases, hence, inducing a trouble-free anesthesia. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of oral midazolam in co-operation of the subjects before general anesthesia and in recalling the pre-anesthetic phases, performed on children candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia. Materials and Method: In this prospective clinical trial study, 62 healthy non-cooperative children, candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia, were randomly divided into study and control groups. The children received 20ml orange juice, 20 minutes before starting the anesthesia. The juice of the test group contained 0.5mg/kg of midazolam and that of the control group included no medication. The induction and the maintenance process of anesthesia were similar in both groups. The manner of subjects when separated from parents, their cooperation during intravenous catheterization, and recalling the pre-anesthetic events were recorded. Data were analyzed by adopting chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Most of the children in the test group had a comfortable separation from parents, restful IV catheterization and 90% of the subjects did not recall the pre-anesthetic events. Conclusion: Under the circumstances of this study, it could be concluded that 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam premedication is effective for comfortable separation of children from parents and restful IV catheterization and also forgetting the pre-anesthetic events. PMID:25191661

  2. ТHE INFLUENCE OF PARENTS ON PREPARING A CHILD FOR SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Veličković

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : Starting school is an important developmental step / task not only for the child but also for their parents and family in which to grow up. The accomplishment of this task expands the boundaries of family / parent and the child's functioning in social, emotional and  cognitive sense. The aim of this paper is to highlight the need to educate the parents of the child going to school, which would contribute to parents with awareness and sensitivity to the nature of long-term process of entering the child's entry into school, to a child's socialization process related to school and proceeded in a favorable direction. The author emphasizes the importance of having a separate program prepares parents for the child starting school, as part of the annual program of preschools / schools that educators / teachers should realize and thus improve their educational work with one hand, while on the other hand its value will be reported in a balanced relation between child-school-family, but also to avert the potential emotional difficulties, or, the child's dysfunctional behavior. Participation of professional services and school teachers / teachers in the implementation of such programs can enhance compliance of educational values that are placed in front of the child in the family and in the school environment.

  3. Natural killer cell activity during premedication, anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, E; Mickley, H; Grunnet, N

    1983-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured against K-562 target cells in a 51Cr release assay in eight patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. Eight consecutive blood samples were taken from each patient. A significant increase of NK cell...... days. The findings of this study indicate that premedication, anaesthesia and surgery cause a rapid and transient increase in NK cell activity, followed by a decline in activity postoperatively. The transient increase in activity may be explained by mobilization of natural killer cells from extravasal...... activity was observed after premedication with diazepam per os. The activity increased further during a combined anaesthesia (thiopentone + N2O + O2 + buprenorphene + pancuronium) and remained increased during surgery. Postoperatively, NK cell activity fell and remained depressed for a period of at least 5...

  4. Use of triazolam and alprazolam as premedication for general anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Doyun; Lee, Seongheon; Pyeon, Taehee; Jeong, Seongwook

    2015-01-01

    Background Triazolam has similar pharmacological properties as other benzodiazepines and is generally used as a sedative to treat insomnia. Alprazolam represents a possible alternative to midazolam for the premedication of surgical patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic, sedative, and amnestic properties of triazolam and alprazolam as pre-anesthetic medications. Methods Sixty adult patients were randomly allocated to receive oral triazolam 0.25 mg or alprazolam 0.5...

  5. Comparison of Clonidine and Midazolam Premedication Before Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Results of Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wawrzyniak, Katarzyna; Kusza, Krzysztof; Cywinski, Jacek B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Premedication with clonidine has been found to reduce the bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS), therefore lowering the risk of surgical complications. Premedication is an essential part of pre-surgical care and can potentially affect magnitude of systemic stress response to a surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of premedication with clonidine and midazolam in patients undergoing sinus surgery. Methods Forty-four patients undergoing ESS fo...

  6. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students’ STEM preparation and career pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Christopher S.; Svoboda, Ryan C.; Harackiewicz, Judith M.; Hulleman, Chris S.; Hyde, Janet S.

    2017-01-01

    During high school, developing competence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally. Given the importance of STEM careers as drivers of modern economies, this deficiency in preparation for STEM careers threatens the United States’ continued economic progress. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term effects of a theory-based intervention designed to help parents convey the importance of mathematics and science courses to their high-school–aged children. A prior report on this intervention showed that it promoted STEM course-taking in high school; in the current follow-up study, we found that the intervention improved mathematics and science standardized test scores on a college preparatory examination (ACT) for adolescents by 12 percentile points. Greater high-school STEM preparation (STEM course-taking and ACT scores) was associated with increased STEM career pursuit (i.e., STEM career interest, the number of college STEM courses, and students’ attitudes toward STEM) 5 y after the intervention. These results suggest that the intervention can affect STEM career pursuit indirectly by increasing high-school STEM preparation. This finding underscores the importance of targeting high-school STEM preparation to increase STEM career pursuit. Overall, these findings demonstrate that a motivational intervention with parents can have important effects on STEM preparation in high school, as well as downstream effects on STEM career pursuit 5 y later. PMID:28096393

  7. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students' STEM preparation and career pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Christopher S; Svoboda, Ryan C; Harackiewicz, Judith M; Hulleman, Chris S; Hyde, Janet S

    2017-01-31

    During high school, developing competence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally. Given the importance of STEM careers as drivers of modern economies, this deficiency in preparation for STEM careers threatens the United States' continued economic progress. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term effects of a theory-based intervention designed to help parents convey the importance of mathematics and science courses to their high-school-aged children. A prior report on this intervention showed that it promoted STEM course-taking in high school; in the current follow-up study, we found that the intervention improved mathematics and science standardized test scores on a college preparatory examination (ACT) for adolescents by 12 percentile points. Greater high-school STEM preparation (STEM course-taking and ACT scores) was associated with increased STEM career pursuit (i.e., STEM career interest, the number of college STEM courses, and students' attitudes toward STEM) 5 y after the intervention. These results suggest that the intervention can affect STEM career pursuit indirectly by increasing high-school STEM preparation. This finding underscores the importance of targeting high-school STEM preparation to increase STEM career pursuit. Overall, these findings demonstrate that a motivational intervention with parents can have important effects on STEM preparation in high school, as well as downstream effects on STEM career pursuit 5 y later.

  8. Perspectives of Preservice and In-Service Teachers on Their Preparation to Work with Parents in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Zafer; Unal, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines preservice and in-service teachers' perspectives on their preparation in learning parental involvement strategies and explores their opinions on what kind of experiences regarding parental involvement they think teacher education programs should provide. The data from the study suggested that the preservice teachers held…

  9. Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication in clinical routine - an observational study : Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, C; Steurer, M P; Mueller, D; Zueger, M; Dullenkopf, A

    2016-10-24

    Midazolam is commonly used as a pre-anesthesia anxiolytic. It`s elimination may not be fast enough for short procedures. In orally premedicated patients we obtained midazolam plasma concentrations at the end of surgical procedures and compared those to concentrations at anesthesia induction. The study was conducted prospectively with consent of the local ethics committee (Ethikkomission Kanton Thurgau, Switzerland) and carried out with written informed consent of each patient. Female patients aged 20 to 60 years undergoing elective procedures with general anesthesia were included, and were divided in two groups according to the planned surgical time: group S (Midazolam po as premedication. Blood samples were drawn at anesthesia induction, and at the end of surgery. Data were compared with t-test (independent samples; significance level p midazolam was not detectable in any samples. Time of premedication to the 1st blood sample was not statistically different between groups, neither were Midazolam plasma levels at this time point (p = 0.94). None of the patients from group L (n = 24), but five patients in group S (n = 22) did have a higher plasma level of Midazolam at the end of the case compared to the beginning. The elimination half-life of oral Midazolam can lead to higher plasma levels at the end of a short procedure compared to those at induction of anesthesia. German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien), DRKS00005429 ; date of registration 3(rd) January 2014.

  10. Quantifying parental preferences for interventions designed to improve home food preparation and home food environments during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virudachalam, Senbagam; Chung, Paul J; Faerber, Jennifer A; Pian, Timothy M; Thomas, Karen; Feudtner, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Though preparing healthy food at home is a critical health promotion habit, few interventions have aimed to improve parental cooking skills and behaviors. We sought to understand parents' preferences and priorities regarding interventions to improve home food preparation practices and home food environments during early childhood. We administered a discrete choice experiment using maximum difference scaling. Eighty English-speaking parents of healthy 1-4 year-old children rated the relative importance of potential attributes of interventions to improve home food preparation practices and home food environments. We performed latent class analysis to identify subgroups of parents with similar preferences and tested for differences between the subgroups. Participants were mostly white or black 21-45 year-old women whose prevalence of overweight/obesity mirrored the general population. Latent class analysis revealed three distinct groups of parental preferences for intervention content: a healthy cooking group, focused on nutrition and cooking healthier food; a child persuasion group, focused on convincing toddlers to eat home-cooked food; and a creative cooking group, focused on cooking without recipes, meal planning, and time-saving strategies. Younger, lower income, 1-parent households comprised the healthy cooking group, while older, higher income, 2-parent households comprised the creative cooking group (p food preparation practices. Such interventions are important for creating healthier home food environments and preventing obesity starting from early childhood.

  11. The undergraduate premedical experience in the United States: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Katherine Y; Parnami, Sonali; Fuhrel-Forbis, Andrea; Anspach, Renee R; Crawford, Brett; De Vries, Raymond G

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the consequences of the premedical years for the character of (future) physicians by critically reviewing the empirical research done on the undergraduate premedical experience in the United States. We searched ERIC, JSTOR, PubMed, Scopus, ISI Web of Science, and PsycINFO from the earliest available date for empirical, peer-reviewed studies of premedical students in the United States. We then used qualitative methods to uncover overall themes present in this literature. The initial literature search identified 1,168 articles, 19 of which were included for review. Reviewed articles were published between 1976 and 2010 with the majority published prior to 1990. Articles covered two broad topics: explaining attrition from the premedical track, and investigating the personality traits and stereotypes of premedical students. Self-selection bias and high attrition rates were among the limitations of the reviewed articles. There is very little current research on the premedical experience. Given the importance of the premedical years on the process of becoming a medical professional, it is imperative that we do more and better research on how the premedical experience shapes future physicians.

  12. [Combined premedication at adenectomy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishunin, Iu V; Kamanin, E I; Erokhov, S A; Nikiforov, A V; Bannova, I A

    2003-01-01

    Adenoid vegetation is a frequent pathology in children, and adenotomy (AT) is the only method of its treatment. The problem of anesthesia at AT has always remained an acute one: the risk of general anesthesia exceeds manifold the risk of intervention itself. At the same time, the local anesthesia is not always an method, therefore, the authors put the goal to improve it through potentiating. A total of 180 children, aged 3 to 14, were divided into several groups; anesthesia at AT was implemented according to the below described methods and with regard for the age-related doses of preparations: Group 1--a 2% lydocain solution administered endonasally (e/n); Group 2--lydocain plus diazepam solution administered e/n; Group 3--same preparations and 50% metamizol solution administered e/n; Group 4--lydocain, metamizol e/n, and diazepam administered transbuccally, i.e. chewing gum; Group 5--a 4% articain solution and metamizol e/n plus diazepam administered transbuccally; Group 6--the same technique after a preliminary administration of lydocain; Group 7--clonidine, administered transbuccally, was added. The adequacy of anesthesia was evaluated by using the parameters of the vegetative nervous system and hemodynamics. It was demonstrated that the administration of lydocain alone leads to a sharp activation of the sympathoadrenal system; metamizol and diazepam, especially when administered transbuccally, contribute to an enhanced efficiency of anesthesia, while the endonasal administration of articain and metamizol, after a preliminary introduction of lydocain, combined with the transbuccal administration of diazepam and clonidine is the most optimal variant, however, this method can not be acknowledged as an ideal one and needs further improvement.

  13. Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M Al-Mazrou

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels. The GPA of premedical year is a useful predictor of students who need close monitoring and academic support. The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

  14. Premedication with oral Dextromethorphan reduces intra-operative Morphine requirement

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    R Talakoub

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intra-operative pain has adverse effects on hemodynamic parameters. Due to complications of opioids for pain relief, using non-opioids medication is preferred. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of oral dextrometorphan premedication on intra-operative Morphine requirement. Methods: After approval of the Ethics committee and informed consent, 40 adult patients who stand in American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II, under general anesthesia for elective laparatomy were selected and classified in two equal groups randomly. In group A, oral dextromethorphan (60mg was administered at 10 PM and 6 AM preoperatively. In group B, placebo (dextrose was administered. After induction of general anesthesia and before skin incision, intravenous morphine (0.01 mg/kg was administered. During surgery, when systolic blood pressure or heart rate was increased more than 20% of the preoperative baseline, 0.01 mg/kg morphine was administered. At the end of surgery, the totally prescribed morphine (mg/kg and maximal increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate relative to the baseline values were calculated and statistically compared with student’s t-test. Results: The mean dose of administered morphine during surgery was significantly less in group A than group B (P<0.0001. Also, Maximal increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure was significantly less in group A (p<0.003, p<0.004, p<0.0001, respectively. There was no significant difference in maximal heart rate increase between two groups (p<0.114. Conclusion: Oral dextromethorphan premedication may decrease intra-operative morphine requirement and reduce maximal increase in systolic and mean arterial blood pressure during surgery. Key words: Dextromethorphan, Morphine, Intra-operative, Premedication Hemodynamic

  15. Premedical anatomy experience and student performance in medical gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, Peter; McDaniel, Dalton J; Jordan, Rebecca M

    2017-04-01

    Gross anatomy is considered one of the most important basic science courses in medical education, yet few medical schools require its completion prior to matriculation. The effect of taking anatomy courses before entering medical school on performance in medical gross anatomy has been previously studied with inconsistent results. The effect of premedical anatomy coursework on performance in medical gross anatomy, overall medical school grade point average (GPA), and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 1 (COMLEX 1) score was evaluated in 456 first-year osteopathic medical students along with a survey on its perceived benefits on success in medical gross anatomy course. No significant differences were found in gross anatomy grade, GPA, or COMLEX 1 score between students with premedical anatomy coursework and those without. However, significant differences and higher scores were observed in students who had taken three or more undergraduate anatomy courses including at least one with cadaveric laboratory. There was significantly lower perceived benefit for academic success in the medical gross anatomy course (P<.001) from those students who had taken premedical anatomy courses (5.9 of 10) compared with those who had not (8.2 of 10). Results suggest that requiring any anatomy course as a prerequisite for medical school would not have significant effect on student performance in the medical gross anatomy course. However, requiring more specific anatomy coursework including taking three or more undergraduate anatomy courses, one with cadaveric laboratory component, may result in higher medical gross anatomy grades, medical school GPA, and COMLEX 1 scores. Clin. Anat. 30:303-311, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Premedication in an autistic, combative child: Challenges and nuances

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    S Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with autistic spectrum disorders are often encountered in anesthesia practice mainly for outdoor procedural sedation or anesthesia in endoscopy and magnetic resonance imaging suites. We describe a case of a 7-year-old autistic boy who required management of dental caries. He had a phobia to intravenous cannulation, displayed increasing anxiety and became combative on the day of surgery. With parental involvement and distraction, we succeeded in giving oral midazolam by concealing it, with the intent of avoiding intramuscular injection or unnecessary restraint. Lack of knowledge about the medical condition of such a patient can lead to inadequate preoperative preparation and use of restraint on the patient, which might cause anxiety or panic attacks in the operative room. To effectively manage children with special needs one needs to have clear guidelines on the management of uncooperative children, involve parents perioperatively, plan ahead with an emphasis on perioperative analgesia and sometimes incorporate the ethical use of restraint.

  17. Prepare Your Child For Reading Tests: Tips for Parents = Prepare a sus hijos para tomar pruebas de lectura: Ideas para padres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Tori Mello

    Parents can help their children prepare for reading tests in a number of ways, not only just before the test, but also with everyday activities. There are generally two types of reading tests given to students: tests given by teachers throughout the year to see what information students have retained, and more formal, often standardized, tests…

  18. Does oral clonidine premedication decrease bleeding during open rhinoplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Reza; Eftekharian, Hamidreza; Pourdanesh, Freydoun; Khaghaninejad, Mohammad Saleh

    2014-05-01

    This uni-blind randomized clinical trial study investigated the effect of clonidine premedication on preoperative blood loss during open rhinoplasty. The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups. The members of the first group received oral clonidine as a single dose (0.2 mg) 2 hours before the induction of general anesthesia, whereas the members of the second group received a placebo. All subjects underwent open rhinoplasty without septoplasty. One anesthetic protocol was followed for all subjects. Variable factors include the subjects' weight, age, sex, and blood pressure during the surgery as well as blood loss during rhinoplasty. Group 1 consisted of 22 women and 11 men, whereas group 2 was composed of 16 women and 17 men. The mean for blood loss amounted to 68.03 ± 22.49 mL for group 1 and 132.12 ± 78.53 mL for group 2. An assessment demonstrated a significant difference in blood loss between the 2 groups (P clonidine premedication thus may decrease preoperative bleeding during open rhinoplasty.

  19. Effect of Oral Midazolam Premedication on Children’s Co-operation Before General Anesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry

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    Nasser Kaviani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Premedication is expedient in reducing the psychological trauma from recalling the unpleasant pre-anesthetic phases, hence, inducing a trouble-free anesthesia. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of oral midazolam in co-operation of the subjects before general anesthesia and in recalling the pre-anesthetic phases, performed on children candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia. Materials and Method: In this prospective clinical trial study, 62 healthy non-cooperative children, candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia, were randomly divided into study and control groups. The children received 20ml orange juice, 20 minutes before starting the anesthesia. The juice of the test group contained 0.5mg/kg of midazolam and that of the control group included no medication. The induction and the maintenance process of anesthesia were similar in both groups. The manner of subjects when separated from parents, their cooperation during intravenous catheterization, and recalling the pre-anesthetic events were recorded. Data were analyzed by adopting chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Most of the children in the test group had a comfortable separation from parents, restful IV catheterization and 90% of the subjects did not recall the pre-anesthetic events. Conclusion: Under the circumstances of this study, it could be concluded that 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam premedication is effective for comfortable separation of children from parents and restful IV catheterization and also forgetting the pre-anesthetic events.

  20. Is premedication with midazolam more effective by the sublingual than the oral route?

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Shobhana; Gadani, Hina; Kedia, Shravan

    2011-01-01

    Background: In this study, we compared the sedative effects of sublingual midazolam solution with the oral tablet as premedication. Sixty pediatric patients of ASA physical status I and II were randomly selected to receive either 0.5 mg/kg of tablet or 0.5 mg/kg of sublingual solution of midazolam as premedication, about 45 min before elective surgery. Materials and Methods: There were 30 patients in each group. In Group I, the patients received premedication in the form of oral midazolam tab...

  1. Oral premedication with pregabalin and clonidine for hemodynamic stability during laryngoscopy: A comparative study

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    Asmita Chaudhary

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Hemodynamic pressure response of airway instrumentation was attenuated with pregabalin and clonidine oral premedication without prolongation of recovery time and side effects. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 294-299

  2. Anaphylactic reaction to polyethylene-glycol conjugated-asparaginase: premedication and desensitization may not be sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahiner, Umit M; Yavuz, S Tolga; Gökce, Muge; Buyuktiryaki, Betul; Altan, Ilhan; Aytac, Selin; Tuncer, Murat; Tuncer, Ayfer; Sackesen, Cansin

    2013-08-01

    In hypersensitive reactions to native L-asparaginase, either premedication and desensitization or substitution with polyethylene glycol conjugated asparaginase (PEG-ASP) is preferred. Anaphylaxis with PEG-ASP is rare. An 8-year-old girl and a 2.5-year-old boy, both diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukemia, presented with native L-asparaginase hypersensitivity and substitution with PEG-ASP was preferred. They received a premedication (methylprednisolone, hydroxyzine and ranitidine) followed by desensitization with PEG-ASP infusion. Both patients developed anaphylaxis with peg-asparaginase. These are the first reported cases of anaphylactic reaction to PEG-ASP, despite the application of both premedication and desensitization. Anaphylaxis with PEG-ASP is very rare and premedication and desensitization protocols may not prevent these hypersensitive reactions. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Outcomes of premedication for non-ionic radio-contrast media hypersensitivity reactions in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sae-Hoon, E-mail: imimdr@yahoo.co.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Hee, E-mail: lshsophia@hanmail.net [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Min, E-mail: sangminlee77@naver.com [Department of Internal Medicine, The Korean Armed Force Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hye-Ryun, E-mail: helenmed@hanmail.net [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heung-Woo, E-mail: guineapark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-Sin, E-mail: ssksting@hanmail.net [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Heon, E-mail: shcho@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Background: Radio-contrast media (CM)-related adverse reactions are important clinical problems that may cause fatal anaphylaxis. Accordingly, it has been common practice to premedicate patients who have had previous reactions to CM with corticosteroids, antihistamines, and H2 blockers to prevent hypersensitive reactions. However, the effectiveness of premedication has not been properly demonstrated, especially in cases related to non-ionic CM. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of premedication at preventing of non-ionic CM immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. Methods: A total of 30 patients who had been pretreated with corticosteroid and H1 antihistamines and/or H2 blockers in a 3-year period were enrolled. The results of premedication were evaluated in terms of clinical characteristics and the features of breakthrough reactions. Results: Hypersensitivity reactions were not prevented in 5 of the 30 patients who had experienced prior CM reactions (overall recurrence rate after premedication 16.7%; 4/17 patients with mild previous reactions, and 1/13 patients with severe previous reactions). The recurrence rate after premedication was significantly higher in patients with mild previous reactions than in those with severe reactions (23.5% vs. 7.7%; p < 0.001). The breakthrough reactions were similar to the prior reactions in terms of severity and clinical manifestations. Conclusion: Premedication with corticosteroid and H1 antihistamines and/or H2 blockers effectively prevent non-ionic CM-related adverse events in most patients who have had severe previous reactions to CM. However, physicians should be aware of the possibility of premedication failing and of breakthrough reactions, even in cases in which the previous reactions were mild.

  4. Competencies as the basis for reformed premedical education. The case for an unrestricted liberal arts collegiate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Nathan; Muller, David

    2012-01-01

    As the HHMI-AAMC declared, their report should be taken as a "first step in a continuing conversation about the appropriate skills and knowledge," and, echoing the ACGME and GPEP, "values and attitudes that future physicians should possess." (9pExecSum) As a new formulation evolves, the premedical curriculum must foster "scholastic vigor, analytic thinking, quantitative assessment and analysis of complex systems." (9pExecSum) Based on the Mount Sinai experience, these qualities are not engendered solely nor confined to engagement in natural sciences. Students involved in a variety of baccalaureate liberal arts endeavors appear to acquire similar intellectual competencies. Furthermore, when performed successfully in challenging collegiate environments, a thorough liberal arts education may yield precisely the same values, attitudes, and behavioral characteristics all agree are essential to the medical profession and preparing physicians for the twenty-first century.

  5. The Effect of Oral Dexmedetomidine Premedication on Preoperative Cooperation and Emergence Delirium in Children Undergoing Dental Procedures

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    Sultan Keles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of 1 μg/kg of oral dexmedetomidine (DEX as premedication among children undergoing dental procedures. Materials and Methods. The study involved 100 children between 2 and 6 years of age, ASA I, who underwent full-mouth dental rehabilitation. The DEX group (n=50 received 1 μg/kg DEX in apple juice, and the control group (n=50 received only apple juice. The patients’ scores on the Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS, parental separation anxiety scale, mask acceptance scale, and pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale (PAEDS and hemodynamic parameters were recorded. The data were analyzed using chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Student’s t-test, and analysis of variance in SPSS. Results. RSS scores were significantly higher in the DEX group than group C at 15, 30, and 45 min (p<0.05. More children (68% easy separation, 74% satisfactory mask acceptance in the DEX group showed satisfactory ease of parental separation and mask acceptance behavior (p<0.05. There was no significant difference in the PAEDS scores and mean hemodynamic parameters of both groups. Conclusions. Oral DEX administered at 1 μg/kg provided satisfactory sedation levels, ease of parental separation, and mask acceptance in children but was not effective in preventing emergence delirium. The trial was registered (Protocol Registration Receipt NCT03174678 at clinicaltrials.gov.

  6. Effects of oral premedication on cognitive status of elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javed M Ashraf; Marc Schweiger; Neelima Vallurupalli; Sandra Bellantonio; James R Cook

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedatives and analgesics are often administered to achieve conscious sedation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Appropriate concerns have been raised regarding post procedure delirium related to peri-procedural medication in the elderly. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of premedication on new onset delirium and procedural care in elderly patients. Methods Patients≥70 years old and scheduled for elective cardiac catheterization were randomly assigned to receive either oral diphenhydramine and diaze-pam (25 mg/5 mg) or no premedication. All patients underwent a mini mental state exam and delirium assessment using confusion assess-ment method prior to the procedure and repeated at 4 h after the procedure and prior to discharge. Patients’ cooperation during the procedure and ease of post-procedure were measured using Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The degree of alertness was assessed immediately on arrival to the floor, and twice hourly afterwards using Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled. The mean age was 77 years, and 47 patients received premedication prior to the procedure. None of the patients in either group developed delirium. Patients’ cooperation and the ease of procedure was greater and pain medication requirement less both during and after the procedure in the pre-medicated group (P < 0.05 for both). Nurses reported an improvement with patient management in the pre-medicated group (P=0.08). Conclusions In conclusion, premedication did not cause delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The reduced pain medication requirement, perceived procedural ease and post procedure management favors premedication in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

  7. Application of 'writing for healing' in premedical humanities education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Jae Yu; Yeh, Byung Il

    2012-09-01

    There has been a recent tendency to attach special importance to writing education. Books on 'writing to heal' are being written in or translated into Korean. According to these texts, writing is a valuable tool for internal healing, depending on the mode of application. Writing can have positive effects and give hope to an individual or group, but it can also be a source of frustration and despair. Based on the distinct effects of writing, we cannot overemphasize the significance of writing education. Writing is generally taught during a premedical course that targets students who will eventually practice medicine. Many reports have examined immorality in medical students and health care providers, which is a reason that writing education is important for medical systems. 'Writing for Healing' is open to freshmen at Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine. The aim of this subject is to help students identify and acknowledge internal diseases to lead a healthier life and eventually become positive and responsible health care providers. However, in addition to the vague definition of what 'healing' is, the concept of 'writing for healing' has not been defined. This paper attempts to define the concept of 'writing for healing' and considers what influences it can have on a humanities curriculum in medical colleges.

  8. Multimodal Preincisional Premedication to Prevent Acute Pain After Cholecystectomy

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    Dawood Aghamohammadi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative pain as an important medical concern is usually treated by opioids which also are of various inevitable side effects. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of multimodal preincisional premedication on preventing post-cholecystectomy acute pain. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, sixty patients undergoing open cholecystectomy were randomized into two groups. Before anesthesia induction, Diclofenac suppository (100 mg and oral Clonidine (0.2 mg were administered in the first group. Immediately before operation, patients received Ketamine (1 mg/kg IV while the control group received placebo. The site of incision was infiltrated by the surgeon with 20 mL Bupivacaine 0.25% in both groups. Anesthesia induction and maintenance were similar in both groups. The severity of pain was recorded 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after operation according to Visual Analogue Scale. Results: The severity of pain at two defined stages (6 and 12 hours later was significantly less in the intervention group than the control group (P<0.005. The average pain severity score was less than the control group (P<0.005. Conclusion: In our study, the administration of Clonidine, Diclofenac and Ketamine and bupivacaine infiltration to the site of incision, altogether was associated with a significant decrease in pain score and opioid requirement after cholecystectomy in comparison to bupivacaine infiltration to the site of incision.

  9. Oral clonidine premedication exacerbates hypotension following tourniquet deflation by inhibiting noradrenaline release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Koichi; Takeda, Shinhiro; Hongo, Takashi; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Kim, Chol; Ogawa, Ryo

    2004-02-01

    Clonidine premedication prevents tourniquet pain and reduces sympathetic nerve activity. We evaluated hemodynamic changes and catecholamine release following tourniquet deflation during spinal anesthesia in patients who received oral clonidine premedication. The final analysis included 24 otherwise healthy patients undergoing lower-limb surgery randomly assigned to two groups: those receiving approximately 5 micrograms/kg of oral clonidine 1 hr before anesthesia (clonidine group, n = 12), and those receiving no premedication (control group, n = 12). After lumbar anesthesia, a tourniquet was applied for approximately 60 minutes to each patient. Electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, and consumption of butorphanol for tourniquet pain were monitored. Blood samples were obtained at different times to measure serum concentration of catecholamine. In the clonidine group, mean blood pressure decreased from 87 +/- 7 mmHg at baseline to 65 +/- 10 mmHg after tourniquet deflation (P clonidine group was significantly lower than in the control group. After receiving clonidine premedication, the plasma noradrenaline concentrations in the clonidine group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Noradrenaline concentration increased in the control group from 162.3 +/- 89.2 pg/mL before tourniquet deflation to 199.3 +/- 95.7 pg/mL afterward (P clonidine group. We conclude that oral clonidine premedication exacerbated the reduction in mean blood pressure following tourniquet deflation by inhibiting noradrenaline release.

  10. The effect of play distraction on anxiety before premedication administration: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumin Aydın, Gözde; Yüksel, Serhat; Ergil, Jülide; Polat, Reyhan; Akelma, Fatma Kavak; Ekici, Musa; Sayın, Murat; Odabaş, Öner

    2017-02-01

    The majority of children scheduled to undergo surgery experience substantial anxiety in the preoperative holding area before induction of anesthesia. Pharmacological interventions aimed at reducing perioperative anxiety are paradoxically a source of stress for children themselves. Midazolam is frequently used as premedication, and the formula of this drug in Turkey is bitter. We aimed to assess the role of distraction in the form of playing with play dough (Play-Doh) on reducing premedication anxiety in children. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Preoperative holding area. One hundred four healthy children aged 3 to 7 years scheduled to undergo elective surgery were enrolled into the study. All children routinely receive sedative premedication (oral midazolam) before anesthesia. Children were randomized to 2 groups to receive either play dough (group PD) (n=52) or not (group C) (n=52) before administration of oral premedication. Children's premedication anxiety was determined by the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS). The difference in mYPAS scores between groups at T0 (immediately after entering the preoperative holding area) was not significant (P=.876). Compared with group C, group PD was associated with lower mYPAS scores at T1 and T2 (P.001). This study showed that distraction in the form of playing with play dough facilitated administration of oral midazolam in young children. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Premedicación en anestesia pediátrica: citrato de fentanilo oral transmucoso frente a midazolam oral Premedication in paediatric anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Velázquez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La premedicación anestésica está destinada a reducir la ansiedad y la respuesta al estrés que supone el período anterior a la intervención quirúrgica. El temor a lo desconocido, al dolor y la separación de los padres son elementos que se añaden a la ansiedad perioperatoria en la población pediátrica. La necesidad de encontrar una vía de administración idónea en niños que no añada más sufrimientos a los ya existentes, es un reto para los anestesiólogos. Objetivo: Los objetivos del presente estudio eran valorar la eficacia, el grado de sedación y el modo de aceptación de 2 modalidades de premedicación para niños: citrato de fentanilo oral transmucoso (CFOT y midazolam oral disuelto en zumo de fruta. Material y método: Se estudiaron 2 grupos aleatorizados de 40 niños que iban a someterse a cirugía de diversas especialidades. Las dosis administradas fueron de 10 μg/kg de CFOT y 0,3 mg/kg de midazolam, administrados 30 minutos antes de la punciσn venosa. Las variables consideradas fueron: saturaciσn de hemoglobina desde el inicio de la premedicaciσn y en la sala de despertar, modo de aceptaciσn, grado de sedaciσn, actitud del niρo al separarlo de los padres, ante la punción venosa y ante la inducción anestésica, retraso en el despertar, requerimiento de analgesia postoperatoria, aparición de efectos secundarios. Resultados: Los resultados se compararon utilizando la t de Student (p Introduction: The aim of anaesthetic premedication is to reduce anxiety and stress prior to surgery. Paediatric patients suffer even more anxiety due to fear of the unknown and the separation from parents. The need to find out a suitable way of administering premedication to paediatric patients without causing any more trauma is a challenge for the anaesthesiologist. Objectives: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy, level of sedation and a way of accepting two different types of premedication for

  12. Premedication with clonidine versus fentanyl for intraoperative hemodynamic stability and recovery outcome during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Kumkum; Lakhanpal, Mahima; Prashant K.Gupta; Krishan, Atul; Rastogi, Bhawna; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia induced intraoperative hemodynamic responses which should be attenuated by appropriate premedication. The present study was aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of clonidine and fentanyl premedication during laparoscopic cholecystectomy for attenuation of hemodynamic responses with postoperative recovery outcome. Subjects and Methods: In this prospective randomized double blind study 64 adult consented patients of either sex ...

  13. Premedication with N-acetylcysteine and simethicone improves mucosal visualization during gastroscopy: a randomized, controlled, endoscopist-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, James R; James, Shirley; Callaghan, James; Patel, Praful

    2013-07-01

    Diagnostic gastroscopy provides a unique opportunity to diagnose early oesophagogastric neoplasia; however, intraluminal mucus and bile can obscure mucosal visualization. The aim of this study was to determine whether the use of a premedication solution containing the mucolytic agent N-acetylcysteine and the surfactant simethicone improves mucosal visualization within a UK diagnostic gastroscopy service. A total of 75 consecutive patients were recruited from a single (S.J.) endoscopist's diagnostic gastroscopy list. They were randomized into three treatment groups: (a) standard control=clear fluids only for 6 h, nil by mouth for 2 h; (b) water control=standard control+100 ml sterile water (given 20 min before gastroscopy); and (c) solution=standard control+100 ml investigated solution (20 min before gastroscopy). The endoscopist was blinded to patient preparation. Inadequate mucosal visualization was defined as fluid/mucus during gastroscopy that could not be suctioned and required flushing with water. The volume of flush, the site at which it was used and the total procedure times were recorded. All three groups showed no statistical difference for age, sex ratio, procedure priority or indication. The mean volume of flush required to obtain clear mucosa was significantly less in the solution group compared with the other groups. The mean overall procedure time was also less in the solution group compared with the other groups. Premedication with N-acetylcysteine and simethicone markedly improves mucosal visibility during gastroscopy. It also reduces the time taken for the procedure. This low-cost and well-tolerated intervention may improve detection of early neoplasia.

  14. Should we tell Annie? Preparing for death at the intersection of parental authority and adolescent autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Erica K

    2013-01-01

    This case analysis examines the pediatric clinical ethics issues of adolescent autonomy and parental authority in medical decision-making. The case involves a dying adolescent whose parents request that the medical team withhold diagnosis and prognosis information from the patient. The analysis engages two related ethical questions: Should Annie be given information about her medical condition? And, who is the proper decision-maker in Annie's case? Ultimately, four practical recommendations are offered.

