WorldWideScience

Sample records for preoptic-anterior hypothalamic region

  1. Muscarinic Receptors Types 1 and 2 in the Preoptic-Anterior Hypothalamic Areas Regulate Ovulation Unequally in the Rat Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira L. López-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic receptors types 1 (m1AChR and 2 (m2AChR in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus areas (POA-AHA were counted, and the effects of blocking these receptors on spontaneous ovulation were analysed throughout the rat oestrous cycle. Rats in each phase of the oestrous cycle were assigned to the following experiments: (1 an immunohistochemical study of the number of cells expressing m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA and (2 analysis of the effects of the unilateral blockade of the m1AChR (pirenzepine, PZP or m2AChR (methoctramine, MTC on either side of the POA-AHA on the ovulation rate. The number of m2AChR-immunoreactive cells was significantly higher at 09:00 h on each day of the oestrous cycle in the POA-AHA region, while no changes in the expression profile of m1AChR protein were observed. The ovulation rate in rats treated with PZP on the oestrous day was lower than that in the vehicle group. Animals treated on dioestrous-1 with PZP or MTC had a higher ovulation rate than those in the vehicle group. In contrast, on dioestrous-2, the MTC treatment decreased the ovulation rate. These results suggest that m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA could participate in the regulation of spontaneous ovulation in rats.

  2. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Bolado Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E9.5 contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia. Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5 give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly

  3. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  4. Efferent connections from the lateral hypothalamic region and the lateral preoptic area to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P J; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Mikkelsen, J D

    1994-01-01

    area within the lateral hypothalamic region that consistently innervated magnocellular perikarya of the PVN. Finally, all areas of the lateral hypothalamic region contributed substantially to fibres terminating in the perinuclear shell of the PVN. These results demonstrate that anatomically distinct...

  5. Surgical therapy of lesions within the hypothalamic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahlbusch, R.; Schrell, U. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    On one hand pituitary microadenomas with autonomous character and those, which had been influenced by hypothalamic disorders, are summarized and discussed. On the other hand, the neurosurgical management of tumours, adjacent to or involved with the hypothalamus, are described. Endocrinologically active pituitary adenomas are characterized by their hormone excess of ACTH, GH, and prolactin. In Cushing's disease endocrine and clinical remission occurred in 74%. 3 patients out of this group showed a reincrease of ACTH after a period of remission, indicating a possible hypothalamic influence. In acromegaly the hypothalamic influence is also discussed. One patient with an ectopic GRF-producing tumour showing a reincrease of GH levels after successful transsphenoidal adenomectomy has been described. In microprolactinomas, 7 patients out of 45 showed a reincrease of prolactin-levels after a period of normalization, we also discussed hypothalamic disorders. Tumours with suprasellar extension such as macroadenomas without endocrine activity and meningiomas are removed nowadays with minimal risk for the life of the patients. In craniopharyngiomas radical excision is accompanied by a high risk of hypothalamic defects caused by mechanical lesions and possible secondary vasospasm. Finally the excision of a hamartoma growing from the floor of the third ventricle into the interpeduncular cistern is discussed. Up to now the successful excision could be documented by endocrinological data, which give no sign of further growth of the hamartoma.

  6. Connections of the juxtaventromedial region of the lateral hypothalamic area in the male rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel D Hahn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary conservation of the hypothalamus attests to its critical role in the control of fundamental behaviors. However, our knowledge of hypothalamic connections is incomplete, particularly for the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA. Here we present the results of neuronal pathway-tracing experiments to investigate connections of the LHA juxtaventromedial region, which is parceled into dorsal (LHAjvd and ventral (LHAjvv zones. Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL, for outputs and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, for inputs coinjections were targeted stereotaxically to the LHAjvd/v. RESULTS: LHAjvd/v connections overlapped highly but not uniformly. Major joint outputs included: Bed nuc. stria terminalis (BST, interfascicular nuc. (BSTif and BST anteromedial area, rostral lateral septal (LSr- and ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH nuc., and periaqueductal gray. Prominent joint LHAjvd/v input sources included: BSTif, BST principal nuc., LSr, VMH, anterior hypothalamic-, ventral premammillary-, and medial amygdalar nuc., and hippocampal formation (HPF field CA1. However, LHAjvd HPF retrograde labeling was markedly more abundant than from the LHAjvv; in the LSr this was reversed. Furthermore, robust LHAjvv (but not LHAjvd targets included posterior- and basomedial amygdalar nuc., whereas the midbrain reticular nuc. received a dense input from the LHAjvd alone. Our analyses indicate the existence of about 500 LHAjvd and LHAjvv connections with about 200 distinct regions of the cerebral cortex, cerebral nuclei, and cerebrospinal trunk. Several highly LHAjvd/v-connected regions have a prominent role in reproductive behavior. These findings contrast with those from our previous pathway-tracing studies of other LHA medial and perifornical tier regions, with different connectional behavioral relations. The emerging picture is of a highly differentiated LHA with extensive and far-reaching connections that point to a role as a central coordinator of behavioral

  7. Regional neurohypophysial and hypothalamic blood flow in rats during hypercapnia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, R.M. Jr.; Myers, C.L.; Page, R.B.

    1988-08-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in the neurohypophysis and hypothalamus in normocapnic and hypercapnic rats using (/sup 14/C)isopropyliodoamphetamine. Rats were surgically prepared using nitrous oxide and halothane and placed in plaster restraining casts. Hypercapnia was produced by increasing the fractional concentration of inspired CO/sub 2/ (FICO/sub 2/). rCBF in normocapnic rats was higher in the paraventricular nucleus, supraoptic nucleus, median eminence, and neural lobe than rates previously measured by use of diffusible tracers. During hypercapnia blood flow increased linearly with arterial PCO/sub 2/ (PACO/sub 2/) in all regions except the median eminence and neural lobe, which were not affected by hypercapnia. When rats were pretreated with phentolamine (1 mg/kg) to block the alpha-adrenergic receptors, blood flow in the median eminence and neural lobe increased significantly during hypercapnia. We conclude that blood flow in the cell bodies of the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus is regulated differently during hypercapnia than blood flow in the nerve terminals in the median eminence and neural lobe. Furthermore, vasodilation produced by increased CO/sub 2/ is offset by alpha-receptor stimulation in the median eminence and neural lobe.

  8. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eDominguez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture, supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: 1 The supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. 2 The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2 and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1 portions. 3 Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. 4 Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote, and the alar supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  9. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture), supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions (SCs) in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: (1) The supraoptoparaventricular region (SPV) is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. (2) The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2) and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1) portions. (3) Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. (4) Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote), and the alar SPV is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jai Y; Ahn, Ryun S

    2012-09-01

    An exaggerated inflammatory process is considered an important pathophysiological feature of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis serves as a negative feedback mechanism for inflammatory processes. The present study examined the HPA axis function in patients with CRPS-1 by a determination of cortisol concentrations in saliva. Three sets of saliva samples were sequentially collected from 24 patients with CRPS-1 during medication (on-Med), 72 h after stopping medication (off-Med) and 8h after the oral administration of 1mg dexamethasone. One set of saliva samples was collected from healthy controls. The cortisol awakening response (CAR) and diurnal cortisol decline (DCD) were used as indices for HPA axis function. Cortisol levels during the post-awakening period in patients were increased following withdrawal of medications. The CAR during the off-Med condition was disappeared after administration of dexamethasone. Among the examined CRPS-related numerical variables, the frequency of spontaneous pain attacks showed relationships with the indices of HPA axis function. After classifying the patients into two subgroups, we observed that the CAR and DCD in patient who had a relatively high frequency of spontaneous pain attacks (subgroup 5 ≤) were lower and less steep than those in patient who had a relatively low frequency of spontaneous pain attacks (subgroup 0-4) for the on- and off-Med conditions. The CAR and DCD in subgroup 5 ≤ during their off-Med condition were comparable to those in controls. These results suggest that the increase in frequency of spontaneous pain attacks is associated with a reduced CAR and flattened DCD in patients CRPS-1.

  11. Regional haemodynamic effects of carbachol injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1994-06-01

    Carbachol was injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats, chronically instrumented with intravascular catheters and pulsed Doppler probes to assess changes in regional haemodynamics. Bilateral microinjections of carbachol (1 ng-1 microgram) produced increases in blood pressure, bradycardias and vasoconstrictions in renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. In the presence of phentolamine, the bradycardic and hindquarters vasoconstrictor responses to carbachol were unchanged while the pressor response was smaller due to a reduction in the renal and the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction. In the presence of propranolol, the bradycardic response was reduced, but the pressor and renal vasoconstrictor responses were potentiated, whereas the superior mesenteric and hindquarter vasoconstrictions were not changed significantly. In the presence of phentolamine and propranolol, the heart rate and pressor responses, as well as the renal vasoconstriction, were unchanged, whereas the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction was reduced and the hindquarters vasoconstriction was potentiated. Together these results are consistent with an involvement of the sympathoadrenal system in the pressor response to carbachol injected into the PVN of untreated animals. They indicate that alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the superior mesenteric vascular bed is a particularly important component in that regard. In the presence of the vasopressin antagonist, d(CH2)5(Tyr(Et))DAVP, alone or in combination with phentolamine and propranolol, the pressor response to carbachol was substantially reduced, while the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictor effects were completely abolished; the bradycardia was not significantly affected by this treatment. These results indicate an important involvement of vasopressin in the cardiovascular responses to carbachol injected into the PVN of untreated animals

  12. Hypothalamic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common causes of hypothalamic dysfunction are surgery, traumatic brain injury, tumors, and radiation. Other causes include: Anorexia nervosa or bulimia Bleeding Genetic disorders that cause iron ...

  13. Distribution of type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing neurons in the septal-hypothalamic region of the mouse: colocalization with GABAergic and glutamatergic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovszky, Erik; Wittmann, Gábor; Kalló, Imre; Füzesi, Tamás; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2012-04-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the principal mediator of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling in the brain. In this study, we addressed the topographic distribution and amino acid neurotransmitter phenotype of endocannabinoid-sensitive hypothalamic neurons in mice. The in situ hybridization detection of CB1 mRNA revealed high levels of expression in the medial septum (MS) and the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), moderate levels in the preoptic area and the hypothalamic lateroanterior (LA), paraventricular (Pa), ventromedial (VMH), lateral mammillary (LM), and ventral premammillary (PMV) nuclei, and low levels in many other hypothalamic regions including the suprachiasmatic (SCh) and arcuate (Arc) nuclei. This regional distribution pattern was compared with location of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic cell groups, as identified by the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and type 2 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT2) mRNAs, respectively. The MS, DBB, and preoptic area showed overlaps between GABAergic and CB1-expressing neurons, whereas hypothalamic sites with moderate CB1 signals, including the LA, Pa, VMH, LM, and PMV, were dominated by glutamatergic neurons. Low CB1 mRNA levels were also present in other glutamatergic and GABAergic regions. Dual-label in situ hybridization experiments confirmed the cellular co-expression of CB1 with both glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. In this report we provide a detailed anatomical map of hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic systems whose neurotransmitter release is controlled by retrograde endocannabinoid signaling from hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic target neurons. This neuroanatomical information contributes to an understanding of the role that the endocannabinoid system plays in the regulation of endocrine and metabolic functions.

  14. EFFECT OF ANESTHETIZING THE REGION OF THE PARAVENTRICULAR HYPOTHALAMIC NUCLEI ON ENERGY-METABOLISM DURING EXERCISE IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIJK, G; VISSING, J; STEFFENS, AB; GALBO, H

    1994-01-01

    The ventromedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei are known to influence glucoregulation during exercise. The extensive projections of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) to the sympathetic nervous system suggest that the PVN also may be involved in glucoregulation during exercise. The r

  15. Region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA in rat hypothalamic nuclei induced by forced swim stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, Burcu; Gozen, Oguz; Koylu, Ersin O; Keser, Aysegul; Kuhar, Michael J; Pogun, Sakire

    2012-10-15

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) mRNA and peptides are highly expressed in the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMH) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that these nuclei regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system activity, and feeding behavior. Our previous studies showed that forced swim stress augmented CART peptide expression significantly in whole hypothalamus of male rats. In another study, forced swim stress increased the number of CART-immunoreactive cells in female PVN, whereas no effect was observed in male PVN or in the ARC nucleus of either sex. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of forced swim stress on CART mRNA expression in PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei in both male and female rats. Twelve male (stressed and controls, n=6 each) and 12 female (stressed and controls, n=6 each) Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Control animals were only handled, whereas forced swim stress procedure was applied to the stressed groups. Brains were dissected and brain sections containing PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei were prepared. CART mRNA levels were determined by in situ hybridization. In male rats, forced swim stress upregulated CART mRNA expression in DMH and downregulated it in the ARC. In female rats, forced swim stress increased CART mRNA expression in PVN and DMH, whereas a decrease was observed in the ARC nucleus. Our results show that forced swim stress elicits region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA expression in rat hypothalamus that may help in explaining some of the effects of stress.

