WorldWideScience

Sample records for preparation curriculum results

  1. Job Preparation: A Curriculum for Refugee and Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croydon, Alysan; Crichton, Kathy

    This refugee women's job preparation curriculum is designed to provide facilitators with a sourcebook of information and activities to assist refugee and immigrant women in gaining unsubsidized employment. It specifically addresses the needs of women with children and the impact of employment on home and family life. The curriculum materials…

  2. [Towards a pedagogical e-learning approach to improve preparation for medical school curriculum in Grenoble: results over the 10 last years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillois, Pierre; Pagonis, Daniel; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Romanet, Jean-Paul

    2013-02-01

    Before 2005, at Grenoble, the teaching of the first year of medicine satisfied neither the students, nor the teachers anxious to exempt a correctly targeted effective teaching. By 2006, the Grenoble-native teaching method was reformed in-depth with the introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) in education. Each sequence was over 4 weeks connecting: self- learning using multi-media resources, questions submitted online, meetings with teaching staff for interactive question-answer sessions in the presence of the teacher,) tutorials animated by older students for Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) training in preparation for the exams. The whole health formation was structured in 12 cycles of this same structured sequence. Since 2010, this method was extended from the faculty of medicine to the faculty of pharmacy and maieutic. Each year, more than 1600 students, 40 teachers and 140 tutors are concerned. The ICT laboratory was responsible for the production of the multi-media support, of the management of the questions online, the collection and the treatment of the evaluations of the lesson by the students. It also took part in the preparation of the MCQ trainings and after each sequence, delivered to students their personal ranking. Staffs between teachers and students are organized for the 12 cycles. The teachers' and students' opinions were analyzed to evaluate the reforms and allow teaching methods to be adapted accordingly. The expressed satisfaction' rate vary from 85% with more than 91% by students and teachers. The intensive use of new information and communication technologies is well accepted, by both sides: teachers and students. After each tutorial, students had their results and their rank, which are linked with the contest result. The mean of the 12 notes obtained during the tutorials is correlated with the note with the contest (R of Spearman=0.75). Student profiles at registration and success in the exams following the reform are

  3. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Rama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods: Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results: Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows’ professional growth. Conclusion: The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn.

  4. Preparing residents for family practice: role of an integrated “Triple C” curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited understanding of the impact of Triple C competency-based curriculums on the preparation of residents for family practice. This paper describes a competency-based curriculum within an integrated longitudinal block design and presents preliminary evaluation data on the impact of this curriculum on preparedness for family practice. Methods: First and second year family medicine residents were surveyed as a component of a year-end program evaluation to assess the extent to which the residency program is preparing them to engage in a variety of practice domains, the likelihood that they would engage in these domains, and the extent to which this residency program is comprehensive, relevant to their development as a family physician, and promotes interprofessional practice. Results: Residents perceived themselves as prepared to engage in most practice areas and their intentions to engage in various practice domains were positively correlated to their ratings of preparedness. Ratings reflected that residents perceived this program as comprehensive and relevant to their development as a family physician and they perceived a high degree of encouragement for interprofessional practice. Conclusions: This study provides some preliminary evidence that an integrated competency-based curriculum, with an emphasis on interprofessional practice has the potential to effectively prepare residents for practice in family medicine.

  5. Preparing a successful, role-specific curriculum vitae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2014-10-01

    An internet search reveals just how many articles there are on preparing a curriculum vitae (CV). The preparation of a CV should not be regarded as a 'one-off' event, to be updated periodically. A successful CV requires thoughtful preparation to ensure it is directed towards a specific post and should consider two important perspectives. First, an understanding of what is required of the practitioner in the nursing post (demand), and second, what the nurse can offer in terms of his or her skills, experience, qualities and qualifications (supply). The demands of the post will also include meeting professional standards, such as those that have emerged following consideration of the Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry (Francis 2013). This article explores how to prepare a successful CV for a specific role, using a demand and supply perspective--where a nurse seeks to match the specific requirements of the post by summarising what he or she has to offer.

  6. ASHA Survey of Health Curriculum Needs: Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Livingston S.; Thier, Herbert D.

    The results of a survey conducted by the Ad hoc Committee to Study the Needs and Problems of the Classroom Teacher in Curriculum Development are reported. Questionnaires were sent to members of the American School Health Association (ASHA). The survey was composed of four sections: (1) background information on demographic data, institutional…

  7. The Curriculum in Quantitative Analysis: Results of a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, David C.; Grossman, William E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on the results of a survey of college level instructors of quantitative analysis courses. Discusses what topics are taught in such courses, how much weight is given to these topics, and which experiments are used in the laboratory. Poses some basic questions about the curriculum in quantitative analysis. (TW)

  8. Curriculum Type and Sophomore Students' Preparation Time for the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Boyd F.; Cariaga-Lo, Liza

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen medical students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum reported that on average they spent twice as much time preparing for step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination as did 52 students in the traditional lecture-based curriculum at the same school. Different learning approaches were also employed. (SLD)

  9. Preschool Teachers Can Use a Media-Rich Curriculum to Prepare Low-Income Children for School Success: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Summative Evaluation of the "Ready to Learn Initiative"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Pasnik, Shelley; Bates, Lauren; Townsend, Eve; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Llorente, Carlin; Hupert, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    Described here is a study on the efficacy of a media-rich curriculum based on the idea that children can learn best from "media synergy," that is, when children have opportunities to learn a focused set of skills by engaging in repeated practice with them in many different formats and media. Participants in this study were low-income children ages…

  10. Preservice Teachers: Teacher Preparation, Multicultural Curriculum and Culturally Relevant Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins-Gillispie, Delphina

    2009-01-01

    This study is part of a larger study that uses mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) to investigate preservice teachers' knowledge and understanding of multiculturalism and to prepare preservice teachers to work in diverse classrooms. The results indicate two findings: 1) that preservice teachers come from homogeneous backgrounds;…

  11. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Helen; Marzano, David; Lanham, Michael; Stein, Tamara; Curran, Diana; Hammoud, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Background The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions) had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System. PMID:25430640

  12. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Morgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose: We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods: The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results: Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System.

  13. Program Evaluation of the "PREPaRE" School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Serwacki, Michelle L.; Brock, Stephen E.; Savage, Todd A.; Woitaszewski, Scott A.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study details a program evaluation of the "PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum" ("PREPaRE"), conducted in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2011. Significant improvements in crisis prevention and intervention attitudes and knowledge were shown among 875 "Crisis Prevention…

  14. A Case-Based Curriculum Approach to Special Education Teacher Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peggy L.; Baker, Barbara K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how Metropolitan State College of Denver, a large undergraduate institution, developed and implemented a case-based special-education curriculum approach to special-education teacher preparation. Of 20 students prepared using the case-based method, 19 have successfully passed the State of Colorado mandated teacher competency test.…

  15. Elementary Education Curriculum Folio Guidelines for the NCATE Review Process: Basic Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisenberry, Nancy L.

    This publication provides guidelines for institutions of higher education preparing an Elementary Education Curriculum Folio for review by the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI). Preparation of folios is part of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accreditation process. The completed form and…

  16. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Yost, S. A.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort--the design of an "Introduction to Mechatronics" course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers…

  17. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Yost, S. A.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort--the design of an "Introduction to Mechatronics" course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers…

  18. Algunas consideraciones sobre la confección del Curriculum Vitae Some considerations on the preparation of the Curriculum Vitae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reyes Miranda

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo expone algunas consideraciones necesarias a la hora de confeccionar el Curriculum Vitae, con el propósito de que se logre estructurar de la forma más organizada y clara posible con todos los elementos necesarios en dependencia de su destinación. En este documento se recoge la vida del trabajador y va a determinar el logro de los objetivos por los cuales se presenta. Teniendo en cuenta la importancia que reviste su correcta confección, presencia, nivel de detalles y relevancia de los datos anotados es que se hacen algunas reflexiones y se comentan algunas ideas básicas sobre la confección de este tipo de documento que se espera sean de utilidad.The present paper deals with some considerations that are necessary at the time of preparing the Curriculum Vitae so as to structure it in an organized an clear way with all the necessary elements, depending on its destination. The worker's life is expressed in this document and it is going to determine the achievement of the goals for which it is presented. Taking into account the importance of its correct preparation, presence, level of details and relevance of the data included, some reflexions are made and some basic ideas are discussed thay may be useful for the preparation of this type of document.

  19. Experiential Placements: Dissemination and Stakeholder Engagement for Curriculum Planning Action to Prepare Future Pharmacy Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susanne; Stupans, Ieva

    2009-01-01

    Preparing graduates for the professions is increasingly recognised as involving a partnership approach to curriculum design, implementation and evaluation. Experiential placements play a critical role in developing discipline-specific knowledge and skills and also generic professional dispositions including relationships, communication, problem…

  20. Prescribed Commercially-Prepared Language Arts Intervention Curriculum: Illuminating a Practitioner Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabienke, Shonika

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the perceptions of a small group of Language Arts intervention teachers who have been prescribed a commercially-prepared intervention curriculum for use with their students. Written surveys and semi-structured interviews were used to gather data in pursuit of answers to the following research questions: (1) How do teachers…

  1. Preparation and Evaluation of Children's Rights Education Curriculum: An Action Research Regarding on Protection Rights Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçus, Sükran; Dedeoglu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Children's rights education is to enable children to gain the necessary social behaviors and essential knowledge for creating a democratic society that is based on respecting human rights. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preparation, application and assessment of a curriculum for teaching children's rights in elementary education.…

  2. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Tourist Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This career preparation curriculum outline for the hospitality/tourism industry is intended to provide secondary and postsecondary learning outcomes for completion of program requirements. The guide is organized into four sections. Section one presents an overview of the program, of the philosophy of career education, and of the organization and…

  3. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Food Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the food services program requirements in the hospitality/tourism industry. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their…

  4. Post-Fordism, the Vocational Curriculum and the Challenge to Teacher Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Graham

    1996-01-01

    As the economy changes from Fordist to post-Fordist, questions about the correspondence between new workplace demands and National Vocational Qualifications/General Vocational Qualifications in Britain arise. The new curriculum demands a new kind of professionalism for vocational teachers and a new kind of teacher preparation. (SK)

  5. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Debra K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI. It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control. Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control, which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity.

  6. Preparing students to practice evidence-based dentistry: a mixed methods conceptual framework for curriculum enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palcanis, Kent G; Geiger, Brian F; O'Neal, Marcia R; Ivankova, Nataliya V; Evans, Retta R; Kennedy, Lasonja B; Carera, Karen W

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a mixed methods conceptual framework for evidence-based dentistry to enhance the curriculum at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry. A focus of recent curriculum reform has been to prepare students to integrate evidence-based dentistry into clinical practice. The authors developed a framework consisting of four conceptual phases to introduce curriculum innovation: 1) exploration of the phenomenon; 2) development of two new instruments; 3) data collection, analysis, outcomes, and evaluation; and 4) application to curricular reform. Eight sequential procedural steps (literature review; focus group discussions; development of themes; survey design; internal review; data collection, analysis, and evaluation; development of recommendations with external review; and implementation of recommendations for curricular enhancement) guided the curricular enhancement. Faculty members supported the concept of teaching evidence-based dentistry to facilitate major curriculum reform, and course directors incorporated evidence-based teaching to prepare scientist-practitioners who meet dental performance standards. The new curriculum implemented following completion of the study is in its third year. Much of its structure is based on evidence-based teaching methodologies, and approximately one-third of the content consists of small groups researching clinical problems with applied science and discussing the findings. The framework described in this article proved useful to guide revision of predoctoral clinical education at one dental school and may be useful in other settings.

  7. Preparing Medical Graduates for an Interconnected World: Current Practices and Future Possibilities for Internationalizing the Medical Curriculum in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stütz, Alexander; Green, Wendy; McAllister, Lindy; Eley, Diann

    2015-01-01

    Preparing medical graduates who are competent to work in a global environment requires broad integration of international and intercultural perspectives throughout the medical curriculum. Employing Leask and Bridge's "conceptual framework of internationalisation of the curriculum," this article first highlights the emphasis placed on…

  8. Preparing Medical Graduates for an Interconnected World: Current Practices and Future Possibilities for Internationalizing the Medical Curriculum in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stütz, Alexander; Green, Wendy; McAllister, Lindy; Eley, Diann

    2015-01-01

    Preparing medical graduates who are competent to work in a global environment requires broad integration of international and intercultural perspectives throughout the medical curriculum. Employing Leask and Bridge's "conceptual framework of internationalisation of the curriculum," this article first highlights the emphasis placed…

  9. Preparation courses for medical clerkships and the final clinical internship in medical education – The Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spura, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Goals: Supporting medical students entering their internships – the clinical clerkship and the internship “final clinical year” (Praktisches Jahr, PJ – the seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Ready for PJ” were held for the first time in 2014 and continued successfully in 2015. These seminars are part of the “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (Magdeburger Curriculum zur Versorgungskompetenz, MCV. The concept comprises three main issues: “Understanding interdisciplinary clinical procedures”, “Interprofessional collaboration”, and “Individual cases and their reference to the system.” The aim of the seminar series is to prepare students as medical trainees for their role in the practice-oriented clinical clerkship and PJ, respectively.Methods: Quality assurance evaluations and didactic research are integral parts of the seminars. In preparation for the “Ready for PJ” seminar a needs assessment was conducted. The seminars were rated by the participants using an anonymized questionnaire consisting of a 5-choice Likert scale (ranging from 1=fully agree to 5=fully disagree and spaces for comments that was generated by the evaluation software Evasys.Results: The results are presented for the preparatory seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Fit für PJ” held in 2014 and 2015. Overall, the students regarded the facultative courses as very good preparation for the clerkship as well as for the PJ. The three-dimensional main curricular concept of the MCV was recognized in the evaluation as a valuable educational approach. Interprofessional collaboration, taught by instructors focussing in teamwork between disciplines, was scored positively and highly valued.Conclusions: The “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (MCV integrates clerkship and PJ in a framing educational concept and allows students a better appreciation of their role in patient care and the tasks that they will

  10. What to Consider When Preparing a Model Core Curriculum for GIS Ethics: Objectives, Methods, and a Sketch of Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of what is known about teaching ethics in engineering, science, and related disciplines. Such a summary should provide a useful starting point for preparation of a detailed curriculum for teaching the ethics of geo-coded information systems broadly understood ("GIS ethics" for short).…

  11. Changes in Transferable Knowledge Resulting from Study in a Graduate Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, Ray; Sedano, Todd; Katz, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a study of the evolution of students' knowledge of software engineering from the beginning to the end of a master's degree curriculum in software engineering. Students were presented with a problem involving the initiation of a complex new project at the beginning of the program and again at the end of…

  12. Changes in Transferable Knowledge Resulting from Study in a Graduate Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, Ray; Sedano, Todd; Katz, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a study of the evolution of students' knowledge of software engineering from the beginning to the end of a master's degree curriculum in software engineering. Students were presented with a problem involving the initiation of a complex new project at the beginning of the program and again at the end of…

  13. Improving Preparation for College Physics of Minority Students Aspiring to Science-Related Careers: Investigation of Student Difficulties and Development of Appropriate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Mark Linn

    This dissertation reports on a project, begun in 1976 by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, to improve the performance of minority undergraduates in physics and other science courses required for admission to engineering, medicine, and other technical professions. The project has two main elements. The first is an investigation of specific conceptual and reasoning difficulties encountered by the students in the study of physics and physical science. This investigation forms the basis of an empirical assessment of the students' academic needs. The second is the use of this assessment in developing a curriculum specifically designed to help students overcome the difficulties they experience in introductory science courses. The research and curriculum development have taken place in the context of a special physics course to help prepare minority college students for science-related majors. Specific difficulties encountered by the students as they work through the subject matter of the course have been identified and grouped into three categories: difficulty with basic concepts, difficulty with scientific representations, and difficulty with scientific reasoning. Curriculum development has focused on helping students overcome these difficulties. The dissertation gives the results of the investigation and presents samples of the curriculum with a discussion of the principles of its design. The dissertation also illustrates how the close association of investigation of difficulties, development of curriculum, and teaching of the course has provided an environment that allows continuous feedback on the design of instructional materials and facilitates the tasks of testing, evaluation, and revision. The effectiveness of the project is discussed in terms of student achievement at the University of Washington and curriculum adoption by other institutions. It appears that the goal of increasing minority representation in the sciences through action

  14. Preparing College Students to Teach an Environmental Problem Solving Curriculum to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    An NSF-funded project-based program was implemented by Clarkson University in 2000 to increase the interest and knowledge of middle school students in science, math and technology through the solution of an environmental problem that is relevant to their local school community. Clarkson students developed curricula for 7th and 8th grade science and technology classes and then worked with the middle school students throughout the year to reduce to transform solid waste into healthy soil for plant growth. The solution to this problem provided a vehicle to teach fundamental science and math content as well as the process of doing science and solving problems. Placing college science and engineering students in the classroom proved to be a great mechanism for engaging students in science topics and providing mentoring experiences that differ greatly from those that a practicing professional can provide. It is clear, however, that the students must be well prepared for this experience to maximize the benefits of university - school district partnership programs. The objective of this presentation will be to describe the training program that has been developed to prepare Clarkson students to work effectively in middle school classrooms. The Clarkson students are trained for their classroom experiences during the summer before they enter the classroom. They receive three credits for the training, curriculum development, and teaching efforts. It is expected that the students have the necessary background in science and technology to teach themselves the content and environmental relevance of the problem they will be teaching. Lectures and workshops focus on how to transform this knowledge into a project-based curriculum that meets the needs of the teachers, while also exciting the students. Lecture/workshops include: team work; components of an effective class and teacher; project planning and management; problem solving process; inquiry based learning, deductive

  15. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E., E-mail: Ariel.hirsch@bmc.org

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  16. Establishing Astronomy in the Curriculum at a Teacher Preparation College: Some Successes and Some Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, L. M.; Borkovitz, D.

    1999-12-01

    At Wheelock College, a liberal arts college in Boston which prepares students for careers in elementary and early childhood teaching and social work, we are developing science and mathematics courses designed to prepare our students for their work with children while teaching them adult-level math and science. Our students arrive with varying skill levels and, often, a great deal of math and science anxiety. We must address the anxiety in order for the students to make progress as learners and, eventually, teachers of math and science. Two courses have been notable successes. A one-semester course entitled The Solar System has become a staple in the curriculum. Major topics covered include finding our way around the sky, the nature of light and color, the size and scale of the solar system, and the causes of the Earth’s seasons and the phases of the moon. Students report that it changes their minds about how science can be taught by modeling a style of teaching which is more interactive than the way they were taught. In the graduate school, astronomy is the focus for a course entitled Teaching and Learning. Co-taught by an education faculty member and an astronomer, the course immerses students in learning a new content area and asks them to consider their own learning process. Observations play an important role here, with students keeping journals of their own sky observations. We also describe two challenges. One is the establishment of more advanced courses; although an astrophysics class has been offered twice to overwhelmingly positive student reviews, it is not easy to “sell”. The other challenge is the establishment of an introductory level course in stars and galaxies for non-science majors. This work has been supported in part by a grant from the DUE of the National Science Foundation.

  17. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  18. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  19. Methods of Science Investigation Part 2: Results of Implementation of a Curriculum Fostering Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Originally designed to allow secondary students with special needs to participate in original scientific research, the Methods of Science Curriculum was piloted in 2008. Students participating included those with special needs, English language learners, and the general population. Students were incrementally graduated from traditional inquiry activities towards authentic student-generated research projects. Students were evaluated via class work grades, an in-school symposium and a pre/post test. 100 percent of participants successfully completed and presented their original research. The pre/post evaluation demonstrated improvement for 91 percent of participants. An unanticipated result was the performance and growth of English language learners, possibly because of the emphasis on the creative and active process of science rather than vocabulary. A teacher-training program is being developed for expansion of the curriculum to additional schools in 2009.

  20. Results of Modifying Astronomy Curriculum for Special Needs Students Using Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, J. K.; Slater, T. F.

    2008-06-01

    In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) conducted a national field-test of a new GEMS space science curriculum package developed for use with middle school students. During this field-test, we modified a subset of the curriculum materials for use by special needs students, to be delivered via computer mediated instruction. These materials were implemented in a subset of the field-test classrooms and LHS collected pre- and post-test data for each unit. This data was analyzed to determine if students in the classrooms using the modified materials scored differently than students in the larger assessment data base. Data was disaggregated to measure the impact on students with special needs, as evidenced by individualized education plans (IEPs). Results suggest that many students, not just those with special needs, demonstrate greater achievement gains using materials modified using the principles of best practice for special needs students.

  1. A transitional curriculum for preparing medical students for internship, does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a formative evaluation, we were supposed to find whether an innovative program has some merits to be continued or not. We also determined the critical points of the program. The evaluated program was a clinical pre-clerkship curriculum launched for departing to a less stressful medical clerkship. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the information contained in the students′ logbooks. Using Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure standardized questionnaire, we also assessed the students′ perception of learning environment within six clinical departments. Results: Totally, 64% of expected patient contacts, and teaching of more than 71% of required skills at 4 departments were carried out and students had more positive than negative perspective of their learning environments. Conclusion: The evaluand is a worthwhile program to be continued, though it needs some considerations for improvement.

  2. Longitudinal Study of the Impacts of a Climate Change Curriculum on Undergraduate Student Learning: Initial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin C. Burkholder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses the efficacy of a semester-long undergraduate sustainability curriculum designed from a systems approach. The three-course curriculum, which incorporated environmental science and ethics courses along with an integrative course using a community-based learning pedagogy, was intended to provide students with experience using knowledge and skills from distinct disciplines in a holistic way in order to address the complex problems of the human acceptance of and response to anthropogenic climate change. In the fall of 2013, 23 of the 24 sophomore general education students enrolled in the three courses were surveyed at the beginning and end of the semester; 17 of those same students completed the survey again in the spring of 2016, their senior year. Results, which focus on the 17 students who continued to participate through their senior year, were analyzed with quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The pre/post data from the surveys demonstrated significant improvement in climate literacy, certainty, concern and urgency over the course of the semester; the senior data indicated that those improvements were largely retained. The study also suggests that the nine-credit curriculum improved transferable skills such as interdisciplinary thinking, self-confidence and public speaking. A qualitative analysis of three student cases, informed by a focus group (n = 7 of seniors along with other sources of information, suggested retention of such transferable skills, and, in some cases, deeper involvement in climate and sustainability action.

  3. Unfolding Case-Based Practicum Curriculum Infusing Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Catie A.; Williams, Amy E.; Harris, Pamela N.; Travis, Sterling P.; Kim, Sharon Y.

    2016-01-01

    The authors evaluated an unfolding case-based approach to a practicum in counseling course infusing crisis, trauma, and disaster preparation for changes in students' crisis self-efficacy across a semester. The course, informed by constructivist-developmental pedagogy and centered on the unfolding case, resulted in significant increases in…

  4. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rama, Jennifer A; Campbell, Judith R; Balmer, Dorene F; Turner, Teri L; Hsu, Deborah C

    2015-01-01

    .... In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows...

  5. Designing and teaching of the education curriculum for disaster preparation course among college students%大学生备灾教育课程设计与教学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡秀英; 刘祚燕; 王恒; 陈龑; 陈华英; 刘逸文; 叶磊; 方进博; 成翼娟

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨大学生备灾教育课程设计与教学实践效果.方法 介绍备灾教育的课程设计、课程内容、课程教学的实施及评价等内容.结果 大学生对备灾教育课程设计的整体满意度为95.42%;对课程教学的平均满意度为94.65%;课程学习后大学生的备灾意识、知识和行为能力提高明显(P<0.01).结论 大学生备灾教育课程设计合理,课程教学成效显著,在一定程度上能够为今后我国备灾教育的深入开展提供参考.%Objective To explore designing and practicing of the education curriculum for disaster preparation among college students. Methods The process of curriculum design, curriculum content, implementation and evaluation of the curriculum teaching were introduced. Results Students'overall satisfaction of the course was 95.42% ,and the average satisfaction of teaching was 94.65% . Students'awareness, knowledge and abilities of disaster preparation significantly improved after studying the curriculum (P <0. 01 ) . Conclusion The designing of the education for disaster preparation among college students is reasonable. The effects of the curriculum teaching is remarkble. It can provide reference for the future further development of disaster - preparation of our country.

  6. A proposed medical physics curriculum: preparing for the 2013 ABR examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachiappan, Arun C; Wynne, David M; Katz, David P; Willis, Marc H; Bushong, Stewart C

    2011-01-01

    The upcoming ABR examination format for radiology residents is undergoing significant changes in 2013. This requires adaptation of the didactic curriculum for radiology residents entering in July 2010 to meet these changes. Physics will now be incorporated into the core (qualifying) examination during the third year of residency, instead of being tested as a separate examination that was often taken earlier in residency training in past years. In this article, the authors discuss the past, present, and future of medical physics instruction and outline a revised medical physics curriculum for radiology residents that has been internally approved for implementation at the authors' institution and has not been advocated by any society or by the ABR. Starting with this article, the authors hope to encourage a discussion of physics curriculum revision with other institutions.

  7. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOSEIN NEJAD, HOOMAN; BAGHERABADI, MEHDI; SISTANI, ALIREZA; DARGAHI, HELEN

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents’ teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students’ perception of the residents’ teaching quality. Methods: This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick’s model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents’ teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. Results: The results indicated that residents’ attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pKirkpatrick’s model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third evaluated level of Kirkpatrick’s model, i.e. the residents

  8. Preparing Students for Education, Work, and Community: Activity Theory in Task-Based Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chris; MacPherson, Seonaigh; Sawkins, Tanis

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes how sociocultural and activity theory were applied in the design of a publicly funded, Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)-based English as a Second Language (ESL) credential program and curriculum for immigrant and international students in postsecondary institutions in British Columbia, Canada. The ESL Pathways Project…

  9. New inorganic membranes for pervaporation. Preparation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Veen, H.M.; Vente, J.F.; Wolfs, D.P.; Kreiter, R.; Pex, P.P.A.C. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-08-15

    The expected high chemical and thermal stability of inorganic membranes compared to polymer membranes has resulted in a growing research activity with the aim of replacing polymer membranes with inorganic ones. The superior separation performance, i.e. selectivity and flux, of silica-based membranes in the dehydration of alcohols and solvents at elevated temperatures has raised the interest even further. High flux performance is required especially to overcome the higher unit cost price of the inorganic membranes. It is proven that the required water flux of at least 3 kg/m{sup 2}.h, for the dehydration of 5wt.% water in butanol as a representative standard application, can be achieved easily. The profitable application of inorganic membranes depends also on a reliable, stable long-term behaviour. Unfortunately, information on this topic is still very limited. Dehydration experiments at temperatures below 100C indicate a fast decrease of the water flux through silica membranes during the first few days of operation. The origin of this decline has not been determined yet, but we believe that sorption processes on the membrane surface play an important role. In an attempt to overcome this fast decline, we have prepared methylated silica (Me-SiO2) membranes. By incorporating methyl groups in the silica structure, the water flux decline during the first weeks is only in the order of 20% and is stable hereafter. Dehydration experiments performed up to 165C using these Me-SiO2 membranes showed membrane failure after 4 to 40 days due to reorganisation of the silica structure. In all cases we observe a strong increase in the organic flux, indicating that the pore size increases over time. As a consequence, we conclude that the application window of state-of-the-art Me-SiO2 membranes for use in dehydration processes is limited to 95C. Microporous titania, zirconia and organic/inorganic hybrid silica materials are expected to have a much higher hydrothermal stability than

  10. Higher education and curriculum innovation: results of an institutional network research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Maria Prata-Linhares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we share the paths of an investigation carried out by a group of researchers from different Brazilian universities (FORPEC, which, based on the results of the investigation, built a network of information and research involving various education institutions. While describing this group’s pathway, the text presents innovating experiences of curriculums in higher education which provided important and significant pedagogic changes in their projects. During the period of investigation, 6 (six projects of university courses with innovation proposals were brought up and analyzed. This analysis allowed for the elaboration of innovation concepts for Higher Education, identify active innovating methodologies, create and implant innovative projects in Higher Education, as well as give the start off to investigation concerning the development of the docents integrating the innovating curricular projects. The groups’ pathway in itself may be considered an innovative research project.

  11. Curriculum development: Preparing trainees to care for children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kimberly P; Haggerty, Treah S; Harrison, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Family physicians provide care for about one-third of the children and adolescents in the United States, many of whom present with psychological concerns. Family physicians often do not recognize these psychological disorders and therefore do not diagnose or treat them. This report describes the implementation of a curriculum designed to increase family medicine trainees' level of awareness that children/adolescents experience psychiatric conditions. This goal is achieved through the addition of a clinical child/adolescent psychologist faculty member, resident self-assessment of training needs and subsequent development of didactic presentations to address these needs. The curriculum relies on the acquisition of child/adolescent psychiatric screeners, development of child/adolescent-focused bibliotherapy materials, and the development of a longitudinal behavioral sciences curriculum. To facilitate the screening of child/adolescent psychiatric disorders, a comprehensive collection of age-appropriate psychiatric screeners were compiled and made readily available in all precepting areas. To assist with the identification of specific child/adolescent psychiatric deficit areas, family medicine resident physicians were presented with an inventory of child/adolescent psychiatric, psychosocial, and behavioral topics, based upon American Academy of Family Practice guidelines and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition psychiatric disorders, and self-selected training deficiencies.

  12. Supervision of Curriculum at the Middle Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienapfel, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Effective curriculum supervision is essential to a good middle school and curriculum program, and principals can do this job through preparation, curriculum review and development, taking advantage of supervisory opportunities, and curriculum evaluation. (DCS)

  13. γ-ray spectrometry results versus sample preparation methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    According to recommended conditions two bio-samples, tea leave and flour, are prepared with different methods: grounding into powder and reducing to ash, then they were analyzed by γ ray spectrometry. Remarkable difference was shown between the measured values of tea samples prepared with these different methods. One of the reasons may be that the method of reducing to ash makes some nuclides lost. Compared with the "non-destructive"method of grounding into powder, the method of reducing to ash can be much more sensible to the loss of some nuclides. The probable reasons are discussed for the varied influences of different preparation methods of tea leave and flour samples.

  14. Preparing nurses to intervene in the tobacco epidemic: Developing a model for faculty development and curriculum redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Berit; Meyer, Bonnie; Sachs, Bonnie L; Bialous, Stella A; Cataldo, Janine K

    2017-07-01

    As the largest group of health professionals, nurses have a tremendous potential to help curb the tobacco epidemic. However, studies conducted across a range of global settings continue to indicate that both practicing nurses and nursing student have limited knowledge, skills and confidence needed to implement evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions. A contributing factor is the limited inclusion of tobacco control content in nursing curricula. Additionally, there is limited understanding of nurse educators' knowledge and perceptions about teaching tobacco dependence content. This paper presents the Loma Linda University School of Nursing's concurrent experience with both faculty development and curriculum redesign in the area of tobacco dependence prevention and treatment. An internal survey was administered at baseline and at 2-year follow-up to assess faculty's knowledge, perceptions and practices related to teaching tobacco dependence content and skills (n = 42). Faculty and curriculum development strategies and resources utilized, evaluation findings and subsequent lessons learned are described. The findings have implications for nursing programs seeking to enhance their curricula and commitment to ensuring that their graduates are prepared to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions with each patient they encounter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Capstone Course with a Comprehensive and Integrated Review of the Pharmacy Curriculum and Student Assessment as a Preparation for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Adina C.; Parihar, Harish S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To create a capstone course that provides a comprehensive and integrated review of the pharmacy curriculum with a broad range of assessment tools to evaluate student knowledge and skills as a final preparation prior to beginning fourth-year advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs).

  16. Preparing for SMOS: Sea Salinity Campaigns and Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2006-01-01

    Mapping of sea surface salinity, based on L-band radiometric measurements, is presently investigated as a preparation for space missions. Special concern is on correction for effects caused by the sea surface roughness, and this paper will address two campaigns, LOSAC and CoSMOS, with the aim...

  17. Can prepared fear conditioning result from verbal instructions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, Gaëtan; Raes, An K.; De Houwer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary fear-relevant stimuli such as snakes or spiders are thought to be prepared to elicit fear reactions. This implies that the acquisition of conditioned fear responses is facilitated when these stimuli serve as conditioned stimuli (CSs). Moreover, extinction of conditioned fear responses i

  18. The Geography Curriculum and Its Contents: Preparing for the Twenty-First Century in Argentina Geography Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Gloria Z. de

    1996-01-01

    Considers the various educational philosophies governing geography instruction in Argentina and places them in historical perspective. Contrasts the positivist and historicist approaches and discusses the current curriculum. Includes summaries of proposed changes in the curriculum emphasizing social education. (MJP)

  19. Vision, Curriculum, and Pedagogical Content Knowledge in the Preparation of Israel Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenroth, Ofra; Sinclair, Alex

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore how we as teacher educators translate a new vision of Israel education into curricular practice in the preparation of emerging Jewish educators. Using a practitioner inquiry mode of research, we reflect on our existential vision of Israel education and its translation into practice as creators and directors of a semester…

  20. Crisis in the Curriculum? New Counselors' Crisis Preparation, Experiences, and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carrie A. Wachter; Minton, Casey A. Barrio

    2012-01-01

    Professional counselors are responsible for providing crisis assessment, referral, and intervention (Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs, 2009); however, little is known about their preparation and experiences in these areas. This study examined new professional counselors' (N= 193) crisis intervention…

  1. Internationalising the Student Experience: Preparing Instructors to Embed Intercultural Skills in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Anita S.; Kennedy, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The Internationalising the Student Experience Project was devised and piloted as a teaching innovation to improve the intercultural awareness of instructors and, subsequently, that of their domestic and international students. In this article we claim that instructor preparation in the use of the Alliance Building and Cultural Mapping tools of the…

  2. Crisis in the Curriculum? New Counselors' Crisis Preparation, Experiences, and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carrie A. Wachter; Minton, Casey A. Barrio

    2012-01-01

    Professional counselors are responsible for providing crisis assessment, referral, and intervention (Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs, 2009); however, little is known about their preparation and experiences in these areas. This study examined new professional counselors' (N= 193) crisis intervention…

  3. Status of Chemistry Content in the Professional Pharmacy Curriculum: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Victoria F.; Davis, Patrick J.; Pankaskie, Marvin C.; Currie, Bruce L.; Roche, Edward B.; Sindelar, Robert D.; Wynn, James E.; Zito, S. William

    2000-01-01

    A national survey conducted in 1997-1998 evaluated the current and anticipated future emphasis of chemistry-related content in the professional pharmacy curriculum, the credentials of the teaching faculty, and pedagogical methods used to deliver the content. Thirty-three schools or colleges of pharmacy participated. (Author)

  4. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, M.; Das, S.; Yost, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the second and third phases of a comprehensive mechatronics curriculum development effort. They encompass the development of two advanced mechatronics courses ("Simulation and Modeling of Mechatronic Systems" and "Sensors and Actuators for Mechatronic Systems"), the formulation of a Mechatronics concentration, and offshoot…

  5. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, M.; Das, S.; Yost, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the second and third phases of a comprehensive mechatronics curriculum development effort. They encompass the development of two advanced mechatronics courses ("Simulation and Modeling of Mechatronic Systems" and "Sensors and Actuators for Mechatronic Systems"), the formulation of a Mechatronics concentration, and offshoot…

  6. Postgraduate Education in Quality Improvement Methods: Initial Results of the Fellows' Applied Quality Training (FAQT) Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Burkart, Thomas A; Choi, Calvin Y; McKillop, Matthew S; Beyth, Rebecca J; Dahm, Phillipp

    2016-06-01

    Training in quality improvement (QI) is a pillar of the next accreditation system of the Accreditation Committee on Graduate Medical Education and a growing expectation of physicians for maintenance of certification. Despite this, many postgraduate medical trainees are not receiving training in QI methods. We created the Fellows Applied Quality Training (FAQT) curriculum for cardiology fellows using both didactic and applied components with the goal of increasing confidence to participate in future QI projects. Fellows completed didactic training from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Open School and then designed and completed a project to improve quality of care or patient safety. Self-assessments were completed by the fellows before, during, and after the first year of the curriculum. The primary outcome for our curriculum was the median score reported by the fellows regarding their self-confidence to complete QI activities. Self-assessments were completed by 23 fellows. The majority of fellows (15 of 23, 65.2%) reported no prior formal QI training. Median score on baseline self-assessment was 3.0 (range, 1.85-4), which was significantly increased to 3.27 (range, 2.23-4; P = 0.004) on the final assessment. The distribution of scores reported by the fellows indicates that 30% were slightly confident at conducting QI activities on their own, which was reduced to 5% after completing the FAQT curriculum. An interim assessment was conducted after the fellows completed didactic training only; median scores were not different from the baseline (mean, 3.0; P = 0.51). After completion of the FAQT, cardiology fellows reported higher self-confidence to complete QI activities. The increase in self-confidence seemed to be limited to the applied component of the curriculum, with no significant change after the didactic component.

  7. Experimental course of bioethics upon the bioethics core curriculum of UNESCO: methodoloy and result of investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, S

    2012-12-01

    In October 2005 the General Conference of UNESCO adopted the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. The aim of this Declaration was to assist in the realization ofprinciples and support the thorough understanding of the consequences of the ethics of scientific and technical progress, especially for youth. In 2008, the Division of Ethics of Science and Technology Sector for Social and Human Sciences of UNESCO worked out an Educational Program (Bioethics Core Curriculum). On November 23, 2010 a Memorandum was signed between UNESCO and the Yerevan State Medical University after M. Heratsi. The Memorandum was aimed to test the Bioethics Core Curriculum of UNESCO. In this article we will analyze the aims and goals of studying the course, as well as disputable shortcomings of the Program, make recommendations for the improvement of the course of bioethics, and highlight the positive aspects of this Educational Program.

  8. Preparation and results of a 24-hour orbital flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, G S

    1963-01-01

    The space age presents man with unprecedented opportunities for discovery and for cooperative endeavors to benefit all mankind. My flight of August 6-7, 1961 was conducted for the purpose of determining whether man can stay and work effectively and whether all systems of the spaceship can operate successfully during a period of 24 hours in space. The flight of Vostok II represents an experimental step in a logical sequence which included the first earth orbiting flight of USSR citizen Yuri A. Gagarin. Preparation for the flight included the study of theoretical and applied subjects, testing in various kinds of apparatus which provide acceleration, heat and isolation experience, brief airborne weightless flights and parachute landings, in addition to extensive training in a real spacecraft having simulators for normal and emergency contingencies of space flight. The actual flight was therefore carried out with a sense of confidence and familiarity and with continuous close radio contact with ground centers from whom my fellow cosmonauts served as spokesmen. Sequential boosters totaling 600 000 kg thrust placed the 4731 kg spaceship into a perfect orbit varying in altitude from 178-246 km in a plane 64 degrees 58' inclined to the equator. The spaceship made 17 orbits around the earth landing 25 hours, 18 minutes after take-off. The cabin had full atmospheric pressure and a comfortable habitability which could be extended for 10 days. I was able to maneuver the spaceship and perform many other control functions, make observations and take pictures of the earth and its cloud cover, eat meals and sleep all with good efficiency. I experienced mild symptoms suggestive of seasickness which were aggravated by head turning, ameliorated by sleep and entirely relieved by resumption of g-loading during descent. Altogether analyses of the physical and structural performance of the spaceship and the continuously monitored physiological responses of the pilot indicate that all

  9. Review of evaluations of crushing results for the seedbed preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Anisch

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For evaluating the work results of tillage operations today only inaccurate parameters are available which cannot be readily measured. Thus, evaluating and comparing the work results of machines and developing suitable sensors are difficult. At the Technical University of Dresden, till 1990, research projects for determining aggregate size composition of soil have been done. Based on this work, this study will show suggestions for measuring, displaying and evaluation of soil crushing results depending on tillage work conditions.