  15. Giving toys to children reduces their anxiety about receiving premedication for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Leonard; Pagala, Murali; Sukhavasi, Sujatha; Nagpal, Dheeraj; Ahmad, Ayeesha; Mahanta, Aruna

    2006-04-01

    Children have increased anxiety during the preoperative period. The administration of oral premedication to children is often met with apprehension, reluctance, or refusal. We sought to determine whether giving a small toy to the children would decrease the anxiety associated with taking oral premedication. This was a prospective study involving 100 children 3-6 yr of age randomized into two equal groups. The anxiety of each child was assessed using the Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale. The results showed significantly less anxiety in children who received a toy before oral administration of midazolam.

  16. Parents as Partners for Preparing Deaf Students for Bi-Bi Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, Carol J.; Metzger, Melanie A.

    This paper describes Bilingual-Bicultural (BiBi) instructional programs for students with hearing impairments and proposes a model for BiBi instruction which uses parents as partners with instructors to develop the linguistic abilities of hearing-impaired students. In the model, traditionally spoken languages are conveyed via cued speech instead…

  17. First-Time Parents Are Not Well Enough Prepared for the Safety of Their Infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E.J. van Scholing-van Beelen (Mirjam); T.M.J. Beirens (Tinneke); P. den Hertog (Paul); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); H. Raat (Hein)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Unintentional falls and poisonings are major causes of death and disability among infants. Although guidelines are available to prevent these injuries, safety behaviours are not performed by parents, causing unnecessary risks. Little is known about safety behaviours of first-

  18. The World Ahead: Black Parents Prepare Their Children for Pride and Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Presents interviews with Blacks about past experiences with racial discrimination and the impact of integration and prejudice on their children. Discusses the importance of parental guidance in teaching young Blacks about their cultural heritage and how to cope with prejudice and discrimination. (SA)

  19. Preparing the Field for Feasibility Testing of a Parenting Intervention for War-Affected Mothers in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieling, Elizabeth; Mehus, Christopher; Yumbul, Cigdem; Möllerherm, Julia; Ertl, Verena; Laura, Achan; Forgatch, Marion; Neuner, Frank; Catani, Claudia

    2015-10-26

    In this article, we discuss the successful implementation of an adapted evidence-based parenting intervention for families affected by two decades of war in Northern Uganda. The adaptation and adoption of such interventions to support mental health and family functioning is widely endorsed by prevention scientists and considered a priority in global mental health. The preparation and early adoption phases of engaging with a highly vulnerable community affected by war trauma are documented in this paper along with a discussion of the steps taken to adapt a parenting intervention for cultural and contextual fit. This study is a component of an overall program of research aimed at reducing the long-term negative effects of war on parenting practices and childhood outcomes, which have considerable implications for preventing mental, neurological, and substance-use disorders. The processes described here cover a 4-year period culminating in the implementation of the nine-session Enhancing Family Connection intervention piloted with a group of 14 mothers. The lessons in cultural adaptation have been valuable and the feasibility results promising for further testing the intervention.

  20. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups - Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results : The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion : Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway.

  1. Competencies in premedical and medical education: the AAMC-HHMI report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpern, Robert J; Belitsky, Richard; Long, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Flexner emphasized the importance of science in medicine and medical education. Over the subsequent years, science education in the premedical and medical curricula has changed little, in spite of the vast changes in the biomedical sciences. The National Research Council, in their report Bio 2010, noted that the premedical curriculum caused many students to lose interest in medicine and in the biological sciences in general. Many medical students and physicians have come to view the premedical curriculum as of limited relevance to medicine and designed more as a screening mechanism for medical school admission. To address this, the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute formed a committee to evaluate the premedical and medical school science curricula. The committee made a number of recommendations that are summarized in this essay. Most important were that competencies replace course requirements and that the physical sciences and mathematics be better integrated with the biological sciences and medicine. The goal is that all physicians possess a strong scientific knowledge base and come to appreciate the importance of this to the practice of medicine. While science education needs to evolve, Flexner's vision is as relevant today as it was 100 years ago.

  2. Utility-value intervention with parents increases students’ STEM preparation and career pursuit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rozek, Christopher S; Svoboda, Ryan C; Harackiewicz, Judith M; Hulleman, Chris S; Hyde, Janet S

    2017-01-01

    ...) is critically important as preparation to pursue STEM careers, yet students in the United States lag behind other countries, ranking 35th in mathematics and 27th in science achievement internationally...

  3. A Comparative Study between Intramuscular Midazolam and Oral Clonidine As A Premedication For General Anesthesia

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    Jignasa J Patel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most anesthesiologists agree on the need for efficient pre-medication. The pattern of desired effects of a pre-medication is however, complex and includes relief of anxiety, sedation and relaxation of the patient. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of Midazolam and clonidine as premedication. Methodology: A comparative study between midazolam and clonidine as a premedication for general anesthesia was conducted. Patients were divided in two groups: Group I: Inj. Midazolam 0.07 mg/kg i.m. before surgery; Group II Tab.Clonidine 4 and micro;g/kg oral, 2 hours before surgery. Pulse rate, blood pressure, state of excitement, apprehension and sedation were noted at the time of giving premedication. Results: Majority of cases in both the groups were in the age group of 16-30 years (56%. Gender wise distribution shows 40% cases were males and 60% were females. The sedation score, apprehension score and excitement score in both the groups before and after induction was statistically significant. There is no significant difference in dose requirement of pentothal for induction between midazolam and clonidine group. The amnesia score shows that midazolam produces more potent and perfect amnesia as compared to clonidine. Amnesia score in both the groups was statistically significant Conclusion: It was concluded from the present study that midazolam was superior to clonidine in its sedative and anxiolytic effects, had a potent amnesia and does not attenuate hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation and does not prolong recovery time. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(4.000: 312-315

  4. Spectral entropy as an objective measure of sedation state in midazolam-premedicated patients

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    Hany A Mowafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Objective assessment of sedation depth is a valuable target. Spectral entropy is an anesthetic depth monitor based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram signal. Aims: To evaluate the performance of spectral entropy as an objective measure of sedation state in midazolam-premedicated patients and to correlate it with a clinically assessed sedation score. Settings and Design: This prospective double-blind placebo-controlled study was performed in King Fahd Hospital of the university. Methods: Eighty adult ASA I-II patients were randomly assigned into 4 groups. Patients were premedicated using 0.02, 0.04, or 0.06 mg/kg midazolam or saline intramuscularly. The effect of these doses on the Observer′s Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (OAA/S scale, hemodynamic variables, response entropy (RE, and state entropy (SE, was evaluated at 10, 20, and 30 min after premedication. Statistical analysis: Spearman Rank-order correlation analysis to examine the relation between OAA/S and entropy. The ability of spectral entropy to predict the depth of sedation was evaluated using Smith prediction probability. Results: Midazolam doses ≥0.04 mg/kg produced significant decreases in RE, SE, and OAA/S scores. There was a strong correlation between midazolam dose and OAA/S scale, RE, and SE since Spearman Rank R values were 0.792, 0.822, and 0.745, respectively (P<0.001. In addition, RE and SE were strong predictors of OAA/S level during midazolam sedation with no significant difference in prediction between the 2 entropy components. Conclusions: Spectral entropy is a reliable measure for the sedative premedication. It may be used to objectively assess the adequacy of midazolam premedication and to determine the dose requirement.

  5. Effects of addition of ketamine, fentanyl and saline with Propofol induction on hemodynamics and laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions in oral clonidine premedicated children

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    Tanmoy Ghatak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study was to compare the effect of addition of ketamine; fentanyl and saline with propofol anesthesia on hemodynamic profile and laryngeal mask airway (LMA insertion conditions in oral clonidine premedicated children. Methods: 180 children (age 2 - 10 years were at first given oral clonidine (4 μg/kg 90 minutes before operation, and then were randomly allocated to receive either ketamine 0.5 mg/kg (n=60, fentanyl 1 μg/kg (n=60 or 0.9% normal saline (n=60 before induction with propofol 3.0 mg/kg. Insertion of LMA was performed within 1 minute of injection of propofol. Heart rate and mean blood pressure were noted 1 min before induction (baseline, immediately after induction, before and after insertion of LMA for up to 3 min. Following LMA insertion, 6 subjective end points were noted-mouth opening, coughing, swallowing, patient′s movement, laryngospasm, and ease of an insertion. LMA insertion summed score was prepared depending upon these variables. Results: LMA insertion summed score was nearly similar in ketamine and fentanyl group, which were significantly better than saline group (P120 secs. was higher in fentanyl group compared to ketamine and saline group. Conclusion: Even in oral clonidine premedicated children, addition of ketamine with propofol provides hemodynamic stability and comparable conditions for LMA insertion like fentanyl propofol with significantly less prolonged apnea.

  6. Feasibility of stopping paclitaxel premedication after two doses in patients not experiencing a previous infusion hypersensitivity reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Michael J; Dunlea, Leslie J.; Rettig, Amy E.; Lustberg, Maryam B.; Phillips, Gary S.; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Paclitaxel-based chemotherapy continues to be an integral component in the treatment of many solid tumors. Prolonged use of paclitaxel may result in repeated doses of premedications and potential unwanted side effects. Infusion hypersensitivity reactions occurring beyond the second dose are infrequent and not well characterized. We hypothesized that patients whose paclitaxel premedications were discontinued after two doses were unlikely to experience infusion hypersensitivity reaction...

  7. Construction and validation of a distance learning module on premedication antisepsis for nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Barbara Juliana da Costa; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Beatriz Maria, Jorge; Mazzo, Alessandra

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this descriptive study, carried out at a public university, was to design, develop, and validate a distance learning module on intramuscular premedication antisepsis. The content was introduced in the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment, based on the Systematic Model for Web-Based Training projects. Ten nurses and information technologists at work consented to participate, in compliance with ethical guidelines, and answered a questionnaire to validate the Virtual Learning Environment. The educational aspects of the environment interface were mostly evaluated as "excellent," whereas the assessment of didactic resources indicated interactivity difficulties. It is concluded that distance learning is an important tool for the teaching of premedication antisepsis. To ensure its effectiveness, appropriate methods and interactive devices must be used.

  8. Effect of electroconvulsive therapy without anticonvulsive premedication on serum growth hormone in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigas, M; Stowasserová, N; Németh, S; Jurcovicová, J

    1975-01-01

    Serum concentrations of human growth hormone (HGH) were measured in psychiatric patients during the first, third and sixth electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) without anticonvulsive premedication. Serum HGH increased 30 min after the application of current and no differences were found between responses to 1st, 3rd, or 6th ECT. Maximal increase of serum glucose was seen after the first ECT and gradual decreases after the 3rd and 6th ECT were observed

  9. A STUDY OF EFFECTS OF ORAL CLONIDINE ON PREMEDICATION AND HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Rao; Mahesh,

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Use of Clonidine as a premedicant started incidentally. Clonidine is a potent antihypertensive drug that suppresses RAAS. Clonidine may be beneficial during laparoscopy in patients with hypertension, cardiovascular and/or renal diseases. AIM OF STUDY To determine the effects of Oral Clonidine on premedication and haemodynamic changes during Laparoscopic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Study was conducted on 60 adult patients belonging to ASA physical...

  10. Response of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: effect of inherent personality traits and premedication with diazepam.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The influence of personality traits on the reaction of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was studied prospectively in 86 patients. High N (neuroticism) scores on the Eysenck personality inventory were associated with poor tolerance to and future compliance with the procedure. Although premedication with diazepam did not affect the degree of discomfort and distress during the procedure, it guaranteed acceptance of repeat endoscopy by virtue of its strong amnesic effect. By contrast,...

  11. Comparison of nasal Midazolam with Ketamine versus nasal Midazolam as a premedication in children

    OpenAIRE

    Khatavkar, Sonal S; Bakhshi, Rochana G

    2014-01-01

    Background: T his study was done to compare effects of intranasal midazolam and intranasal midazolam with ketamine for premedication of children aged 1-12 yrs undergoing intermediate and major surgeries. Aims: Midazolam and Ketamine have already been used as premedicants in children. Our aim was to find out advantage of combination of midazolam with ketamine over midazolam by nasal route. Methods: Sixty children of age group 1-12 yrs of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade 1 and ...

  12. Effect of clonidine premedication on postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after total intravenous anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Koichi; Yamada, Takeshi; Hara, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effect of oral clonidine premedication on postoperative sore throat and hoarseness, we evaluated the incidence and severity of each of these complications in patients who underwent elective surgery in the supine position. The subjects were 82 patients, American Society of Anesthiologists (ASA) status I-III, aged 15-82 years. They were premedicated with either 150 microg oral clonidine and 20 mg raftidine (clonidine group; n = 41) or with 20 mg raftidine only (control group; n = 41) 2 h before anesthesia induction. General anesthesia was maintained with propofol, ketamine, fentanyl, and vecuronium, with or without epidural anesthesia. Postoperative sore throat and hoarseness were evaluated immediately after surgery and on the day after surgery. The incidences of sore throat and hoarseness tended to be higher in the clonidine group than in the control group; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant differences in the severity of these symptoms between the two groups. In conclusion, oral premedication with 150 microg clonidine did not prevent postoperative sore throat or hoarseness, and may have exacerbated these symptoms.

  13. EFFECT OF ORAL CLONIDINE PREMEDICATION ON THE ONSET AND DURATION OF SPINAL ANESTHESIA WITH HYPERBARIC BUPIVACAINE

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    Shruthi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal anesthesia is the most common technique used for lower abdominal surgeries. Hyperbaric Bupivacaine has limited duration of action. Clonidine has been used to prolong the duration of local anaesthetic. Hence in our study, we studied the effects of oral clonidine premedication on spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric Bupivacaine with reference to sedation, onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade including its effects on hemodynamic status. METHODS: Prospective randomized, double – blinded placebo, control study, two groups of thirty patients each were selected. One group (Group C received 150μg clonidine tablets and the other group (Group B received placebo, 90 minutes before anesthesia. Primary outcome were sedation, onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade. Hemodynamic and other effects of the study drug were the secondary outcomes. RESULT: It was observed that clonidine premedication resulted in higher incidence of moderate sedation, hastens the onset of sensory block but has no effect on the onset of motor blockade. It prolonged the duration of sensory and motor blockade. Clonidine at a dose of 150μg is not associated with any greater change in heart rate and blood pressure following spinal anesthesia. CONCLUSION: We conclude that oral clonidine premedication,in patients with hyperbaric bupivacaine hastesns the onset of sensory block and prolongs the duration of sensory and motor anesthesia with moderate sedation.

  14. A STUDY OF EFFECTS OF ORAL CLONIDINE ON PREMEDICATION AND HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Use of Clonidine as a premedicant started incidentally. Clonidine is a potent antihypertensive drug that suppresses RAAS. Clonidine may be beneficial during laparoscopy in patients with hypertension, cardiovascular and/or renal diseases. AIM OF STUDY To determine the effects of Oral Clonidine on premedication and haemodynamic changes during Laparoscopic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Study was conducted on 60 adult patients belonging to ASA physical status I & II. They were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 30 each. Group C received oral clonidine 150 mcg 90 minutes before surgery and group P received oral ranitidine 150 mg 90 minutes before surgery. Sedation score was noted on arrival to operation theatre. All vital parameters were recorded at regular intervals intra-operatively. RESULTS Clonidine premedication was able to achieve haemodynamic stability during pneumoperitoneum. CONCLUSION Premedication with 150mcg oral Clonidine has been found to be relatively safe as well as effective method that provides stable haemodynamics and protection against stress response triggered by pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries.

  15. The effect of clonidine premedication on hemodynamic responses to microlaryngoscopy and rigid bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matot, I; Sichel, J Y; Yofe, V; Gozal, Y

    2000-10-01

    The usual hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy is an increase in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. Previous work has reported that 10%-18% of the patients develop ischemic ST segment changes during the procedure. Therefore, we performed a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study in 36 patients scheduled for elective microlaryngeal and bronchoscopic surgical procedures to evaluate the effects of 300-microg oral clonidine premedication (n = 18) or placebo (n = 18) on the hemodynamic alterations and the incidence of perioperative myocardial ischemic episodes. Myocardial ischemia was assessed by using continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, beginning 30 min before, and lasting until 24 h after the operation. During the procedure, patients receiving placebo exhibited a significant increase (mean +/- SD) in arterial blood pressure (the systolic increasing from 137+/-11 to 166+/-17 mm Hg, the diastolic increasing from 80+/-11 to 97+/-14 mm Hg) and heart rate (increasing from 79+/-15 to 97+/-12 bpm) compared with the baseline and with the clonidine group. A dose of 300-microg clonidine blunted the hemodynamic response to endoscopy. Ventricular arrhythmias were more frequent in patients who were not premedicated with clonidine. Two patients in the control group, but none in the clonidine group, had evidence of myocardial ischemia. These data should encourage routine premedication with clonidine in patients undergoing microlaryngoscopic and bronchoscopic procedures.

  16. EFFECT OF ORAL CLONIDINE PREMEDICATION ON HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY - A CLINICAL STUDY

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    Abu Lais Mustaque

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Laparoscopic surgeries are the recent advances in the field of surgery and are the essence of today’s surgical practice. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has revolutionised gall bladder surgeries and has become the treatment of choice for cholelithiasis. This procedure has minimised the numbers of open cholecystectomy performed these days. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the effect of oral clonidine premedication on haemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. MATERIALS & METHODS The present study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology of Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh for a period of one year from July 2012 to June 2013 on patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy at operation theatre of Department of General Surgery of Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh. A total of 150 adult patients of either sex between the age group of 18 to 40 years of ASA-1 and ASA-2 undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were divided randomly into two groups of 75 patients each. RESULTS With the present study that oral premedication with Tab. Clonidine 150 mcg administered 90 minutes before surgery was able to prevent adverse haemodynamic changes during elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anaesthesia. CONCLUSION Hence, from the findings of this study, we can reasonably recommend oral premedication with Tab. Clonidine 150 mcg in otherwise healthy patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  17. Melatonin versus midazolam premedication in children undergoing surgery: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Eloisa; Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Crisafi, Caterina; Montalto, Angela Simona; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Reiter, Russel J; Romeo, Carmelo

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin has been proposed as a premedication alternative to midazolam, preceding anaesthesia induction. However, to our knowledge, data concerning interaction between melatonin and intravenous anaesthetic drugs in children are not available. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind pilot study was to investigate the possible effect of melatonin premedication, in comparison to midazolam, on the required infusion of propofol in children undergoing surgery. As a secondary outcome, the effect of oral melatonin on the preoperative sedation level and on the post anaesthesia recovery score was evaluated. Children between the age of 5 and 14 years, scheduled for elective surgery, were prospectively enrolled between January 2012 and December 2013, and randomly assigned to two groups based on whether they received oral melatonin (0.5 mg/kg) or oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) premedication before induction of anaesthesia with propofol. Degree of sedation before and after anaesthesia was also evaluated. Ninety-two patients were studied, 46 for each group. We found that oral administration of melatonin significantly reduced doses of propofol required for induction of anaesthesia in paediatric patients, more than midazolam (P midazolam. These data support the use of melatonin as a premedicant in paediatric surgical patients. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  18. The cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane after premedication of healthy dogs undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Janan M; Pike, Fred S; Clare, Monica C; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Sevoflurane and isoflurane are commonly used in veterinary anesthesia. The objective of this prospective, randomized, open-label clinical study was to compare the cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane via direct arterial blood pressure measurements and the lithium dilution cardiac output (LDCO) on premedicated healthy dogs undergoing elective tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). Nineteen client-owned dogs were included. All dogs were premedicated with hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg IV and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg subcutaneously). Ten dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane and nine dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane. Eighteen dogs were instrumented with a dorsal pedal arterial catheter, and one dog had a femoral arterial catheter. All dogs had continuous, direct systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure readings as well as heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), stroke volume variation (SVV), and pulse pressure variation (PPV) recorded q 5 min during the surgical procedure. There was no significant statistical difference in all parameters between the sevoflurane and isoflurane treatment groups. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane inhalant anesthetics appear to have similar hemodynamic effects when used as part of a multimodal anesthetic protocol in premedicated healthy dogs undergoing an elective surgical procedure.

  19. School Engagement as a Mediator of Academic Performance among Urban Youth: The Role of Career Preparation, Parental Career Support, and Teacher Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Liu, Xiongyi; Pabian, Yvona

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from the contributions of vocational psychology, this study examined school engagement as a mediator of academic performance through the effects of career preparation (career planning, career decision-making self-efficacy), parental career support, and teacher support among diverse urban youth in middle school and high school (N = 285).…

  20. 加巴喷丁在小儿术前用药中的临床观察%Clinical Observation of Oral Gabapentin for Premedication in Pediatric Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵长敏; 陈曦

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the clinical efficacy of oral gabapentin for premedication in pediatric patients. Method:Sixty ASA I-II pediatric patients were randomly divided into three groups ,each of 20 patients.The A groups and the B groups were orally received gabapentin(20 mg/kg)and midazolam(0.5 mg/kg)respectively.The C groups were given intramuscularly injection of Phenobarbital sodium with 5 mg/kg.The assessment of medication compliance during the premedication and the anxiety behavior and neurobehavioral at separation from parents during venepuncture and induction were graded.In addition,HR,RR,and SpO2 were also recorded and evaluated.Result:Comparison of the C group,there were significant difference with the A and B group with the clinical effects.Conclusion:Gabapentin is effective and safe in pediatric patients as premedication.%目的:探讨加巴喷丁在小儿术前用药中的疗效。方法:择期手术患儿60例,随机分为三组:A组加巴喷丁20 mg/kg口服,B组咪达唑仑0.5 mg/kg+5 mL的10%GS混合液口服,C组苯巴比妥钠5 mg/kg肌注。观察三组患儿给药时接受配合情况,给药后的HR、RR、MAP、SpO2变化;患儿用药后的行为变化。结果:使用加巴喷丁和咪达唑仑作为术前给药的患儿在给药配合、生理循环稳定方面明显优于使用苯巴比妥钠的患儿。结论:加巴喷丁作用安全有效,围术期患儿血流动力学稳定,可作为小儿术前用药。

  1. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  2. [Condition of patients after surgical wisdom tooth extraction under general anesthesia with different premedication variants--a prospective study based on a post-anesthesia questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, H; Schwarz, A

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the modified "postanaesthesiological questionnaire" pointed to a subtle influencing of the condition of patients who had undergone 3rd molar surgery in general anaesthesia by using different premedication variants: "Atropine, Pethidine and Midazolam" (group A) and "Atropine, Midazolam and S-Ketamin" (group B). The combination in group B seems to be more suitable. On the one hand, a lower incidence of unwanted side-effects was found and, on the other hand, remarkable positive effects were observed. Of particular significance with this combination was also the more effective suppression of postoperative pain. The Propofol-supplemented general anaesthesia prepared in this way and administered using a nasal intubation technique found the full approval of the patients. Postoperative pain therapy was effective and also inexpensive, costing just 8.20 DM per patient, according to current prices calculated by Magdeburg University Hospital.

  3. Comparison Of Oral Premedication With Combination Of Midazolam With Ketamine Vs Midazolam Ketamine Alone In Children Children Medical Center (year 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani M

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Anxiolysis and sedation with oral midazolam are common practice in pediatric anesthesia. Good or excellent results are seen in only 50% to 80% of cases, so we decided to investigate if addition of a low dose of oral ketamine to midazolam (ketamine2.5 mg /kg ^midazolam 0.25 mg/kg resulted in better premedication compared with oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg or ketamine 6 mg/kg alone."nMethods and Materials: in a prospective, randomized ,double -blind study we study 105 children (mean age 6 ,range 2-10 yr. undergoing non thoracic and non cardiac surgery of more than 30 min duration. The patients were in ASA 1, 2. After oral premedication the child's condition was evaluated by assigning 1-4 point to the quality of anxiolysis, sedation, and separation from parents in the induction room .The groups were similar in sex, age, weight, intervention and duration of anaesthesia."nResults: The score of sedation before transfer to the operation room was significantly better in the ketamine, midazolam combination group than in the ketamine or midazolam group. Success rates for anxiolysis and behavior at separation were grater than 90%with the combination, approximately 80% with midazolam and 70% with ketamine alone .The incidence of salivation, excitation, nausea and vomiting was grater in the ketamine group but were very low in other groups. During recovery there were no difference in sedation or time of possible discharge."nConclusion: In summery, significantly better anxiolysis and separation were observed with a combination of ketamine and midazolam, even in awake children than with midazolam or ketamine alone. Duration of action and side effects of the combination was similar to those of midazolam.

  4. Preparing Teachers to Train Parents to Use Evidence-Based Strategies for Oral Reading Fluency with Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupzyk, Sara; Daly, Edward J., III; Andersen, Melissa N.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is promising evidence for parent-tutoring strategies for improving oral reading fluency, such parent tutoring programs are not widely used in schools. This study examined the effectiveness of providing parent training in school settings using teachers as trainers. An evidence-based reading package including listening passage…

  5. Effect of Oral Premedication on the Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Dubey, Sandeep; Kala, Shubham; Misuriya, Abhinav; Kataria, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is generally accepted that achieving complete anaesthesia with an Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block (IANB) in mandibular molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is more challenging than for other teeth. Therefore, administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents (NSAIDs) 1 hour prior to anaesthetic administration has been proposed as a means to increase the efficacy of the IANB in such patients. Aim The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to determine the effect of administration of oral premedication with ketorolac (KETO) and diclofenac potassium (DP) on the efficacy of IANB in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods One hundred and fifty patients with irreversible pulpitis were evaluated preoperatively for pain using Heft Parker visual analogue scale, after which they were randomly divided into three groups. The subjects received identical tablets of ketorolac, diclofenac pottasium or cellulose powder (placebo), 1 hour prior to administration of IANB with 2% lidocaine containing 1:200 000 epinephrine. Lip numbness as well as positive and negative responses to cold test were ascertained. Additionally pain score of each patient was recorded during cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation. Success was defined as the absence of pain or mild pain based on the visual analog scale readings. The data was analysed using One-Way Anova, Post-Hoc Tukey pair wise, Paired T – Test and chi-square test. Trial Registery Number is 4722/2015 for this clinical trial study. Results There were no significant differences with respect to age (p =0.098), gender (p = 0.801) and pre-VAS score (DP-KETO p=0.645, PLAC-KETO p =0.964, PLAC-DP p = 0.801) between the three groups. All patients had subjective lip anaesthesia with the IAN blocks. Patients of all the three groups reported a significant decrease in active pain after local anaesthesia (p< 0.05). The post injection VAS Score was least in group

  6. Ketamine anesthesia with or without diazepam premedication for bone marrow punctures in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, R Y; Noordhoek, M; Kroon, J; Faber-Nijholt, R

    2000-01-01

    Ketamine is a drug widely used for analgesia and sedation of children for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The authors investigated in a randomized controlled clinical trial if diazepam premedication would have a beneficial effect on side effects related to ketamine anesthesia for bone marrow punctures (BMPs) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Sixteen children 4 years or older at the time of BMP were eligible. The first 2 BMPs after complete remission was obtained were studied. BMPs were performed under ketamine anesthesia (1.0-1.5 mg/kg i.v.), as usual. Patients were randomized to receive 1 h before the first BMP blinded, either diazepam or placebo orally and before the second BMP the other way round. Blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were monitored, and patients were observed for signs of anxiety, pain, and other side effects. The patients were interviewed after each BMP and asked for their preference 1 week after the second BMP. Ketamine anesthesia appeared as safe and effective after diazepam premedication as after placebo premedication. From the interviews and questionnaires, it was clear that half of the children preferred diazepam premedication because of less awful dreaming and more gradual falling asleep and waking up. Diazepam premedication may be useful for selected children with ALL receiving ketamine anesthesia for BMPs.

  7. Premedication with midazolam in intellectually disabled dental patients: Intramuscular or oral administration? A retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boku, Aiji; Sugimura, Mitsutaka; Oyamaguchi, Aiko; Inoue, Mika; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. The purpose of this study was to determine which method of premedication is more effective for these patients, 0.15 mg/kg of intramuscular midazolam or 0.3 mg/kg of oral midazolam. Material and Methods This study was designed and implemented as a non-randomized retrospective study. The study population was composed of patients with intellectual disability who required dental treatment under ambulatory general anesthesia from August 2009 through April 2013. Patients were administered 0.15 mg/kg of midazolam intramuscularly (Group IM) or 0.3 mg/kg orally (Group PO). The predictor variable was the method of midazolam administration. The outcome variables measured were Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/ Sedation (OAA/S) Scale scores, the level of cooperation when entering the operation room and for venous cannulation, post-anesthetic agitation and recovery time. Results Midazolam was administered intramuscularly in 23 patients and orally in 21 patients. More patients were successfully sedated with no resistance behavior during venous cannulation in Group PO than in Group IM (p=0.034). There were no differences in demographic data and other variables between the groups. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that oral premedication with 0.3 mg/kg of midazolam is more effective than 0.15 mg/kg of midazolam administered intramuscularly, in terms of patient resistance to venous cannulation. If both oral and intramuscular routes of midazolam are acceptable in intellectually disabled patients, the oral route is recommended. Key words:Premedication, midazolam, intellectual disability. PMID:27031068

  8. A comparison of midazolam and clonidine as an oral premedication in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sequeira Trevor; Madhusudan Upadya; Chandni Sinha; Manpreet Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Background: To compare oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) versus oral clonidine (4 μg/kg) as a premedication in pediatric patients aged between 2-12 years with regard to sedation and anxiolysis. Methods: Sixty pediatric patients belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologists class I and II between the age group of 2-12 years scheduled for elective surgery were randomly allocated to receive either oral midazolam (group I) 30 min before induction or oral clonidine (group II) 90 min before induc...

  9. Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazrou, Abdulrahman M

    2008-05-01

    Student admission into the College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU) is dependent on the achievement of a grade point average (GPA) of ≥3.5 /5 by the end of the premedical year. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether pre-selected medical students who achieve a relatively low GPA (≤3.75/5) in the premedical year are at risk of having academic difficulties in subsequent years. A cross-sectional study of all students admitted to the College of Medicine at KSU during 5 academic years (1994 to 1998) was conducted in 2004. The likelihood of completing the program by 2004 and the dropout frequency were compared in the two groups based on their GPA in the premedical year: High GPA (>3.75) and Low GPA (≤3.75). During the study period, 739 students were admitted to the college. Of these, 619 (84%) were in High GPA group, and 120 (16%) in the Low GPA group. Of the students with High GPA, 545 (88%) out of 619 graduated compared with 79 (66%) of 120 in the Low GPA group (OR 3.822 [95% CI: 2.44, 5.99]: PGPA group (10/120; 8.3%) compared with the High GPA group (18/619; 2.9%: OR 3.035 [95% CI: 1.37, 6.75], P=0.01). Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels. The GPA of premedical year is a useful predictor of students who need close monitoring and academic support. The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

  10. Oral premedication with pregabalin or clonidine for hemodynamic stability during laryngoscopy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodynamic responses of laryngoscopy and laparoscopy should be attenuated by the appropriate premedication, smooth induction, and rapid intubation. The present study evaluated the clinical efficacy of oral premedication with pregabalin or clonidine for hemodynamic stability during laryngoscopy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: A total of 180 healthy adult consented patients aged 35 to 52 years with American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status I and II of both gender, who met the inclusion criteria for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were randomized to receive placebo Group I, pregabalin (150 mg Group II, or clonidine (200 μg Group III, given 75 to 90 minutes before surgery as oral premedication. All groups were compared for preoperative sedation and anxiety level along with changes of heart rate and mean arterial pressure prior to premedication, before induction, after laryngoscopy, pneumoperitoneum, release of carbon dioxide, and extubation. Intraoperative analgesic drug requirement and any postoperative complications were also recorded. Results: Pregabalin and clonidine proved to have sedative and anxiolytic effects as oral premedicants and decreased the need of intraoperative analgesic drug requirement. Clonidine was superior to pregabalin for attenuation of the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and laparoscopy, but it increased the incidence of intra-and postoperative bradycardia. No significant differences in the parameters of recovery were observed between the groups. None of the premedicated patient has suffered from any postoperative side effects. Conclusion: Oral premedication with pregabalin 150 mg or clonidine 200 μg causes sedation and anxiolysis with hemodynamic stability during laryngoscopy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, without prolongation of recovery time and side effects.

  11. A qualitative study of the pre-operative preparation of children, young people and their parents' for planned continence surgery: experiences and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lucy; Callery, Peter; Kirk, Sue

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore children's, young people's and parents' pre-operative experiences of continent stoma formation. Current research investigating continent stoma surgery focuses on surgical outcomes including complication rates, adherence to management regimes, self-management practices and levels of continence achieved. Despite reports of pre-operative anxiety in families undergoing continent stoma surgery, there has been a lack of research exploring pre-operative experiences, information needs or decision-making processes in this group. A qualitative study. Forty-nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 children, young people and their parents. Data were collected at key points in the surgical process that aimed to represent a longitudinal perspective of continent stoma formation. The interviews suggested that children's, young people's and parents' information needs in relation to the long-term implications of surgery and for their day-to-day lives were not being adequately met. The preparation process was described as being positively influenced by contact with a nurse specialist, being given time to make the decision and having access to different sources of information. Decisions regarding life-long planned surgery can be challenging. The individual involvement and information needs of children, young people and their parents need to be recognised during pre-operative preparation. Health professionals need to discuss the holistic implications of continent stoma surgery and provide families with the time and opportunity to consider surgery and access relevant sources of information pre-operatively. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF A COMBINATION OF MIDAZOLAM AND KETAMINE VERSUS MIDAZOLAM OR KETAMINE ALONE AS ORAL PREMEDICATION FOR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This prospective double blind randomized study was conducted to compare the efficacy of combination of oral ketamine and midazolam with oral midazolam or ketamine alone in terms of acceptability, anxiolysis, sedation and side effects. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: Compare the efficacy of oral midazolam, oral ketamine and combination of these two drugs, as pre medication in terms of acceptability, sedation, anxiolysis and side effects in paediatric children and t o evaluate whether the addition of oral midazolam to oral ketamine reduces the side effects of oral Ketamine. METHODS: In this randomized prospective study, 90 children of (age 1 - 8 years either sex, ASA grade I and II were randomly allocated to three groups of thirty each. Group M received midazolam 0.75mg/kg, Group K received ketamine 6 mg/kg and Group M+K received midazolam 0.5 mg/kg and ketamine 3 mg/kg via oral route. Formulations of the drugs were given to the children to swallow after mixing with apple juice. The children were separated from their parents 45 minutes after administration of the drug and were taken inside the operation theatre. Acceptability of the drug, time of onset of sedation, level of sedation and anxiolysis at the time of separation from parents and sedation at the time of induction of anaesthesia was noted. Any side effect after administration of the drug and in post - operative period was looked for. RESULTS: The Group K had better acceptance as compared to Group M and Group M+K . The onset of sedation was faster in Group M+K as compared to Group K and Group M, but not statistically significant . The sedation as well as anxiolysis in all the three groups was found to be acceptable at the time of separation; however it was not found to be satisfactory at the time of induction. Incidence of side effects was more in Group K as compared to the other two groups. CONCLUSION: The combination of oral midazolam and oral ketamine in low dose is better premedication than the

  13. Preparanda a Sus Hijos para la Universidad. Guia para Padres (Preparing Your Child for College. A Resource Book for Parents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Elizabeth; Tikoff, Valentina K.