  16. Regional haemodynamic effects of noradrenaline injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats: possible mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Harland, D; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1992-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of noradrenaline bilaterally injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Long-Evans rats and homozygous, vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. In Long-Evans rats, incremental doses of noradrenaline (0.01-10 nmol) caused dose-related increases in blood pressure and a substantial, dose-related, superior mesenteric vasoconstriction. These changes were accompanied by bradycardia and reductions in renal and hind-quarter vascular conductances. In Brattleboro rats, noradrenaline (10 nmol) had no effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or renal or superior mesenteric vascular conductances. However, there was a slight vasodilatation in the vascular bed of the hindquarters. In Long-Evans rats, intravenous pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the bradycardia but partly inhibited the pressor response to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei. These effects were associated with a smaller superior mesenteric vasoconstriction and an abolition of the vasoconstriction in the hindquarters. Combined intravenous pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol had no effect on the heart rate or pressor responses to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei, but reduced the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction, potentiated the vasoconstriction in the hindquarters and eliminated the renal vasoconstriction. These results suggest that, in untreated Long-Evans rats, alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated constriction in the mesenteric vascular bed and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated dilatation in the vascular bed of the hindquarters have important influences on the pressor response to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei. In the presence of the vasopressin V1-receptor antagonist, d(CH2)5[Tyr(Et)]DAVP, the pressor and heart rate responses to noradrenaline injected into the

  17. Diet-induced changes in the Lean Brain: Hypercaloric high-fat-high-sugar snacking decreases serotonin transporters in the human hypothalamic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Karin Eva; Booij, Jan; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille Johanna; la Fleur, Susanne Eva

    2013-01-01

    It is evident that there is a relationship between the brain's serotonin system and obesity. Although it is clear that drugs affecting the serotonin system regulate appetite and food intake, it is unclear whether changes in the serotonin system are cause or consequence of obesity. To determine whether obesogenic eating habits result in reduced serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding in the human hypothalamic region, we included 25 lean, male subjects who followed a 6-week-hypercaloric diet, which were high-fat-high-sugar (HFHS) or high-sugar (HS) with increased meal size or -frequency (=snacking pattern). We measured SERT-binding in the hypothalamic region with SPECT. All hypercaloric diets significantly increased body weight by 3-3.5%. Although there were no differences in total calories consumed between the diets, only a hypercaloric HFHS-snacking diet decreased SERT-binding significantly by 30%. We here show for the first time in humans that snacking may change the serotonergic system increasing the risk to develop obesity.

  18. Regional haemodynamic effects of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid agonists microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Pître, M

    1995-06-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of bilateral injection into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of selective mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptor agonists were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Wistar Kyoto rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. 2. The selective mu-agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5ol]enkephalin (DAMGO), injected bilaterally into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (0.01-1.0 nmol), caused increases in blood pressure, tachycardias, vasoconstriction in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and substantial vasodilatation in the hindquarter vascular bed. 3. The administration of increasing doses (0.01-5.0 nmol) of the selective delta-agonist [D-Phe2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE) or the selective kappa-agonist, U50488H into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) had no significant effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or regional haemodynamics. 4. Together, the present results are further evidence of a role for opioid peptides, especially acting at mu-receptors in the PVN, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system, whereas a role for opioid peptides, acting at delta- and kappa-receptors in the PVN, seems less obvious from the present results.

  19. Hypothalamic inflammation: a double-edged sword to nutritional diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamus is one of the master regulators of various physiological processes, including energy balance and nutrient metabolism. These regulatory functions are mediated by discrete hypothalamic regions that integrate metabolic sensing with neuroendocrine and neural controls of systemic physiology. Neurons and non-neuronal cells in these hypothalamic regions act supportively to execute metabolic regulations. Under conditions of brain and hypothalamic inflammation, which may result from o...

  20. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation.

  1. Hypothalamic inflammation: a double-edged sword to nutritional diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is one of the master regulators of various physiological processes, including energy balance and nutrient metabolism. These regulatory functions are mediated by discrete hypothalamic regions that integrate metabolic sensing with neuroendocrine and neural controls of systemic physiology. Neurons and non-neuronal cells in these hypothalamic regions act supportively to execute metabolic regulations. Under conditions of brain and hypothalamic inflammation, which may result from overnutrition-induced intracellular stresses or disease-associated systemic inflammatory factors, extracellular and intracellular environments of hypothalamic cells are disrupted, leading to central metabolic dysregulations and various diseases. Recent research has begun to elucidate the effects of hypothalamic inflammation in causing diverse components of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These new understandings have provocatively expanded previous knowledge on the cachectic roles of brain inflammatory response in diseases, such as infections and cancers. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of hypothalamic inflammation in metabolic syndrome and related diseases as opposed to cachectic diseases, and also discusses concepts and potential applications of inhibiting central/hypothalamic inflammation to treat nutritional diseases. PMID:22417140

  2. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob eBiran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors, secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms.

  3. Medical therapy of hypothalamic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, K. von; Mueller, O.A. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik 1)

    1985-01-01

    Hormonal disturbances caused by hypothalamic pathology can be treated effectively by target hormone replacement in the case of failure of glandotropic hormone secretion. Hyposomatotropism in children has to be substituted by parenteral administration of growth hormone. In addition gonadotropins respectively gonadotropin releasing factor have to be given in order to restore fertility in hypothalamic hypogonadism. Posterior pituitary failure can be adequately replaced by administration of analogues of antidiuretic hormone. Hypothalamic pathology causing hypersecretion of anterior pituitary hormones may also be accessable to medical treatment. This pertains particularly to hyperprolactinemia and precocious puberty. However, there is no medical therapy so far for hypothalamic disturbances leading to veterative dysfunction like disturbances of temperature regulation and control of thirst and polyphagia. In this situation symptomatic correction of the abnormality represents the only possibility to keep these patients alive.

  4. Hypothalamic obesity in patients with craniopharyngioma: Profound changes of several weight regulatory circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRoth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking examples of dysfunctional hypothalamic signaling of energy homeostasis is observed in patients with hypothalamic lesions leading to hypothalamic obesity (HO. This drastic condition is frequently seen in patients with craniopharyngioma (CP, an embryological tumor located in the hypothalamic and/or pituitary region, frequently causing not only hypopituitarism, but also leading to damage of medial hypothalamic nuclei due to the tumor and its treatment. HO syndrome in CP patients is characterized by fatigue, decreased physical activity, uncontrolled appetite, and morbid obesity, and is associated with insulin and leptin resistance. Mechanisms leading to the profoundly disturbed energy homeostasis are complex. This review summarizes different aspects of important clinical studies as well as data obtained in rodent studies. In addition a model is provided describing how medial hypothalamic lesion can interact simultaneously with several weight regulating circuitries.

  5. [Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stárka, Luboslav; Dušková, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) besides pregnancy and syndrome of polycystic ovary is one of the most common causes of secondary amenorrhea. FHA results from the aberrations in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which in turn causes impairment of the gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone). FHA is a form of the defence of organism in situations where life functions are more important than reproductive function. FHA is reversible; it can be normalized after ceasing the stress situation. There are three types of FHA: weight loss related, stress-related, and exercise-related amenorrhea. The final consequences are complex hormonal changes manifested by profound hypoestrogenism. Additionally, these patients present mild hypercortisolemia, low serum insulin levels, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and low total triiodothyronine. Women health in this disorder is disturbed in several aspects including the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, and mental problems. Patients manifest a decrease in bone mass density, which is related to an increase in fracture risk. Therefore, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the main long-term complications of FHA. Cardiovascular complications include endothelial dysfunction and abnormal changes in the lipid profile. FHA patients present significantly higher depression and anxiety and also sexual problems compared to healthy subjects.

  6. [Hypothalamic dysfunction in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande-Lee, Simone; Velloso, Licio A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair life quality, is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. The control of energy balance in animals and humans is performed by the central nervous system (CNS) by means of neuroendocrine connections, in which circulating peripheral hormones, such as leptin and insulin, provide signals to specialized neurons of the hypothalamus reflecting body fat stores, and induce appropriate responses to maintain the stability of these stores. The majority of obesity cases are associated with central resistance to both leptin and insulin actions. In experimental animals, high-fat diets can induce an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus, which impairs leptin and insulin intracellular signaling pathways, and results in hyperphagia, decreased energy expenditure and, ultimately, obesity. Recent evidence obtained from neuroimaging studies and assessment of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid of obese subjects suggests that similar alterations may be also present in humans. In this review, we briefly present the mechanisms involved with the loss of homeostatic control of energy balance in animal models of obesity, and the current evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction in obese humans.

  7. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Uribe-San-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia. The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  8. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Roth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic obesity (HO occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP, which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future.

  9. Direct Cellular Peptidomics of Hypothalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Atkins, Norman; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical complexity of cell-to-cell communication has emerged as a fundamental challenge to understanding brain systems. This is certainly true for the hypothalamus, where neuropeptide signals are heterogeneous, localized and dynamic. Thus far, most hypothalamic peptidomic studies have centered on the entire structure; however, recent advances in collection strategies and analytical technologies have enabled direct, high-resolution peptidomic profiles focused on two regions of interest, the suprachiasmatic and supraoptic nuclei, including their subregions and individual cells. Suites of peptides now can be identified and probed for function. High spatial and analytical sensitivities reveal that discrete hypothalamic nuclei have distinct peptidomic signatures. Peptidomic discovery not only reveals unanticipated complexity, but also peptides previously unknown that act as key circuit components. Analysis of tissue releasates identifies peptides secreted into the extracellular environment and available for transmitting intercellular signals. Direct sampling techniques define peptide-releasate profiles in spatial, temporal and event-dependent patterns. These approaches are providing remarkable new insights into the complexity of neuropeptidergic cell-to-cell signaling central to neuroendocrine physiology. PMID:21334363

  10. Proliferative hypothalamic neurospheres express NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A and differentiate to functional neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Some pathological conditions with feeding pattern alterations, including obesity and Huntington disease (HD are associated with hypothalamic dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Additionally, the hypothalamus is a neurogenic region with the constitutive capacity to generate new cells of neuronal lineage, in adult rodents. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of feeding-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and their capacity to differentiate to functional neurons which have been described to be affected by hypothalamic dysfunction. Our study shows that hypothalamic progenitor cells from rat embryos grow as floating neurospheres and express the feeding-related neuropeptides Neuropeptide Y (NPY, Agouti-related Protein (AGRP, Pro-OpioMelanocortin (POMC, Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Responsive Transcript (CART and Orexin-A/Hypocretin-1. Moreover the relative mRNA expression of NPY and POMC increases during the expansion of hypothalamic neurospheres in proliferative conditions.Mature neurons were obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic progenitor cells including NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A positive neurons. Furthermore the relative mRNA expression of NPY, CART and Orexin-A increases after the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres. Similarly to the adult hypothalamic neurons the neurospheres-derived neurons express the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The orexigenic and anorexigenic phenotype of these neurons was identified by functional response to ghrelin and leptin hormones, respectively. This work demonstrates the presence of appetite-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and neurons obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres, including the neuronal phenotypes that have been described by others as being affected by hypothalamic neurodegeneration. These in vitro models can be used to study hypothalamic progenitor cells aiming a therapeutic intervention to

  11. HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROHORMONES AND IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis eQuintanar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, Corticotropin-releasing hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  12. Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBingham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas (CP are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb, is often severe and refractory to therapy.Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven truly effective in the treatment of CP-HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be well defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome and patients with melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective trials with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of all types of hypothalamic

  13. Hypopituitarism after external irradiation. Evidence for both hypothalamic and pituitary origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaan, N.A.; Bakdash, M.M.; Caderao, J.B.; Cangir, A.; Jesse, R.H. Jr.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Endocrine complications after radiotherapy for tumors of the head and neck are thought to be relatively rare. The availability of synthetic hypothalamic hormones for clinical investigations and the radioimmunoassay of hormones have enabled us to study function of the hypothalamic pituitary axis in 15 patients who had radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer. Fourteen had evidence of endocrine deficiency. Twelve patients had evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction, 7 developed primary pituitary hormone deficiencies, and 3 developed primary hypothyroidism. These results indicate that (1) secondary hypopituitarism due to a hypothalamic lesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer may be more common than suspected in the past; (2) primary hypopituitarism after irradiation of extracranial tumors can occur; and (3) primary hypothyroidism may result from irradiation of regional neck nodes.