  10. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  11. Infusing the Core Curriculum with Societally Relevant Issues and Preparing Faculty to Work with Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellito, L. J.; Straw, B.; Sexton, J. M.; Hoyt, W.

    2016-12-01

    The way we teach our courses has an impact on student experience, and ultimately, student interest and persistence in geoscience majors and career paths. With that in mind, the primary goal of the InTeGrate implementation program in the University of Northern Colorado Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science is to promote retention in the Earth Science major through interventions that impact student classroom experience. We used two approaches to accomplish this. 1) We developed interdisciplinary curricular activities that are based on societally-relevant issues, engage students in problem-solving, and that prompt students to consider the relationships between science, society, and sustainability. We implemented these activities in core earth science courses and in a general education scientific writing course. 2) Our Earth and Atmospheric Science faculty participated in diversity and equity awareness training. In this presentation, we share our initial assessment of the effectiveness of new curricular activities and the effectiveness of a workshop developed for faculty that promotes awareness of teaching styles and behaviors that promote inclusion of students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences. Our results suggest that incorporating a societally-relevant component to activities improves student interest in the material and provides them with experience in interdisciplinary analysis and problem solving. The implementation of sustainability issues into a general education scientific writing course has a demonstrated impact on student perception of climate change and sustainability. Faculty report that they are more aware of teaching styles that promote inclusion of students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences.

  12. Preparing students in two-year colleges for geoscience degrees and careers: Workshop results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2012-12-01

    Building a strong and diverse geoscience workforce is a critical national challenge. Two-year colleges (2YCs) play an important role in increasing both the number and diversity of geoscience graduates. A workshop on Preparing Students from Two-year Colleges for Geoscience Degrees and Careers was held in Tacoma, WA in July 2012 to discuss the successes and challenges of programs, strategies, and activities that support career preparation of 2YC students for geoscience careers, either as geotechnical graduates or as geoscience majors at four-year colleges and universities, and to make recommendations for future efforts. At the workshop several successful partnerships between employers and two-year colleges as well as between two-year colleges and four-year institutions were discussed as potential models that could be replicated with adaptations for local employment needs. Participants shared successful techniques for supporting 2YC students in their career path such as internships, early opportunities for participating in research, joint fieldtrips with transfer institutions, and supportive curriculum alignment between two and four-year institutions. Professional organizations have much to offer including information about career options, networking opportunities, and more. Participants discussed strategies for supporting geoscience workforce development at 2YCs such as making connections between 2YCs and local employers, identifying geoscience students at 2YCs who are planning to transfer and building relationships with 4YCs, establishing internship programs, supporting student geoscience clubs, and developing a repository of geoscience employment information targeted to 2YC students. Participants recognized significant barriers to incorporating career training and information into the geoscience curriculum at two-year colleges. These barriers include a predominance of non-geoscience students in classes, lack of support or rewards for improving or increasing the

  13. Formal quality improvement curriculum and DMAIC method results in interdisciplinary collaboration and process improvement in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaphart, Cynthia L; Gonwa, Thomas A; Mai, Martin L; Prendergast, Mary B; Wadei, Hani M; Tepas, Joseph J; Taner, C Burcin

    2012-09-01

    Broad-based formal quality improvement curriculum emphasizing Six Sigma and the DMAIC approach developed by our institution is required for physicians in training. DMAIC methods evaluated the common outcome of postoperative hyponatremia, thus resulting in collaboration to prevent hyponatremia in the renal transplant population. To define postoperative hyponatremia in renal transplant recipients, a project charter outlined project aims. To measure postoperative hyponatremia, serum sodium at admission and immediately postoperative were recorded by retrospective review of renal transplant recipient charts from June 29, 2010 to December 31, 2011. An Ishikawa diagram was generated to analyze potential causative factors. Interdisciplinary collaboration and hospital policy assessment determined necessary improvements to prevent hyponatremia. Continuous monitoring in control phase was performed by establishing the goal of <10% of transplant recipients with abnormal serum sodium annually through quarterly reduction of hyponatremia by 30% to reach this goal. Of 54 transplant recipients, postoperative hyponatremia occurred in 92.6% of patients. These potential causes were evaluated: 1) Hemodialysis was more common than peritoneal dialysis. 2) Alemtuzumab induction was more common than antithymocyte globulin. 3) A primary diagnosis of diabetes existed in 16 patients (30%). 4) Strikingly, 51 patients received 0.45% sodium chloride intraoperatively, suggesting this as the most likely cause of postoperative hyponatremia. A hospital policy change to administer 0.9% sodium chloride during renal transplantation resulted in normal serum sodium levels postoperatively in 59 of 64 patients (92.2%). The DMAIC approach and formal quality curriculum for trainees addresses core competencies by providing a framework for problem solving, interdisciplinary collaboration, and process improvement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the MARGINS-GeoPRISMS Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. K.; Costa, A.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Marshall, J. S.; Iverson, E. A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes, organized around four initiatives: (1) chemical cycling in subduction zones (SubFac), (2) seismogenic zone processes at subduction zones (SEIZE), (3) rupturing continental lithosphere (RCL), and (4) source to sink sediment cycling at continental margins (S2S). The outcomes of this research provided critical new observations and insights into fundamental geologic processes along continental margins, and associated geologic hazards and economic resources. The transition to the successor GeoPRISMS Program provided a unique opportunity to identify and synthesize the highlights of MARGINS research, and to disseminate this knowledge to educators and students who will carry out the next phase of cutting-edge scientific research. The NSF TUES Program funded a two-year project entitled: "Bringing NSF MARGINS Continental Margins Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum," enabling development of ~15 mini-lessons drawing on key MARGINS results and data sets. The mini-lesson development team consists of 18 educators and scientists, grouped by initiative, and guided by experts in MARGINS science and current educational research and practices. Webinars and virtual check-ins enable team interactions and exchange of ideas and experiences; in person workshops solidified pedagogical approaches and assessment strategies, as well as initiative frameworks for the mini-lessons. Field testing by team members and outside volunteers during AY 2013-14 identified challenges and opportunities, guiding mini-lesson revision and finalization. The MARGINS mini-lessons define coordinated, data-rich educational resources, easy to access and free to the public, ready to be incorporated into multiple common geoscience course frameworks, taking the first step toward building a community of practice of scientists and curriculum specialists with the shared goal of moving cutting-edge science into undergraduate

  15. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Test Methods on the Flexural Strength Results of Monolithic Zirconia Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Schatz; Monika Strickstrock; Malgorzata Roos; Daniel Edelhoff; Marlis Eichberger; Isabella-Maria Zylla; Bogna Stawarczyk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx2 (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods wer...

  16. Influence of specimen preparation and test methods on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia materials

    OpenAIRE

    Schatz, Christine; Strickstrock, Monika; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Zylla, Isabella-Maria; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx2 (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods wer...

  17. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: CERCLA BDAT SARM PREPARATION AND RESULTS OF PHYSICAL SOILS WASHING EXPERIMENTS (FINAL REPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports on the results of work preparing 30,000 Ibs of SARM or synthetic analytical reference matrix, a surrogate Superfund soil containing a vide range of contaminants. It also reports the results ©f bench scale treatability experiments designed to simulate the EP...

  18. The Changing Landscape of Principal Preparation: An Analysis of Statewide Longitudinal Program Component Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Watson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article examines comparative survey results for 16 principal preparation programs located in the Midwestern state of Missouri across a four-year time period from 2008 to 2012. The authors are founding members of a statewide Higher Education Evaluation Committee (HEEC), which has been meeting on a monthly basis since 2005, comprised of faculty…

  19. Influence of results phsycological - professional selection, physical and training preparations on success flying training of cadets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov F.I.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of flying success is presented to beginning of the flying teaching of students. A prognosis is made on results a complex analysis phsycological - professional selection, physical and training preparation. Each of estimations individually does not give a reliable prediction. Facilities of physical preparation can be used for determination of level of development professionally of important qualities of future pilots. Professionally important qualities need periodic (not rarer than once in a year control after their dynamics the method of the repeated inspections.

  20. Preparing to care for an aging population: medical student reflections on their clinical mentors within a new geriatrics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Timothy W; Shield, Renée R; Wetle, Terrie; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Reflective writing techniques such as journaling help provide insights into the process by which medical students are mentored and develop into practicing physicians. The authors sought to analyze medical students' journals regarding their mentored experiences within a new geriatrics curriculum at a U.S. medical school. Thirty preclinical and clinical medical student journalers participated in this project. The authors employed qualitative analytic techniques using an interdisciplinary team process. Three major themes emerged: (a) exposure to clinical mentors challenged medical students' preconceptions regarding older adults and geriatric medicine; (b) students learned new medical knowledge and techniques from observing their mentors; and (c) students provided positive and negative assessments of their mentors. Reflective journaling provides important insights into the process by which medical students draw upon mentored clinical experiences during their training. Such mentorship may be particularly relevant to promoting their interest in geriatrics.

  1. Collaboration leads to enhanced curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerius, J; Mohan, V; Doctor, D; Hersh, W

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, we initiated a health information management (HIM) track of our biomedical informatics graduate program, and subsequent ongoing program assessment revealed a confluence of topics and courses within HIM and clinical informatics (CI) tracks. We completed a thorough comparative analysis of competencies derived from AMIA, AHIMA, and CAHIIM. Coupled with the need to streamline course offerings, the process, described in this paper allowed new opportunities for faculty collaboration, resulted in the creation of a model assessment for best practice in courses, and led to new avenues of growth within the program. The objective of the case study is to provide others in the informatics educational community with a model for analysis of curriculum in order to improve quality of student learning. We describe a case study where an academic informatics program realigned its course offerings to better reflect the HIM of today, and prepare for challenges of the future. Visionary leadership, intra-departmental self-analysis and alignment of the curriculum through defined mapping process reduced overlap within the CI and HIM tracks. Teaching within courses was optimized through the work of core faculty collaboration. The analysis of curriculum resulted in reduction of overlap within course curriculum. This allowed for additional and new course content to be added to existing courses. Leadership fostered an environment where top-down as well as bottom-up collaborative assessment activities resulted in a model to consolidate learning and reduce unnecessary duplication within courses. A focus on curriculum integration, emphasis on course alignment and strategic consolidation of course content raised the quality of informatics education provided to students. Faculty synergy was an essential component of this redesign process. Continuous quality improvement strategy included an ongoing alignment of curriculum and competencies through a comparative analysis approach. Through

  2. Development of Science Web-Based Curriculum for Elementary School: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuntalee Boriraksontikul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research were to develop and evaluate science web-based curriculum for elementary school: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok. Research for Development method was applied in this study which consisted of 4 stages: preparation of science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum evaluation and teachers development for science web-based unit plans design. The population was science teachers who have taught in 2014 academic year. The instrument used in this study were 1 the evaluation form for web-based curriculum and web-based unit plans. 2 the interview form for interview teachers’ opinion on web-based curriculum. lastly 3 the questionnaire of elementary students’ opinion on web-based curriculum. The results of this study were 1 Pratchatorn School had science web-based curriculum for elementary students with interesting units’ names. The units’ names reflect the focus and goals of learning. The learning activities were well organized according to the units design in a sequential manner for the website resource and science web-based curriculum for elementary school was evaluated as being a good quality. 2 Science web-based unit plans were also evaluated as being a good quality. 3 Teachers understood the science web-based curriculum development process and thaught about science web-based curriculum enhancing students’ learning. And 4 students’ opinion on web-based curriculum were as being a excellence quality.

  3. Survey results of the training, nutrition, and mental preparation of triathletes: practical implications of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Shawn H; Houston, Melinda; Martin, Scott B

    2011-07-01

    Although triathlon is growing in popularity at a remarkable rate, it has not been extensively studied. The aims of this research were to identify preparation strategies used by triathletes and to categorize these strategies according to gender and consultation with triathlon coaches. Survey data collected from 401 triathletes (207 males, 194 females) revealed training, nutritional, and mental preparation habits. Most participants engaged in strength training, consumed food and/or fluids during and after training, set training and competition goals, and applied mental preparation strategies during training and the hour before racing. Water was the most commonly consumed fluid; positive self-talk was the most used mental strategy. Participants were more likely to consult with a triathlon coach than a nutrition or sport psychology professional. Athletes with more years of experience in triathlon and those competing in longer distances were more likely to consult a triathlon coach. Female triathletes were more likely than male triathletes to train with others, use mental preparation strategies, and report feeling anxious before competitions. More male triathletes reported using nutritional supplements during training than their female counterparts. These findings add to the limited research base on triathletes' training habits, and hopefully will help guide practitioners who work with this group. The results provide guidance for collaborative efforts among training, nutrition, and mental health professionals to best support triathletes.

  4. Optimization of sample preparation for accurate results in quantitative NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Taichi; Nakamura, Satoe; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy has received high marks as an excellent measurement tool that does not require the same reference standard as the analyte. Measurement parameters have been discussed in detail and high-resolution balances have been used for sample preparation. However, the high-resolution balances, such as an ultra-microbalance, are not general-purpose analytical tools and many analysts may find those balances difficult to use, thereby hindering accurate sample preparation for qNMR measurement. In this study, we examined the relationship between the resolution of the balance and the amount of sample weighed during sample preparation. We were able to confirm the accuracy of the assay results for samples weighed on a high-resolution balance, such as the ultra-microbalance. Furthermore, when an appropriate tare and amount of sample was weighed on a given balance, accurate assay results were obtained with another high-resolution balance. Although this is a fundamental result, it offers important evidence that would enhance the versatility of the qNMR method.

  5. Curriculum Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five teachers with reputations for artistry in curriculum planning were interviewed about their "curriculum animation" plans or how they ensured their curriculum was brought to life. Their statements indicated that much of their planning is informal and intuitive, and that the criteria they use for their curriculum includes: (1) it is…

  6. ‘Compulsory creativity’: rationales, recipes, and results in the placement of mandatory creative endeavour in a medical undergraduate curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Thompson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2004, medical students at the University of Bristol have been required as part of their core curriculum to submit creative works for assessment. This requirement, which we term, ironically, “compulsory creativity”, may be unique within medical education where arts-based modules are typically elective. Such courses often harness the insights of established artists and writers in the illumination of medical themes. Less commonly students are called upon to link their own creative work with clinical and other life experience. Occasions for students to develop such an interpretative voice are generally sparse but the benefits can be argued theoretically and practically. In this paper we explore the rationale for the inclusion of such opportunities, the ways in which we have woven creativity into the curriculum and the sorts of artistic outputs we have witnessed. Contextualised links to a wide range of original student works from the www.outofourheads.net website are provided, as is a range of student reflection on the creative process ranging from the bemused to the ecstatic. The paper provides a model and a guide for educationalists interested in developing artistic creativity within the medical curriculum.

  7. To the point: reviews in medical education-taking control of the hidden curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Alice W; Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Casey, Petra M; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Dugoff, Lorraine; Espey, Eve L; Hammoud, Maya M; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Katz, Nadine T; Peskin, Edward G

    2010-10-01

    This article, the ninth in the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, discusses the role of the "hidden curriculum" in shaping the professional identity of doctors in training. The characteristics that distinguish the formal curriculum and hidden curriculum are defined. Specific examples of hidden curricula in clinical environments and the positive and negative impacts that may result are highlighted. Techniques to evaluate clinical training environments and to identify the hidden curriculum are provided and are followed by methods to promote its positive messages and lessen its negative ones.

  8. Precision Machining Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide was developed from a Technical Committee Report prepared with the assistance of industry personnel and containing a Task List which is the basis of the guide. It presents competency-based program standards for courses in precision machining technology and is part of the Idaho Vocational Curriculum Guide Project, a cooperative…

  9. Classifying, archiving and digitalizing documents related to normal conducting magnets & preparing graphs of magnetic measurement results

    CERN Document Server

    Bayramoglu, Gultug

    2016-01-01

    The main project aims to classify and digitalize documents related to normal conducting magnets. These documents include magnetic measurement results and their graphs, inspection reports, manufacturing reports and so on. The archive of Normal Conducting Magnets Section consists lots of different types of normal conducting magnets documents. Besides these magnet varieties, there are still documents from the times of first accelerator at CERN. In that moment, my project involves to identify, classify and digitalize documents and make them ready to be uploaded in NORMA - database of normal conducting magnets. In addition part of my time I’ve spent on second project, which was preparing graphs of magnetic measurement results of magnets such as current and magnetic field. The aim of these graphs is to compare parameters of magnets the same type and check measurement results’ consistency according to reference points. All of these graphs are on time basis.

  10. Hidden Curriculum as One of Current Issue of Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    There are several issues in the education system, especially in the curriculum field that affect education. Hidden curriculum is one of current controversial curriculum issues. Many hidden curricular issues are the result of assumptions and expectations that are not formally communicated, established, or conveyed within the learning environment.…

  11. FACTORS AFFECTING RESULT IN CHINESE PROFICIENCY TEST (HSK LEVEL 6: READING SECTION AND PREPARATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Haryanti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK is an internationally standardized exam which tests and rates Chinese language proficiency. The highest level in this test is level 6. The writing part of the test consists of 3 (three parts, namely, (1 listening, (2 reading, (3 writing. Furthermore, the reading part is made of 4 components. Level 6 of this test implies a high degree of difficulty. This paper specifically looked on how to prepare effectively for participants to be able to work on the reading part in order to achieve best result. This article used the methods of literature review and observational study as well as field research and would also incorporate the author’s personal experience in taking the test into recommending strategies for doing the reading part in a level 6 HSK test. Finally, research suggested several techniques and tips that might assist participants in achieving maximum scores in handling the reading part of level 6 HSK test.

  12. FACTORS AFFECTING RESULT IN CHINESE PROFICIENCY TEST (HSK LEVEL 6 READING SECTION AND PREPARATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Haryanti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chinese proficiency test (HSK is an internationally standardized exam which tests and rates Chinese language proficiency. The highest level in this test is level 6. The writing part of the test consists of 3 (three parts, namely, (1 listening, (2 reading, (3 writing. Furthermore, the reading part is made of 4 components. Level 6 of this test implies a high degree of difficulty. This paper specifically looked on how to prepare effectively for participants to be able to work on the reading part in order to achieve best result. This article used the methods of literature review and observational study as well as field research and would also incorporate the authors personal experience in taking the test into recommending strategies for doing the reading part in a level 6 HSK test. Finally, research suggested several techniques and tips that might assist participants in achieving maximum scores in handling the reading part of level 6 HSK test.

  13. Results of Numerical Modeling and Experimental Activities in Preparation of the Maxus-5 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassano, Edmondo; Castagnolo, Dario; Albano, Floriana; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2002-01-01

    The present paper describes numerical and experimental research activities carried out at MARS center for the preparation of an experiment on the Marangoni migration of a dissolving drop, composed by a liquid binary mixture having a miscibility gap. The paper integrates the results already presented in the previous congress, the emphasis is set on the determination of the parameters to be used for the MAXUS 5 sounding rocket mission, which is scheduled for spring 2003. Level set technique has been used for the calculation of the non-steady thermo-solutal capillary flow evolution in a bounded medium.Migration velocities and volume variation are calculated for different Marangoni numbers. The results of the numerical simulations provide the determination of drop radii and temperature gradients to be used during 12 minutes of low gravity, as provided by a MAXUS rocket. Experimental results provide accurate information on the refraction index gradient variation, due to the improvement of the interpretation of the fringe pattern. These results have allowed us to determine the optical parameters that optimize the Wollaston interferometer features. Comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  14. Writing your curriculum vitae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, S

    2001-09-01

    Your curriculum vitae (CV) is your gateway to shortlisting. A good CV takes a long time to prepare. It should not only record your training but, more importantly, should reflect your 'physicianly' qualities, management skills and knowledge of health-care systems.

  15. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  16. Carnival in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herne, Steve; Burgess-Macey, Celia; Rogers, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on a carnival in the curriculum project designed to revitalise the arts in the experience of students in Higher Education preparing to become primary school teachers. It argues the relevance of a combined arts or trans-disciplinary artform in the remit of a visual arts education journal and explores carnival as a complex,…

  17. 14 CFR 121.403 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 121.403...: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum... airplane. The curriculum must include ground and flight training required by this subpart. (b) Each...

  18. Curriculum, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Studies? Problematising Theoretical Ambiguities in Doctoral Theses in the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, Petro; Simmonds, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ambiguities in curriculum studies result in conceptual mayhem. Accordingly, they hinder the development of the complicated conversation on curriculum as a verb. This article aims to contribute to reconceptualizing curriculum studies as a dynamic social practice that aspires to thinking and acting with intelligences and sensitivity so…

  19. Strategies toward the Inclusion of Environmental Education in Educator Preparation Programs: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crim, Courtney; Moseley, Christine; Desjean-Perrotta, Blanche

    2017-01-01

    A national study was conducted to investigate the inclusion of environmental education (EE) into educator preparation programs across the United States. Responses from teacher educators in institutions of higher education indicated that the infusion of EE into educator preparation programs is limited and varies greatly across the nation. Findings…

  20. Effect of semen preparation on casa motility results in cryopreserved bull spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contri, Alberto; Valorz, Claudio; Faustini, Massimo; Wegher, Laura; Carluccio, Augusto

    2010-08-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analyzers (CASA) have become the standard tool for evaluating sperm motility and kinetic patterns because they provide objective data for thousands of sperm tracks. However, these devices are not ready-to-use and standardization of analytical practices is a fundamental requirement. In this study, we evaluated the effects of some settings, such as frame rate and frames per field, chamber and time of analysis, and samples preparations, including thawing temperature, sperm sample concentration, and media used for dilution, on the kinetic results of bovine frozen-thawed semen using a CASA. In Experiment 1, the frame rate (30-60 frame/s) significantly affected motility parameters, whereas the number of frames per field (30 or 45) did not seem to affect sperm kinetics. In Experiment 2, the thawing protocol affects sperm motility and kinetic parameters. Sperm sample concentration significantly limited the opportunity to perform the analysis and the kinetic results. A concentration of 100 and 50 x 10(6) sperm/mL limited the device's ability to perform the analysis or gave wrong results, whereas 5, 10, 20, and 30 x 10(6) sperm/mL concentrations allowed the analysis to be performed, but with different results (Experiment 3). The medium used for the dilution of the sample, which is fundamental for a correct sperm head detection, affects sperm motility results (Experiment 4). In this study, Makler and Leja chambers were used to perform the semen analysis with CASA devices. The chamber used significantly affected motility results (Experiment 5). The time between chamber loading and analysis affected sperm velocities, regardless of chamber used. Based on results recorded in this study, we propose that the CASA evaluation of motility of bovine frozen-thawed semen using Hamilton-Thorne IVOS 12.3 should be performed using a frame rate of 60 frame/s and 30 frames per field. Semen should be diluted at least at 20 x 10(6) sperm/mL using PBS. Furthermore, it is

  1. Waste Preparation and Transport Chemistry: Results of the FY 2001 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.D.

    2002-03-25

    of researchers from AEA Technology, Florida International University (FIU), Fluor Hanford, Mississippi State University (MSU), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to evaluate various aspects of the waste preparation and transport chemistry. The majority of this effort was focused on saltcake dissolution and saltwell pumping. The results of the AEA Technology, FIU, and MSU studies of saltcake dissolution and slurry transfers for Hanford are discussed in detail in a companion report prepared by T. D. Welch in 2001 (ORNIJTM-2001097). Staff members at Fluor Hanford have continued to conduct saltcake dissolution tests on actual tank waste (documented in reports prepared by D. L. Herting in 2000 and 2001). It should be noted that full-scale saltcake dissolution at Hanford is scheduled to begin in FY 2002. While the Hanford effort is focused on the transfer of waste from one tank to another, the objective of the SRTC study is the formation of aluminosilicates at elevated temperatures, which are present in the waste evaporator.

  2. INTEGRATIVE CURRICULUM IN TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ibrahim,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a curriculum for teaching science in the Integrative Science in elementary school, as well as foster an attitude wise on students to the cultural values that are integrated. Implementation of integrative curriculum is expected to drive the implementation of the curriculum of characters that are beneficial to the students, such as: understanding and mastery of teaching materials, the growth of the student's personal attitude toward wise on religious values and culture of Aceh are integrated. The main objective While the schools prepare learning device or media integrative learning curriculum for elementary schools as a guideline for teachers. Curriculum development method consists of three phases: (1 the initial assessment phase, (2 design phase, (3 the implementation phase. As for assessing the quality of the curriculum is an integrative manner stare validity, practical, and effective in implementation in the thematic learning in primary school. The results are found to exist Integrative Curriculum device and its components are valid for use by teachers in the learning process of primary school students.is to implement integrative values of Islamic Shari'a in thematic learning in elementary school as expected by parents guardians and community. The teacher's role in implementing character education, which provides guidance and examples in the learning process so that there is a change in attitude to the students.

  3. The Development of e-tutorial on Implementation National Curriculum 2013 for Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Yenita; Satria, Gita; Nur Siregar, Syarifah

    2017-06-01

    Curriculum 2013 is the new national Curriculum in Indonesia that is targeted to be used in all Indonesian schools in 2019. At this time the teacher training continues but the number and locations of teachers very diffuse and time constraints to be an obstacle for the government to be able to conduct training for teachers. This research resulted in the e-tutorial which is designed for mathematics teachers in studying the process of Curriculum implementation. This product will assist the government in accelerating the preparation of teachers in implementation of Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial contains the dynamics of Curriculum development, learning model, learning assessment, lesson plan, curriculum stages of implementation and government regulation that is relevant to the implementation of Curriculum 2013. The product development started with a needs analysis through discussions with mathematics teachers about their difficulties in the implementation of the Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial was developed using Application of Adobe Director 11. This paper discusses the results of need analysis, process development and results of product revisions made based on input from teachers during the FGD. From the discussion, it can be concluded that this e-tutorial easily understood by teachers and help them to understand the implementation of Curriculum 2013

  4. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  5. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  6. Interkulturelle Kompetenz in der Facharztausbildung von Psychiatern in Deutschland: Ergebnisse einer Umfrage [Intercultural competence in the psychiatric training curriculum in Germany: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machleidt, Wielant

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: This study was carried out to assess the situation of and the demand for specific training in transcultural psychiatry as part of the residency program in Germany. Method: A semistructured questionnaire with 30 questions (28 structured, 2 open was developed, for which the “Local Survey of Realities in Transcultural Psychiatry” of the (APA served as a model and was modified accordingly. This questionnaire was sent out to all directors of psychiatric training institutions in Germany (N = 450. The directors of official psychiatric training institutions are authorized for residency training by the state medical associations. The responses were not anonymous. Results: The return rate was 25.5% (N = 114. In 71.7% of the training institutions (81 out of 113 valid cases, specific training in transcultural psychiatry occurred only rarely or not at all. 83.3% of the directors of psychiatric training institutions (70 out of 84 valid cases reported a demand for training in transcultural psychiatry in their training institutions; in 94.5% of the cases, the directors of psychiatric training institutions (69 out of 73 valid cases reported a need for transcultural issues as part of the official curriculum of the psychiatric residency program in Germany. The most frequently reported aspects were teaching of general cultural competence and of culture-specific issues in mental disorders. Implications: Cultural aspects currently are not a mandatory part of the official training curriculum of the psychiatric residency training in Germany. With respect to the reported need for training in cultural issues of mental disorders, the implementation of transcultural psychiatry within the official curriculum of the psychiatric residency training in Germany should be discussed. [german] Zielsetzung: Ziel der vorliegenden Studie ist die Erhebung des Status quo der Weiterbildungssituation in transkultureller Psychiatrie für den Facharzt in

  7. Characteristics associated with suboptimal bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy: Results of a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey H Basch

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates the potential value of a personalized approach to bowel preparation, which addresses the specific needs of an individual patient like chronic constipation and diabetes and those with poor literacy skills or poor fluency in English. Development and evaluation of educational interventions to address these factors warrants investment.

  8. Results of targets preparation of specialists for automotive branch with use of contemporary bundled software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina MAKAROVA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are features of the automobile profile specialists’ informationcompetence forming are considered in the article. The role of employers in professionalorder for specialists’ preparation forming, forms of their interaction with educationalinstitutions while maintenance of hi-tech and high technology manufactures problemsdecision by the highly skilled personnel, that is capable to use science and technologiesachievements during formulated goals decision are mentioned.

  9. Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory: Development and Implementation of a Longitudinal Simulation Educator Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Glenn; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Simulation-based education has gained popularity, yet many faculty members feel inadequately prepared to teach using this technique. Fellowship training in medical education exists, but there is little information regarding simulation or formal educational programs therein. In our institution, simulation fellowships were offered by individual clinical departments. We recognized the need for a formal curriculum in educational theory. Kern’s approach to curriculum development was used to develop, implement, and evaluate the Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory (FEAST) curriculum. Needs assessments resulted in a 26-topic curriculum; each biweekly session built upon the previous. Components essential to success included setting goals and objectives for each interactive session and having dedicated faculty, collaborative leadership and administrative support for the curriculum. Evaluation data was collated and analyzed annually via anonymous feedback surveys, focus groups, and retrospective pre-post self-assessment questionnaires. Data collected from 32 fellows over five years of implementation showed that the curriculum improved knowledge, challenged thinking, and was excellent preparation for a career in simulation-based medical education. Themes arising from focus groups demonstrated that participants valued faculty expertise and the structure, practicality, and content of the curriculum. We present a longitudinal simulation educator curriculum that adheres to a well-described framework of curriculum development. Program evaluation shows that FEAST has increased participant knowledge in key areas relevant to simulation-based education and that the curriculum has been successful in meeting the needs of novice simulation educators. Insights and practice points are offered for educators wishing to implement a similar curriculum in their institution. PMID:28280655

  10. Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory: Development and Implementation of a Longitudinal Simulation Educator Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michelle; Posner, Glenn; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2017-01-27

    Simulation-based education has gained popularity, yet many faculty members feel inadequately prepared to teach using this technique. Fellowship training in medical education exists, but there is little information regarding simulation or formal educational programs therein. In our institution, simulation fellowships were offered by individual clinical departments. We recognized the need for a formal curriculum in educational theory. Kern's approach to curriculum development was used to develop, implement, and evaluate the Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory (FEAST) curriculum. Needs assessments resulted in a 26-topic curriculum; each biweekly session built upon the previous. Components essential to success included setting goals and objectives for each interactive session and having dedicated faculty, collaborative leadership and administrative support for the curriculum. Evaluation data was collated and analyzed annually via anonymous feedback surveys, focus groups, and retrospective pre-post self-assessment questionnaires. Data collected from 32 fellows over five years of implementation showed that the curriculum improved knowledge, challenged thinking, and was excellent preparation for a career in simulation-based medical education. Themes arising from focus groups demonstrated that participants valued faculty expertise and the structure, practicality, and content of the curriculum. We present a longitudinal simulation educator curriculum that adheres to a well-described framework of curriculum development. Program evaluation shows that FEAST has increased participant knowledge in key areas relevant to simulation-based education and that the curriculum has been successful in meeting the needs of novice simulation educators. Insights and practice points are offered for educators wishing to implement a similar curriculum in their institution.

  11. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  12. How prepared are your interns to take calls? Results of a multi-institutional study of simulated pages to prepare medical students for surgery internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischknecht, Adam C; Boehler, Margaret L; Schwind, Cathy J; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Gruppen, Larry D; Brenner, Michael J; Hauge, Linnea S

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated a simulated pages curriculum that was developed to assess communication and clinical decision making in medical students and interns. A curriculum consisting of 14 simulated pages was administered across 5 institutions to 150 senior medical students. A 3-case subset was administered to interns who did not participate in the curriculum. Six expert surgeons identified critical fails and set passing scores for case-specific assessments using the Graphical Hofstee Method. Participants in the curriculum demonstrated superior clinical decision making compared with non-participants across all cases scenarios (P < .01). Average medical student scores for clinical decision making were 46.9%. Global ratings averaged 6.0 for communication and 5.2 for patient care. Passing rates averaged 46%. Participation in a mock page curriculum improved performance. The performance of participants based on expert standards set for simulated page performance highlight the need for innovative approaches to improve interns' preparedness to take calls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David CM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. Results The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. Conclusion According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  14. Self-directed learning can outperform direct instruction in the course of a modern German medical curriculum - results of a mixed methods trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, Arne; Kabino, Klaus; Spreckelsen, Cord

    2016-06-03

    Modernised medical curricula in Germany (so called "reformed study programs") rely increasingly on alternative self-instructed learning forms such as e-learning and curriculum-guided self-study. However, there is a lack of evidence that these methods can outperform conventional teaching methods such as lectures and seminars. This study was conducted in order to compare extant traditional teaching methods with new instruction forms in terms of learning effect and student satisfaction. In a randomised trial, 244 students of medicine in their third academic year were assigned to one of four study branches representing self-instructed learning forms (e-learning and curriculum-based self-study) and instructed learning forms (lectures and seminars). All groups participated in their respective learning module with standardised materials and instructions. Learning effect was measured with pre-test and post-test multiple-choice questionnaires. Student satisfaction and learning style were examined via self-assessment. Of 244 initial participants, 223 completed the respective module and were included in the study. In the pre-test, the groups showed relatively homogenous scores. All students showed notable improvements compared with the pre-test results. Participants in the non-self-instructed learning groups reached scores of 14.71 (seminar) and 14.37 (lecture), while the groups of self-instructed learners reached higher scores with 17.23 (e-learning) and 15.81 (self-study). All groups improved significantly (p study shows that students in modern study curricula learn better through modern self-instructed methods than through conventional methods. These methods should be used more, as they also show good levels of student acceptance and higher scores in personal self-assessment of knowledge.

  15. Longitudinales, bologna-kompatibles Modell-Curriculum "Kommunikative und Soziale Kompetenzen": Ergebnisse eines interdisziplinären Workshops deutschsprachiger medizinischer Fakultäten [A longitudinal, Bologna-compatible model curriculum "communication and social competencies": Results of an interdisciplinary workshop of German-speaking medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hölzer, Henrike

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aim: The aim of the project is to present and discuss a longitudinal model curriculum “Communication and social competencies” for undergraduate medical education. Procedure and results: In a two-day workshop, a multidisciplinary, cross-faculty group of medical educators developed a curriculum model based on the “Basel Consensus Statement”. It can now be used by German-speaking medical schools as a blueprint for curriculum planning and implementation processes. The modular structure enables it to be implemented either in whole or in part. The model can also be used to facilitate the conversion of medical education into Bachelor and Master degree programmes. The longitudinal model curriculum features 131 educational objectives and makes suggestions for didactic concepts and assessment tools. For various disciplines, it also recommends at what point in time specific topics should be taught. Conclusion: The longitudinal model curriculum “Communication and social competencies”, based on the educational objectives of the “Basel Consensus Statement”, is a new curricular instrument that can be used by German, Austrian and Swiss medical schools. It can help to simplify the realisation of the Bologna process, also across different faculties. [german] Zielsetzung: Ziel des Projekts ist es, ein longitudinales Modell-Curriculum „Kommunikative und soziale Kompetenzen“ für die medizinische Ausbildung zur Diskussion zu stellen. Vorgehen und Ergebnisse: Auf einem 2-tägigen Workshop wurde interfakultär und interdisziplinär auf der Grundlage des „Basler Consensus Statements: Kommunikative und soziale Kompetenzen im Medizinstudium“ ein Curriculum entwickelt, das deutschsprachigen Fakultäten bei der Planung und Implementierung als Vorlage dienen kann. Das Modell lässt sich als Gesamt-Curriculum oder in Teilmodulen implementieren. Es kann auch bei der Umstellung auf Bachelor- und Masterstudiengänge genutzt werden. Das

  16. Recent results on the preparation and properties of Li-Containing Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, M. H.; Gruen, D. M.; Krauss, A. R.

    1986-11-01

    Copper-lithium alloys are of interest in fusion applications because of their previously observed capability of forming self-sustaining secondary-ion emitting lithium overlayers on predominantly copper substrates. Large quantities (up to 250 g) of material containing up to about 12 at% Li have been successfully prepared by melting samples in boron nitride crucibles in a resistance heated furnace. In order to obtain a uniform lithium concentration, remelting or annealing treatments are necessary. Metallographic examination has revealed that single-phase homogeneous alloys exist only up to a concentration of about 8 at% Li. However, the thermodynamic stability of these solid solutions has not been determined. Preliminary studies have been performed on the color changes observed upon reaction of these alloys with gaseous oxygen at elevated temperatures.

  17. Combining rimonabant and fentanyl in a single entity: preparation and pharmacological results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fernández, Cristina; Callado, Luis F; Girón, Rocío; Sánchez, Eva; Erdozain, Amaia M; López-Moreno, José Antonio; Morales, Paula; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Goya, Pilar; Meana, J Javier; Martín, M Isabel; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Based on numerous pharmacological studies that have revealed an interaction between cannabinoid and opioid systems at the molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral levels, a new series of hybrid molecules has been prepared by coupling the molecular features of two wellknown drugs, ie, rimonabant and fentanyl. The new compounds have been tested for their affinity and functionality regarding CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid and μ opioid receptors. In [35S]-GTPγS (guanosine 5′-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) binding assays from the post-mortem human frontal cortex, they proved to be CB1 cannabinoid antagonists and μ opioid antagonists. Interestingly, in vivo, the new compounds exhibited a significant dual antagonist action on the endocannabinoid and opioid systems. PMID:24591816

  18. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Spektor, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  19. Purification of Ovine Respiratory Complex I Results in a Highly Active and Stable Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letts, James A; Degliesposti, Gianluca; Fiedorczuk, Karol; Skehel, Mark; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-11-18

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest (∼1 MDa) and the least characterized complex of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Because of the ease of sample availability, previous work has focused almost exclusively on bovine complex I. However, only medium resolution structural analyses of this complex have been reported. Working with other mammalian complex I homologues is a potential approach for overcoming these limitations. Due to the inherent difficulty of expressing large membrane protein complexes, screening of complex I homologues is limited to large mammals reared for human consumption. The high sequence identity among these available sources may preclude the benefits of screening. Here, we report the characterization of complex I purified from Ovis aries (ovine) heart mitochondria. All 44 unique subunits of the intact complex were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified differences in the subunit composition of subcomplexes of ovine complex I as compared with bovine, suggesting differential stability of inter-subunit interactions within the complex. Furthermore, the 42-kDa subunit, which is easily lost from the bovine enzyme, remains tightly bound to ovine complex I. Additionally, we developed a novel purification protocol for highly active and stable mitochondrial complex I using the branched-chain detergent lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol. Our data demonstrate that, although closely related, significant differences exist between the biochemical properties of complex I prepared from ovine and bovine mitochondria and that ovine complex I represents a suitable alternative target for further structural studies.

  20. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry: Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlandale Independent School District, San Antonio, TX. Career Education Center.