    This document is a Spanish translation of a resource book designed to help parents help their children with the process of making decisions about college. Its purpose is to help parents to: set high expectations for their children's future; know what college options are available; plan their finances with college in mind; and know what financial…

  14. Low-dose (1 microg/kg) clonidine premedication and hypotension after carotid artery surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandazi, Ageliki; Karamanis, Periandros; Sidiropoulou, Tatiana; Matsota, Paraskevi; Papasideris, Christos; Niokou, Dimitra; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the role of low-dose clonidine intravenous (IV) premedication in arterial pressure variation during and after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). A total of 84 patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) II-III, scheduled for elective CEA under general anesthesia participated in this study. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group P (n = 42) and group C (n = 42) and received N/S 0.9% (placebo) or clonidine 1 μg/kg IV, respectively, 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia. Recovery times, number of patients needed to be treated for circulatory events (hypertension, hypotension, and bradycardia), number of circulatory events per patient, and consumption of vasoactive drugs (nitroglycerine, phenylphrine, and atropine) intraoperatively and the first 6 hours postoperatively were recorded. Significantly less hypertensive episodes were observed intraoperatively, but more hypotensive episodes were observed postoperatively in patients receiving clonidine. Intravenous premedication with low-dose clonidine (1 μg/kg) seems to be effective in preventing hypertensive episodes during CEA under general anesthesia but seems to increase the incidence of hypotension postoperatively.

  15. Antiemetic effects of granisetron versus dexamethasone in clonidine premedicated children undergoing strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Sen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In a prospective, double blind, randomized trial, 120 children, aged 3-8 years,ASAI-II, undergoing strabismus repair were randomly divided into three groups (n = 40 each. Oral clonidine premedication (4gg.kg-1 was administered to all the patients two hours prior to surgery. Soon after induction of anaesthesia, Group G patients were administered intravenous granisetron (40gg.kg-1 , Group D intravenous dexamethasone (150gg.kg-1 and group S received 4ml normal saline. Postoperatively, children were continuously monitored and assessed half-hourly till discharge and then after 24 hours for vomiting and pain. The overall incidence of postoperative emesis was lower (15.4% in the Group G compared with the Group D (21.6% in the first 24 hours (P>0.05. The Group S had a highest incidence of postoperative vomiting ((37% P value < 0.0324 compared to group G. The frequency of early vomiting was highest in the S group. Both G and D groups showed better control of delayed emetic episodes. We observed that in children who were premedicated with clonidine, both IV granisetron or dexamethasone were efficacious in reducing the incidence and severity of POV in day-care strabismus surgery.

  16. Effect of alpha-2-agonist premedication on intraocular pressure after selective laser trabeculoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius T Oatts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the effect of alpha-2-agonist (AA premedication (PM on intraocular pressure (IOP following selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of all patients undergoing 360° SLT at an institution with two prevalent practice patterns consisting of SLT performed with PM and without premedication (NPM with AA. The association between pre- and post-operative IOP was evaluated using a linear regression model in 49 (59% PM and 34 (41% NPM eyes. Results: The prevalence of IOP elevations up to 5 mmHg 1 h postoperatively was similar in both groups, occurring in 18% of PM and in 15% of NPM. Elevations above 5 mmHg were seen in 4% of PM and 8% of NPM (P = 0.732. After correcting for age, gender, diagnosis, number of medications, and preoperative IOP, the presence or absence of AA PM had no significant association with any postoperative IOP (P > 0.5. Conclusion: The practice of using AAs before SLT and measuring IOP at 1 h has not been validated yet adds to expenses and workflow burden. Our retrospective study showed no significant correlation between PM and postoperative or longer-term IOP. IOP at 1 h should be measured in patients who cannot tolerate transient pressure elevations. Further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship.

  17. Premedication with midazolam prior to caesarean section has no neonatal adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, Ahmet Can; Mergan, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Like all surgical patients, obstetric patients also feel operative stress and anxiety. This can be prevented by giving patients detailed information about their operation and with preoperative pharmacological medications. Because of depressive effects of sedatives on newborns, pharmacological medications are omitted, especially in obstetric patients. The literature contains few studies concerning preoperative midazolam use in Caesarian section (C/S) patients. Our aim in this study was to help patients undergoing C/S surgery. One group scheduled for elective C/S received midazolam 0.025 mg kg(-1) intravenously, the other received saline. Maternal anxiety was evaluated using Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) scores, and newborns were evaluated using Apgar and the Neonatal Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity Score (NACS). In conclusion, patients receiving midazolam 0.025 mg kg(-1) as premedication had significantly low anxiety scores, without any adverse effects on the newborns. Midazolam can therefore safely be used as a premedicative agent in C/S surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Premedication with midazolam prior to cesarean delivery in preeclamptic parturients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Ali M; Elsakka, Ahmed I; Ali, Hassan M

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety is a concern in obstetrics, especially in preeclamptic mothers. Sedation is not commonly used in parturients for fear of adverse neonatal effect. We investigated maternal and neonatal outcome of midazolam as an adjuvant to spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery. A prospective randomized controlled trial, in which eighty preeclamptic parturients received either an intravenous dose of 0.035 mg/kg of midazolam or an equal volume of normal saline, 30 min before spinal anesthesia. Maternal anxiety was assessed using Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS); postoperative maternal satisfaction was assessed using Maternal Satisfaction Scale for Cesarean Section (MSSCS). Newborns were assessed using Apgar score, Neonatal Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity Score (NACS), and umbilical artery blood gases. Mothers premedicated with midazolam showed a lower level of preoperative anxiety and a higher degree of postoperative satisfaction than the control group. There were no between-group differences regarding the neonatal outcome. Preeclamptic parturients premedicated with midazolam (0.035 mg/kg) before spinal anesthesia have lower anxiety and higher postoperative satisfaction levels, with no adverse effects on the newborns.

  19. Premedication with midazolam prior to cesarean delivery in preeclamptic parturients: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Ali M.; Elsakka, Ahmed I.; Ali, Hassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is a concern in obstetrics, especially in preeclamptic mothers. Sedation is not commonly used in parturients for fear of adverse neonatal effect. We investigated maternal and neonatal outcome of midazolam as an adjuvant to spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial, in which eighty preeclamptic parturients received either an intravenous dose of 0.035 mg/kg of midazolam or an equal volume of normal saline, 30 min before spinal anesthesia. Maternal anxiety was assessed using Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS); postoperative maternal satisfaction was assessed using Maternal Satisfaction Scale for Cesarean Section (MSSCS). Newborns were assessed using Apgar score, Neonatal Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity Score (NACS), and umbilical artery blood gases. Results: Mothers premedicated with midazolam showed a lower level of preoperative anxiety and a higher degree of postoperative satisfaction than the control group. There were no between-group differences regarding the neonatal outcome. Conclusion: Preeclamptic parturients premedicated with midazolam (0.035 mg/kg) before spinal anesthesia have lower anxiety and higher postoperative satisfaction levels, with no adverse effects on the newborns. PMID:27746564

  20. Effects of natural childbirth preparation versus standard antenatal education on epidural rates, experience of childbirth and parental stress in mothers and fathers: a randomised controlled multicentre trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, M; Kieler, H; Waldenström, U

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with psychoprophylactic training versus standard antenatal education on the use of epidural analgesia, experience of childbirth and parental stress in first-time mothers and fathers. Design Randomised controlled multicentre trial. Setting Fifteen antenatal clinics in Sweden between January 2006 and May 2007. Sample A total of 1087 nulliparous women and 1064 of their partners. Methods Natural group: Antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with training in breathing and relaxation techniques (psychoprophylaxis). Standard care group: Standard antenatal education focussing on both childbirth and parenthood, without psychoprophylactic training. Both groups: Four 2-hour sessions in groups of 12 participants during third trimester of pregnancy and one follow-up after delivery. Main outcome measures Epidural analgesia during labour, experience of childbirth as measured by the Wijma Delivery Experience Questionnaire (B), and parental stress measured by the Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire. Results The epidural rate was 52% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the experience of childbirth or parental stress between the randomised groups, either in women or men. Seventy percent of the women in the Natural group reported having used psychoprophylaxis during labour. A minority in the Standard care group (37%) had also used this method, but subgroup analysis where these women were excluded did not change the principal findings. Conclusion Natural childbirth preparation including training in breathing and relaxation did not decrease the use of epidural analgesia during labour, nor did it improve the birth experience or affect parental stress in early parenthood in nulliparous women and men, compared with a standard form of antenatal education. PMID:19538406

  1. Adoptive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotevant, Harold D; Lo, Albert Yh

    2017-06-01

    Challenges in adoptive parenting continue to emerge as adoption policies and practices evolve. We review three areas of research in adoptive parenting that reflect contemporary shifts in adoption. First, we highlight recent findings concerning openness in adoption contact arrangements, or contact between a child's families of birth and rearing. Second, we examine research regarding racial and cultural socialization in transracial and international adoptions. Finally, we review investigations of parenting experiences of lesbian and gay adoptive parents. Overall, parenting processes (e.g., supportive vs. problematic family interaction) are better predictors of child adjustment than are group differences (e.g., open vs. closed adoptions; adoption by heterosexual vs. same-sex parents). The distinctive needs of adopted children call for preparation of adoption-competent mental health, casework, education, and health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Is a career in medicine the right choice? The impact of a physician shadowing program on undergraduate premedical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jennifer Y; Lin, Hillary; Lewis, Patricia Y; Fetterman, David M; Gesundheit, Neil

    2015-05-01

    Undergraduate (i.e., baccalaureate) premedical students have limited exposure to clinical practice before applying to medical school-a shortcoming, given the personal and financial resources required to complete medical training. The Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS) is a program that streamlines the completion of regulatory requirements for premedical students and allows them to develop one-on-one mentor-mentee relationships with practicing physicians. The program, offered quarterly since 2007, is an elective available for Stanford University sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Participants apply to the program and, if accepted, receive patient rights and professionalism training. Students shadow the physician they are paired with at least four times and submit a reflective essay about their experience.SIMS program coordinators administered surveys before and after shadowing to assess changes in students' perceptions and understanding of medical careers. The authors observed, in the 61 Stanford premedical students who participated in SIMS between March and June 2010 and completed both pre- and postprogram questionnaires, significant increases in familiarity with physician responsibilities and in understanding physician-patient interactions. The authors detected no significant changes in student commitment to pursuing medicine. Student perceptions of the value of shadowing-high both pre- and post shadowing-did not change. Physician shadowing by premedical baccalaureate students appears to promote an understanding of physician roles and workplace challenges. Future studies should identify the ideal timing, format, and duration of shadowing to optimize the experience and allow students to make informed decisions about whether to pursue a medical career.

  3. ORAL CLONIDINE PREMEDICATION: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH A PLACEBO IN ATTENUATING HEMODYNAMIC RESPONSES TO LARYNGOSCOPY AND INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudatta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sympathetic response associated with laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation is a potential cause for a number of complications especially in patients with cardiovascular compromise . The aim of our study was to evaluate and study the efficiency of oral Clonidine premedication in this respect as compared with a placebo . METHODS: 100 surgical patients of either sex of physical status ASA I/II were randomly divided into two groups . Group I , who r eceived oral Clonidine tablet 0 . 003mg ( 3μg /kg 90 minutes before surgery and group II , who received oral Ranitidine tablet 150mg 90 minutes before surgery . Basal parameters like HR , SBP , DBP were measured before premedication and for 90 minutes after ; scoring was done for sedation , anxiolysis and antisialogogue effects 90 minutes after premedication . RESULT: Oral Clonidine showed statistically significant attenuation of haemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation and in addition it was found t o have good sedative , anxiolytic effect as comared with placebo . CONCLUSION: we conclude that oral Clonidine premedication with dose of 3μg/kg is highly effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation

  4. Pre-medication with H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists for intravenous urography

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    Reimann, H.J.; Tauber, R.; Kramann, B.; Gmeinwieser, J.; Schmidt, U.; Reiser, M.

    1986-02-01

    Intravenous urography using Telebrix was performed on 500 patients. Two hundred patients (group I) received no pre-medication; 300 patients (group II) were premedicated with H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists. All patients were examined for signs of contrast reactions, blood pressure, pulse rate and plasma histamine levels. These were measured before and three minutes after the administration of the antihistamine substances and/or the contrast medium, and also at the end of the examination. Following the administration of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists, a slight, transient and insignificant rise in plasma histamine could be demonstrated. Both groups showed a significant rise in plasma histamine levels after the injection of the contrast medium. Although the pre-medicated group contained a higher percentage of high risk patients, there were significantly fewer patients with contrast reactions. Pre-medication with H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists in high risk patients is therefore advisable.

  5. Ketamine anesthesia with or without diazepam premedication for bone marrow punctures in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, RYJ; Noordhoek, M; Kroon, J; Faber-Nijholt, R

    2000-01-01

    Ketamine is a drug widely used for analgesia and sedation of children for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The authors investigated in a randomized controlled clinical trial id diazepam premedication would have a beneficial effect on side effects related to ketamine anesthesia for bone marrow

  6. Perceived Ethnic Discrimination by Teachers and Ethnic Minority Students' Academic Futility: Can Parents Prepare Their Youth for Better or for Worse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hondt, Fanny; Eccles, Jacquelynne S; Van Houtte, Mieke; Stevens, Peter A J

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the interplay of perceived ethnic discrimination by teachers, parents' ethnic socialization practices, and ethnic minority students' sense of academic futility. Since discrimination creates barriers beyond control of the individual, the first research goal is to examine the association of perceived ethnic discrimination by teachers with ethnic minority students' sense of academic futility. The second research goal is to focus on the role of perceived parental ethnic socialization (e.g., cultural socialization and preparation for bias) to get a better understanding of the interaction between family level factors and the potentially negative consequences of ethnic teacher discrimination. A multilevel analysis on 1181 ethnic minority students (50.6 % girls; mean age = 15.5), originating from migration, in 53 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) shows that the frequent perception of ethnic discrimination by teachers is associated with stronger feelings of academic futility, and if these students also received high levels of parents' ethnic socialization, they perceive even stronger feelings of futility. The group of ethnic minority students, who perceive frequent ethnic teacher discrimination, is a group at risk, and parents' ethnic socialization does not seem able to change this.

  7. EFFECT OF PREMEDICATION WITH INTRAVENOUS CLONIDINE ON HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES IN LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY: A RANDOMISED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy offers many benefits but significant hemodynamic changes are observed, which can be detrimental especially in elderly and hemodynamically compromised patients. Clonidine was found to inhibit the release of catecholamines and v asopressin and thus modulate the haemodynamic changes induced by pneumoperitoneum. AIM AND OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY: To assess the efficacy of intravenous clonidine premedication in prevention of adverse haemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystec tomy. The following parameters were studied. Heart rate and Blood pressure response to induction, intubation and pneumoperitoneum . Requirements of intra - op analgesia like Fentanyl . Incidence of post - op nausea and vomiting Incidence of shivering . METHODS: 100 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to one of the two groups to receive either clonidine 4 micrograms per kg or equivalent quantity of normal saline The primary outcome was to assess the efficacy of intrave nous clonidine premedication in prevention of adverse haemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. STATISTICAL METHODS : Student t test (two tailed, independent has been used to find the significance of study parameters (HR, SBP, DBP on conti nuous scale between two groups (Inter group analysis and to test the homogeneity samples based on age (continuous parameters. Chi - square test was used to test the homogeneity of samples based on parameters on categorical scale between two groups. P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant . The statistical software namely SPSS 15.0, Stata 8.0, Med Calc 9.0.1 and Systat 11.0 were used for the analysis of the data and Microsoft word and Excel have been used to generate graphs, tables etc. RESULTS: The result showed that Blood Pressure (SBP, DBP, MAP and HR in study group fell significantly to lower level within 10 minutes after starting clonidine infusion and

  8. Oral Clonidine Premedication Decreases Intraoperative Bleeding in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jabalameli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antihypertensive drug, clonidine, is a centrally acting alpha 2 agonist, useful as a premedication because of its sedative and analgesic properties. We examined the effect of clonidine given as an oral premedication in producing a bloodless surgical field in patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. We also evaluated the relation between bleeding volume and consumption of fentanyl and hydralazine to control hypotension. Methods: This prospective double - blinded clinical trial was performed on 113 patients (ASA I, ASA II. Fifty-two patients received oral clonidine (5 µg/kg while the other 61 patients received placebo. During general anesthesia, the hemodynamic endpoint of the anesthetic management was maintenance of hypotension (MAP at 70 mmHg for producing a bloodless surgical field. The direct control of MAP was attained with inspired concentration increments of halothane up to maximum of 1.5 vol % as needed. When it was unsuccessful, an intravenous fentanyl bolus of 2 µg/kg was also added. When both drugs failed, hydralazine , was given intravenously as a bolus and intermittently, 0.1mg/kg up to a maximum dose of 40 mg. Intraoperative bleeding was assessed on a six – point scale from 0 (= no bleeding to 5 (= severe bleeding. Data were compared with chisquare test, fisher's exact test and Student t-test. Results: There was less bleeding volume in the clonidine group (mean ± SD than in the placebo group (144 ± 75 Vs 225 ± 72 ml, P<0.05. Frequency of bleeding severity scores 3 and 4 (troublesome with repeated suction were lower in the clonidine group than in the placebo group (12% Vs 35%, P< 0.05. Fentanyl requirement was significantly lower (112 ± 18 Vs 142 ± 21 µg, P < 0.05 in the clonidine group. Hydralazine requirement was significantly lower (0.45 ± 1.68 Vs 2.67 ± 4.33 Conclusion: Premedication with oral clonidine reduces bleeding in endoscopic sinus surgery and also decreases fentanyl, and hydralazine

  9. Child Well-Being in Same-Sex Parent Families: Review of Research Prepared for American Sociological Association Amicus Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Wendy D; Fettro, Marshal Neal; Lamidi, Esther

    2014-08-01

    Recent legal cases before the Supreme Court of the United States were challenging federal definitions of marriage created by the Defense of Marriage Act and California's voter approved Proposition 8 which limited marriage to different-sex couples only. Social science literature regarding child well-being was being used within these cases, and the American Sociological Association sought to provide a concise evaluation of the literature through an amicus curiae brief. The authors were tasked in the assistance of this legal brief by reviewing literature regarding the well-being of children raised within same-sex parent families. This article includes our assessment of the literature, focusing on those studies, reviews and books published within the past decade. We conclude that there is a clear consensus in the social science literature indicating that American children living within same-sex parent households fare just, as well as those children residing within different-sex parent households over a wide array of well-being measures: academic performance, cognitive development, social development, psychological health, early sexual activity, and substance abuse. Our assessment of the literature is based on credible and methodologically sound studies that compare well-being outcomes of children residing within same-sex and different-sex parent families. Differences that exist in child well-being are largely due to socioeconomic circumstances and family stability. We discuss challenges and opportunities for new research on the well-being of children in same-sex parent families.

  10. Biologic: Gene circuits and feedback in an introductory physics sequence for biology and premedical students

    CERN Document Server

    Cahn, S B

    2013-01-01

    Two synthetic gene circuits -- the genetic toggle switch and the repressilator -- are analyzed quantitatively and discussed in the context of an educational module on gene circuits and feedback that constitutes the final topic of a year-long introductory physics sequence, aimed at biology and premedical undergraduate students. The genetic toggle switch consists of two genes, each of whose protein product represses the other's expression, while the repressilator consists of three genes, each of whose protein product represses the next gene's expression. Analytic, numerical, and electronic treatments of the genetic toggle switch shows that this gene circuit realizes bistability. A simplified treatment of the repressilator reveals that this circuit can realize sustained oscillations. In both cases, a "phase diagram" is obtained, that specifies the region of parameter space in which bistability or oscillatory behavior, respectively, occurs.

  11. Predictive factors of premedical student retention and degree completion within a private undergraduate university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frances E.

    Undergraduate retention and eventual graduation is of paramount importance to universities globally. Approximately 58% of students who began their college career at a four-year institution with the intention of receiving a bachelor's degree actually received that degree in a 6-year timeframe, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) annual report The Condition of Education 2009 (Planty, 2009). In certain subgroups of the undergraduate population, this graduation rate is even lower. This dissertation presents research into the academic integration of students in premedical programs subgroup based on Vincent Tinto's Integrationist Model of Student Departure. Pre-entry factors of interest for this study included incoming high school grade point average (GPA), incoming SAT total test scores, while post-matriculation factors included grade in organic chemistry, and the initial calculus course taken. A sample of 519 students from a private coeducational institution in the southeastern United States was examined. A logistic regression was performed to determine the effect of high school GPA, SAT total scores, organic chemistry grades, and calculus-readiness on graduation. A significant regression equation was found. The findings suggest that of the four predictor variables, high school GPA and organic chemistry grade were the only variables that showed significant predictive ability based on a significance level of p < .05. Further research should involve the examination of additional indicators of academic integration as well as information on the social integration of the student. Additionally, institutional leaders should continue to evaluate the premedical curriculum based on potential changes in medical school requirements.

  12. Comparison of nasal Midazolam with Ketamine versus nasal Midazolam as a premedication in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal S Khatavkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: T his study was done to compare effects of intranasal midazolam and intranasal midazolam with ketamine for premedication of children aged 1-12 yrs undergoing intermediate and major surgeries. Aims: Midazolam and Ketamine have already been used as premedicants in children. Our aim was to find out advantage of combination of midazolam with ketamine over midazolam by nasal route. Methods: Sixty children of age group 1-12 yrs of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA grade 1 and 2 were selected. Group A- midazolam (0.2 mg/kg, Group B- midazolam (0.15 mg/kg + ketamine 1 mg/kg. Both groups received drug intranasally 30 min before surgery in recovery room with monitored anesthesia care. Onset of sedation, sedation score, emotional reaction, intravenous cannula acceptance, and mask acceptance were studied. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired t test and chi square test. Results: Sedation score, anxiolysis, attitude, reaction to intravenous cannulation, face mask acceptance, and emotional reaction were significantly better in midazolam with ketamine group. Intra operatively, in both groups, pulse rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate had no significant difference; also, post operatively, no significant difference was observed in above parameters, post operative analgesia was significantly better in midazolam with ketamine group. Conclusions: Intra nasal premedication allows rapid and predictable sedation in children. Midazolam as well as combination of Midazolam with ketamine gives good level of sedation and comfort. But quality of sedation, analgesia, and comfort is significantly better in midazolam with ketamine group. No significant side effects were observed in both groups.

  13. Examining Preschool Teachers' Attitudes, Comfort, Action Orientation and Preparation to Work with Children Reared by Gay and Lesbian Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Archana V.; Averett, Paige; Parker White, Carmel; Deese, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed preschool teachers' attitudes towards homosexuality, their comfort levels in working with same sex parents and their children, their action orientation and preparedness to work on this topic. Twenty teachers from public schools and 20 from private child care settings in North Carolina, USA, participated in the study. Two…

  14. Preparing Kindergarten Two Children for Primary One in Singapore: Perceptions and Practices of Parents, Kindergarten Teachers and Primary Schoolteachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Mian Yee; Karuppiah, Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Successful transition from preschool to primary school is believed to have long-term positive effects on a child's academic performance and social competence. In this study, data were gathered from preschool teachers, primary schoolteachers and parents through the use of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews, on their perceptions and…

  15. Effects of dobutamine hydrochloride on cardiovascular function in horses anesthetized with isoflurane with or without acepromazine maleate premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schier, Mara F; Raisis, Anthea L; Secombe, Cristy J; Hosgood, Giselle; Musk, Gabrielle C; Lester, Guy D

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of acepromazine maleate premedication on cardiovascular function before and after infusion of dobutamine hydrochloride for 30 minutes in isoflurane-anesthetized horses. ANIMALS 6 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURES Each horse was anesthetized once following premedication with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg, IV) administered 30 minutes prior to anesthetic induction (ACP+ treatment) and once without premedication (ACP- treatment). Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of xylazine hydrochloride (0.8 mg/kg), ketamine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg), and diazepam (0.08 mg/kg). Horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and anesthesia was maintained via inhalation of isoflurane delivered in oxygen. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 60 mm Hg (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 57 to 63 mm Hg) for at least 15 minutes. Cardiac index, oxygen delivery index, and femoral arterial blood flow indices were determined 60 minutes after anesthetic induction (baseline). Dobutamine was then infused to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 80 mm Hg (interquartile range, 76 to 80 mm Hg). Data collection was repeated 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion for comparison with baseline values. RESULTS Complete data sets were available from 5 of the 6 horses. Dobutamine administration resulted in significant increases in oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices but no significant change in cardiac index for each treatment. However, at baseline or 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion, findings for the ACP+ and ACP- treatments did not differ. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, dobutamine administration increased oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices, but these changes were unaffected by premedication with acepromazine.

  16. Melatonin and clonidine premedication has similar impact on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propofol target controlled-infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Wawrzyniak, Katarzyna; Wiczling, Paweł; Przybyłowski, Krzysztof; Kokot, Zenon J; Matysiak, Jan; Pachutko, Agnieszka; Józefowicz, Martyna; Kusza, Krzysztof; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2015-03-01

    Recently oral melatonin has been proposed as an agent for premedication. In this study, we compared melatonin with clonidine, considering its anxiolytic properties as well as the influence of both agents on the pharmacokinetic, hypnotic, and hemodynamic effects of propofol during propofol-remifentanil total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). The dataset under analysis included 32 patients scheduled for a functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The population pharmacokinetic modeling was done with NONMEM. The PK of propofol was described with a two-compartment disposition model, whereas the BIS and AAI were described with a sigmoidal Emax model linked with the propofol concentration via the biophase compartment. The anxiolytic effect was assessed by means of the visual analog scale for anxiety (VAS-A). The population PK/PD model was successfully developed to describe the data. No significant differences in the PK/PD of propofol were noted due to the premedication with clonidine and melatonin. Melatonin was less effective than clonidine in reducing patients' anxiety at the induction of anesthesia, whereas clonidine premedication was associated with greater decrease in heart rate and blood pressure. A decreased EC50 (2.47 vs. 3.17 mg/L) and increased slope (2.71 vs. 1.30) of the sigmoidal Emax relationship was observed for the AAI index, as compared with the BIS measurements.

  17. [Evaluation of short-time premedication with d-chlorpheniramine maleate injection for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitivity reaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomohiko; Doi, Masakazu; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Akase, Tomohide

    2008-08-01

    Paclitaxel(referred to hereinafter as PTX )is used in ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, gastric cancer, and endometrial cancer with positive treatment result reports. However, severe allergic reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with relatively high frequency. For the prevention of such allergic reactions, administration of a premedication composed of the three components, dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection, diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablet, and ranitidine hydrochloride injection solution(or injectable famodine), is advised in the appended documentation. Administration is difficult because, among these three components, only diphenhydramine hydrochloride is administered orally and thus must be provided through the internal medicine department. Particularly when this combined dosage is administered as outpatient chemotherapy, the doctor must prescribe diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the patient must not forget to bring them on the day in which chemotherapy is administered. Also, checks by the medical staff such as pharmacists and nurses are required, complicating the administration of this therapy further. Taking this situation into consideration, our hospital uses a short-time premedication method wherein d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate injections are substituted for diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the time required for premedication is reduced to 15 minutes. This study investigated the allergic reaction ratio to consider the safety and usefulness of the short-time premedication method used at our hospital. The chemotherapy regimens conducted for the subject patients were 9 cases of PTX+CBDCA, 6 cases of biweekly- PTX, and 5 cases of weekly-PTX. A total of 67 PTX injections were given, 15 of them being first-time administrations. The ratio of allergic/hypersensitivity reactions was 10.0%(2 cases in 20). The short-time premedication method using d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate

  18. Oral Clonidine Premedication Reduces Nausea and Vomiting in Children after Appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Alizadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clonidine is an α2-agonist which is used as a sedative premedication in children. There are conflicting results in the published literature about the effect of clonidine on the incidence of post operative nausea and vomiting (PONV. We therefore decided to evaluate the effect of oral clonidine given preoperatively on the incidence of PONV in children after appendectomy.Methods: sixty children, 5-12 years old, classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, who were scheduled for appendecectomy were enrolled in this randomized double blinded clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 30 patients. Patients in clonidine group were given4 μg.kg -1 clonidine in 20 cc of apple juice and patients in control group were given only 20 cc of apple juice 1 hour before transporting to operating room. The protocol of general anesthesia and postoperative analgesia was the same for two groups. Incidence of PONV and antiemetic usage of patients were assessed during 0-24hours after anesthesia.Findings: The patients' characteristics were similar in two groups. Patients who had received clonidine had significantly less episodes of PONV and also less rescue antiemetic usage than patients in control group.Conclusion: we showed that oral clonidine at a dose of 4 μg.kg -1 administered preoperatively is associated with a reduced incidence of postoperative vomiting in children who have undergone appendectomy.

  19. Effects of oral clonidine premedication on haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, H; Nourozi, A; Fateh, S; Mohammadzadeh, A; Eghtesadi-Araghi, P; Jabbari, S; Kalantarian, M

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pre-anesthetic orally administration of clonidine on pulse rate and blood stress response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. In a double-blinded, randomized study, 274 ASA I and II subjects with age of 18 to 45 years scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled. They were randomly allocated to receive oral clonidine (0.2 mg) or placebo as premedication 90-120 min before surgery. All the patients received Succinylcholine (1.5 mg kg(-1)) after induction of anesthesia with Fentanyl (50 microg) and Thiopentone (5 mg kg(-1)). The anesthesia was maintained with halothane (1.5 Mac) in 50% mixture of N2O/O2. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure were recorded before, immediately after and then every 5 min after intubation until 20 min. The Clonidine group showed a significant superiority over placebo in the prevention of increase in systolic blood pressure as well as heart rate over the intubation. A significant difference was observed in both heart rate and systolic blood pressures were significantly higher in Control group at three subsequent measurements following intubation. The results of this study suggest that orally administered clonidine in preanesthetic period, provides more haemodynamic stability and attenuates the stress response to laryngoscopy and intubation.

  20. Demonstration of a frozen sample aliquotter to prepare plasma and serum aliquots without thawing frozen parent samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Helena Judge; Venturini, Deborah S

    2013-06-01

    Human biospecimens represent invaluable resources to advance molecular medicine, epidemiology, and biomarker discovery/validation, among other biomedical research. Biobanks typically cryopreserve biospecimens to safeguard their biochemical composition. However, exposing specimens repeatedly to freeze/thaw cycles can degrade their integrity in unforeseen ways. Those biobanks storing liquid samples, thus, regularly make a fundamental compromise at collection time between freezing samples in many small volumes (e.g., 0.5 mL or smaller) or in fewer, larger volumes (e.g., 1.8 mL). The former eliminates the need to expose samples to repeated freeze/thaw cycling, although increasing up-front labor costs, consumables used, and cold storage space requirements. The latter decreases up-front labor costs, consumables, and cold storage requirements, yet exposes samples repeatedly to damaging freeze/thaw cycles when smaller aliquots are needed for analysis. The Rhode Island BioBank at Brown University (RIBB) thoroughly evaluated the performance of an original technology that minimizes a sample's exposure to freeze/thaw cycling by enabling the automated extraction of frozen aliquots from one single frozen parent sample without thawing it. A technology that eliminates unnecessary sample exposures to freeze/thaw cycles could help protect sample integrity, extend its useful life, and effectively rectify and eliminate the aforementioned need to compromise. This report presents the results of the evaluation, and conclusively demonstrates the technology's ability to extract multiple uniform frozen aliquots from a single cryotube of never-thawed frozen human plasma, which faithfully represent the parent sample when analyzed for typical biochemical analytes, showing a coefficient of variability lower than 5.5%.

  1. Parental presence, clowns or sedative premedication to treat preoperative anxiety in children: what could be the most promising option?

    OpenAIRE

    Vagnoli, Laura; Caprilli, Simona; Messeri, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives: A significant number of children undergo surgery experience high levels of anxiety in the presurgical period. The aim of this study is to investigate which intervention is more effective in reducing preoperative anxiety. Methods/Materials: The sample was composed of 75 subjects (ages 5-12 years) who had to undergo minor day-surgery. Children were randomly assigned to: the Clowns group (N = 25), accompanied to the preoperative room by the clown...

  2. Hemodynamic stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Effect of two different doses of intravenous clonidine premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshikha C Tripathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Clonidine has emerged as an attractive premedication desirable in laparoscopic surgery wherein significant hemodynamic stress response is seen. The minimum safe and effective dose of intravenous clonidine to attenuate the hemodynamic stress response during laparoscopic surgery has however not yet been determined. Materials and Methods : This prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study was conducted on 90 adults of ASA physical status I and II, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Patients were randomized to one of the three groups (n= 30. Group I received 100 ml of normal saline, while groups II and III received 1 μg/ kg and 2 μg/ kg of clonidine respectively, intravenous, in 100 ml of normal saline along. All patients received glycopyrrolate 0.004 mg/kg and tramadol 1.5 mg/kg intravenously, 30 min before induction. Hemodynamic variables (heart rate, systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure, SpO2, and sedation score were recorded at specific timings. MAP above 20% from baseline was considered significant and treated with nitroglycerine. Results : In group I, there was a significant increase in hemodynamic variables during intubation pneumoperitoneum and extubation (P<0.001. Clonidine given 1 μg/kg intravenous attenuated hemodynamic stress response to pneumoperitoneum (P<0.05, but not that associated with intubation and extubation. Clonidine 2 μg/kg intravenous prevented hemodynamic stress response to pneumoperitoneum and that associated with intubation and extubation (P<0.05. As against 14 and 2 patients in groups I and II respectively, no patient required nitroglycerine infusion in group III. Conclusions : Clonidine, 2 μg/ kg intravenously, 30 min before induction is safe and effective in preventing the hemodynamic stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  3. Changes in intraocular pressure following administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation: Influence of dexmedetomidine premedication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chandan Kumar; Ray, Manjushree; Sen, Anjana; Hajra, Bimal; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Ghanta, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Use of suxamethonium is associated with an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and may be harmful for patients with penetrating eye injuries. The purpose of our study was to observe the efficacy of dexmedetomidine for prevention of rise in IOP associated with the administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. Methods: Sixty-six American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II patients undergoing general anaesthesia for non-ophthalmic surgery were included in this randomized, prospective, clinical study. Patients were allocated into three groups to receive 0.4 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D4), 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D6) or normal saline (group C) over a period of 10 min before induction. IOP, heart rate and mean arterial pressure were recorded before and after the premedication, after induction, after suxamethonium injection and after endotracheal intubation. Results: Fall in IOP was observed following administration of dexmedetomidine. IOP increased in all three groups after suxamethonium injection and endotracheal intubation, but it never crossed the baseline value in group D4 as well as in group D6. Fall in mean arterial pressure was noticed after dexmedetomidine infusion, especially in the D6 group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine (0.6 μg/kg as well as 0.4 μg/kg body weight) effectively prevents rise of IOP associated with administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. However, dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg may cause significant hypotension. Thus, dexmedetomidine 0.4 μg/kg may be preferred for prevention of rise in IOP. PMID:22223900

  4. Changes in intraocular pressure following administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation: Influence of dexmedetomidine premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Kumar Pal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of suxamethonium is associated with an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP and may be harmful for patients with penetrating eye injuries. The purpose of our study was to observe the efficacy of dexmedetomidine for prevention of rise in IOP associated with the administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. Methods: Sixty-six American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II patients undergoing general anaesthesia for non-ophthalmic surgery were included in this randomized, prospective, clinical study. Patients were allocated into three groups to receive 0.4 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D4, 0.6 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D6 or normal saline (group C over a period of 10 min before induction. IOP, heart rate and mean arterial pressure were recorded before and after the premedication, after induction, after suxamethonium injection and after endotracheal intubation. Results: Fall in IOP was observed following administration of dexmedetomidine. IOP increased in all three groups after suxamethonium injection and endotracheal intubation, but it never crossed the baseline value in group D4 as well as in group D6. Fall in mean arterial pressure was noticed after dexmedetomidine infusion, especially in the D6 group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine (0.6 mg/kg as well as 0.4 mg/kg body weight effectively prevents rise of IOP associated with administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. However, dexmedetomidine 0.6 mg/kg may cause significant hypotension. Thus, dexmedetomidine 0.4 mg/kg may be preferred for prevention of rise in IOP.