  14. Sex differences in hypothalamic astrocyte response to estradiol stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive functions controlled by the hypothalamus are highly sexually differentiated. One of the most dramatic differences involves estrogen positive feedback, which leads to ovulation. A crucial feature of this positive feedback is the ability of estradiol to facilitate progesterone synthesis in female hypothalamic astrocytes. Conversely, estradiol fails to elevate hypothalamic progesterone levels in male rodents, which lack the estrogen positive feedback-induced luteinizing hormone (LH surge. To determine whether hypothalamic astrocytes are sexually differentiated, we examined the cellular responses of female and male astrocytes to estradiol stimulation. Methods Primary adult hypothalamic astrocyte cultures were established from wild type rats and mice, estrogen receptor-α knockout (ERKO mice, and four core genotype (FCG mice, with the sex determining region of the Y chromosome (Sry deleted and inserted into an autosome. Astrocytes were analyzed for Sry expression with reverse transcription PCR. Responses to estradiol stimulation were tested by measuring free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i with fluo-4 AM, and progesterone synthesis with column chromatography and radioimmunoassay. Membrane estrogen receptor-α (mERα levels were examined using surface biotinylation and western blotting. Results Estradiol stimulated both [Ca2+]i release and progesterone synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes from adult female mice. Male astrocytes had a significantly elevated [Ca2+]i response but it was significantly lower than in females, and progesterone synthesis was not enhanced. Surface biotinylation demonstrated mERα in both female and male astrocytes, but only in female astrocytes did estradiol treatment increase insertion of the receptor into the membrane, a necessary step for maximal [Ca2+]i release. Regardless of the chromosomal sex, estradiol facilitated progesterone synthesis in astrocytes from mice with ovaries

  15. Role of leptin in energy expenditure: the hypothalamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, R; Beerens, S; Adan, R A H

    2017-06-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is a peripheral signal that informs the brain about the metabolic status of an organism. Although traditionally viewed as an appetite-suppressing hormone, studies in the past decade have highlighted the role of leptin in energy expenditure. Leptin has been shown to increase energy expenditure in particular through its effects on the cardiovascular system and brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis via the hypothalamus. The current review summarizes the role of leptin signaling in various hypothalamic nuclei and its effects on the sympathetic nervous system to influence blood pressure, heart rate, and BAT thermogenesis. Specifically, the role of leptin signaling on three different hypothalamic nuclei, the dorsomedial hypothalamus, the ventromedial hypothalamus, and the arcuate nucleus, is reviewed. It is known that all of these brain regions influence the sympathetic nervous system activity and thereby regulate BAT thermogenesis and the cardiovascular system. Thus the current work focuses on how leptin signaling in specific neuronal populations within these hypothalamic nuclei influences certain aspects of energy expenditure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. In vivo Investigation of Hypothalamic Secretory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, A L; Jaffe, C A; Padmanabhan, V

    1997-04-01

    The finding that all pituitary hormones are released in a discrete pulsatile fashion and that the pulsatile properties of the pituitary hormone secretion are altered in some physiologic and pathologic conditions prompted the development of techniques designed to study the pattern of release and the regulation of secretion of the hypothalamic neuropeptides. This review describes the currently used techniques to assess hypothalamic hormone secretion. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:105-111). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Hypothalamic control of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, A; Wiedmann, N M; Adler, E S; Oldfield, B J

    2014-10-01

    A detailed appreciation of the control of adipose tissue whether it be white, brown or brite/beige has never been more important to the development of a framework on which to build therapeutic strategies to combat obesity. This is because 1) the rate of fatty acid release into the circulation from lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) is integrally important to the development of obesity, 2) brown adipose tissue (BAT) has now moved back to center stage with the realization that it is present in adult humans and, in its activated form, is inversely proportional to levels of obesity and 3) the identification and characterization of "brown-like" or brite/beige fat is likely to be one of the most exciting developments in adipose tissue biology in the last decade. Central to all of these developments is the role of the CNS in the control of different fat cell functions and central to CNS control is the integrative capacity of the hypothalamus. In this chapter we will attempt to detail key issues relevant to the structure and function of hypothalamic and downstream control of WAT and BAT and highlight the importance of developing an understanding of the neural input to brite/beige fat cells as a precursor to its recruitment as therapeutic target.

  18. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  19. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  20. Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan L Reiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataplexy is observed in a subset of patients with narcolepsy and affects approximately 1 in 2,000 persons. Cataplexy is most often triggered by strong emotions such as laughter, which can result in transient, yet debilitating, muscle atonia. The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, we showed ten narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and ten healthy controls humorous cartoons. In addition, we examined the brain activity of one subject while in a full-blown cataplectic attack. Behavioral results showed that participants with cataplexy rated significantly fewer humorous cartoons as funny compared to controls. Concurrent fMRI showed that patients, when compared to controls and in the absence of overt cataplexy symptoms, showed pronounced activity in the emotional network including the ventral striatum and hypothalamus while viewing humorous versus non-humorous cartoons. Increased activity was also observed in the right inferior frontal gyri--a core component of the inhibitory circuitry. In comparison, the one subject who experienced a cataplectic attack showed dramatic reductions in hypothalamic activity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest an overdrive of the emotional circuitry and possible compensatory suppression by cortical inhibitory regions in cataplexy. Moreover, during cataplectic attacks, the hypothalamus is characterized by a marked decrease in activity similar to that observed during sleep. One possible explanation for these findings is an initial overdrive and compensatory shutdown of the hypothalamus resulting in full cataplectic symptoms.

  1. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Yeon; Khang, Shin Kwang [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography.

  2. Neurological complications after gamma-knife radiosurgery for hypothalamic hamartoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butragueño Laiseca, Laura; Oikonomopoulou, Niki; Miranda Herrero, María Concepción; Barredo Valderrama, Estíbaliz; Vázquez López, María; Jiménez de Domingo, Ana; Aguado Del Hoyo, Alejandra; García-Leal, Roberto; Meiriño, Rosa M

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-knife technique is a safe and effective option for the treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas that produce epileptic seizures refractory to medical treatment and/or serious behavioral disorders. After this type of radiosurgery, an adequate symptomatic control is normally achieved, with notable decrease or even disappearance of the seizures. Radiological changes, such as a decrease in the size of the tumor or adjacent edema secondary to non-necrotizing radioinduced inflammatory reaction are unusual consequences. Side effects and neurological complications are also rare events. This report describes an unusual case of complete radiological resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma as well as neurological complications after Gamma-knife surgery (receiving 13 Gy to the 85% isodose line, 1 cm(3) of tumor volume) in a 8-year-old boy who suffered from severe refractory seizures. After radiosurgery, the patient experienced a notable improvement in his symptoms, achieving seizure cessation within 3 months. However, 4 months after the procedure he presented drowsiness, fever and decreased level of consciousness due to a direct effect on the hypothalamus with local and regional edema secondary to the radiosurgery that was performed. He was successfully treated with corticosteroids (with a total duration of 11 months), and twelve months after the surgery, complete disappearance of both the nodular lesion and the secondary edema was observed. The patient remains seizure-free in the last 16 months, with remarkable changes in his behavior. The present case shows that complete radiological resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma after Gamma-knife technique is unusual but possible, without long-term neurological consequences. Nevertheless, despite its low incidence, if a patient presents neurological symptoms, primarily during the first year after intervention, possible complications of this type of surgery must be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric

  3. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  4. Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Mauricio D; Thaler, Joshua P

    2015-10-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis are recently discovered mechanisms that may contribute to obesity pathogenesis. Current research in this area suggests that investigation of these central nervous system responses may provide opportunities to develop new weight loss treatments. In rodents, hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis occur rapidly with high-fat diet consumption prior to significant weight gain. In addition, sensitivity or resistance to diet-induced obesity in rodents generally correlates with the presence or absence of hypothalamic inflammation and reactive gliosis (brain response to injury). Moreover, functional interventions that increase or decrease inflammation in neurons and glia correspondingly alter diet-associated weight gain. However, some conflicting data have recently emerged that question the contribution of hypothalamic inflammation to obesity pathogenesis. Nevertheless, several studies have detected gliosis and disrupted connectivity in obese humans, highlighting the potential translational importance of this mechanism. There is growing evidence that obesity is associated with brain inflammation in humans, particularly in the hypothalamus where its presence may disrupt body weight control and glucose homeostasis. More work is needed to determine whether this response is common in human obesity and to what extent it can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  5. Evolution of Gelastic Epilepsy with Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The patterns of clinical presentation, evolution of the epilepsy, and electoclinical diagnostic features of hypothalamic hamartoma (HH in 19 patients (8 children and 11 adults, seen between 1991 and 2001, were evaluated at Kings College Hospital and the Institute of Epileptology, London, UK.

  6. Hypothalamic functions in patients with pituitary insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to increase our understanding of hypothalamic (dys)function in patients with pituitary insufficiency. This goal is driven by the clinical experience of persisting symptoms in patients adequately treated for pituitary insufficiency. We focus primarily on patients

  7. MRI of hypothalamic hamartomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, V.; Brunelle, F.; Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.; Lallemand, D.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the MRI characteristics of hypothalamic hamartomas of which only one case has been reported to our knowledge. Radiological studies were normal X-ray studies of the skull and sella turcica and CT studies.

  8. Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Mediates Acupunctural Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis During Ethanol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng Lin; Kim, Sang Chan; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hong Feng; Lee, Bong Hyo; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Chul Won; Cho, Il Je; An, Won G; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Young Woo; Zhao, Rong Jie; Wu, Yi Yan

    2016-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that acupuncture at ST36 (Zu-San-Li) attenuates ethanol withdrawal (EW)-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rats. The current study investigated the involvement of hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) in that process. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with 3 g/kg/d of ethanol or saline for 28 days. After 24 hours of EW, acupuncture was applied to rats at bilateral ST36 points or at nonacupoints (tail) for 1 minute. A high-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that EW significantly increased both the NE and the 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG) levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Western blot analysis also revealed that EW markedly elevated the phosphorylation rates of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), but spared TH protein expression in the PVN. However, acupuncture at ST36, but not at nonacupoints, greatly inhibited the increase in the hypothalamic NE, MHPG, and phosphorylation rates of TH. Additionally, postacupuncture infusion of NE into the PVN significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of acupuncture at ST36 on the oversecretion of plasma corticosterone during EW. These results suggest that acupuncture at ST36 inhibits EW-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic NEergic system to produce therapeutic effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  9. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  10. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  11. Hypothalamic-endocrine aspects in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria

    2006-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and fatal disorder caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat in the HD gene, resulting in a mutant form of the protein huntingtin. Wild-type and mutant huntingtin are expressed in most tissues of the body but the normal function of huntingtin is not fully known. In HD, the neuropathology is characterized by intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions of huntingtin aggregates, and cell death primarily in striatum and cerebral cortex. However, hypothalamic atrophy occurs at early stages of HD with loss of orexin- and somatostatin-containing cell populations. Several symptoms of HD such as sleep disturbances, alterations in circadian rhythm, and weight loss may be due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Endocrine changes including increased cortisol levels, reduced testosterone levels and increased prevalence of diabetes are found in HD patients. In HD mice, alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs as well as pancreatic beta-cell and adipocyte dysfunction. Increasing evidence points towards important pathology of the hypothalamus and the endocrine system in HD. As many neuroendocrine factors are secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine, it is possible that their levels may reflect the disease state in the central nervous system. Investigating neuroendocrine changes in HD opens up the possibility of finding biomarkers to evaluate future therapies for HD, as well as of identifying novel targets for therapeutic interventions.

  12. Effects of hypothalamic neurodegeneration on energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Wanting Xu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging in humans and rodents is accompanied by a progressive increase in adiposity. To investigate the role of hypothalamic neuronal circuits in this process, we used a Cre-lox strategy to create mice with specific and progressive degeneration of hypothalamic neurons that express agouti-related protein (Agrp or proopiomelanocortin (Pomc, neuropeptides that promote positive or negative energy balance, respectively, through their opposing effects on melanocortin receptor signaling. In previous studies, Pomc mutant mice became obese, but Agrp mutant mice were surprisingly normal, suggesting potential compensation by neuronal circuits or genetic redundancy. Here we find that Pomc-ablation mice develop obesity similar to that described for Pomc knockout mice, but also exhibit defects in compensatory hyperphagia similar to what occurs during normal aging. Agrp-ablation female mice exhibit reduced adiposity with normal compensatory hyperphagia, while animals ablated for both Pomc and Agrp neurons exhibit an additive interaction phenotype. These findings provide new insight into the roles of hypothalamic neurons in energy balance regulation, and provide a model for understanding defects in human energy balance associated with neurodegeneration and aging.

  13. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  14. Anterior hypothalamic knife cut eliminates a specific component of the predatory behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus or ventral midbrain in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, R; Bandler, R

    1981-01-20

    Following unilateral transection of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) within the anterior hypothalamic-preoptic region of cats, the biting attack upon a rat elicited by ipsilateral posterior hypothalamic or ventral midbrain stimulation is eliminated, although the cat continues to approach from 2.8 metres away to within several centimetres of the rat. In contrast, both the approach to and biting attack upon a rat elicited by contralateral posterior hypothalamic and ventral midbrain stimulation are unchanged. The results suggest that specific agents (biting, approach) of the elicited behaviour may be mediated by neural effects which proceed along anatomically distinct components of the ascending as well as the descending MFB.

  15. InsR/FoxO1 signaling curtails hypothalamic POMC neuron number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Plum

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor (InsR signaling through transcription factor FoxO1 is important in the development of hypothalamic neuron feeding circuits, but knowledge about underlying mechanisms is limited. To investigate the role of InsR/FoxO1 signaling in the development and maintenance of these circuits, we surveyed the pool of hypothalamic neurons expressing Pomc mRNA in different mouse models of impaired hypothalamic InsR signaling. InsR ablation in the entire hypothalamus did not affect Pomc-neuron number at birth, but resulted in a 25% increase, most notably in the middle arcuate nucleus region, in young adults. Selective restoration of InsR expression in POMC neurons in these mice partly reversed the abnormality, resulting in a 10% decrease compared to age-matched controls. To establish whether FoxO1 signaling plays a role in this process, we examined POMC neuron number in mice with POMC-specific deletion of FoxO1, and detected a 23% decrease in age-matched animals, consistent with a cell-autonomous role of InsR/FoxO1 signaling in regulating POMC neuron number, distinct from its established role to activate Pomc transcription. These changes in Pomc cells occurred in the absence of marked changes in humoral factors or hypothalamic NPY neurons.

  16. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M.V.; Laak, ter, H.J.; Heins, M.S.; Norren, van, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS....

  17. Giant solid-cystic hypothalamic hamartoma. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfer, Christian; Kasprian, Gregor; Mühlebner, Angelika; Czech, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare lesions for which different classification schemes have been proposed. The authors report on an exceptionally large solid-cystic hamartoma that led to hydrocephalus, precocious puberty, and intractable gelastic seizures. They discuss potential mechanisms of the development of hypothalamic hamartomas.