    The guide (one-quarter trigonometry course; two-quarter analytic geometry course) provides both subject matter and career preparation assistance for advanced mathematics teachers. It is arranged in vertical columns relating curriculum concepts in trigonometry and analytic geometry to curriculum performance objectives, career concepts and teaching…

  1. Nurse manager characteristics and skills: curriculum implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, J; Shaffer, C

    1993-01-01

    If one accepts the premise that all nurses need knowledge of management and leadership, then schools of nursing need to design their curriculum to provide administrative content and learning experiences to adequately prepare nurses for leadership positions. This study assays the opinions of nurse unit managers about the relative importance of different characteristics and skills in effective job performance. A sample of 73 unit managers from six hospitals and two community health agencies ranked human relations and communication skills as most important. Nursing knowledge and clinical skills were ranked second. Experienced managers thought political savvy and business or management skills were more important than did novice managers. The results of this study are discussed in relation to curriculum issues in nursing management at both the baccalaureate and the graduate level.

  2. Combining rimonabant and fentanyl in a single entity: preparation and pharmacological results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Fernández C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Fernández-Fernández,1 Luis F Callado,2 Rocío Girón,3 Eva Sánchez,3 Amaia M Erdozain,2 José Antonio López-Moreno,4 Paula Morales,1 Fernando Rodríguez de Fonseca,5 Javier Fernández-Ruiz,6 Pilar Goya,1 J Javier Meana,2 M Isabel Martín,3 Nadine Jagerovic1 1Instituto de Química Médica, CSIC, Madrid, 2Departamento de Farmacología, Universidad del Pais Vasco, UPV/EHU, CIBERSAM, Leioa, 3Departamento de Farmacología y Nutrición, Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, 4Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, 5Laboratorio de Medicina Regenerativa, Hospital Carlos Haya, Fundación IMABIS, Málaga, 6Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, CIBERNED, IRYCIS, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Based on numerous pharmacological studies that have revealed an interaction between cannabinoid and opioid systems at the molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral levels, a new series of hybrid molecules has been prepared by coupling the molecular features of two wellknown drugs, ie, rimonabant and fentanyl. The new compounds have been tested for their affinity and functionality regarding CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid and µ opioid receptors. In [35S]-GTPγS (guanosine 5’-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate binding assays from the post-mortem human frontal cortex, they proved to be CB1 cannabinoid antagonists and µ opioid antagonists. Interestingly, in vivo, the new compounds exhibited a significant dual antagonist action on the endocannabinoid and opioid systems. Keywords: fentanyl, rimonabant, cannabinoid, opioid, behavioral assays

  3. Plasma concentrations resulting from florfenicol preparations given to pigs in their drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, L; Vargas, D; Ocampo, L; Sumano, H; Martinez, R; Tapia, G

    2011-09-01

    Florfenicol administered through the drinking water has been recommended as a metaphylactic antibacterial drug to control outbreaks of respiratory diseases in pigs caused by strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida, yet it is difficult to pinpoint in practice when the drug is given metaphylactically or therapeutically. Further, pigs are likely to reject florfenicol-medicated water, and plasma concentrations of the drug are likely to be marginal for diseases caused by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The reported minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for these organisms show a breakpoint of 2 to 3 μg/mL. An experiment was conducted during September and October 2009. One hundred twenty healthy crossbred pigs (Landrace-Yorkshire), weighing 23 ± 6.2 kg, were used in this trial. They were randomly assigned to 5 groups, with 3 replicates of 8 animals/group. Two commercial preparations of florfenicol were administered through the drinking water at 2 concentrations (0.01 and 0.015%). Water intake was measured before and after medication, and plasma concentrations of florfenicol were determined by HPLC. Considerable rejection of florfenicol-medicated water was observed. However, plasma florfenicol concentrations were of a range sufficient for a methaphylaxis approach to preventing disease by bacteria, with MIC breakpoints of ≤ 0.25 μg/mL. Decreased efficacy as a metaphylactic medication should be expected for bacteria with MIC >0.25 μg/mL, considering the reported existence of bacteria resistant to florfenicol and the natural resistance of Streptococcus suis or E. coli to this drug.

  4. Modelling and observation of transionospheric propagation results from ISIS II in preparation for ePOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Gillies

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP is scheduled to be launched as part of the Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE satellite in early 2008. A Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI on ePOP will receive HF transmissions from various ground-based transmitters. In preparation for the ePOP mission, data from a similar transionospheric experiment performed by the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS II satellite has been studied. Prominent features in the received 9.303-MHz signal were periodic Faraday fading of signal intensity at rates up to 13 Hz and a time of arrival delay between the O- and X-modes of up to 0.8 ms. Both features occurred when the satellite was above or south of the Ottawa transmitter. Ionospheric models for ray tracing were constructed using both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI profiles and local peak electron density values from ISIS ionograms. Values for fade rate and differential mode delay were computed and compared to the values observed in the ISIS II data. The computed values showed very good agreement to the observed values of both received signal parameters when the topside sounding foF2 values were used to scale IRI profiles, but not when strictly modelled IRI profiles were used. It was determined that the primary modifier of the received signal parameters was the foF2 density and not the shape of the profile. This dependence was due to refraction, at the 9.303-MHz signal frequency, causing the rays to travel larger distances near the peak density where essentially all the mode splitting occurred. This study should assist in interpretation of ePOP RRI data when they are available.

  5. 14 CFR 91.1079 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 91.1079... Operations Program Management § 91.1079 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each program manager must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember...

  6. 14 CFR 135.327 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 135.327... § 135.327 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember required for that type...

  7. Taken for Granted: Why Curriculum Content Is Like Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Carolyn; Hansel, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    For educators, the content of the curriculum really is like oxygen: it is the necessary precondition for improving schools, closing the achievement gap, engaging parents, and preparing teachers. However, when educators take the content of the curriculum for granted, they lose opportunities to coordinate and collaborate. Good curriculum instruction…

  8. Teachers' Planning and Preparation for Lesson Plan in the Implementation of Form 4 Physical Education Curriculum for the Physical Fitness Strand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Kamaruzaman Syed

    2013-01-01

    This article is related to the study of lesson planning prepared by secondary school Physical Education teachers in the Gombak district. Findings of the study show that Physical Education teachers have prepared lesson plans at satisfactory level (M = 4.13; SD = 0.79). All elements within the lesson planning components achieved high mean scores.…

  9. The CMS muon system in Run2: preparation, status and first results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072274

    2015-01-01

    The CMS muon system has played a key role for many physics results obtained from the LHC Run-1 data. During the Long Shutdown (2013-2014) significant upgrades have been carried out on the muon detectors and on the L1 muon trigger. In parallel the algorithms for muon reconstruction and identification have been improved for both the High-Level Trigger and the offline reconstruction. Results of studies performed on data and Monte Carlo simulations will be presented, with focus on the improvements aiming to ensure an excellent performance in conditions of multiplicity of pileup events and bunch spacing expected during the high-luminosity phase of Run-2. The early muon performance results from LHC Run-2 will be shown.

  10. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2008-01-01

    of virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning......, locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study...

  11. Astronomical Approach to Physical Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, H. L. K.; Churukian, A. D.

    2004-11-01

    The Astronomical Approach to Physical Science Curriculum (AAPS Curriculum) is an innovative curriculum that incorporates an astronomy theme into an inquiry-based physical science curriculum for pre-service, elementary school teachers. Many physical science courses are a non-cohesive collection of topics required for the state teaching license. Through the use of astronomy and space science examples, the AAPS Curriculum will have a coherent theme that ties the wide variety of physical science topics together and provides many real world applications for the topics covered in the course. This new curriculum will incorporate the applications of knowledge to complete the learning cycle-exploration, concept introduction, application. Astronomy and space science applications will be emphasized throughout the curriculum. The theme of astronomy was chosen to prepare elementary school teachers for teaching astronomy and space science in their classroom, as this is a topic in which many school children are consistently interested. Since astronomy is a topic that can be used as a springboard to teach many other areas of study, we want teachers who are knowledgeable in topics of astronomy so they are capable of preparing creative lessons throughout their entire curriculum that are exciting to their students. The AAPS Curriculum will train college students to become teachers who are comfortable with physical science and astronomy topics and who are excited to teach these topics in their classroom. Funding for this work is provided by the IDEAS grant program of the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  12. Preparing Corrections Staff for the Future: Results of a 2-Day Training About Aging Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Julie L; Magnuson, Thomas M; Bayer, Barbara L; Potter, Jane F; Falkowski, Paul P

    2016-04-01

    The aging of the prison population presents corrections staff with unique challenges in knowing how to support inmates while maintaining security. This article describes a 2-day training program to introduce the aging process to select staff at all levels. While the results of a pre-posttest measure, using a modified version of Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz, did not produce a statistically significant difference at the conclusion of the training, attendees did express satisfaction with the training and their newfound insight into the challenges faced by aging inmates. They also offered recommendations for future training to include more practical suggestions for the work environment.

  13. Effects of Synthetic Serum Supplementation in Sperm Preparation Media on Sperm Capacitation and Function Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Fu Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Albumin supplementation of culture media induces sperm capacitation in assisted reproduction technique cycles. Synthetic serum supplementation is clinically used to replace albumin for preventing transmission of infectious agents. However, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation have rarely been investigated. Spermatozoa from 30 men with normal basic semen analysis results were collected, divided into five aliquots, and cultured in capacitating conditions in four combinations of two synthetic serum supplements, serum substitute supplement (SSS and serum protein substitute (SPS, and two fertilization media, Quinns Advantage™ Fertilization (QF and human tubular fluid (HTF media. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in spermatozoa were measured through chemiluminescence. Furthermore, acrosome reaction and western blotting for tyrosine phosphorylation were used to evaluate sperm capacitation. HTF+SSS had significantly higher ROS levels than QF+SPS did (11,725 ± 1,172 versus 6,278 ± 864 relative light units. In addition, the spermatozoa cultured in QF+SPS had lower motility, acrosome reaction rates, and tyrosine phosphorylation levels compared with those cultured in HTF+SSS. In conclusion, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation varied according to the combination of media. These differences may lead to variations in spermatozoon ROS levels, thus affecting sperm function test results.

  14. Connecticut Business Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsbury Public Schools, CT.

    This comprehensive curriculum guide was developed to enable business education teachers and administrators in Connecticut to update and upgrade their curricula, with emphasis on and information about cross credits, technology preparation (Tech Prep 2 + 2), interdisciplinary teaching, and global economics interdependence study. Preliminary…

  15. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  16. Curriculum Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    The English as a Second Language (ESL) Curriculum for grades K - 12 is a scope that builds and develops linguistic proficiency for students between the ages of six and 21 years. The ESL professionals defines ESL students as those students who are non - native English speakers and who may or may not have English proficiency.

  17. Curriculum integrated information literacy: a challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Mette; Kobow, Else; Kristensen, Anne-Kirstine Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    Information literacy is a competence needed for students and for practitioners in the nursing profession. A curriculum integrated intervention was qualitatively evaluated by focus group interviews of students, lecturers and the university librarian. Information literacy makes sense for students...... when it is linked to assignments, timed right, prepared, systematic and continuous. Support is needed to help students understand the meaning of seeking information, to focus their problem and to make them reflect on their search and its results. Feedback on materials used is also asked for...

  18. Students' Conceptions of Sound Waves Resulting from the Enactment of a New Technology-Enhanced Inquiry-Based Curriculum on Urban Bird Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Meredith E.; Barnett, G. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The emerging field of urban ecology has the potential to engage urban youth in the practices of scientists by studying a locally relevant environmental problem. To this end, we are developing curriculum modules designed to engage students in learning science through the use of emerging information technology. In this paper, we describe the impact…

  19. A Media-Rich Curriculum for Improving Early Literacy Outcomes of Low-Income Children: Evaluation Results for the "Ready to Learn" Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Bates, Lauren; Townsend, Eve; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Pasnik, Shelley; Llorente, Carlin

    2010-01-01

    Described here is a study on the efficacy of a digital media-rich curriculum based on the idea that children can learn best from "media synergy", that is, when children have opportunities to learn skills by engaging in repeated practice with them in many different formats and media (Neuman, 1995). The study is part of the "Ready to…

  20. Inclusive and Individually Adapted Education in Norway Results from a Survey Study in Two Municipalities Focusing the Roles of Headteachers, Teachers and Curriculum Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buli-Holmberg, Jorun; Nilsen, Sven; Skogen, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to throw light on how the intentions behind inclusive and individually adapted education in Norwegian compulsory schools are followed up in practice with regard to central aspects of the roles of headteachers, teachers and curriculum planning. The study was carried out as a postal survey of compulsory school teachers in two…

  1. ICT and Curriculum Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Voogt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The change towards the information society implies that many countries have to change their curricula, because students need to develop competencies that are not addressed in the traditional curricula. A case study approach was applied to examine curriculum changes in ICT-supported pedagogical practices from 28 countries. The analysis focused on curriculum content and goals of the ICT-supported pedagogical practices, how these aims were implemented in practice and which outcomes for students and teachers could be observed. The results showed that the curriculum content often was not new but rather was delivered in a different way. Many ICT-supported pedagogical practices strove to realize new goals important for lifelong learning in an information society. Content and goals were offered in curricular settings, often crossing the traditional boundaries of academic subjects. In many of the cases students worked on topics that were meaningful to them.

  2. Incentives from Curriculum Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerselman, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum tracking creates incentives in the years before its start, and we should therefore expect test scores to be higher during those years. I find robust evidence for incentive effects of tracking in the UK based on the UK comprehensive school reform. Results from the Swedish comprehensive school reform are inconclusive. Internationally, I…

  3. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  4. A model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Philip James

    This dissertation focused on the development of a model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in the State of Florida. The curriculum was developed using grounded theory research method, including a component of data collected from an on-line survey administered to 106 professional educators and marine biologists. The results of the data collection and analysis showed a definitive necessity for teacher preparedness, multidisciplinary content, and inquiry-based science instruction. Further, three important factors emerged: (a) collaborative grouping increases achievement; (b) field excursions significantly impact student motivation; (c) standardized testing influences curriculum development. The curriculum is organized as an 11-day unit, with detailed lesson plans presented in standard curricular format and with all components correlated to the Florida State Educational Standards. The curriculum incorporates teacher preparation, multimedia presentations, computer-assisted instruction, scientific art appreciation, and replication as well as assessment factors. The curriculum addresses topics of ichthyology, marine animal identification, environmental conservation and protection, marine animal anatomy, water safety, environmental stewardship, and responsible angling techniques. The components of the curriculum were discussed with reference to the literature on which it was based and recommendations for future research were addressed.

  5. Problem-Based Learning across the Curriculum: Exploring the Efficacy of a Cross-Curricular Application of Preparation for Future Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Vahey, Philip; van 't Hooft, Mark; Kratcoski, Annette; Rafanan, Ken; Stanford, Tina; Yarnall, Louise; Cook, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The research reported in this paper explores the applicability and efficacy of a variant of problem-based learning, the Preparation for Future Learning (PFL) approach, to teaching and learning within the context of a cross-curricular, middle school data literacy unit called "Thinking with Data" (TWD). A quasi-experimental design was used…

  6. Enhancing the Undergraduate Industrial Engineering Curriculum: Defining Desired Characteristics and Emerging Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Hamidreza; Sala-Diakanda, Serge; Furterer, Sandra; Rabelo, Luis; Crumpton-Young, Lesia; Williams, Kent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the results of an initial research study conducted to identify the desired professional characteristics of an industrial engineer with an undergraduate degree and the emerging topic areas that should be incorporated into the curriculum to prepare industrial engineering (IE) graduates for the future workforce.…

  7. Enhancing the Undergraduate Industrial Engineering Curriculum: Defining Desired Characteristics and Emerging Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Hamidreza; Sala-Diakanda, Serge; Furterer, Sandra; Rabelo, Luis; Crumpton-Young, Lesia; Williams, Kent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the results of an initial research study conducted to identify the desired professional characteristics of an industrial engineer with an undergraduate degree and the emerging topic areas that should be incorporated into the curriculum to prepare industrial engineering (IE) graduates for the future workforce.…

  8. Basic airway skills acquisition using the American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum: Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Sydne; Kim, Michael; Olasky, Jaisa; Campbell, Andre; Acton, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Skills Curriculum was developed to standardize medical student training. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and validity of implementing the basic airway curriculum. This single-center, prospective study of medical students participating in the basic airway module from 12/2014-3/2016 consisted of didactics, small-group practice, and testing in a simulated clinical scenario. Proficiency was determined by a checklist of skills (1-15), global score (1-5), and letter grade (NR-needs review, PS-proficient in simulation scenario, CP-proficient in clinical scenario). A proportion of students completed pre/post-test surveys regarding experience, satisfaction, comfort, and self-perceived proficiency. Over 16 months, 240 students were enrolled with 98% deemed proficient in a simulated or clinical scenario. Pre/post-test surveys (n = 126) indicated improvement in self-perceived proficiency by 99% of learners. All students felt moderately to very comfortable performing basic airway skills and 94% had moderate to considerable satisfaction after completing the module. The ACS/ASE Surgical Skills Curriculum is a feasible and effective way to teach medical students basic airway skills using simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface properties of latex film and solvent-borne film resulted from fluorinated acrylate copolymers prepared by emulsion polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluorinated acrylate copolymer, poly (BMA-co-DFHMA, was prepared by emulsion polymerization using a preemulsified monomer addition process. The FTIR and 1H –NMR were used to characterize the copolymer structure. The contact angle of water on the solvent-borne film increased dramatically and reached an equilibrium value (103° when the PDFHMA content in the copolymer was only 0.97 mol%. However, the contact of water on the latex film increased slowly, and reached the equilibrium value of 99° until the fluorinated component content was as highly as 9 mol%. A similar result was observed for the oil contact angle on the two types of films. XPS results showed that when the F/C ratio on film surfaces reached equilibrium, the required content of fluorinated component in the copolymer for the solvent-borne film was much lower than that for the latex film.

  10. Silver Vanadium Phosphorous Oxide, Ag(2)VO(2)PO(4): Chimie Douce Preparation and Resulting Lithium Cell Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2011-08-15

    Recently, we have shown silver vanadium phosphorous oxide (Ag(2)VO(2)PO(4), SVPO) to be a promising cathode material for lithium based batteries. Whereas the first reported preparation of SVPO employed an elevated pressure, hydrothermal approach, we report herein a novel ambient pressure synthesis method to prepare SVPO, where our chimie douce preparation is readily scalable and provides material with a smaller, more consistent particle size and higher surface area relative to SVPO prepared via the hydrothermal method. Lithium electrochemical cells utilizing SVPO cathodes made by our new process show improved power capability under constant current and pulse conditions over cells containing cathode from SVPO prepared via the hydrothermal method.

  11. Preparation and characterisation of in-house reference material of tylosin in honey and results of a proficiency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Detlef A; Stachel, Carolin S; Hackenberg, Rudolf; Gowik, Petra

    2011-08-26

    The analysis of incurred material from animals treated with pharmacologically active substances is an efficient way to check the accuracy of a method. Tylosin A was chosen for the preparation of that material because it is highly effective in controlling active infections of American Foulbrood (AFB), a global threat to apiculture, but residues in honey are not allowed according to European legislation. For this reason an in-house reference material of honey containing the macrolide tylosin A and its degradation product desmycosin (tylosin B) was prepared. After the treatment of a beehive with the appropriate macrolide tylosin A, the honey samples were collected. The incurred honey material was diluted by mixing with blank honey. Concentrations of 25.81 μg kg(-1) for tylosin A and of 19.28 μg kg(-1) for its degradation product desmycosin (tylosin B) were reached. The homogeneity was checked by analysing 12 bottles in duplicate. The stability was tested at different defined temperatures and storage conditions. The reference material described above was homogeneous and stable. Samples of this in-house reference material were used for the realisation of a proficiency test with international participation. All participants accomplished satisfying results with the exception of one laboratory. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  13. Competentiegericht curriculum en cursusontwerp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga; Giesbertz, Wil

    2012-01-01

    Firssova, O., & Giesbertz, W. (2011, 30 mei). Competentiegericht curriculum en cursusontwerp. Presentatie gegeven tijdens de workshop van de BKO cursus Competentiegericht curriculum en cursusontwerp, Eindhoven, Nederland: Open Universiteit.

  14. Perspectives of contained chondroprotective therapy of osteoarthritis. Results of an open randomized study of Artra preparation in patients with gonarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L L Alexeeeva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess efficacy and safety of combined chondroprotective ARTRA preparation ("Unipharm Inc" USA in pts with gonarthrosis Material and methods. 90 pts with knee joint osteoarthritis (OA, 11-111 radiological stage according to Kellgren-Lawrence and prominent pain syndrome requiring regular treatment with NSAIDs were included. 45 pts received ARTRA and diclofenac sodium, 45 control pts were treated only with diclofenac sodium during 6 months. Clinical examination was performed before, after 30, 120 and 180 days of treatment. Efficacy was assessed according to conventional criteria of assessment drugs assigned for OA treatment. Results. ARTRA proved to be a new effective drug for OA treatment. It provided decrease of pain and stiffness in damaged joints so as significant improvement of functional state. Systematical ARTRA administration allows decreasing NSAID dose or completely withdrawing such drugs in many pts. ARTRA showed good tolerability and safety so as long aftereffect.

  15. Effectiveness of a quality improvement curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Tartaglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As health systems find ways to improve quality of care, medical training programs are finding opportunities to prepare learners on principles of quality improvement (QI. The impact of QI curricula for medical students as measured by student learning is not well delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a QI curriculum for senior medical students as measured by student knowledge and skills. Methods: This study was an observational study that involved a self-assessment and post-test Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT for intervention and control students. A QI curriculum consisting of online modules, live discussions, independent readings and reflective writing, and participation in a mentored QI project was offered to fourth-year medical students completing an honor's elective (intervention group. Senior medical students who received the standard QI curriculum only were recruited as controls. Results: A total of 22 intervention students and 12 control students completed the self-assessment and QIKAT. At baseline, there was no difference between groups in self-reported prior exposure to QI principles. Students in the intervention group reported more comfort with their skills in QI overall and in 9 of the 12 domains (p<0.05. Additionally, intervention students performed better in each of the three case scenarios (p<0.01. Discussion: A brief QI curriculum for senior medical students results in improved comfort and knowledge with QI principles. The strengths of our curriculum include effective use of classroom time and faculty mentorship with reliance on pre-existing online modules and written resources. Additionally, the curriculum is easily expandable to larger groups of students and transferable to other institutions.

  16. PDCA循环:关于优化成果导向体育课程方案的研究%PDCA Cycle: Study on the Result Optimization-oriented Physical Education Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏俊彪; 程传银; 王庆军

    2016-01-01

    Using literature review, the present paper analyzes the PDCA cycle of result optimization -oriented sports curriculum. Meanwhile, it assesses the curriculum evaluation method by combining empirical and humanity methods. The study holds that the PDCA cycle includes four steps, namely, design of evaluation plan, data collection, operation of original curriculum program and effect verification of revised curriculum program. The four steps form a continuous cycle, thereby ensuring the constant improvement of physical education curriculum program. Our findings include:the PDCA cycle can ensure the achievement of learning objectives in a compre-hensive and consistent way through vertical decomposition of the curriculum objectives. Besides, in order to save time, teachers can combine formal and informal evaluation, make sampling and complete evaluation in the process of evaluation. Teachers can also employ appropriate tools to assess in a comprehensive way students ac-tion, attention, understanding and efforts so that they can give students feedback information, find out students advantages and disadvantages, figure out the reasons way some students are at a disadvantage, and finally put forward hypotheses regarding curriculum improvement and revise the curriculum program.%通过文献资料法,对优化成果导向的体育课程方案的PDCA循环加以分析;同时,采用实证化和人文化相结合的课程评价方法,对课程方案进行评价. 分析认为,PDCA循环包括方案评价计划设计、数据收集、原课程方案实施效果核查与改善后课程方案实施效果验证四个环节,并且它们构成了一个连续不断的循环过程,能够确保体育课程方案得到不断改进. 研究的结论是,PDCA循环通过对课程方案成果目标的纵向分解,确保了学习目标的全面性和衔接性;另外,在评价课程方案的过程中,为了节省时间,教师应借助正式与非正式评价、抽样与完整评价相结合的评

  17. Managing Expectations: Results from Case Studies of US Water Utilities on Preparing for, Coping with, and Adapting to Extreme Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller-Simms, N.; Metchis, K.

    2014-12-01

    Water utilities, reeling from increased impacts of successive extreme events such as floods, droughts, and derechos, are taking a more proactive role in preparing for future incursions. A recent study by Federal and water foundation investigators, reveals how six US water utilities and their regions prepared for, responded to, and coped with recent extreme weather and climate events and the lessons they are using to plan future adaptation and resilience activities. Two case studies will be highlighted. (1) Sonoma County, CA, has had alternating floods and severe droughts. In 2009, this area, home to competing water users, namely, agricultural crops, wineries, tourism, and fisheries faced a three-year drought, accompanied at the end by intense frosts. Competing uses of water threatened the grape harvest, endangered the fish industry and resulted in a series of regulations, and court cases. Five years later, new efforts by partners in the entire watershed have identified mutual opportunities for increased basin sustainability in the face of a changing climate. (2) Washington DC had a derecho in late June 2012, which curtailed water, communications, and power delivery during a record heat spell that impacted hundreds of thousands of residents and lasted over the height of the tourist-intensive July 4th holiday. Lessons from this event were applied three months later in anticipation of an approaching Superstorm Sandy. This study will help other communities in improving their resiliency in the face of future climate extremes. For example, this study revealed that (1) communities are planning with multiple types and occurrences of extreme events which are becoming more severe and frequent and are impacting communities that are expanding into more vulnerable areas and (2) decisions by one sector can not be made in a vacuum and require the scientific, sectoral and citizen communities to work towards sustainable solutions.

  18. Curriculum Mapping. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineaux, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This "Focus On" discusses curriculum mapping, a process that allows educators to align the curriculum both within and across grades and to ensure that the curriculum is in line with school, local, and state standards. It outlines the steps of the curriculum mapping process from planning the mapping initiative to creating and editing curriculum…

  19. Preparation of a multi-isotope plutonium AMS standard and preliminary results of a first inter-lab comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, B.-A.; Dunai, T. J.; Dewald, A.; Heinze, S.; Feuerstein, C.; Strub, E.; Fifield, L. K.; Froehlich, M. B.; Tims, S. G.; Wallner, A.; Christl, M.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation of this work is to establish a new multi-isotope plutonium standard for isotopic ratio measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), since stocks of existing solutions are declining. To this end, certified reference materials (CRMs) of each of the individual isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu and 244Pu were obtained from JRC IRMM (Joint Research Center Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements). These certified reference materials (IRMM-081a, IRMM-083, IRMM-043 and IRMM-042a) were diluted with nitric acid and mixed to obtain a stock standard solution with an isotopic ratio of approximately 1.0:1.0:1.0:0.1 (239Pu:240Pu:242Pu:244Pu). From this stock solution, samples were prepared for measurement of the plutonium isotopic composition by AMS. These samples have been measured in a round-robin exercise between the AMS facilities at CologneAMS, at the ANU Canberra and ETH Zurich to verify the isotopic ratio and to demonstrate the reproducibility of the measurements. The results show good agreement both between the different AMS measurements and with the gravimetrically determined nominal ratios.

  20. Preparation by mandatory E-modules improves learning of practical skills : A quasi-experimental comparison of skill examination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwant, Kelly J.; Custers, Eugene J F M; Jongen-Hermus, Femke J.; Kluijtmans, Manon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Until recently, students at UMC Utrecht Faculty of Medicine prepared for practical skills training sessions by studying recommended literature and making written assignments, which was considered unsatisfactory. Therefore, mandatory e-modules were gradually introduced as substitute for t

  1. Preparation by mandatory E-modules improves learning of practical skills : A quasi-experimental comparison of skill examination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwant, Kelly J.; Custers, Eugene J F M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/137104081; Jongen-Hermus, Femke J.; Kluijtmans, Manon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Until recently, students at UMC Utrecht Faculty of Medicine prepared for practical skills training sessions by studying recommended literature and making written assignments, which was considered unsatisfactory. Therefore, mandatory e-modules were gradually introduced as substitute for t

  2. Preparedness for clinical: evaluation of the core elements of the Clinical Immersion curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbeck, Cynthia; Herrman, Judith; Wade, Gail; Hayes, Evelyn; Voelmeck, Wayne; Cowperthwait, Amy; Norris, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Immersion Model is an innovative baccalaureate nursing curriculum that has demonstrated successful outcomes over the past 10 years. For those intending to adopt the model, individual components in isolation may prove ineffective. This article describes three core components of the curriculum that form the foundation of preparation for the senior-year clinical immersion. Detailed student-centered outcomes evaluation of these critical components is shared. Results of a mixed-methods evaluation, including surveys and focus groups, are presented. Implications of this curricular evaluation and future directions are explored.

  3. A Proficiency-Based Progression Training Curriculum Coupled With a Model Simulator Results in the Acquisition of a Superior Arthroscopic Bankart Skill Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Richard L; Ryu, Richard K N; Pedowitz, Robert A; Beach, William; Burns, Joseph; Dodds, Julie; Field, Larry; Getelman, Mark; Hobgood, Rhett; McIntyre, Louis; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2015-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of proficiency-based progression (PBP) training using simulation both compared with the same training without proficiency requirements and compared with a traditional resident course for learning to perform an arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR). In a prospective, randomized, blinded study, 44 postgraduate year 4 or 5 orthopaedic residents from 21 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved US orthopaedic residency programs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 skills training protocols for learning to perform an ABR: group A, traditional (routine Arthroscopy Association of North America Resident Course) (control, n = 14); group B, simulator (modified curriculum adding a shoulder model simulator) (n = 14); or group C, PBP (PBP plus the simulator) (n = 16). At the completion of training, all subjects performed a 3 suture anchor ABR on a cadaveric shoulder, which was videotaped and scored in blinded fashion with the use of previously validated metrics. The PBP-trained group (group C) made 56% fewer objectively assessed errors than the traditionally trained group (group A) (P = .011) and 41% fewer than group B (P = .049) (both comparisons were statistically significant). The proficiency benchmark was achieved on the final repair by 68.7% of participants in group C compared with 36.7% in group B and 28.6% in group A. When compared with group A, group B participants were 1.4 times, group C participants were 5.5 times, and group C(PBP) participants (who met all intermediate proficiency benchmarks) were 7.5 times as likely to achieve the final proficiency benchmark. A PBP training curriculum and protocol coupled with the use of a shoulder model simulator and previously validated metrics produces a superior arthroscopic Bankart skill set when compared with traditional and simulator-enhanced training methods. Surgical training combining PBP and a simulator is efficient and effective. Patient safety could be improved if

  4. Curriculum Development 101: Lessons Learned from a Curriculum-Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albilehi, Reema; Han, Ju Young; Desmidt, Heather

    2013-01-01

    To better prepare themselves for authentic teaching situations, pre- and in-service teachers should become familiarized with the application of curriculum-development theory in their training programs. The authors will detail how they have become more prepared to face the challenges of course development by outlining their own experience designing…

  5. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  6. Internationalisation of the Sport Management Curriculum : academic and student reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de Donna; Sherry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Internationalisation of the sport industry has resulted in a demand for integration of international perspectives into the sport management higher education curriculum, to produce graduates capable of working within this rapidly developing global industry. Internationalisation of the curriculum can

  7. A UV-Raman spectrometry method for quality control of anticancer preparations: Results after 18 months of implementation in hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardella, Flore; Beck, Morgane; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre; Becker, Guillaume; Boulanger, Coralie; Perello, Laurent; Gairard-Dory, Anne; Gourieux, Bénédicte; Ubeaud-Séquier, Geneviève

    2016-02-29

    In France, chemotherapy preparation units of hospital pharmacy compound cytotoxic infusion bags adapted to each patient. The narrow therapeutic index of these preparations led us to implement qualitative and quantitative control for patients' safety. To this aim, we calibrated an equipment combining UV-vis spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy (QC Prep+) and monitored 14 different molecule-solvent combinations over a 18 months period. This rapid and specific method allowed the qualitative and quantitative analysis of 1 mL sample tests in less than 2 min. On 5742 anticancer preparations, we obtained accepted results with more than 99.4% solvent identification, 99.6% drug identification and only 1.52% of preparations not matching quantitative specifications (±15% of theoretical concentration). This quantitative control enabled us to pinpoint some critical points of production for two of the most common preparations. We thus updated the procedures of reconstitution and preparation, increasing the quality of final product. UV-Raman spectrometry is thus an effective tool to control chemotherapy infusions and to improve good practices of preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of pre-cut corneas from fresh donated whole globes for Descemet's stripping automated keratoplasty: 3-year results at the Central Eye Bank of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Javadi, Fatemeh; Chamani, Tahereh

    2014-09-01

    To describe the technique and the results of the preparation of pre-cut corneas for Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) during a 3-year period at the Central Eye Bank of Iran (CEBI). The method of preparation of pre-cut corneas from donated whole globes at the CEBI is described and the frequency and percentage of pre-cut corneas prepared for DSAEK, between April 2009 and March 2012, are specified. Moreover, post-operative reports are reviewed for any complaints about using pre-cut tissues for DSAEK. Out of the 1,518 donated whole globes appropriate for DSAEK, 1,478 (97.4 %) pre-cut corneas were successfully prepared. The method of preparation failed in 40 (2.6 %) cases. Based on the eye bank post-operative reports, thickness of pre-cut tissues for DSAEK was deemed unacceptable in only 6 (0.4 %) cases prior to surgery; five of these were too thick and one was too thin. Preparation of pre-cut corneas, for DSAEK from donated whole globes, in the CEBI is a safe and easy method, with very good preservation of endothelial cells after the preparation of the pre-cut corneas and reduced risks from corneal manipulation.

  9. Construction of PREMUX and preliminary experimental results, as preparation for the HCPB breeder unit mock-up testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, F., E-mail: francisco.hernandez@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) (Germany); Kolb, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT) (Germany); Annabattula, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras (IITM), Department of Mechanical Engineering (India); Weth, A. von der [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • PREMUX has been constructed as preparation for a future out-of-pile thermo-mechanical qualification of a HCPB breeder unit mock-up. • The rationale and constructive details of PREMUX are reported in this paper. • PREMUX serves as a test rig for the new heater system developed for the HCPB-BU mock-up. • PREMUX will be used as benchmark for the thermal and thermo-mechanical models developed in ANSYS for the pebble beds of the HCPB-BU. • Preliminary results show the functionality of PREMUX and the good agreement of the measured temperatures with the thermal model developed in ANSYS. - Abstract: One of the European blanket designs for ITER is the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket. The core of the HCPB-TBM consists of so-called breeder units (BUs), which encloses beryllium as neutron multiplier and lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) as tritium breeder in form of pebble beds. After the design phase of the HCPB-BU, a non-nuclear thermal and thermo-mechanical qualification program for this device is running at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Before the complex full scale BU testing, a pre-test mock-up experiment (PREMUX) has been constructed, which consists of a slice of the BU containing the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble bed. PREMUX is going to be operated under highly ITER-relevant conditions and has the following goals: (1) as a testing rig of new heater concept based on a matrix of wire heaters, (2) as benchmark for the existing finite element method (FEM) codes used for the thermo-mechanical assessment of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble bed, and (3) in situ measurement of thermal conductivity of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble bed during the tests. This paper describes the construction of PREMUX, its rationale and the experimental campaign planned with the device. Preliminary results testing the algorithm used for the temperature reconstruction of the pebble bed are reported and compared qualitatively with first analyses

  10. South African Curriculum Reform: Education for Active Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Juliana; Arendse, Agnetha

    2016-01-01

    The changing societal context in South Africa (SA) has necessitated curriculum reform to deal with the challenges of education, from apartheid to democracy, with the aim of promoting active citizenship education. The aim of the paper is thus to illuminate to what extent the Grade 11 Life Orientation (LO) curriculum prepares learners for active…

  11. New Math Curriculum Formula for Success: Grades K-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Everyday Mathematics, a new math education curriculum targeted to kindergarten, first grade, and second grade students in Holland. It will be introduced to third and fourth grades in 2008. The curriculum helps prepare pupils for standardized tests; allows for students to work at their own rate; involves parents in helping…

  12. High School Physics Teacher Preparation: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    This report examines teachers' self-assessed preparedness to teach physics, their membership in professional organizations, and where they turn for help when they have questions. Almost every teacher reports feeling at least adequately prepared to teach basic physics knowledge and the application of physics to everyday experience. The smallest…

  13. Graduates from a traditional medical curriculum evaluate the effectiveness of their medical curriculum through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 The University of Liverpool reformed its medical course from a traditional lecture-based course to an integrated PBL curriculum. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. Part of this project has involved gathering retrospective views on the relevance of both types of undergraduate education according to graduates. This paper focuses on the views of traditional Liverpool graduates approximately 6 years after graduation. Methods From February 2006 to June 2006 interviews took place with 46 graduates from the last 2 cohorts to graduate from the traditional Liverpool curriculum. Results The graduates were generally happy with their undergraduate education although they did feel there were some flaws in their curriculum. They felt they had picked up good history and examination skills and were content with their exposure to different specialties on clinical attachments. They were also pleased with their basic science teaching as preparation for postgraduate exams, however many complained about the overload and irrelevance of many lectures in the early years of their course, particular in biochemistry. There were many different views about how they integrated this science teaching into understanding disease processes and many didn't feel it was made relevant to them at the time they learned it. Retrospectively, they felt that they hadn't been clinically well prepared for the role of working as junior doctor, particularly the practical aspects of the job nor had enough exposure to research skills. Although there was little communication skills training in their course they didn't feel they would have benefited from this training as they managed to pick up had the required skills on clinical attachments. Conclusion These interviews offer a historical snapshot of the views of graduates from a traditional course before many courses were reformed. There was some conflict in the interviews about the doctors

  14. Food Technology on the School Curriculum in England: Is It a Curriculum for the Twenty-First Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Marion; Owen-Jackson, Gwyneth

    2015-01-01

    In England, food technology is part of the curriculum for design and technology but the purpose of food technology education is not clear. Over the years, food on the school curriculum has generally been seen as a practical, learning to cook, activity initially for girls to prepare them for domestic employment or housewifery. As society has…

  15. Residents’ perceptions of an integrated longitudinal curriculum: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Lubitz

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This study suggests that an integrated longitudinalized family medicine block training model has the potential to support the principles of a longitudinal integrated competency-based curriculum to effectively prepare residents for family medicine practice.