  5. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia after premedication with butorphanol in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Divers, Sonia M; Schumacher, Juergen; Stahl, Scott; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    The anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol followed by sevoflurane or isoflurane were compared in 23 male green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Heart and respiratory rates were recorded before administration of butorphanol (2 mg/kg i.m.) and at 30 min after premedication. Anesthesia was induced in 12 iguanas (group 1) with isoflurane (5%) and in 11 iguanas (group 2) with sevoflurane (7%). Heart rate, relative arterial oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and end-tidal CO2 concentrations (EtCO2) were measured every minute for the first 5 min and every 5 min thereafter. Arterial blood gas parameters were determined at 10 and 40 min after induction. Thirty minutes after butorphanol administration, no significant changes in heart and respiratory rate were seen as compared with baseline values. Quality and time to induction were superior with butorphanol-sevoflurane (6 +/- 3 min) than with butorphanol-isoflurane (9 +/- 4 min). Vaporizer settings during maintenance ranged between 1-3% and 2-4%, respectively. No significant differences in heart rate were noted between groups. In the sevoflurane group, SpO2 values were > 90% throughout. Although SpO2, values were isoflurane group, no significant differences in SpO2 values were seen over time and between groups. A significant decrease in EtCO2 with time was present in both groups, with no significant differences between the groups. At 10 and 40 min, arterial blood oxygen saturation values were > 90% in both groups and no significant differences were noted with time and between groups. Recovery time was significantly longer in the butorphanol-isoflurane group (35 +/- 27 min) than in the butorphanol-sevoflurane group (7 +/- 4 min). The cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol-isoflurane and butorphanol-sevoflurane assessed in this study are similar, and both inhalants appear to be safe and effective for induction and maintenance in the green iguana.

  6. A comparative study to assess the effect of oral alprazolam as premedication on vital parameters of patients during surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and monitor the changes in vital parameters of patients during surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Methods: This was an in vivo study conducted in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Terna Dental College. Sixty patients were randomly selected. Thirty patients were given a preoperative single dose of oral tablet alprazolam 0.5 mg as premedication (test group, whereas the other thirty were treated without any premedication (control group. Results: It was found that the mean systolic blood pressure during surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar was raised in the control group and exhibited minimal fluctuation in the test group. Conclusion: The use of tablet alprazolam as premedication before surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars resulted in stability of vital parameters, secondary to reduced patient anxiety.

  7. Influence of premedication with alprazolam on the occurence of obstructive apneas. A prospective randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflandre, E; Bonhomme, V; Courtois, A-C; Degey, S; Poirrier, R; Brichant, J-F

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative development or worsening of obstructive sleep apnea is a potential complication of anesthesia. The objective of this study was to study the effects of a premedication with alprazolam on the occurrence of apneas during the immediate postoperative period. Fifty ASA 1 - 2 patients undergoing a colonoscopy were recruited. Patients with a history of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were excluded. Recruited patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: in Group A, they received 0.5 mg of alprazolam orally one hour before the procedure; and in Group C, they received placebo. Anesthesia technique was identical in both groups. Patients were monitored during the first two postoperative hours to establish their AHI (apnea hypopnea index, the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour). Nine patients were excluded (4 in group A and 5 in group C) due to technical problems or refusal. Interestingly, premedication by alprazolam did not change intra-operative propofol requirements. During the first two postoperative hours, the AHI was significantly higher in group A than in group C (Group A: 20.33 ± 10.97 h(-1), C: 9.63 ± 4.67 h(-1)). These apneas did not induce significant arterial oxygen desaturation, or mandibular instability. Our study demonstrates that a premedication with 0.5 mg of alprazolam doesn't modify intra-operative anesthetic requirements during colonoscopy, but is associated with a higher rate of obstructive apneas during at least three and a half hours after ingestion. No severe side effects were observed in our non-obese population. Our results must be confirmed on a larger scale.

  8. STUDY OF THE ROLE OF ORAL CLONIDINE PREMEDICATION ON HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA WITH ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajyoti Chattopadhyay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC is known to produce Exaggerated Haemodynamic Responses (HDR owing to pneumoperitoneum. Different pharmacological agents like opioids, benzodiazepines, lignocaine, beta blockers, nitroglycerine, etc. are being used to alleviate HDR. Clonidine at doses varying from 2 to 6 mcg per kg body weight or a fixed dose of 150 or 200 mcg have been tested either through intravenous or oral routes with varying results thus creating confusion. Hence, we have designed to observe the effect of oral premedication with 200 mcg clonidine in attenuating HDR in patients undergoing LC under GA. METHODS Sixty adults aged between 18 and 60 years of either sex of American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA physical status I or II, undergoing LC under GA were randomly allocated to receive orally either tablet clonidine 200 mcg (Group 1, n=30 or multivitamin tablets (Group 2, n=30 about 60-90 minutes before induction of GA. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP, SpO2, and EtCO2 were recorded at different perioperative time points. The level of sedation was also noted using Ramsay Sedation Scale. Postoperatively, the incidence of shivering was recorded. RESULTS The surge in heart rate and MAP after intubation, 15 and 30 min after pneumoperitoneum, after release of CO2, and after extubation were found lower in the study group (p=0.0001. Patients receiving oral clonidine premedication showed a deeper level of sedation before induction (p=0.001 and in the postoperative period (p <0.001, better control of postoperative shivering (p=0.038, nausea (p=0.038 and vomiting (p=0.036. CONCLUSION Oral premedication with 200 mcg clonidine is effective in achieving better perioperative haemodynamic stability, deeper level of sedation, and reduced incidences of postoperative shivering, nausea, and vomiting compared with placebo. With such dose, clonidine does not produce any harmful changes in observed parameters like SpO2, EtCO2, or ECG.

  9. Preparation and Evaluation of SKI-HI: A Parent-Infant Auditory Training Program for under 3- Year -Old Hearing Impaird Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Samadi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Lack of early detection of and intervention for infants hearing loss results in a significant delay in speech and language development. So auditory rehabilitation plays an important role in improving the diminished communication ability. One of the most successful auditory training approaches is the SKI-HI parent-infant program. The purpose of this study was preparation and evaluation of Farsi-language SKI-HI program for under 3-year-old hearing impaired children. Materials and Methods: After translation and modification of the text of the program, fifteen under 3-year-old children with bilateral severe sensory hearing loss who were fitted with appropriate behind the ear hearing aids received intervention for 6 months. The levels of the auditory skills were measured pre and post intervention. Intervention Efficiency Index (IEI, Pretest Developmental Rate (PDR and Proportional Change Index (PCI were computed. Results: The data indicated that there was a significant difference between means of IEI and PDR which were 0.87 and 0.31, respectively. PCI was 3.38 indicated that the children's auditory skills developed at about 2.38 times higher rate after SKI-HI intervention than they did before. PCI confidence interval showed that development in the population is 1.46 to 3.30 times higher after SKI-HI intervention (with 95% probability the rate of auditory skills. Conclusion: The auditory training with Farsi-language SKI-HI parent-infant program may efficiently affect development of auditory skills of hearing impaired children.

  10. Sevoflurane-emergence agitation: Effect of supplementary low-dose oral ketamine premedication in preschool children undergoing dental surgery

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    Khattab Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The use of sevoflurane in pediatric anesthesia, which could enable a more rapid emergence and recovery, is complicated by the frequent occurrence of post-anesthesia agitation. This study aims to test the efficacy of adding a low dose of ketamine orally, as a supplement to the midazolam-based oral premedication for reducing sevoflurane-related emergence agitation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-two preschool children, aged between two and six years, with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, scheduled for elective dental filling and extractions under general anesthesia were included. The patients were allocated into two groups: Group M (46 patients received oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg, mixed with ibuprofen 10 mg/kg, while group KM (46 patients received a similar premedication mixture, in addition to ketamine 2 mg/kg. The acceptance of the drug mixture, the onset of action, and the occurrence of vomiting were monitored over the next 30 minutes. Induction of anesthesia was carried out using sevoflurane 8 Vol% in 100% oxygen via face mask. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane 1.5-2 Vol% in an oxygen-nitrous oxide mixture. After extubation, the standard scoring scale was used for assessing the quality of emergence. Agitation parameters were measured using a five-point scale. Agitated children were managed by giving intravenous increments of fentanyl 1 μg/ kg. The time of hospital discharge allowance was recorded. Results: Drug palatability, vomiting, and onset of action of premedication; showed no significant differences between both groups. Time of eye opening after discontinuation of sevoflurane showed no significant differences between both groups. Postoperative agitation score and rescue fentanyl consumption were higher in group M than in group KM on admission to the PACU ( P < 0.01. The time of hospital discharge allowance in group M was longer than in group KM ( P< 0.05. Conclusion

  11. Preparing for Multiple Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video Games, and the Internet Preparing for Multiple Births KidsHealth > For Parents > Preparing for Multiple Births Print ... a combination of both. The Risks of Multiple Births The most common risk involved with multiple births ...

  12. Effect of oral clonidine premedication on perioperative haemodynamic response and postoperative analgesic requirement for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shivinder; Arora, Kapil

    2011-01-01

    Clonidine has anti-hypertensive properties and augments the effects of anaesthesia, hence we considered it to be an ideal agent to contain the stress response to pneumoperitoneum. We studied the clinical efficacy of oral clonidine premedication in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Fifty patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anaesthesia were randomly allocated to receive premedication with either oral clonidine 150 μg (Group I, n = 25) or placebo (Group II, n = 25) 90 minutes prior to induction. The patients were managed with a standard general anaesthetic. The two groups were compared with respect to haemodynamic parameters, isoflurane concentration, pain and sedation scores, time to request of analgesic and cumulative analgesic requirements. Oral clonidine was found to be significantly better in terms of maintaining stable haemodynamics, having an isoflurane sparing effect and having a prolonged time interval to the first request of analgesia postoperatively compared to the control group. Administration of oral clonidine 150 μg as a pre-medicant in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy results in improved perioperative haemodynamic stability and a reduction in the intra-operative anaesthetic and post-operative analgesic requirements.

  13. Effect of oral clonidine premedication on perioperative haemodynamic response and post-operative analgesic requirement for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivinder Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clonidine has anti-hypertensive properties and augments the effects of anaesthesia, hence we considered it to be an ideal agent to contain the stress response to pneumoperitoneum. We studied the clinical efficacy of oral clonidine premedication in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Fifty patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anaesthesia were randomly allocated to receive premedication with either oral clonidine 150 μg (Group I, n = 25 or placebo (Group II, n = 25 90 minutes prior to induction. The patients were managed with a standard general anaesthetic. The two groups were compared with respect to haemodynamic parameters, isoflurane concentration, pain and sedation scores, time to request of analgesic and cumulative analgesic requirements. Oral clonidine was found to be significantly better in terms of maintaining stable haemodynamics, having an isoflurane sparing effect and having a prolonged time interval to the first request of analgesia postoperatively compared to the control group. Administration of oral clonidine 150 μg as a pre-medicant in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy results in improved perioperative haemodynamic stability and a reduction in the intra-operative anaesthetic and post-operative analgesic requirements.

  14. The role of codeine phosphate premedication in fibre-optic bronchoscopy under insufficient local anaesthesia and midazolam sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunezuka, Y; Sato, H; Tsukioka, T; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, Y

    1999-06-01

    Midazolam is widely used as a sedative agent to produce amnesia in patients undergoing fibre-optic bronchoscopy. However, if a patient does not receive sufficient local anaesthesia, continuous severe cough and physical movement may interrupt the procedure and reduce its safety. We therefore examined whether codeine phosphate is a useful premedication for bronchoscopy. The study design was a randomized comparison between codeine phosphate and a placebo in patients undergoing light local anaesthesia and midazolam sedation. We used low dose local anaesthesia (5 ml of nebulized 2% xylocaine) on the assumption of insufficient local anaesthesia. Patients were allocated to receive codeine phosphate 0.4 mg kg-1 or a saline placebo 60 min before they were sedated with i.v. midazolam. If the patients exhibited severe cough during bronchoscopy, intrabronchial supplemental local anaesthesia (2% xylocaine solution in 1 ml increments) was instilled via a bronchoscope to the trachea and segmental bronchi to suppress the cough. The dose of supplemental xylocaine was assessed and the requirements were significantly lower in the codeine group compared to the placebo group: 36.4 +/- 10.2 mg vs. 95.1 +/- 24.6 mg, respectively. After bronchoscopy, patients were interviewed by a doctor to assess their willingness to undergo a repeat procedure if one was clinically indicated, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. If local anaesthesia is insufficient, midazolam together with codeine phosphate premedication is useful for both the patient and the bronchoscopist.

  15. Parents are Educators: Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, Ed

    1982-01-01

    Discusses growing recognition of the importance of parenting and of parents as educators, due to the increase in single-parent households and awareness of importance of early childhood learning experiences. Ways outdoor education can help (emphasizing methods, materials, motivations) are described, including 11 starting points and 15 tips for…

  16. Comparative evaluation of dexmedetomidine with clonidine as premedication for attenuation of hemodynamic responses during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia

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    Salony Agarwal

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine premedication in dose of 1 and #956;g.kg-1 provided more stable hemodynamics during induction with propofol and following laryngoscopy and intubation as compared to clonidine. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 4026-4032

  17. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of psycholeptic drugs in the course of radiation disease. The effect of premedication with cystamine on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of nitrazepam. [Rats, x radiation, nitrazepam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szcawinska, K.; Cenajek, D.; Chodera, D.; Wojciak, Z.; Okulicz-Kozaryn, I.

    1977-01-01

    In the experiments carried out on rats the radiation disease was evoked by exposure to 600 R. The strongest radioprotective action of cystamine was found on the 3rd day of radiation disease. The tendency to normalization of both the pharmacodynamics (exploring mobility and anticonvulsant action) and pharmacokinetics of nitrazepam in the animals premedicated with cystamine was described.

  18. Parent-to-Parent Support.

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    Scott, Sue; Doyle, Phyllis

    1984-01-01

    A parent-to-parent support program was begun to provide early support for parents of handicapped children. New parents are carefully matched with helping parents, who have been trained in communication, resource finding, and referral making. (CL)

  19. Preparing children for the operating room: psychological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, T

    1994-11-01

    Children respond psychologically to the prospect of surgery in a variable and age-dependent manner. This review summarizes the psychoanalytic, cognitive, behavioural and family system models of child development. It then reviews studies of hospitalization and anaesthesia in children. These studies suggest that younger children, children previously anaesthetized, and children who experience turbulent anaesthetic inductions are at particular risk for postoperative behavioural disturbances. Strategies of dealing with children and their parents during the perioperative period are discussed. Such strategies include: allowing a parent to be present during induction of anaesthesia, administering sedative premedication, creating a supportive environment, educating children and parents (verbal descriptions, tours, books, videos), and establishing rapport with children and their parents. Age-specific techniques of establishing rapport with children are discussed. If children are less anxious during the perioperative period, not only will they often exhibit less behavioural disturbances postoperatively, but they may face subsequent medical care more easily.

  20. Sibling Rivalry (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to any family member is damaging to the self-esteem or psychological well-being of any family member ... Should I Intervene During Teasing? Becoming a Stepparent Parenting Multiples Birth of a Second Child Preparing Your ...

  1. "Hope for the best, prepare for the worst": A qualitative interview study on parents' needs and fears in pediatric advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Julia Desiree; Daxer, Marion; Jox, Ralf J; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Führer, Monika

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric advance care planning is advocated by healthcare providers because it may increase the chance that patient and/or parent wishes are respected and thus improve end-of-life care. However, since end-of-life decisions for children are particularly difficult and charged with emotions, physicians are often afraid of addressing pediatric advance care planning. We aimed to investigate parents' views and needs regarding pediatric advance care planning. We performed a qualitative interview study with parents of children who had died from a severe illness. The interviews were analyzed by descriptive and evaluation coding according to Saldaña. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 11 parents of 9 children. Maximum variation was sought regarding the child's illness, age at death, care setting, and parent gender. Parents find it difficult to engage in pediatric advance care planning but consider it important. They argue for a sensitive, individualized, and gradual approach. Hope and quality of life issues are primary. Parents have many non-medical concerns that they want to discuss. Written advance directives are considered less important, but medical emergency plans are viewed as necessary in particular cases. Continuity of care and information should be improved through regular pediatric advance care planning meetings with the various care providers. Parents emphasize the importance of a continuous contact person to facilitate pediatric advance care planning. Despite a need for pediatric advance care planning, it is perceived as challenging. Needs-adjusted content and process and continuity of communication should be a main focus in pediatric advance care planning. Future research should focus on strategies that facilitate parent engagement in pediatric advance care planning to increase the benefit for the families.

  2. Sedative and analgesic effects of buprenorphine, combined with either acepromazine or dexmedetomidine, for premedication prior to elective surgery in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James R; Grint, Nicola J; Taylor, Polly M; Murrell, Joanna C

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the sedative and analgesic effects of intramuscular buprenorphine with either dexmedetomidine or acepromazine, administered as premedication to cats and dogs undergoing elective surgery. Prospective, randomized, blinded clinical study. Forty dogs and 48 cats. Animals were assigned to one of four groups, according to anaesthetic premedication and induction agent: buprenorphine 20 μg kg(-1) with either dexmedetomidine (dex) 250 μg m(-2) or acepromazine (acp) 0.03 mg kg(-1), followed by alfaxalone (ALF) or propofol (PRO). Meloxicam was administered preoperatively to all animals and anaesthesia was always maintained using isoflurane. Physiological measures and assessments of pain, sedation and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) were made before and after premedication, intraoperatively, and for up to 24 hours after premedication. Data were analyzed with one-way, two-way and mixed between-within subjects anova, Kruskall-Wallis analyses and Chi squared tests. Results were deemed significant if p ≤ 0.05, except where multiple comparisons were performed (p ≤ 0.005). Cats premedicated with dex were more sedated than cats premedicated with acp (p cats (1.2 ± 1.0 mg kg(-1) ) than acp cats (2.5 ± 1.9 mg kg(-1)) (p = 0.041). There were no differences in sedation in dogs however PRO doses were lower in dex dogs (1.5 ± 0.8 mg kg(-1) ) compared to acp dogs (3.3 ± 1.1 mg kg(-1) ) (p cats or dogs. Choice of dex or acp, when given with buprenorphine, caused minor, clinically detectable, differences in various characteristics of anaesthesia, but not in the level of analgesia. A combination of buprenorphine with either acp or dex, followed by either PRO or ALF, and then isoflurane, accompanied by an NSAID, was suitable for anaesthesia in dogs and cats undergoing elective surgery. Choice of sedative agent may influence dose of anaesthetic induction agent. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists

  3. The impact of a pilot cooking intervention for parent-child dyads on the consumption of foods prepared away from home.

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    Robson, Shannon M; Stough, Cathleen Odar; Stark, Lori J

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study investigated the impact of a parent-child dyad cooking intervention on reducing eating dinner away from home. Eating away from home often results in consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods that can contribute to excess energy consumption in children. A pre-post design to evaluate a 10-week cooking intervention on reducing eating dinner away from home, energy intake, and improving diet quality was implemented. The intervention was delivered at an instructional kitchen on a university campus and assessments were completed at a children's academic medical center. Subjects included six parent-child dyads whom reported eating dinner away from home ≥3 times/week and in which the parent was overweight based on their body mass index (BMI) of ≥25 kg/m(2). Parents were a mean age of 34.7 (SD = 3.9) years, and children were a mean age of 8.7 (SD = 2.0) years. Two-thirds of parents self-identified themselves and their children as White. Results showed the proportion of dinners consumed by parent-child dyads away from home significantly decreased (F (1,161) = 16.1, p < 0.05) from 56% at baseline to 25% at post-treatment. Dyad cholesterol intake at dinner also significantly decreased over time; however, changes in energy intake, total fat, saturated fat, and sodium at dinner were not significant. A large effect size was found for changes in parent ratings of enjoyment of cooking between baseline and post-treatment. A cooking intervention that involves parent-child dyads and incorporates behavior management strategies and nutrition education may be an innovative obesity prevention intervention.

  4. Comparative evaluation of oral gabapentin versus clonidine as premedication on preoperative sedation and laryngoscopic stress response attenuation for the patients undergoing general anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Saikat Majumdar; Anjan Das; Haripada Das; Sambhunath Bandyopadhyay; Bimal Kumar Hajra; Dipankar Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation (L and I) is associated with rise in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), leading to adverse cardiological outcome especially in susceptible individuals. To compare the BP, HR during L and I as well as to evaluate the preoperative sedation status between oral clonidine (Group C) and oral gabapentine (Group G) as premedication for the patients undergoing major surgery under general anesthesia (GA). Materials and Methods: From April 2008...

  5. Comparative evaluation of oral clonidine and midazolam as premedication on preoperative sedation and laryngoscopic stress response attenuation for the patients undergoing general anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Anjan Das; Tushar Kanti Saha; Saikat Majumdar; Rahul Deb Mandal; Anindya Mukherjee; Subrata Kumar Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Context: Laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation is associated detrimental hemodynamic changes like rise in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) leading to adverse cardiological outcome specially in susceptible individuals. Aims: To compare the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) changes during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation as well as to evaluate the preoperative sedation status between oral clonidine and oral midazolam as premedication for the patients undergoing general anes...

  6. Comparative evaluation of oral clonidine and midazolam as premedication on preoperative sedation and laryngoscopic stress response attenuation for the patients undergoing general anaesthesia

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    Anjan Das

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation is associated detrimental hemodynamic changes like rise in blood pressure (BP, heart rate (HR leading to adverse cardiological outcome specially in susceptible individuals. Aims: To compare the blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR changes during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation as well as to evaluate the preoperative sedation status between oral clonidine and oral midazolam as premedication for the patients undergoing general anesthesia (GA. Settings and Design: Fifty patients between 18 and 60 years of age of either sex of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA Grade I and II undergoing GA were randomly divided into two equal groups of 25 patients each. Group-C patients received clonidine 4 mcg/kg orally and Group-M patients received 0.5 mg/kg midazolam orally as premedication. Material s and Methods: After measuring baseline hemodynamic parameters patients of both groups received premedication. Preoperative sedation was assessed 2 hr after premedication administration. Standard anesthetic technique was followed. Hemodynamic (HR, BP parameters were noted baseline, immediately after laryngoscopy and intubation and 5 min after intubation to observe the stress response. Results and Statistical Analysis: A significant difference in pre-operative sedation between two groups (P < 0.05 and midazolam (group M produced significantly better sedation than clonidine (group C. Laryngoscopic stress response in group C was still at a lower level than baseline values and significantly (P < 0.005 less than group M. Conclusions: Oral midazolam is more effective in producing preoperative sedation than oral clonidine while on the contrary oral clonidine is more efficacious in reducing laryngoscopic stress response than oral midazolam. Laryngoscopy and intubation was better controlled by oral clonidine than midazolam.

  7. [Night-time premedication with Di-potassium-clorazepate, diazepam or a placebo before anaesthesia; a double-blind trial (author' transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubella, U; Henschel, W F; Franzke, H G

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of dipotassium clorazepate (DPCA) and of diazepam (DP) as night-time premedication was tested against a placebo in a double-blind trial in 300 patients of all ages. Examination of the patients in the morning before anaesthesia showed that tachycardia, nausea and anxiety were considerably less in patients who had been premedicated with DPCA or DP. Relief from anxiety and restlessness according to standardized self-evaluation scale was most marked in the DPCA group. There were statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to the sleep pattern: 66 per cent of patients in the DPCA group fell asleep within the normal time of 2-15 minutes compared with 53 per cent in the DP group and 48 per cent in the placebo group. Uninterrupted sleep until the morning was experienced by about 70 per cent of patients who had been premedicated with DPCA as against 47 per cent and 31 per cent who had been given DP or a placebo respectively. The total sleeping period was normal or slightly prolonged in 73 and 74 per cent of patients who had received one or the other drug but in only 38 per cent of patients in the placebo group. As regarded the quality of sleep (quiet, uninterrupted sleep and feeling rested) the DPCA group considered it to have been much sounder than did the other groups. On account of its marked ataractic and sleep-protecting properties DPCA is considered to be the most suitable agent for night-time premedication.

  8. Effect of the premedication with oral clonidine on surgical comfort in patients undergoing fess due to advanced nasal polyposis: A randomized double blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugrul, Selahattin; Dogan, Remzi; Senturk, Erol; Kocak, Ilker; Sezen, Seda; Bakan, Mefkur; Ozturan, Orhan

    OBJECTıVE: The objective of this randomized double blind study was to evaluate effect of the premedication with oral clonidine on blood pressure, cleaning of surgical site and bleeding in the ESS performed due to advanced NP. A total of 52 patients who underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) due to Kennedy grade 4 nasal polyposis (NP) were included. Patients were randomized into two groups. Group 1 (n=26) received 0.2mg oral clonodine one hour before the operation in addition to standard anesthesia procedure. Group 2 (n=26) was administered standard anesthesia procedure alone. The amount of bleeding during surgery, cleaning of surgical site and surgeon's satisfaction were evaluated in comparison between the groups. The amount of bleeding and mean arterial pressure were significantly lower in the Group 1 compared to the Group 2. The cleaning of surgical site was found to be significantly better and surgeon's satisfaction significantly higher in the Group 1 than in the Group 2. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures during surgery were significantly lower in the Group 1 compared to the Group 2. Premedication with oral clonidine provides a clearer view of surgical site, reduces the amount of bleeding and significantly increases surgeon's satisfaction during the operation in FESS performed due to NP. Premedication with oral clonidine is a safe, inexpensive and effective methods in order to increase the surgical success and comfort and reduce complications in the FESS surgery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. A comparative study to evaluate the effect of intranasal dexmedetomidine versus oral alprazolam as a premedication agent in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

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    Lakshmi Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morbidly obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea are extremely sensitive to sedative premedication. Intranasal dexmedetomidine is painless and quick acting. Intranasal dexmedetomidine can be used for premedication as it produces adequate sedation and also obtund hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: Forty morbidly obese patients with BMI > 35 were chosen and divided into two groups. Group DEX received intranasal dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg (ideal body weight while other group (AZ received oral alprazolam 0.5 mg. Sedation scale, heart rate and the mean arterial pressure was assessed in both the groups at 0 hour, 45 minutes, during laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Results: The demographic profile, baseline heart rate, means arterial pressure, oxygen saturation and sedation scale was comparable between the two groups. The sedation scores, after 45 min, were statistically significant between the two groups i.e., 2.40 ± 1.09 in the AZ group as compared to 3.20 ± 1.79 in DEX group P value 0.034. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure and oxygen saturation were statistically similar between the two groups, after 45 min. The heart rate was significantly lower in the DEX group as compared to the AZ group. There was no statistical difference in the mean arterial pressure between the two groups either during laryngoscopy or tracheal intubation. Conclusion: Intranasal dexmedetomidine is a better premedication agent in morbidly obese patients than oral alprazolam.

  10. Comparative evaluation of halothane anaesthesia in medetomidine–butorphanol and midazolam–butorphanol premedicated water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis

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    V. Malik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Six clinically healthy male water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis 2–3 years of age and weighing 290–325 kg were used for 2 different treatments (H1 andH2. The animals of groupH1 were premedicated with medetomidine (2.5 g/kg, i.v. and butorphanol (0.05 mg/kg, i.v., while in groupH2 midazolam (0.25 mg/kg and butorphanol (0.05 mg/kg were used intravenously. Induction of anaesthesia was achieved by 5%thiopental sodium inH1 (3.85±0.63 mg/kg and H2 (6.96 ± 0.45 mg/kg groups. The anaesthesia was maintained with halothane in 100 % oxygen through a large animal anaesthetic machine. Better analgesia and sedation with a significantly lower dose of thiopental for induction and significantly higher values of sternal recumbency time and standing time were recorded in group H1 than in group H2 , whereas no significant (P > 0.05 difference for the halothane concentration was observed between groups H1 and H2. Significant decrease in heart rate was observed in group H1 whereas it significantly increased in group H2. In both groups, RR decreased during the preanaesthetic period, which increased significantly (P<0.01 after halothane administration. In both groups a significant (P<0.01 fall in RT was recorded from 20 min to the end of observation period. A significant (P < 0.05 fall in MAP was observed in group H1 from 15 min until the end, while in group H2 MAP increased nonsignificantly (P > 0.05 after premedication and a significant (P<0.05 occurredafter thiopental administration. In both groups a significant (P<0.01 increase in CVP and a significant (P<0.01 decrease in SpO2 were observed after premedication which persisted up to 120 min. ECG changes included significant (P<0.01 decrease and increase in QRS amplitudes in groupsH1 andH2 respectively, a significant (P < 0.05 increase in PR interval was recorded at 15 min in group H1, a significant (P<0.05 decrease in PR interval in groupH2 , a significant (P<0.05 decrease in T wave amplitude in groupH1, and a

  11. Oral premedication for pediatric anaesthesia: a comparison between midazolam and clonidine

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    Anupam Das

    2016-06-01

    Results: In the midazolam group 23 (76.67% children had no apprehension after parental separation and at induction (P and #706;0.001, sedation score at induction was significant higher in midazolam group versus clonidine group (93.33% versus 66.6%, P<0.01, clonidine resulted in a more stable pulse and blood pressure peri-operatively (P<0.05. Conclusion: Oral midazolam has better efficacy in terms of preoperative sedation and oral clonidine had stable hemodynamic profile and better analgesia in the clonidine group. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2341-2347

  12. Effects of oral clonidine premedication on hemodynamic status in bimaxillary orthognathic surgery: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Farnoosh; Marashi, Mojtaba; Tavakoli, Iman; Khakbaz, Oveis

    2016-04-01

    Controlled hypotension during a surgical procedure is a way to decrease blood pressure and subsequently to improve the field of operation. Clonidine is an antihypertensive agent used for induced hypotension. Correction of maxillomandibular discrepancies may necessitate performing osteotomy on both jaws in many cases. Bimaxillary orthognathic surgery is a procedure that is associated with significant blood loss. A total of 30 participants who were candidates for double-jaw orthognathic surgery were classified into two groups with equal numbers. In one group, 300 μg oral clonidine premedication was administered 90 min before the operation, and in the other group a placebo with the same condition as in the first group. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate at 10 min intervals, operation time, blood loss, and surgeon satisfaction were measured. A total of 10 men and 5 women with a mean age of 22.9 ± 2.9 years in the study group and 13 men and 2 women with a mean age of 22.1 ± 2.1 years in the control group were evaluated. The MAP was significantly lower in the clonidine group (P bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. Hemodynamic stability, bleeding control, decrease of operative time, and enhancement of surgical results are advantages of this method. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparative study of clonidine versus a combination of diazepam and atropine for premedication in orthopaedic patients.

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    Chaurasia S

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Sixty patients in the age group of 18-60 years of A.S.A. Grade I/II risk, scheduled for elective orthopaedic surgeries under general anaesthesia were studied for pre-medication with either oral clonidine or with combination of effects of diazepam & atropine. Patients in Group A (clonidine group received tablet clonidine 100 mcg (1 tablet if less than 50 kg in weight and 200 mcg if weighing more than 50 kg two hours before surgery. Patients in Group B (Diazepam-atropine group received one tablet of Diazepam (10 mg orally two hours before surgery and injection atropine-sulphate 0.01 mg/kg half an hour preoperatively by intramuscular route. In our study, the sedative and anti-sialogogue effects of clonidine were comparable to those of diazepam-atropine combination, which are commonly used premedicants. The anti-anxiety effect of clonidine was found to be better than that of diazepam-atropine combination. Clonidine also proved to be a better agent for the attenuation of pressor response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Thus, oral clonidine is a better premedicant compared to atropine-diazepam combination. Also, it is a more acceptable agent because of its oral route of administration.

  14. Clonidine premedication in patients with sleep apnea syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Michael T; Hansen, Ernil; Waldhauser, Daniela; Selig, Christoph; Kuehnel, Thomas S

    2005-11-01

    Patients with sleep apnea often present with cardiac diseases and breathing difficulties, with a high risk of postoperative respiratory depression. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, prospective study in 30 adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea, undergoing elective ear-nose-throat surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to receive placebo or clonidine (2 microg/kg oral) the night before and the next morning 2 h before surgery. Spo2, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, snoring, and oronasal airflow were monitored for 36 h. A standard anesthesia was used consisting of propofol and remifentanil. Anesthetic drug consumption, postoperative analgesics, and pain score were recorded. In the clonidine group, mean arterial blood pressures were significantly lower during induction, operation, and emergence from anesthesia. Both propofol dose required for induction (190 +/- 32.2 mg) and anesthesia (6.3 +/- 1.3 mg . kg(-1).h(-1)) during surgery were significantly reduced in the clonidine group compared with the placebo group (induction 218 +/- 32.4, anesthesia 7.70 +/- 1.5; P clonidine group. Apnea and desaturation index were not different between the groups, whereas the minimal postoperative oxygen saturation on the day of surgery was significantly lower in the placebo than in the clonidine group (76.7% +/- 8.0% versus 82.4% +/- 5.8%; P clonidine premedication stabilizes hemodynamic variables during induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia and reduces the amount of intraoperative anesthetics and postoperative opioids without deterioration of ventilation.

  15. Single dose oral clonidine premedication does not enhance postoperative, single low dose epidural morphine analgesia in hysterectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oofuvong, Maliwan; Chanvej, Laksamee; Thongsuksai, Paramee

    2005-03-01

    In this randomized, double blind placebo controlled study, the authors evaluated the effects of oral clonidine premedication on very low dose epidural morphine analgesia in 50 hysterectomy patients. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral clonidine 300 microg (n = 25) or a placebo (n = 25) 90 minutes before insertion of the epidural catheter. 3 ml of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (5 microg ml(-1) mixed with 2 mg morphine were injected via epidural, followed by an additional volume of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (5 microg ml(-1)) titrated to T6 block height before commencing general anesthesia. The postoperative analgesia regimen was 2 mg of intravenous morphine every 10 minutes for the first 48 hr and 1 gm of oral acetaminophen every 4-6 hr after initiation of oral diet at 24-48 hr as required. Morphine consumption, acetaminophen, pain scores, and side effects were recorded thoughout 48 hr after surgery. The results show patients in the clonidine and placebo groups were not different in terms of local anesthetics dose (p = 0.27), total morphine and acetaminophen requirement (p = 0.34, p = 0.1) respectively. Pain scores at rest and movement were also not different in both groups (p = 0.83, p = 0.64) respectively. No serious adverse effects were noted. The authors concluded that oral clonidine approximately 6 microg kg(-1) does not enhance the analgesic effect of epidural morphine 2 mg after hysterectomy.