  18. Early life origins of metabolic disease: Developmental programming of hypothalamic pathways controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    A wealth of animal and human studies demonstrate that perinatal exposure to adverse metabolic conditions - be it maternal obesity, diabetes or under-nutrition - results in predisposition of offspring to develop obesity later in life. This mechanism is a contributing factor to the exponential rise in obesity rates. Increased weight gain in offspring exposed to maternal obesity is usually associated with hyperphagia, implicating altered central regulation of energy homeostasis as an underlying cause. Perinatal development of the hypothalamus (a brain region key to metabolic regulation) is plastic and sensitive to metabolic signals during this critical time window. Recent research in non-human primate and rodent models has demonstrated that exposure to adverse maternal environments impairs the development of hypothalamic structure and consequently function, potentially underpinning metabolic phenotypes in later life. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how adverse perinatal environments program hypothalamic development and explores the mechanisms that could mediate these effects.

  19. Risk factors for mortality caused by hypothalamic obesity in children with hypothalamic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, B; Atay, Z; Guran, T; Abalı, S; Bas, S; Turan, S; Bereket, A

    2016-10-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a common complication of childhood hypothalamic tumours. Patients with HyOb probably have a higher mortality rate than those with other types of obesity due in many cases to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypoventilation. To identify predictive factors for mortality caused by HyOb in children. Twenty children with HyOb secondary to hypothalamic tumours that were followed-up for ≥3 years and aged 6 years at diagnosis (3.71 ± 1.96 vs. 0.83 ± 0.73, P  1 SDS after 6 months of therapy (RR: 8.4, P obesity-related mortality rates were higher in the patients aged  0.05). The mortality rate was also 3.7-fold higher in the patients with a maximum BMI SDS ≥ 3 at any time during the first 3 years after therapy(P > 0.05). An increase in BMI SDS after 6 months of therapy was observed to be a risk factor for mortality caused by HyOb. In addition, age obesity is required. © 2015 World Obesity.

  20. Lateral hypothalamic circuits for feeding and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Garret D; Wise, Roy A

    2016-02-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in well-fed animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing thousands of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has used contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding-specific circuits.

  1. Management of optic chiasmatic/hypothalamic astrocytomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbok, P.; Hentschel, S.; Almqvist, P.; Cochrane, D.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, British Columbia' s Children' s Hospital, Div. of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dept. of Surgery, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Poskitt, K. [Univ. of British Columbia, British Columbia' s Children' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2002-05-01

    The management of optic chiasmatic gliomas is controversial, partly related to failure to separate out those tumors involving the optic chiasm only (chiasmatic tumors) from those also involving the hypothalamus (chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors). The purpose of this study was: (i) to analyze the outcomes of chiasmatic and chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors separately; and (ii) to determine the appropriateness of recommending radical surgical resection for the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. A retrospective chart review of all newly diagnosed tumors involving the optic chiasm from 1982-1996 at British Columbia's Children's Hospital was performed. There were 32 patients less than 16 years of age, 14 with chiasmatic and 18 with chiasmatic/hypothalamic astrocytomas, with an average duration of follow-up of 5.8 years and 6.3 years, respectively. Ten of the patients with chiasmatic tumors and none with chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors had neurofibromatosis I. Thirteen of the 14 chiasmatic tumors were managed with observation only, and none had progression requiring active intervention. For the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. eight patients had subtotal resections (>95% resection), six had partial resections (50-95%), three had limited resections (<50%), and one had no surgery. There were fewer complications associated with the limited resections, especially with respect to hypothalamic dysfunction. There was no correlation between the extent of resection (subtotal, partial, or limited) and the time to tumor progression (average 18 months). In conclusion, chiasmatic and chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors are different entities, which should be separated out for the Purposes of any study. For the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors, there was more morbidity and no prolongation of time to progression when radical resections were compared to more limited resections. Therefore, if surgery is performed, it may be appropriate to do a surgical procedure that strives only to provide a

  2. Hypothalamic dysfunction without hamartomas causing gelastic seizures in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Simon, Carrie Zaslow; Saper, Clifford

    2015-02-01

    This report describes gelastic seizures in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia and hypothalamic dysfunction without hypothalamic hamartoma. All participants (n = 4) from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles presenting with gelastic seizures were included. The clinical and pathology characteristics include hypothalamic dysgenesis and dysfunction, but no hamartomas. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures.

  3. Indirect evidence for decreased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Andersen, M; Flyvbjerg, A

    2002-01-01

    in the central feeding mechanism in anorexia nervosa (AN). Peripheral administration of pyridostigmine (PD) minimizes the release of hypothalamic SRIH. DESIGN: To study the influence of hypothalamic somatostatinergic inhibition on the exaggerated somatotroph responsiveness to GHRH in patients with severe AN, two...... indirectly to greater SRIH withdrawal and greater GHRH release in anorexia nervosa. Moreover, hypothalamic SRIH activity seems to be inversely related to cortisol levels, indirectly supporting the hypothesis that SRIH and CRH neuronal activity are inversely related in anorexia nervosa. Leptin, which...... is believed to act on hypothalamic feeding mechanisms, seems to be positively related to SRIH activity. Finally, the present data demonstrate that the potentiating effect of pyridostigmine in anorexia nervosa is related to body mass index and increases upon weight gain, suggesting that the low...

  4. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  5. Toxic effects of methoxychlor administered subcutaneously on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, A; Cabaleiro, T; Caride, A; Esquifino, A I

    2008-05-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of methoxychlor MTX at the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in adult male rats. This global objective comprises three major aims: (1) to analyze the possible differential MTX effects in norepinephrine and serotonin concentration an in serotoninergic metabolism in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus and median eminence; (2) to evaluate effects induced by MTX exposure on gonadotropins and testosterone; 93 to elucidate whether the regulatory interactions in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis are modified by this pesticide. Animals were administered subcutaneously 25mg/kg/day of MTX for 1 month. MTX increased norepinephrine and serotonin content in anterior hypothalamus (P < or = 0.05), but decreased serotonin concentration in posterior hypothalamus (P < or = 0.05). MTX diminished serotonin turnover in anterior hypothalamus (P < or = 0.01) and decreased plasma LH (P < or = 0.001) and testosterone (P < or = 0.05) levels but those of FSH remained unmodified. We can conclude that MTX exposure: (1) could exert differential effects in norepinephrine and serotonin concentration an in serotoninergic metabolism in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus and median eminence, being the anterior hypothalamus the most sensitive region to the pesticide; (2) could inhibit LH and testosterone secretion without changing FSH; (3) four potential pathways might be involved in MTX effects on testosterone secretion (changing LH secretion; modifying serotonin and norepinephrine at the hypothalamic level; alterating the direct neural pathway between brain and testes; and/or by a direct effect in testes).

  6. Brain Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF and hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacher Claire-Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an important role in energy-balance regulation. Notably leptin, an adipocyte-secreted cytokine, regulates the activity of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in the modulation of appetite. Leptin decreases appetite and stimulates weight loss in rodents. Unfortunately, numerous forms of obesity in humans seem to be resistant to leptin action. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a neurocytokine that belongs to the same family as leptin and that was originally characterized as a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of a broad spectrum of neuronal cell types and that enhances neurogenesis in adult rodents. It presents the advantage of stimulating weight loss in humans, despite the leptin resistance. Moreover, the weight loss persists several weeks after the cessation of treatment. Hence, CNTF has been considered as a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of obesity and has prompted intense research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its potent anorexigenic properties. It has been found that CNTF shares signaling pathways with leptin and is expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, a key hypothalamic region controlling food intake. Endogenous CNTF may also participate in the control of energy balance. Indeed, its expression in the ARC is inversely correlated to body weight in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Thus hypothalamic CNTF may act, in some individuals, as a protective factor against weight gain during hypercaloric diet and could account for individual differences in the susceptibility to obesity.

  7. Role of homeobox genes in the hypothalamic development and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Takao; Nonogaki, Katsunori

    2013-01-01

    Homeobox genes contribute to the regionalization, patterning and cell differentiation during embryogenesis and organ development. During mammalian embryonic development, homeobox genes, including orthopedia (Otp), a brain-specific homeobox transcription factor (Bsx) and a thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), are expressed in the hypothalamus. The genetic ablation of these genes indicated that Otp and TTF-1 are essential for the normal morphological development of the hypothalamus, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC), whereas Bsx is not required. In the adult stage, Bsx and TTF-1 continue to be expressed in the hypothalamus, including the ARC, and serve as transcription factors of neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein. The expression of hypothalamic Bsx and TTF-1 can be altered by the feeding state and appetite regulatory hormones such as ghrelin and leptin. Although Bsx and TTF-1 are essential for normal feeding behavior in adult mice, they exert different effects on the expression of hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and body weight homeostasis. Thus, the hypothalamic homeobox genes may contribute to the dissociation of food intake and body weight via AgRP-POMC neurons.

  8. Early hypothalamic FTO overexpression in response to maternal obesity--potential contribution to postweaning hyperphagia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanni Caruso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine and postnatal overnutrition program hyperphagia, adiposity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have been linked to increased risk of obesity. FTO is highly expressed in hypothalamic regions critical for energy balance and hyperphagic phenotypes were linked with FTO SNPs. As nutrition during fetal development can influence the expression of genes involved in metabolic function, we investigated the impact of maternal obesity on FTO. METHODS: Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to chow or high fat diet (HFD for 5 weeks before mating, throughout gestation and lactation. On postnatal day 1 (PND1, some litters were adjusted to 3 pups (vs. 12 control to induce postnatal overnutrition. At PND20, rats were weaned onto chow or HFD for 15 weeks. FTO mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and liver, as well as hepatic markers of lipid metabolism were measured. RESULTS: At weaning, hypothalamic FTO mRNA expression was increased significantly in offspring of obese mothers and FTO was correlated with both visceral and epididymal fat mass (P<0.05; body weight approached significance (P = 0.07. Hepatic FTO and Fatty Acid Synthase mRNA expression were decreased by maternal obesity. At 18 weeks, FTO mRNA expression did not differ between groups; however body weight was significantly correlated with hypothalamic FTO. Postnatal HFD feeding significantly reduced hepatic Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1a but did not affect the expression of other hepatic markers investigated. FTO was not affected by chronic HFD feeding. SIGNIFICANCE: Maternal obesity significantly impacted FTO expression in both hypothalamus and liver at weaning. Early overexpression of hypothalamic FTO correlated with increased adiposity and later food intake of siblings exposed to HFD suggesting upregulation of FTO may contribute to subsequent hyperphagia, in line with some human

  9. Differential effects of histamine on the activity of hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on hypothalamic dopaminergic neuronal activity was estimated in male rats by measuring concentrations of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in brain regions containing terminals or perikarya of these neurons. Three distinct, regionally specific neurochemical responses were apparent. In the median eminence and intermediate lobe of the pituitary, histamine affected neither DOPAC nor dopamine concentrations, suggesting no effect on tuberoinfundibular or periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic neuronal activity. In the medial zona incerta and in the dorsomedial, rostral periventricular and medial preoptic hypothalamic nuclei, histamine effected a dose- and time-related increase in both DOPAC and dopamine concentrations; these effects were blocked by destruction of noradrenergic neurons projecting to these regions, suggesting that these changes are attributable to noradrenergic neuronal activation, and that histamine does not affect the activity of incertohypothalamic or periventricular-preoptic dopaminergic neurons located in these brain regions. In the suprachiasmatic, caudal periventricular and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, histamine effected a dose- and time-related increase in DOPAC, but not dopamine, concentrations; these effects were blocked by the H1 antagonist mepyramine, but not the H2 antagonist zolantidine. Destruction of noradrenergic neurons projecting to these regions did not prevent the histamine-induced increases in DOPAC concentrations. These data indicate that histamine increases the activity of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the suprachiasmatic, caudal periventricular and paraventricular nuclei via an action at H1 receptors. Overall, these results reveal that i.c.v. administration of histamine differentially affects the activity of the various dopaminergic neuronal systems of the rat hypothalamus.

  10. Hypothalamic germinoma masquerading as superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vethakkan, Shireene R; Venugopal, Yogeswari; Tan, Alexander T B; Paramasivam, Sharmila S; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Razak, Rohaya A; Alias, Azmi; Kassim, Fauziah; Choong, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome secondary to hypothalamic germinoma. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, management, and clinical course of a patient admitted with SMA syndrome who was subsequently found to have a hypothalamic germinoma. An adolescent boy was admitted to the surgical ward with progressive weight loss over a 2 year period and postprandial vomiting. He was diagnosed with SMA syndrome based on evidence of proximal duodenal dilatation, extrinsic compression of the distal duodenum, and a narrowed aortomesenteric angle (16°). Investigations performed to exclude thyrotoxicosis unexpectedly revealed secondary hypothyroidism and further evaluation demonstrated evidence of pan-hypopituitarism. Psychiatric evaluation excluded anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a heterogeneously enhancing hypothalamic lesion, but a normal pituitary gland. Hormone replacement with hydrocortisone, desmopressin, testosterone, and thyroxine resulted in weight gain and resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms. A transventricular endoscopic biopsy subsequently confirmed a hypothalamic germinoma and he was referred to an oncologist. SMA syndrome secondary to severe weight loss is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. While there have been reports of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and thyrotoxicosis manifesting as SMA syndrome, there are no published reports to date of SMA syndrome secondary to hypothalamic/pituitary disease. Management of SMA syndrome is conservative, as symptoms of intestinal obstruction resolve with weight gain following treatment of the underlying cause. Awareness of this uncommon presentation of endocrine cachexia/hypothalamic disease will prevent unnecessary laparotomies and a misdiagnosis of an eating disorder.