  16. [Chicano Counselor Training: Curriculum and Beyond Curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon

    The particulars of the evolved curriculum and how the training has evolved around the change-agent concept are stressed in this presentation. The measure of success achieved in attempting to influence the staff and course of studies of the regular guidance department is also emphasized. The curriculum of this counselor training institute has, from…

  17. Curriculum Development: Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    In order for curriculum development to be effective and schools to be successful, teachers must be involved in the development process. An effective curriculum should reflect the philosophy, goals, objectives, learning experiences, instructional resources, and assessments that comprise a specific educational program ("Guide to curriculum…

  18. Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincy, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper, "Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works", is to present some basic curriculum necessities for developing an in-school sexual education program that results in decreasing the number of teenagers initiating sex, thus reducing the number of teen pregnancies and cases of sexually transmitted…

  19. Water Curriculum Evaluation for Educators in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruver, Joshua B.; Smith, Sanford S.; Finley, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented from a formal evaluation of The Pennsylvania Bureau of State Park's Watershed Education (WE) curriculum developed for students in grades 6-12. The primary research objective was to measure the impact the training and subsequent use of the WE curriculum had on teachers' behavior, confidence, and self-efficacy in teaching about…

  20. Nutrition Education Today. A Curriculum Development Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    Nutrition Education Today is a state-funded curriculum project that addresses the behavioral aspects of nutrition as well as the nutritional knowledge of secondary school students in California. The curriculum design for the Nutrition Education Today project is a result of the efforts of a statewide task force of specialists in the area of…

  1. An Art Appreciation Curriculum for Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Kim; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week art appreciation curriculum on 17 preschool children's levels of self-esteem, art involvement, and art appreciation. Pre- and postintervention tests demonstrated that, as a result of the curriculum, the children's self-esteem increased and that they displayed greater interest and knowledge of art. (MDM)

  2. Teaching Television: A Curriculum for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaczynski, Wanda; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the adaptation and testing of a curriculum designed to mediate the effects of television. Curriculum included lessons on special effects, violence, commercials, audio and video aspects. Results of the testing indicate that children in kindergarten through second grade made significant gains in their knowledge of how television works. (PD)

  3. Teaching Television: A Curriculum for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaczynski, Wanda; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the adaptation and testing of a curriculum designed to mediate the effects of television. Curriculum included lessons on special effects, violence, commercials, audio and video aspects. Results of the testing indicate that children in kindergarten through second grade made significant gains in their knowledge of how television works. (PD)

  4. An Art Appreciation Curriculum for Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Kim; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week art appreciation curriculum on 17 preschool children's levels of self-esteem, art involvement, and art appreciation. Pre- and postintervention tests demonstrated that, as a result of the curriculum, the children's self-esteem increased and that they displayed greater interest and knowledge of art. (MDM)

  5. Competence, Curriculum, and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nancy S.

    1988-01-01

    Draws upon a case study of a community college program review to examine the application of a competency-based approach to the process of curriculum design. Suggests that competency-based curriculum development shifts the basis for decision making from teacher knowledge to an objectified accounting system of employers and curriculum technicians.…

  6. EDF - Electricite de France. Results 1997. 1997: The enterprise prepares for competition; EDF - Electricite de France. Resultats 1997. 1997: L'entreprise se prepare a la concurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In 1997 the energy production of the French Electricity Company EDF (Electricite de France) reached the value of 457.7 billion kWh, of which 82% is nuclear, 14% hydraulic and 4% classical thermal power. The management of maintenance annual intervention allowed and availability of the nuclear sector of 82.6%. The safety level was also maintained at a high value. The quality of the supplied electricity has been improved continuously: the annual average interruption duration for low voltage supply has been reduced from 1.35 h in 1996 to 1.06 h in 1997. Sale volume in France (369.9 billion kWh) is 0.7% lower than in 1996. EDF remains the first electricity exporter in Europe. The EDF has strengthened in 1997 its international development. FF 4.2 billions have been invested in Europe, Latin America and Asia. A social policy has been developed in favor of employee, particularly, young people acting toward enterprise's development, better management and working time reduction. In the frame of its relation with the state the EDF Company has signed a new contract for the period 1997-2000 which will allow reaching its ambition: becoming a public service of reference in Europe and its promotion as leader in industrial services, in the electric sector of France and on the international market. The results of this first year has confirmed the course adopted. The report contains the following seven chapters: 1. Relations with the state and the evolution of the institutional frame; 2. The financial results and administration; 3. Technical results; 4. Development in France; 5. International development; 6. Social and human resources; 7. Environment.

  7. Development of Science Web-Based Curriculum for Elementary School: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok

    OpenAIRE

    Khuntalee Boriraksontikul; Sitthikorn Sumalee; Wiparat Sangchan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research were to develop and evaluate science web-based curriculum for elementary school: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok. Research for Development method was applied in this study which consisted of 4 stages: preparation of science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum evaluation and teachers development for science web-based unit plans design. The population was science teachers who have taug...

  8. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as a Means for School-Based Science Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Christi L.

    The challenge of school-based science curriculum change and educational reform is often presented to science teachers and departments who are not necessarily prepared for the complexity of considerations that change movements require. The development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) focused on a science department's curriculum change efforts, may provide the necessary tools to foster sustainable school-based curriculum science changes. This research presents a case study of an evolving science department PLC consisting of 10 middle school science teachers from the same middle school and their efforts of school-based science curriculum change. A transformative mixed model case study with qualitative data and deepened by quantitative analysis, was chosen to guide the investigation. Collected data worked to document the essential developmental steps, the occurrence and frequency of the five essential dimensions of successful PLCs, and the influences the science department PLC had on the middle school science department's progression through school-based science curriculum change, and the barriers, struggles and inhibiting actions of the science department PLC. Findings indicated that a science department PLC was unique in that it allowed for a focal science departmental lens of science curriculum change to be applied to the structure and function of the PLC and therefore the process, proceedings, and results were directly aligned to and driven by the science department. The science PLC, while logically difficult to set-up and maintain, became a professional science forum where the middle school science teachers were exposed to new science teaching and learning knowledge, explored new science standards, discussed effects on student science learning, designed and critically analyzed science curriculum change application. Conclusions resulted in the science department PLC as an identified tool providing the ability for science departmental actions to lead to

  9. Integration of evidence based medicine into a medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, H M; Ferwana, M; Al Banyan, E; Al Alwan, I; Hajeer, A H

    2009-09-20

    The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) was established in January 2004. The four-year curriculum was based on the Problem Based Learning (PBL) format and involved the web-based graduate medical program adopted from the University of Sydney, Australia. At KSAU-HS, one additional semester was added to the beginning of this curriculum to prepare the students in English language skills, PBL, Information Technology and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). EBM is part of the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) theme of the medical curriculum and is integrated into each stage of the medical curriculum. These modifications of the University of Sydney curriculum are presented here as a model of EBM integration into a college of medicine curriculum.

  10. Integration of Evidence Based Medicine into a Medical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, H M; Ferwana, M; Al Banyan, E; Al Alwan, I; Hajeer, AH

    2009-01-01

    The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) was established in January 2004. The four-year curriculum was based on the Problem Based Learning (PBL) format and involved the web-based graduate medical program adopted from the University of Sydney, Australia. At KSAU-HS, one additional semester was added to the beginning of this curriculum to prepare the students in English language skills, PBL, Information Technology and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). EBM is part of the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) theme of the medical curriculum and is integrated into each stage of the medical curriculum. These modifications of the University of Sydney curriculum are presented here as a model of EBM integration into a college of medicine curriculum. PMID:20165529

  11. The Coherent Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Thomas

    2005-01-01

    @@ What makes a coherent EFL curriculum? How can curriculum planners avoid a mismatch between policy and pragmatics to produce an effective decision-making process? In The Second Language Curriculum, Johnson describes the coherent curriculum as one in which decision outcomes from the various stages of development are mutually consistent and complementary,and learning outcomes reflect curriculum aims.The achievement of coherence is said to depend crucially in most educational contexts upon the formalisation of decision-making processes and products. This formalisation facilitates consensus among those involved and is a prerequisite for effective evaluation and subsequent renewal (1994: xiii)

  12. Creating Culturally Relevant Holiday Curriculum: A Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Karen; Jones, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes the holiday celebration of Dia de los Muertos at Pacific Oaks Children's School in Los Angeles. Considers the decision to celebrate the holiday, preparation for the celebration, its place in the curriculum, its relationship to Halloween, adult conflicts related to personal religious values, children's misunderstanding of the rituals, and…

  13. Real Estate Curriculum for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert W.

    The Oregon Department of Education has prepared this curriculum guide to assist community college personnel in developing or upgrading real estate programs. This fast-growing field has demanded that community colleges analyze the course content of such programs so that they are relevant to the actual needs of the industry. An Advisory Committee…

  14. Real Estate Curriculum for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert W.

    The Oregon Department of Education has prepared this curriculum guide to assist community college personnel in developing or upgrading real estate programs. This fast-growing field has demanded that community colleges analyze the course content of such programs so that they are relevant to the actual needs of the industry. An Advisory Committee…

  15. Machine Operator Training Program and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, David; And Others

    This curriculum contains materials for use in duplicating the 11-week course for machine operators that was implemented at New Hampshire Vocational-Technical College in Nashua, New Hampshire. Addressed in the course, which is designed to prepare entry-level employees, are the following topics: basic math, blueprint reading, layout tools and…

  16. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  17. MYTHS--LITERATURE CURRICULUM I, STUDENT VERSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KITZHABER, ALBERT

    PRESENTED HERE WAS A STUDY GUIDE FOR STUDENT USE IN A SEVENTH-GRADE LITERATURE CURRICULUM. INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL WAS PRESENTED ON GREEK MYTHS, NORSE MYTHOLOGY, AND AMERICAN INDIAN MYTHOLOGY. STUDY QUESTIONS, SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES, AND A REFERENCE BOOK OF MYTHS WERE PRESENTED. AN ACCOMPANYING GUIDE WAS PREPARED FOR TEACHERS (ED 010 140). (WN)

  18. Technology and Environmental Education: An Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jana M.; Weiser, Brenda

    2005-01-01

    Preparing teacher candidates to integrate technology into their future classrooms effectively requires experience in instructional planning that utilizes technology to enhance student learning. Teacher candidates need to work with curriculum that supports a variety of technologies. Using Project Learning Tree and environmental education (EE),…

  19. Ethical Issues within the Gerontological Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Rose Therese

    This presentation focuses on ethical issues that need to be addressed within the gerontological nursing curriculum for preparing nurses to become change agents and catalysts in the health care of the older population. Ethics and ethical principles are defined, and three ethical principles are discussed: justice; beneficence; and autonomy.…

  20. Creating Culturally Relevant Holiday Curriculum: A Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Karen; Jones, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes the holiday celebration of Dia de los Muertos at Pacific Oaks Children's School in Los Angeles. Considers the decision to celebrate the holiday, preparation for the celebration, its place in the curriculum, its relationship to Halloween, adult conflicts related to personal religious values, children's misunderstanding of the rituals, and…

  1. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  2. A professional curriculum vitae will open career doors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D S

    1999-01-01

    In today's challenging healthcare environment, it is essential for nurse practitioners to be able to describe themselves professionally on paper to compete for practice and academic opportunities. Nurse practitioners are competing with physician assistants as well as physicians for primary and acute care positions. A carefully compiled curriculum vitae will present the individual in the best light possible to help open career doors and enhance chances of success. Preparing a curriculum vitae will serve to highlight relevant professional accomplishments, whatever the setting, toward the fulfillment of professional goals. This article reviews the current professional print and electronic literature on preparing a curriculum vitae to assist the nurse practitioner in developing this vital document.

  3. Clinical results with two different methods of root-end preparation and filling in apical surgery: mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hänni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2010-01-01

    The aim of apical surgery is to hermetically seal the root canal system after root-end resection, thereby enabling periradicular healing. The objective of this nonrandomized prospective clinical study was to report results of 2 different root-end preparation and filling methods, ie, mineral triox...... trioxide aggregate (MTA) and an adhesive resin composite (Retroplast)....

  4. Dependence of sports results on data of physical development, morphofunctional and special power preparedness of weight-lifters at the stage of initial preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Bugaev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the establishment of nature of the interrelation between sports results of weight-lifters and level of their special physical and morphofunctional preparedness. Material & Methods: 48 sportsmen of group of initial preparation of the first year of training were involved to the experiment. The research was conducted on the basis of the chair of weightlifting and boxing of Kharkov state academy of physical culture and CYSS “HTZ”. Results: the correlation between indicators of morphofunctional, high-speed and power and special (competitive preparedness of weight-lifters is revealed at the stage of initial preparation. The conducted research shows that the result of competitive exercises of the sportsmen, specializing in weightlifting at the stage of initial preparation, depends on power and high-speed and power preparedness. Conclusions: it is established that the correlation between results of competitive exercises and jumps uphill from the place, in length from the place, run on 30 m can demonstrate the interrelation of power and high-speed and power preparedness of the sportsmen, specializing in weightlifting at the stage of initial preparation.

  5. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  6. A Delphi study to curriculum modifying through the application of the course objective and competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymoori, Parvaneh; Moshki, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    In order to incorporate new knowledge, skills and emerging concepts from dynamic fields of public health into ongoing courses reform of curriculums sounds necessary. Accordingly, this study was performed to modify health education curriculum of public health undergraduate level. Using Delphi technique, 18 health education lecturers from Tehran, Tabriz, Yazd, Shiraz, Gonabad, Ghazvin, Avhvaz and Kurdistan Universities Medical of Sciences based on their expertize in health education with PhD degree as scientific members, also 5 heads of departments according to working at health deputy for at least more than 5 years were asked during three rounds through panel experts to suggest and rate topics they deemed most important to graduate public health experts and curricula related to the areas of knowledge and skills in health education course. The experts suggested that health enhancing behaviors and reduce health risks, advocate health, behavior change theories and developing a framework are key objects in the curriculum. Much more new topical outlines were related to previous course. Skills rated as important included need assessment and health communication. The most evaluators suggested that adding a practicum unit to two theory units will be helpful. The results from our survey suggested that changes in the course definition including new course objectives, topical outlines, and required skills were deemed important by the lecturers and were appropriately integrated into the health education course curriculum. The new curriculum should be evaluated constantly to seek and provide experiences that will best prepare students to meet challenges as a health educator.

  7. Curriculum, evaluation and the constitution of the teaching subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pereira da Cunha Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes in an articulated manner: a. the Minas Gerais State curriculum – Common Basic Content (CBC, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation – and b. the evaluation guidelines linked to it – Public Education Evaluation System of Minas Gerais (SIMAVE, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation from the understanding that neoliberal practices frame the curriculum and the evaluation within the economy perspective. The analysis approach takes neoliberalism as a government system in the Foucauldian sense, that is, one which produces processes of subjectivation on the teaching population in the State education system in Minas Gerais. Therefore, neoliberalism uses education aiming at preparing the individuals to the market, as an important mechanism of the Human Capital. Following this theoretical-methodological route, we investigated empirically the ongoing changes expressed in the official documents issued by the Minas Gerais State Education Secretariat (mainly those related to the CBC and SIMAVE. The results show the CBC as a proposal which is in tune with the Management Chock of the State Government from 2003 to 2014 which places the education in the State of Minas Gerais under regulating mechanisms of management and results, both in favor of the economy. The conclusion points to the articulation between CBC and SIMAVE acting as managerial and performing market practices through a number of powers and knowledges associated to it, making the curriculum proposal supposedly inseparable from such practices.

  8. Curriculum revision and ICT integration

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova-Pacemska, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we will present the possibilities for revision and development of the curriculum of "Math Teaching Methods" related to Child-centered methodology and ICT integration. This paper is a result of the projects: "Teacher, Technology and young learners" and "Child-centered methodology" supported by USAID and World Learning.

  9. Lessons from Star Trek: Engaging Academic Staff in the Internationalisation of the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsed, Craig; Green, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    One consequence of globalisation is the demand on academics to better prepare students for work and life in an interconnected world through curriculum internationalisation. Many academics are hesitant, resistant, or ill-prepared to engage with curriculum internationalisation. This paper explores how this can be addressed by reconfiguring the way…

  10. School Curriculum Committee: Its Role In Curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Education and Sciences ... smooth relationship among staff members, and to participate in decision making process related to curriculum. Except secondary school principals, supervisors, students parents, and community ...

  11. How well do we prepare pediatric radiologists regarding child abuse? Results of a survey of recently trained fellows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Debra J.; Lonergan, Gael J. [Austin Radiological Association, 6101 West Courtyard Drive, Bldg. 5, TX 78730, Austin (United States); Mendelson, Kenneth L. [South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, Massachusetts (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric radiologists serve an important role in the radiologic diagnosis, investigation, and in legal proceedings in cases of child abuse. The Society for Pediatric Radiology should evaluate and insure the adequacy of training of pediatric radiologists for this important role. The Society for Pediatric Radiology Committee on Child Abuse, 2002, conducted a 24-question survey to evaluate the scope and perceived adequacy of training received by pediatric radiology fellows regarding the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse and the associated legal process. Eighty-four surveys were mailed to radiologists who had completed a year in pediatric radiology fellowship training during the years 1999 and 2000. There were 33 surveys returned for an overall response of 39%. Respondents' perception of adequacy of training was best for the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse. The majority perceived they were not well trained in the investigative and legal processes regarding child abuse. The majority would welcome standardized training. Current pediatric radiology training programs do not sufficiently prepare pediatric radiologists for their role in the legal system regarding child abuse. A standardized program to train pediatric radiologists about the imaging diagnosis of child abuse and their role in the legal system is recommended. (orig.)

  12. Preparing Public Relations and Advertising Students for the 21st Century: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Robert A.

    In 1993, the Task Force on Integrated Communications reported that public relations and advertising students would better be prepared to enter a changing communications industry through an "integrated" curriculum. This paper is a case study of how one university has attempted to meet that challenge. The work has resulted in the development of an…

  13. Overview of the Visual Arts Curriculum, and Its Relationship with Evaluation and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imonikebe, Manasseh Emamoke

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation and instruction play very important roles in curriculum implementation. As a result, the two concepts are often enshrined in the curriculum document. This article therefore examined the Visual Arts curriculum and its relationship with evaluation and instruction. Furthermore, the roles of Evaluation and Instruction in curriculum planning…

  14. Orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders: a curriculum proposal for postgraduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Charles S; Stockstill, John; Rinchuse, Donald; Kandasamy, Sanjivan

    2012-07-01

    In a previous article, we reported the results of a survey of American and Canadian orthodontic postgraduate programs to determine how the topics of occlusion, temporomandibular joint, and temporomandibular disorders were currently being taught. Based on the finding of considerable diversity among those programs, we decided to write a curriculum proposal for temporomandibular disorders that would be compatible with and satisfy the current curriculum guidelines for postgraduate orthodontic programs. These guidelines arose from a combination of the requirements published by the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation and the written guide (July 2010) of the American Board of Orthodontics for the its clinical examination. The proposed curriculum, based on the latest scientific evidence in the temporomandibular disorder field, gives program directors a template for covering these subjects thoroughly. At the same time, they can focus on related orthodontic issues, so that their future graduates will be prepared to deal with patients who either have or later develop temporomandibular disorder problems. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mid-Level Healthcare Personnel Training: An Evaluation of the Revised, Nationally-Standardized, Pre-Service Curriculum for Clinical Officers in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldacker, Caryl; Chicumbe, Sergio; Dgedge, Martinho; Augusto, Gerito; Cesar, Freide; Robertson, Molly; Mbofana, Francisco; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG)), in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009–2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH) and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH), University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1) if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2) do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum? Methods T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the pcurriculum, respectively. Mean scores at graduation of initial curriculum TMGs were 56.7%, 63.5%, and 49.1% on the clinical cases, knowledge test, and physical exam, respectively. Scores did not differ significantly from TMGs in the revised curriculum. Results from linear regression models find that training institute was the most significant predictor of TMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam. Conclusion TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may result in improvements in TMG capacity and patient care over time. PMID:25068590

  16. Latest LHCf results and preparation to the LHC run for 13 TeV proton–proton interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonechi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment is a CERN experiment dedicated to forward physics which is optimized to measure the neutral particle flow at extreme pseudo-rapidity values, ranging from 8.4 up to infinity. LHCf results are extremely important for the calibration of the hadronic interaction models used for the study of the development of atmospheric showers in the Earth atmosphere. Starting from the recent run of proton-Lead nucleus interactions at LHC, the LHCf and ATLAS collaborations have performed a common data taking which allows a combined study of the central and forward regions of the interaction. The latest results of LHCf, the upgrade of the detectors for the next 6.5 TeV + 6.5 TeV proton–proton run and the status of the LHCf-ATLAS common activities are summarized in this paper.

  17. Plasma rich in growth factors: preliminary results of use in the preparation of future sites for implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, E

    1999-01-01

    This article presents preliminary clinical evidence of the beneficial effect of the use of plasma rich in growth factors of autologous origin. The plasma is obtained from the individual patient by plasmapheresis. The macroscopic and microscopic results obtained with bone regeneration using this technique, which uses no membrane or barrier, can be observed. The incorporation of these concepts can introduce several advantages, including the enhancement and acceleration of bone regeneration and more rapid and predictable soft tissue healing.

  18. Household Arts: A Curriculum Guide. Professional Series 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle, Roena J.

    Presented is a curriculum guide on household arts developed as part of the Adjustment Training Program of the Greater Pittsburgh Guild for the Blind. Objectives and learning experiences are described for the following seven units: orientation in the kitchen, basic food preparation, advanced food preparation, laundry, housekeeping, basic sewing,…

  19. Undergraduate pharmacology curriculum at an international medical college in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Vasudha; Bhat, Vishal; Shenoy, Ganesh K

    2016-10-01

    Pharmacology is an important aspect of rational therapeutics. There has been a long-standing need for a change in the undergraduate medical curriculum of pharmacology. A review of literature throws up different approaches to improve the curriculum and to provide more importance to conceptualization and relevance to clinical practice. This article describes the undergraduate pharmacology curriculum which is revised to meet the needs of our unique status as an international medical college in India. We highlight how our curriculum prepares the students for future clinical practice by inculcating higher cognitive skills and soft skills. This article also provides a model for program evaluation and also challenges faced by our department while executing the planned curriculum.

  20. Undergraduate pharmacology curriculum at an international medical college in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Vasudha; Bhat, Vishal; Shenoy, Ganesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacology is an important aspect of rational therapeutics. There has been a long-standing need for a change in the undergraduate medical curriculum of pharmacology. A review of literature throws up different approaches to improve the curriculum and to provide more importance to conceptualization and relevance to clinical practice. This article describes the undergraduate pharmacology curriculum which is revised to meet the needs of our unique status as an international medical college in India. We highlight how our curriculum prepares the students for future clinical practice by inculcating higher cognitive skills and soft skills. This article also provides a model for program evaluation and also challenges faced by our department while executing the planned curriculum. PMID:28031601

  1. Marketing Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide a common core of competencies from which to design an effective secondary marketing education program. Introductory materials include a definition of marketing education, objectives, outline of instructional content, and questions and answers regarding the curriculum guide. These practical materials are…

  2. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  3. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities designed for specific curriculum units. Curriculum areas represented include reading and language arts (proverbs and fables, letters of the alphabet, and biographies); science (the study of Gregor Mendel and genetics, oil resources); and social studies (global awareness). (LRW)

  4. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  5. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  6. A Comparative Study of Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events Following Use of Common Bowel Preparations Among a Colonoscopy Screening Population: Results from a Post-Marketing Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassopoulos, Kathryn; Farraye, Francis A; Knight, Tyler; Colman, Sam; Cleveland, Mark vB; Pelham, Russell W

    2016-10-01

    Colonoscopy may be one of the most frequent elective procedures in older adults and is associated with a low occurrence of complications. However, reduction of risks attributable to the bowel preparation may be achieved with the use of effective and safer products. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) associated with SUPREP(®) [oral sulfate solution (OSS)] and other common prescription bowel preparations (non-OSS). This real-world, observational study used de-identified health insurance claims and laboratory results to identify TEAEs in the 3 months following screening colonoscopy in adults with a prescription for a bowel preparation in the prior 60 days. The unadjusted and adjusted (controlling for patient risk factors) cumulative incidences of TEAEs were estimated using Kaplan-Meier and Poisson regression, respectively. Among patients ≥45 years, the overall cumulative incidence was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in the OSS cohort than in the non-OSS cohort (unadjusted: 2.31 vs. 2.89 %; adjusted: 1.61 vs. 1.95 %), with significantly lower acute cardiac conditions (1.56 vs. 1.90 %; p < 0.001), renal failure/other serious renal diseases (OSS: 0.21 %, non-OSS: 0.32 %; p < 0.001), and serum electrolyte abnormalities (OSS: 0.39 %, non-OSS: 0.49 %; p = 0.017). There were no significant differences between cohorts in death, seizure disorders, aggravation of gout, and ischemic colitis. Results were similar in the adjusted cumulative incidences. In actual use, the overall cumulative incidence of TEAEs was significantly lower in the OSS cohort, demonstrating that OSS is as safe as, or possibly safer than, non-OSS prescription bowel preparations.

  7. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  8. 工作过程导向课程体系开发对药物制剂专业建设的启示%Implications of Work Process-oriented Curriculum System Development for Pharmaceutical Preparations Professional Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晟盛

    2014-01-01

    自以工作过程为导向的职业教育理论被引入我国以来,以此为理论依据的课程体系开发被诸多职业院校采用和尝试实施。本文借鉴了两所职业学校工作过程导向课程体系开发的实践案例,研究其一般特点和过程,并以此为依据探索中职药物制剂专业课程体系的建设思路。%Since the theory of vocational education to the process-oriented work was introduced into China in order to de-velop a theoretical basis for the curriculum system is adopted many vocational schools and try to implement. This paper draws on the practical case of two vocational schools work process-oriented curriculum system developed to study the general char-acteristics and processes, and as a basis to explore the construction of a pharmaceutical formulation vocational curriculum system of thought.

  9. Precision of the reportable result. Simultaneous optimisation of number of preparations and injections for sample and reference standard in quantitative liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, J; Agut, C

    2014-08-01

    In pharmaceutical analysis, the precision of the reportable result, i.e. the result which is to be compared to the specification limit, is relevant for the evaluation of the suitability of the analytical procedure. But also for other applications, the precision of the result is important and an optimisation often of interest. However, increasing the number of determinations (e.g. injections or preparations) will reduce only the variability (or standard error) of the corresponding precision level. Therefore, the knowledge of the individual variance contributions, obtained from reliable precision studies is important to determine on a scientific basis which format of the (reportable) result, i.e. the number of injections and sample preparations (or even series), should be used. In case of relative analytical procedures such as LC, the calibration model and format, i.e. the number of determinations of the reference standard is one of the factors (besides instrument, operator, reagents, etc.) affecting the between-series variance contribution at intermediate precision/reproducibility level. Consequently, the precision of the reportable result is only valid for the calibration format used to obtain intermediate precision/reproducibility. Instead of repeating the whole precision study to optimize the calibration format, the present paper describes a statistical approach using variability results from the original precision study.

  10. Nurse Educator Pathway Project: a competency-based intersectoral curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynne; Frost, Linda J; Bigl, Julie; Clauson, Marion; McRae, Cora; Scarborough, Kathy S; Murphy, Sue; Jillings, Carol; Gillespie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the Educator Pathway Project (EPP), an education infrastructure that was developed in response to emerging critical nursing workplace issues, and the related demand for enhanced workplace education. We then describe the EPP competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nurses as preceptors, mentors, and educators to lead learning with diverse learner groups. This competency-based curriculum was developed through a collaboration of nurse leaders across practice, academic, and union sectors and drew from a widely embraced curriculum development model (Iwasiw, Goldenberg, & Andrusyzyn, 2005). The goal of the curriculum was to prepare nurses through a four-level career pathway model that contextualized practice and education theory to various education-related roles and levels of experience within the practice setting. Over 1,100 nurses participated in this innovative intersectoral nursing initiative.

  11. Topical use of a silymarin-based preparation to prevent radiodermatitis. Results of a prospective study in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker-Schiebe, Martina; Hoffmann, Wolfgang [Klinikum Braunschweig (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Mengs, Ulrich; Schaefer, Margitta [Rottapharm/Madaus, Koeln (Germany). Research and Development; Bulitta, Michael [CRM Biometrics GmbH, Rheinbach (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    More than 80% of patients with breast cancer undergoing postsurgical radiotherapy (RT) will develop radiodermatitis and approximately 10% of these patients show grade 3 lesions. Side effects may reduce the patient's compliance and can be limiting factors to follow RT protocols. Therefore, there is a high need for more effective prophylactic treatments. In this study, a silymarin-based cream (Leviaderm {sup registered}) was tested in comparison to our standard of care (SOC) at the involved site. A total of 101 patients were evaluated after breast-conserving surgery followed by RT with 50.4 Gy plus boost 9-16 Gy. Of these, 51 patients were treated with the silymarin-based cream. In addition, 50 patients were documented receiving a panthenol-containing cream interventionally, if local skin lesions occurred. The acute skin reactions were classified according to the RTOG and VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) scores. The median time to toxicity was prolonged significantly with silymarin-based cream (45 vs. 29 days (SOC), p < 0.0001). Only 9.8% of patients using silymarin-based cream showed grade 2 toxicity in week 5 of RT in comparison to 52% with SOC. At the end of RT, 23.5% of patients in the silymarin-based study group developed no skin reactions vs. 2% with SOC, while grade 3 toxicity occurred only in 2% in the silymarin-based arm compared to 28% (SOC). Silymarin-based cream Leviaderm {sup registered} may be a promising and effective treatment for the prevention of acute skin lesions caused by RT of breast cancer patients. To confirm the results of this nonrandomized, observational trial, this component should be tested in larger multicenter studies in this setting. (orig.)

  12. Preparing for severe contrast media reactions in children - results of a national survey, a literature review and a suggested protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, R., E-mail: rwklindsay@hotmail.co [Imaging Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Paterson, A. [Radiology Department, The Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Edgar, D. [Immunology Department, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To identify current practices within paediatric radiology in the UK with regard to the use of prophylactic medication, prior to administering intravenous (IV) radiocontrast medium (RCM). In addition, the pre-injection risk management strategies of the departments questioned was to be evaluated, and using consensus opinion, a protocol for managing patients identified as being at high risk for an adverse reaction to RCM was to be outlined. Materials and methods: An online survey of paediatric radiology consultants representing all geographic regions of the UK was carried out. The questions asked included an assessment of the risk factors for adverse reactions to RCM, and how such reactions are anticipated and managed. The questionnaire asked about the perceived indications for, and the use of prophylactic medication prior to RCM administration. Results: A response rate of 51% was achieved. The majority of respondents felt that a history of previous RCM reaction was an indication to administer prophylactic drugs prior to a further dose of RCM. No other risk factor was believed to require prophylactic medication. Conclusion: Using information obtained from the survey, a literature search was performed to assess the evidence available in support of each practice. A protocol was devised to identify children at risk of an adverse reaction to RCM, and guide the use of prophylactic medication in this group of patients. The survey highlighted considerable variability in the risk-assessment and management practices within paediatric radiology in the UK. The derived protocol may guide radiologists' management of children at risk for an RCM reaction.

  13. Changes in Descriptions on Prevention of Lifestyle-related Diseases in New Curriculum Guidelines for Elementary and Junior High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    本田, 藍; 中村, 修; 片渕, 結子

    2010-01-01

    We did this research to verify descriptions of lifestyle-related diseases by comparing the new curriculum guidelines with the current curriculum guidelines. We compared the contents of descriptions between the current curriculum guidelines and the new curriculum guidelines for elementary and junior high schools by extracting passages related to “lifestyle-related diseases” in “2. Goals and contents for respective grades” and “3. Preparation of an instruction plan and handling of content” from...

  14. Using an Innovative Curriculum Evaluation Tool to Inform Program Improvement: The Clinical Skills Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P.; Whicker, Shari A.; Staples, Betty B.; Bookman, Jack; Bartlett, Kathleen W.; McGann, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Program evaluation is important for assessing the effectiveness of the residency curriculum. Limited resources are available, however, and curriculum evaluation processes must be sustainable and well integrated into program improvement efforts. Intervention We describe the pediatric Clinical Skills Fair, an innovative method for evaluating the effectiveness of residency curriculum through assessment of trainees in 2 domains: medical knowledge/patient care and procedure. Each year from 2008 to 2011, interns completed the Clinical Skills Fair as rising interns in postgraduate year (PGY)-1 (R1s) and again at the end of the year, as rising residents in PGY-2 (R2s). Trainees completed the Clinical Skills Fair at the beginning and end of the intern year for each cohort to assess how well the curriculum prepared them to meet the intern goals and objectives. Results Participants were 48 R1s and 47 R2s. In the medical knowledge/patient care domain, intern scores improved from 48% to 65% correct (P < .001). Significant improvement was demonstrated in the following subdomains: jaundice (41% to 65% correct; P < .001), fever (67% to 94% correct; P < .001), and asthma (43% to 62% correct; P  =  .002). No significant change was noted within the arrhythmia subdomain. There was significant improvement in the procedure domain for all interns (χ2  =  32.82, P < .001). Conclusions The Clinical Skills Fair is a readily implemented and sustainable method for our residency program curriculum assessment. Its feasibility may allow other programs to assess their curriculum and track the impact of programmatic changes; it may be particularly useful for program evaluation committees. PMID:24701324

  15. Curriculum Research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardekker, W.L.; Volman, M.L.L.; Terwel, J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter examines the curriculum research in the Netherlands. The conditions influencing the curriculum field are described, along with the struggle for a common curriculum in the Netherlands. The waves of curriculum theory are presented and illustrated by the case of mathematics. Finally, the r

  16. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  17. Classroom-Level Curriculum Development: EFL Teachers as Curriculum-Developers, Curriculum-Makers and Curriculum-Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore teacher curriculum approaches and the strategies attached to each approach because they influence the taught curriculum, teacher development and student learning. The study was therefore grounded in teacher curriculum development, curriculum implementation, teacher development, student cognitive and…

  18. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  19. Classroom-Level Curriculum Development: EFL Teachers as Curriculum-Developers, Curriculum-Makers and Curriculum-Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore teacher curriculum approaches and the strategies attached to each approach because they influence the taught curriculum, teacher development and student learning. The study was therefore grounded in teacher curriculum development, curriculum implementation, teacher development, student cognitive and…

  20. Meaning from curriculum analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Menahem; Mackeracher, Dorothy

    This paper reports on the analysis of science curricula carried out across Canada within the framework of the Second International Science Study (SISS). The organization of Canadian education in twelve autonomous educational jurisdictions is briefly described and problems are noted in relation to the analysis of curricula on a national scale. The international design for curriculum analysis is discussed and an alternative design, more suited to the diversity of science education in Canada, is introduced. The analysis of curriculum documents is described and three patterns which emerge from this analysis are identified. These derive from the concepts of commonality, specificity and prescriptiveness. Commonality relates to topics listed in curriculum guideline documents by a number of jurisdictions. Specificity refers to the richness of curriculum documents. Prescriptiveness is a measure of the extent to which jurisdictions do or do not make provision for local options in curriculum design. The Canadian analysis, using the concepts of the common curriculum, specificity and prescriptiveness, is described and research procedures are exemplified. Outcomes of curriculum analysis are presented in graphical form.

  1. Neutron-capture therapy of human cancer: in vitro results on the preparation of boron-labeled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Mizusawa, E; Dahlman, H L; Bennett, S. J.; Goldenberg, D M; Hawthorne, M F

    1982-01-01

    Two samples of 2-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-[1-3H]dodecaborane(12) were prepared by treating 1-lithio-2-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12) with 3H2O (0.1 and 5.0 Ci/ml, respectively). These tritiated phenylcarborane samples were subsequently converted to corresponding samples of p-[1,2-dicarba-closo-[1-3H]dodecaboran(12)-2-yl]benzenediazonium ion ([3H]DBD) suitable for azo-coupling reactions. Reaction of the two tritiated diazonium ion samples with 2-napthol resulted in the formation of ...

  2. Curriculum, Classroom, Culture and Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rawe, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum and pedagogy are central to many contemporary debates on fostering a successful student experience, particularly in a massified higher education sector. These themes are evident in discussions from policy level to the staffroom in many countries. Attention has been specifically directed at the transition point from ‘second level’ to ‘higher/third level’ education, resulting in the development of many initiatives and materials around the ‘first year experience’ (‘FYE’). Central prin...

  3. Curriculum, Classroom, Culture and Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rawe, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum and pedagogy are central to many contemporary debates on fostering a successful student experience, particularly in a massified higher education sector. These themes are evident in discussions from policy level to the staffroom in many countries. Attention has been specifically directed at the transition point from ‘second level’ to ‘higher/third level’ education, resulting in the development of many initiatives and materials around the ‘first year experience’ (‘FYE’). Central prin...

  4. Problems and issues in implementing innovative curriculum in the developing countries: the Pakistani experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syeda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Government of Pakistan identified 4 medical Colleges for introduction of COME, one from each province. Curriculum was prepared by the faculty of these colleges and launched in 2001 and despite concerted efforts could not be implemented. The purpose of this research was to identify the reasons for delay in implementation of the COME curriculum and to assess the understanding of the stakeholders about COME. Methods Mixed methods study design was used for data collection. In-depth interviews, mail-in survey questionnaire, and focus group discussions were held with the representatives of federal and provincial governments, Principals of medical colleges, faculty and students of the designated colleges. Rigor was ensured through independent coding and triangulation of data. Results The reasons for delay in implementation differed amongst the policy makers and faculty and included thematic issues at the institutional, programmatic and curricular level. Majority (92% of the faculty felt that COME curriculum couldn’t be implemented without adequate infrastructure. The administrators were willing to provide financial assistance, political support and better coordination and felt that COME could improve the overall health system of the country whereas the faculty did not agree to it. Conclusion The paper discusses the reasons of delay based on findings and identifies the strategies for curriculum change in established institutions. The key issues identified in our study included frequent transfer of faculty of the designated colleges and perceived lack of: · Continuation at the policy making level · Communication between the stakeholders · Effective leadership

  5. Curriculum Guidelines for Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines describe the interrelationships of this and other dental fields, give an overview of the curriculum and its primary educational objectives, and outline the suggested prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, and faculty requirements. (MSE)

  6. Internationalisation of the Sport Management Curriculum : academic and student reflections

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan,; Sherry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Internationalisation of the sport industry has resulted in a demand for integration of international perspectives into the sport management higher education curriculum, to produce graduates capable of working within this rapidly developing global industry. Internationalisation of the curriculum can occur both abroad (i.e., study tour) or at home (i.e., within institution). A collaborative internationalisation at home (IaH) sport management curriculum research project was undertaken between th...

  7. Developing your own curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, N.; Barlex, D

    2007-01-01

    This chapter will explore the processes by which a newly qualified teacher can make a contribution to the design & technology curriculum. It is in six parts. First the chapter will consider the classroom conditions a teacher must create if his or her teaching is to be successful. Second we will explore four key features that determine the success of a subject in the curriculum. Third we will investigate how a newly qualified teacher might develop and articulate their vision for the subject. F...

  8. Standards for Art Teacher Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Carole; Banks, Sam; Day, Michael; Dunn, Phil; Fergus, Victoria; Foster, Mary Sue; Galbraith, Lynn; Hatfield, Thomas A.; Hansen, Mark; Young, Bernard

    Colleges and universities engaged in the preparation of art teachers address a broad range of issues. Questions concerning specific education requirements leading to certification, approaches to curriculum development and assessment, opportunities for clinical experiences, and exposure to teaching methodologies and classroom management strategies…

  9. A Shadow Curriculum: Incorporating Students' Interests into the Formal Biology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagay, Galit; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2011-11-01

    Students have been largely ignored in discussions about how best to teach science, and many students feel the curriculum is detached from their lives and interests. This article presents a strategy for incorporating students' interests into the formal Biology curriculum, by drawing on the political meaning of "shadow government" as alternative policies developed by parties not in office. A "shadow curriculum" thus reflects the interests and information needs of those who have no voice in deciding what the formal curriculum should include, although they are the ones who are most influenced by it. High school students' interests in three Biology topics were identified ( n = 343) and retested on another student sample ( n = 375), based on their solicited questions as indicators for interests. The results of this exploratory case study showed that half of the questions asked by students in the areas of genetics, the cardiovascular system and the reproductive system are not addressed by the national curriculum. Students' questions were then expressed in the curricular language of principles, phenomena and concepts in order to create a shadow curriculum. A procedure that could be used by other researchers and practitioners to guide the development of a curriculum that is more aligned with student interests is suggested.