  16. How different are premedical freshmen who enter after introducing a multiple mini-interview in a medical school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hwan; Hwang, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Jeong; Yoon, Hyun Bae; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Lee, Seunghee

    2014-06-01

    Seoul National University College of Medicine (SNUMC) introduced a multiple mini-interview (MMI) to assess the noncognitive ability of applicants in 2013. This study aims to examine whether students differ with regard to their personal career values and academic achievements by admission type. We administered a survey about career values and self-perception of competencies. We then compared the survey results and academic achievements by admission type. Finally, the correlation coefficient between MMI score and academic achievement was calculated in the MMI group. The data were analyzed by t-test and correlation analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in career values between groups. For self-perception of competency, only the 'interact in heterogeneous groups' domain was higher for those who entered through the MMI. The MMI group had a higher and broader level of academic achievement. Within the MMI group, there was a significant correlation between grade point average and MMI station scores. The characteristics of students who entered through the MMI were more in accordance with the goals of SNUMC and the competency of future doctors. Considering the unique feature of premedical academic achievement, this result implies that such students have superior noncognitive abilities, such as self-development and internal motivation. How these differences change subsequently remains to be seen.

  17. Tolerance of CD8+ T cells developing in parent-->F1 chimeras prepared with supralethal irradiation: step-wise induction of tolerance in the intrathymic and extrathymic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, H; Sprent, J

    1993-02-01

    Tolerance of CD8+ cells was examined in parent-->F1 bone marrow chimeras (BMC) prepared with supralethal irradiation; host class I expression in the chimeras was limited to non-BM-derived cells. In terms of helper-independent proliferative responses in vitro and induction of graft-vs.-host disease on adoptive transfer, CD8+ cells from long-term chimeras showed profound tolerance to host antigens irrespective of whether the cells were prepared from the thymus or from spleen or lymph nodes. By limiting dilution analysis, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for host antigens were rare in the extrathymic lymphoid tissues. In the thymus, by contrast, host-specific CTL precursors were only slightly less frequent than in normal parental strain mice. These host-specific CD8+ cells survived when BMC thymocytes were transferred intravenously to a neutral environment, i.e., to donor strain mice. When transferred to further BMC hosts, however, most of the host-reactive cells disappeared. Collectively, the data suggest that tolerance of CD8+ cells in BMC hosts occurs in both the intrathymic and extrathymic environments. In the thymus, contact with host antigens on thymic epithelial cells deletes CD8+ cells controlling helper-independent proliferative responses and in vivo effector functions but spares typical helper-dependent CTL precursors. After export from the thymus, most of the CTL precursors are eliminated after contacting host antigens on stromal cells in the extrathymic environment.

  18. Parental Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ezra S Simon

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted in Ghana to investigate, (1) factors that predict parental involvement, (2) the relationship between parental home and school involvement and the educational achievement of adolescents, (3) the relationship between parental authoritativeness and the educational achievement of adolescent students, (4) parental involvement serving as a mediator between their authoritativeness and the educational achievement of the students, and (5) whether parental involvement decreases...

  19. Pre-medication to block [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in the brown adipose tissue of pediatric and adolescent patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfand, Michael J.; O' Hara, Sara M.; Curtwright, Lois A.; MacLean, Joseph R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Radiopharmaceutical uptake of [{sup 18}F]2-deoxy-2-glucose (FDG) in brown adipose tissue is noted on 15-20% of positron emission tomography (PET) scans in children and adolescents. To determine whether [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue can be adequately blocked by pre-medication other than moderate-dose oral diazepam. One hundred and eighteen [{sup 18}F]FDG PET body imaging studies were performed in 69 pediatric patients with a variety of solid tumors. The mean age at the time of imaging was 12.9 years (range 1.2-22.6 years), and 33 studies were performed in patients younger than 10 years old. Seventy-six were performed in boys and 42 in girls. Patients were imaged using a dedicated PET camera. Pre-medication was given in 88 studies: 45 received intravenous fentanyl (0.75-1.0 {mu}g/kg), 34 received low-dose oral diazepam (0.06 mg/kg) and 9 received moderate-dose oral diazepam (0.10 mg/kg). Thirty patients received no pre-medication, 7 of whom were known to have received opiates for pain during the 12 h before the study. Six body regions in the neck and chest were reviewed for [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue. Uptake of FDG in brown fat was visually graded: 0 for no FDG uptake, 1 for low-grade uptake, 2 for moderate uptake, and 3 for intense uptake. Visual grades 2 and 3 were considered to interfere potentially with image interpretation in the neck and chest. Data were analyzed by multivariate regression using a Poisson distribution. [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue was most often seen in the lateral neck region and superior and lateral to the lungs (in 36 and 39 studies, respectively). Uptake was also seen near the costovertebral junctions (15 studies), in the superior and central neck in 7 studies and in the anterior mediastinum in 2. Brown adipose tissue uptake was thought to interfere potentially with image interpretation (visual grades 2 and 3) in 19 studies - in 6 of 23 (26.1%) studies after no pre-medication and no

  20. Amphotericin B deoxycholate (d-AMB) use in cases with febrile neutropenia and fungal infections: lower toxicity with suitable premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oto, Ozgur Akin; Paydas, Semra; Disel, Umut; Yavuz, Sinan; Seydaoglu, Gulsah

    2007-03-01

    In spite of the development of new antifungal drugs, amphotericin B deoxycholate (d-AMB) remains the gold standard in the treatment of severe fungal infections in immunosuppressed hosts. However, d-AMB is a toxic drug, the most important dose-limiting toxicities being nephrotoxicity and infusion-related allergic reactions. Lipid and liposomal formulations of d-AMB have relatively lower toxicity and are considered alternative choices. However, the routine use of these formulations is limited by their higher cost. Using retrospective analysis, we explored the incidence of nephrotoxicity and allergic reactions requiring the cessation of conventional d-AMB in 113 cases treated with the drug. In contrast to knowledge in the relevant literature, we did not detect significant toxicity, which would have required discontinuation of the d-AMB treatment. Mean serum creatinine levels were 0.72 +/- 0.25 and 0.84 +/- 0.31 mg dl(-1) before and after therapy, respectively. Although the difference between creatinine levels before and after d-AMB is statistically significant, the creatinine level increased twofold in only eight cases. Mean serum potassium levels were 3.8 +/- 0.54 and 3.6 +/- 0.7 mmol l(-1) before and after d-AMB respectively. Potassium levels below 3 mmol l(-1) were found in 7 and 17 cases before and after d-AMB respectively. Potassium levels were statistically lower in cases with fungal mucositis. Severe infusion-related allergic reactions were observed in three cases. Antihistamine and corticosteroid were added to the treatment in these cases. With these findings, we can conclude that d-AMB is a tolerable, low cost drug which can be safely used provided there is suitable premedication and monitoring of blood urea nitrogen, serum potassium and magnesium levels.

  1. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF GABAPENTIN AND CLONIDINE PREMEDICATION ON POST OPERATIVE ANALGESIA REQUIREMENT FOLLOWING ABDOMINAL SURGERIES UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Aim of our study was to compare the relative effectiveness of gabapentin and clonidine premedication on patients undergoing elective abdominal surgeries under G.A. OBJECTIVE: gabapentine and clonidine have anti-nociceptive properties .This study assess their efficacy in prolonging the analgesic effect intra-operative and postoperative analgesic requirement. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 225 patients of either sex of age between 20-60 years, ASA grade I & II, patient admitted to Hamidia hospital for elective abdominal surgeries under general anaesthesia were included in the study. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups 75 each group I : Control group (patients received placebo tablet at 90 min before the surgery,group II Gabapentin 300 mg tablet orally 90 min before surgery ,groupIII:clonidine150µg tablet orally given 90 min before surgery. Duration of postoperative analgesia, Degree of postoperative pain (VAS scoreand added rescue analgesia required in 24 hrs were recorded postoperatively. RESULT: Analysis reveled that there was no difference in the HR, SBP among the three group during the study. Duration of postoperative analgesia, observed from time of reversal to first demand of analgesia in the recovery room was more in group II compared to group I and group III (p-value <0.001, highly significant. Pain perception was highly blunted in groups II compared to group I & group III. Total rescue analgesic requirement during the postoperative 24hrs period was much lower in group II inj Diclofenac compared to group I and group III . ( p-value < 0.001, highly significant.CONCLUSION: Given 90 min before induction of GA oral gabapentin(300 mg or clonidine(150 µg preoperatively was effective in lowering postoperative VAS pain score and consumption of analgesics, it was also shows that gabapentin significantly decreases postoperative pain intensity and analgesic consumption after abdominal surgeries.

  2. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF INTRAVENOUS DEXMEDETOMIDINE AND CLONIDINE AS PREMEDIC ATION FOR PROLONGATION OF BUPIVA CAINE SUBARACHNOID BLOCK FOR LOWER LIMB ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Addition of α2 adrenergic agonists with local anaesthetics in bupivacaine spinal anaesthesia prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade and postoperative analgesia with minimal haemod ynamic alterations. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine and clonidine as premedication on subarachnoid blockade duration, postoperative analgesia, and sedation score in patients undergoing lower limb orthopaedic surgeries in bupivacaine (0.5% heavy intrathecal block. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: We carried out a prospective, randomized, double blind study in which 60 patients of ASA status I or II, scheduled for orthopaedic lower limb surgery under spinal a naesthesia, were randomly allocated into two groups of 30 each group A and group B. Group A received dexmedetomidine 0.5μg/kg IV and group B received clonidine 1μg/kg in 10 ml of normal saline intravenously as premedication over 10 min., before subarachnoi d blockade with 3.0 ml. of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. Onset time and regression times of both sensory and motor blockade, haemodynamic parameters were recorded. Duration of postoperative analgesia and sedation score with adverse effects were also recorde d. RESULTS: The sensory block level was higher (T5 - T7 and earlier in onset (1.81±1.75min. in dexmedetomidine group than clonidine with level (T6 - T8 and onset (2.56±1.62min.. Dexmedetomidine also increased the onset (3.54±3.07min. and duration (265.45± 41.50min. of motor block achieved as compared to clonidine. The Ramsay sedation score was also greater in dexmedetomidine group than clonidine group (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Single dose of premedication with intravenous dexmedetomidine is better than intrav enous clonidine during bupivacaine spinal anaesthesia in orthopaedic lower limb surgeries for prolongation of sensory and motor blockade.

  3. Parents' food choices: obesity among minority parents and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy, Yvette M

    2010-01-01

    This article examines obesity among minority parents and children in the context of culture, socioeconomic status, and the parent-child dyad. Knowing parental attitudes about eating habits, food preparation, and dietary guidelines is crucial to addressing childhood obesity. Parents of African American, Caribbean, and Hispanic descent participated in focus groups to explore their attitudes and practices regarding the food choices they make for themselves and their 6- to 12-year-old children. Cultural identification and time constraints were identified as key themes that influence food choice decisions. Several recommendations are made for health care practitioners working with families to reduce the incidence of obesity.

  4. Teen Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parents can continue to attend school Classes in parenting skills and child development Child health care Counseling ... the fact that success stories abound. There are single teenage mothers who complete their educations and go ...

  5. Comparison of medetomidine and dexmedetomidine as premedication in isoflurane anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery in domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kästner, S B; Von Rechenberg, B; Keller, K; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R

    2001-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the potency of dexmedetomidine in relation to medetomidine in sheep undergoing orthopaedic surgery by comparing the anaesthetic requirements and cardiovascular changes at a dose relationship that represented equipotency in vitro. Twenty-four non-pregnant, female sheep were used. The study was carried out as a blind, randomized, experimental trial. Group 1 received 5 micrograms/kg bodyweight (BW) dexmedetomidine and group 2 received 10 micrograms/kg BW medetomidine intravenously 5 min prior to induction of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with ketamine (2.0 mg/kg BW intravenously) and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen. End expired anaesthetic concentration (FEIso), end expired carbon dioxide concentration (FECO2), respiratory frequency (fR), direct arterial blood pressures, heart rates (HR) and arterial blood gases were monitored. Data were averaged over time and tested for differences between groups by independent t-tests, and analysis of variance for repeated measures. Average FEIso concentrations required to maintain a surgical plane of anaesthesia were not different between groups (1: 1.02 +/- 0.04%; 2: 0.99 +/- 0.07%). There was no difference in HR, arterial blood pressures, fR, FECO2 and arterial blood gases between groups. Average mean PaO2 were 279.54 +/- 113.37 mmHg and 220.21 +/- 102.15 mmHg with individual minimum values of 27.2 mmHg and 58.5 mmHg in groups 1 and 2, respectively. In conclusion, intravenous dexmedetomidine at 5 micrograms/kg BW and medetomidine at 10 micrograms/kg BW have the same effects on isoflurane requirements and cardiopulmonary parameters in sheep, indicating an equipotent dose relationship. Both preparations induced moderate to severe hypoxaemia in individual sheep.

  6. Single Parents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    FOR some parents the responsibility of bringing up a child is a one person task. Shouldering parental duties of two, single parents not only raise the child, but bring home the bacon as well. This is life for many people—either because of the death of a spouse, divorce, living apart from a spouse, pregnancy without marriage, or abandonment—the parent and child

  7. How Prepared is Prepared Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-Levy; Macleod; Rickert

    1996-10-01

    A 17-year-old female was in the final stage in treatment of right unilateral cleft lip and palate. She had undergone a number of previous surgeries. Hearing and speech were good on evaluation, and her social and family situation were deemed excellent. After preparatory orthodontics she underwent a Lefort I maxillary advancement. Surgery was successful and she was admitted into postoperative recovery. However, the lack of adequate preoperative preparation caused traumatic reaction from the patient and her parents: anxiety over appearance, crying, refusal of oral fluids and oral care, refusal of analgesia, and refusal to mobilize. The patience and persistence of hospital staff slowly overcame all adversities and the patient moved on to full and successful recovery, but this case prompted changes in preoperative procedures and involvement of patients and their families in postoperative meal selection, planing, and preparation.

  8. Comparison of surgical conditions following premedication with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery: A randomized, double-blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS provides a challenge and an opportunity to the anesthesiologists to prove their mettle and give the surgeons a surgical field which can make their delicate surgery safer,more precise and faster. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical field and the rate of blood loss in patients premedicated with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery. Material and Methods: ASA I or II patients who were scheduled to undergo ESS were randomly allocated to group D (n = 30 or group C (n = 30. The patients′ vital parameters, propofol infusion rate, and rate of blood loss were observed and calculated. The surgeon, who was blinded, rated the visibility of the surgical field from grade 0-5. Results: In the clonidine group, the rate of blood loss, the surgical time, propofol infusion rate was found to be statistically lower as compared to the diazepam group. Also a higher number of patients in the clonidine group had a better surgical score (better surgical field than the diazepam group and vice versa. Conclusions: Premedication with clonidine as compared to diazepam, provides a better surgical field with less blood loss in patients undergoing ESS.

  9. The effect of oral clonidine premedication on blood loss and the quality of the surgical field during endoscopic sinus surgery: a placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masood; Ebneshahidi, Amin

    2011-08-01

    Bleeding during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) remains a challenge for both surgeons and anesthesiologists despite several modalities available for improving the surgical field. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of oral clonidine premedication on blood loss and the quality of the surgical field in FESS. In a placebo-controlled clinical trial, a total of 84 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-II patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic sinusitis were randomly allocated to receive either oral clonidine 0.2 mg or identical-looking placebo tablets 90 min before arrival at the operating room. Blood loss in the clonidine group was 214 ± 67 ml on average and that in the placebo group was 276 ± 78 ml (mean ± SD, p clonidine group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group (2 (1-3) vs. 2.5 (2-4), p clonidine group than with that in the placebo group (median score, 4 (3-5) vs. 3 (1-5), p premedication with oral clonidine 0.2 mg can effectively reduce bleeding during FESS.

  10. Comparison of surgical conditions following premedication with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery: A randomized, double-blinded study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat Pai, Rohini V; Badiger, Santhoshi; Sachidananda, Roopa; Basappaji, Santhosh Mysore Chandramouli; Shanbhag, Raghunath; Rao, Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) provides a challenge and an opportunity to the anesthesiologists to prove their mettle and give the surgeons a surgical field which can make their delicate surgery safer,more precise and faster. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical field and the rate of blood loss in patients premedicated with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery. Material and Methods: ASA I or II patients who were scheduled to undergo ESS were randomly allocated to group D (n = 30) or group C (n = 30). The patients' vital parameters, propofol infusion rate, and rate of blood loss were observed and calculated. The surgeon, who was blinded, rated the visibility of the surgical field from grade 0-5. Results: In the clonidine group, the rate of blood loss, the surgical time, propofol infusion rate was found to be statistically lower as compared to the diazepam group. Also a higher number of patients in the clonidine group had a better surgical score (better surgical field) than the diazepam group and vice versa. Conclusions: Premedication with clonidine as compared to diazepam, provides a better surgical field with less blood loss in patients undergoing ESS. PMID:27275059

  11. Effects of midazolam or tramadol premedication on early cognitive function in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): A randomized, controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Hulya; Coskun, Ilker; Arslan, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the sedative efficacy and effects on early period cognitive function of premedication in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Forty patients (18-70 years; American Society of Anesthesiology risk category I-III) undergoing elective ERCP were randomized to receive oral premedication with 0.15 mg/kg midazolam or 1 mg/kg tramadol. Cognitive function was determined by mini-mental test (MMT). Target scores for effective sedation were determined as a Bispectral index score of 70-90 and modified Ramsay Sedation Scale score (mRSS) of 2-4. Global MMT score was not significantly different between treatment groups at 60 min post-ERCP. A significant deterioration in the MMT subcategory of recall was determined in with midazolam versus tramadol. Level of sedation (mRSS) was higher in with midazolam compared with tramadol reaching statistical significance at 30 min after drug administration. Although more effective sedation was obtained with midazolam in patients undergoing ERCP, there was a dysfunction in memory recall. It was concluded, however, that early cognitive functions were generally preserved with both drugs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2013-01-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. ...

  13. A comparative study of effect of dexmedetomidine in dose of 0.7 μg/kg and clonidine in doses of 2 μg/kg as premedication before general anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Singh

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Study concluded that Dexmedetomidine had better control over hemodynamics as compared to clonidine when given as premedication, the drug dose used for induction was lesser and also the post-operative analgesia duration was longer with dexmedetomidine. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3365-3369

  14. Parents' Perceptions of Their Role in Children's Career Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2005-01-01

    This research used the Comprehensive Career Needs Survey to assess the career planning needs of junior and senior high students in southern Alberta. This article examines parents' perceptions of how prepared parents believe their children are for career planning; the role parents play; how parents can help their children with career planning; and…

  15. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  16. Parental divorce and parental death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Jette; Thuen, Frode; Poul, Bruun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify research on children and adolescents who experience double bereavement, i.e. the experience of loss through parental divorce followed by either parental death or critical illness with imminent death. This knowledge may identify evidence to underpin knowledge......; challenges in both custodial and non-custodial parental death; risk of mental health problems, and the need of support and interventions....

  17. Adolescent test or procedure preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... imagery Trying other distractions, such as listening to music through headphones, if allowed When possible, let your ... MA, Chorney JM, Mayes L. Web-based tailored intervention for preparation of parents and children for outpatient ...

  18. Parent Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    and parents say given these assumptions? Which management responsibility is addressed through such training of the difficult conversation?  My conclusions are, briefly, that the difficult conversation is more correctly to be called an impossible conversation. It is an asking for the parent's consent...

  19. Parental Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain, Katrin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Parental responsibility can be broadly defined as a legal term that specifies rights and responsibilities of parents towards their children. It is usually given initially to the birth mother and the married father, though unmarried fathers can obtain it either with the agreement of the mother or through a court order. In accordance with the provisions in law the court can also transfer parental responsibility to other persons (e.g. adoptive parents or in cases of child abuse or neglect to the state, represented by local authority social services. While the concept of parental responsibility can be found in most countries, the exact terminology varies from one country to another, as well as over time.

  20. COMPARISON BETWEEN TAB. CLONIDINE AND TAB. LABETALOL AS ORAL PREMEDICATION IN ATTENUATION OF HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY: A RANDOMISED DOUBLE BLIND STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS To study and compare Labetalol and Clonidine as premedication to attenuate haemodynamic changes to Laparoscopy through oral route, as it is safe method of administration and easy to prescribe. METHODS In a prospective, comparative randomised study, 60 adult patients of both sexes of ASA Grade I and II were divided randomly into 2 groups of 30 each, Group L and Group C. Group L were given Tab. Labetalol 200mg orally 60-90 minutes before induction. Group C were given Tab. Clonidine 300µg orally 60-90 minutes before induction. We compared the degree of attenuation of haemodynamic changes during laparoscopic surgeries. RESULTS Oral Clonidine has better control on the rise in heart rate and mean arterial pressure (MAP during laryngoscopy for laparoscopy compared to oral Labetalol. CONCLUSION We conclude that oral Clonidine showed better attenuation of haemodynamic changes than oral Labetalol.

  1. Effect of oral clonidine, etoricoxib, and gabapentin as premedication on sensory and motor blocks and post operative analgesia in surgeries under subarachnoid block using bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Akhilesh K; Tayal, Swapnil; Chadha, Madhur; Ganguly, Subroto; Mandhyan, Rajani

    2014-01-01

    Oral premedicant has better patient compliance since it avoids a potential needle prick, and hence can be considered closest to an ideal premedicant. This was a randomized prospective observational study on 120 patients after obtaining ethical committee approval and valid informed consent from patients to be part of the study. We assessed the onset and duration of both sensory and motor blocks along with postoperative analgesic requirement by the patient in terms of first dose and total dose required over the period of 24 hours. It is recommended that clonidine, etoricoxib, and gabapentin be considered as good premedicants for patients undergoing surgery under spinal anesthesia. However, more research using these drugs needs to be carried out in the field of premedication.

  2. [Administration of premedication with fexofenadine for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitive reactions in breast cancer patients complicated with closed-angle glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsubara, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Kyoko; Kogure, Yuuki; Matsuhisa, Tetsuaki; Eguchi, Hisae

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most important breast cancer treatment drugs. However, severe hypersensitivity reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with high frequency. For the prevention of such hypersensitivity reactions, administration of a premedication composed of three components, diphenhydramine, ranitidine (or famotidine), and dexamethasone, has been advised in package insert information of medicine. Administration of diphenhydramine is difficult in breast cancer patients complicated with closed-angle glaucoma, because diphenhydramine has a weak anticholinergic adverse effect which can induce mydriasis and glaucoma attack. We studied the prevention of severe hypersensitivity reactions and of glaucoma attack in 2 breast cancer patients complicated with closed angle glaucoma at our hospital from April 2007 to March 2008. We switched from diphenhydramine to fexofenadine as the medicine to prevent hypersensitivity reactions. Hypersensitivity reactions were not observed throughout all courses in both patients, and no glaucoma attack was observed.

  3. Anticholinergic premedication to prevent bradycardia in combined spinal anesthesia and dexmedetomidine sedation: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun Jin; Park, Jun Ha; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Kyung Woo; Choi, Hey Ran; Bang, Si Ra

    2016-12-01

    When dexmedetomidine is used in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, high incidence of bradycardia in response to parasympathetic activation is reported. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of atropine premedication for preventing the incidence of bradycardia and the hemodynamic effect on patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with sedation by dexmedetomidine. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Operating room. One hundred fourteen patients (age range, 2-65 years; American Society of Anesthesiology class I-II) participated in this study, willing to be sedated and to undergo spinal anesthesia. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group A and group C. After performing spinal anesthesia, dexmedetomidine was infused at a loading dose of 0.6 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by an infusion at 0.25 μg/(kg h). Simultaneously with the loading dose of dexmedetomidine, patients in group A received an intravenous bolus of 0.5 mg atropine, whereas patients in group C received an intravenous normal saline bolus. Data on administration of atropine and ephedrine were collected. Hemodynamic data including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean blood pressure (MBP) were also recorded. The incidence of bradycardia requiring atropine treatment was significantly higher in group C than group A (P=.035). However, the incidence of hypotension needing ephedrine treatment showed no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=.7). Systolic blood pressure and heart rate showed no significant differences between the 2 groups (P=.138 and .464, respectively). However, group A showed significant increases in DBP and MBP, and group C did not (P=.014 and .008, respectively). Prophylactic atropine reduces the incidence of bradycardia in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with dexmedetomidine sedation. However, DBP and MBP showed significant increases in patients when prophylactic atropine was administrated. Therefore

  4. Comparison of quality of induction of anaesthesia between intramuscularly administered ketamine, intravenously administered ketamine and intravenously administered propofol in xylazine premedicated cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.B. Dzikiti

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of induction of general anesthesia produced by ketamine and propofol, 2 of the most commonly used anaesthetic agents in cats, was assessed. Eighteen cats admitted for elective procedures were randomly assigned to 3 groups and then premedicated with xylazine 0.75 mg/kg intramuscularly before anaesthesia was induced with ketamine 15 mg/kg intramuscularly (KetIM group, ketamine 10 mg/kg intravenously (KetIV group or propofol 4 mg/kg intravenously (PropIV group. Quality of induction of general anaesthesia was determined by scoring ease of intubation, degree of struggling, and vocalisation during the induction period. The quality of induction of anaesthesia of intramuscularly administered ketamine was inferior to that of intravenously administered ketamine, while intravenously administered propofol showed little difference in quality of induction from ketamine administered by both the intramuscular and intravenous routes. There were no significant differences between groups in the ease of intubation scores, while vocalisation and struggling were more common in cats that received ketamine intramuscularly than in those that received intravenously administered ketamine or propofol for induction of anaesthesia. Laryngospasms occurred in 2 cats that received propofol. The heart rates and respiratory rates decreased after xylazine premedication and either remained the same or decreased further after induction for all 3 groups, but remained within normal acceptable limits. This study indicates that the 3 regimens are associated with acceptable induction characteristics, but administration of ketamine intravenously is superior to its administration intramuscularly and laryngeal desensitisation is recommended to avoid laryngospasms.

  5. Parents of the welfare state:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Bjørg; Dannesboe, Karen Ida; Palludan, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    (Bach & Christensen 2016/7). Numerous studies have already shown how parents all over the world are increasingly expected to take an active role at their children’s schools (Axelvoll 2016, Dannesboe), but this seemingly also now applies to ECEC. Based on ethnographic fieldwork carried out in three ECEC...... of need, do they share the responsibility, are they the experts, guardians of moral rectitude, or just the people who take care of the children while the parents are at work? We are interested both in how ECEC staff behave towards parents and how parents perceive the impact of ECEC personnel...... on their parenting. We focus in particular on these questions in terms of preparing children for school....

  6. Parental involvement with their working teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Carol W; Vladutiu, Catherine J; Schulman, Michael D; Rauscher, Kimberly J

    2011-07-01

    Adolescents work in varied environments and are exposed to hazards. Parents of these working adolescents have an opportunity to help them select jobs and address worker safety issues with employers. The present study conducted telephonic interviews among a national sample of 922 working adolescents along with one parent of each to examine the involvement of parents in their children's employment and safety issues. Over 70% of parents were found who helped their children identify job opportunities, consider questions about work hours or tasks, fill out job applications, prepare for interviews, or handle difficult safety issues. Parents suggested stronger actions in response to hypothetical situations than when confronted with real problems. Mean level of parental involvement did not vary by the number of hazards reported by teen workers. Parents were involved in helping their teens with work. Further research should explore how to enhance parental effectiveness by making work safe for teens.

  7. Parental Marital Quality, Parental Divorce, and Relations with Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alan; Amato, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined data from 419 parents and their adult children to assess impact of parental marital quality and divorce while child is residing with parents on parent-child relations 12 years later. Low marital quality and divorce appeared to have independent effects on adult child-parent relations. Fathers' relationships suffered more than mothers';…

  8. EFFICIENCY OF PREPARED BAITS OF LONE OR/AND ADMIXED FOUR BOTANICAL OILS ON THE VIABILITY OF SUCCESSIVE RAISED GENERATIONS OF AGROTIS IPSILON (HUFNAGEL) (INSECTA: LEPIDOPTERA: NOCTUIDAE) AFTER TREATING THE PARENT ONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, H A; El-Sayed, Nagda A; El-Kady, Magda B; Tayeb, E H; Mourad, A K; Kordy, A M; Henaidy, Zeinab M

    2014-01-01

    The present study is initiated to determine the toxic and delayed effects of four botanical oils on the greasy cutworm A. ipsilon, aiming to attain an alternative environmentally safe and effective phytochemicals against the insect-pest. Four botanical oils (camphor, red basil, menthol and rose oil) were added at rates of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/w). The tested oils were added alone, and/or admixed at proportional rate of 1:1 in the prepared baits against the exposed 4th instar till the 6th instar larvae of the insect. The study was run under the laboratory higrothermic conditions of 25±2°C and 65±5% R.H. The results showed that the tested baits of camphor, red basil and menthol oils at concentration rates of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/w) adversely affected the inspected parameters of fitness components of the treated individuals of parent (p) generation. They gave more or less fewer numbers of weak unviable adult-moths, which were either sterile or they laid few numbers of infertile eggs and died before the induction of (F1) progeny. That failure could be elucidated by the rapid occurrence of drastic effects on the biological performance of both the influenced sexes of adult-moths along the period of parent's development. Finally it ended by the inhibited induction of (F1) progeny. A delayed effect of the prepared baits of rose oil at 0.5 and 1.0% (v/w), was assessed on the following raised F1, F2, F3 and F4 generations after parent's treatment. The delayed effect was detected as less efficient latent effect on each of these consequently raised generations; characterized by the gradual decrease of the number of alive immatures and adult-moths. The effect was recorded as gradual increase of dead and malformed individuals and adult-moths. In addition to the gradual decrease of deposited and/or hatched eggs up to the 4th generation, which ended by the complete failure of the development. That failure could be also attributed to the cumulated effects of the induced recessive lethal

  9. ORAL CLONIDINE AS A PREMEDICATION IN SPINAL ANESTHESIA: EFFECTS ON THE DURATION OF BLOCK AND HEMODYNAMIC STATUS A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE BLIND CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K MONTAZERI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Valuable effects of oral clonidine hemodynamic instability during general anesthesia and prolongation of spinal anesthesia were approved in previous studies. In this study, the effects of clonidine as an oral premedication on the duration of block, hemodynamic status and ephedirine requirements in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, has been evaluated. Methods. In a double blind controlled clinical trial, sixty patients of ASA class I and II, who were candidates for spinal anesthesia for lower abdominal and lower extremity surgical procedures of less than 90 minutes duration, were randomly divided into two equal groups. In interventional group, clonidine and in another control group placebo, was taken orally, 90 minutes before begining of operation. Blood pressure and pulse rate in predetermined times, the amounts of ephedrine being used, duration of sensory and motor blocks and the block level were compaired. Results. Mean changes in MAP and pulse rate at 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after induction of spinal anesthesia from basic values in the study group was more than control group (P < 0.05. Mean duration of sensory and motor block in the study group was more than the control group (P < 0.001. Mean of the ephedrine requirements in the study group (5.47 ± 7.5rng was more than the control group (1.9 ± 4.97mg (P < 0.05. Block levels was the same (P > 0.05. Discussion. It is implicated that the effect of oral clonidine premedication in prolongation the block time in spinal anesthesia is almost conclusive. But regarding more hemodynamic flactuations in the study group, the results of this study was different from studies that performed with general anesthesia. This may be due to additive effects of spinal anesthesia or inappropriate dose of clonidine. More ephedrine requirements in the study group was due to more hemodynamic instability in this group which may be decreased by modifying the clonidine dose. It is suggested

  10. Postoperative Pain After Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial Comparing the Effects of Tramadol and Gabapentin as Premedication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Farnoush; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Mirmansouri, Ali; Fakoor, Fereshteh; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Biazar, Gelareh; Zarei, Tayyebeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncontrolled postoperative pain, characteristic to abdominal hysterectomy, results in multiple complications. One of the methods for controlling postoperative pain is preemptive analgesia. Gabapentin and tramadol are both used for this purpose. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effects of tramadol and gabapentin, as premedication, in decreasing the pain after hysterectomy. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 120 eligible elective abdominal hysterectomy patients, divided in three groups of 40, receiving tramadol, gabapentin and placebo, respectively. Two hours before the surgery, the first group was given 300 mg gabapentin, the second one was given 100 mg tramadol, while the other group was given placebo, with 50 ml water. After the surgery, in case of visual analog pain scale (VAS) > 3, up to 3 mg of diclofenac suppository would be used. Pain score, nausea, vomiting, sedation, patient’s satisfaction and the number of meperidine administered during 24 hours (1 - 4 - 8 - 12 - 16 - 20 - 24 hours) were recorded. If patients had VAS > 3, despite using diclofenac, intravenous meperidine (0.25 mg/kg) would be prescribed. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 software, chi-square test, general linear model and repeated measurement. Results: The three groups were similar regarding age and length of surgery (up to 2 hours). The average VAS, in the placebo group, was higher than in the other two groups (P = 0.0001) and the average received doses of meperidine during 24-hour time were considerably higher in placebo group, compared to the other two groups (55.62 mg in placebo, 18.75 mg in gabapentin and 17.5 mg in tramadol groups, P = 0.0001). Nausea, vomiting and sedation, in the tramadol group, were higher than in the other two groups, although they were not significant. Patients’ dissatisfaction, in the placebo group, during initial hours, especially in the fourth hour, was higher (P = 0.0001). In the gabapentin and tramadol groups

  11. Total Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins…

  12. Total Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins…

  13. Adolescents' and Parents' Conceptions of Parental Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1988-01-01

    Children ranging from fifth to twelfth grade, and their parents, were presented with items pertaining to family transgressions and asked to judge the legitimacy of parental jurisdiction, justify its wrongness or permissibility, and assess its contingency on parental authority. (PCB)

  14. Adolescents' and Parents' Conceptions of Parental Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1988-01-01

    Children ranging from fifth to twelfth grade, and their parents, were presented with items pertaining to family transgressions and asked to judge the legitimacy of parental jurisdiction, justify its wrongness or permissibility, and assess its contingency on parental authority. (PCB)

  15. Seeing African Americans as Competent Parents: Implications for Family Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary roles of parents is to guide and socialize children to make meaningful life choices. African American parents, in particular, have the additional tasks of preparing their children to thrive in an environment that has historically been hostile toward African Americans. Yet, many African American parents are often depicted as…

  16. Responsive Parenting: One Approach for Teaching Single Parents Parenting Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Marilyn C.; Nelson, Dorellis J.