  11. Regulation of nucleus accumbens activity by the hypothalamic neuropeptide MCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Robert M.; Liu, Rong-Jian; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Sharf, Ruth; Yeckel, Mark F.; Laubach, Mark; Aghajanian, George K.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2010-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) are brain regions important for food intake. The AcbSh contains high levels of receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a lateral hypothalamic peptide critical for feeding and metabolism. MCH receptor (MCHR1) activation in the AcbSh increases food intake while AcbSh MCHR1 blockade reduces feeding. Here biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MCH action in the rodent AcbSh are described. A reduction of phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine 845 (pSer845) is shown to occur after both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of MCHR1 activity. These changes depend upon signaling through Gi/o, and result in decreased surface expression of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Electrophysiological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the AcbSh revealed decreased amplitude of AMPAR-mediated synaptic events (mEPSC) with MCH treatment. In addition, MCH suppressed action potential firing MSNs through K+ channel activation. Finally, in vivo recordings confirmed that MCH reduces neuronal cell firing in the AcbSh in freely moving animals. The ability of MCH to reduce cell firing in the AcbSh is consistent with a general model from other pharmacological and electrophysiological studies whereby reduced AcbSh neuronal firing leads to food intake. The current work integrates the hypothalamus into this model, providing biochemical and cellular mechanisms whereby metabolic and limbic signals converge to regulate food intake. PMID:20554878

  12. Dorsomedial hypothalamic NPY and energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Kim, Yonwook J; Zheng, Fenping

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent hypothalamic orexigenic peptide. Within the hypothalamus, Npy is primarily expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). While the actions of ARC NPY in energy balance control have been well studied, a role for DMH NPY is still being unraveled. In contrast to ARC NPY that serves as one of downstream mediators of actions of leptin in maintaining energy homeostasis, DMH NPY is not under the control of leptin. Npy gene expression in the DMH is regulated by brain cholecystokinin (CCK) and other yet to be identified molecules. The findings of DMH NPY overexpression or induction in animals with increased energy demands and in certain rodent models of obesity implicate a role for DMH NPY in maintaining energy homeostasis. In support of this view, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH causes increases in food intake and body weight and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH via AAV-mediated RNAi ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and glucose intolerance of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats in which DMH NPY overexpression has been proposed to play a causal role. NPY knockdown in the DMH also prevents high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia, obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis. A detailed examination of actions of DMH NPY reveals that DMH NPY specifically affects nocturnal meal size and produces an inhibitory action on within meal satiety signals. In addition, DMH NPY modulates energy expenditure likely through affecting brown adipocyte formation and thermogenic activity. Overall, the recent findings provide clear evidence demonstrating critical roles for DMH NPY in energy balance control, and also imply a potential role for DMH NPY in maintaining glucose homeostasis.

  13. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  14. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Van Opstal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN. The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods. 10 women aged 18-30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI <23 kg/m2 women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local grey volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry.Results. No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in grey matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally.Conclusions. We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls.

  15. The role of NPY in hypothalamic mediated food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Rebecca E; Chee, Melissa J S; Colmers, William F

    2011-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly conserved neuropeptide with orexigenic actions in discrete hypothalamic nuclei that plays a role in regulating energy homeostasis. NPY signals via a family of high affinity receptors that mediate the widespread actions of NPY in all hypothalamic nuclei. These actions are also subject to tight, intricate regulation by numerous peripheral and central energy balance signals. The NPY system is embedded within a densely-redundant network designed to ensure stable energy homeostasis. This redundancy may underlie compensation for the loss of NPY or its receptors in germline knockouts, explaining why conventional knockouts of NPY or its receptors rarely yield a marked phenotypic change. We discuss insights into the hypothalamic role of NPY from studies of its physiological actions, responses to genetic manipulations and interactions with other energy balance signals. We conclude that numerous approaches must be employed to effectively study different aspects of NPY action.

  16. Hypothalamic adipic hypernatraemia syndrome with normal osmoregulation of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Capapé, Marta; Golmayo, Luz; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Gallego, Nieves; Barrio, Raquel

    2004-10-01

    Adipsic hypernatraemia is an uncommon disorder in childhood caused by a defect in the osmoregulation of thirst, leading to impairment of water homeostasis and chronic hyperosmolality of body fluids. Adipsia is often associated with an abnormality in osmoregulated vasopressin secretion due to the close proximity of the hypothalamic osmoreceptors that control thirst with those regulating vasopressin secretion. Hypothalamic lesions of diverse aetiology (vascular abnormalities, neoplasms, granulomatous diseases, trauma etc.) have been described in this syndrome. We report a 12-year-old boy with evident weight loss due to hypernatraemic dehydration with a selective defect in osmoregulation of thirst and normal vasopressin secretion with no demonstrable structural lesion. To date, only six paediatric patients with this condition have been described in the literature. Hypothalamic adipsic hypernatraemia syndrome must be suspected when a dehydrated patient denies thirst. The study of antidiuretic function is necessary because the osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion could be altered.

  17. Hypothalamic Lipids: Key Regulators of Whole Body Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Ismael; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Hypothalamic lipid metabolism plays a major role in the physiological regulation of energy balance. Modulation of several enzymatic activities that control lipid biosynthesis, such as fatty acid synthase and AMP-activated protein kinase, impacts both feeding and energy expenditure. However, lipids can also cause pathological alterations in the hypothalamus. Lipotoxicity is promoted by excess lipids in tissues not suitable for their storage. A large amount of evidence has demonstrated that lipotoxicity is a pathophysiological mechanism leading to metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and steatohepatitis. Current data have reported that, similar to what is observed in peripheral tissues, complex lipids such as ceramides and sphingolipids act as lipotoxic species at the hypothalamic level to impact metabolism. Here, we will review what is currently known about hypothalamic lipid metabolism and the modulation of energy homeostasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Brain Mast Cells Act as an Immune Gate to the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Itsuro; Inoue, Yasuhisa; Shimada, Toshio; Aikawa, Tadaomi

    2001-01-01

    Mast cells perform a significant role in the host defense against parasitic and some bacterial infections. Here we show that in the dog, degranulation of brain mast cells evokes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responses via histamine release. A large number of mast cells were found in a circumscribed ventral region of the hypothalamus, including the pars tuberalis and median eminence. When these intracranial mast cells were passively sensitized with immunoglobulin E via either the intracerebro...

  19. Symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients following radiation therapy: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, K.S.; Ho, J.H.; Lee, A.W.; Tse, V.K.; Chan, P.K.; Wang, C.; Ma, J.T.; Yeung, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Endocrine assessment was performed in 32 relapse-free southern Chinese patients 5-17 years following radiation therapy (RT) alone for early nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Initial screening was done using questionnaires emphasizing impaired sexual function and menstrual disturbance plus measurement of serum levels of thyroxine, free thyroxine index, thyrotropic hormone, prolactin, and additionally testosterone for males only. Those showing abnormalities were subjected to detailed pituitary function tests. Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction was found in 7 female patients and only 1 male patient. A delayed TSH response to thyrotropin releasing hormone suggesting a hypothalamic disorder was seen in 6 of the affected female patients, and hyperprolactinaemia in also 6. None of the patients had evidence of diabetes insipidus. Hypopituitarism became symptomatic 2-5 years after RT with a mean latent interval of 3.8 years. A practical protocol for regular endocrine assessment for NPC patients after RT has been proposed. Multiple linear regression analysis of the radiotherapeutic data from the 11 female patients indicates that the likelihood of late occurrence of symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction following RT is dependent on the TDF of the target dose to the nasopharyngeal region and the height of the upper margin of the opposed lateral facial fields above the diaphragma sellae (coefficient of multiple correlation = 0.9025). Except when the sphenoid sinus or the middle cranial fossa is involved, it is advisable to set the height of the upper margin of the lateral facial field at a level no higher than the diaphragma sellae. The hypothalamus and possibly the pituitary stalk as well may sustain permanent damage by doses of radiation within the conventional radiotherapeutic range for carcinomas.

  20. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats.

  1. Loss of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone markedly reduces anxiety behaviors in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Asai, Masato; Mahoney, Carrie E; Joachim, Maria; Shen, Yuan; Gunner, Georgia; Majzoub, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing paradigm posits that hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) regulates neuroendocrine functions such as adrenal glucocorticoid release, while extra-hypothalamic CRH plays a key role in stressor-triggered behaviors. Here we report that hypothalamus-specific Crh knockout mice (Sim1CrhKO mice, created by crossing Crhflox with Sim1Cre mice) have absent Crh mRNA and peptide mainly in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) but preserved Crh expression in other brain regions including amygdala and cerebral cortex. As expected, Sim1CrhKO mice exhibit adrenal atrophy as well as decreased basal, diurnal and stressor-stimulated plasma corticosterone secretion and basal plasma ACTH, but surprisingly, have a profound anxiolytic phenotype when evaluated using multiple stressors including open field, elevated plus maze, holeboard, light-dark box, and novel object recognition task. Restoring plasma corticosterone did not reverse the anxiolytic phenotype of Sim1CrhKO mice. Crh-Cre driver mice revealed that PVHCrh fibers project abundantly to cingulate cortex and the nucleus accumbens shell, and moderately to medial amygdala, locus coeruleus, and solitary tract, consistent with the existence of PVHCrh-dependent behavioral pathways. Although previous, nonselective attenuation of CRH production or action, genetically in mice and pharmacologically in humans, respectively, has not produced the anticipated anxiolytic effects, our data show that targeted interference specifically with hypothalamic Crh expression results in anxiolysis. Our data identify neurons that express both Sim1 and Crh as a cellular entry point into the study of CRH-mediated, anxiety-like behaviors and their therapeutic attenuation. PMID:27595593

  2. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stud

  3. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Witkamp, R.F.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Laak, ter M.C.; Heins, M.S.; Norren, van K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections b

  4. A case for hypothalamic acromegaly: a clinicopathological study of six patients with hypothalamic gangliocytomas producing growth hormone-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, S L; Scheithauer, B W; Bilbao, J M; Horvath, E; Ryan, N; Kovacs, K; Randall, R V; Laws, E R; Singer, W; Linfoot, J A

    1984-05-01

    We report the histological, ultrastructural, and immunocytochemical features of six hypothalamic gangliocytomas associated with pituitary GH cell adenomas and/or acromegaly. In four patients, the gangliocytoma was intrasellar, and no hypothalamic investigation was performed; in two patients, autopsy confirmed hypothalamic involvement. Four patients had a gangliocytoma associated with pituitary GH cell adenoma and acromegaly; electron microscopy demonstrated an intimate association between neurons and adenomatous GH cells. One patient had a gangliocytoma and a GH cell adenoma but no clinical evidence of acromegaly. In the sixth patient, clinical and biochemical acromegaly was manifest, but no pituitary adenoma was demonstrated. Using immunocytochemistry, human pancreatic tumor GRF (hptGRF-40) was localized in the majority of neurons of all six gangliocytomas. The pituitary adenomas and nontumorous adenohypophyses were negative for hptGRF-40. In addition, somatostatin, glucagon, and GnRH were demonstrated within some neurons of several tumors; insulin and gastrin stains were equivocal. These findings confirm previous proposals of production of a GRF by such gangliocytomas. While the significance of other peptides found in some of the tumors is uncertain, the presence of hptGRF-40 in neurons of these gangliocytomas supports the theory that GRF excess is the mechanism responsible for over-production of GH and provides evidence for a syndrome of hypothalamic acromegaly.

  5. Effects of fluoxetine administration on hypothalamic melanocortin system in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, I; Portillo, M P; Casis, L; Gutiérrez, A; Macarulla, M T; Echevarría, E

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the potential involvement of melanocortin system in the anorectic mechanism of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, in obese Zucker rats. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. The control group was given 0.9% NaCl solution. RT-PCR for pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), Agouti gene related peptide (AgRP) and melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4-R) in the hypothalamus, as well as regional immunostaining for alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and MC4-R were carried out. Fluoxetine administration increased POMC expression and reduced MC4-R expression in the hypothalamus, without changes in AgRP mRNA levels. Moreover, an increase in the numbers of alpha-MSH positively immunostained neural cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), as well as a significant decrease in the numbers of neural cells positively immunostained for MC4-R in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), without changes in lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), were observed. These results suggest the involvement of alpha-MSH in central fluoxetine anorectic action.

  6. Intracisternally Injected L-Proline Activates Hypothalamic Supraoptic, but Not Paraventricular, Vasopressin-Expressing Neurons in Conscious Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Takemoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When injected into specific rat brain regions, the neurotransmitter candidate L-proline produces various cardiovascular changes through ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptors. The present study used an immunohistochemical double-labeling approach to determine whether intracisternally injected L-proline in freely moving rats, which increases blood pressure, activates hypothalamic vasopressin-expressing neurons and ventral medullary tyrosine-hydroxylase- (TH- containing neurons. Following injection of L-proline, the number of activated hypothalamic neurons that coexpressed vasopressin and c-Fos was much greater in the supraoptic nucleus (SON than in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN of rats with increased blood pressure. The number of activated TH-containing neurons was significantly greater following L-proline treatment than following control injections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF. These results clearly demonstrate that intracisternally injected L-proline activates hypothalamic supraoptic, but not paraventricular, vasopressin-expressing neurons and medullary TH-containing (A1/C1 neurons in freely moving rats.