  10. Implementation of school-based curriculum as perceived by secondary school teachers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuzaimah D. Diem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about Curriculum 2013 has seemed to make many EFL teachers feel anxious. This anxiety is assumed to happen due to the unwillingness of the teachers to implement the new curriculum because they have not yet even implemented the previous curriculum (KTSP in their classrooms optimally. This study was aimed primarily at investigating the implementation of KTSP covering three important components: preparation, application, and evaluation by 107 secondary school teachers of English. To collect the data, “KTSP Implementation Questionnaire” was used. The data collected based on the teachers’ own perceptions were analyzed in relation to their education level, teaching experience, certification status, and KTSP socialization involvement. The results showed that (1 62% teachers confessed that they had not yet optimally implemented KTSP although all of them had been involved in its dissemination program done by the government; (2 there was no correlation between either education level or teaching experience and the implementation of KTSP. However, (3 there was a significant correlation between teachers’ certification status and their (i KTSP preparation, (ii teaching experience, and (iii involvement in dissemination program activities.

  11. Embracing a competency-based specialty curriculum for community-based nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Pamela F; Swider, Susan M; Breakwell, Susan; Cowell, Julia M; Reising, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The Quad Council competencies for public health nursing (PHN) provide guidance in developing curricula at both the generalist and specialist level. However, these competencies are based on nursing roles in traditional public health agencies and community/public health is defined more broadly than official agency practice. The question arises as to whether community-based specialties require largely the same knowledge and skill set as PHN. The purpose of the competency cross-mapping project reported here was to (a) assess the intersection of the Quad Council competencies with four community-based specialties and (b) ensure the appropriateness of a Quad Council-based curriculum to prepare graduates across these four specialties (home health, occupational health, environmental health, and school nursing). This article details the multistep cross-mapping process, including validation with practice leaders. Results indicate strong alignment of community-based specialty competencies with Quad Council competencies. Community-based specialty-specific content that did not align well is identified, along with examples of didactic and clinical strategies to address gaps. This work indicates that a Quad Council-based curriculum is appropriate to prepare graduates in community-based specialties when attention to the specialty-specific competencies in the clinical setting is included. This work guides the development of a doctorate of nursing practice curriculum in PHN, encompassing the four additional community-based specialties.

  12. Curriculum revision: reaching faculty consensus through the Nominal Group Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D C; Rhodes, R; Baker, A S

    1998-10-01

    A fundamental concept to initiate change in the curriculum revision process is to overcome resistance to change and the boundaries of self-interest. Curriculum change cannot occur without an "unfreezing" of faculty values and interests. The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) was used to facilitate faculty identification of areas needing change in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. The process led to the generation of numerous independent ideas in which all faculty participated. The revised curriculum which resulted from the NGT process has had full and enthusiastic support of the faculty.

  13. Midwifery participatory curriculum development: Transformation through active partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, Mary; Walters, Caroline; Chipperfield, Janine; Gamble, Jenny

    2017-07-01

    Evolving knowledge and professional practice combined with advances in pedagogy and learning technology create challenges for accredited professional programs. Internationally a sparsity of literature exists around curriculum development for professional programs responsive to regulatory and societal drivers. This paper evaluates a participatory curriculum development framework, adapted from the community development sector, to determine its applicability to promote engagement and ownership during the development of a Bachelor of Midwifery curriculum at an Australian University. The structures, processes and resulting curriculum development framework are described. A representative sample of key curriculum development team members were interviewed in relation to their participation. Qualitative analysis of transcribed interviews occurred through inductive, essentialist thematic analysis. Two main themes emerged: (1) 'it is a transformative journey' and (2) focused 'partnership in action'. Results confirmed the participatory curriculum development process provides symbiotic benefits to participants leading to individual and organisational growth and the perception of a shared curriculum. A final operational model using a participatory curriculum development process to guide the development of accredited health programs emerged. The model provides an appropriate structure to create meaningful collaboration with multiple stakeholders to produce a curriculum that is contemporary, underpinned by evidence and reflective of 'real world' practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Internationalizing the Curriculum: The Implementation Experience in a Faculty of Business and Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosling, Glenda; Edwards, Ron; Schroder, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Curriculum internationalization is a strategy adopted by many universities as they prepare their graduates for employment in the global economy. This paper is a case study of the organizational change involved in one institution's (Monash University, Melbourne, Australia) attempts to implement curriculum internationalization in the foundation…

  15. Embedding International Experiences in Business Curriculum Design: Cultivating a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Jeffry; Womble, Lynsee A.; De'Armond, De'Arno

    2013-01-01

    In business education, the impacts of the globalization of markets, financial institutions, and economies exert increasing influence on the curriculum in business schools. Schools of business recognize the need to embed international experiences into their curriculum in order to prepare students for global context of the marketplace. Often,…

  16. Competency-Based Curriculum: An Effective Approach to Digital Curation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-01-01

    The University of North Texas conducted a project involving rigorous curriculum development and instructional design to address the goal of building capacity in the Library and Information Sciences curriculum. To prepare information professionals with the competencies needed for digital curation and data management practice, the project developed…

  17. Electromagnetic Spectrum. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide, the second in a set of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on the electromagnetic spectrum prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for…

  18. Attitudes of Teachers and Students towards Art and Design Curriculum: Implications for Vocational Education in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagah, M. O.; Indoshi, F. C.; Agak, J. O.

    2009-01-01

    Art and Design Curriculum taught in secondary schools in Kenya is intended not only to prepare learners for a vocation in Art and Design industry but also to complement literacy, scientific and factual subjects by awakening creativity in the individual. It is part of the government policy of diversification and vocationalization of the curriculum.…

  19. Competency-Based Curriculum: An Effective Approach to Digital Curation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-01-01

    The University of North Texas conducted a project involving rigorous curriculum development and instructional design to address the goal of building capacity in the Library and Information Sciences curriculum. To prepare information professionals with the competencies needed for digital curation and data management practice, the project developed…

  20. Explore-create-share study: An evaluation of teachers as curriculum innovators in engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ayora

    included twenty-six teachers and data was collected pre-, mid-, and post-program using teacher surveys and a curriculum analysis instrument. The second study evaluated teachers' perceptions of the ECS model as a curriculum authoring tool and the quality of the curriculum units they developed. The study included sixty-two participants and data was collected post-program using teacher surveys and a curriculum analysis instrument. The third study evaluated teachers' experiences implementing ECS units in the classroom with a focus on identifying the benefits, challenges and solutions associated with project-based engineering in the classroom. The study included thirty-one participants and data was collected using an open-ended survey instrument after teachers completed implementation of the ECS curriculum unit. Results of these three studies indicate that teachers can be prepared to integrate engineering in the classroom using a CDB professional development model. Teachers reported an increase in engineering content knowledge, improved their self-efficacy in curriculum planning, and developed high quality instructional units that were aligned to engineering design practices and STEM educational standards. The ECS instructional model was acknowledged as a valuable tool for developing and implementing engineering education in the classroom. Teachers reported that ECS curriculum design aligned with their teaching goals, provided a framework to integrate engineering with other subject-area concepts, and incorporated innovative teaching strategies. After implementing ECS units in the classroom, teachers reported that the ECS model engaged students in engineering design challenges that were situated in a real world context and required the application of interdisciplinary content knowledge and skills. Teachers also reported a number of challenges related to scheduling, content alignment, and access to resources. In the face of these obstacles, teachers presented a number of

  1. Cultural competence in the baccalaureate degree nursing curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Angela

    Health care providers are members of a helping profession and need to provide quality care to all members of society. As a result of current and projected demographic changes within the United States (U.S.), health care professionals are faced with the challenges of providing culturally competent care and fulfilling the role as the "helping profession." In the past 10 years, minority populations have increased in the U.S. For example, the African American population experienced an approximate 12.3% increase, and the Hispanic population increased by 43%. Just as it is necessary for health care professionals to respond to the increase in the geriatric population as a result of the Baby Boomer generation, it is crucial to address the needs of an increasingly culturally diverse population in the U.S. Preparing to care for a culturally diverse population begins during the teaching and learning process in the nursing curriculum. This study intended to identify the methods in which nursing programs are integrating cultural concepts in their plan of study. Josepha Campinha-Bacote's model titled "The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Health Care Services" was used as the theoretical framework to guide this study. Campinha-Bacote has studied transcultural nursing and has added to the current body of nursing knowledge with regard to incorporating cultural concepts in the nursing curriculum. This model requires health care professionals to see themselves as becoming culturally competent rather than being culturally competent and involves the integration of cultural awareness, cultural skill, cultural knowledge, cultural encounters, and cultural desire. An electronic survey was sent using Survey Monkey to 298 schools in the Northeast and Southern regions of the United States. The survey was sent on January 19, 2012 and remained open for 20 days. Once the survey closed, statistical analyses were conducted using frequencies and cross-tabluations, and the findings

  2. Solution preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results.

  3. Some Possible Effects of World War II on the Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Murry R.

    1986-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of professional literature, curriculum guides, textbook advertisements, and newspaper articles from World War II era in order to assess response of social studies educators to crisis of World War II and effect of the war on the social studies curriculum. Concludes that rapid curriculum change resulted in response to the…

  4. Knowledge and curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šaranović-Božanović Nadežda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper raises the questions as follows: What is knowledge in general? What is it that a student should know? What does it mean that somebody knows something? Those questions point to a volume of dilemmas related to the epistemological issue of the nature of knowledge. Regardless of some authors' views that knowledge has not been defined yet, in the present paper knowledge is a subject matter of analysis from the aspect of various theoretical conceptions. The fact is that curricula development as well as the conception of student cognitive development depends on how knowledge is defined. Also, a question is raised on how beliefs about human thinking affect curricula development and accomplishment. It is all the more important if the basic function of education is considered to be knowledge acquisition and development of intellectual abilities. Regarding different approaches to curriculum development, the paper points to some epistemological postulates that affected educational practice. It is true that a model of talking and numerical approach dominate educational practice. It would be quite appropriate to modify curricula in accordance with contemporary theoretical-empirical research results. There is a general agreement that the process of knowledge acquisition in teaching should become the subject of special analysis in order that its regularities can be understood.

  5. Can Resilience be built Through a Citizenship Education Curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Print

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The global financial crisis has impacted upon the way of life of young Europeans with great severity. Across most European countries youth unemployment has remained stubbornly high for many years, compounding the effects of the crisis on the social and psychological well-being of young people. Given that crises are highly likely to occur in the future are there ways to help prepare young people to build resilience to meet an unpredictable future? For a long-term approach to building youth resilience the role of the school is highly significant. Consequently this article asks - what are the elements in a school curriculum that can build resilience for times of crisis? The article explores the case of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship as a possible approach to building resilience amongst school students. The curriculum identifies knowledge, skills and values that students may acquire through this curriculum that build resilience.

  6. Faculty-Curriculum Development. Curriculum Design by Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Helen; And Others

    Faculty curriculum development, and specific applications to nursing education, are addressed in 37 papers and 6 discussion summaries from 1973 and 1974 workshops sponsored by the National League for Nursing. Attention is directed to: the curriculum development process, curriculum evaluation, the conceptual framework as a part of curriculum…

  7. Issues Forum: National Curriculum Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Edward M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "On the Common Core of Learning" (Kennedy); "Constitutional Implications of National Curriculum Standards" (Arons); "Arguments against National Performance Standards" (Fulk, Mantzicopoulos, Hirth); and "The Painful Lessons of Introducing the National Curriculum in England" (Foster). (SK)

  8. Issues Forum: National Curriculum Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Edward M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "On the Common Core of Learning" (Kennedy); "Constitutional Implications of National Curriculum Standards" (Arons); "Arguments against National Performance Standards" (Fulk, Mantzicopoulos, Hirth); and "The Painful Lessons of Introducing the National Curriculum in England" (Foster). (SK)

  9. toward a curriculum for justice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    profound justice; i.e. justice that is based on reasonableness and, more ... way to conduct a curriculum enquiry, since it acknowledges the crisis of ..... The principle of having a caring curriculum necessitates that we create learning-teaching.

  10. Results on the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of vanadium doped tungsten oxide thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu Karuppasamy, K.; Subrahmanyam, A.

    2008-02-01

    In this investigation, vanadium doped tungsten oxide (V : WO3) thin films are prepared at room temperature by reactive dc magnetron sputtering employing a tungsten-vanadium 'inlay' target. In comparison with pure sputtered tungsten oxide thin films, 11% vanadium doping is observed to decrease the optical band gap, enhance the colour neutral property, decrease the coloration efficiency (from 121 to 13 cm2 C-1), increase the surface work function (4.68-4.83 eV) and significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency in WO3 thin films. These observations suggest that (i) vanadium creates defect levels that are responsible for optical band gap reduction, (ii) multivalent vanadium bonding with terminal oxygen in the WO3 lattice gives rise to localized covalent bonds and thus results in an increase in the work function, and (iii) a suitable work function of V : WO3 with ITO results in an enhancement of the photocatalytic activity. These results on electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of V : WO3 thin films show good promise in the low maintenance window application.

  11. Results on the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of vanadium doped tungsten oxide thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuppasamy, K Muthu; Subrahmanyam, A [Semiconductor Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2008-02-07

    In this investigation, vanadium doped tungsten oxide (V : WO{sub 3}) thin films are prepared at room temperature by reactive dc magnetron sputtering employing a tungsten-vanadium 'inlay' target. In comparison with pure sputtered tungsten oxide thin films, 11% vanadium doping is observed to decrease the optical band gap, enhance the colour neutral property, decrease the coloration efficiency (from 121 to 13 cm{sup 2} C{sup -1}), increase the surface work function (4.68-4.83 eV) and significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency in WO{sub 3} thin films. These observations suggest that (i) vanadium creates defect levels that are responsible for optical band gap reduction, (ii) multivalent vanadium bonding with terminal oxygen in the WO{sub 3} lattice gives rise to localized covalent bonds and thus results in an increase in the work function, and (iii) a suitable work function of V : WO{sub 3} with ITO results in an enhancement of the photocatalytic activity. These results on electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of V : WO{sub 3} thin films show good promise in the low maintenance window application.

  12. Matching Office Information Systems (OIS Curriculum To Relevant Standards: Students, School Mission, Regional Business Needs, and National Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene August

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the process and outcome of a major curriculum update for the Office Information Systems (OIS major in the Office Information Systems Department in the School of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS at Pace University. The curriculum was updated to better prepare our students for success as end-user specialists in today’s flattened organizations. The changes made were based on modules recommended from the Office Systems Research Association (OSRA--recommendations that were both reliable and valid. OSRA’s national curriculum was flexible enough to allow us to incorporate regional business demands as well as adhere to CSIS’s mission statement. The success of this curriculum, now two years old, is measured by the success of our graduates (B.Sc. degree in obtaining meaningful employment.

  13. Rethinking the mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyles, Celia; Woodhouse, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.

  14. Integrating the Executive MBA Curriculum: Tales of the Cat Herder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Ellen D.; Mento, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous improvement has been a strategic priority for Loyola College in Maryland's Executive MBA (EMBA) Program since the program's inception in 1973. In the summer of 2008, Loyola began an intensive EMBA curriculum review. The process resulted in a recommendation to make a significant shift in the curriculum's emphasis. This paper reports on…

  15. Designing a Learning Curriculum and Technology's Role in It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sue; Scott, Logan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the design and implementation of a master's level research course. Factors that defined the curriculum design problem included the subject matter, a view of learning as a change in identity, and the role of technology in curriculum design. Both the design process and results of research on the implementation of…

  16. Boundary Issues and Transformation Possibilities in the HBSE Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levande, Diane I.

    1987-01-01

    "Add and stir" approaches to curriculum revision can result in contradictory and fragmented human behavior in the social environment (HBSE) content; therefore, transformative approaches are advocated. Curriculum transformation experiences described in the feminist literature are explored for applicability to social work. (Author/MH)

  17. The Curriculum of Climate Change Education: A Case for Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chew-Hung; Pascua, Liberty

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of the climate change topic in the curriculum of school subjects in Singapore was pivotal, such that it positioned the discourse squarely in the structure of Singapore's education system. In an examination of the intersections and disjoints between state policies on climate change against the programmatic curriculum, results showed…

  18. A strategy for teacher involvement in curriculum development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mona V 1997. Teachers support plan to restore normality to schools, but warn that ... curriculum development, one of the major stakeholders in education that is teachers .... Curriculum is the result of the interaction of objectively developed ..... excessively in white, single-sex boys schools and liberally in all other schools ...

  19. Basic School Teachers' Perceptions about Curriculum Design in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudu, Amadu Musah; Mensah, Mary Afi

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on teachers' perceptions about curriculum design and barriers to their participation. The sample size was 130 teachers who responded to a questionnaire. The analyses made use of descriptive statistics and descriptions. The study found that the level of teachers' participation in curriculum design is low. The results further…

  20. "In Reality It's Almost Impossible": CLT-Oriented Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Simon; Burns, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum innovation is challenging and, as several commentators have reported, moves to introduce communicative language teaching in many contexts internationally have resulted in mixed outcomes, or even failure. In an effort to shed some light on this complex problem, this article focuses on curriculum change through the introduction of new…

  1. Internationalisation of the Sport Management Curriculum: Academic and Student Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Donna; Sherry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Internationalisation of the sport industry has resulted in a demand for integration of international perspectives into the sport management higher education curriculum, to produce graduates capable of working within this rapidly developing global industry. Internationalisation of the curriculum can occur both abroad (i.e., study tour) or at home…

  2. Mentoring BUGS: An Integrated Science and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Walker, Michelle; Hildreth, Bertina; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2004-01-01

    The current study describes an authentic learning experience designed to develop technology and science process skills through a carefully scaffolded curriculum using mealworms as a content focus. An individual mentor assigned to each 4th and 5th grade girl participating in the program delivered the curriculum. Results indicate mastery of science…

  3. Teacher Perceptions of Curriculum Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Alan

    This study first provides a review of literature relevant to curriculum autonomy and school-based curriculum development, with special emphasis on Australian secondary schools. The second part of the report analyzes Australian secondary school staff's perceptions of: 1) the meaning of curriculum autonomy, 2) the advantages and disadvantages of…

  4. Computers in the Mathematics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper examines ways that mathematics teachers and supervisors can use computers in a quality mathematics curriculum in a school setting. Teachers and supervisors continually need to appraise the present mathematics curriculum and make necessary changes. A modern mathematics curriculum makes much use of technology. Society emphasizes heavy use…

  5. Intercultural gerontology curriculum: Principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Lorraine

    2017-03-28

    The internationalization of universities and the aging of the global population are two current issues that converge and challenge undergraduate gerontology curriculum development in Canada. One response to this challenge is to envision an intercultural gerontology curriculum. What might this curriculum encompass? How might it be taught? An exploratory study was undertaken to address these two questions. This paper presents findings from this study based primarily on interviews with university-based stakeholders from Canada, the United States, and Europe. Thematic analysis of the interviews resulted in five themes: multiple perspectives on cultural diversity; the dynamic nature of cultural diversity and aging; flow of an intercultural curriculum; institutional culture and intercultural curricula; and principles and practice for intercultural gerontology. Framed by principles of gerontology theory and educational approaches, this paper focuses on the principles and practice suggested by study participants. Scaffolding learning, active learning strategies, experiential learning opportunities, teacher modelling, and internet-based learning are discussed as key to intercultural learning. An appendix includes a list of resources that may be useful to developing an intercultural gerontology curriculum.

  6. Writing a curriculum vitae, resume or data sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, D

    1995-02-01

    This paper outlines a method for the preparation of a curriculum vitae, resume or data sheet, which is an essential document for professional people seeking employment or promotion. However, it needs to be accurate and relevant to the circumstances of the position, and requires regular updating.

  7. A European curriculum for nurses working in haemophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrington, C.; Bedford, M.; Andritschke, K.; Barrie, A.; Elfvinge, P.; Grønhaug, S.; Mueller-Kagi, E.; Leenders, B.; Schrijvers, L. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357290763

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, there is no consensus on education required to develop haemophilia nursing. The aim was to develop a curriculum for haemophilia nurses that could be used as a resource in Europe. This could form a basis for continuous professional development and used in the preparation of s

  8. Conversion to a Proficiency Oriented Curriculum at the University Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Carmen Villegas; And Others

    A state grant to the Department of Romance Languages of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville has allowed development of a proficiency-based curriculum for first- and second-year French and Spanish. Most of the effort to date has been preparation of the syllabus based on specified goals and objectives, or student outcomes, focusing on allowing…

  9. Project Wingspread. Education for Metropolitan Living: High School Curriculum Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Lloyd J.

    The curriculum overview, intended for secondary teachers, describes the general objectives, methodology, and units of the Wingspread project. Goals of the project are to prepare individuals to function in a complex society; to promote academic and social development through personal and direct involvement with problems in a metropolitan society;…

  10. Central Florida Film Production Technology Training Program. Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Community Coll., Orlando, FL.

    The Central Florida Film Production Technology Training program provided training to prepare 134 persons for employment in the motion picture industry. Students were trained in stagecraft, sound, set construction, camera/editing, and post production. The project also developed a curriculum model that could be used for establishing an Associate in…

  11. Printing/Graphic Arts Technology. Curriculum Guide. Invest in Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    Under the Idaho state system for curriculum development in vocational education, Technical Committees made up solely of industry personnel are responsible for drawing up task lists for each program. A Technical Committee Report is prepared on completion of the Committee's assignment. This report presents a task list that reflects current trends…

  12. Microelectronics in the Curriculum--The Science Teacher's Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    Rapid advances in microelectronics over the past few years have generally been beneficial, but they have also created some problems, and questions must be asked about the philosophy for including aspects of the new technology in the school curriculum. This statement, prepared by the Microelectronics and Science Education Subcommittee of the…

  13. Cross-District Collaboration: Curriculum and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Deborah J.; Cloud, Nancy; Morris, Patricia; Motta, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Secondary English as a second language (ESL) curricula that address four levels of ESL proficiency and prepare students for the English language arts (ELA) curricula and state-mandated ELA tests are not common. A curriculum jointly developed by two districts is even rarer. Yet two urban districts in Rhode Island undertook such a curriculum…

  14. A European curriculum for nurses working in haemophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrington, C.; Bedford, M.; Andritschke, K.; Barrie, A.; Elfvinge, P.; Grønhaug, S.; Mueller-Kagi, E.; Leenders, B.; Schrijvers, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, there is no consensus on education required to develop haemophilia nursing. The aim was to develop a curriculum for haemophilia nurses that could be used as a resource in Europe. This could form a basis for continuous professional development and used in the preparation of s

  15. Fiber Optics Technician. Curriculum Research Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Herschel K.

    A study examined the role of technicians in the fiber optics industry and determined those elements that should be included in a comprehensive curriculum to prepare fiber optics technicians for employment in the Texas labor market. First the current literature, including the ERIC database and equipment manufacturers' journals were reviewed. After…

  16. Curriculum Guide for Art in the Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    This secondary school curriculum guide is written in outline form to simplify the planning of a design-oriented art program. For each of 15 design units, a step-by-step set of instructions is given. Each unit is presented in three stages, each of which is a complete lesson in design. Materials and tools necessary for lesson preparation, motivation…

  17. Identifying International Agricultural Concepts for Secondary Agricultural Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Nathan W.; Gates, Hailey; Stripling, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    The globalization of the agriculture industry has created an emerging need for agricultural education in the United States to take a more globalized approach to prepare students for future careers in agriculture. The purpose of this study was to identify international agricultural concepts for secondary agricultural education curriculum. A Delphi…

  18. 21st Century Standards and Curriculum: Current Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alismail, Halah Ahmed; McGuire, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The integration of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and 21st century skills in the curriculum is not only beneficial to students and teachers, but also necessary to prepare our youth for their future careers. In an age of education where standardized tests determine the success of our schools, it is important to allow students the creativity and…

  19. Deliberations on the Development of an Intercultural Competence Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punteney, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Committed to developing an institution-wide intercultural competence curriculum for master's-level students preparing for international careers, a team of nine professors from across disciplines deliberated for a year on their fundamental understandings of intercultural competence and what it would mean to facilitate the development of that…

  20. Cross-District Collaboration: Curriculum and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Deborah J.; Cloud, Nancy; Morris, Patricia; Motta, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Secondary English as a second language (ESL) curricula that address four levels of ESL proficiency and prepare students for the English language arts (ELA) curricula and state-mandated ELA tests are not common. A curriculum jointly developed by two districts is even rarer. Yet two urban districts in Rhode Island undertook such a curriculum…

  1. Pikes Peak Community College Deaf Prep Program Study Skills Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paula

    This study skills curriculum is designed to assist students who are deaf or hearing impaired to prepare for college life. It presents lesson plans and activities that address the following topics: (1) effective school tools; (2) effective school attitudes; (3) effective school behaviors; (4) time management and goal settings, including keeping…

  2. Designing an ESP Curriculum for Saudi Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfallaj, Fahad Saleh Suleiman

    2016-01-01

    The present study looks at available views on ESP especially for students of science both as an academic tool and as an occupational need. It also endeavours to present a curriculum for the undergraduate students of Science at Qassim University, KSA. It is an objective of the paper to propose a use and need based syllabus to prepare the learners…

  3. IS Curriculum Recommendations for Web Courses in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Juyun; Couraud, Jason

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of software tools is currently available to businesses when building e-commerce solutions. Businesses are in need of employees with the appropriate skills to support and implement their e-commerce solutions. Students transitioning from school into the workforce need a well-designed curriculum that can prepare them with the skills…

  4. Expanding the Oral Hygiene Curriculum in a Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Susan; Griego, Elizabeth

    A program was implemented to expand the curriculum materials within the Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) Program at Clark County Community College (CCCC) which relate to oral hygiene care for the hospital patient. The instructional materials included a video tape and a written instructional packet which were researched, prepared, and presented by…

  5. Neglected Literature: An Experimental Curriculum Resource Bulletin for Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    The materials presented in this teaching guide for Negro literature, prepared under an ESEA Title 3 grant, were collected for inclusion into the traditional English curriculum "to enable students to regard the works of Negro writers as a sharing of diversified human experiences." Sample units on the novel, slave narration, short story, poetry,…

  6. Engineering Technology Curriculum Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes curriculum guidelines for the following engineering technologies: chemical, industrial, mining, petroleum, nuclear, civil, mechanical, electrical, automotive, and manufacturing. In a few years, these Engineering Council for Professional Development committee guidelines are intended to become the criteria by which programs will be judged…

  7. Biology Curriculum Support Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This biology curriculum supplement includes the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Goals, helpful resources, and suggested activities supported by inquiry-based laboratory activities. Contents include a detailed description of content which provides the goals and standards being sough), a materials list for inquiry support labs and…

  8. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  9. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Christine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading and language arts, science, and social studies. Library skills, objectives, grade levels, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Topics include poetry, memory, plant/animal…

  10. Music Curriculum for Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picht, Harriet

    This kindergarten music curriculum provides a year-long program of a sequenced series of activities designed to develop music concepts. Topics of the units in this guide are: self-concept (beginning of the year), fall, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, winter, a circus, Valentine's Day, spring, and farms. A scope and sequence chart of concepts…

  11. Uncovering the Math Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Teachers often express to Marulyn Burns their worry about the need to "cover the curriculum." In response, she draws on one of her favorite quotes: "You don't want to cover a subject; you want to uncover it." This quote is from "The Having of Wonderful Ideas and Other Essays on Teaching and Learning" by Eleanor…

  12. The Changing Curriculum: Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert B.

    In this 1967 booklet, influences of technology, the non-achiever and the culturally disadvantaged, and the revolt against formalism are discussed in relation to the modern mathematics curriculum. Some projects and school programs described include PLATO, the Nuffield Project, the Nova School Program, Advanced Placement Program, and teacher…

  13. School Curriculum in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  14. Listening across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    Listening as a skills objective must be emphasized throughout the curriculum of school subjects. There are a variety of learning opportunities which stress the art and skills of listening. In conversation, it might be embarrassing if the sender of the message needs to repeat content due to faulty listening habits. Or, the responder in response…

  15. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used with specific curriculum units. Highlights include elementary student activities for art (winter holiday crafts); reading/language arts (fantasy in stories, elements of folk stories from India, writing sequels to fairy tales); science (animal symbiosis); and social…

  16. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used with specific curriculum units. Highlights include elementary school activities for reading and language arts (using the "World Almanac," identifying a story's sequence of events, and using autobiographies); science (causes of wind and learning about squirrels); and…

  17. The Second Language Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert Keith, Ed.

    The aim of this collection is to present "state of the art" papers in language curriculum studies by writers who have been actively involved in shaping theory in the field and who, between them, have applied that theory in almost every part of the world and in a variety of contexts. Papers include the following: "A Decision-Making Framework for…

  18. The Business Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha; Meggison, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The business education curriculum encompasses the educational experiences of business students at all levels. Business education curricula include a variety of programs, courses, units, course objectives, student competencies, assessments, and extracurricular activities that have evolved over the years. Curricula are driven by numerous internal…

  19. Singing across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintz, William P.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one attempt to use singing as an instructional strategy to help all students learn across the curriculum. It begins with background on the author's early experiences with singing. Then, it shares professional literature on the relationship between singing, song, and literacy development. Next, it describes singing as an…

  20. Decolonizing the (Distance) Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Postcolonial theory remains part of the challenge of literary theory to curriculum development. As the author's personal history suggests, it is more than simply another way of reading and interpretation, but enables an engagement with, a bearing witness to, the gross inequalities of the world today. Drama is a good example, evidenced by the…

  1. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units. Topics covered include art (U.S. folk art); reading/language arts (dramatizing story events); science (simple machines); and social studies (state and federal legislatures, and explorers). (LRW)

  2. School Curriculum in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  3. Psychopharmacology Curriculum Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Benjamin, Sheldon; Beresin, Eugene; Goldberg, David A.; Jibson, Michael D.; Thrall, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Objective: As part of an effort to improve psychopharmacology training in psychiatric residency programs, a committee of residency training directors and associate directors adapted an introductory schizophrenia presentation from the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology's Model Psychopharmacology Curriculum to develop a multimodal,…

  4. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    A unified science approach is incorporated in this K-6 curriculum mode. The program is organized into six major cycles. These include: (1) science, math, and technology cycle; (2) universe cycle; (3) life cycle; (4) water cycle; (5) plate tectonics cycle; and (6) rock cycle. An overview is provided of each cycle's major concepts. The topic…

  5. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities which are designed to be used in connection with seven specific curriculum units for grades one through seven. Highlights include vocabulary of sports; Dewey Decimal classification; writing fables; using nonfiction books and encyclopedias for social studies topics; and political maps in atlases.…

  6. LAT-1 based primary breast cancer detection by [99m]Tc-labeled DTPA-bis-methionine scintimammography: first results using indigenously developed single vial kit preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sarika; Singh, Baljinder; Mishra, Anil K; Rathod, Deepti; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Chuttani, Krishna; Chopra, Shalini; Singh, Paramvir Mangat; Abrar, M L; Mittal, Bhagwant R; Singh, Gurpreet

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic utility of a single vial ready to label with [99m]Tc kit preparation of DTPA-bis-methionine (DTPA-bis-MET) for the detection of primary breast cancer. The conjugate (DTPA-bis-MET) was synthesized by covalently conjugating two molecules of methionine to DTPA and formulated as a single vial ready to label with [99m]Tc lyophilized kit preparations. Thirty female patients (mean age=47.5±11.8 years; range=21-69 years) with radiological/clinical evidence of having primary breast carcinoma were subjected to [99m]Tc-methionine scintigraphy. The whole body (anterior and posterior) imaging was performed on all the patients at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 4 hours following an intravenous administration of 555-740 MBq radioactivity of [99m]Tc-methionine. In addition, scintimammography (static images; 256×256 matrix) at 1, 2, and 4 hours was also performed on all the patients. The resultant radiolabel, that is, [99m]Tc-DTPA-bis-MET, yielded high radiolabeling efficiency (>97.0%), radiochemical purity (166-296 MBq/μmol), and shelf life (>3 months). The radiotracer primarily gets excreted through the kidneys and localizes in the breast cancer lesions with high target-to-nontarget ratios. The mean±SD ratios on the scan-positive lesions acquired at 1, 2, and 4 hours postinjection were 3.6±0.48, 3.10±0.24, and 2.5±0.4, respectively. [99m]Tc-methionine scintimammography demonstrated an excellent sensitivity and positive predictive value of 96.0% each for the detection of primary breast cancer. Ready to label single vial kit formulations of DTPA-bis-MET can be easily synthesized as in-house production and conveniently used for the scintigraphic detection of breast cancer and other methionine-dependent tumors expressing the L-type amino acid transporter-1 receptor. The imaging technique thus could be a potential substitute for the conventional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tumor imaging agents, especially

  7. SUSTAINABLE CURRICULUM IN TVET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Lasonen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In some European countries, students receive vocationally oriented education as early as at the age of 12. The students transfer to lower secondary school at the age of 10-13, with the youngest entrants found in Germany and Austria and the oldest ones, being at the age of 16, in the Nordic countries. The most thoroughly school-based vocational upper secondary education is provided in Finland, Sweden, Spain, Greece and Portugal. The highest proportion of vocational training delivered at the workplace is to be found in Austria (a little less than half and the Netherlands (a third, that of training combining the workplace and school in Denmark, Germany, France and the Netherlands. Curriculum denotes the formal specification of what is taught and learnt in educational or training establishments. Curricula are formally specified in such learning and teaching entities as units, courses, clusters, sequences and other specifications. Levels of curricula vary from national to student ones, and types of curricula differ from intended to learned syllabi. The traditions of curriculum vary according to national contexts and to historical periods. Curriculum development in TVET is approached from a broad technological knowledge, activity-oriented theories of learning and from the concept of vocation (Beruf. Ethics of sustainable development gives a global and future perspective to education and training. The first two chapters illustrate the global, regional and national policy context of curriculum in TVET followed by a historical discussion about a curriculum theory and didactics. Then the learning theories focus on work-based learning issues and an activity approach. Next the ethics and implementation of education for sustainable development is analysed. Finally a window to the future is opened by a national practice of workforce anticipation.

  8. European Higher Health Care Education Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Kelly, Hélène; Bergknut, Eva;

    2012-01-01

    This article concerns the European Curriculum in Cultural Care Project (2005-2009), which aimed at developing a curriculum framework for the enhancement of cultural competence in European health care education. The project was initiated and supported by the Consortium of Institutes in Higher...... Education in Health and Rehabilitation, whose goal is to nurture educational development and networking among member institutions. The framework is the result of a collaborative endeavor by nine nurse educators from five different European countries. The production of the framework will be described...

  9. [A new, problem oriented medicine curriculum in Utrecht: less basic science knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; Custers, Eugène J F M; ten Cate, Olle Th J

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether the transition from a conventional, discipline-based curriculum to a problem-orientated, integrated curriculum at the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands, has resulted in students having less knowledge of the basic medical sciences. Comparative. The difference in the amount of basic science between the curricula was quantitatively assessed. 37 final-year students in each curriculum volunteered to complete a test specifically designed to measure knowledge of the basic sciences, a few weeks before their graduation. The transition from the old to the new curriculum resulted in a decline of almost half in the amount of time dedicated to the basic sciences, from 84 to 48 'fulltime week equivalents'. Students in the old curriculum performed significantly better on the test than students in the new curriculum, with 43.2% (SD: 9.56) correct answers versus 35.8% (SD: 8.19) correct answers respectively, which amounted to an effect size of 0.828 (Cohen-d). Yet, on the pathophysiology/pathology subscale, students in each curriculum showed similar performance: 36.1% (SD: 11.55) correct answers for students in the old curriculum, versus 37.2% (SD: 11.66) correct answers for students in the new curriculum. Students in the old curriculum had overall significantly more knowledge of the basic sciences than students in the new curriculum, except for pathophysiology/pathology, though the time devoted to this discipline in the new curriculum had also decreased considerably.

  10. Educational outcomes from a novel house call curriculum for internal medicine residents: report of a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Jennifer; Christmas, Colleen; Durso, Samuel C

    2011-07-01

    Physician house calls are an important mode of healthcare delivery to frail homebound older adults and positively affect patient outcomes and learner education, but most physicians receive scant training in home care medicine. A novel longitudinal curriculum in house call medicine for internal medicine residents was implemented in July 2006, and educational outcomes were evaluated over the following 3 years. The 2-year curriculum included didactic and experiential components. Residents made house calls with preceptors and alone and completed a series of computer modules outlining knowledge essential to providing home-based care. They discussed the important features of the modules in regularly scheduled small groups throughout the 2-year experience, and each taught a "house call morning report" in their senior resident year. Evaluation methods included surveys before, during, and at the end of the 2-year curriculum (knowledge and attitudes); direct observation by preceptors during house calls (skills); and an online, anonymous survey at the end of each year (attitudes). Results show statistically significant increases in residents' knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to home care medicine. Residents describe educationally significant and positive effects from their house call experiences. This novel curriculum improved medical residents' knowledge, attitudes, and skills in performing house calls for frail elderly individuals. The longer-term outcomes of this intervention will continue to be studied, with the hope that it may be used to help provide educational opportunities to prepare the physician workforce to meet the service needs of a growing segment of the population.

  11. [Curriculum vitae organization: the Lattes software platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorin, Cristiane V

    2003-05-01

    Curriculum vitae is a Latin expression meaning "career" or "life course". That means the data set concerning name, age, marital status, situation, studies, diplomas, published works and other activities of a student, an applicant for a position, for an exam or for a public office, and others. In short, it is the document that provides an outlook of the person as an individual; that is why this document must be carefully prepared as to precise and true contents, as to presentation and as to writing.

  12. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  13. Hand-Clap Songs across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Bintz, William P.

    2012-01-01

    This teaching tip focuses on using hand-clapping to teach content area material across the curriculum. We begin with a brief history of hand-clap songs, followed by a rationale for using them in content area literacy. Then, we describe the instructional lesson, share samples that resulted, and discuss lesson extensions. Our goal is to have…

  14. Survey Indicates Ethics Have Place in Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Ruth; Gordon, David

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the results of a survey which examined mass media law instructors' attitudes and practices concerning the incorporation of ethics material into the media law curriculum. Reports that, although instructors believe ethics has an important relationship to media law, few instructors use materials that provide formal or theoretical grounding…

  15. The Missing Curriculum Link: Personal Financial Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidermeyer, Adolph A.; Neidermeyer, Presha E.

    2010-01-01

    With increasing personal and business financial challenges facing today's professionals, we, as business school faculty, have a responsibility to offer the educational background that should enable rising professionals to successfully manage finances. Unfortunately, the results of a recent analysis of curriculum offerings in Personal Financial…

  16. Communication across the curriculum in animal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C L

    1996-11-01

    The growing movement toward the integration of communications in science-based courses has been taken to the heart of the curriculum at Berea College. New college-wide general education requirements initiated a review of student abilities, departmental expectations, and the use of writing and speaking skills in all courses. Agriculture graduates require highly developed reading and speaking skills as well as fundamental control of language to succeed in industry today. Depending only on the English department to teach students writing and speaking skills can lead to graduates ill-prepared for communication in their chosen profession. The inclusion of communication skills in an animal science course not only improves such skills, but it also increases the ability of students to apply and use animal science concepts. The benefits of broadening the teaching curriculum to include reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills can provide improved academic achievement, attitude, confidence levels, and self-images. Students can become active participants rather than note-takers. Curriculum changes of such magnitude require faculty development opportunities and administrative support.