    1981-01-01

    Responsive Parenting is a program designed to use parents in helping teach other parents to apply a behavior analysis approach in managing the behavior of their children. A description and evaluation of the adaptations for single-parents are discussed. Guidelines for program development and implementation are provided. (Author/RL)

  17. COMPARISON OF ORAL TRAMADOL AND ORAL CLONIDINE AS A PREMEDICATION TO PREVENT PERIOPERATIVE SHIVERING IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING SURGERY UNDER SUBARACHNOID BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Ajjapp

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Perioperative shivering, in patients undergoing surgery under central neuraxial blockade is a common complication. Prophylactic measures to reduce shivering are quintessential to decrease the morbidity and mortality. AIMS This randomised prospective study seeks to compare the efficacy of oral clonidine and tramadol, as premedication, in prevention of shivering in patients undergoing surgery under spinal anaesthesia. METHODS AND MATERIAL The patients were randomly allocated into two groups (50 patients each. Group C received oral clonidine 100 μg; Group T received oral tramadol 50 mg. Number of patients having shivering, their grades and duration, hemodynamic changes were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Data were analysed using appropriate statistical software, Student’s t-test when appropriate RESULTS In group I and II, 39 patients (78% and 28 patients (56% did not shiver, respectively. No drug showed any statistically significant advantage over the other. CONCLUSION Oral clonidine and tramadol were comparable in respect to their effect in decreasing the incidence, intensity and duration of shivering when used prophylactically in patients who underwent surgery under subarachnoid blockade.

  18. Prenatal parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Vivette; Capron, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Parenting begins before birth. This includes prenatal maternal and paternal bonding with the baby, and biological effects on fetal development. Recent research has confirmed how prenatal maternal stress can alter the development of the fetus and the child, and that this can persist until early adulthood. Children are affected in different ways depending, in part, on their own genetic makeup. The fetus may also have a direct effect on prenatal maternal mood and later parenting behaviour via the placenta. The father is important prenatally too. An abusive partner can increase the mother's prenatal stress and alter fetal development, but he can also be an important source of emotional support. New research suggests the potential benefits of prenatal interventions, including viewing of prenatal scans and cognitive behavioural therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Helicopter Parents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏宪国

    2008-01-01

    孩子的自理能力差,与父母的过度关心有关。请阅读下面一篇短文,想想你有此经历吗? Do you know parents of high school students who come to the rescue whenever their son or daughter is in a tough spot?Are they still delivering forgotten lunches or gym clothes to school?Have they tried to

  20. Parenting Styles and Beliefs about Parental Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that models of parenting style, such as Baumrind's popular model, are insensitive to variations in parenting resulting from characteristics of the different situations in which the parenting is expressed. Argues that considering parenting in context adds greater specificity to the model and enhances the potential for predicting child…

  1. Parenting Styles and Beliefs about Parental Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that models of parenting style, such as Baumrind's popular model, are insensitive to variations in parenting resulting from characteristics of the different situations in which the parenting is expressed. Argues that considering parenting in context adds greater specificity to the model and enhances the potential for predicting child…

  2. Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor KidsHealth > For Parents > Preparing Your Child for Visits ... vital to making an informed diagnosis. Choose a Doctor Who Relates Well to Kids Because your doctor ...

  3. Pre-anesthetic Anxiety Level in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: Comparison between Maternal Presence during Anesthetic Induction and Midazolam Premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna F Soenarto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available General anesthesia was needed by children with congenital heart disease (CHD who underwent cardiaccatheterization procedure and surgery. Pre-anesthetic anxiety in children with CHD can cause significantproblems during induction of anesthesia which leads to negative postoperative outcomes. This studycompared the role of maternal presence during anesthesia induction with midazolam premedication onpre-anesthetic anxiety level in children with CHD. Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital on April toSeptember 2014. Forty-five CHD patients aged 2-5 years old who underwent cardiac invasive procedurewere divided into P group (received midazolam premedication and M group (had maternal presence duringanesthesia induction. Modified Yale Pre-anxiety Scale (MYPAS was used for measuring anxiety level ineach patient during preoperative visit, on the time patient entered the procedure room and during induction ofanesthesia. There was no significant difference of MYPAS scores between the two groups in all measurementtimes. The MYPAS score results were non-anxious (median score 23.4 and the highest was at induction ofanesthesia. Inter-rater agreement test between 2 observers was good (k>0.5. In conclusion, there was nosignificant difference between the effect of maternal presence during induction of anesthesia and midazolampremedication on pre-anesthetic anxiety level in children with CHD. Keywords: pre-anesthetic anxiety, congenital heart disease, maternal presence, midazolam.   Peran Kehadiran Ibu selama Induksi Anestesia dengan PremedikasiMidazolam terhadap Tingkat Kecemasan Pra-anestesia Anak denganPenyakit Jantung Bawan Abstrak Pembiusan umum diperlukan oleh pasien dengan penyakit jantung bawaan (PJB pada saat kateterisasiatau pembedahan jantung. Kecemasan pra-anestesia dapat menimbulkan masalah saat induksi anestesiayang berdampak negatif pascapembedahan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membandingkan efek premedikasimidazolam dan kehadiran ibu selama

  4. Living with a Single Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Living With a Single Parent KidsHealth > For Kids > Living With a Single Parent ... single parents can be a great idea, too. Single Parents and Work Single parents are often working parents ...

  5. Role of butorphanol and ondansetron premedication in reducing postoperative shivering after general and spinal anesthesia: A randomized comparative study from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sujeet; Verma, Satyajeet; Pandey, H P; Yadav, Pramod; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative shivering (PAS) is a common problem following general and spinal anesthesia and may lead to multiple complications. This placebo-controlled, randomized study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of Ondansetron and butorphanol premedication reduces shivering after general and spinal anaesthesia. The aim of this study to highlight the efficacy of Butorphenol and ondosteron in controlling postoperative shivering. This clinical trial included 180 patients scheduled for elective general surgery, E.N.T., Ophthamological operations, randomly divided to six groups. Three groups in which General Anaesthesia was used i.e. Group 1-ondansetron 8 mg intravenously(IV).Group 2 butorphanol 2 mg IV and Group 3 - saline 4 ml IV. And three groups where spinal Anaesthesia was used i.e. Group 4-Ondosteron 8 mg IV, Group 5 butorphanol 2 mg IV and Group 6 - saline 4 ml IV 3-5 minutes before anaesthesia. Patients were observed in terms of vital signs, side effects and shivering. The type of the study was double blind randomized trial. Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 13.0 statistical analysis software. Postoperative shivering was observed in 15.5%, 22.2% and 60% in general anaesthesia groups I II and III respectively. The reduction of core and dermal temperature during the anaesthesia and recovery, changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were similar in all three groups (i.e. Group I,II,III). In spinal anaesthesia groups, PAS occurred 10%, 13.3% and 43.3% in group IV, V, VI respectively. The reduction of core temperature is similar in all three groups of spinal anaesthesia. But heart rate and mean arterial pressure increase were significant in control saline group in post operative recovery time. No complication seen in any of the six groups. This study suggested that use of Butorphanol and Ondansteron both are effective in reducing the incidence of PAS after general and spinal anaesthesia.

  6. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices…

  7. How Can Catholic Higher Education Help K-12 Catholic Schools and School Systems Prepare for and Maximize Participation in Parental Choice Programs? "A Reflection on the 2013 Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference on Catholic School Financing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Susan Ferguson reflects on the Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference of 2013 and the breakout group talk titled "Helping the Church Prepare for and Implement Publicly Funded Programs." The main point of the talk asked: "How Can Catholic Higher Education Help K-12 Catholic Schools and School Systems Prepare for and…

  8. Impact of the parenting style of foster parents on the behaviour problems of foster children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M J; Salas, M D; Bernedo, I M; García-Martín, M A

    2015-09-01

    Few studies have analysed the effects of the parenting style used by foster carers on children's behaviour problems. This study examines the role played by the quality of the emotional relationship with foster carers and the kind of discipline they use as regard internalizing and externalizing problems among foster children. Participants were 104 foster children (56 boys and 48 girls) and their respective foster families. The Child Behaviour Checklist, the Affect and Communication Scale, and the Rules and Demands Scale were completed by foster parents. A series of linear regression analyses were performed using the stepwise method. The main findings were as follows: an authoritarian parenting style explained the internalizing problems presented by foster children (11% of the variance); criticism/rejection, authoritarian parenting and permissive parenting explained externalizing problems (37% of the variance); and criticism/rejection and authoritarian parenting explained total problems (29% of the variance). These results indicate that criticism/rejection on the part of foster parents, as well as the use of inappropriate parenting styles (authoritarian and permissive), has an important effect in relation to the behaviour problems of foster children. This highlights the key role that foster carers play in terms of tackling the behaviour problems that foster children present. The findings also suggest that preparation for fostering should focus especially on ways of helping foster parents both to acquire positive parenting strategies and to avoid authoritarian and permissive parenting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... KidsHealth from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Search Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections ... this movie to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC ...

  10. Comprehensive NICU Parental Education: Beyond Baby Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Sara L

    2017-01-01

    Educating NICU families during their child's hospitalization and prior to hospital discharge is an integral task for staff from the moment an infant is admitted to the unit. Staff has the responsibility of providing parents with a myriad of education regarding the intensive care environment and information concerning their child's medical condition. With first-time parents, staff teaching topics extend to also include training on how to perform basic newborn care such as diapering, bathing, feeding, and numerous other primary parenting responsibilities. True comprehensive education, however, should include information about and evidence on the significance of parental self-care in not only their own health and emotional stability but also the cognitive and behavioral development of their child prior to leaving the comfort of their NICU support network. Recommendations for this essential education are presented so NICU providers can best prepare parents for this critical responsibility.

  11. Resilient Parenting: Overcoming Poor Parental Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Wendy J.; Combs-Orme, Terri

    2007-01-01

    This study identified groups of mothers with varying patterns of adaptive functioning and bonds with their own parents. These patterns were related to mothers' parenting of their own children to understand how some mothers avoid repeating the cycle of poor parenting. Data from 210 new mothers were analyzed before hospital discharge about bonding…

  12. Chinese Parenting Reconsideration: Parenting Practices in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-mei; Luster, Tom

    This study examined authoritative and authoritarian parenting and specific parenting practices among Chinese mothers with preschoolers. The final sample consisted of 463 mothers with their 3 to 7 year-olds from 11 preschools, in Taiwan. Mothers completed a Chinese translation of the Parenting Behavior Questionnaire that assessed their parenting…

  13. Review of research literature on: "Parenting styles and childrearing practices among Poles : historical and contemporary perspectives" : report prepared in the framework of the Polish-Norwegian research project PARMigration Navigator

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a literature review of existing research on issues pertaining to parenting styles and child rearing practices among Polish migrant families living abroad in different immigration contexts and under changing socio-economic conditions in Poland. The review was conducted in the scope of the international research project entitled ‘Socio-cultural and Psychological Predictors of Work-Life Balance and Gender Equality - Cross-Cultural Comparison of Polish a...

  14. Role of butorphanol and ondansetron premedication in reducing postoperative shivering after general and spinal anesthesia: A randomized comparative study from North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sujeet; Verma, Satyajeet; Pandey, H. P.; Yadav, Pramod; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postoperative shivering (PAS) is a common problem following general and spinal anesthesia and may lead to multiple complications. This placebo-controlled, randomized study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of Ondansetron and butorphanol premedication reduces shivering after general and spinal anaesthesia. Aims: The aim of this study to highlight the efficacy of Butorphenol and ondosteron in controlling postoperative shivering. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial included 180 patients scheduled for elective general surgery, E.N.T., Ophthamological operations, randomly divided to six groups. Three groups in which General Anaesthesia was used i.e. Group 1-ondansetron 8 mg intravenously(IV).Group 2 butorphanol 2 mg IV and Group 3 – saline 4 ml IV. And three groups where spinal Anaesthesia was used i.e. Group 4-Ondosteron 8 mg IV, Group 5 butorphanol 2 mg IV and Group 6 – saline 4 ml IV 3-5 minutes before anaesthesia. Patients were observed in terms of vital signs, side effects and shivering. Settings and Design: The type of the study was double blind randomized trial. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 13.0 statistical analysis software. Results: Postoperative shivering was observed in 15.5%, 22.2% and 60% in general anaesthesia groups I II and III respectively. The reduction of core and dermal temperature during the anaesthesia and recovery, changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were similar in all three groups (i.e. Group I,II,III). In spinal anaesthesia groups, PAS occurred 10%, 13.3% and 43.3% in group IV, V, VI respectively. The reduction of core temperature is similar in all three groups of spinal anaesthesia. But heart rate and mean arterial pressure increase were significant in control saline group in post operative recovery time. No complication seen in any of the six groups. Conclusion: This study suggested that use of Butorphanol and Ondansteron both are effective

  15. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H

    2013-10-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. Every culture is characterized, and distinguished from other cultures, by deep-rooted and widely acknowledged ideas about how one needs to feel, think, and act as an adequately functioning member of the culture. Insofar as parents subscribe to particular conventions of a culture, they likely follow prevailing "cultural scripts" in childrearing. Broadening our definition, it is therefore the continuing task of parents also to enculturate children by preparing them for the physical, psychosocial, and educational situations that are characteristic of their specific culture. Cross-cultural comparisons show that virtually all aspects of parenting children are informed by culture: culture influences when and how parents care for children, what parents expect of children, and which behaviors parents appreciate, emphasize and reward or discourage and punish. Thus, cultural norms become manifest in the mental health of children through parenting. Furthermore, variations in what is normative in different cultures challenge our assumptions about what is universal and inform our understanding of how parent-child relationships unfold in ways both culturally universal and specific. This essay concerns the contributions of culture to parenting and child mental health. No study of a single society can address this broad issue. It is possible, however, to learn lessons about parenting and child mental health from the study of different societies.

  16. Reaching Parents Through Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Ronald J.

    1974-01-01

    The parent involvement program evolved from the needs of parents. Basic to the program is the concept of parenting, which implies taking positive action to facilitate and meet the needs of the children ahe family. Parents participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of their child's program. (Author)

  17. A Chance to Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Susan; Brillhart, Lindsay; Lightfoot, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    While parents with disabilities may face big challenges, with appropriate supports, many can be great parents. Just like other parents, they do not have to be responsible for every part of childrearing all by themselves. All parents rely on supports to help raise their children, such as day care, carpools, schools, babysitting co-ops, or advice…

  18. Parental Relationships and Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ray B.

    1971-01-01

    Confirmed is Bieber's finding (1962) that childhood parental relationships of homosexual men are less desirable than those of heterosexual men. However, while parental impact on children may be greater than the other way around, child impact on the parent probably determines parental attitudes toward that child. (CJ)

  19. Parental Relationships and Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ray B.

    1971-01-01

    Confirmed is Bieber's finding (1962) that childhood parental relationships of homosexual men are less desirable than those of heterosexual men. However, while parental impact on children may be greater than the other way around, child impact on the parent probably determines parental attitudes toward that child. (CJ)

  20. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  1. Reconceptualizing Parent Involvement: Parent as Accomplice or Parent as Partner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, Nichole M.; Brooks, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Policy statements of the last two decades have directed schools to enter into partnerships with parents to enhance the social, emotional, and academic growth of their children. However, in practice and scholarship, parental involvement has been constructed as attendance to school-based activities and needs. This article draws on data from an…

  2. Lesson Design and Biblical Reasoning for Homeschool Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Lynn Michelle

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to create a lesson design to train parent/educators in the art of preparing lessons incorporating biblical reasoning throughout all subjects. It is an introductory seminar and not intended to provide complete training in this area. A sample group of parent educators were made available to pilot the program. Among…

  3. Overcoming Parental Resistance to Change in a Professional Development School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, James R.; Young, James R.; Egan, M. Winston; Ostlund, Margaret R.; Cook, Paul F.; Tibbitts, Cathy B.; Dewitt, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the role of two parents who helped design and implement a field-based teacher-preparation program at one professional-development school. Interviews with participants led to four main themes that illuminated the stages parents experienced: excluding breeds suspicion, holding our ground, saying the same thing, and establishing a new…

  4. Parenting African American Children in the Context of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Angela W.; Smyke, Anna T.; Middleton, Melissa; Black, Corey L.

    2015-01-01

    The legacy of slavery in the United States has impacted generations of African Americans, especially parents who must prepare their children to face the challenges associated with being a person of color in this country. The authors explore aspects of racism, White privilege, racial socialization, and African American parents' fears as they equip…

  5. An Earthquake Education Program with Parent Participation for Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulay, Hulya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the earthquake education program which was prepared for 5 to 6 year old children and to draw attention to the importance of parent participation. The earthquake education program was applied to 93 children and 31 parents in the province of Denizli situated in the first degree seismic zone…

  6. An Earthquake Education Program with Parent Participation for Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulay, Hulya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the earthquake education program which was prepared for 5 to 6 year old children and to draw attention to the importance of parent participation. The earthquake education program was applied to 93 children and 31 parents in the province of Denizli situated in the first degree seismic zone…

  7. Parenting African American Children in the Context of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Angela W.; Smyke, Anna T.; Middleton, Melissa; Black, Corey L.

    2015-01-01

    The legacy of slavery in the United States has impacted generations of African Americans, especially parents who must prepare their children to face the challenges associated with being a person of color in this country. The authors explore aspects of racism, White privilege, racial socialization, and African American parents' fears as they equip…

  8. Oral midazolam in paediatric premedication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-06

    Apr 6, 1991 ... the holding room and at induction, than those over 5 years. (P < 0,01). ... priate size, at a fresh gas flow of 3 times the calculated minute volume. ... End-expired carbon dioxide levels were measured with a. Normocap CD-102 ...

  9. Burnout in Premedical Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christina; Fang, Daniel; Golshan, Shah; Moutier, Christine; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Background: There has been growing recognition that medical students, interns, residents and practicing physicians across many specialties are prone to burnout, with recent studies linking high rates of burnout to adverse mental health issues. Little is known about the trajectory and origins of burnout or whether its roots may be traced to earlier…

  10. Burnout in Premedical Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christina; Fang, Daniel; Golshan, Shah; Moutier, Christine; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Background: There has been growing recognition that medical students, interns, residents and practicing physicians across many specialties are prone to burnout, with recent studies linking high rates of burnout to adverse mental health issues. Little is known about the trajectory and origins of burnout or whether its roots may be traced to earlier…

  11. Choosing a Great Preschool: A Parent's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Marilee

    2012-01-01

    Many parents--whether employed outside the home or not--either want or need preschool for their young children. Research indicates that quality early educational experiences bestow numerous benefits on children, including developing a love of school, healthy socialization, meaningful learning, and preparation for kindergarten. Equipped with this…

  12. A Parent's Guide to Internet Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC. Crimes against Children Unit.

    While online computer exploration opens a world of possibilities, children and adolescents online can be exposed to individuals who attempt to sexually exploit children through the use of online services and the Internet. This pamphlet, prepared from actual investigations involving child victims, was designed to help parents understand the…

  13. Parental authority questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, J R

    1991-08-01

    A questionnaire was developed for the purpose of measuring Baumrind's (1971) permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative parental authority prototypes. It consists of 30 items per parent and yields permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative scores for both the mother and the father; each of these scores is derived from the phenomenological appraisals of the parents' authority by their son or daughter. The results of several studies have supported the Parental Authority Questionnaire as a psychometrically sound and valid measure of Baumrind's parental authority prototypes, and they have suggested that this questionnaire has considerable potential as a valuable tool in the investigation of correlates of parental permissiveness, authoritarianism, and authoritativeness.

  14. Parenting children with down syndrome: An analysis of parenting styles, parenting dimensions, and parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B Allyson; Conners, Frances; Curtner-Smith, Mary Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Effective parenting is vital for a child's development. Although much work has been conducted on parenting typically developing children, little work has examined parenting children with Down syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to compare the parenting styles and dimensions in mothers of children with DS and mothers of TD children. Thirty-five mothers of children with DS and 47 mothers of TD children completed questionnaires about parenting, parental stress, child behavior problems, and child executive function. We found that mothers of children with DS use an authoritative parenting style less and a permissive parenting style more than mothers of TD children. Additionally, we found that mothers of children with DS use reasoning/induction and verbal hostility less and ignoring misbehavior more than mothers of TD children. All of these differences, except for those of reasoning/induction, were at least partially accounted for by the higher levels of parental stress in the DS group. Parenting interventions should be focused on reducing parental stress and training mothers to parent under stress in an effort to improve parenting techniques, which would, in theory, improve long-term child outcomes for children with DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Self-Esteem, Parenting Style and Parental Monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of Self-Esteem, Parenting Style and Parental Monitoring on Sexual Risk Behaviour of ... authoritative parenting style [t(192)=4.99, p<.001]; authoritarian parenting style has no significant effect on adolescents' risky sexual behavior ...

  16. Parents' Reactions to Teacher Practices of Parent Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joyce L.

    1986-01-01

    Presents the findings of a survey of parents' experiences with different kinds of parent involvement. Views school and family relations from the parents' perspective and suggests that parents favor programs that stress cooperation between school and home. (DR)

  17. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... KidsHealth from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life ...

  18. Who Needs Parent Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1978-01-01

    The author proposes that those most in need of parent education are non-parents; the basis for this contradictory conclusion is in the changes that have been taking place in the structure and position of the American family. (MM)

  19. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety Print A A ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  20. Stresses of Single Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ways to avoid the stress of being a single parent? Single parenthood can bring added pressure and stress ... share day-to-day responsibilities or decision-making, single parents must provide greater support for their children while ...

  1. Parenting in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Camilla J; Berrow, Steffan R; Harwood, Chris G

    2017-08-01

    This paper provides a brief summary and commentary on the growing literature on parenting in sport, with a particular emphasis on literature from the last 2-3 years. Following a brief introduction overviewing the topic area, we firstly focus on the influence of parental involvement on children. Specifically, we examine the range of factors that influence children's perceptions of parental involvement and the consequences of different behaviors. Next we discuss the factors influencing parental involvement, such as the challenges and stressors associated with parenting children in sport and the culture within different sports. Finally, our review focuses upon the strategies developed by parents to facilitate their involvement in their children's sport, as well as the few papers focused upon parent education and support. We conclude by examining the need for further research and examination of support strategies for parents. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety A A A ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  3. Night Terrors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Night Terrors KidsHealth > For Parents > Night Terrors Print A A A en español Terrores nocturnos What Are Night Terrors? Most parents have comforted their child after the ...

  4. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines ... or her parents, and the doctor. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Meningococcal disease is caused by a ...

  5. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Machteld

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted.

  6. New Parent Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your parenting and improve your childrearing skills. Everyone wins with responsible parenting. Protect Your Children from Health ... or peer aggression, is more common than you think. It consists of any behavior – verbal or physical – ...

  7. Helping Parents Say No.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duel, Debra K.

    1988-01-01

    Provides some activities that are designed to help students understand some of the reasons why parents sometimes refuse to let their children have pets. Includes mathematics and writing lessons, a student checklist, and a set of tips for parents. (TW)

  8. Investigation of PHC as Premedication in Pediatric Surgery%盐酸戊乙奎醚应用于大样本小儿外科手术麻醉前用药分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽伟; 艾艳秋; 王家祥; 王宏伟

    2012-01-01

    为了观察盐酸戊乙奎醚(PHC)应用于小儿外科手术麻醉前用药效果及不良反应,选取1 535例小儿外科手术,随机分为三组,观察麻醉前用药唾液分泌量、体温和血流动力学变化.结果发现气管插管和拔管时,三组分泌物量有差异(P<0.01).三组基础体温无差异(P>0.05),组内有差异(P<0.05).三组基础心率无差异(P>0.05),组内有差异(P<0.01).三组平均动脉压无差异(P>0.05).因此PHC 0.04mg/kg应用于小儿外科手术麻醉前用药,能有效抑制唾液腺分泌,维持体温和血流动力学稳定.%To study the influence of PHC as premedication in pediatric surgery, we selected 1 535 cases of pediatric surgeries which were divided into three groups randomly. The results are as follow. There is significant difference of secretion during the endotracheal intubation and extubation(P0. 05). HR; there is significant difference of heart rate among the three groups (P0. 05). MAP: there is no significant difference of mean arterial blood pressure (P>0. 05). Therefore, PHC 0. 04mg/kg used in the pediatric surgeries as premedication can effectively inhibit the salivary gland secretion, maintain a stable temperature and hemodynamics.

  9. Does Parents' Money Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    This paper asks whether parental income per se has a positive impact on children's human capital accumulation. Previous research has established that income is positively correlated across generations. This does not prove that parents' money matters, however, since income is presumably correlated with unobserved abilities transmitted across generations. This paper estimates the impact of parental income by focusing on variation due to parental factors -- union, industry, and job loss experien...

  10. Emotional distress and parenting among community and clinic parents

    OpenAIRE

    Rimehaug, Tormod

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the distribution of and the change in parental emotional distress and parenting dimensions by combining samples of community parents, non-parents and clinic parents. Clinic parents were involved in intensive inpatient family treatment related to their children’s psychiatric problems. Research questions: The focal themes of the three research questions were as follows: 1) Anxiety and depression among community parent and non-parent subg...

  11. Parental Engagement with Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Joanna; Harbinson, Terence

    2010-01-01

    A programme of parental engagement with school science is described, in which parents and their children take part in scientific debate and practical science lessons. Three sessions, in biology, chemistry and physics, of this ongoing programme are described, through which parents have been able to support their children by learning science with…

  12. Parent's Journal. [Videotape Series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    Parent's Journal is a set of 16 videotapes for parents of prenatal, infant, and toddler-age children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on the life stories and experiences of capable mothers and…

  13. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  14. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  15. Parenting by Lying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Gail D.; Luu, Diem H.; Lee, Kang

    2009-01-01

    The present set of studies identifies the phenomenon of "parenting by lying", in which parents lie to their children as a means of influencing their emotional states and behaviour. In Study 1, undergraduates (n = 127) reported that their parents had lied to them while maintaining a concurrent emphasis on the importance of honesty. In Study 2 (n =…

  16. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  17. Parenting Beliefs, Parental Stress, and Social Support Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respler-Herman, Melissa; Mowder, Barbara A.; Yasik, Anastasia E.; Shamah, Renee

    2012-01-01

    The present study built on prior research by examining the relationship of parental stress and social support to parenting beliefs and behaviors. A sample of 87 parents provided their views concerning the importance of parenting characteristics as well as their level of parental stress and perceived social support. These parents completed the…

  18. Personality and Parenting Style in Parents of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huver, Rose M. E.; Otten, Roy; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian,…

  19. Personality and Parenting Style in Parents of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huver, Rose M. E.; Otten, Roy; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian,…

  20. Adolescents' and Parents' Conceptions of Parental Authority and Personal Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Asquith, Pamela

    1994-01-01

    Conceptions of parental authority and ratings of adolescent-parent conflict were assessed in 6th-, 8th-, and 10th-graders and their parents. Participants judged the legitimacy of parental authority and rated the frequency and intensity of conflict regarding 24 hypothetical issues. Adolescents and parents agreed that parents should retain authority…

  1. Parent Behavior Importance and Parent Behavior Frequency Questionnaires: Psychometric Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowder, Barbara A.; Sanders, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics of two parenting measures: the Parent Behavior Importance Questionnaire (PBIQ) and Parent Behavior Frequency Questionnaire (PBFQ). Both research questionnaires are based on the parent development theory (PDT) and offer parent as well as non-parent respondents the opportunity to rate 38 parenting…

  2. Adolescents' and Parents' Conceptions of Parental Authority and Personal Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Asquith, Pamela

    1994-01-01

    Conceptions of parental authority and ratings of adolescent-parent conflict were assessed in 6th-, 8th-, and 10th-graders and their parents. Participants judged the legitimacy of parental authority and rated the frequency and intensity of conflict regarding 24 hypothetical issues. Adolescents and parents agreed that parents should retain authority…

  3. Assessing Dimensions of Single Parenting: The Single Parenting Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, Arnold L.; Ullman, Ann J.

    1984-01-01

    Developed and validated an instrument that assesses five dimensions of single parenting: problem solving skills, parental warmth, discipline procedures, parent rules, enthusiasm for parenting and parent support systems. Results gave statistical support for the Single Parenting Questionnaire, suggesting it may be useful in both clinical and…

  4. Solution preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results.

  5. Parent-child interaction: Does parental language matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menashe, Atara; Atzaba-Poria, Naama

    2016-11-01

    Although parental language and behaviour have been widely investigated, few studies have examined their unique and interactive contribution to the parent-child relationship. The current study explores how parental behaviour (sensitivity and non-intrusiveness) and the use of parental language (exploring and control languages) correlate with parent-child dyadic mutuality. Specifically, we investigated the following questions: (1) 'Is parental language associated with parent-child dyadic mutuality above and beyond parental behaviour?' (2) 'Does parental language moderate the links between parental behaviour and the parent-child dyadic mutuality?' (3) 'Do these differences vary between mothers and fathers?' The sample included 65 children (Mage  = 1.97 years, SD = 0.86) and their parents. We observed parental behaviour, parent-child dyadic mutuality, and the type of parental language used during videotaped in-home observations. The results indicated that parental language and behaviours are distinct components of the parent-child interaction. Parents who used higher levels of exploring language showed higher levels of parent-child dyadic mutuality, even when accounting for parental behaviour. Use of controlling language, however, was not found to be related to the parent-child dyadic mutuality. Different moderation models were found for mothers and fathers. These results highlight the need to distinguish parental language and behaviour when assessing their contribution to the parent-child relationship. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  6. Parents who use drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Tim; Bernays, Sarah; Houmøller, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    ' parenting. Accounts of damage acceptance highlight a theme of 'recovery'. We find that the interview accounts operate in response to a regulative norm of 'good parenting' in which one strives to deflect damaged identity through narratives of damage qualification and to seek understanding and acceptance......Parents who use drugs parent in a context of heightened concern regarding the damaging effects of parental drug use on child welfare and family life. Yet there is little research exploring how parents who use drugs account for such damage and its limitation. We draw here upon analyses of audio......-recorded depth qualitative interviews, conducted in south-east England between 2008 and 2009, with 29 parents who use drugs. Our approach to thematic analysis treated accounts as co-produced and socially situated. An over-arching theme of accounts was 'damage limitation'. Most damage limitation work centred...

  7. Parental Alienation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Torun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children who have been programmed by one parent to be alienated from the other parent are commonly seen in the context of child-custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It is said to result from a combination of a programming (brainwashing parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the targeted parent. Many evaluators use the term parental alienation syndrome to refer to the disorder engendered in such children. However, there is significant controversy going on about the validity of parental alienation syndrome. The purpose of this article has been to describe and help to differentiate parental alienation syndrome and abuse for mental health professionals working in the field, and discuss the arguments about the validity of this syndrome.

  8. Children with ostomies: parents helping parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A

    1992-01-01

    Thousands of ostomies are performed on children every year to treat a variety of acquired conditions and congenital anomalies. The parents of children with ostomies are faced with the challenge of successfully living with and managing their child's ostomy. These families need practical information and support, both from the professional community and from parents who have shared the responsibility of a child with an ostomy. A parental support network has been developed throughout the country to address some of the needs of these families. This article provides current information about the status of these networks: what they have to offer and how they can be accessed. These groups, which continue to evolve, demonstrate a trend within this unique population. The parents of a child with an ostomy no longer need to feel alone in their experience.

  9. Development of a Positive Youth Development Program: Helping Parents to Improve Their Parenting Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs is a positive youth development program that attempts to promote holistic development in adolescents in Hong Kong. In the Tier 2 Program of this project, social workers are expected to develop positive youth development programs for adolescents having greater psychosocial needs. They are required to submit proposals that will be evaluated in terms of whether the proposals are evidence based, and appropriate evaluation mechanisms are included. With reference to the literature on parental control processes that Chinese parents may be loose in their behavioral control and they tend to overemphasize academic excellence, it is argued that improvement of the parenting skills of parents of Chinese adolescents is an important area to be addressed. To facilitate social workers to prepare the related proposals, a sample proposal on how to improve the parenting skills of Chinese parents is described, including its conceptual framework, proposed program, and evaluation plan. It is argued that this supportive approach (i.e., preparation of a sample proposal can help social workers to develop quality proposals on positive youth development programs in Hong Kong.

  10. Parenting styles and conceptions of parental authority during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, J G

    1995-04-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 110 primarily white, middle-class sixth, eighth, and tenth graders (M = 11.98, 13.84, and 16.18 years of age) and their parents (108 mothers and 92 fathers). Parents judged the legitimacy of parental authority and rated family conflict and rules regarding 24 hypothetical moral, conventional, personal, multifaceted (containing conventional and personal components), prudential, and friendship issues. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Parents' parenting styles differentiated their conceptions of parental authority, but adolescents' perceptions did not. Differences were primarily over the boundaries of adolescents' personal jurisdiction. Furthermore, conceptions of parental authority and parenting styles both contributed significantly to emotional autonomy and adolescent-parent conflict. The implications of the findings for typological models of parenting and distinct domain views of social-cognitive development are discussed.

  11. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Roos; Meijer, Anne Marie; Deković, Maja; Aldenkamp, Albert P

    2007-09-01

    The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting. Participants were 91 parents of children with epilepsy (mean age of children=8 years, 5 months). Parental perceptions of stressors, resources, parental coping behaviors, parenting stress, and parenting were assessed by means of questionnaires. Regression analyses were used to analyze the unique and combined power of the predictors to predict parenting stress and parenting. Sobel tests were used to identify the mediational role of parenting stress. Evidence was found for direct effects of stressors, resources, and coping behaviors on parenting stress and parenting, with relatively large effects for stressors. The mediational role of parenting stress was largest in the domain of parental behavioral control. In the context of pediatric epilepsy, parenting stress mediates both disruptive and resilient family factors for their effects on parenting. Parents of children with epilepsy may benefit from parent training programs that, to reduce parenting stress, address epilepsy education, the management of difficult child temperament, building social support networks, and the modification of inadequate parental coping behaviors.

  12. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting. Metho

  13. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting. METHO

  14. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting.

  15. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting.

  16. Parenting adolescents with cystic fibrosis: the adolescents' and young adults' perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    and the influence of different parenting styles on the adolescents’ adherence to treatment is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to identify the types of parental support that adolescents and young adults with CF want and find helpful in terms of preparing them for adult life. Methods: Sixteen Danish...... was conducted. Results: The adolescents and young adults wanted their parents educated about the adolescent experience. They wanted their parents to learn a pedagogical parenting style, to learn to trust them, and to learn to gradually transfer responsibility for their medical treatment. Additionally......: chronic illness, parenting style, qualitative research, patient preferences, interpretive description...