  7. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  8. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  9. [Conditioned trace reactions of hypothalamic neurons following exposure to vibration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednikova, Iu S

    1977-01-01

    Trace reactions were studied in 112 hypothalamic units in rabbits during motor defensive conditioning to time after vibration action of two intensities. A later formation of conditioned trace reactions was observed as compared to the control. Vibration of lesser intensity improved the course of trace processes and slightly increased the number of neurones responding to the conditioned stimulus (45% as against 43% in the control); after a stronger vibration action, conditioned reactions to time were recorded only in 29% of the hypothalamic cells eith a simultaneous diminution of the trace response. It has been assumed that the observed transformations result from changes of the significance of the reinforcing factor in the formation of a motor defensive conditioned reflex after the action of vibration.

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic function in girls with premature thelarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, A M; Piccolo, F; Scalamandre, A; Malvaso, M; Ortolani, R; Boscherini, B

    1980-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic activity was investigated in 9 girls with premature thelarche, and compared with that in 9 healthy girls and 6 girls with true precocious puberty. The gonadotropin stimulation test with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone was used. Girls with premature thelarche showed luteinising hormone response resembling that of normal girls, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) response quite similar to that of girls with precocious puberty. This suggests that in premature thelarche there is a partial activation of the diencephalic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis, which affects FSH only. Premature thelarche therefore, should be considered as one of the disorders due to altered sensitivity of the hypothalamic receptors which regulate sex maturation. PMID:6779715

  11. Stochastic modeling of the hypothalamic pulse generator activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camproux, A C; Thalabard, J C; Thomas, G

    1994-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is released by the pituitary in discrete pulses. In the monkey, the appearance of LH pulses in the plasma is invariably associated with sharp increases (i.e, volleys) in the frequency of the hypothalamic pulse generator electrical activity, so that continuous monitoring of this activity by telemetry provides a unique means to study the temporal structure of the mechanism generating the pulses. To assess whether the times of occurrence and durations of previous volleys exert significant influence on the timing of the next volley, we used a class of periodic counting process models that specify the stochastic intensity of the process as the product of two factors: 1) a periodic baseline intensity and 2) a stochastic regression function with covariates representing the influence of the past. This approach allows the characterization of circadian modulation and memory range of the process underlying hypothalamic pulse generator activity, as illustrated by fitting the model to experimental data from two ovariectomized rhesus monkeys.

  12. Hypothalamic pituitary disorders expressed by galactorrhea. A dynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, F R

    1975-11-01

    Physiologic and pathologic production of milk involves complex relations between the mammary glands, hormones, and the central nervous system. In all the galactorrhea syndromes there is a functional or mechanical problem at the pituitary level, with abnormal secretion or reserve of prolactin secretion. Stimulatory agents of prolactin, like thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), chlorpromazine, amnio acids, and insulin, can be helpful in the study of the hypothalamic pituitary functional reserve, while the osmotic tests seem to provide a clear distinction between functional and tumoral causes. The inhibitory agents of prolactin secretion, L-dopa and CB 154, permit the study of the negative control of the hormone. In addition, CB 154 appears to be an effective treatment for functional galactorrhea. Hyperprolactinemia appears to exert an inhibitory influence on gonadotropins. Clomiphene, acting on the hypothalamus, and LHRH, acting on the gonadotropes, permit the assessment of the gonadotropic hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis.

  13. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Endocrine System in the Hagfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumi eNozaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates. Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrate known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates, the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTH mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  14. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  15. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans a...

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  17. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  18. EJE PRIZE 2017: Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular gauge that is activated under conditions, such as low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy waste. Centrally, the AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis, by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. Current evidence links hypothalamic AMPK with feeding, brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT), as well as muscle metabolism, hepatic function and glucose homeostasis. The relevance of these data is interesting from a therapeutic point of view as several agents with potential anti-obesity and/or antidiabetic effects, some currently in clinical use, such as nicotine, metformin and liraglutide are known to act through AMPK, either peripherally or centrally. Furthermore, the orexigenic and weight-gaining effects of the worldwide use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as olanzapine, are also mediated by hypothalamic AMPK. Overall, this evidence makes hypothalamic AMPK signaling an interesting target for the drug development, with its potential for controlling both sides of the energy balance equation, namely feeding and energy expenditure through defined metabolic pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  19. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JH LEE; SB YOO; JY KIM; JY LEE; BT KIM; K PARK; JW JAHNG

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neonatal maternal separation (MS) – chronic stress experience inearly life – affects the anorectic efficacy of leptin in the offspring at adolescence. Sprague–Dawley pups wereseparated from the dam daily for 3 h during postnatal day 1–14 or left undisturbed as non-handled controls (NH).NH and MS male pups received an intraperitoneal leptin (100 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 28, and thenfood intake and body weight gain were recorded. The hypothalamic levels of leptin-signalling-related genes,phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B(PTP1B) were examined at 40 min after a single injection of leptin on PND 39 by immunohistochemistry and Westernblot analysis. Leptin-induced suppressions in food intake and weight gain was observed in NH pups, but not in MS.Leptin increased pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of NH pups, but not of MS. Interestingly, basal levelsof the hypothalamic PTP1B and pSTAT3 were increased in MS pups compared with NH controls. The results suggestthat neonatal MS experience may blunt the anorectic efficacy of leptin later in life, possibly in relation with increasedexpressions of PTP1B and/or pSTAT3 in the hypothalamus.

  20. Effects of sugar solutions on hypothalamic appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Danielle L; Castonguay, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Several hypotheses for the causes of the obesity epidemic in the US have been proposed. One such hypothesis is that dietary intake patterns have significantly shifted to include unprecedented amounts of refined sugar. We set out to determine if different sugars might promote changes in the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake by measuring several hypothalamic peptides subsequent to overnight access to dilute glucose, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, or fructose solutions. Rats were given access to food, water and a sugar solution for 24h, after which blood and tissues were collected. Fructose access (as opposed to other sugars that were tested) resulted in a doubling of circulating triglycerides. Glucose consumption resulted in upregulation of 7 satiety-related hypothalamic peptides whereas changes in gene expression were mixed for remaining sugars. Also, following multiple verification assays, 6 satiety related peptides were verified as being affected by sugar intake. These data provide evidence that not all sugars are equally effective in affecting the control of intake.

  1. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Yoo, S B; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Kim, B T; Park, K; Jahng, J W

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neonatal maternal separation (MS) - chronic stress experience in early life - affects the anorectic efficacy of leptin in the offspring at adolescence. Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from the dam daily for 3 h during postnatal day 1-14 or left undisturbed as non-handled controls (NH). NH and MS male pups received an intraperitoneal leptin (100 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 28, and then food intake and body weight gain were recorded. The hypothalamic levels of leptin-signalling-related genes, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were examined at 40 min after a single injection of leptin on PND 39 by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Leptin-induced suppressions in food intake and weight gain was observed in NH pups, but not in MS. Leptin increased pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of NH pups, but not of MS. Interestingly, basal levels of the hypothalamic PTP1B and pSTAT3 were increased in MS pups compared with NH controls. The results suggest that neonatal MS experience may blunt the anorectic efficacy of leptin later in life, possibly in relation with increased expressions of PTP1B and/or pSTAT3 in the hypothalamus.

  2. [Conditioning of emotional behavior caused by hypothalamic stimulation (3): The learned behavior caused by hypothalamic stimulation in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaura, S; Funada, K; Abe, Y; Hosokawa, T

    1976-09-01

    In the present study, the learned behavior caused by hypothalamic electrical stimulation was examined in order to determine the effects of psychotropic drugs. Subjects were albino male rabbits with electrodes chronically implanted in the hypothalamic area. A shuttle box, which was adjusted for behavioral pharmacological estimation of drugs in rabbits, was used. A buzzer sound (85dB) and electrical stimulation of hypothalamus (100 HZ, 1 msec, 1.2-2.0V) were used as the conditional stimulation (CS) and unconditional stimulation (UCS), respectively. The same animal was trained in habituation to a buzzer sound as the CS. For avoidance conditioning in a two-compartment situation, the animal was placed in a shuttle box divided by a hurdle situated at the middle of two-compartments. After the CS was presented for 10 sec, the UCS was given. The animals were subjected to 15 conditioning trials per day. The avoidance and escape behavior model became as distinct by hypothalamic stimulation as by UCS. After termination of the experiments, extinction trials were carried out after which the animals were sacrificed, and localization of the stimulating electrodes was determined histologically.

  3. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-15

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP](c)) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of K(ATP) channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mM) caused no detectable increase in [ATP](c), monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25-luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mM) with a significant increase in [ATP](c). Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mM glucose with increases in [ATP](c). Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of K(ATP) channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mM) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mM) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mM lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP](c). High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed K(ATP) channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells.

  4. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]c) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of KATP channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mm) caused no detectable increase in [ATP]c, monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25–luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mm) with a significant increase in [ATP]c. Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mm glucose with increases in [ATP]c. Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of KATP channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mm) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mm) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mm lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP]c. High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed KATP channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells. PMID:12381816

  5. Suprasellar ganglioglioma with unusual diffuse involvement of the entire optico-chiasmal hypothalamic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalali Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gangliogliomas (GG are mixed glioneuronal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS, occurring mostly in the pediatric population, with common sites being temporal lobes and less commonly in the frontal and parietal lobes. We report a case of a 7-year-old child who presented with bilateral visual defects for 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed an intensely enhancing mass lesion with calcification in the sellar and suprasellar region involving the optic chiasm and the left optic nerve. The mass showed almost bilaterally symmetrical diffuse spread along the optic tracts posteriorly and hypothalamus, temporal lobes, thalami and the basal ganglia. The lesion was radiologically indistinguishable from chiasmatic astrocytoma or a germ cell tumor but histopathological features were of a ganglioglioma. While a few optic apparatus gangliogliomas have been reported in the literature, such widespread diffuse involvement of the entire optico-chiasmal hypothalamic pathway is unusual.

  6. Thyroid hormone exerts negative feedback on hypothalamic type 4 melanocortin receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2010-03-01

    The type 4 melanocortin receptor MC4R, a key relay in leptin signaling, links central energy control to peripheral reserve status. MC4R activation in different brain areas reduces food intake and increases energy expenditure. Mice lacking Mc4r are obese. Mc4r is expressed by hypothalamic paraventricular Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neurons and increases energy usage through activation of Trh and production of the thyroid hormone tri-iodothyronine (T(3)). These facts led us to test the hypothesis that energy homeostasis should require negative feedback by T(3) on Mc4r expression. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed hyperthyroidism reduces Mc4r mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus. Comparative in silico analysis of Mc4r regulatory regions revealed two evolutionarily conserved potential negative thyroid hormone-response elements (nTREs). In vivo ChIP assays on mouse hypothalamus demonstrated association of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) with a region spanning one nTRE. Further, in vivo gene reporter assays revealed dose-dependent T(3) repression of transcription from the Mc4r promoter in mouse hypothalamus, in parallel with T(3)-dependent Trh repression. Mutagenesis of the nTREs in the Mc4r promoter demonstrated direct regulation by T(3), consolidating the ChIP results. In vivo shRNA knockdown, TR over-expression approaches and use of mutant mice lacking specific TRs showed that both TRalpha and TRbeta contribute to Mc4r regulation. T(3) repression of Mc4r transcription ensures that the energy-saving effects of T(3) feedback on Trh are not overridden by MC4R activation of Trh. Thus parallel repression by T(3) on hypothalamic Mc4r and Trh contributes to energy homeostasis.

  7. Acupoint specificity on acupuncture regulation of hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal cortex axis function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-jun; Zhang, Jiao-jiao; Yang, Hao-yan; Wang, Fang; Li, Si-ting

    2015-03-27

    The hypothalamus is an essential part of the brain that responds to a variety of signaling including stressful stimulations and acupuncture signals. It is also the key element of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex axis(HPAA). The effect of acupuncture is transmitted into the brain from the distance sensory receptor around the acupoints via peripheral nerves and body fluid. In vivo recording the activities of stress reaction neurons (SRNs, CRH-like neurons) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in response to the stimulations from different acupoints could therefore objectively reflect the acupuncture afferent effect. In this study, the electrophysiological method was adopted to record synchronously the activities of 43 CRH-like neurons after acupuncture stimulations at 33 acupoints located at the different regions. The acupoints that specifically activate certain CRH-like neurons (specificity acupoints) were selected. Furthermore, we investigated in a rat model of unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) whether these specificity acupoints regulate HPAA function. The endpoints of measurement include corticosterone (CORT) level in peripheral blood, the expressions of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein in PVN and the animal behavioral performance. Our results reveal that Shenshu (BL23), Ganshu (BL18), Qimen (LR14), Jingmen (GB25), Riyue (GB24), Zangmen (LR13), Dazui (DU14) and auricular concha region (ACR) are the specificity acupoints; and Gallbladder, Liver and Du Channels were the specificity Channels. The acupoints on Gallbladder Channel and the acupoints innervated by the same spinal cord segments as the adrenal gland demonstrated dramatic effects. This study provides a new platform to further explore acupoints specificity in the regulation of HPAA activities.