  17. Introduction to the Core Curriculum in GIS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This short narrative introduces the Core Curriculum in GIS and provides a historical overview of the Core Curriculum Project, including the later Core Curriculum in GIScience and Core Curriculum for Technical Programs. Appended to this description is an original pamphlet advertising the Core Curriculum in GIS.

  18. The purpose and content of vocational curriculum for entrepreneurship education: a case study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrasoul Jamshidian

    2016-12-01

    . Originality. Value: The research has examined the effectiveness of the technical and vocational education to deliver the needed Information and knowledge by trainees and whether the course has the significant ability to acquire entrepreneurial skills and characteristics which considered as one of its goals. The results of the prepared paper is identified and provided the aspects of the curriculum in two areas of content and purpose. The results can be available and used by the curriculum planners and the entrepreneurial educators to make decisions related to improving the vocational curriculum for entrepreneurship education and training.

  19. Designing a Mathematics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peng Yee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A decade of PMRI saw the changes in the classroom in some of the primary schools in Indonesia. Based on observation, we can say that though the mathematics syllabus in Indonesia did not change, its curriculum has changed under the movement of PMRI. In this article, we put in writing some of the experience gained through the involvement in designing curricula since 1971. Hopefully, some of the observations made may be of use to the colleagues in Indonesia. The discussion below will cover some deciding factors in designing a curriculum, some practices, and the latest trends. For convenience, we keep the discussion general, and do not refer to a specific syllabus. Also, in many cases, we refer mainly to secondary schools, that is, Grade 7 to Grade 10.

  20. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Most of these fully-developed library media activities are to be used in connection with specific curriculum units: art (paper marbling, grades 4-9); reading/language arts (national holiday customs, grades 1-6; Robin Hood, grades 4-5); science (zoo animals, grades K-2; the aurora borealis, grades 7-9; identifying and feeding birds (grades 2-3);…

  1. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Most of these fully-developed library media activities are to be used in connection with specific curriculum units: art (paper marbling, grades 4-9); reading/language arts (national holiday customs, grades 1-6; Robin Hood, grades 4-5); science (zoo animals, grades K-2; the aurora borealis, grades 7-9; identifying and feeding birds (grades 2-3);…

  2. Factor Structure of Content Preparation for E-Business Web Sites: Results of a Survey of 428 Industrial Employees in the People's Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yinni; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2009-01-01

    To better fulfil customer satisfaction, a study of what content e-business web sites should contain is conducted. Based on background literature, a content preparation survey of 70 items was developed and completed by 428 white collar employees of an electronic company in mainland China. The survey aimed at examining the significant content…

  3. Designing an ESP Curriculum for Saudi Science Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Saleh Suleiman Alfallaj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study looks at available views on ESP especially for students of science both as an academic tool and as an occupational need. It also endeavours to present a curriculum for the undergraduate students of Science at Qassim University, KSA. It is an objective of the paper to propose a use and need based syllabus to prepare the learners for life. The study concludes with a set of recommendations and suggestions that would improve the Academic and occupational aspects of the ESP scenario at all institutions of Higher Learning in the Kingdom where English is a secondary subject.Keywords: Designing curriculum, Saudi students, ESP

  4. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenda, Martin; Víta, Martin; Vaitsis, Christos; Schwarz, Daniel; Pokorná, Andrea; Zary, Nabil; Dušek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution’s curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets. Objective We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations. Methods We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom’s taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets. Results We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent

  5. Improved kit formulation for preparation of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC: results of preliminary clinical evaluation in imaging patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korde, Aruna; Mallia, Madhava; Shinto, Ajit; Sarma, H D; Samuel, Grace; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2014-11-01

    (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC is a cost-effective and logistically viable agent for scintigraphy of neuroendocrine tumors overexpressing somatostatin receptors as compared with [(111)In-DTPA-D-Phe(1)] Octreotide (Octreoscan(®)). Several studies have been reported, wherein the efficacy of this agent is demonstrated. In the present article, the authors report the preparation of a single-vial HYNIC-TOC kit suitable for the preparation of 4-5 patient doses (15 mCi/patient) of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC. The kits were tested for sterility and bacterial endotoxins to assure safety of the product. A significant modification in this kit is the inclusion of buffer in the kit itself, unlike in commercially available kits where the buffer solution has to be added during preparation. (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC was prepared by adding 20-80 mCi (740-2960 MBq) of freshly eluted Na(99m)TcO4 in 1-3 mL of sterile saline directly into the kit vial and heating the vial in a water bath at 100°C for 20 minutes. The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC, prepared using the lyophilized cold kit, were consistently >90%. The kits were evaluated over a period of 9 months and found to be stable when stored at -20°C. Limited clinical studies performed with the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC, formulated using the kit, showed adequate sensitivity and specificity for the detection of gasteroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  6. The teacher and the curriculum;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Philippou, Stavroula;

    2015-01-01

    A key debate in the curriculum field has centred on the extent to which teachers should or could achieve agency over the curriculum they enact. Risks to teacher agency have come from top-down control of curricula, either through input regulation (prescription of content, methods and/or teaching m...... with a discussion of why it is important to understand and take into account teacher agency, when formulating and developing curriculum policy....

  7. Mathematical Knowledge and Skills Expected by Higher Education in Engineering and the Social Sciences: Implications for High School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Mehmet; Özalp, Gülümser; Kalender, Ilker; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    One important function of school mathematics curriculum is to prepare high school students with the knowledge and skills needed for university education. Identifying them empirically will help making sound decisions about the contents of high school mathematics curriculum. It will also help students to make informed choices in course selection at…

  8. Mathematical Knowledge and Skills Expected by Higher Education in Engineering and the Social Sciences: Implications for High School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Mehmet; Özalp, Gülümser; Kalender, Ilker; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    One important function of school mathematics curriculum is to prepare high school students with the knowledge and skills needed for university education. Identifying them empirically will help making sound decisions about the contents of high school mathematics curriculum. It will also help students to make informed choices in course selection at…

  9. Dental hygiene students' perceptions of a cultural competence component in a tobacco dependence education curriculum: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Heather J; Maillet, Peggy J; Brillant, Martha G; Tax, Cara L

    2015-06-01

    First Nations and Inuit peoples have tobacco use rates three times that of the Canadian national average. Providing tobacco dependence education (TDE) requires an understanding of the factors surrounding tobacco use that are culturally specific to this population. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new cultural competence component for Canadian First Nations and Inuit peoples in a TDE curriculum at Dalhousie University School of Dental Hygiene, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. In 2011, the TDE curriculum was revised to include a First Nations and Inuit people's cultural component. A 32-question survey was developed for the study, with questions divided into four subscales regarding students' perceived knowledge, skills, comfort level, and attitudes about working with this population. Responses from students in two succeeding years were compared: the first cohort had not participated in the revised curriculum (56% response rate), and the second cohort had (63% response rate). The results showed an overall improvement in the subscales evaluated and a significant (p=0.002) improvement in the knowledge subscale of the students who received the new TDE curriculum, specifically regarding knowledge about sociocultural characteristics, health risks, and cultural healing traditions of First Nations and Inuit people. Although the results indicated an increase in the knowledge of the culture of First Nations and Inuit peoples, it is unclear whether the students felt better prepared to provide TDE to this population. For future research, the investigators would examine what learning experiences and further changes to the curriculum could be provided to facilitate the level of preparedness to successfully deliver TDE.

  10. Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report.

  11. Effect of the La(OH){sub 3} preparation method on the surface and rehydroxylation properties of resulting La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, M. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Centre EmaS (Spain); Carvajal, J. J. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Fisica i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FICMA-FiCNA), Centre EmaS (Spain); Marsal, L. F. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Centre EmaS (Spain); Salagre, P. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Centre EmaS (Spain); Aguilo, M.; Diaz, F. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Fisica i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FICMA-FiCNA), Centre EmaS (Spain); Formentin, P.; Pallares, J. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Centre EmaS (Spain); Cesteros, Y., E-mail: yolanda.cesteros@urv.cat [Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Centre EmaS (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Several lanthanum hydroxides (28-146 m{sup 2}/g) were prepared by different procedures involving precipitation and hydrothermal methods by conventional heating or with microwaves. The use of ultrasounds during precipitation led to the formation of additional crystalline phases whereas the aging treatment with microwaves decreased the temperature needed to form the lanthanum oxide phase when compared with the samples aged by conventional heating. After calcination, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples showed similar BET surface areas (3-5 m{sup 2}/g) but different particle sizes ranging from 150 to 600 nm depending on the La(OH){sub 3} preparation method, as observed by TEM. La{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were completely rehydroxylated after 80 h of exposure to atmospheric air at controlled humidity conditions recovering only partially the surface areas of the La(OH){sub 3} precursors (14-18 m{sup 2}/g). The progress of rehydroxylation with time occurred in several steps at different rates. Rehydroxylation rate mainly depended on the particle size and surface area of the lanthanum oxide sample. Therefore, the method used to prepare the initial lanthanum hydroxide affects the surface and rehydroxylation properties of the subsequent lanthanum oxide sample.

  12. Curriculum Online Review System: Proposing Curriculum with Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinehart, Marilyn; Barlow, Rhonda; Shafer, Stu; Hassur, Debby

    2009-01-01

    The Curriculum Online Review System (CORS) at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) uses SharePoint as a Web platform for the JCCC Curriculum Proposals Process. The CORS application manages proposals throughout the approval process using collaboration tools and workflows to notify all stakeholders. This innovative new program has changed the way…

  13. Whatever Happened to Curriculum Theory? Critical Realism and Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In the face of what has been characterised by some as a "crisis" in curriculum--an apparent decline of some aspects of curriculum studies combined with the emergence of new types of national curricula which downgrade knowledge--some writers have been arguing for the use of realist theory to address these issues. This article offers a…

  14. Analysis of 100 Years of Curriculum Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Kelting-Gibson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen historical and contemporary curriculum designs were analyzed for elements of assessment that support student learning and inform instructional decisions. Educational researchers are purposely paying attention to the role assessment plays in a well-designed planning and teaching process. Assessment is a vital component to educational planning and teaching because it is a way to gather accurate evidence of student learning and information to inform instructional decisions. The purpose of this review was to analyze 100 years of curriculum designs to uncover elements of assessment that will support teachers in their desire to improve student learning. Throughout this research the author seeks to answer the question: Do historical and contemporary curriculum designs include elements of assessment that help teachers improve student learning? The results of the review reveal that assessment elements were addressed in all of the curricular designs analyzed, but not all elements of assessment were identified using similar terminology. Based on the analysis of this review, it is suggested that teachers not be particular about the terminology used to describe assessment elements, as all curriculum models discussed use one or more elements similar to the context of pre, formative, and summative assessments.

  15. Improving integration of clinical clerkship didactic curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay A. Mazotti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Curricular integration is a primary focus of many efforts to improve clinical education, but the practical realities of connecting content across discipline-based learning experience is a formidable challenge. This paper describes the construction of a third-year clinical clerkship curriculum featuring integrated didactics, purposeful sequencing, linkage to clinical context and introduction of competency-based learning activities. We describe the organization of our curriculum, the methods by which we integrated our didactic curriculum, and the results of curricular evaluations. Over two years, we improved integration and reduced fragmented learning experiences in a longitudinal integrated clerkship. Individual lectures were highly rated with a mean overall score of 4.29 (SD=0.78 (1=poor, 5= excellent(N=23. Integrated didactic sessions and competency-based learning activities, including a quality improvement curriculum and reflection sessions, were also highly rated. Purposeful integration of clinical content, sequencing of didactics across the academic year, linking didactic content to a clinical context and creating new competency-based learning activities were highly rated and feasible ways to combine didactics across disciplines in the core clerkship year. Similar integrated curricula may be used with students in longitudinal integrated clerkships or in a traditional third-year clerkship model.

  16. Developing a competency-based curriculum in HIV for nursing schools in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knebel Elisa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparing health workers to confront the HIV/AIDS epidemic is an urgent challenge in Haiti, where the HIV prevalence rate is 2.2% and approximately 10 100 people are taking antiretroviral treatment. There is a critical shortage of doctors in Haiti, leaving nurses as the primary care providers for much of the population. Haiti's approximately 1000 nurses play a leading role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment. However, nurses do not receive sufficient training at the pre-service level to carry out this important work. Methods To address this issue, the Ministry of Health and Population collaborated with the International Training and Education Center on HIV over a period of 12 months to create a competency-based HIV/AIDS curriculum to be integrated into the 4-year baccalaureate programme of the four national schools of nursing. Results Using a review of the international health and education literature on HIV/AIDS competencies and various models of curriculum development, a Haiti-based curriculum committee developed expected HIV/AIDS competencies for graduating nurses and then drafted related learning objectives. The committee then mapped these learning objectives to current courses in the nursing curriculum and created an 'HIV/AIDS Teaching Guide' for faculty on how to integrate and achieve these objectives within their current courses. The curriculum committee also created an 'HIV/AIDS Reference Manual' that detailed the relevant HIV/AIDS content that should be taught for each course. Conclusion All nursing students will now need to demonstrate competency in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, skills and attitudes during periodic assessment with direct observation of the student performing authentic tasks. Faculty will have the responsibility of developing exercises to address the required objectives and creating assessment tools to demonstrate that their graduates have met the objectives. This activity brought different

  17. Medical faculty and curriculum design - 'No, no, it's like this: You give your lectures...'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Eika, Berit

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims: The purpose of this study was to understand more completely the (tacit) curriculum design models of medical faculty. We report on two research questions: (1) Can medical faculty give an account of their curriculum design assumptions? and (2) What are their assumptions concern......, to a belief that learning outcomes are incompatible with higher education. Finally, we found that teachers do not necessarily play a clear, central role in curriculum design....... concerning curriculum design? Method: We conducted an explorative, qualitative case study. We interviewed educational decision makers at the three Danish medical schools and associate professors from different courses concerning curriculum design. We carried out four individual, in-depth interviews and four...... focus groups with 20 participants in all. Results and conclusions: Only one decision maker had an explicit curriculum design model. However, all participants had assumptions concerning curriculum design. We displayed their assumptions as five essentially different and increasingly complex models...

  18. Teaching Geoethics Across the Geoscience Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, David; Bruckner, Monica; Kieffer, Susan; Geissman, John; Reidy, Michael; Taylor, Shaun; Vallero, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    values required to successfully prepare for and contribute to a career in the geosciences? 2) Geoethics and the geoscience profession: what are the ethical standards expected of geoscientists if they are to contribute responsibly to the community of practice expected of the profession? 3) Geoethics and society: what are the responsibilities of geoscientists to effectively and responsibly communicate the results of geoscience research to inform society about issues ranging from geohazards to natural resource utilization in order to protect the health, safety, and economic security of humanity? 4) Geoethics and Earth: what are the responsibilities of geoscientists to provide good stewardship of Earth based on their knowledge of Earth's composition, architecture, history, dynamic processes, and complex systems? Consideration of these components of geoethics will prepare students to recognize ethical dilemmas, and to master the skills needed for ethical decision-making in their professional lives. Collections of resources, case studies, presentations and working group summaries of the workshop can be accessed at: http://serc.carleton.edu/geoethics/index.html

  19. Frontiers in Microbiology: Envisioning a Curriculum Unit for High School Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Bloom

    2004-06-18

    Microbiology is undergoing a quiet revolution. Techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, high throughput DNA sequencing, whole genome shotgun sequencing, DNA microarrays, and bioinformatics analyses are greatly aiding our understanding of the estimated one billion species of microbes that inhabit the Earth. Unfortunately, the rapid pace of research in microbiology stands in contrast to the much slower pace of change in educational reform. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) hosted a two-day planning meeting to discuss whether or not a new curriculum unit on microbiology is desirable for the high school audience. Attending the meeting were microbiologists, high school biology teachers, and science educators. The consensus of the participants was that an inquiry-based unit dealing with advances in microbiology should be developed for a high school biology audience. Participants established content priorities for the unit, discussed the unit's conceptual flow, brainstormed potential student activities, and discussed the role of educational technology for the unit. As a result of the planning meeting discussions, BSCS staff sought additional funding to develop, disseminate, and evaluate the Frontiers in Microbiology curriculum unit. This unit was intended to be developed as a replacement unit suitable for an introductory biology course. The unit would feature inquiry-based student activities and provide approximately four weeks of instruction. As appropriate, activities would make use of multimedia. The development and production processes would require about two years for completion. Unfortunately, BSCS staff was not able to attract sufficient funding to develop the proposed curriculum unit. Since there were some unexpended funds left over from the planning meeting, BSCS requested and received permission from DOE to use the balance of the funds to prepare background materials about advances in microbiology that would be useful to teachers. These

  20. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    develop new curricula, materials and methods that will enhance the appreciation and learning of science, especially chemistry, for every undergraduate student such that all college graduates will command the knowledge and skills necessary to permit continued learning, lead productive lives, and make informed decisions. To accomplish this mission, a modular approach to teaching chemistry in the first two years of the undergraduate curriculum is being developed and evaluated. Modules of 1-4 weeks present fundamental chemistry to students in the context of a real-world problem or application and emphasize the links between chemistry and other disciplines. In collaboration with the ChemLinks Coalition, modules are being developed, tested and refined at the two- and four-year colleges and research universities comprising the two consortia. Curriculum materials, including text, lab, and multimedia components suitable for students from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds and usable at a wide variety of undergraduate institutions are being produced and distributed by an established publisher. Teaching methods that utilize current understanding of learning processes and emphasize active learning and the full spectrum of modern technologies are being supported, tested, and promulgated. A model support infrastructure for development and assessment of new materials and methods is being provided. A framework for continuous improvement of curricula should result from the work and be institutionalized within the consortium. Faculty workshops and sessions at national and regional meetings will be conducted to guarantee dissemination. Our consortium institutions now participate significantly in pre-service teacher training and education of advanced science or engineering technicians and are developing new programs in these areas. Thus, our program will strongly impact the Advanced Technological Education and Teacher Preparation Programs by developing modular materials appropriate to

  1. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  2. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Curriculum in Florida: Food Modification for Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Radford, Allyson; Gal, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    State and national surveys of adult family care homes identified a strong need for education on texture-modified food preparation and the nutritional needs of older adults. An Extension curriculum, Food Modification for Special Needs, was developed to provide an overview of chewing and swallowing problems, food texture, pureed food preparation,…

  3. [Efficacy and safety of acute bronchitis treatment in adults--a comparison of Bronchosol® syrup and synthetic preparations with ambroxol. Results of observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fal, Andrzej M; Schönknecht, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), including acute bronchitis, are the frequent health problems and the most common reason for acute cough in adults. Even though the infections are caused mainly by viruses, and their course is usually not complicated, febrifuges, i.a. mucokinetics, or antitussives are used in the treatment of URTI in order to improve the quality of life and safety of patients. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Bronchosol® herbal syrup in comparison to ambroxol preparations in the treatment of acute bronchitis in adult patients. The Bronchosol®/2013 study was a non-interventional, prospective, open-label, observational study. Data from adult patients treated with Bronchosol® syrup for acute bronchitis were collected and compared with data from patients treated for the same condition with ambroxol preparations. The severity of bronchitis symptoms was evaluated with the BSS (Bronchitis Severity Score) scale, and patients'quality of life wasassessed with the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) scale. Between visits patients conducted self-observations and filled out observation diaries. Moreover, the data on adverse events were collected. In 87.68% of patients the infections were cured. Most of patients considered the studied drugs to be the agent decreasing the duration of infection and its intensity. The percentage of patients who declared that they had a less intense cough than during earlier infections was higher in the group of patients treated with Bronchosol® syrup in comparison to ambroxol treated patients (60.22% vs. 45.03%). 91.94% of patients treated with Bronchosol® considered this syrup to be very safe; in the ambroxol group such a declaration was made by 76.61% of patients. Bronchosol® syrup is an efficient, well-tolerated, and safe drug. Its efficacy in the treatment of acute bronchitis symptoms in adult patients is similar to the efficacy of ambroxol preparations.

  4. Many Mansions: Conceptualizing Translingual Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmetdinova, Alsu; Burdick, Jake

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a vision for fostering multilingualism in schools that extends the notion of translanguaging to include the realm of multilingual curriculum theorizing. We locate our analysis at the intersection of multicultural education, multilingual education, and curriculum studies in order to conceptualize language, culture, and…

  5. Curriculum Mapping in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Heidi; Webb, Katy Kavanagh; Houk, Amy Harris; Tingelstad, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Librarians at four different academic institutions concurrently completed curriculum mapping projects using varying methods to analyze their information literacy instruction. Curriculum mapping is a process for systematically evaluating components of an instructional program for cohesiveness, proper sequencing, and goal achievement. There is a…

  6. Customizing Curriculum with Digital Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To effectively use digital resources in the classroom, teachers must customize the information, merge it with pre-existing curriculum, differentiate it for diverse student populations, and still meet standards-based learning goals. This article describes a solution to these challenges: the Curriculum Customization Service, which provides access to…

  7. Cosmetology. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local postsecondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  8. Designing a Pharmaceutical Care Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Donald G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Guidelines for developing a pharmacy school curriculum based on the principle of pharmaceutical care and professional responsibility are offered, beginning with mission statements for profession, practice, and pharmaceutical education in general. The University of Toronto experience in designing such a curriculum is chronicled as an illustration…

  9. Curriculum Guidelines on Forensic Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curriculum design explain the scope of forensic dentistry and interrelationships with other fields, give an overview of the curriculum, and outline suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty and facility…

  10. IBE Glossary of Curriculum Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    UNESCO International Bureau of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The International Bureau of Education (IBE) has compiled a "Glossary of Curriculum Terminology" offering definitions for over 180 terms related to the curriculum. It is also intended to be a working reference tool for specialists, educators and practitioners, and therefore feedback and suggestions are invited to help us to continue to…

  11. National Identity in Korean Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojeong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of national identity has evolved during the last half century within the Korean social studies curriculum. There have been seven curricular revisions since the first national curriculum was released in 1955. Each time the concept of national identity was changed with the biggest changes to this concept within the last two iterations of…

  12. Learning-Based Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Claus; Hojlt, Thomas; Hermansen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    This article is written to inspire curriculum developers to centre their efforts on the learning processes of students. It presents a learning-based paradigm for higher education and demonstrates the close relationship between curriculum development and students' learning processes. The article has three sections: Section "The role of higher…

  13. Curriculum Mapping in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Heidi; Webb, Katy Kavanagh; Houk, Amy Harris; Tingelstad, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Librarians at four different academic institutions concurrently completed curriculum mapping projects using varying methods to analyze their information literacy instruction. Curriculum mapping is a process for systematically evaluating components of an instructional program for cohesiveness, proper sequencing, and goal achievement. There is a…

  14. Learning-Based Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Claus; Hojlt, Thomas; Hermansen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    This article is written to inspire curriculum developers to centre their efforts on the learning processes of students. It presents a learning-based paradigm for higher education and demonstrates the close relationship between curriculum development and students' learning processes. The article has three sections: Section "The role of higher…

  15. Leadership in Mathematics Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Kenneth Ray

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses mathematics curriculum development throughout the past century and incorporates a discussion of appropriate leadership style needed to bring about effective change. School leaders must be cognizant of the commitment and competence of the faculty within their school for successful curriculum development to take place.…

  16. Humanitarian engineering in the engineering curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersteen, Jonathan Daniel James

    There are many opportunities to use engineering skills to improve the conditions for marginalized communities, but our current engineering education praxis does not instruct on how engineering can be a force for human development. In a time of great inequality and exploitation, the desire to work with the impoverished is prevalent, and it has been proposed to adjust the engineering curriculum to include a larger focus on human needs. This proposed curriculum philosophy is called humanitarian engineering. Professional engineers have played an important role in the modern history of power, wealth, economic development, war, and industrialization; they have also contributed to infrastructure, sanitation, and energy sources necessary to meet human need. Engineers are currently at an important point in time when they must look back on their history in order to be more clear about how to move forward. The changing role of the engineer in history puts into context the call for a more balanced, community-centred engineering curriculum. Qualitative, phenomenographic research was conducted in order to understand the need, opportunity, benefits, and limitations of a proposed humanitarian engineering curriculum. The potential role of the engineer in marginalized communities and details regarding what a humanitarian engineering program could look like were also investigated. Thirty-two semi-structured research interviews were conducted in Canada and Ghana in order to collect a pool of understanding before a phenomenographic analysis resulted in five distinct outcome spaces. The data suggests that an effective curriculum design will include teaching technical skills in conjunction with instructing about issues of social justice, social location, cultural awareness, root causes of marginalization, a broader understanding of technology, and unlearning many elements about the role of the engineer and the dominant economic/political ideology. Cross-cultural engineering development

  17. Sequence Matching Analysis for Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Yenny Bendatu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations apply information technologies to support their business processes. Using the information technologies, the actual events are recorded and utilized to conform with predefined model. Conformance checking is an approach to measure the fitness and appropriateness between process model and actual events. However, when there are multiple events with the same timestamp, the traditional approach unfit to result such measures. This study attempts to develop a sequence matching analysis. Considering conformance checking as the basis of this approach, this proposed approach utilizes the current control flow technique in process mining domain. A case study in the field of educational process has been conducted. This study also proposes a curriculum analysis framework to test the proposed approach. By considering the learning sequence of students, it results some measurements for curriculum development. Finally, the result of the proposed approach has been verified by relevant instructors for further development.

  18. On the Development of Digital Forensics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghui Tu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer Crime and computer related incidents continue their prevalence and frequency and result in loss of billions of dollars. To fight against those crimes and frauds, it is urgent to develop digital forensics education programs to train a suitable workforce to efficiently and effectively investigate crimes and frauds. However, there is no standard to guide the design of digital forensics curriculum for an academic program. In this research, we investigate the research works on digital forensics curriculum design and existing education programs.  Both digital forensics educators and practitioners were surveyed and the results are analyzed to determine what industry and law enforcement need. Based on the survey results and what the industry certificate programs cover, we identified topics that are desired to be covered in digital forensics courses. Finally, we propose six digital forensics courses and their topics that can be offered in both undergraduate and graduate digital forensics programs.

  19. Evaluation of real-time data obtained from gravimetric preparation of antineoplastic agents shows medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact: Results of a large-scale, multicentre, multinational, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkola, R; Czejka, M; Bérubé, J

    2017-08-01

    Medication errors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality especially with antineoplastic drugs, owing to their narrow therapeutic index. Gravimetric workflow software systems have the potential to reduce volumetric errors during intravenous antineoplastic drug preparation which may occur when verification is reliant on visual inspection. Our aim was to detect medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact as determined by the rate of prevented medication errors in chemotherapy compounding after implementation of gravimetric measurement. A large-scale, retrospective analysis of data was carried out, related to medication errors identified during preparation of antineoplastic drugs in 10 pharmacy services ("centres") in five European countries following the introduction of an intravenous workflow software gravimetric system. Errors were defined as errors in dose volumes outside tolerance levels, identified during weighing stages of preparation of chemotherapy solutions which would not otherwise have been detected by conventional visual inspection. The gravimetric system detected that 7.89% of the 759 060 doses of antineoplastic drugs prepared at participating centres between July 2011 and October 2015 had error levels outside the accepted tolerance range set by individual centres, and prevented these doses from reaching patients. The proportion of antineoplastic preparations with deviations >10% ranged from 0.49% to 5.04% across sites, with a mean of 2.25%. The proportion of preparations with deviations >20% ranged from 0.21% to 1.27% across sites, with a mean of 0.71%. There was considerable variation in error levels for different antineoplastic agents. Introduction of a gravimetric preparation system for antineoplastic agents detected and prevented dosing errors which would not have been recognized with traditional methods and could have resulted in toxicity or suboptimal therapeutic outcomes for patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  20. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology : systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.; Oudkerk, M.

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic

  1. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology : systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.; Oudkerk, M.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic

  2. The Role of Curriculum Scholars in Current Curriculum Debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mushtaq

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum is a set of planned tasks, learning experiences and behaviors proposed by an authority to achieve predetermined goals in form of behavioral change, academic achievements and learning outcomes within a particular time. The scholars are the people who have command and expertise in any of the curriculum components. The article focuses on the role of curriculum scholars in Pakistan and how and what type of changes they can initiate to bring harmony and tolerance, character and quality in development of curricula. The international issues, trends evolving globalization can be enhanced and incorporated to foster individual and social development. It is a qualitative study based on historical evidences and current researches highlighting the importance and role of curriculum scholars and meeting the world class education system. The issues and trends mentioned by developed countries curriculum experts paved way to synthesis them with local rising issues and trends.The study concluded that the curriculum developers have dynamic roles in curriculum debates because they have to work for bridging gaps of developing and developed nation, addressing local curriculum issues, Using pragmatic approach rather than ideological, reorganizing of recent curricula, solving language issue, facing controversies on curriculum change, making it unified and centralized, diverting curricula to research orientation, obtaining continuous feedback and developing harmony in society at the same time. It is imperative for scholars to have effective communication skills and dynamic personality to incorporate the future trends without creating conflicts and confusion in the society. They need to know the skill to motivate and mould high ups for future changes and bring changes without development of controversies.

  3. Management of Character-Based Curriculum in the Educational Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Agustinus Hermino Superma Putra

    2015-01-01

    Manajemen Kurikulum Berbasis Karakter pada Satuan Pendidikan Abstract: The purpose of this study to determine the character-based curriculum in the educational unit. The approach used is a multi-case study design using the constant comparative method. Data were collected through interviews, observation, and study documentation. Analysis using comparative analysis. The results showed that curriculum planning based on the needs of the school, the ability of the foundation, educational exper...

  4. Prudentia: A Medical School's Solution to Curriculum Mapping and Curriculum Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steketee, Carole

    2015-01-01

    During early accreditation visits by the Australian Medical Council (AMC), staff in the School of Medicine (SoM) were asked to demonstrate how and when AMC student outcome statements were being integrated into the MBBS course. As a result, the School Executive committed to developing a curriculum mapping system (CMS) that could systematically…

  5. Curriculum Sexualmedizin der Universität Greifswald [Curriculum sexual medicine at the University of Greifswald

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rösing, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Undergraduate medical education of sexual medicine contents in Germany is very heterogeneous and is spread over various disciplines such as urology, gynaecology, dermatology, psychiatry and forensic medicine. In none of the existing curricula sexual health is a mandatory subject. Only those universities that have sexual medicine as an independent discipline offer a noteworthy curriculum. Based on incidence of sexual disorders and resultant necessity of health education as well as changes in the German medical licensing order (ÄAppO have led to restructuring undergraduate medical education. Emanating from the necessity of imparting sexual health knowledge, attitudes and communication skills we planned and implemented a new curriculum for sexual medicine. The bio-psycho-social approach of human sexuality is the basis of the curriculum that is divided in several parts.[german] Die Lehre von sexualmedizinischen Inhalten in Deutschland ist sehr heterogen und verteilt sich auf verschiedene Fächer wie die Urologie, Gynäkologie, Dermatologie, Psychiatrie und Rechtsmedizin. In keiner Studienordnung ist Sexualmedizin als Pflichtfach verankert. Ein nennenswertes Angebot findet sich bisher nur an den Hochschulen, an denen Sexualmedizin als eigenständiges Fach vertreten ist. Ausgehend von der Häufigkeit von Sexualstörungen, der sich daraus ergebenden Notwendigkeit einer strukturierten sexualmedizinischen Lehre im Humanmedizinstudium und den veränderten Bedingungen durch die Einführung der neuen ÄAppO ist durch die Klinik und Poliklinik für Urologie der Universität Greifswald ein sexualmedizinisches Curriculum geplant und implementiert worden . Grundlage des Curriculums ist die bio-psycho-soziale Betrachtungsweise der Sexualität des Menschen. Das Curriculum ist in mehrere Abschnitte gegliedert, in denen Wissen über Sexualität und Sexualstörungen und notwendige kommunikative Fähigkeiten gelehrt werden.

  6. Computing in the curriculum: challenges and strategies from a teacher's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sentance, Susan Elizabeth; Csizmadia, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Computing is being introduced into the curriculum in many countries. Teachers’ perspectives enable us to discover the challenges this presents, and also the strategies teachers claim to be using successfully in teaching the subject across primary and secondary education. The study described in this paper was carried out in the UK in 2014 where teachers were preparing for the mandatory inclusion of Computing into the curriculum. A survey was conducted of over 300 teachers who were currently te...

  7. Teaching GeoEthics Across the Geoscience Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.; Geissman, J. W.; Kieffer, S. W.; Reidy, M.; Taylor, S.; Vallero, D. A.; Bruckner, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Ethics education is an increasingly important component of the pre-professional training of geoscientists. Funding agencies (NSF) require training of graduate students in the responsible conduct of research, employers are increasingly expecting their workers to have basic training in ethics, and the public demands that scientists abide by the highest standards of ethical conduct. Yet, few faculty have the requisite training to effectively teach about ethics in their classes, or even informally in mentoring their research students. To address this need, an NSF-funded workshop was convened to explore how ethics education can be incorporated into the geoscience curriculum. Workshop goals included: examining where and how geoethics topics can be taught from introductory courses for non-majors to modules embedded in "core" geoscience majors courses or dedicated courses in geoethics; sharing best pedagogic practices for "what works" in ethics education; developing a geoethics curriculum framework; creating a collection of online instructional resources, case studies, and related materials; applying lessons learned about ethics education from sister disciplines (biology, engineering, philosophy); and considering ways that geoethics instruction can contribute to public scientific literacy. Four major themes were explored in detail: (1) GeoEthics and self: examining the internal attributes of a geoscientist that establish the ethical values required to successfully prepare for and contribute to a career in the geosciences; (2) GeoEthics and the geoscience profession: identifying ethical standards expected of geoscientists if they are to contribute responsibly to the community of practice; (3) GeoEthics and society: exploring geoscientists' responsibilities to effectively and responsibly communicate the results of geoscience research to inform society about issues ranging from geohazards to natural resource utilization in order to protect public health, safety, and economic

  8. University of the Witwatersrand physiotherapy undergraduate curriculum alignment to medical conditions of patients within Gauteng state health facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgobadibe V. Ntsiea

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The healthcare sector requires graduates with the ability to confidently assess and manage the majority of the medical conditions seen in hospitals.Objective: To establish whether the most prevalent medical conditions treated by physiotherapists in Gauteng (South Africa state health facilities align with the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits physiotherapy curriculum.Methods: This was a retrospective review of condition-related statistics from physiotherapy departments within the Gauteng province state health facilities. Data from all Gauteng government hospitals that had submitted at least 75% of their physiotherapy condition–related statistics to the provincial statistics coordinator from January 2012 to December 2014 were considered and compared to medical conditions covered in the Wits 2015 physiotherapy curriculum to check if all conditions listed in the Gauteng statistics appeared within the Wits curriculum document. The number of teaching hours for the common conditions was noted to check the emphasis given to these conditions in the curriculum.Results: Eighty-three per cent of the hospitals submitted 75% of their monthly statistics. Overall, the most common conditions treated were lower limb fractures (13% followed by stroke (7.6% (n = 705 597. Within the neuro-musculoskeletal category, the most common conditions after lower limb fractures were soft tissue injuries (15.1% (n = 330 511. The most common cardiopulmonary conditions were tuberculosis (24.9%, followed by pneumonia (13.8% (n = 94 895. The most common neurological conditions were stroke (30.9% followed by cerebral palsy (17% (n = 174 024. Within the non-specified categories, the number of intensive care unit (ICU patients was the highest (23%, followed by sputum induction (21% (n = 138 187. The most common conditions that were emphasised within the Wits curriculum as indicated by the teaching hours: fractures, 14.5 (66% of 22 third-year orthopaedics hours

  9. School-Based Curriculum Development in Scotland: Curriculum Policy and Enactment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark; Minty, Sarah; Eager, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent worldwide trends in curriculum policy have re-emphasised the role of teachers in school-based curriculum development. Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence is typical of these trends, stressing that teachers are agents of change. This paper draws upon empirical data to explore school-based curriculum development in response to Curriculum for…

  10. School-Based Curriculum Development in Scotland: Curriculum Policy and Enactment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark; Minty, Sarah; Eager, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent worldwide trends in curriculum policy have re-emphasised the role of teachers in school-based curriculum development. Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence is typical of these trends, stressing that teachers are agents of change. This paper draws upon empirical data to explore school-based curriculum development in response to Curriculum for…

  11. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    important positions in the lower-division chemistry curriculum. The new curriculum reflects accurately current practice in research and the chemical industry where growth is occurring in these new fields. Today information-technology-based learning enables a practical approach to discovery learning, which educational theorists have long favored. Students can learn science by doing science. In particular, we will produce problem-based modular learning units that define the molecular science curriculum; data sets organized for exploratory learning; prepackaged molecular, mathematical, and schematic models illustrating important principles and phenomena; and a client/server system that manages education. Client/server technology enables individualized courses and frees students from rigid time constraints. The learning units will be used immediately by several of the community colleges in technology programs, such as those for science technicians and hazardous materials technicians at Mount San Antonio CC. New assessment vehicles including cumulative electronic portfolios of group and individual work provide new insight into student development and potential. The project also addresses the preparation of primary and secondary science teachers by involving them as active participants in the lower division courses of the molecular science curriculum. At both UCLA and CSUF, these students will gain experience with the modules, associated learning methods, and electronic delivery system. These experiences should result in teachers with a practical perspective on science teaching as well as the ability to utilize current technology to direct learning activities. The electronic delivery system will allow students at UCLA to work with the science education faculty at CSUF to obtain certification. Since 1990 two high schools (Aliso Niguel and Crossroads) have become members of the Alliance. These schools have the facilities to expose students, experienced teachers, and future teachers

  12. 14 CFR 121.911 - Indoctrination curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indoctrination curriculum. 121.911 Section... Indoctrination curriculum. Each indoctrination curriculum must include the following: (a) For newly hired persons... curriculums, as appropriate. (d) For evaluators: General evaluation requirements of the AQP; methods of...

  13. 24 CFR 3286.308 - Training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Training curriculum. 3286.308... States § 3286.308 Training curriculum. (a) Curriculum for initial installer licensing. The training... regulations in this part. The curriculum must include, at a minimum, training in the following areas: (1) An...

  14. A Topography for Canadian Curriculum Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Presents challenges to Canadian curriculum theorists: (1) to create curriculum languages and genres that represent all of Canada; (2) to use Canadian scholars and indigenous languages to find these curriculum languages and genres; (3) to seek interpretive tools to understand what it means to be Canadian; and (4) to create curriculum theory that…

  15. School Leadership and Curriculum: German Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephan; Tulowitzki, Pierre; Hameyer, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the role of school leadership vis-à-vis the curriculum. First, it offers a brief overview of school leadership in Germany. Next, curriculum development and curriculum research in Germany is briefly recapped. We present empirical data on school leadership preferences, strain experience, and practices as to curriculum work.…

  16. Medical graduates feel well-prepared for clinical work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Kjeldsen, Inge Trads

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to assess the coherence between the undergraduate medical program at Aarhus University and the foundation year. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional questionnaire survey included 503 doctors graduated from Aarhus University from the winter of 2007....../2008 to the summer of 2009. RESULTS: The response rate was 73%. Approximately 73% of the respondents were in their foundation year or their first year of specialist training and 83% generally felt well-prepared. Respondents found that most of the learning outcomes of the undergraduate medical curriculum at Aarhus...... University are important for junior doctors. More than 90% of the respondents estimated that they were sufficiently prepared when it came to core outcomes such as history taking and physical examination. Five issues diverged considerably in importance stated and preparedness experienced: suggestion...