  17. 双亲灭活制备粘质沙雷氏菌和红曲霉的跨界产色素融合子%Preparation of Cross-border Integration of Sub-pigment in Serratia Marcescens and Monascus by Parents Inactivated Protoplast Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周林; 朱爽; 潘敏芬; 蔡泽加; 许尧滨

    2011-01-01

    目的:采用双亲灭活原生质体技术制备粘质沙雷氏菌和红曲霉的跨界产色素融合子,并测定其抑菌活性.方法:经0.2%溶菌酶处理获得粘质沙雷氏菌的原生质体并热灭活;经混合酶(0.8%溶菌酶+1.2%蜗牛酶+1.6%纤维素酶)处理获得红曲霉的原生质体并紫外灭活;用含25%PEG的原生质体融合剂进行促融合与再生.观察融合子的菌落形态和色素合成能力,测定融合子色素提取物对金黄色葡萄球菌的抑制活性.结果:在优化条件下,粘质沙雷氏菌原生质体的形成率为92.58%,红曲霉原生质体形成数约为10个/mL,两菌原生质体灭活率均为100%.共获得13个融合子,9个能产红色素,融合率为1×10%.其中8个融合子的95%乙醇提取物对金黄色葡萄球菌表现出不同程度的抑制.结论:采用双亲灭活原生质体技术,能够制备具有抑菌性的粘质沙雷氏菌和红曲霉的跨界产色素融合子.%Objective: To prepare inter-kingdom pigmented fusant from Serratia marcescens and Monascus by double parents inactivated protoplasts method and determine the inhibition activity of the pigmented fusants. Methods:The protoplast of Serratia marcescens was obtained by 0.2% lysozyme treatment and then inactivated by heat treatment, while the protoplast of Monascus was obtained by enzyme mixture with 0.8% lysozyme, 1.2% snail enzyme and 1.6% cellulase, then inactivated by ultraoviolet treatment. The protoplast fusion of double inactivated parents was carried out using fusion solution with 25% polyethylene glycol. The morphology and pigment produced ability of the fusants were observed, while the inhibition activity of the pigment extrative on Staphylococcus aureu was tested. Results: Under the optimal conditions, the protoplast formation rate of Serratia marcescens and Monascus was 92.58% and 106/mL, respectively. The protoplast inactivated rate of both microbes was 100%. Thirteen protoplast fusants was prepared

  18. Difluoromethane preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, A.; Sandt, E.J.A.; Van Bekkum, H.; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9401574 (A) The invention relates to a method for preparing difluoromethane, wherein dichlorodifluoromethane or monochlorodifluoromethane is brought into contact with hydrogen in the presence of palladium on activated carbon, wherein the loading of the palladium on the activated c

  19. Parenting in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    The study of parenting in animals has allowed us to come to a better understanding of the neural and physiological mechanisms that underlie mammalian parental behavior. The long-term effects of parenting (and parental abuse or neglect) on offspring, and the neurobiological changes that underlie those changes, have also been best studied in animal models. Our greater experimental control and ability to directly manipulate neural and hormonal systems, as well as the environment of the subjects, will ensure that animal models remain important in the study of parenting; while in the future, the great variety of parental caregiving systems displayed by animals should be more thoroughly explored. Most importantly, cross-talk between animal and human subjects research should be promoted.

  20. Late adolescent perceptions of parent religiosity and parenting processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, J Blake; Clements, Andrea; Vazsonyi, Alexander T

    2004-12-01

    The current investigation examined the relations between adolescent reports of parent religiosity and parenting processes, using both a dimensional and a typological conceptualization of parenting. Self-report data were collected from 357 late adolescents. Partial correlations indicated that parent religiosity was associated with both parenting dimensions and parenting styles in conceptually expected directions. Regression analyses provided evidence that the dimensional conceptualization of parenting explained additional variability in perceived parental religiosity above and beyond parenting style effects. Findings suggest that a dimensional conceptualization of parenting processes extends the literature on parent religiosity because it yields more nuanced information about how parental religiosity may be related to differentiated parenting behaviors. Potential therapeutic implications of the findings are discussed.

  1. Parenting style, parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjeong; Walton-Moss, Benita

    2012-07-01

    Parental guidance is critical to the development of children's health-related behaviors. The purpose of this study was to look at the relationship between parenting factors, including parenting style and parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors. In this descriptive, correlational study, 284 parents of preschool children were interviewed using the Child Rearing Questionnaire and the Korean Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Parent distress, authoritative and permissive parenting styles, family income, and mother's education were significantly associated with children's health-related behaviors. These findings suggest that higher levels of warmth, characteristics of both parenting styles, may be a critical factor in the development of health-related behaviors.

  2. Parental leave in Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Maron, Leila; Meulders, Danièle; O'Dorchai, Sile Padraigin

    2008-01-01

    All over Europe, parental leaves are essentially taken by women which leads to perpetuate gender inequalities in the labour market. The economic literature illustrates the issues at stake and is presented in this article to contextualise the analysis of the Belgian parental leave system. The Belgian parental leave system has two strong features: it is individualised and it offers a relatively short leave. The system could be improved by the implementation of a wage-related payment. However, p...

  3. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeve, Machteld

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted. The first study addressed a meta-analysis on parenting characteristics and styles in relation to delinquency. In this meta-analysis, previous manuscripts were systematically analyzed, computing mean ...

  4. Parental Involvement in Mathematics: Giving Parents a Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, S.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why parents become involved in their children's education is crucial in strengthening the relationship between parental involvement and academic achievement. The present study focuses on the parental role construction and parental self-efficacy. The resulting trends suggest that parents, regardless of their self-efficacy, may assume…

  5. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 1: Children and Parenting. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with different types of parents and the forces that shape parenting, this volume, the first of five volumes on parenting, deals specifically with parent-child relationships throughout the lifespan and the parenting of children of different physical, behavioral, and intellectual needs. The volume consists of the following 14 chapters: (1)…

  6. Parenting Styles and Conceptions of Parental Authority during Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1995-01-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 100 mostly white, middle-class, 6th, 8th, and 10th graders and their parents. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Differences were primarily over the…

  7. Personality and parenting style in parents of adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huver, R.M.E.; Otten, R.; Vries, H. de; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parentin

  8. Personality and parenting style in parents of adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huver, R.M.E.; Otten, R.; Vries, H. de; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived

  9. Personality and parenting style in parents of adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huver, R.M.E.; Otten, R.; Vries, H. de; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parentin

  10. Longitudinal impact of parental and adolescent personality on parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Amaranta D; Deković, Maja; Prinzie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a test of how personality may shape social behaviors in a long-lasting dyad: the parent-adolescent relationship. In a large Belgian community sample, it was examined which parent Big Five characteristics were related to parenting and whether adolescent Big Five characteristics elicited certain parenting behaviors. Further, the proposition that individual differences are amplified under stress was examined by exploring whether parent personality was differentially related to parenting for parents of "easy" versus "difficult" adolescents. Moreover, possible differences in associations across parental and adolescent gender were explored. Mothers (N = 467) and fathers (N = 428) reported on their personality using the Five-Factor Personality Inventory; adolescents (N = 475) assessed their personality with the Hierarchical Personality Inventory for Children. Two types of parenting behaviors, overreactive discipline and warmth, were assessed 2 years later by parent self-reports, partner reports, and adolescent reports, from which multi-informant latent factors were created. Results indicate that parental personality was more relevant than adolescent personality for explaining overreactivity, but parent and adolescent personality were similarly relevant in explaining warmth. Especially parental and adolescent Agreeableness and adolescent Extraversion were important predictors of both types of parenting. Associations between parental personality and parenting were similarly related to parents of easy versus difficult adolescents, and for mothers and fathers parenting daughters or sons. Together, results show that parent characteristics as well as adolescent characteristics importantly affect dysfunctional and adaptive parenting.

  11. Parental Involvement in Mathematics: Giving Parents a Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, S.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why parents become involved in their children's education is crucial in strengthening the relationship between parental involvement and academic achievement. The present study focuses on the parental role construction and parental self-efficacy. The resulting trends suggest that parents, regardless of their self-efficacy, may assume…

  12. Parents' Perspectives on Parental Notification of College Students' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Although many colleges and universities use "parental notification" to inform parents of students' alcohol use, the impact of this intervention on student and parent behavior is unclear. Surveys were obtained from 326 parents of university undergraduates, 56 of whom had received a notification. Parent responses to the notification were…

  13. Gay and lesbian parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M B; Turner, P H

    An anonymous survey of 23 gay and lesbian parents and 16 heterosexual single parents was conducted in order to see whether the parents' homosexuality created special problems or benefits or both, for their children. Both sets of parents reported relatively few serious problems and generally positive relationships with their children, with only a minority encouraging sex-typed toys, activities, and playmates. Heterosexual parents made a greater effort to provide an opposite-sex role model for their children, but no other differences in their parenting behaviors were found. Gay and lesbian parents saw a number of benefits and relatively few problems for their children as a result of their homosexuality, with lesbians perceiving greater benefits than gay men. Conversely, the gay males reported greater satisfaction with their first child, fewer disagreements with their partners over discipline, and a greater tendency to encourage play with sex-typed toys than did the lesbians. The findings suggest that being homosexual is clearly compatible with effective parenting and is not a major issue in parents' relationships with their children.

  14. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Kids for Teens Search Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ...

  15. Parental concerns in parents of children attending pre- and primary school: analysis of the Portuguese population by District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Algarvio

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, our aim was to assess and analyze parental concerns by Portuguese District. Methods: The participants were 3842 parents of children between 3 and 10 years old, attending preschool and primary school, from 820 public schools in 18 Portuguese Districts. Parents completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, and a Parental Concerns Scale, composed by 5 subscales, family and school problems; feeding, sleep and physical complaints; preparation; fears; and negative behaviors. Results: Portuguese parents concerned about all the dimensions considered in this study. The highest level of concern was obtained in family and school problems, and the lowest level of concern about their children’s fears. There were significant differences between Districts, parents from Porto and Bragança showed the highest levels of concern. Parents from Coimbra, Évora, Beja e Portalegre, presented the lowest levels of concern. Conclusion: Parental concerns are an aspect of general parenting and must be considered by health professionals to promote healthier parents-children relationships. Geographic differences should be further investigated.

  16. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents' Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte; Engvall, Gunn; Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80-90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child's and the parent's view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents' experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents' suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2-16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people's lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child's suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process.

  17. 术前口服可乐定对脊柱手术患者全麻苏醒的影响%The effects of oral clonidine for premedication of anesthetic recovery on the spinal operation patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓嘉陵; 李军祥; 杨小霖

    2015-01-01

    目的::观察脊柱手术患者术前口服可乐定对全麻苏醒的影响。方法:将64例ASAⅠ-Ⅱ级,18~60岁,择期行椎管减压、脊柱融合手术的患者随机分为术前口服可乐定组(200μg)和安慰剂组(维生素C 600 mg)。麻醉诱导采用芬太尼2μg/kg、异丙酚1~2 mg/kg及维库溴铵0.1 mg/kg。气管插管后机械通气,调整吸入异氟烷浓度维持BIS 40~50,间断给予维库溴铵维持肌松。调整呼吸参数维持ETCO235~40 mmHg。记录患者一般资料,芬太尼、异丙酚用量、麻醉时间、拔管时间、低血压或高血压发生率。结果:可乐定组患者芬太尼用量少于安慰剂组(2.11±0.87 vs 3.68±0.93,P0.05)。结论:脊柱手术的患者,术前给于可乐定能减轻麻醉所需麻醉药的用量,加快麻醉后复苏,并且不增加低血压和心动过缓的发生率。%Objective:To observe the effects of oral clonidine premedication on the general anesthesia and recovery in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Methods:Sixty-four ASA levelⅠ-Ⅱ patients (18-60 years old) undergoing major spine surgery were ran-domly allocated to two groups. One group received oral clonidine (200 μg) and the other received placebo (Vitamin C 600 mg) for premedication. Standard anesthesia protocols were followed for induction Fentanyl 2 μg/kg,Propofol 1~2 mg/kg and Vecuronium Bro-mide 0. 1 mg/kg. The mechanical ventilation was performed after the tracheal intubation. And the concentration of isoflurance was adjus-ted and maintained at the level of BIS 40~50. The Vecuronium Bromide was given inconsistently in order to keep the muscular relaxa-tion. The reference data of breathing is adjusted at the level of ETCO2 35~40 mmHg. Heart rate,blood pressure,and end-tidal concen-trations of isoflurane were monitored. Hypotensive episodes were treated with bolus doses of ephedrine or phenylephrine. Results:The demographic data,duration of anesthesia,propofol requirement were not

  18. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  19. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  20. Hacer lo mejor de la educacion de su nino: Una Guia para padres. Preparado para el Proyecto para la Movilizacion de la Communidad Hispana para la Provencion de la Desercion Escolar. (Making the Most of Your Child's Education: A Guide to Parents. Prepared for the ASPIRA Hispanic Community Mobilization for Dropout Prevention Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Elena; And Others

    This guide, in Spanish, offers practical advice to Latino parents on how to help their children succeed academically. Chapter 1, "About This Booklet," discusses the importance of parent involvement in a child's education and development and reviews the format of the five other chapters. Chapter 2, "What Is Parent Involvement, and…

  1. Parental Divorce, Parental Religious Characteristics, and Religious Outcomes in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E; Ellison, Christopher G

    2012-12-01

    Parental divorce has been linked to religious outcomes in adulthood. Previous research has not adequately accounted for parental religious characteristics or subsequent family context, namely whether one's custodial parent remarries. Using pooled data from three waves of the General Social Survey, we examine the relationships among parental divorce, subsequent family structure, and religiosity in adulthood. Growing up in a single-parent family-but not a stepparent family-is positively associated with religious disaffiliation and religious switching and negatively associated with regular religious attendance. Accounting for parental religious characteristics, however, explains sizable proportions of these relationships. Accounting for parental religious affiliation and attendance, growing up with a single parent does not significantly affect religious attendance. Parental religiosity also moderates the relationship between growing up with a single parent and religious attendance: being raised in a single-parent home has a negative effect on religious attendance among adults who had two religiously involved parents.

  2. Parenting and adolescents' accuracy in perceiving parental values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafo, Ariel; Schwartz, Shalom H

    2003-01-01

    What determines adolescents' accuracy in perceiving parental values? The current study examined potential predictors including parental value communication, family value agreement, and parenting styles. In the study, 547 Israeli adolescents (aged 16 to 18) of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds participated with their parents. Adolescents reported the values they perceive their parents want them to hold. Parents reported their socialization values. Accuracy in perceiving parents' overall value system correlated positively with parents' actual and perceived value agreement and perceived parental warmth and responsiveness, but negatively with perceived value conflict, indifferent parenting, and autocratic parenting in all gender compositions of parent-child dyads. Other associations varied by dyad type. Findings were similar for predicting accuracy in perceiving two specific values: tradition and hedonism. The article discusses implications for the processes that underlie accurate perception, gender differences, and other potential influences on accuracy in value perception.

  3. Codependency and Parenting Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Judith L.; Crawford, Duane W.

    1992-01-01

    College students (n=175) reported the parenting style of their mother and father and completed a scale assessing their own level of codependency. Parenting style of the father (uninvolved, permissive, authoritarian, or democratic) was related to offspring codependency. Both sons and daughters of authoritarian fathers had higher levels of…

  4. Parenting Young Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    1986-01-01

    Provides information on the following for parents and care-givers of gifted children: (1) recognizing giftedness; (2) dealing with nongifted children in the family; (3) effect of chronic early ear infection on IQ; (4) introversion; (5) "normalizing" gifted children; (6) need for gifted peers; and (7) responsive parenting. A list of guidelines for…

  5. Codependency and Parenting Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Judith L.; Crawford, Duane W.

    1992-01-01

    College students (n=175) reported the parenting style of their mother and father and completed a scale assessing their own level of codependency. Parenting style of the father (uninvolved, permissive, authoritarian, or democratic) was related to offspring codependency. Both sons and daughters of authoritarian fathers had higher levels of…

  6. Parenting: An Ecological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Tom, Ed.; Okagaki, Lynn, Ed.

    This book examines various aspects of parenting and influences on parents, including such key contexts affecting child development as school, neighborhood, and culture. After a forward by Urie Bronfenbrenner and a preface by Tom Luster and Lynn Okagaki, which together help to introduce the topics to be discussed, the book is divided into nine…

  7. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents for Kids for Teens Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other ...

  8. Hemophilia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Hemophilia KidsHealth > For Parents > Hemophilia Print A A A ... bike or a stray kick in a soccer game means a temporary bruise or a cut that ... with hemophilia, these everyday mishaps are cause for concern. What ...

  9. Parent News Offline, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 5 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduced those without Internet Access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2003 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Summer Academic…

  10. Parents on education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lex Herweijer; Ria Vogels

    2004-01-01

    Original title: Ouders over opvoeding en onderwijs. The position of parents with regard to children' education has been changing in recent years: the government believes that they should have a major influence on what happens at their children's school, and also that parents and schools should coop

  11. Tips for Divorcing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... Cope With Divorce? How Can I Help My Child Deal With My Dating After Divorce? ... With a Single Parent Living With Stepparents What Kids Who Are Moving ...

  12. Profile: parents help themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G E

    1981-01-01

    A short account is given of a voluntary organization, PACE, formed by parents of young handicapped children in Leeds. PACE provides friendship and help to other parents, arranges the toy library, riding for the disabled and other activities for the children. It also raises money that is needed for special projects.

  13. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Machteld

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted. Th

  14. Parents, Peers and Pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Marsha

    This book looks at the problem of drug abuse, particularly the use of marihuana by children ages 9 to 14, and describes one strategy parents can use to prevent drug use by their children. On the premise that nonmedical drug use is not acceptable for children, parents need to provide guidance and exercise discipline with respect to drug use among…

  15. Adolescent to Parent Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Claire Pedrick; Gelles, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the extent of violence toward parents by adolescent children in relation to: (1) sex and age of the child; (2) the likelihood that mothers, more than fathers, are victims of children's violence; (3) social factors that may influence child to parent violence; and (4) stress as a factor in family violence. (Author/MJL)

  16. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Machteld

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted. Th

  17. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ... to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's Story ( ...

  18. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ... to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's Story ( ...

  19. Parental and child fruit consumption in the context of general parenting, parental education and ethnic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Rodenburg (Gerda); A. Oenema (Anke); S.P.J. Kremers (Stef); H. van de Mheen (Dike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the association between parental and child fruit consumption in the context of general parenting, parental education and ethnic background. A cross-sectional study was performed among 1762 parent-child dyads. Mean age of the children was 8. years. One parent completed

  20. Foster Parents' Involvement in Authoritative Parenting and Interest in Future Parenting Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Kraemer, Linda K.; Bernard, Amy L.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed 191 Southwest Ohio foster parents regarding their involvement in authoritative parenting and interest for additional parenting education. Our results showed that most respondents reported using an authoritative parenting style and were interested in receiving future training. Involvement in authoritative parenting differed…

  1. Parenting stress and affective symptoms in parents of autistic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yun; Du, YaSong; Li, HuiLin; Zhang, XiYan; An, Yu; Wu, Bai-Lin

    2015-10-01

    We examined parenting stress and mental health status in parents of autistic children and assessed factors associated with such stress. Participants were parents of 188 autistic children diagnosed with DSM-IV criteria and parents of 144 normally developing children. Parents of autistic children reported higher levels of stress, depression, and anxiety than parents of normally developing children. Mothers of autistic children had a higher risk of depression and anxiety than that did parents of normally developing children. Mothers compared to fathers of autistic children were more vulnerable to depression. Age, behavior problems of autistic children, and mothers' anxiety were significantly associated with parenting stress.

  2. Parental Relationships in Fragile Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sara McLanahan; Audrey N. Beck

    2010-01-01

    ...: the quality of parents' intimate relationship, the stability of that relationship, the quality of the co-parenting relationship among parents who live apart, and nonresident fathers' involvement with their child...

  3. Parents' responses to their children's wishes for advertised products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Gradišek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In our study we investigated how children express their wishes for products advertised on television and how parents respond to their children's wishes. 133 parents of children between 3 and 9 years of age filled in three questionnaires: Questionnaire on children's and parents' response to television advertising, Parental control of children's television viewing (an adapted version and Family functioning scales. Results have shown that children usually tell their parents about their wishes or ask for a specific product several times. They rarely nag with the intention of getting a product. Parents react differently to their children's wishes: most of them usually explain to their children that they cannot get everything they want or they reconsider whether the child really needs a certain product. They rarely come up with excuses. We have found significant correlations between parents' purchasing styles and their reactions to children's requests. Those parents who tend to buy items which they were not planning to get, comply their children's wishes more often than those who stick to what they intended to purchase in the first place. Findings of the study were used to prepare a list of useful strategies for parents and teachers – how to discuss the effects of advertising with children.

  4. Parental perceptions regarding lifestyle interventions for obese children and adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Ingrid Rivera; Yap, Jason; Mager, Diana R

    2014-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects 30% of obese children globally. The main treatment for NAFLD is to promote gradual weight loss through lifestyle modification. Very little is known regarding parental perspectives about the barriers and facilitators that influence the ability to promote healthy lifestyle behaviours in children with NAFLD. To explore and describe parental perspectives regarding barriers to and facilitators of implementing lifestyle modification in children with NAFLD. A mixed-methods approach, including qualitative methodology (focus groups) and validated questionnaires (Lifestyle Behaviour Checklist), was used to assess parental perceptions regarding barriers to and facilitators of lifestyle change in parents of children with healthy body weights (control parents) and in parents of children with NAFLD (NAFLD parents). NAFLD parents identified more problem behaviours related to food portion size and time spent in nonsedentary physical activity, and lower parental self-efficacy than parents of controls (Pparents were lack of time, self-motivation and role modelling of healthy lifestyle behaviours. In contrast, control parents used a variety of strategies to elicit healthy lifestyle behaviours in their children including positive role modelling, and inclusion of the child in food preparation and meal purchasing decisions, and perceived few barriers to promoting healthy lifestyles. Internet sources were the main form of nutrition information used by parents. Lifestyle modification strategies focused on promoting increased parental self-efficacy and parental motivation to promote healthy lifestyle behaviour are important components in the treatment of obese children with NAFLD.

  5. Parenting Information for Parents: Books 1-3 (Informacion Para Los Padres Sobre La Crianza De Los Hijos: Libros 1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Steve

    These 3 booklets provide ideas, guidelines, and activities for establishing effective parenting and are part of a series of 22 booklets specifically designed to help parents understand their children and help them to learn. The first booklet (booklet #20) discusses preparation for parenthood, infant and toddler developmental stages, the importance…

  6. Parenting Information for Parents: Books 1-3 (Informacion Para Los Padres Sobre La Crianza De Los Hijos: Libros 1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Steve

    These 3 booklets provide ideas, guidelines, and activities for establishing effective parenting and are part of a series of 22 booklets specifically designed to help parents understand their children and help them to learn. The first booklet (booklet #20) discusses preparation for parenthood, infant and toddler developmental stages, the importance…

  7. Parent-Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Strandgaard

    2016-01-01

    of parents as co-consumers prevailed despite radical changes in views on children’s media consumption. In particular, I examine the shared inter-Scandinavian socio-cultural contexts that structured the changing professional and political groups’ pressure on parents to perform according to their norms......In this article, I examine change and continuity in conceptions of parental agency in public debates about children’s media consumption in Scandinavia, 1945-1975. During this period, public debates about the various kinds of media products children consumed were dominated by different groups...

  8. Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gulden, Holly; Bartels-Rabb, Lisa M.

    Parenting an adopted child is, for the most part, the same as parenting any other child, but is different in some unique and critical ways related to the child's separation from birth parents and genetic roots. Understanding how a child interprets, understands, and feels about adoption, and why, can help the parent guide the adopted child…

  9. Educational Groups for Single Parents: The Parenting after Divorce Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Nancy J.; Amara, Ingrid A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a group that teaches parenting skills to divorced parents. Presents various elements of the group experience, including a focus on the child's needs and developmental stages, role-playing, and co-parenting issues. Response to the group suggests that parents with greater postdivorce stress benefit the most. (BH)

  10. Perceptions of Parent School Collaboration within Single Parent Households

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josafat, Jason Marc

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the involvement levels of single parents in their child's education or what schools can do to support the collaborative involvement with single parents. This is important, because parent involvement is crucial for student success, and schools play an important part in garnering this role towards parent involvement; single…

  11. Patterns of Parenting during Adolescence: Perceptions of Adolescents and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.; Sputa, Cheryl L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores differences in maternal and paternal parenting styles and involvement, the differences between parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parenting style and involvement, and changes in parenting style and involvement between the adolescents' 9th and 12th grade years. Subjects were 244 ninth graders from the Southeast and Midwest. Discusses…

  12. Parents Want Their Children's Data: DQC's 2015 Parent Poll Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) believes that when parents and educators have the right information to make decisions, students excel. Parents agree, according to a recent survey. DQC's Parent Poll, conducted online by Harris Poll in November 2015, surveyed 1,093 US parents with children ages 5-17 about their attitudes toward data collection and…

  13. Parental problem drinking, parenting, and adolescent alcohol use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaluw, C.S. van der; Scholte, R.H.J.; Vermulst, A.A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Verkes, R.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether parental problem drinking affected parenting (i.e., behavioral control, support, rule-setting, alcohol-specific behavioral control), and whether parental problem drinking and parenting affected subsequent adolescent alcohol use over time. A total of 428 families, c

  14. Patterns of Parenting during Adolescence: Perceptions of Adolescents and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.; Sputa, Cheryl L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores differences in maternal and paternal parenting styles and involvement, the differences between parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parenting style and involvement, and changes in parenting style and involvement between the adolescents' 9th and 12th grade years. Subjects were 244 ninth graders from the Southeast and Midwest. Discusses…

  15. Parenting during toddlerhood: Contributions of parental, contextual and child characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Marjolein; Junger, Marianne; Aken, van Chantal; Dekovic, Maja; Aken, van Marcel A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines the contribution of parental, contextual, and child characteristics to parenting behavior during toddlerhood in 111 two-parent families with a 17-month-old son (M = 16.9 months, SD = 0.57). Parenting was conceptualized in terms of five dimensions: support, structure, posit

  16. Malaria (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Malaria KidsHealth > For Parents > Malaria A A A What's ... Prevention Diagnosis and Treatment en español Malaria About Malaria Malaria is a common infection in hot, tropical ...

  17. Tetanus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Dealing With Cuts Osteomyelitis Bites and Scratches Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations ... Scratches, and Abrasions Dealing With Cuts and Wounds Osteomyelitis Wound Healing and Care Why Did I Feel ...

  18. Rh Incompatibility (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Rh Incompatibility KidsHealth > For Parents > Rh Incompatibility Print A ... this information early in your pregnancy. About the Rh Factor People with different blood types have proteins ...

  19. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Listeriosis About Listeria Listeria infections (known as listeriosis ) are rare. When ...

  20. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > Burns A A A What's ... outlets, etc.) overexposure to the sun Types of Burns Burns are often categorized as first-, second-, or ...

  1. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... vaccines are a good idea. Caring for Your Child After Immunization Your child might have a fever, soreness, and ...

  2. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections Print A A ... your risk of getting this infection. continue Treating Listeriosis Listeriosis is usually treated with antibiotics in the ...

  3. Understanding Dyslexia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Understanding Dyslexia KidsHealth > For Parents > Understanding Dyslexia A A A ... be taught to become successful readers. Reading and Dyslexia Most kids begin learning to read by learning ...

  4. Asperger Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Asperger Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Asperger Syndrome Print A ... the medical community still use the term. About Asperger Syndrome The disorder is named after Hans Asperger, ...

  5. Sexual Orientation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to reconcile their teen's sexual orientation with their religious or personal beliefs. Sadly, some react with anger, hostility, or rejection. But many parents find that they just need time to adjust ...

  6. Amblyopia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Amblyopia KidsHealth > For Parents > Amblyopia Print A A A ... could lead to permanent vision loss later. About Amblyopia From birth until about age 8, a child's ...

  7. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones Print A A ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ...

  8. Strokes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 ... test that uses magnets, radio waves, and computer technology to produce very good pictures of internal body ...

  9. Cochlear Implants (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 ... understand their new bionic ear and the cool technology behind it that allows them to hear better. ...

  10. Turner Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 ... become pregnant) as adults. However, advances in medical technology, including hormonal therapy and in vitro fertilization, can ...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  12. CPR (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help CPR KidsHealth > For Parents > CPR Print A A A ... can be given by health care providers. About CPR CPR (or cardiopulmonary resuscitation ) is a combination of ...

  13. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) KidsHealth > For Parents > Cradle Cap ( ... many babies develop called cradle cap. About Cradle Cap Cradle cap is the common term for seborrheic ...

  14. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A ... Media Use Affects Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes ...

  15. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents Help Kids Handle Teasing? Talking to Your Child About Puberty Helping Kids Deal With Bullies How Media Use Affects Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diabetes Movie ...

  16. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  17. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia A A A What's in this article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  18. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections, but the condition is usually not severe. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is also known as the "bubble boy ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: Autoimmunity Immunotherapy Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Living With Lupus Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) ...

  19. Understanding Dyslexia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Understanding Dyslexia KidsHealth > For Parents > Understanding Dyslexia Print A A ... be taught to become successful readers. Reading and Dyslexia Most kids begin learning to read by learning ...

  20. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood A A A What's ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  1. Genital Herpes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Genital Herpes KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Herpes Print A A A What's in this article? Symptoms Contagiousness Treatment Prevention Getting Help Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually ...

  2. When Parents Argue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fight with each other? When Parents Disagree All couples argue from time to time. They might disagree ... happen and that's OK — it's all part of learning how to live with each other and get ...

  3. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  4. Diphtheria (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diphtheria KidsHealth > For Parents > Diphtheria Print A A A ... Contagiousness Treatment When to Call the Doctor About Diphtheria Diphtheria is a bacterial infection that spreads easily ...

  5. Gun Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Gun Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Gun Safety Print A ... unloaded, and the ammunition should be stored separately. Guns and Pretend Play Allowing kids to play with ...

  6. Warts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affects Your Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide to Getting Involved Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Warts KidsHealth > For Parents > Warts Print A A A ...

  7. Sepsis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Sepsis KidsHealth > For Parents > Sepsis Print A A A ... Infections When to Call the Doctor What Is Sepsis? Sepsis is when the immune system responds to ...

  8. Amebiasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Amebiasis KidsHealth > For Parents > Amebiasis Print A A A ... Prevention Treatment When to Call the Doctor About Amebiasis Amebiasis is an intestinal illness that's typically transmitted ...

  9. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Beta Thalassemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Beta Thalassemia Print A A ... Complications Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Beta talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  10. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or bleeding disorder , such as sickle cell disease , thalassemia, or anemia caused by kidney disease , hemophilia , or ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Beta Thalassemia Sickle Cell Disease Alpha Thalassemia von Willebrand Disease ...

  11. Alpha Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Alpha Thalassemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Alpha Thalassemia Print A A ... Complications Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Alfa talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  12. Psoriasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Psoriasis KidsHealth > For Parents > Psoriasis A A A What's ... treatment doesn't work, another probably will. About Psoriasis Psoriasis (suh-RYE-uh-sus) is a non- ...

  13. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Occupational Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Occupational Therapy Print A A ... for some kids. continue Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  14. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Blood Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Culture Print A A ... adjust the treatment choice. Why Do a Blood Culture? During some illnesses, certain infection-causing bacteria and ...

  15. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  16. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Hepatitis About Hepatitis The word hepatitis simply means an inflammation of ...

  17. Hernias (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Hernias KidsHealth > For Parents > Hernias Print A A A ... get your child the appropriate medical care. About Hernias When part of an organ or tissue in ...

  18. Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Scoliosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Scoliosis Print A A A en español Escoliosis What Is Scoliosis? Scoliosis affects the spine. Although the spine is ...

  19. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease Print A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  20. Chlamydia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with urination Untreated chlamydia also can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can affect the vagina, cervix, uterus, ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Sexual Development Pelvic Inflammatory Disease About Condoms STDs Questions and Answers About Sex ...

  1. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease A A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  2. Neurofibromatosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Neurofibromatosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Neurofibromatosis Print A A A ... Caring for Your Child en español Neurofibromatosis About Neurofibromatosis Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a neurocutaneous syndrome that can ...

  3. Measles: Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARENTS | DISEASES and the VACCINES THAT PREVENT THEM | Measles and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It Last ... July 2015 The best way to protect against measles is to get the measles-mumps-rubella shot ( ...

  4. Counseling Black Adolescent Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn C.

    1974-01-01

    Black adolescent parents need counsel from social workers who are able to intervene with a discerning knowledge of concepts, such as neocolonialism, survival, and liberation, that are important to them and to the black community. (Author)

  5. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Eye Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > Eye Injuries Print A ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  6. Spider Bites (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet First Aid: Spider Bites KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Spider Bites ... rare. Signs and Symptoms Of a brown recluse spider bite: red blister in the center with surrounding ...

  7. Dinosaur Reproduction and Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, John R.

    Non-avian dinosaur reproductive and parenting behaviors were mostly similar to those of extant archosaurs. Non-avian dinosaurs were probably sexually dimorphic and some may have engaged in hierarchical rituals. Non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodontidae, Oviraptorosauria) had two active oviducts, each of which produced single eggs on a daily or greater time scale. The eggs of non-coelurosaurian dinosaurs (e.g. Ornithischia, Sauropoda) were incubated in soils, whereas the eggs of non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodon, Oviraptor) were incubated with a combination of soil and direct parental contact. Parental attention to the young was variable, ranging from protection from predators to possible parental feeding of nest-bound hatchlings. Semi-altricial hadrosaur hatchlings exited their respective nests near the time of their first linear doubling. Some reproductive behaviors, once thought exclusive to Aves, arose first in non-avian dinosaurs. The success of the Dinosauria may be related to reproductive strategies.

  8. ECG Electrocardiogram (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old ECG (Electrocardiogram) KidsHealth > For Parents > ECG (Electrocardiogram) Print A ... whether there is any damage. How Is an ECG Done? There is nothing painful about getting an ...

  9. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  10. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions A A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. ...

  11. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  12. Meningitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Meningitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Meningitis A A A What's ... to Call the Doctor en español Meningitis About Meningitis Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the ...

  13. Sexual Orientation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Sexual Orientation KidsHealth > For Parents > Sexual Orientation Print A ... orientation is part of that process. What Is Sexual Orientation? The term sexual orientation refers to the ...

  14. Bronchiolitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Bronchiolitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Bronchiolitis Print A A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Bronquiolitis About Bronchiolitis Bronchiolitis is a common illness of the respiratory ...

  15. Ebola (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Ebola KidsHealth > For Parents > Ebola Print A A A ... take precautions to avoid becoming infected. What Is Ebola? Ebola, or Ebola hemorrhagic fever ( Ebola HF) , is ...

  16. MRSA (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... are harder to kill. They become resistant by changing in some way that affects the ability of ...

  17. Understanding Puberty (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... voice is a sign that his voice is changing and will become deeper. Dark, coarse, curly hair ...

  18. Toxoplasmosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... it, then wash his or her hands after changing the litter. If you are unable to have ...

  19. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned.

  20. Parents as Writing Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenworth, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Parents know that writing is essential to their children's success, and they're eager to help their children become good writers. But often, they're at a loss about how to help. Instead of leaving them in the dark, schools can make parents into valuable writing partners by giving them a toolkit of guidelines for coaching writers.…

  1. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Diabetes Movie ... For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who ...