  8. Enhancers of GnRH Transcription Embedded in an Upstream Gene Use Homeodomain Proteins to Specify Hypothalamic Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Anita K.; MILLER, NICHOL L. G.; Yip, Kathleen; Tran, Brian H.; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    GnRH, the central regulator of reproductive function, is produced by only approximately 800 highly specialized hypothalamic neurons. Previous studies identified a minimal promoter [GnRH minimal promoter (GnRH-P)] (−173/+1) and a neuron-specific enhancer [GnRH-enhancer (E)1] (−1863/−1571) as regulatory regions in the rat gene that confer this stringent specificity of GnRH expression to differentiated GnRH neurons. In transgenic mice, these two elements target only GnRH neurons but fail to driv...

  9. 下丘脑异常与抑郁症%Hypothalamic Abnormalities and Major Depressive Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓乐; 王东林

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of depression model animals or patients with major depressive disorders have found substantial evidence of hypothalamic abnormalities, such as changes in the hypothalamus volume and the number of neurons, dysfunctions in hypothalamic-pituitary-endocrine axis, hypothalamic-related hormone, receptors and their genes, neuropeptides, and alterations in the connectivity between hypothalamus and other brain regions. Most of this evidence, however, was obtained either from animal experiments, from indirect clinical indicators (such as peripheral blood hormone levels, etc.), or from brain autopsies of patients with depression. No direct evidence for abnormal hypothalamus in depressive disorders has been confirmed in vivo in humans. Future studies may use brain imaging methods to more directly explore the structural and functional characteristics of abnormal hypothalamus in depressed patients. The resulting biomarkers, along with measurements of their reliability, can provide the basis for objective diagnosis, and lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of depressive disorders.%近年来的研究发现了抑郁模型动物或抑郁症病人下丘脑异常的大量证据,诸如下丘脑体积及神经元数目的改变,下丘脑-垂体-内分泌轴的改变,下丘脑相关激素、受体及其基因、神经肽的改变,下丘脑与其他脑区功能联系的改变等等。然而,下丘脑与抑郁症关系的研究所获证据多来自动物实验、或临床间接指标(如病人外周血激素水平等),或病人脑组织尸检,缺乏来自病人活体下丘脑异常的直接证据。今后的研究可考虑运用影像学的手段更直接地探索抑郁症患者活体下丘脑的结构特征和功能特征,以期发现抑郁症的生物学标记及其可靠性指标,为抑郁症的客观诊断提供依据,为揭示抑郁症病理机制提供线索。

  10. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  12. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  13. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eSchneeberger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  14. Neuroendocrine Function After Hypothalamic Depletion of Glucocorticoid Receptors in Male and Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Matia B; Loftspring, Matthew; de Kloet, Annette D; Ghosal, Sriparna; Jankord, Ryan; Flak, Jonathan N; Wulsin, Aynara C; Krause, Eric G; Zhang, Rong; Rice, Taylor; McKlveen, Jessica; Myers, Brent; Tasker, Jeffrey G; Herman, James P

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids act rapidly at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) to inhibit stress-excitatory neurons and limit excessive glucocorticoid secretion. The signaling mechanism underlying rapid feedback inhibition remains to be determined. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the canonical glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) is required for appropriate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation. Local PVN GR knockdown (KD) was achieved by breeding homozygous floxed GR mice with Sim1-cre recombinase transgenic mice. This genetic approach created mice with a KD of GR primarily confined to hypothalamic cell groups, including the PVN, sparing GR expression in other HPA axis limbic regulatory regions, and the pituitary. There were no differences in circadian nadir and peak corticosterone concentrations between male PVN GR KD mice and male littermate controls. However, reduction of PVN GR increased ACTH and corticosterone responses to acute, but not chronic stress, indicating that PVN GR is critical for limiting neuroendocrine responses to acute stress in males. Loss of PVN GR induced an opposite neuroendocrine phenotype in females, characterized by increased circadian nadir corticosterone levels and suppressed ACTH responses to acute restraint stress, without a concomitant change in corticosterone responses under acute or chronic stress conditions. PVN GR deletion had no effect on depression-like behavior in either sex in the forced swim test. Overall, these findings reveal pronounced sex differences in the PVN GR dependence of acute stress feedback regulation of HPA axis function. In addition, these data further indicate that glucocorticoid control of HPA axis responses after chronic stress operates via a PVN-independent mechanism.

  15. Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Vidarsdottir, S.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Viergever, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Grond, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that hypothalamic neuronal activity, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal, declines in response to oral glucose intake. To further explore the mechanism driving changes in hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to an oral glucose load,

  16. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, C.L.; Yang, L.; Dacks, P.A.; Isoda, F.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Mobbs, C.V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance.

  17. HYPOTHALAMIC BLOOD-FLOW REMAINS UNALTERED FOLLOWING CHRONIC NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE BLOCKADE IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BENYO, Z; SZABO, C; STUIVER, BT; BOHUS, B; SANDOR, P

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the chronic oral application of N-G-nitro-L-arginine methyl eater (L-NAME), a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production, was studied on hypothalamic blood flow (HBF) and hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in rats. L-NAME was dissolved in the drinking water, in a c

  18. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew eElson; Joseph eBovi; Kawaljeet eKaur; Diana eMaas; Grant eSinson; Chris eSchultz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife) on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT) ...

  19. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Guaraldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A. The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data.

  20. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  1. Nutritional Recovery Promotes Hypothalamic Inflammation in Rats during Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Barbosa Farias Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated whether protein restriction in fetal life alters food intake and glucose homeostasis in adulthood by interfering with insulin signal transduction through proinflammatory mechanisms in the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues. Rats were divided into the following: a control group (C; a recovered group (R; and a low protein (LP group. Relative food intake was greater and serum leptin was diminished in LP and R compared to C rats. Proinflammatory genes and POMC mRNA were upregulated in the hypothalamus of R group. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression was greater but AKT phosphorylation was diminished in the LP than in the C rats. In muscle, AKT phosphorylation was higher in restricted than in control animals. The HOMA-IR was decreased in R and C compared to the LP group. In contrast, the Kitt in R was similar to that in C and both were lower than LP rats. Thus, nutritional recovery did not alter glucose homeostasis but produced middle hyperphagia, possibly due to increased anorexigenic neuropeptide expression that counteracted the hypothalamic inflammatory process. In long term protein deprived rats, hyperphagia most likely resulted from increased orexigenic neuropeptide expression, and glucose homeostasis was maintained, at least in part, at the expense of increased muscle insulin sensitivity.

  2. Disruption of neurogenesis by hypothalamic inflammation in obesity or aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Adult neural stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and plasticity of the brain which is essential for central regulation of systemic homeostasis. Damage to these homeostatic components, depending on locations in the brain, poses threat to impaired neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, cognitive loss and energy imbalance. Recent research has identified brain metabolic inflammation via proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ) and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB pathway as a non-classical linker of metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic activation of the pathway results in impairment of energy balance and nutrient metabolism, impediment of neurogenesis, neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, collectively converging on metabolic and cognitive decline. Hypothalamic IKKβ/NF-κB via inflammatory crosstalk between microglia and neurons has been discovered to direct systemic aging by inhibiting the production of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and inhibition of inflammation or GnRH therapy could revert aging related degenerative symptoms at least in part. This article reviews the crucial role of hypothalamic inflammation in affecting neural stem cells which mediates the neurodegenerative mechanisms of causing metabolic derangements as well as aging-associated disorders or diseases.

  3. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  4. A treasure trove of hypothalamic neurocircuitries governing body weight homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Claudia R; Coppari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Changes in physical activities and feeding habits have transformed the historically rare disease of obesity into a modern metabolic pandemic. Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. This energy imbalance significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and as such represents an enormous socioeconomic burden and health threat. To combat obesity, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitries underlying normal body weight homeostasis is required. In the 1940s, pioneering lesion experiments unveiled the importance of medial and lateral hypothalamic structures. In the 1980s and 1990s, several neuropeptides and peripheral hormones critical for appropriate feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and hence body weight homeostasis were identified. In the 2000s, results from metabolic analyses of genetically engineered mice bearing mutations only in selected neuronal groups greatly advanced our knowledge of the peripheral/brain feedback-loop modalities by which central neurons control energy balance. In this review, we will summarize these recent progresses with particular emphasis on the biochemical identities of hypothalamic neurons and molecular components underlying normal appetite, energy expenditure, and body weight homeostasis. We will also parse which of those neurons and molecules are critical components of homeostatic adaptive pathways against obesity induced by hypercaloric feeding.

  5. MRI of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, Dimitrios Nikiforos [University of Ioannina, Department of Physiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-11-01

    In childhood, the MR characteristics of the normal pituitary gland are well established. During the first 2 months of life the adenohypophysis demonstrates high signal. Pituitary gland height (PGH) decreases during the 1st year of life and then increases, reaching a plateau after puberty. The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) increases in both sexes up to the age of 20 years. On dynamic contrast-enhanced studies, the posterior pituitary lobe enhances simultaneously with the straight sinus, and the adenohypophysis later, but within 30 s. In genetically determined dysfunctional states, the adenohypophysis may be normal, hypoplastic, or enlarged. Pituitary enlargement, observed in Prop 1 gene mutations, is characterized by a mass interposed between the anterior and posterior lobes. An ectopic posterior lobe (EPP), associated with a hypoplastic or absent pituitary stalk, may be observed in patients with hypopituitarism. Tumors of the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis may be the origin of adenohypophyseal deficiencies. A small hypointense adenohypophysis is found in iron overload states and is often associated with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Absence of the posterior lobe bright signal, with or without a thick pituitary stalk or a mass at any site from the median eminence to the posterior pituitary lobe, may be found in diabetes insipidus. Hydrocephalus, suprasellar arachnoid cysts, hypothalamic hamartomas and craniopharyngiomas may result in central precocious puberty (CPP). Increased PGH in girls with idiopathic CPP is useful for its differential diagnosis from premature thelarche (PT). Pituitary adenomas, observed mainly in adolescents, present the same MR characteristics as those in adults. (orig.)

  6. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2011-06-11

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on the regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans and in animals. Specifically, mutations in the POMC processing enzymes prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) and in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and in the α-MSH degrading enzyme, PRCP, are associated with changes in energy balance. There is increasing evidence that POMC processing is regulated with respect to energy balance. Studies have implicated both the leptin and insulin signaling pathways in the regulation of POMC at various steps in the processing pathway. This article will review the role of hypothalamic POMC in regulating energy balance with a focus on POMC processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypothalamic leptin-neurotensin-hypocretin neuronal networks in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas-Djerbi, Talia; Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus. In mammals, NTS-producing neurons that express leptin receptor (LepRb) regulate the function of hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) and dopamine neurons. Thus, the hypothalamic leptin-NTS-HCRT neuronal network orchestrates key homeostatic output, including sleep, feeding, and reward. However, the intricate mechanisms of the circuitry and the unique role of NTS-expressing neurons remain unclear. We studied the NTS neuronal networks in zebrafish and cloned the genes encoding the NTS neuropeptide and receptor (NTSR). Similar to mammals, the ligand is expressed primarily in the hypothalamus, while the receptor is expressed widely throughout the brain in zebrafish. A portion of hypothalamic nts-expressing neurons are inhibitory and some coexpress leptin receptor (lepR1). As in mammals, NTS and HCRT neurons are localized adjacently in the hypothalamus. To track the development and axonal projection of NTS neurons, the NTS promoter was isolated. Transgenesis and double labeling of NTS and HCRT neurons showed that NTS axons project toward HCRT neurons, some of which express ntsr. Moreover, another target of NTS neurons is ntsr-expressing dopaminergeric neurons. These findings suggest structural circuitry between leptin, NTS, and hypocretinergic or dopaminergic neurons and establish the zebrafish as a model to study the role of these neuronal circuits in the regulation of feeding, sleep, and reward.

  8. Desipramine inhibits histamine H1 receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling in rat hypothalamic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ah Kang

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus in the brain is the main center for appetite control and integrates signals from adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. Antidepressants are known to modulate the activities of hypothalamic neurons and affect food intake, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antidepressants modulate hypothalamic function remain unclear. Here we have investigated how hypothalamic neurons respond to treatment with antidepressants, including desipramine and sibutramine. In primary cultured rat hypothalamic cells, desipramine markedly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ evoked by histamine H1 receptor activation. Desipramine also inhibited the histamine-induced Ca(2+ increase and the expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone in hypothalamic GT1-1 cells. The effect of desipramine was not affected by pretreatment with prazosin or propranolol, excluding catecholamine reuptake activity of desipramine as an underlying mechanism. Sibutramine which is also an antidepressant but decreases food intake, had little effect on the histamine-induced Ca(2+ increase or AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Our results reveal that desipramine and sibutramine have different effects on histamine H1 receptor signaling in hypothalamic cells and suggest that distinct regulation of hypothalamic histamine signaling might underlie the differential regulation of food intake between antidepressants.

  9. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypothalamic obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja Hye; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2013-12-01

    The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of body weight by balancing the intake of food, energy expenditure, and body fat stores, as evidenced by the fact that most monogenic syndromes of morbid obesity result from mutations in genes expressed in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic obesity is a result of impairment in the hypothalamic regulatory centers of body weight and energy expenditure, and is caused by structural damage to the hypothalamus, radiotherapy, Prader-Willi syndrome, and mutations in the LEP, LEPR, POMC, MC4R and CART genes. The pathophysiology includes loss of sensitivity to afferent peripheral humoral signals, such as leptin, dysregulated insulin secretion, and impaired activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Dysregulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 activity and melatonin may also have a role in the development of hypothalamic obesity. Intervention of this complex entity requires simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms that are deranged in patients with hypothalamic obesity. Despite a great deal of theoretical understanding, effective treatment for hypothalamic obesity has not yet been developed. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control food intake and energy homeostasis and pathophysiology of hypothalamic obesity can be the cornerstone of the development of new treatments options. Early identification of patients at-risk can relieve the severity of weight gain by the provision of dietary and behavioral modification, and antiobesity medication. This review summarizes recent advances of the pathophysiology, endocrine characteristics, and treatment strategies of hypothalamic obesity.