  17. On the Development of Digital Forensics Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Manghui Tu; Dianxiang Xu; Cristian Balan; kyle Cronin

    2012-01-01

    Computer Crime and computer related incidents continue their prevalence and frequency and result in loss of billions of dollars. To fight against those crimes and frauds, it is urgent to develop digital forensics education programs to train a suitable workforce to efficiently and effectively investigate crimes and frauds. However, there is no standard to guide the design of digital forensics curriculum for an academic program. In this research, we investigate the research works on digital for...

  18. A ‘Globalised’ Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Globalisation is often referred to as being external to education – a state of affairs presenting the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this article, ‘globalisation’ is examined as something that is internal to curriculum and analysed as a problematisation in a Foucaultian sense......, that is, as a complex of attentions, worries and ways of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish preschool, and the way the curricular variable of the preschool child comes into being through ‘globalisation...

  19. Assessment of occlusion curriculum in predoctoral dental education: report from ACP Task Force on Occlusion Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Damian J; Wiens, Jonathan P; Ference, John; Donatelli, David; Smith, Rick M; Dye, Bryan D; Obrez, Ales; Lang, Lisa A

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this report were to (1) assess the current occlusion curriculum in the predoctoral prosthodontic education of US dental institutions and (2) to examine the opinions of faculty, course directors, and program directors on the contents of occlusion curriculum. The Task Force on Occlusion Education from the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) conducted two surveys using a web-based survey engine: one to assess the current status of occlusion education in predoctoral dental education and another to examine the opinions of faculty and course directors on the content of occlusion curriculum. The sections in the surveys included demographic information, general curriculum information, occlusion curriculum for dentate patients, occlusion curriculum for removable prosthodontics, occlusion curriculum for implant prosthodontics, temporomandibular disorder (TMD) curriculum, teaching philosophy, concepts taught, and methods of assessment. The results from the surveys were compiled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results from the two surveys on general concepts taught in occlusion curriculum were sorted and compared for discrepancies. According to the predoctoral occlusion curriculum surveys, canine guidance was preferred for dentate patients, fixed prosthodontics, and fixed implant prosthodontics. Bilateral balanced occlusion was preferred for removable prosthodontics and removable implant prosthodontics. There were minor differences between the two surveys regarding the occlusion concepts being taught and the opinions of faculty members teaching occlusion. Two surveys were conducted regarding the current concepts being taught in occlusion curriculum and the opinions of educators on what should be taught in occlusion curriculum. An updated and clearly defined curriculum guideline addressing occlusion in fixed prosthodontics, removable prosthodontics, implant prosthodontics, and TMD is needed. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. A curriculum vitae that gives you a competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, S M

    1997-07-01

    All nurses with advancing careers should maintain a current curriculum vitae (CV) to chronicle professional accomplishments. Whatever the work setting, a CV can showcase skills and achievements. It is used when applying for a new position, but also within one's current situation to inform other professionals of specific interests and abilities. This article reviews nursing literature regarding preparation of a CV and suggests a format for the advanced practice nurse to use when writing a CV.

  1. Will the use of double barrier result in sustained release of vancomycin? Optimization of parameters for preparation of a new antibacterial alginate-based modern dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczewska, Joanna; Sawicka, Paulina; Ratajczak, Magdalena; Gajęcka, Marzena; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this research was to prepare and characterize an alginate-based wound dressing containing vancomycin immobilized at the silica surface. The silica samples functionalized with amine, diol and carboxylic acid groups were loaded with 7.8, 5.7 and 7.1wt.% of the antibiotic respectively. The immobilized drug was encapsulated in alginate or gelatin/alginate gels and the average concentration of vancomycin was about 10mg per g of the dried gel. The effect of functional organic groups at the silica surface on the release rate of the drug was investigated. Only the drug immobilized at Si-amine in alginate matrix was found to demonstrate slower release from the proposed wound dressing. The in vitro release profiles for other silica carriers did not show significant differences in relation to the free loaded drug. The presence of gelatin had a favourable impact on the slowing down of the drug release from the dressing with a double barrier. All the gels studied with vancomycin immobilized at the silica surface demonstrated antimicrobial activity against various bacteria. A reduction of the drug dose to a half had no effect on changing microbiological activity of gels.

  2. Roles of Principals in the Preparing Students to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Bingul, Murat

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the impacts of school leaders on the school curriculums of preparing students to life. Even if the school leaders and teachers are expert in their area related to the functions of the schools, it seems that schools are failing in the preparation of the students to life. The school leaders may play an important role to…

  3. Innovating Science Teaching by Participatory Action Research – Reflections from an Interdisciplinary Project of Curriculum Innovation on Teaching about Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Feierabend

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a three-year curriculum innovation project on teaching about climate change. The innovation for this study focused on a socio-critical approach towards teaching climate change in four different teaching domains (biology, chemistry, physics and politics. The teaching itself explicitly aimed at general educational objectives, i.e., fostering students’ communication and evaluation abilities as essential components for preparing young people for active participation in society. Participatory Action Research has been used as a collaborative strategy of cyclical curriculum innovation and research. Using past experiences and selected results from accompanying research, this project and its methodology will be reflected upon from the viewpoint of the chemistry group taking part in the project. Core issues reflected upon include how the project contributed to the creation of feasible curriculum materials, how it led to innovative structures in practice, and whether it supported experienced teachers’ ongoing professional development. General considerations for the process of curriculum innovation will also be derived.

  4. Analyzing the curriculum of the faculty of medicine, University of Gezira using Harden’s 10 questions framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASAR ALBUSHRA AHMED

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the importance of curriculum analysis for internal refinement of a programme, the approach for such a step in under-described in the literature. This article describes the analysis of the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira (FMUG. This analysis is crucial in the era of innovative medical education since introducing new curricula and curricular changes has become a common occurrence in medical education worldwide. Methods: The curriculum analysis was qualitatively approached using descriptive analysis and adopting Harden’s 10 Questions of curriculum development framework approach. Answering Harden’s questions reflects the fundamental curricular components and how the different aspects of a curriculum framework fit together. The key features highlighted in the curriculum-related material and literature have been presented. Results: The analysis of the curriculum of FMUG reveals a curriculum with interactive components. Clear structured objectives and goals reflect the faculty’s vision. The approach for needs assessment is based on a scientific ground, and the curriculum integrated contents have been set to meet national and international requirements. Adopting SPICES strategies helps FMUG and students achieve the objectives of the curriculum. Multiple motivated instructional methods are adopted, fostering coping with the programme objectives and outcomes. A wide range of assessment methods has been adopted to assess the learning outcomes of the curriculum correctly, reliably, and in alignment with the intended outcomes. The prevailing conducive educational environment of FMUG is favourable for its operation and profoundly influences the outcome of the programme. And there is a well-defined policy for curriculum management, monitoring and evaluation. Conclusion: Harden’s 10 questions are satisfactorily addressed by the multi-disciplinary and well-developed FMUG curriculum. The current

  5. Analyzing the Curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira using Harden’s 10 questions framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    AHMED, YASAR ALBUSHRA; ALNEEL, SALMA

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the importance of curriculum analysis for internal refinement of a programme, the approach for such a step in under-described in the literature. This article describes the analysis of the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira (FMUG). This analysis is crucial in the era of innovative medical education since introducing new curricula and curricular changes has become a common occurrence in medical education worldwide. Methods: The curriculum analysis was qualitatively approached using descriptive analysis and adopting Harden’s 10 Questions of curriculum development framework approach. Answering Harden's questions reflects the fundamental curricular components and how the different aspects of a curriculum framework fit together. The key features highlighted in the curriculum-related material and literature have been presented. Results: The analysis of the curriculum of FMUG reveals a curriculum with interactive components. Clear structured objectives and goals reflect the faculty’s vision. The approach for needs assessment is based on a scientific ground, and the curriculum integrated contents have been set to meet national and international requirements. Adopting SPICES strategies helps FMUG and students achieve the objectives of the curriculum. Multiple motivated instructional methods are adopted, fostering coping with the programme objectives and outcomes. A wide range of assessment methods has been adopted to assess the learning outcomes of the curriculum correctly, reliably, and in alignment with the intended outcomes. The prevailing conducive educational environment of FMUG is favourable for its operation and profoundly influences the outcome of the programme. And there is a well-defined policy for curriculum management, monitoring and evaluation. Conclusion: Harden’s 10 questions are satisfactorily addressed by the multi-disciplinary and well-developed FMUG curriculum. The current curriculum supports the

  6. An Imperative for Leadership Preparation Programs: Preparing Future Leaders to Meet the Needs of Students, Schools, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the structure, philosophy, and curriculum of educational leadership preparation programs and the importance of preparing schools leaders to address the unique needs of students and communities. In particular, it will address how programs can be enhanced by integrating organizational research and philosophies from educational,…

  7. Basic sciences curriculum in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA REZAEE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditional methods are generally used for teaching basic science courses at Shiraz Medical School. Such courses are taught during the first and second years of a seven-year medical program. The goal of this study was to analyze teachers and students’ perceptions of basic science teaching in medical education. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the college of medicine of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Results: Regarding the students’ viewpoints, 71.4% reported that curriculum content in basic sciences was enough and had good relevance. 59.2% of students believed the objectives of basic sciences curriculum were clear. Conclusion: The burden of teaching basic sciences ranges from sustaining interest to clinical relevance. It is expected that medical schools will continuously monitor what works and what does not work with their curricula and make the necessary adaptations as required.

  8. A Model for the Development of a CDIO Based Curriculum in Electrical Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Kjærgaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    at the Technical University of Denmark and this gives a strong direct impact of the university environment on the resulting curriculum in electrical engineering. The resulting Bachelor of Engineering curriculum is presented and it is discussed how it complies with the model for curriculum development. The main...... environment, the university environment, and the teachers and students. Each of them and their influence on the curriculum is described and the sources of information about the influencers are discussed. The CDIO syllabus has been defined as part of the basis for the Bachelor of Engineering programs...

  9. Adding Creativity to the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Verna

    1974-01-01

    Numerous ways are discussed in which teachers can make creative additions to the nursery school curriculum in activities related to science, creative arts, outdoor play, dramatics, music, and language arts. (BP)

  10. Ethics in the Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroskar, Mila Ann

    1977-01-01

    In theory, most educators in this survey supported teaching ethics; in practice, few baccalaureate programs provide planned curricular offerings dealing with this subject. Suggestions are offered for implementing curriculum changes. (Editor/TA)

  11. Engaging young children in collective curriculum design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Maria Inês Mafra; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2010-09-01

    In this study we investigate how 5-year-old children in Brazil and their teachers collectively design science curriculum. More specifically, we develop an agency|structure dialectic as a framework to describe this collective praxis in which science curriculum may emerge as the result of children-teacher transactions rather than as a result of being predetermined and controlled by the latter. We draw on a cultural-historical approach and on the theory of structure and agency to analyze the events showing the complexity of the activity inside a classroom of very young children by science education standards. Data were collected in the context of a science unit in an early-childhood education program in Belo Horizonte. Our study suggests that (a) throughout the movement of agency|passivity || schema|resources one can observe participative thinking, a form of collective consciousness that arises in and from lived experience; (b) learning is a process in which a group is invested in searching for solutions while they create schemas and rearrange resources to evolve a new structure; and (c) the emergent curriculum is a powerful form of praxis that develops children's participation from early childhood on.

  12. Developing and analysing a curriculum map in Occupational- and Environmental Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Inga

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last 5 years a fundamental curriculum reform was realized at the medical school of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University. In contrast to those efforts, the learning objectives were not defined consistently for the curriculum and important questions concerning the curriculum could not be answered. This also applied to Occupational and Environmental Medicine where teachers of both courses were faced with additional problems such as the low number of students attending the lectures. The aims of the study were to develop and analyse a curriculum map for Occupational and Environmental Medicine based on learning objectives using a web-based database. Furthermore we aimed to evaluate student perception about the curricular structure. Methods Using a web-based learning objectives database, a curriculum map for Occupational and Environmental Medicine was developed and analysed. Additionally online evaluations of students for each course were conducted. Results The results show a discrepancy between the taught and the assessed curriculum. For both curricula, we identified that several learning objectives were not covered in the curriculum. There were overlaps with other content domains and redundancies within both curricula. 53% of the students in Occupational Medicine and 43% in Environmental Medicine stated that there is a lack of information regarding the learning objectives of the curriculum. Conclusions The results of the curriculum mapping and the poor evaluation results for the courses suggest a need for re-structuring both curricula.

  13. Developing and analysing a curriculum map in Occupational- and Environmental Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background During the last 5 years a fundamental curriculum reform was realized at the medical school of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University. In contrast to those efforts, the learning objectives were not defined consistently for the curriculum and important questions concerning the curriculum could not be answered. This also applied to Occupational and Environmental Medicine where teachers of both courses were faced with additional problems such as the low number of students attending the lectures. The aims of the study were to develop and analyse a curriculum map for Occupational and Environmental Medicine based on learning objectives using a web-based database. Furthermore we aimed to evaluate student perception about the curricular structure. Methods Using a web-based learning objectives database, a curriculum map for Occupational and Environmental Medicine was developed and analysed. Additionally online evaluations of students for each course were conducted. Results The results show a discrepancy between the taught and the assessed curriculum. For both curricula, we identified that several learning objectives were not covered in the curriculum. There were overlaps with other content domains and redundancies within both curricula. 53% of the students in Occupational Medicine and 43% in Environmental Medicine stated that there is a lack of information regarding the learning objectives of the curriculum. Conclusions The results of the curriculum mapping and the poor evaluation results for the courses suggest a need for re-structuring both curricula. PMID:20840737

  14. Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit was designed to help engineering educators develop and teach energy management courses. Montana State University and Oklahoma State University courses are embodied in the model curriculum given. The curricula offered at many other universities throughout the United States are also presented. The kit was designed specifically to train engineering students to be good energy managers. Courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level are presented.

  15. A balancing act: the curriculum vitae and the interview process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B A; Dickson, C J

    1994-01-01

    The authors believe that one possible solution to the dearth of minority nursing faculty in higher education is thorough preparation for the search process by the minority applicant. This article discusses the appointment/hiring process and provides the reader with authoritative and experiential information necessary for constructing a curriculum vitae (CV) and preparing for an interview. Armed with a proper CV and knowledge of potential interview questions, the authors believe that minority applicants will be able to maneuver their way through the maize of job interviews. In addition, suggestions are offered to those serving on promotion and tenure committees and administrators.

  16. The development of a problem-based curriculum in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B G; Quant, V M; Cooke, P

    1998-12-01

    Making use of best available evidence has clearly become an important part of midwifery practice. As educational programmes are preparing the practitioners of the future, it is believed that midwifery education should also be informed by evidence. At Thames Valley University, a BSc Midwifery curriculum, using the principles of problem-based learning, has been implemented following a review of both appropriate research and evaluation. This article explains the process undertaken in preparation for the course as well as the proposed means of ongoing evaluation.

  17. A Needs Assessment for a Longitudinal Emergency Medicine Intern Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappell, Eric; Ahn, James

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A key task of emergency medicine (EM) training programs is to develop a consistent knowledge of core content in recruits with heterogeneous training backgrounds. The traditional model for delivering core content is lecture-based weekly conference; however, a growing body of literature finds this format less effective and less appealing than alternatives. We sought to address this challenge by conducting a needs assessment for a longitudinal intern curriculum for millennial learners. Methods We surveyed all residents from the six EM programs in the greater Chicago area regarding the concept, format, and scope of a longitudinal intern curriculum. Results We received 153 responses from the 300 residents surveyed (51% response rate). The majority of respondents (80%; 82% of interns) agreed or strongly agreed that a dedicated intern curriculum would add value to residency education. The most positively rated teaching method was simulation sessions (91% positive responses), followed by dedicated weekly conference time (75% positive responses) and dedicated asynchronous resources (71% positive responses). Less than half of respondents (47%; 26% of interns) supported use of textbook readings in the curriculum. Conclusion There is strong learner interest in a longitudinal intern curriculum. This needs assessment can serve to inform the development of a universal intern curriculum targeting the millennial generation. PMID:28116005

  18. Designing a tool for curriculum leadership development in postgraduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership in the area of curriculum development is increasingly important as we look for ways to improve our programmes and practices. In curriculum studies, leadership has received little attention. Considering the lack of an evaluation tool with objective criteria in postgraduate curriculum leadership process, this study aimed to design a specific tool and determine the validity and reliability of the tool. Method: This study is a methodological research.  At first, domains and items of the tool were determined through expert interviews and literature review. Then, using Delphi technique, 54 important criteria were developed. A panel of experts was used to confirm content and face validity. Reliability was determined by a descriptive study in which 30 faculties from two of Isfahan universities and was estimated by internal consistency. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and reliability analysis. Results: At first, considering the definition of curriculum leadership determined the domains and items of the tool and they were developed primary tool. Expert’s faculties’ views were used in deferent stages of development and psychometry. The tool internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient times was 96.5. This was determined for each domain separately. Conclution: Applying this instrument can improve the effectiveness of curriculum leadership. Identifying the characteristics of successful and effective leaders, and utilizing this knowledge in developing and implementing curriculum might help us to have better respond to the changing needs of our students, teachers and schools of tomorrow.

  19. Uncovering Portuguese teachers’ difficulties in implementing sciences curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Vasconcelos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many countries recognize the positive and effective results of improving science education through the introduction of reforms in the sciences curriculum. However, some important issues are generally neglected like, for example, the involvement of the teachers in the reform process. Taking the sciences curriculum reform under analysis and benefitting from 10 years of teachers’ experiences in teaching sciences based on this curriculum, 19 semi-structure interviews were applied so as to identify the major difficulties felt by science teachers when implementing the Portuguese sciences curriculum in the third cycle of middle school (pupils’ age range of 12–15. Some of the difficulties depicted by the data analysis include: length of the curriculum, lack of time, unsuitable laboratory facilities, insufficient means and materials for experimental work, pupils’ indiscipline and little interest in learning sciences. Although less frequently mentioned, the lack of professional development was also referred to as a constraint that seems to play an essential role in this process. Some recommendations for improving the success of sciences curriculum reforms’ implementation are given: defining and conceptualizing curricular policies by relating the reality of both the schools and the science classrooms; reorganizing and restructuring pre-service teachers’ courses; organizing professional development courses for in-service teachers.

  20. The critical thinking curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William Haviland

    The Critical Thinking Curriculum Model (CTCM) utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that integrates effective learning and teaching practices with computer technology. The model is designed to be flexible within a curriculum, an example for teachers to follow, where they can plug in their own critical issue. This process engages students in collaborative research that can be shared in the classroom, across the country or around the globe. The CTCM features open-ended and collaborative activities that deal with current, real world issues which leaders are attempting to solve. As implemented in the Critical Issues Forum (CIF), an educational program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the CTCM encompasses the political, social/cultural, economic, and scientific realms in the context of a current global issue. In this way, students realize the importance of their schooling by applying their efforts to an endeavor that ultimately will affect their future. This study measures student attitudes toward science and technology and the changes that result from immersion in the CTCM. It also assesses the differences in student learning in science content and problem solving for students involved in the CTCM. A sample of 24 students participated in classrooms at two separate high schools in New Mexico. The evaluation results were analyzed using SPSS in a MANOVA format in order to determine the significance of the between and within-subjects effects. A comparison ANOVA was done for each two-way MANOVA to see if the comparison groups were equal. Significant findings were validated using the Scheffe test in a Post Hoc analysis. Demographic information for the sample population was recorded and tracked, including self-assessments of computer use and availability. Overall, the results indicated that the CTCM did help to increase science content understanding and problem-solving skills for students, thereby positively effecting critical thinking. No matter if the

  1. Research on Motivation: New Content for the Teacher Preparation Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Margaret W.

    1986-01-01

    The author reviews the literature on attribution theory and extrinsic and intrinsic rewards, and describes how teacher educators can work with prospective teachers to facilitate improved classroom conditions to motivate student teachers and, in turn, students. (MT)

  2. Research on Motivation: New Content for the Teacher Preparation Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Margaret W.

    1986-01-01

    The author reviews the literature on attribution theory and extrinsic and intrinsic rewards, and describes how teacher educators can work with prospective teachers to facilitate improved classroom conditions to motivate student teachers and, in turn, students. (MT)

  3. Understanding change and curriculum implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Gayle Marie

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative case study that examined perceptions of teachers in 2 schools about the process of change used in the implementation of a hands-on science program. Many change initiatives have failed in their implementation, and it may not necessarily be attributed to their quality. A countless number of promising programs have been derailed by a poor understanding of the process of change. This study looks first at the history of science reform to illustrate first the importance of hands-on inquiry as an effective instructional strategy. Then the process of change and its relationship to the implementation of a hands-on science curriculum was examined. The Hands on Science Program (HASP) is modular based and relies heavily on inquiry teaching. The project had been underway in these schools for about 5 years, and the districts are ready to evaluate its success. An interview with the original Project Director and information obtained from a summative evaluation helped explain the HASP. The Project Director shared the thinking that was involved in the program's inception, and the evaluation report served as a summary of the project's progress. Two schools were selected to examine the status of the program. The Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire and the Organizational Health Inventory developed by Hoy and Tarter (1997) were used to enrich the description of the school. Five teachers from each school, who have had leading roles in the implementation, were interviewed in an attempt to understand the insider's view of the change process used in the implementation of the HASP in their schools. Achievement data from the Stanford Achievement Test-9 was also used to provide some additional information. Interviews were used to understand teacher perceptions in each school and then compared in a cross-ease analysis. The results of this study could be used as planning suggestions for educational leaders designing change initiatives, although it

  4. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  5. Undergraduate study in psychology: Curriculum and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Hailstorks, Robin; Aiken, Leona S; Pfund, Rory A; Stamm, Karen E; Christidis, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    The undergraduate curriculum in psychology profoundly reflects and shapes the discipline. Yet, reliable information on the undergraduate psychology curriculum has been difficult to acquire due to insufficient research carried out on unrepresentative program samples with disparate methods. In 2014, APA launched the first systematic effort in a decade to gather national data on the psychology major and program outcomes. We surveyed a stratified random sample of department chairs/coordinators of accredited colleges and universities in the United States that offer undergraduate courses and programs in psychology. A total of 439 undergraduate psychology programs (45.2%) completed the survey. This article summarizes, for both associate and baccalaureate programs, the results of the Undergraduate Study in Psychology. Current practices concerning the introductory course, the courses offered, core requirements, the psychology minor, and tracks/concentrations are presented. The frequency of formal program reviews and program-level assessment methods are also addressed. By extending prior research on the undergraduate curriculum, we chronicle longitudinal changes in the psychology major over the past 20 years.

  6. Reforming the 4th-Year Curriculum as a Springboard to Graduate Medical Training: One School's Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Andrew; Daroowalla, Feroza; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-01-01

    Concerns regarding the quality of training in the 4th year of medical school and preparation of graduates to enter residency education persist and are borne out in the literature. We reviewed the published literature regarding Year 4 concerns as well as institutional efforts to improve the 4th-year curriculum from several schools. Based on input from key stakeholders, we established 4 goals for our Year 4 curriculum reform: (a) standardize the curricular structure, (b) allow flexibility and individualization, (c) improve the preparation for residency, and (d) improve student satisfaction. After the reform, we evaluated the outcomes using results from the Association of American Medical Colleges Questionnaire, student focus groups, and program director surveys. This article describes the context, process, and outcomes of the reform of the Year 4 curriculum at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. We were able to achieve all four stated goals for the reform. The significant components of the change included a flexible adaptable curriculum based on individual needs and preferences, standardized learning objectives across the year, standardized competency-based evaluations regardless of discipline, reinforcement of clinical skills, and training for the transition to the workplace as an intern. The reform resulted in increased student satisfaction, increased elective time, and increased preparedness for residency training as perceived by the graduates. The Program Director survey showed significant changes in ability to perform a medical history and exam, management of common medical conditions and emergencies, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills, working and communication with the healthcare team, and overall professionalism in meeting obligations inherent in the practice of medicine. Lessons learned from our 4th-year reform process are discussed. Listening to the needs of the stakeholders was an important step in ensuring buy-in, having an institutional

  7. The Emergence of Enterprise Systems Management - A Challenge to the IS Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2005-01-01

    in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). Enterprise Systems Management calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways......This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems curriculum. It analyzes the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage resulting...

  8. The Emergence of Enterprise Systems Management - A Challenge to the IS Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems curriculum. It analyzes the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage resulting...... in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). Enterprise Systems Management calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways...

  9. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...... resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching...

  10. Development and assessment of a radiology core curriculum in health care policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirowitz, S A

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a core curriculum in health policy and practice for radiology residents and fellows, to determine whether such a curriculum would be considered professionally valuable by participants, and to determine if the curriculum would influence participants' careers. A core curriculum in health policy and practice was developed, involving 19 seminars presented over 5 weeks. Twelve faculty members presented comprehensive and integrated information relevant to current and future radiology practice. Topic clusters included health care structure and payment, technology and health services, radiology practice management, and career issues. Classroom teaching was supplemented by a course syllabus and resource library. Participants were surveyed following each seminar and at the conclusion of the curriculum. Participants described their baseline knowledge of each topic as weak. As a result of the curriculum, self-described knowledge ratings increased considerably. Interest in curriculum topics and perception of their importance and relevance to radiology practice increased. Of respondents, 84% (26 of 31) described the curriculum as having very good or excellent educational value. All respondents indicated that the curriculum should be repeated in the future, 42% (13 of 31) indicated that the curriculum motivated them to pursue further related education, and 61% (19 of 31) developed interest in personal involvement in administrative issues and radiology organizations. A core curriculum in health policy and practice was successfully integrated into radiology training. The curriculum resulted in increased knowledge, interest, and perceived importance of medical management issues by residents and fellows and stimulated their interest in pursuing further management education and involvement in radiology administration and organizations.

  11. The digital curriculum vitae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Greg M; Gotway, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The curriculum vitae (CV) has been the traditional method for radiologists to illustrate their accomplishments in the field of medicine. Despite its presence in medicine as a standard, widely accepted means to describe one's professional career and its use for decades as an accomplice to most applications and interviews, there is relatively little written in the medical literature regarding the CV. Misrepresentation on medical students', residents', and fellows' applications has been reported. Using digital technology, CVs have the potential to be much more than printed words on paper and offers a solution to misrepresentation. Digital CVs may incorporate full-length articles, graphics, presentations, clinical images, and video. Common formats for digital CVs include CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs containing articles (in Adobe Portable Document Format) and presentations (in Microsoft PowerPoint format) accompanying printed CVs, word processing documents with hyperlinks to articles and presentations either locally (on CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs) or remotely (via the Internet), or hypertext markup language documents. Digital CVs afford the ability to provide more information that is readily accessible to those receiving and reviewing them. Articles, presentations, videos, images, and Internet links can be illustrated using standard file formats commonly available to all radiologists. They can be easily updated and distributed on an inexpensive media, such as a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM. With the availability of electronic articles, presentations, and information via the Internet, traditional paper CVs may soon be superseded by their electronic successors.

  12. Teaching learning methods of an entrepreneurship curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERAMAT ESMI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most significant elements of entrepreneurship curriculum design is teaching-learning methods, which plays a key role in studies and researches related to such a curriculum. It is the teaching method, and systematic, organized and logical ways of providing lessons that should be consistent with entrepreneurship goals and contents, and should also be developed according to the learners’ needs. Therefore, the current study aimed to introduce appropriate, modern, and effective methods of teaching entrepreneurship and their validation Methods: This is a mixed method research of a sequential exploratory kind conducted through two stages: a developing teaching methods of entrepreneurship curriculum, and b validating developed framework. Data were collected through “triangulation” (study of documents, investigating theoretical basics and the literature, and semi-structured interviews with key experts. Since the literature on this topic is very rich, and views of the key experts are vast, directed and summative content analysis was used. In the second stage, qualitative credibility of research findings was obtained using qualitative validation criteria (credibility, confirmability, and transferability, and applying various techniques. Moreover, in order to make sure that the qualitative part is reliable, reliability test was used. Moreover, quantitative validation of the developed framework was conducted utilizing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods and Cronbach’s alpha. The data were gathered through distributing a three-aspect questionnaire (direct presentation teaching methods, interactive, and practical-operational aspects with 29 items among 90 curriculum scholars. Target population was selected by means of purposive sampling and representative sample. Results: Results obtained from exploratory factor analysis showed that a three factor structure is an appropriate method for describing elements of

  13. The essential research curriculum for doctor of pharmacy degree programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mary W; Clay, Patrick G; Kennedy, W Klugh; Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Sifontis, Nicole M; Simonson, Dana; Sowinski, Kevin M; Taylor, William J; Teply, Robyn M; Vardeny, Orly; Welty, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    In 2008, the American College of Clinical Pharmacy appointed the Task Force on Research in the Professional Curriculum to review and make recommendations on the essential research curriculum that should be part of doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree programs. The essential research curriculum provides all students with critical and analytical thinking and lifelong learning skills, which will apply to current and future practice and stimulate some students to pursue a career in this field. Eight key curricular competencies are as follows: identifying relevant problems and gaps in pharmacotherapeutic knowledge; generating a research hypothesis; designing a study to test the hypothesis; analyzing data results using appropriate statistical tests; interpreting and applying the results of a research study to practice; effectively communicating research and clinical findings to pharmacy, medical, and basic science audiences; interpreting and effectively communicating research and clinical findings to patients and caregivers; and applying regulatory and ethical principles when conducting research or using research results. Faculty are encouraged to use research-related examples across the curriculum in nonresearch courses and to employ interactive teaching methods to promote student engagement. Examples of successful strategies used by Pharm.D. degree programs to integrate research content into the curriculum are provided. Current pharmacy school curricula allow variable amounts of time for instructional content in research, which may or may not include hands-on experiences for students to develop research-related skills. Therefore, an important opportunity exists for schools to incorporate the essential research curriculum. Despite the challenges of implementing these recommendations, the essential research curriculum will position pharmacy school graduates to understand the importance of research and its applications to practice. This perspective is provided as an aid

  14. English Language Teacher Education: Rewriting S-1 National Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Soenardi Djiwandono

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of an overall attempt to improve secondary school teacher education, a program has been launched to review and develop the national curriculum (KURNAS of English language teacher education in Indonesia as a means to improve the quality of teachers of English. The new curriculum is at the same time intended to be a revision of the 1995 national curriculum supposedly in use now. For the purpose a team of three members was appointed by the Secondary School Teacher Development Project (nationally known as Proyek PGSM, comprising English teaching professionalls from Universitas Negeri Malang, GAJAHMADA UNIVERSITY, and a senior high school teacher of English. Following a study of the existing documents related to ELT in Indonesia, an initial draft was written and gradually developed following a series of discussions and exchanges of ideas with teachers and profesionalls in the field of ELT. By the 3 rd year of the appointment of the team, the draft for the new KURNAS comprising Books I, II, and III, has been completed and ready for a try-out. The try-out was intended to put into practise the Intensive Course (IC Program as one of the most important components of the new KURNAS for the development of fluency in English as an essential basis for the preparation of competent high school teachers of English. This article describes the background and the underlying principles of the curriculum revision, along with the classification and identification of courses, descriptions of courses their and syllabus outlines.

  15. Recent changes in the curriculum of Chinese dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Junqi; Fu, Yun

    2007-11-01

    Chinese dental education is organized and controlled by the government at different levels, and the curriculum is based on the stomatology model. The unique feature of this system has been a heavy emphasis on the medical sciences and the integration of medicine with dentistry. However, the problems with this curriculum have been greater than its advantages since a dental student trained under this educational model was unlikely to be well prepared for patient care in a clinical setting and could struggle to apply modern techniques during his or her professional career. From 1995 to 2000, six well-known Chinese dental schools participated in a curriculum innovation project supported by the central government. This article describes the educational model developed during the project and presents several new educational concepts that have been put into practice in dental schools in China. Nevertheless, the new model is not without problems. If there are no additional innovations related to didactic teaching methods, clinical education, and interpersonal skills, the outcome of recent changes in the curriculum of Chinese dental schools will be unpredictable, and our dental education will not continue to advance.

  16. Enhancing Medical Student Education by Implementing a Competency-Based Ophthalmology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succar, Tony; McCluskey, Peter; Grigg, John

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate innovative educational strategies that help optimize ophthalmology teaching in a crowded medical curriculum. The knowledge acquisition and perceptions of medical students undertaking the revised competency-based curriculum were compared with the prior content-based curriculum within the Sydney Medical Program. A mixed-methods research design was employed to include both quantitative and qualitative dimensions in evaluating the revised curriculum with medical students (n = 328) undergoing their ophthalmology rotation. Quantitative evaluation was performed with a 20-item multiple choice pre- and post-test of ophthalmic knowledge. A 12-month follow-up test was readministered to compare the long-term retention rate of graduates. Qualitative evaluation was measured with student satisfaction questionnaires. In the original curriculum there was an improvement of 19.9% from pre- to post-test scores [2.15; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-2.94; P higher than students from the original curriculum (1.56; 95% CI, 0.42-2.71; P = 0.008). In addition, qualitative feedback also improved, with the rotation being highly valued. The revised ophthalmic curriculum resulted in an increase in academic performance and a higher degree of student satisfaction. Given the gradual decline of ophthalmic education in the standard medical school curriculum, our results are timely in providing guidance for minimum ophthalmic curriculum exposure and strategies to improve ophthalmic education in medical schools. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  17. Comparison of procedures for immediate reconstruction of large osseous defects resulting from removal of a single tooth to prepare for insertion of an endosseous implant after healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, G. M.; Slater, J. J. H.; den Hartog, L.; Meijer, H. J. A.; Vissink, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the treatment outcome of immediate reconstruction of 45 large osseous defects resulting from removal of a single tooth with a 1:2 mixture of Bio-Oss(R) and autologous tuberosity bone, and three different procedures for soft tissue closing (Bio-Gide(R) membrane, connective tissue

  18. Evaluating Curricular Influence on Preparation for Practice, Career Outcomes, and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Alumni Survey of a 40-Year Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tammy Jorgensen; Reid, Joan A.; Henry, Ryan G.; Dixon, Charlotte G.; Wright, Tennyson J.

    2013-01-01

    Alumni of a Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)-accredited graduate rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) program were surveyed to evaluate career outcomes, job satisfaction, licensure and certification rates, client populations served, and RCE program satisfaction and effectiveness. Results indicate a high level of satisfaction with the…

  19. Evaluating Curricular Influence on Preparation for Practice, Career Outcomes, and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Alumni Survey of a 40-Year Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tammy Jorgensen; Reid, Joan A.; Henry, Ryan G.; Dixon, Charlotte G.; Wright, Tennyson J.

    2013-01-01

    Alumni of a Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)-accredited graduate rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) program were surveyed to evaluate career outcomes, job satisfaction, licensure and certification rates, client populations served, and RCE program satisfaction and effectiveness. Results indicate a high level of satisfaction with the…

  20. Results and summary of voting among the audience during presentation and discussion of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma clinical guidelines prepared by American Thyroid Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Soderstrom, Folke

    2013-01-01

    , related to the specific aspect, were presented to the audience. The responses from the audience were collected by an AudioResponseSystem (ARS voting system). The results of the voting showed in summary that European expert opinion leaders and an audience of specialists in treatment of Medullary Carcinoma...

  1. Communication skills training curriculum for pulmonary and critical care fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Jennifer W; Gustin, Jillian L; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; Way, David P; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires physicians training in pulmonary and critical care medicine to demonstrate competency in interpersonal communication. Studies have shown that residency training is often insufficient to prepare physicians to provide end-of-life care and facilitate patient and family decision-making. Poor communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) can adversely affect outcomes for critically ill patients and their family members. Despite this, communication training curricula in pulmonary and critical care medicine are largely absent in the published literature. We evaluated the effectiveness of a communication skills curriculum during the first year of a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship using a family meeting checklist to provide formative feedback to fellows during ICU rotations. We hypothesized that fellows would demonstrate increased competence and confidence in the behavioral skills necessary for facilitating family meetings. We evaluated a 12-month communication skills curriculum using a pre-post, quasiexperimental design. Subjects for this study included 11 first-year fellows who participated in the new curriculum (intervention group) and a historical control group of five fellows who had completed no formal communication curriculum. Performance of communication skills and self-confidence in family meetings were assessed for the intervention group before and after the curriculum. The control group was assessed once at the beginning of their second year of fellowship. Fellows in the intervention group demonstrated significantly improved communication skills as evaluated by two psychologists using the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist, with an increase in total observed skills from 51 to 65% (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's D effect size [es], 1.13). Their performance was also rated significantly higher when compared with the historical control group, who demonstrated only 49% of observed skills

  2. Project Termination Report for ESEA Title III Grant for the Period Between August 15, 1971 and August 14, 1974 (Center for the Development of Environmental Curriculum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby-Eastlake School District, Willoughby, OH.

    This project termination report deals with an environmental education curriculum developed by the Center for the Development of Environmental Curriculum and Willoughby-Eastlake City School District (Ohio). During the three years of the project, 34 units for elementary teachers and 34 units for secondary teachers were prepared. All curriculum…

  3. Examining the Place of Geography in the American Social Studies Curriculum and the Efforts toward an Effective Teacher Education in K-12 Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin AYAS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily focuses on locating geography education in the American secondary social studies curriculum, and then examines the American teacher education in geography. Therefore, the paper first defines the common ground between social studies and geography, followed by a discussion regarding how geography as a school subject fits in to the social studies curriculum. It next analyzes the American experience in preparing pre- and in-service geography and/or social studies teachers as there have been quite efforts to that end due to the widespread “geographic illiteracy” in the American schools. As a result, the current paper attempts to provide the interested audience with a general perspective concerning the place of geography education in the American schools, and suggests a comprehensive teacher education model based on the related literature investigated

  4. Water-quality trends in the nation’s rivers and streams, 1972–2012—Data preparation, statistical methods, and trend results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelsner, Gretchen P.; Sprague, Lori A.; Murphy, Jennifer C.; Zuellig, Robert E.; Johnson, Henry M.; Ryberg, Karen R.; Falcone, James A.; Stets, Edward G.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Riskin, Melissa L.; De Cicco, Laura A.; Mills, Taylor J.; Farmer, William H.