  2. Parenting Role's Tasks as Parents of Healthy and Disabled Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azade Riyahi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to determine how to do parenting role's tasks as parents of healthy and disabled children younger than 7 years old in Iran (Arak. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the parenting role tasks questionnaire was completed for 120 parents of healthy children and 120 parents of disabled children with at least one child with disability and the parents were selected by convenience sampling method. T-test, Mann-Whitney test and analysis of variances was used to compare the scores between parents of healthy and disabled children based on studied variables including child age, parent age, child gender, parent education, family economic status, history of trauma and seizure in children was applied to perform the role of parents. Results: There was a significant difference of parent role in both groups of parents. There was observed a significant relationship between role of healthy children's parents and age of child (r=0.21, P=0.016, but not observed in disabled children's parents. In healthy children, there was no significant correlation between parent's role and maternal age. In contrast, in disabled children, there was found a significant difference (P= 0.04 with correlation coefficient of -0.18 representing the inverse relationship. Moreover, no relationship was found between history of seizure and performance of parenting role's tasks in the group of disabled children (P>0.05. Conclusion The performance of tasks of parenting role in two groups of parents of healthy children and disabled ones in four areas of primary care, education, leisure and improving cognitive level had significant difference. This difference in the area of improving the cognitive level was higher. Due to complications of disability, parents of these children pay more attention to other areas of care except of improving cognitive level. Therefore presence of disabled child has negative effect on the balance of the

  3. Parental attitudes toward mouthguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, N; Mourino, A P

    1997-01-01

    An 11-item, one-page questionnaire was mailed to 1800 parents chosen at random in the Henrico County, VA public school system. Parents were asked questions such as "who should be responsible for mouthguard wear?" "what sports should require mouthguards?" and "has [their] child ever sustained an oral or facial injury?" The parental responses indicate that mouthguard enforcement is the responsibility of both parents and coaches. Of the total injuries reported, 19% were sustained in basketball, 17% in baseball, and 11% in soccer. Despite these high injury rates, however, there was a lack of perceived need for mouthguard use in these sports. When asked which sports should require a mouthguard rule, the sports that generated the most responses were, in decreasing order, football, boxing, ice hockey, wrestling, field hockey, and karate. Parents were more likely to require mouthguards for their sons than daughters, and more likely to require them for their children who participated in a mandatory mouthguard sport, a contact sport, or who had been previously injured. The authors conclude that because parents view themselves as equally responsible as coaches for maintaining mouthguard use, both groups should be targeted and approached as a possible source for the recommendation of mandatory mouthguard rules in basketball, baseball, and soccer.

  4. Implications of antisocial parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Zachary D; Billick, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Antisocial behavior is a socially maladaptive and harmful trait to possess. This can be especially injurious for a child who is raised by a parent with this personality structure. The pathology of antisocial behavior implies traits such as deceitfulness, irresponsibility, unreliability, and an incapability to feel guilt, remorse, or even love. This is damaging to a child's emotional, cognitive, and social development. Parents with this personality makeup can leave a child traumatized, empty, and incapable of forming meaningful personal relationships. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the development of antisocial behavior. Moreover, the child with a genetic predisposition to antisocial behavior who is raised with a parental style that triggers the genetic liability is at high risk for developing the same personality structure. Antisocial individuals are impulsive, irritable, and often have no concerns over their purported responsibilities. As a parent, this can lead to erratic discipline, neglectful parenting, and can undermine effective care giving. This paper will focus on the implications of parents with antisocial behavior and the impact that this behavior has on attachment as well as on the development of antisocial traits in children.

  5. Reflections on Parental Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela LUPŞAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The movement in the European Union territory of the family members de jure or de facto - parents married or not, on the one hand, and their children, on the other hand, the birth of litigation related to the content, exercising or limiting the parental authority in the event at least one holder of parental authority is in a Member State other than where the minor child is, and the interest of achieving a good administration of justice within the European Union, led to the development of Community instruments in the area of parental authority, which has provisions on conflicts of jurisdiction, conflict of laws, recognition and enforceability, enforcement, legal aid and cooperation between central authorities, designating the applicable law. In the first part of the study we have analyzed the rules of jurisdiction by establishing the jurisdiction of the court hearing with an application for parental responsibility, whether there are pending divorce proceeding or not. In the second part of the study, we have limited the analysis to the rules applicable to the law causes that have as object parental authority.

  6. Parental Involvement in Norwegian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jan Merok

    2012-01-01

    This article examines findings on key challenges of school-parent relations in Norway. The review is based on recent large-scale studies on several issues, including formalized school-parent cooperation, parental involvement in the pedagogical discourse, and teacher perspectives on the parents' role in the school community. Findings suggest a…

  7. Parents' Knowledge of Emergent Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Ellen

    This study investigated parents' knowledge of their child's emergent literacy development by administering parent questionnaires that examined parents' beliefs of literacy learning and the early writing and reading experiences of preschool children in their home. A total of 115 questionnaires were administered to parents with children enrolled in…

  8. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  9. Parents of "Beyond Control" Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul A.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the child rearing and disciplinary methods of parents of adolescent boys who were reported by their parents to be serious control problems. On the basis of a social learning analysis of family relationships, it was hypothesized that parental difficulty in controlling adolescents was related to two factors: parent consistency in setting…

  10. Parents, Teens, and Online Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Mary; Cortesi, Sandra; Gasser, Urs; Lenhart, Amanda; Duggan, Maeve

    2012-01-01

    Most parents of teenagers are concerned about what their teenage children do online and how their behavior could be monitored by others. Some parents are taking steps to observe, discuss, and check up on their children's digital footprints. A new survey of 802 parents and their teens shows that: (1) 81% of parents of online teens say they are…

  11. Single Parenting of the Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll

    1991-06-01

    This article discusses issues that are of interest and concern to all parents of adolescents, but that may be particularly difficult for single parents to manage. It also provides a framework for examining the areas of similarity as well as difference between the adolescent and the single parent. Attention is paid to the potential advantages of single-parent status.

  12. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  13. Psychological preparation of the parent and pediatric surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Zeev N; Caldwell-Andrews, Alison; Wang, Shu-Ming

    2002-03-01

    Some 3 million children undergo anesthesia and surgery in the United States every year; 40% to 60% of these children develop significant behavioral stress prior to surgery. Multiple interventions have been suggested to treat the preoperative behavioral stress responses in children. There is a trend toward reducing both behavioral and pharmacological preoperative interventions aimed at children, perhaps because though there is a consensus that preoperative interventions can be useful, almost no outcome studies have evaluated the effects of these interventions on measurable, clinically "important" postoperative outcomes. More research is needed in this area.

  14. Preparing Your Child for a New Sibling (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... new baby can bring, some older kids might struggle as they try to adjust. Encourage older kids to talk about their feelings about the new baby. If a child cannot express those feelings, don't be surprised if he or she tests limits or reverts to speaking in baby talk. If your child acts up, ...

  15. Digital Parenting and Changing Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl KABAKÇI YURDAKUL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies are developing rapidly. Developing technologies are integrated in many fields of life. This situation facilitated almost all fields of life. Owing to integration process, children’s technology use and adaption is easy compare to their parents. But technology use and adaption brings several disadvantages for children. Computer and the Internet have been used nearly all home in about last five years. Parents who were worried about their children when they played outside are worried about their children when they are on net at home. Due to these developments, parenting notion has gain new different dimensions and parenting roles are changed. Parents should now be digital parent, the Internet Parent or online parent. In this paper Digital Parenting is examined and described in additon to thisdigital parenting roles are determined. Based on these roles recommendations are presented for future studies and practices

  16. The Relations between Parents' Smoking, General Parenting, Parental Smoking Communication, and Adolescents' Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakeh, Zeena; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Vermulst, Ad A.; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined whether the associations between general parenting practices (i.e., support, behavioral control, and psychological control) and parental smoking on the one hand and older and younger siblings' smoking on the other were mediated by parental smoking communication (i.e., frequency and quality of parent-adolescent…

  17. The Influences of the Sixth Graders' Parents' Internet Literacy and Parenting Style on Internet Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Shih, Ru-Chu; Liu, Hung-Tzu; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Tseng, Kuo-Hung

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore the sixth grade students' parents' Internet literacy and parenting style on Internet parenting in Kaohsiung County in Taiwan. Upon stratified cluster sampling, a total of 822 parents from 34 classes in 28 schools participated in this study. The descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used to analyze the responses…

  18. Parental feeding practices predict authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Kennedy, Tay Seacord; Page, Melanie C; Topham, Glade L; Harrist, Amanda W

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to identify how parental feeding practices from the nutrition literature link to general parenting styles from the child development literature to understand how to target parenting practices to increase effectiveness of interventions. Stand-alone parental feeding practices could be targeted independently. However, parental feeding practices linked to parenting styles require interventions treating underlying family dynamics as a whole. To predict parenting styles from feeding practices and to test three hypotheses: restriction and pressure to eat are positively related whereas responsibility, monitoring, modeling, and encouraging are negatively related to an authoritarian parenting style; responsibility, monitoring, modeling, and encouraging are positively related whereas restriction and pressure to eat are negatively related to an authoritative parenting style; a permissive parenting style is negatively linked with all six feeding practices. Baseline data of a randomized-controlled intervention study. Two hundred thirty-nine parents (93.5% mothers) of first-grade children (134 boys, 105 girls) enrolled in rural public schools. Parental responses to encouraging and modeling questionnaires and the Child Feeding Questionnaire, as well as parenting styles measured by the Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire. Correlation and regression analyses. Feeding practices explained 21%, 15%, and 8% of the variance in authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting, respectively. Restriction, pressure to eat, and monitoring (negative) significantly predicted an authoritarian style (Hypothesis 1); responsibility, restriction (negative), monitoring, and modeling predicted an authoritative style (Hypothesis 2); and modeling (negative) and restriction significantly predicted a permissive style (Hypothesis 3). Parental feeding practices with young children predict general parenting styles. Interventions that fail to address underlying parenting styles

  19. The impact of parental self-esteem and parental rearing behavior on adolescent attachment to parents

    OpenAIRE

    Anbo Yang

    2011-01-01

    In this study the relationship of parental self-esteem, parental rearing and adolescent adult attachment was investigated. A total 448 senior high school students completed EMBU(Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran, or ―Own memories of parental rearing‖, Perris et al., 1980), the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR; Brennan, Clark, &Shaver, 1998), and their parents completed The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES; Rosenberg, 1965). The results suggested that parental global self-esteem ...

  20. Why It Is Important to Learn Algebra. Parent/Student Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Parent/Student Guide explains why Algebra I is a required subject, how it helps prepare students for the future, how Algebra I fits into the student's high school math program, and what parents can do to support their student's success in learning algebra. It also explains why California policymakers require all students to take algebra and…

  1. Hearing Parents of Children with Hearing Loss: Perceptions of the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Robin Fern

    2016-01-01

    Under federal guidelines, parents of school-aged children with hearing loss are required to attend an individualized education program (IEP) meeting on behalf of their child. However, it remains unclear how prepared hearing parents are to oversee development of IEPs that guarantee their children the best educational outcomes, as well as how much…

  2. Managing Middle School Madness: Helping Parents and Teachers Understand the "Wonder Years"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilderman, Glen

    2006-01-01

    For many parents and students, the transition from elementary school to middle school can be difficult. This book is a compilation of advice and information to help parents prepare for the behavioral, social, and academic adjustments that students may encounter. In this book, the author offers practical tips on topics such a setting up rewards for…

  3. Family Mathematics Nights: An Opportunity to Improve Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Parents' Roles and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofferding, Laura; Kastberg, Signe; Hoffman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Providing preservice teachers with opportunities to engage with parents and begin to see them as collaborators in their children's education is a persistent challenge in mathematics methods courses and teacher preparation programs more broadly. We describe the use of family mathematics nights as a model for engaging parents and preservice…

  4. Family Mathematics Nights: An Opportunity to Improve Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Parents' Roles and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofferding, Laura; Kastberg, Signe; Hoffman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Providing preservice teachers with opportunities to engage with parents and begin to see them as collaborators in their children's education is a persistent challenge in mathematics methods courses and teacher preparation programs more broadly. We describe the use of family mathematics nights as a model for engaging parents and preservice…

  5. Can I Make It? A Transition Program for College Bound Learning Disabled Students and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ellen; Czamanske, Jackie

    The metaphor of a family road trip is used to describe a 10-week seminar program at the Rochester Institute of Technology (New York) for learning disabled high school students and their parents in preparation for student transition to college. The small group format (maximum eight families) allows for both whole group and separate (parents and…

  6. Parenting intervention effects on parental depressive symptoms: examining the role of parenting and child behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jessie J; Gonzales, Nancy A; Montaño, Zorash; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger E

    2014-06-01

    Parental depression is a major risk factor in child development. Growing research suggests parenting programs can positively impact parental depressive symptoms, although the specific mechanisms that explain these effects are unknown. The current study examined parenting mediated effects of a parenting program on mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms, as well as the role of child behavior in linking parenting to reductions in depressive symptoms. The study samples included 494 mothers and 288 fathers of Mexican origin adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program/Proyecto Puentes a la Secundaria, a universal prevention and promotion intervention that included parent training but did not directly target parental depressive symptoms. Parenting mediator models tested program effects on parental depressive symptoms through changes in harsh and supportive parenting. Results showed a significant indirect intervention effect on maternal depressive symptoms through changes in mothers' harsh parenting. Next, child behavior models revealed a partial mediation effect of harsh parenting and a full mediation effect of supportive parenting on maternal depressive symptoms through mothers' reports of child externalizing symptoms. Indirect effects of fathers' harsh and supportive parenting on paternal depressive symptoms were also found through fathers' reports of child behavior.

  7. Parenting adolescents with cystic fibrosis: the adolescents' and young adults' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    When suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF), a number of problems may arise during adolescence; for example, poor adherence. The problems may be attributed to the adolescent being insufficiently prepared for adult life. Research on different ways of parenting adolescents with CF and the influence of different parenting styles on the adolescents' adherence to treatment is still limited. The aim of this study was to identify the types of parental support that adolescents and young adults with CF want and find helpful in terms of preparing them for adult life. Sixteen Danish adolescents with CF, aged 14-25, participated in the study. Two focus group interviews were carried out, one for 14-18-year-olds and one for 19-25-year-olds. Individual interviews were conducted, with three subjects. Using interpretive description strategy, a secondary analysis of the interview data was conducted. The adolescents and young adults wanted their parents educated about the adolescent experience. They wanted their parents to learn a pedagogical parenting style, to learn to trust them, and to learn to gradually transfer responsibility for their medical treatment. Additionally, the adolescents noted that meeting other parents may be beneficial for the parents. The findings of this study suggest that adolescents and young adults with CF want their parents to be educated about how to handle adolescents with CF and thereby sufficiently prepare them for adult life.

  8. Parent attitudes towards medical student attendance and interaction in the paediatric burns outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shinichiro; McBride, Craig A; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-05-01

    Medical student attendance in the Outpatient Department is not only essential for the teaching of paediatric burns, but is also important in the recruitment of promising individuals for the growth of our speciality. In 2008, 110 consecutive parents were asked to complete written surveys before the start of their clinic appointment. Only one parent per family could choose to complete the survey. The response rate was 100%. Parents from a diverse range of cultural, educational and socioeconomic were represented in this study. Eighteen parents (16.4%), 48 parents (46.3%) and 44 parents (40.0%) considered their child's burn to be severe, moderate and mild, respectively. One hundred and nine parents (99.1%) accepted the attendance of medical students. Forty-two parents (38.5%) preferred fewer than 3 students, 35 parents (32.1%) would be comfortable with 3-5 medical students and 32 parents (29.4%) could accept more than 6 medical students. One hundred and two parents (92.7%) would allow students to physically interact with their children and 108 parents (99.2%) would allow medical students to freely ask questions in burns clinic. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that high income earners would be comfortable with fewer medical students attending clinic than low income earners (p=0.007). Also, younger parents (p=0.002) and parents from families who made less than A$25,000 a year (p=0.009), believed that they could perceive 'a lot of benefit' from observing medical students being taught, whereas older parents and parents from higher income families responded more often with a perception of only 'some benefit'. This first study in a paediatric outpatient setting shows that parents are overwhelmingly prepared to have medical students involved in the care of their child. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Parents bereaved by offspring suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Leslie, William D

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Suicide bereavement remains understudied and poorly understood. OBJECTIVES To examine outcomes of parents bereaved by the suicide death of their offspring and to compare these with both nonbereaved parent controls and parents who had offspring die in a motor vehicle crash (MVC). DESIGN...... Population-based case-control study. Suicide-bereaved parents were compared with nonbereaved matched control parents in the general population (n = 1415) and with MVC-bereaved parents (n = 1132) on the rates of physician-diagnosed mental and physical disorders, social factors, and treatment use in the 2...... years after the suicide of an offspring, as compared with the 2 years prior to the death. Suicide-bereaved and MVC-bereaved parents had very few differences on predeath to postdeath outcomes. Depression rate increases were greater for MVC-bereaved parents (19.9%) compared with suicide-bereaved parents...

  10. Parental Investments in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Esping-Andersen, Gösta

    This study examines parental time investment in their children, distinguishing between developmental and non-developmental care. Our analyses centre on three influential determinants: educational background, marital homogamy, and spouses’ relative bargaining power. We find that the emphasis...... on quality care time is correlated with parents’ education, and that marital homogamy reduces couple specialization, but only among the highly educated. In line with earlier research, we identify gendered parental behaviour. The presence of boys is an important condition for fathers’ time dedication......, but primarily among lower educated fathers. To the extent that parental stimulation is decisive for child outcomes, our findings suggest the persistence of important inequalities. This emerges through our special attention to behavioural differences across the educational distribution among households....

  11. Parental trisomy 21 mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D J; Begleiter, M L; Chamberlin, J; Hankins, L; Magenis, R E

    1982-01-01

    A family with three children with trisomy 21 in which the mother is a phenotypically normal, trisomy 21/normal mosaic was studied. Chromosome 21 fluorescent heteromorphisms were used to document that two of the three number 21's in two of the Down syndrome offspring were of maternal origin. Five cytogenetic surveys in which both parents of a child with trisomy 21 were studied have been reviewed. From these data, it is estimated that 3% of couples producing a child with trisomy 21 can be explained by parental mosaicism. From 17 informative sibships, with one parent mosaic, the segregation ratio was estimated to be 0.43 +/- 0.11. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6211090

  12. Parenting Style and Its Correlates. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Nancy

    One of the most robust approaches to researching parents' influence on children's social competence is the study of what has been called "parenting style." Parenting style captures two important elements of parenting: parental responsiveness and parental demandingness. Categorizing parents according to whether they are high or low on parental…

  13. Recruitment of Native American Parents: Ideas for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodluck, Charlotte

    Recruitment of Native Americans to be foster or adoptive parents for Native American children involves careful planning, preparation, and work. In addition to making standard administrative decisions and maintaining required records, social workers must be sensitive to the attitudes, lifestyle, and culture of Native Americans recruited as adoptive…

  14. Empowering Latino Parents to Transform the Education of Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pstross, Mikulas; Rodríguez, Ariel; Knopf, Richard C.; Paris, Cody Morris

    2016-01-01

    This article emphasizes the role of parental involvement in the college preparation of Latino elementary and secondary school students. Although literature shows that education is highly valued in Latino families, actual college enrollment rates for Latino youth are below average. This has been attributed to barriers including lack of financial…

  15. "You Cannot Learn This from a Book:" Pre-Service Teachers Developing Empathy towards Parents of Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) via Parent Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomhead, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education for inclusive education is a key priority in the UK and internationally, with much research exploring how pre-service teachers can be prepared to educate pupils with Special Educational Needs (SEN). However, this has resulted in less consideration of how pre-service teachers can be prepared to work with the "parents" of…

  16. Parent-Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Strandgaard

    2016-01-01

    of parents as co-consumers prevailed despite radical changes in views on children’s media consumption. In particular, I examine the shared inter-Scandinavian socio-cultural contexts that structured the changing professional and political groups’ pressure on parents to perform according to their norms...... of professionals: first, by teachers and librarians in the mid-fifties and, then, by intellectuals and performing artists in the late sixties. With a radically changed professional hegemony and a shifting media landscape, the role of media in children’s lives was described very differently during the period...

  17. Parental Investments in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Esping-Andersen, Gösta

    on quality care time is correlated with parents’ education, and that marital homogamy reduces couple specialization, but only among the highly educated. In line with earlier research, we identify gendered parental behaviour. The presence of boys is an important condition for fathers’ time dedication......, but primarily among lower educated fathers. To the extent that parental stimulation is decisive for child outcomes, our findings suggest the persistence of important inequalities. This emerges through our special attention to behavioural differences across the educational distribution among households....

  18. Aimons nos parents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑涛

    2004-01-01

    En général, on trouve naturel d'aimer ses parents. Par exemple, on dit très souvent penser à papa et à maman quand on est loin de chez sol; et beaucoup de gens ont écrit de belles phrases pour chanter l'amour éternel entre parents et enfants. Mais est-ce que la réalité est aussi simple? Ma réponse est bien sūr que non.

  19. Parents who use drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Tim; Bernays, Sarah; Houmøller, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    on efforts to create a sense of normalcy of family life, involving keeping drug use secret from children, and investing heavily in strategies to maintain ambiguity regarding children's awareness. Our analysis highlights that damage limitation strategies double-up in accounts as resources of child protection......' parenting. Accounts of damage acceptance highlight a theme of 'recovery'. We find that the interview accounts operate in response to a regulative norm of 'good parenting' in which one strives to deflect damaged identity through narratives of damage qualification and to seek understanding and acceptance...

  20. Misunderstandings between Parents and Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建琳; 尹小明

    2002-01-01

    Today more and mere young men say that their parents don’t understand them well. They think their parents are very striet with them and don't give them enough space to do their own things which they like to. They even think their parents are out of touch with modern life. So,generally speaking, they don' t want to talk with their parents, they don' t tell everything, especially their secret to their parents. It seems there is a gap between the parents and their children.

  1. Improving health outcomes of children through effective parenting: model and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Martha; Sarpong, Daniel F; Ferguson, Aneeqah; Satcher, David

    2013-12-23

    This article reports on the design, development, testing and presentation of preliminary evidence of a translational, culturally relevant parenting education model, titled Smart and Secured Children (SSC). SSC, a quality parenting curriculum, prepares disparate African American parents as leaders for transforming their parenting behaviors and leading their peers and community in changing existing parenting culture. The article recommends expanded utility of identified promising processes, approaches and practices to engage African American parents to lead in addressing health inequity conditions in their families and communities. It adds to the growing scientific literature on the association between parent-child relationship quality and a wide variety of children physical, emotional and social outcomes. SSC applied principles of developmental theories; community based participatory research (CBPR), and iterative Delphi method between the community stakeholders, parents and researchers. The delivery approach of SSC was revamped from professional-led to parent-led content presentation and delivery methods using a conversational learning approach, referred to as 'conversepedia'. Parents' leadership development training and delivery of this curriculum in social supportive groups improved their mental wellbeing, parenting capacity and leadership skills. Parents do matter and can choose positive influence in their lives and are capable of reversing negative peer influence.

  2. The impact of parental self-esteem and parental rearing behavior on adolescent attachment to parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbo Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the relationship of parental self-esteem, parental rearing and adolescent adult attachment was investigated. A total 448 senior high school students completed EMBU(Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran, or ―Own memories of parental rearing‖, Perris et al., 1980, the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR; Brennan, Clark, &Shaver, 1998, and their parents completed The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES; Rosenberg, 1965. The results suggested that parental global self-esteem has no effect on the adolescent attachment to parents. Parental positive rearing behaviors have been significantly associated with avoidance to parents. Furthermore, the negative rearing behaviors, such as paternal denying and rejecting, maternal punitiveness, maternal overinvolved and overprotective behavior, can predict the adolescent avoidance and anxiety to parents.

  3. Parenting of adult children in an Israeli sample: parents are always parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzki, Naama

    2009-04-01

    This qualitative study examines the role of parents with regard to their adult children, by exploring parents' experiences, meanings, and the underlying psychological processes of their parental role. In-depth interviews with healthy Israeli parents (N = 23) aged 56 to 69 explored their perceptions about their parental role. Narrative analysis techniques focused on the content and on the form of the narratives were applied. Five important internal dialectic dimensions emerged: emotional connection and separation; the child as narcissistic extension of the parent and the parent's desire to let the child individuate; growing importance of familial connections and the perceived generation gap; parents' balancing personal needs and the children's needs, and finally, maintaining a hierarchical stance and an equal stance. The results are integrated into the developing theory of intergenerational ambivalence, suggesting a dialectical configuration for the role of parent to adult children.

  4. Parenting challenges in the setting of terminal illness: a family-focused perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaider, Talia I; Salley, Christina G; Terry, Rachel; Davidovits, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In the advanced stages of illness, families with dependent children experience disruption across all dimensions of family life. The need for family support during palliative care is well recognized, yet little is understood about how parents and their children navigate these difficult circumstances. This review summarizes the current body of research on parenting challenges in advanced cancer. To date, the study of parental cancer has focused predominantly on the early stages of disease and its impact on children and adolescents. Less is known about how families with minor children prepare for parental loss. Evidence suggests that having dependent children influences parents' treatment decisions at the end of life, and that a central concern for children and parents is optimizing time spent together. Parents may feel an urgency to engage in accelerated parenting, and maintaining normalcy remains a consistent theme for the ill and healthy parent alike. There is a growing evidence base affirming the importance of responsive communication prior to death. Advancing knowledge about the parenting experience at the end of life is critical for ensuring effective support to the entire family, as it accommodates and prepares for the loss of a vital member.

  5. Why Do Parents Homeschool? A Systematic Examination of Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christa L.; Hoover-Dempsey, Kathleen V.

    2007-01-01

    Although homeschooling is growing in popularity in the United States, little systematic research has focused on this population. Grounded in the parental involvement literature, this study examines why parents decide to home-school. Parents of 136 homeschooled elementary children completed questionnaires assessing constructs derived from the…

  6. Mainland Chinese Parenting Styles and Parent-Child Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiyuan; Farver, Jo Ann M.; Zhang, Zengxiu; Zeng, Qiang; Yu, Lidong; Cai, Beiying

    2005-01-01

    Parenting styles and mother-child interaction were examined with 97 Mainland Chinese mothers (M age = 29.64 years, SD = 3.64) and their young children (M = 24.30 months, SD = 4.57). Mothers completed questionnaires about their parenting styles, orientation to Chinese cultural values, perceived parenting stress, and sources of social support. The…

  7. Parental influences on memories of parents and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Franca; Bonechi, Alice; Peterson, Carole; Smorti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The authors evaluated the role parent-child relationship quality has on two types of memories, those of parents and those of friends. Participants were 198 Italian university students who recalled memories during 4 separate timed memory-fluency tasks about their preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school and university years. Half were instructed to recall memories involving parents and the remainder memories involving friends. Moreover, parent-child relationships were assessed by the Network of Relationships Inventory (NRI; W. Furman & D. Buhrmester, 1985) and Adolescents' Report of Parental Monitoring (D. M. Capaldi & G. R. Patterson, 1989). Results showed that men with positive parent-son relationships had more memories of parents and more affectively positive memories of friends, supporting a consistency model positing similarity between parent-child relationships and memories of friends. Women with positive parental relationship quality had more affectively positive memories of parents but for friends, positive relationship quality only predicted positive memories when young. At older ages, especially middle school-aged children, negative parent-daughter relationships predicted more positive memories of friends, supporting a compensatory model. The gender of parent also mattered, with fathers having a more influential role on affect for memories of friends.

  8. Parental relocation Free movement rights and joint parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeppesen de Boer, Christina G.

    2008-01-01

    As joint parental authority increasingly becomes the legal norm applied in situations where the parents do not live together, for example, after divorce or the breakup of a relationship, the settlement of disputes regarding the concrete exercise of parental authority gain relevance. A common dispute

  9. Exploring Parental Perspectives on Parent-Child Sexual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Gross, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    We examined parental perspectives about parent-child sexual communication through four focus groups conducted with 25 parents of young children. Participant comments fell into six areas: 1) personal experience with sexuality education, 2) current sexuality education efforts, 3) comfort and confidence, 4) content and timing, 5) importance of a…

  10. Parental relocation Free movement rights and joint parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeppesen de Boer, Christina G.

    2008-01-01

    As joint parental authority increasingly becomes the legal norm applied in situations where the parents do not live together, for example, after divorce or the breakup of a relationship, the settlement of disputes regarding the concrete exercise of parental authority gain relevance. A common dispute

  11. Adolescents' and Parents' Changing Conceptions of Parental Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith; Crean, Hugh F.; Campione-Barr, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Adolescents and parents view parents' regulation of some aspects of adolescents' lives as legitimate, but they disagree as to how much personal freedom adolescents should have. Too much parental control over personal issues in early adolescence leads to feelings of psychological control, but increasing autonomy over personal issues in later…

  12. Parental monitoring, sensitivity toward parents, and a child's mate preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbs, Shelli L.; Buunk, Abraham P.; Li, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated gender differences in parental monitoring and sensitivity toward parents and the extent to which these measures can influence children's mate preferences. In 2 samples (the United States and the Netherlands), females reported experiencing higher levels of parental monitoring

  13. Parent Training: Implementation Strategies for "Adventures in Parenting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Shannon Carothers; Farris, Jaelyn R.; Borkowski, John G.

    2008-01-01

    "Adventures in Parenting", an informational booklet published by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, offers five principles that parents can use to develop a mental model of parenting: Responding, Preventing, Monitoring, Mentoring, and Modeling (RPM3). The current study was designed to assess the differential impact of…

  14. Parenting Behaviour among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Boonen, Hannah; Maes, Bea; Noens, Ilse

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to the extensive amount of empirical findings about parental perceptions, parenting cognitions, and coping in families with a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research about parenting itself is very scarce. A first goal of this study was to examine the factor structure and internal consistency of two scales to measure parenting…

  15. Parenting Style and Parental Involvement: Relations with Adolescent Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty ninth-grade students completed questionnaires regarding their parents' demandingness, responsiveness, school involvement, and commitment to achievement. Boys' reports of both maternal and paternal parenting significantly predicted their achievement, with parental values toward achievement significantly predicting achievement in boys above…

  16. Parental Care Aids, but Parental Overprotection Hinders, College Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B.; Pierce, John D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has shown that students who have troublesome relationships with their parents show higher risk factors for poorer college adjustment. In the present study, we focused on the balance between two key aspects of parenting style, parental care and overprotection, as they affect the transition to college life. Eighty-three undergraduate…

  17. Parenting "Gifted and Talented" Children in Urban Areas: Parents' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Valsa; Smith, Carole Portman; Brown, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    International evidence demonstrates the importance of engaging parents in the education of their "high-potential" children, yet limited research has focused on the involvement of parents from differing economic strata/backgrounds. The current study explored the dilemmas of parenting academically high-ability children from economically…

  18. Evaluation of a Parent Education Program for Divorcing Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenry, Patrick C.; Clark, Kathleen A.; Stone, Glenn

    1999-01-01

    Compares participants in a parent education program [Parents' Education about Children's Emotions Program (PEACE)] mandated for divorcing parents with a similar sample of individuals who had not participated in such a program. Although the findings provide little evidence for the longer-term impact of this program, the program participants…

  19. Parenting Style and Parental Involvement: Relations with Adolescent Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty ninth-grade students completed questionnaires regarding their parents' demandingness, responsiveness, school involvement, and commitment to achievement. Boys' reports of both maternal and paternal parenting significantly predicted their achievement, with parental values toward achievement significantly predicting achievement in boys above…

  20. Adolescents' and Parents' Changing Conceptions of Parental Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith; Crean, Hugh F.; Campione-Barr, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Adolescents and parents view parents' regulation of some aspects of adolescents' lives as legitimate, but they disagree as to how much personal freedom adolescents should have. Too much parental control over personal issues in early adolescence leads to feelings of psychological control, but increasing autonomy over personal issues in later…

  1. Parental Influence on Adolescent Sexuality: Implications for Parents as Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Carol A.; Hicks, Mary W.

    1982-01-01

    Positive and negative sexual messages are communicated by parents to their children, verbally and nonverbally. The impact of parental messages upon the sexuality of youth appears relatively straightforward for males but quite complex for females. Educational approaches are suggested to be used to recycle early parental sexual messages. (Author/PN)

  2. Parental monitoring, sensitivity toward parents, and a child's mate preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbs, Shelli L.; Buunk, Abraham P.; Li, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated gender differences in parental monitoring and sensitivity toward parents and the extent to which these measures can influence children's mate preferences. In 2 samples (the United States and the Netherlands), females reported experiencing higher levels of parental monitoring

  3. Unmarried Parents in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Sorensen, Kia

    2010-01-01

    Noting that access to higher education has expanded dramatically in the past several decades, Sara Goldrick-Rab and Kia Sorensen focus on how unmarried parents fare once they enter college. Contrary to the expectation that access to college consistently promotes family stability and economic security, the authors argue that deficiencies in current…

  4. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Scarlet Fever KidsHealth > For Parents > Scarlet Fever Print A A A What's in this article? ... to Call the Doctor en español Escarlatina Scarlet fever is caused by an infection with group A ...

  5. Kawasaki Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Kawasaki Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Kawasaki Disease Print A A A What's in this ... Complications Diagnosis Treatment en español La enfermedad de Kawasaki Kawasaki disease is an illness that involves the ...

  6. Toxocariasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxocariasis KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxocariasis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Treatment When to Call the Doctor en español Toxocariasis When common parasites of dogs and cats infect ...

  7. Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Depression A A A What's ... to Help en español Comprender la depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  8. Electroencephalogram (EEG) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old EEG (Electroencephalogram) KidsHealth > For Parents > EEG (Electroencephalogram) A A A What's in this article? ... Child If You Have Questions en español Electroencefalograma (EEG) What It Is An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a ...

  9. Parent Education: Abstract Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Barbara, Comp.

    This bibliography has been compiled to alert educators to parent education documents found in the ERIC microfiche collection and in journal literature. Abstracts of selected documents have been taken from "Research in Education (RIE)", and journal article citations from the "Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)". Included are published…

  10. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Liver Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Liver Tumors Print A A A What's in this ... Malignant (Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  11. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections A A A What's in this article? Salmonella ... contaminated food (usually meat, poultry, eggs, or milk). Salmonella infections affect the intestines and cause vomiting, fever, and ...

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Kids for Teens Search Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other ...

  13. Explaining "DSM" to Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    "The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") is useful for children and families for three practical reasons: (1) It provides a way to communicate about emotional and behavioral problems of youth in a common language; (2) Parents can get an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for a child if that process…

  14. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumonia A A A What's in this article? Signs ... Doctor Professional Treatment Home Care en español Neumonía Pneumonia is a general term for lung infections that ...

  15. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? Signs ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  16. Strokes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain that's affected and the amount of damage the stroke causes. More likely, a parent first notices changes ... rehabilitation and therapy. previous continue Complications The brain damage that occurs during a stroke can cause a number of other problems that ...

  17. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Down Syndrome Print A A ... Help en español El síndrome de Down About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is ...

  18. Parenting NICU graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schappin, R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis reflects the results of our randomized, clinical trial on the effectiveness of a generic parenting intervention named Primary Care Triple P. We investigated whether Primary Care Triple P reduced emotional and behavioral problems in preterm-born and asphyxiated term-born preschoolers. The

  19. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Ultrasound: Abdomen KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Abdomen Print A A A What's in this article? ... Child If You Have Questions en español Ultrasonido: abdomen What It Is An abdominal ultrasound is a ...

  20. Genital Warts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Warts (HPV) Print A A A What's in this ... Active Teens en español Verrugas genitales G enital warts are warts that are on or near a ...