    2017-04-04

    Since passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972, Federal, State, and local governments have invested billions of dollars to reduce pollution entering rivers and streams. To understand the return on these investments and to effectively manage and protect the Nation’s water resources in the future, we need to know how and why water quality has been changing over time. As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Project, of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Program, data from the U.S. Geological Survey, along with multiple other Federal, State, Tribal, regional, and local agencies, have been used to support the most comprehensive assessment conducted to date of surface-water-quality trends in the United States. This report documents the methods used to determine trends in water quality and ecology because these methods are vital to ensuring the quality of the results. Specific objectives are to document (1) the data compilation and processing steps used to identify river and stream sites throughout the Nation suitable for water-quality, pesticide, and ecology trend analysis, (2) the statistical methods used to determine trends in target parameters, (3) considerations for water-quality, pesticide, and ecology data and streamflow data when modeling trends, (4) sensitivity analyses for selecting data and interpreting trend results with the Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season method, and (5) the final trend results at each site. The scope of this study includes trends in water-quality concentrations and loads (nutrient, sediment, major ion, salinity, and carbon), pesticide concentrations and loads, and metrics for aquatic ecology (fish, invertebrates, and algae) for four time periods: (1) 1972–2012, (2) 1982–2012, (3) 1992–2012, and (4) 2002–12. In total, nearly 12,000 trends in concentration, load, and ecology metrics were evaluated in this study; there were 11,893 combinations of sites, parameters, and trend periods. The

  5. An exploratory curriculum analysis of thirteen virtual schools, online homeschools and online curriculum providers' science curriculum from kindergarten through twelfth grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dussy L.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine various Internet-based science curricula in terms of their educational value and comprehensiveness. Thirteen online homeschool providers' science curricula were analyzed through an examination of the content and organization of instruction and through a comparison with the seven National Science Education Standards (NSES) in order to assess the pedagogical and developmental appropriateness of online science curriculum, to find the ideological perspectives exhibited by each curriculum, and to identify implications for the future of homeschooling regarding children who use an online science curriculum as the basis of their science education. The results reveal that only a few online schools incorporate all seven NSES in their science curriculum; most online schools' content and instruction have a traditional/behavioral perspective; and the Systematizer theoretical perspective was prevalent in online schools' science curricula. This study investigates the issue of whether online homeschooling can accurately be termed homeschooling. A discussion of education and schooling according to Holt (1976), Illich (1972), and Moore and Moore (1975) explore this issue. The findings from this discussion suggest that the online homeschool movement may be an undiscovered form of "schooling" and that parents, educators, researchers, curriculum developers, and specialists should be aware of the implications online homeschooling has on homeschooling's philosophy of education.

  6. Curriculum-Dependent and Curriculum-Independent Factors in Preservice Elementary Teachers' Adaptation of Science Curriculum Materials for Inquiry-Based Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cory T.

    2013-02-01

    In this nested mixed methods study I investigate factors influencing preservice elementary teachers' adaptation of science curriculum materials to better support students' engagement in science as inquiry. Analyses focus on two `reflective teaching assignments' completed by 46 preservice elementary teachers in an undergraduate elementary science methods course in which they were asked to adapt existing science curriculum materials to plan and enact inquiry-based science lessons in elementary classrooms. Data analysis involved regression modeling of artifacts associated with these lessons, as well as in-depth, semester-long case studies of six of these preservice teachers. Results suggest that features of the existing science curriculum materials, including measures of how inquiry-based they were, have a relatively small influence on the preservice teachers' curricular adaptations, while teacher-specific variables account for a much greater percentage of the variance. Evidence from the case studies illustrates the critical impact of the preservice teachers' field placement contexts as an explanatory, teacher-specific factor in their curricular adaptations. These findings have important implications for science teacher educators and science curriculum developers, in terms of not only better understanding how preservice teachers engage with curriculum materials, but also how programmatic features of teacher education programs influence their ability to do so.

  7. Teaching learning methods of an entrepreneurship curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmi, Keramat; Marzoughi, Rahmatallah; Torkzadeh, Jafar

    2015-10-01

    One of the most significant elements of entrepreneurship curriculum design is teaching-learning methods, which plays a key role in studies and researches related to such a curriculum. It is the teaching method, and systematic, organized and logical ways of providing lessons that should be consistent with entrepreneurship goals and contents, and should also be developed according to the learners' needs. Therefore, the current study aimed to introduce appropriate, modern, and effective methods of teaching entrepreneurship and their validation. This is a mixed method research of a sequential exploratory kind conducted through two stages: a) developing teaching methods of entrepreneurship curriculum, and b) validating developed framework. Data were collected through "triangulation" (study of documents, investigating theoretical basics and the literature, and semi-structured interviews with key experts). Since the literature on this topic is very rich, and views of the key experts are vast, directed and summative content analysis was used. In the second stage, qualitative credibility of research findings was obtained using qualitative validation criteria (credibility, confirmability, and transferability), and applying various techniques. Moreover, in order to make sure that the qualitative part is reliable, reliability test was used. Moreover, quantitative validation of the developed framework was conducted utilizing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods and Cronbach's alpha. The data were gathered through distributing a three-aspect questionnaire (direct presentation teaching methods, interactive, and practical-operational aspects) with 29 items among 90 curriculum scholars. Target population was selected by means of purposive sampling and representative sample. Results obtained from exploratory factor analysis showed that a three factor structure is an appropriate method for describing elements of teaching-learning methods of entrepreneurship curriculum

  8. Anatomy as the Backbone of an Integrated First Year Medical Curriculum: Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Brenda J.; Paulsen, Douglas F.; Wineski, Lawrence E

    2011-01-01

    Morehouse School of Medicine chose to restructure its first year medical curriculum in 2005. The anatomy faculty had prior experience in integrating courses, stemming from the successful integration of individual anatomical sciences courses into a single course called Human Morphology. The integration process was expanded to include the other first year basic science courses (Biochemistry, Physiology, and Neurobiology) as we progressed toward an integrated curriculum. A team, consisting of the course directors, a curriculum coordinator and the Associate Dean for Educational and Faculty Affairs, was assembled to build the new curriculum. For the initial phase, the original course titles were retained but the lecture order was reorganized around the Human Morphology topic sequence. The material from all four courses was organized into four sequential units. Other curricular changes included placing laboratories and lectures more consistently in the daily routine, reducing lecture time from 120 to 90 minute blocks, eliminating unnecessary duplication of content, and increasing the amount of independent study time. Examinations were constructed to include questions from all courses on a single test, reducing the number of examination days in each block from three to one. The entire restructuring process took two years to complete, and the revised curriculum was implemented for the students entering in 2007. The outcomes of the restructured curriculum include a reduction in the number of contact hours by 28%, higher or equivalent subject examination average scores, enhanced student satisfaction, and a first year curriculum team better prepared to move forward with future integration. PMID:21538939

  9. Anatomy as the backbone of an integrated first year medical curriculum: design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Brenda J; Paulsen, Douglas F; Wineski, Lawrence E

    2011-01-01

    Morehouse School of Medicine chose to restructure its first year medical curriculum in 2005. The anatomy faculty had prior experience in integrating courses, stemming from the successful integration of individual anatomical sciences courses into a single course called Human Morphology. The integration process was expanded to include the other first year basic science courses (Biochemistry, Physiology, and Neurobiology) as we progressed toward an integrated curriculum. A team, consisting of the course directors, a curriculum coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Educational and Faculty Affairs, was assembled to build the new curriculum. For the initial phase, the original course titles were retained but the lecture order was reorganized around the Human Morphology topic sequence. The material from all four courses was organized into four sequential units. Other curricular changes included placing laboratories and lectures more consistently in the daily routine, reducing lecture time from 120 to 90 minute blocks, eliminating unnecessary duplication of content, and increasing the amount of independent study time. Examinations were constructed to include questions from all courses on a single test, reducing the number of examination days in each block from three to one. The entire restructuring process took two years to complete, and the revised curriculum was implemented for the students entering in 2007. The outcomes of the restructured curriculum include a reduction in the number of contact hours by 28%, higher or equivalent subject examination average scores, enhanced student satisfaction, and a first year curriculum team better prepared to move forward with future integration.

  10. History of Science in the Physics Curriculum: A Directed Content Analysis of Historical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Hayati; Guney, Burcu G.

    2012-05-01

    Although history of science is a potential resource for instructional materials, teachers do not have a tendency to use historical materials in their lessons. Studies showed that instructional materials should be adaptable and consistent with curriculum. This study purports to examine the alignment between history of science and the curriculum in the light of the facilitator model on the use of history of science in science teaching, and to expose possible difficulties in preparing historical materials. For this purpose, qualitative content analysis method was employed. Codes and themes were defined beforehand, with respect to levels and their sublevels of the model. The analysis revealed several problems with the alignment of historical sources for the physics curriculum: limited information about scientists' personal lives, the difficulty of linking with content knowledge, the lack of emphasis on scientific process in the physics curriculum, differences between chronology and sequence of topics, the lack of information about scientists' reasoning. Based on the findings of the analysis, it would be difficult to use original historical sources; educators were needed to simplify historical knowledge within a pedagogical perspective. There is a need for historical sources, like Harvard Case Histories in Experimental Science, since appropriate historical information to the curriculum objectives can only be obtained by simplifying complex information at the origin. The curriculum should leave opportunities for educators interested in history of science, even historical sources provides legitimate amount of information for every concepts in the curriculum.

  11. Preservice elementary teachers learning to use curriculum materials to plan and teach science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunckel, Kristin Lee

    New elementary teachers rely heavily on curriculum materials, but available science curriculum materials do not often support teachers in meeting specified learning goals, engaging students in the inquiry and application practices of science, or leveraging students' intellectual and cultural resources for learning. One approach to supporting new elementary teachers in using available science curriculum materials is to provide frameworks to scaffold preservice teachers' developing lesson planning and teaching practices. The Inquiry-Application Instructional Model (I-AIM) and the Critical Analysis and Planning (CA&P) tool were designed to scaffold preservice teachers' developing practice to use curriculum materials effectively to plan and teach science. The I-AIM identifies functions for each activity in an instructional sequence. The CA&P provides guides preservice teachers in modifying curriculum materials to better fit I-AIM and leverage students' resources for learning. This study followed three elementary preservice teachers in an intern-level science method course as they learned to use the I-AIM and CA&P to plan and teach a science unit in their field placement classrooms. Using a sociocultural perspective, this study focused on the ways that the interns used the tools and the mediators that influenced how they used the tools. A color-coding analysis procedure was developed to identify the teaching patterns in the interns' planned instructional approaches and enacted activity sequences and compare those to the patterns implied by the I-AIM and CA&P tools. Interviews with the interns were also conducted and analyzed, along with the assignments they completed for their science methods course, to gain insight into the meanings the interns made of the tools and their experiences planning and teaching science. The results show that all three interns had some successes using the I-AIM and CA&P to analyze their curriculum materials and to plan and teach science

  12. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  13. 网络环境下英语隐性课程开发及实施效果研究--以大学英语听力教学为例%Development and implementation results of English Hidden Curriculum in Network Environment--A Case Study of College English Listening Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周婧丹

    2014-01-01

    本文以实证研究为基础,采用实验及问卷调查等方法,结合统计数据分析,对武汉东湖学院2011级计算机科学与技术及自动化专业学生的大学英语隐性课程中的听力教学进行了实验研究。研究结果表明,以网络平台为基础的大学英语隐性课程的开发在很大程度上提升了英语教学的效率,有利于培养学生良好的英语学习习惯和自主学习能力。%This paper is based on an empirical study, the experiment of which is carried out with the second year students of Wuhan Donghu University selected from computer science majors and control science and engineering majors. The experi-ment focuses on the hidden curriculum in College English Listening and makes use of three CET tests, the questionnaire sur-vey methods, as well as the SPSS software to analyze the results of the online experimental group and the traditional control group. The paper concludes that internet-based hidden curriculum exploration will greatly improve the efficiency of teaching in college English and contribute a lot in helping students develop good studying habits and cultivate the ability of auton-omous learning.

  14. Content knowledge development in a chemistry teacher preparation program: A current potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiyanti, Tuszie; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Vishnumolakala, Venkat

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential facets in teacher education program is the development of the teachers' content knowledge and it has been suggested by many scholars that the study to analyse the process of content knowledge development in teacher education program is necessary. Regarding this, the aim of this research is to evaluate the existing program of developing pre-service chemistry teachers' content knowledge, especially in the topic about the particulate nature of matter. The curriculum of content knowledge development was analysed using the forms of the curriculum evaluation (Akker, 1998; Goodlad, Klein, and Tye (1979); Treagust, 1987). Within this framework, the curriculum was evaluated in several aspects including the vision and intention of the curriculum as mentioned in the curriculum documents (intended curriculum), the users' interpretation and perception about the curriculum (perceived curriculum), the actual process of curriculum implementation (implemented curriculum), and the outcomes of the curriculum (achieved curriculum). According to the framework used for this study, the research combined qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and the interpretation including document analysis, classroom observation, interviews, and two-tier diagnostic test. Through this research we examined the coherence among those aspects. The results reveal that although the content knowledge development is explicitly intended in a curriculum, its implementation and lecturers' perceptions give influence in the results as appear in pre-service teachers' achievements. In general, this research provides basic information about the effectiveness of the program including the challenges and the potentials for a reconsideration of the program in the future.

  15. Preliminary Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Results from the Joint Russian/U.S. Pilot Field Test in Preparation for the Full Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Cerisano, J. M..; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing collaborative research efforts between NASA's Neuroscience and Cardiovascular Laboratories, and the Institute of Biomedical Problems' (IBMP) Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories have been measuring functional sensorimotor, cardiovascular and strength responses following bed rest, dry immersion, short-duration (Space Shuttle) and long-duration (Mir and International Space Station [ISS]) space flights. While the unloading paradigms associated with dry immersion and bed rest does serve as acceptable flight analogs, testing of crew responses following the long-duration flights previously has not been possible until a minimum of 24 hours after landing. As a result, it is not possible to estimate the nonlinear trend of the early (physiologic data (orthostatic responses) are required to provide an evidence base for characterizing programmatic risks and the degree of variability among crewmembers for exploration missions where the crew will be unassisted af

  16. Results and summary of voting among the audience during presentation and discussion of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma clinical guidelines prepared by American Thyroid Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Soderstrom, Folke

    2013-03-14

    The one-day ETA-CRN meeting, preceding the ETA meeting in Lisbon, was planned in advance to provide a thorough assessment of the European response to the published American Thyroid Association MTC guidelines. During the meeting, following each of the European speakers, a series of questions, related to the specific aspect, were presented to the audience. The responses from the audience were collected by an AudioResponseSystem (ARS voting system). The results of the voting showed in summary that European expert opinion leaders and an audience of specialists in treatment of Medullary Carcinoma welcomes the American Guidelines on the management of MTC, but simultaneously only partially agrees with some of the statements in the guidelines.

  17. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  18. Emergency preparedness curriculum in nursing schools in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Elizabeth; Irwin, Margaret; Trangenstein, Patricia; Gordon, Jeffry

    2005-01-01

    With concern about bioterrorism and inadequacies in responding to mass casualty events, health care professionals have been placed in the category of first responders. The International Nursing Coalition for Mass Casualty Education (INCMCE) was established to plan strategically to address the educational needs of the nation's nurses. This study sought to determine the types and levels of disaster preparedness curricula being delivered or in development in nursing programs at all levels. INCMCE surveyed 2,013 deans or directors of nursing schools as to curricula for emergency preparedness prior to September 11, 2001, and during the two following academic years. Initial requests were sent via email and the US postal service. Respondents were invited to answer the online survey so data could be directly entered into a database for purposes of data analysis. Responses were received from 348 schools of nursing. Curriculum plans, followed by competency lists, were selected as most helpful for teaching content in disaster preparedness. The survey results validated the general assumption that nursing programs provide limited curricula in this area. The mean number of hours of disaster preparedness content provided, approximately four hours, did not change significantly over three academic years. The study also showed that 75 percent of respondents thought that nurse faculty were inadequately prepared in the area of disaster management. The study established a baseline for future curricular growth.

  19. Writing Across the Curriculum -- An Online Course in Computer Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Sinha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing fosters both critical thinking and student learning, serving as one of the most effective ways to understand a topic. Writing across the Curriculum (WAC began in the late 1970’s, as a pedagogical reform movement in response to a perceived deficiency in literacy among college students. Over the past two decades universities have worked to broaden the scope of student writing from composition classes to classes in the students’ major. This paper chronicles the application of WAC into the discipline of Computer Science. The purpose of this study is to develop an online Computer Security course (for sophomores and juniors in Computer Science, under the umbrella of WAC, to help improve the students’ writing overall and focus on skills students require in upper level courses in the major. Developing this course as an online course (rather than a traditional face-to-face course offers flexible configurability and scalability, features that are useful to prepare students for constantly changing real world security challenges. This paper includes all aspects of course design and insight into lessons learned. Results indicate that both the faculty and students benefit from such a writing intensive course. Reading and responding to the students’ writing enables faculty to gain valuable insights into the students’ thoughts, ideas, problems, and other issues. Students reported increased knowledge and comprehension of the subject material, deeper understanding of the conventions within Computer Science, improved analysis and reporting skills, ability to understand and present abstract concepts effectively, and skill in producing professional documents.

  20. Cultivating professional responsibility in a dental hygiene curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    To prepare dental hygienists for future roles in the health care system, dental hygiene education must prepare graduates with skills, ethics, and values that align with professional responsibility. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of curricular changes designed to develop professional identity and responsibility over the entire span of the dental hygiene curriculum. Twenty-four dental hygiene students at the University of Minnesota were surveyed about their attitudes toward access to dental care, society's and health professionals' responsibility to care for the underserved, and their personal efficacy to provide care for the underserved. Surveys were conducted at three time points in the curriculum. The Attitudes Toward Health Care instrument adapted by Holtzman for dental use was used to survey the students. The findings indicate that this institution's curricular changes were effective in cultivating professional responsibility among these students. Their attitude scores increased across the six-semester curriculum, and students in their last semester of the program believed that all individuals have a right to dental care and that society has an obligation to provide dental care. These students' sense of obligation to care for the needy became stronger and their perceptions of their own ability to impact the community and act as an agent of change also increased.

  1. Preparing High School Students for the Interdisciplinary Nature of Modern Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Preparing students for the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology will require changes in curriculum, instruction, assessments, and teacher professional development in order to support teaching for conceptual understanding and for making cross-disciplinary connections.

  2. Learner-Driven EFL Curriculum Development at the Classroom Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawer, Saad; Gilmore, Deanna; Banks-Joseph, SusanRae

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the learner-directed motives that cause English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers to approach curriculum differently, as curriculum-transmitters, curriculum-developers, or curriculum-makers. This study's conceptual framework was grounded in teacher curriculum development, curriculum implementation,…

  3. The new formal competency-based curriculum and informal curriculum at Indiana University School of Medicine: overview and five-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzelman, Debra K; Cottingham, Ann H

    2007-04-01

    There is growing recognition in the medical community that being a good doctor requires more than strong scientific knowledge and excellent clinical skills. Many key qualities are essential to providing comprehensive care, including the abilities to communicate effectively with patients and colleagues, act in a professional manner, cultivate an awareness of one's own values and prejudices, and provide care with an understanding of the cultural and spiritual dimensions of patients' lives. To ensure that Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) graduates demonstrate this range of abilities, IUSM has undertaken a substantial transformation of both its formal curriculum and learning environment (informal curriculum). The authors provide an overview of IUSM's two-part initiative to develop and implement a competency-based formal curriculum that requires students to demonstrate proficiency in nine core competencies and to create simultaneously an informal curriculum that models and supports the moral, professional, and humane values expressed in the formal curriculum. The authors describe the institutional and curricular transformations that have enabled and furthered the new IUSM curricular goals: changes in education administration; education implementation, assessment, and curricular design; admissions procedures; performance tracking; and the development of an electronic infrastructure to facilitate the expanded curriculum. The authors address the cost of reform and the results of two progress reviews. Specific case examples illustrate the interweaving of the formal competency curriculum through the students' four years of training, as well as techniques that are being used to positively influence the IUSM informal curriculum.

  4. THE ROLE OF INTERFERON PREPARATIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE VIRAL RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN INFANTS, BABIES AND TODDLERS (RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER COMPARATIVE RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Feklisova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the results of a comparative clinical trial of drugs recombinant human interferon alpha-2b in the dosage form of suppositories for their use in the treatment of ARVI in infants, babies and toddlers age. In accordance to the selection criteria 100 children who were hospitalized, aged from 6 months to 3 years with clinically diagnosed ARVI were included in the study. Two study groups were formed: basic, which patients within 5 days received suppositories containing taurine and interferon alpha (125,000 IU,  and the comparison group, where patients received suppositories with interferon (150,000 IU. The patients of both groups were subjects of medical observation for 5 days with an estimate of the effectiveness of treatment on the 6th day of therapy. The eliminating activity of the exploring drugs was determined using standard laboratory techniques (PCR or DFA scrapings from the nasopharynx. The study established the high effectiveness and wide safety profile of both drugs. No cases of the adverse events that have established link with the study medications. Key words: influenza, ARVI, recombinant human interferon alpha-2b, taurine, suppositories, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 76–82.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: The development of a curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are seen as an interlinked array of political, social, economic .... Having defined several ecology tieldwork problems. all that seemed ... and thus as a focus for curriculum innovation. ... curriculum development suggests that innovation should.

  6. Culturally sensitive curriculum development in international cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervedink Nijhuis, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    To assure high quality education in developing countries, curriculum development endeavours are often initiated as part of international cooperation projects. Since culture affects the educational context of the countries involved and the way in which curriculum developers from different countries

  7. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Bregje de; Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ colla

  8. Reaching Consensus on Essential Biomedical Science Learning Objectives in a Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Leandra; Walton, Joanne N; Walker, Judith; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2016-04-01

    This article describes how the University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry reached consensus on essential basic biomedical science objectives for DMD students and applied the information to the renewal of its DMD curriculum. The Delphi Method was used to build consensus among dental faculty members and students regarding the relevance of over 1,500 existing biomedical science objectives. Volunteer panels of at least three faculty members (a basic scientist, a general dentist, and a dental specialist) and a fourth-year dental student were formed for each of 13 biomedical courses in the first two years of the program. Panel members worked independently and anonymously, rating each course objective as "need to know," "nice to know," "irrelevant," or "don't know." Panel members were advised after each round which objectives had not yet achieved a 75% consensus and were asked to reconsider their ratings. After a maximum of three rounds to reach consensus, a second group of faculty experts reviewed and refined the results to establish the biomedical science objectives for the renewed curriculum. There was consensus on 46% of the learning objectives after round one, 80% after round two, and 95% after round three. The second expert group addressed any remaining objectives as part of its review process. Only 47% of previous biomedical science course objectives were judged to be essential or "need to know" for the general dentist. The consensus reached by participants in the Delphi Method panels and a second group of faculty experts led to a streamlined, better integrated DMD curriculum to prepare graduates for future practice.

  9. Safety and efficacy trial of adipose-tissue derived oral preparation V-6 Immunitor (V-6: results of open-label, two-month, follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirathitikal Vichai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammations, atherosclerosis and obesity, are major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Immune modulation of the inflammatory response has shown promise in animal models of atherogenesis and metabolic disease. Tableted dietary supplement, V-6, containing pooled antigens derived from pig adipose tissue has been administered daily to 12 volunteers for 2 months. Results No significant changes were observed in liver ALT and AST enzymes, i.e., 28 vs 23.8 IU and 22.6 vs 24.8 IU, with p = 0.07 and p = 0.49, respectively. Creatinine decreased; 0.88 vs 0.84 mg/dL (p = 0.05 while BUN moved upward; 14.5 vs 17.5 mg/dL (p = 0.01, but both values remained within normal range. Blood glucose remained within normal range; 96.1 vs 101.1 mg/dL (p = 0.04. Complete blood cell analysis has not revealed any change except slight increase in hemoglobin; 13.13 to 13.96 g/dL (p = 0.0002; hematocrit and red blood cells count 40.3 to 42.3% (p = 0.02 and 5.15 to 5.35 × 106 cells/mm3 (p = 0.03 respectively. Blood pressure systolic and diastolic values were not affected, i.e., 116.1 vs 116.3 (p = 0.12 and 76.8 vs 76.6 (p = 0.99. Body weight and body mass index (BMI remained same; 66.4 vs 66.3 kg (p = 0.47 and 25.7 vs 25.6 kg/m2 (p = 0.2. Body fat deposit indices, such as abdomen; mid-arm; and thigh circumferences declined by 3.5 cm (p = 0.008; 1.2 cm (p = 0.004; and 3.0 cm (p = 0.0007 respectively. The total cholesterol and LDL levels did not change; 195.5 vs 195.1 (-0.2%; p = 0.8 and 113.4 vs 120.3 (6.1%; p = 0.08 respectively. Triglycerides have been reduced but not statistically significant; 168.1 vs 118 mg/dL (-29.8%; p = 0.2. In contrast, HDL content had risen by 29.7% from 39.4 to 51.1 mg/dL in all 12 patients (p = 0.000003. TG/HDL ratio - a marker of insulin resistance - was reduced from 4.78 to 2.56 (-46.5%; p = 0.04. Conclusions These results demonstrate that V-6 is safe and has a potential as an anti-atherogenic and overweight

  10. Curriculum structure: principles and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, R; Kersten, H; Vinkka-Puhakka, H; Alpasan, G; Bearn, D; Cema, I; Delap, E; Dummer, P; Goulet, J P; Gugushe, T; Jeniati, E; Jerolimov, V; Kotsanos, N; Krifka, S; Levy, G; Neway, M; Ogawa, T; Saag, M; Sidlauskas, A; Skaleric, U; Vervoorn, M; White, D

    2008-02-01

    This report provides general guidelines for the structure of a curriculum, followed by specific advice on the principles of learning and teaching, the process of restructuring and change leadership and management. It provides examples of several educational philosophies, including vertical and horizontal integration. It discusses the use of competence, learning outcomes, level of degree and assessment and provides a number of recommendations. It does not seek to be prescriptive of time allocation to disciplines within a curriculum. Although this report has been written primarily for those who will develop an undergraduate curriculum, the information may be sufficiently generic to apply to the recent development in graduate entry ('shortened dental' or 'accelerated') courses and to postgraduate degree planning and higher education certificate or diploma courses for other dental care professionals (auxiliaries). The report may have a European bias as progress is made to converge and enhance educational standards in 29 countries with different educational approaches - a microcosm of global collaboration.

  11. A ‘Globalised’ Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Globalisation is often referred to as being external to education – a state of affairs presenting the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this article, ‘globalisation’ is examined as something that is internal to curriculum and analysed as a problematisation in a Foucaultian sense......, that is, as a complex of attentions, worries and ways of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish preschool, and the way the curricular variable of the preschool child comes into being through ‘globalisation......’ as a problematisation, carried forth by comparative practices such as Programme for International Student Assessment. It thus explores some of the systems of reason that educational comparative practices carry through time, focusing on the ways in which configurations are reproduced and transformed, forming...

  12. Working towards an inclusive curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Y; Parkhouse, J

    1998-01-01

    The move towards an inclusive model of education presents teachers with the difficulty of differentiating the curriculum for children with speech, language and communication impairments. This paper focuses on the 'WiSaLT Curriculum Appendix'-a tool which can be used by teachers and speech and language therapists to help such children access the mainstream curriculum and to promote improvement in their language and communication skills. As well as highlighting potential areas of difficulty within each attainment target for key stage one, the appendix guides users to specific strategies and activities. Thus the speech and language therapist and teacher can identify which attainment targets might prove problematic for any one child and also have access to ideas which can help.

  13. Effect of different solvents on skin test results of tetanus antitoxin prepared%不同溶媒配制破伤风抗毒素皮试液对皮试结果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施雪雁; 范爱飞; 彭丽萍; 龚海琴

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe skin test results of tetanus antitoxin prepared by different solvents.Methods Patients who needed injecting tetanus antitoxin as required by trauma were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B, respectively. Group A was administered with tetanus antitoxin prepared by water for injection, while Group B with tetanus antitoxin prepared by saline. Skin test results were observed, the incidence of positive skin test results and self-inductance of pain intensity were compared.Results The incidence of positive skin test results in Group A was significantly higher than that in Group B (34.19% vs 17.50%,χ2=8.631,P<0.01), and the self-inductance of pain intensity were also greater than that in Group B. Patients with positive skin test results (40 patients) in Group A, were later injected tetanus antitoxin prepared by saline, 42.50% of them (17 patients) shown negative skin test results.Conclusions There might be a high false positive rate by using tetanus antitoxin prepared by water for injection; therefore tetanus antitoxin prepared by saline is recommended, for it could decrease the false positive rate, reduce unnecessary desensitization injections, alleviate patients' pain and improve nurses' work efficiency.%目的 观察2种不同溶媒配制破伤风抗毒素(TAT)皮试液对皮试结果的影响.方法 将因外伤需要注射TAT的患者237例随机分为甲组117例和乙组120例,分别使用注射用水配制的TAT皮试液和生理盐水配制的TAT皮试液做皮肤过敏试验,观察两组患者的皮试结果,对比两组皮试结果阳性率以及患者自感疼痛度的高低.结果 甲组患者皮试结果阳性率明显高于乙组,差异具有统计学意义(34.19%比17.50%,χ2=8.631,P<0.01),且患者自感疼痛度也高于乙组.甲组皮试结果阳性的患者(40例)在改用生理盐水配制的TAT皮试液做皮试后,17例(42.50%)患者皮试结果转为阴性.结论 用注射用水配制的TAT皮试液做皮肤

  14. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shib Sekhar Datta; Boratne, Abhijit V; Rajkumar Patil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare ...

  15. Basic Education Curriculum Reform in Rural China: Achievements, Problems, and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayi; Zhao, Zhichun

    2011-01-01

    The latest wave of basic education curriculum reform, carried out over the past ten years, has achieved significant results and promoted the development of rural education. There are still some problems in the reform of basic education in rural areas, however, such as a serious shortage of funds for rural school curriculum reform, the continuing…

  16. The African Renaissance and the Transformation of the Higher Education Curriculum in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum is a critical element in the transformation of higher education, and as a result, I argue for the inclusion of what I refer to as an African epistemic in higher education curricula in South Africa. In so doing, attention is directed at the decolonisation of the curriculum in higher education in South Africa, which aims to give…

  17. Civic Education Curriculum Reform in Hong Kong: What Should Be the Direction under Chinese Sovereignty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Gregory P.; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses results from a cross-national analysis of the impact of varying approaches to civic education curriculum delivery on three learning outcomes, to draw conclusions about the value of a government-mandated compulsory, independent subject of civic education in the school curriculum. It starts from the context of Hong Kong, where…

  18. THE TASK OF SYNTHESIS OF INDIVIDUAL CURRICULUMS IN THE SPACE OF VIRTUAL LEARNING GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A. Denks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach of educational planning and organization of educational process is offered to provide students the ability to select and adjust trajectories of learning. The mathematical description of curriculum and algorithm of synthesis individual curriculums are presented. The results of applying the algorithm are showed using an automated system.

  19. The Creation of an Integrated Sustainability Curriculum and Student Praxis Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Christopher M.; Mulvaney, Dustin; Ball, Tamara B.; DuPuis, E. Melanie; Gliessman, Stephen R.; Lipschutz, Ronnie D.; Shakouri, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share the content and early results from an interdisciplinary sustainability curriculum that integrates theory and practice (praxis). The curriculum links new topical courses concerning renewable energy, food, water, engineering and social change with specialized labs that enhance technological and…

  20. Predicting undergraduates' academic achievement : the role of the curriculum, time investment and self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenbeek, Marjolein; Jansen, Ellen; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The time students invest in their studies and their resulting achievement is partly dependent on curriculum characteristics. Degree programmes differ greatly with respect to how the curriculum is organized, for example in the type (e.g. lectures, practicals) and the number of classes. The focus of t

  1. Accreditation of Interpreter Training Courses Curriculum in Bachelors of English Translation in Iranian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Dabaghi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study attempts to see to what extent interpreter training courses offered in bachelor’s degree of English translation in Iranian universities are able to prepare students by teaching them the necessary skills of interpreting.  Semi-structured interviews with experts and review of literature were used to find the skills required in interpreter training.  A researcher made questionnaire, containing 69 items with a four point Likert scale was made to find out how much the students felt they had learned each necessary skill during their courses.  A total of 103 students from six different universities completed the questionnaire.  SPSS 17 was used to the analysis the data.  The data gathered revealed that 67% of the students received a mean score of less than half the highest possible score. There was a significant difference between the six universities (P<0.001.  The results of this study can be used by curriculum planners in the reformation and improvement of interpreter training courses. Keywords: interpreter training; simultaneous interpreting; consecutive interpreting; curriculum evaluation

  2. Corrupting the Curriculum? The Case of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Morgan, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers influences on the contemporary school curriculum in England. It does so mainly through a critical analysis of one significant critique of the curriculum made by the think tank Civitas in their collection of essays asserting the "corruption" of the curriculum, published in 2007. The paper places the Civitas position…

  3. A Daoist Perspective on Internationalizing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of three chapters in "Part II, Section E: Internationalizing Curriculum" and one chapter in "Part III, Section F: Inquiring into Curriculum" of "The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" (F. M. Connelly, M. F. He, J. I. Phillion, Eds.; Sage Publications, 2008). These chapters ["Indigenous Resistance and…

  4. 14 CFR 121.913 - Qualification curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification curriculum. 121.913 Section 121.913 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Qualification curriculum. Each qualification curriculum must contain training, evaluation, and certification...

  5. Sustainability in the Australian Curriculum: Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric

    2014-01-01

    "Sustainability" is one of the seven major concepts in the geography curriculum. It is also one of the three cross-curriculum priorities in the Australian curriculum, together with Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. This paper describes how the concept is explained…

  6. Grammar and the English National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Laura Louise

    2010-01-01

    In 1998 the regulatory body for the National Curriculum, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, acknowledged that there was "widespread uncertainty" over the grammar requirements of the English Curriculum. In this paper I argue that the QCA still has not addressed this uncertainty. I analyse the 1999 and 2011 Primary English Curricula,…

  7. Wind energy curriculum development at GWU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Stephen M [GWU

    2013-06-08

    A wind energy curriculum has been developed at the George Washington University, School of Engineering and Applied Science. Surveys of student interest and potential employers expectations were conducted. Wind industry desires a combination of mechanical engineering training with electrical engineering training. The curriculum topics and syllabus were tested in several graduate/undergraduate elective courses. The developed curriculum was then submitted for consideration.

  8. Curriculum Design and Children's Learning at Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Larry D.; Paroschi, Eliane E.; Habenicht, Donna J.; Hollingsead, Candice C.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between curriculum design and children's learning in church. Participants in this study included 12 six-year-old children attending two different Sabbath school classes in the same Midwestern Seventh-day Adventist church. A traditional curriculum guided instruction in Class 1. "GraceLink," a new curriculum,…

  9. Teacher Learning in Collaborative Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.; de Vries, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers' collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to…

  10. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.B.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; Vries, de B.

    2011-01-01

    Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to identify the l

  11. Whose Curriculum? A Conversation with Nicholas Tate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Nicholas Tate is chief executive of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority in England, set up by Parliament, in October 1997, to oversee the national curriculum. In this interview, Tate describes the British National Curriculum, national tests, and the promotion of moral education. The national papers publish massive supplements showing…

  12. Corrupting the Curriculum? The Case of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Morgan, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers influences on the contemporary school curriculum in England. It does so mainly through a critical analysis of one significant critique of the curriculum made by the think tank Civitas in their collection of essays asserting the "corruption" of the curriculum, published in 2007. The paper places the Civitas position in a wider…

  13. A Critical Perspective on Managing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Alice Casimiro; De Macedo, Elizabeth Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of an introductory essay and three chapters in "Part I, Section B: Managing Curriculum" of "The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" (F. M. Connelly, M. F. He, J. I. Phillion, Eds.; Sage Publications, 2008). The introductory essay ["Part I: Curriculum in Practice. Introductory Essay" (Ian Westbury. pp. 1-5)]…

  14. Curriculum and Pedagogy in School Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wei

    2015-01-01

    Both curriculum and pedagogy play a significant role for the success of school education, curriculum and pedagogy are indicate respectively the teaching content and teaching methods implemented by teachers.In this paper, the relationship between curriculum and pedagogy will be studied in detail.

  15. Curriculum Development in Remote Sensing at California State University, Monterery, Seaside, California 93955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ravi; Geol, P.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Research Center and the California State University, Monterey Bay, California (CSUMB), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to develop and provide cooperative programs between the Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch of NASA (ECOSAT) and the University (CSUMB). The agreement is to carry out educational, research, and technology goals in ecological and environmental sciences and related disciplines, with particular emphasis on changing environmental and climatic conditions occurring worldwide due to the anthropogenic causes affecting the balance within ecological systems and the health and well-being of humans. The preparation of the Curriculum for Remote Sensing at CSUMB was undertaken at the request of the Center as a result of the above agreement.

  16. The Cognitive Curriculum. Ypsilanti Preschool Curriculum Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Donna; And Others

    The Cognitive Curriculum focuses primarily on intellectual, or cognitive development of the child. Much of its theory is based on the work of Piaget and is concerned with the development of logical thinking and representation. A central tenet is that the child learns through active involvement with his environment and that the child undergoes…

  17. The Research of Software Engineering Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Li-Qun; Han, Xie

    With the problem that software engineering training can't meet the needs of the community, this paper analysis some outstanding reasons in software engineering curriculum teaching, such as old teaching contents, weak in practice and low quality of teachers etc. We propose the methods of teaching reform as guided by market demand, update the teaching content, optimize the teaching methods, reform the teaching practice, strengthen the teacher-student exchange and promote teachers and students together. We carried out the reform and explore positive and achieved the desired results.

  18. Best Practices for Modifying Astronomy Curriculum for Special Needs Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Julia K.; Slater, T. F.

    2006-12-01

    Current instructional issues necessitate educators start with curriculum and determine how educational technology can assist students in achieving positive learning goals, functionally supplementing the classroom instruction. Technology projects incorporating principles of situated learning have been shown to provide an effective framework for learning, and computer technology has been shown to facilitate learning among special needs students. Students with learning disabilities may benefit from assistive technology, but these resources are not always utilized during classroom instruction: technology is only effective if teachers view it as an integral part of the learning process. In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science conducted a national field -test of a new GEMS space science curriculum package for middle school students which they had developed. LHS collected preand post-test data for each unit based on student work samples. During this field-testing, we modified a subset of the curriculum materials so that they could be delivered via computer mediated instruction for the students in a subset of the field-test classrooms in order to determine if the students in the classrooms using the curriculum modified for computer mediated instruction scored differently on the assessments than students in the larger assessment database. Results suggest that many students, not just those with special needs, demonstrate greater achievement gains using materials modified using the principles of best practice for special needs students. This poster illustrates curriculum materials before and after modification based on best practice.

  19. Research training in dental undergraduate curriculum in Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Moreno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research plays a central role in professional training in dentistry. There is a clear recommendation to include a minimum training in biomedical research at undergraduate level. In Chile, there is no standardized curriculum structure including research training for undergraduate students. Objective: To describe the presence of research courses in the undergraduate dental curriculum in Chile during 2014. Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional study. The curriculum for all Chilean universities teaching dental careers and updated during 2014 were analyzed. Results: The dental curriculum for twenty Chilean universities was analyzed. On average, each university has 4.05±2.06 research courses (semesterly from which 1±0.92 are thesis courses. In the private universities, these numbers were 4.64±1.91 and 1.18±0.87 respectively. Meanwhile, these numbers were 3.33±2.12 and 0.78±0.97 respectively in the traditional universities. Sixty percent of universities have thesis or research project courses. Conclusion: There is a disparate presence of research courses in the undergraduate dental curriculum in Chile, with a higher presence in private institutions. However, this does not actualize a greater scientific production by them.

  20. Measuring Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Curriculum Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Romina M. J.; Watson, Glenice; Finger, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    There is currently a trend toward the development of methodologies to measure Information and Communication Technology (ICT) curriculum integration and its resultant impact on student learning outcomes. Simplistic, negative correlations between numbers of classroom computers and standardized literacy and numeracy test results provide headlines for…