  10. Hypothalamic obesity after craniopharyngioma: mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Lustig

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a common complication after craniopharyngioma therapy, occurring in up to 75% of survivors. Its weight gain is unlike that of normal obesity, in that it occurs even with caloric restriction, and attempts at lifestyle modification are useless to prevent or treat the obesity. The pathogenesis of this condition involves the inability to transduce afferent hormonal signals of adiposity, in effect mimicking a state of CNS starvation. Efferent sympathetic activity drops, resulting in malaise and reduced energy expenditure, and vagal activity increases, resulting in increased insulin secretion and adipogenesis. Lifestyle intervention is essentially useless in this syndrome, termed hypothalamic obesity. Pharmacologic treatment is also difficult, consisting of adrenergics to mimic sympathetic activity, or suppression of insulin secretion with octreotide, or both. Recently, bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric banding, truncal vagotomy have also been attempted with variable results. Early and intensive management is required to mitigate the obesity and its negative consequences.

  11. Early life origins of obesity: role of hypothalamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Sebastien G

    2009-03-01

    The incidence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and this worldwide epidemic represents an ominous predictor of increases in diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Epidemiological and animals studies suggest that maternal obesity and alterations in postnatal nutrition are associated with increased risks for obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes in the offspring. Furthermore, there is also growing appreciation that developmental programming of neuroendocrine systems by the perinatal environment represents a possible cause for these diseases. This review article provides a synthesis of recent evidence concerning the actions of perinatal hormones and nutrition in programming the development and organization of hypothalamic circuits that regulate body weight and energy balance. Particular attention is given to the neurodevelopmental actions of insulin and leptin.

  12. Perinatal nutrition programs the hypothalamic melanocortin system in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattez, J-S; Delahaye, F; Lukaszewski, M-A; Risold, P-Y; Eberlé, D; Vieau, D; Breton, C

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies initially suggested that maternal undernutrition leading to low birth weight may predispose for long-lasting energy balance disorders. High birth weight due to maternal obesity or diabetes, inappropriate early postnatal nutrition, and rapid catch-up growth, may also sensitize to increased risk of obesity. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, the perinatal perturbation of fetus/neonate nutrient supply might be a crucial determinant of individual programming of body weight set-point. The hypothalamic melanocortin system composed of the melanocortin receptor 4, its agonist α-melanin-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and its antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP) is considered as the main central anorexigenic pathway controlling energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models demonstrated that this system is a prime target of developmental programming by maternal nutritional manipulation. In rodents, the perinatal period of life corresponds largely to the period of brain maturation (i. e., melanocortin neuronal differentiation and development of their neural projections). In contrast, these phenomena essentially take place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several common offspring programming mechanisms. Offspring from malnourished dams present a hypothalamic melanocortin system with a series of alterations: impaired neurogenesis and neuronal functionality, disorganization of feeding pathways, modified glucose sensing, and leptin/insulin resistance. Overall, these alterations may account for the long-lasting dysregulation of energy balance and obesity. Following maternal malnutrition, hormonal and epigenetic mechanisms might be responsible for melanocortin system programming in offspring. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Genetic, hypothalamic and endocrine features of clinical and experimental obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, G A

    1992-01-01

    Obesity occurs in both clinical and animal forms in a variety of specific models which allow study of its underlining endocrine and mechanistic features. Among the neuroendocrine varieties of obesity, polycystic ovaries are probably the most common. The importance of the gonadal feedback system for regulation of food intake and obesity is indicated by the effects of castration in experimental animals which is a widely used mechanism for producing experimental obesity. Cushing syndrome and hypothalamic obesity are rare clinical syndromes. The current evidence suggests that there are two types of hypothalamic obesity from a mechanistic point of view--one associated with hyperphagia as a necessary and sufficient cause and a disturbance of the autonomic nervous system without hyperphagia as a second mechanism. Although genetic factors underlie most types of human obesity, there are several dymorphic forms of obesity including the Prader-Willy syndrome, Cohen's syndrome, Carpenter's syndrome, Ahlstrom's syndrome and the Bardet-Biedel syndrome. The Prader-Willi syndrome is characterized by obesity hypotonia hypogonadism and mental retardation. In animals, a dominant form of inheritance of obesity is seen in the yellow mouse. Current evidence suggests that this syndrome can be explained by reduced acetylation of MSH in the pituitary and/or hypothalamus. Several recessively inherited forms of obesity exist including the obese mouse, the diabetes mouse, fatty rat, the fat mouse, tubby mouse and the corpulent rat. In addition, there are a number of polygenic types of experimental obesity. The final mechanistic classification of obesity are those due to dietary manipulation. For both human beings and animals, a highly fat diet appears to be particularly problematic for the development of obesity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight.

  15. Hypothalamic CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate energy balance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Clark, Samantha; Cannich, Astrid; Klugmann, Matthias; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor activation is generally considered a powerful orexigenic signal and inhibition of the endocannabinoid system is beneficial for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. The hypothalamus plays a critical role in regulating energy balance by modulating both food intake and energy expenditure. Although CB(1) receptor signaling has been implicated in the modulation of both these mechanisms, a complete understanding of its role in the hypothalamus is still lacking. Here we combined a genetic approach with the use of adeno-associated viral vectors to delete the CB(1) receptor gene in the adult mouse hypothalamus and assessed the impact of such manipulation on the regulation of energy balance. Viral-mediated deletion of the CB(1) receptor gene in the hypothalamus led to the generation of Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice, which displayed an approximately 60% decrease in hypothalamic CB(1) receptor mRNA levels. Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice maintained on a normocaloric, standard diet showed decreased body weight gain over time, which was associated with increased energy expenditure and elevated β(3)-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 mRNA levels in the brown adipose tissue but, surprisingly, not to changes in food intake. Additionally, Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice were insensitive to the anorectic action of the hormone leptin (5 mg/kg) and displayed a time-dependent hypophagic response to the CB(1) inverse agonist rimonabant (3 mg/kg). Altogether these findings suggest that hypothalamic CB(1) receptor signaling is a key determinant of energy expenditure under basal conditions and reveal its specific role in conveying the effects of leptin and pharmacological CB1 receptor antagonism on food intake.

  16. Hypothalamic glutamate levels following serotonergic stimulation: a pilot study using 7-Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G E; der Grond, J van; Teeuwisse, W M; Langeveld, T J C; van Pelt, J; Verhagen, J C M; de Kam, M L; Cohen, A F; Zitman, F G; van Gerven, J M A

    2010-04-16

    Functional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be applied to measure pharmacodynamic effects of central nervous system (CNS)-active drugs. The serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), administered together with carbidopa and granisetron to improve kinetics and reduce adverse effects, acutely enhances central serotonergic neurotransmission and induces hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA) axis activation. We studied the hypothalamic levels of glutamate/glutamine (Glx), choline (Chol), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and creatine using 7-Tesla (7T) MRS, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in peripheral blood, after the administration of the 5-HTP function test in healthy volunteers. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, two-way cross-over study was performed in 12 healthy males with a 7day wash-out period. After administration of the oral 5-HTP function test, ACTH and cortisol were measured over 4h and MRS scans at 7T were performed every 30min over 3h measuring Glx:Creatine, Chol:Creatine and NAA:Creatine ratios. In the hypothalamus, the administration of 5-HTP had no effect on the average Glx, Chol or NAA levels over 180min but induced a significant decrease of Glx at 60min on post-hoc analysis. 5-HTP-induced significant ACTH release reaching an E(max) of 60.2ng/L at 80min followed by cortisol with an E(max) of 246.4ng/mL at 110min. The reduction in hypothalamic Glx levels after serotonergic stimulation is compatible with activation of excitatory neurons in this region, which is expected to cause depletion of local glutamate stores. The hypothalamic MRS-response reached its maximum prior to subsequent increases of ACTH and cortisol, which support the functional relevance of hypothalamic Glx-depletion for activation of the HPA-axis. This exploratory study shows that MRS is capable of detecting neuronal activation following functional stimulation of a targeted brain area. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes: sex differences in regulation of stress responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola, Mario G; Handa, Robert J

    2017-08-31

    Gonadal hormones play a key role in the establishment, activation, and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. By influencing the response and sensitivity to releasing factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, gonadal steroids help orchestrate the gain of the HPA axis to fine-tune the levels of stress hormones in the general circulation. From early life to adulthood, gonadal steroids can differentially affect the HPA axis, resulting in sex differences in the responsivity of this axis. The HPA axis influences many physiological functions making an organism's response to changes in the environment appropriate for its reproductive status. Although the acute HPA response to stressors is a beneficial response, constant activation of this circuitry by chronic or traumatic stressful episodes may lead to a dysregulation of the HPA axis and cause pathology. Compared to males, female mice and rats show a more robust HPA axis response, as a result of circulating estradiol levels which elevate stress hormone levels during non-threatening situations, and during and after stressors. Fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids in females across the estrous cycle are a major factor contributing to sex differences in the robustness of HPA activity in females compared to males. Moreover, gonadal steroids may also contribute to epigenetic and organizational influences on the HPA axis even before puberty. Correspondingly, crosstalk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and HPA axes could lead to abnormalities of stress responses. In humans, a dysregulated stress response is one of the most common symptoms seen across many neuropsychiatric disorders, and as a result, such interactions may exacerbate peripheral pathologies. In this review, we discuss the HPA and HPG axes and review how gonadal steroids interact with the HPA axis to regulate the stress circuitry during all stages in life.

  18. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eduardo R. Ropelle; José R. Pauli; Patrícia Prada; Dennys E. Cintra; Guilherme Z. Rocha; Juliana C. Moraes; Marisa J. S. Frederico; Gabrielle da Luz; Ricardo A. Pinho; José B. C. Carvalheira; Licio A. Velloso; Mario A. Saad; Cláudio T. De Souza

    2009-01-01

    ... in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats...

  19. Neuropeptide exocytosis involving synaptotagmin-4 and oxytocin in hypothalamic programming of body weight and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-02-10

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction.

  1. Unsaturated Fatty Acids Revert Diet-Induced Hypothalamic Inflammation in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Cintra, Dennys E.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Moraes, Juliana C.; José R. Pauli; Joseane Morari; Claudio T. De Souza; Renato Grimaldi; Marcela Stahl; Carvalheira, José B.; Saad, Mario J.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In experimental models, hypothalamic inflammation is an early and determining factor in the installation and progression of obesity. Pharmacological and gene-based approaches have proven efficient in restraining inflammation and correcting the obese phenotypes. However, the role of nutrients in the modulation of hypothalamic inflammation is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we show that, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, partial substitution of the fatty acid c...

  2. Tibolone Rapidly Attenuates the GABAB Response in Hypothalamic Neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibolone is primarily used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone is rapidly converted into three major metabolites: 3α- and 3β-hydroxy-tibolone (3α- and 3βOH-tibolone), which have oestrogenic effects, and the Δ4-isomer (Δ4-tibolone), which has progestogenic and androgenic effects. Since tibolone is effective in treating climacteric symptoms, the effects on the brain may be explained by the oestrogenic activity of tibolone. Previously using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found that 17β-oestradiol (E2) rapidly altered GABA neurotransmission in hypothalamic neurones through a membrane oestrogen receptor (mER). E2 reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ channels in hypothalamic neurones. Therefore, we hypothesized that tibolone may have some rapid effects through the mER and sought to elucidate the signalling pathway of tibolone’s action using selective inhibitors and whole cell recording in ovariectomized female guinea pigs and mice. A sub-population of neurones was identified post hoc as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones by immunocytochemical staining. Similar to E2, we have found that tibolone and its active metabolite 3βOH-tibolone rapidly reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate GIRK channels in POMC neurones. The effects were blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Other metabolites of tibolone (3αOH-tibolone and Δ4-tibolone) had no effect. Furthermore, tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) was fully efficacious in ERαKO and ERβKO mice to attenuate GABAB responses. The effects of tibolone were blocked by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. However, in contrast to E2, the effects of tibolone were not blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase A inhibitors. It appears that tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) activates phospholipase C leading to PIP2 metabolism and direct alteration of GIRK channel function. Therefore, tibolone

  3. Galanin: a hypothalamic-hypophysiotropic hormone modulating reproductive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, F J; Merchenthaler, I; Ching, M; Wisniewski, M G; Negro-Vilar, A

    1991-01-01

    Galanin (GAL) is widely distributed in the peripheral and the central nervous systems. In the brain, the highest GAL concentrations are observed within the hypothalamus and, particularly, in nerve terminals of the median eminence. This location, as well as GAL actions on prolactin, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion, suggest the possibility that GAL may act as a putative hypothalamic-hypophysiotropic hormone. To establish this, GAL and LHRH levels were measured in hypophyseal portal plasma samples using specific radioimmunoassays. Rat galanin (rGAL) concentrations in portal blood were approximately 7-fold higher than those observed in peripheral plasma in male and female (estrus, diestrus) rats, indicating an active secretory process of rGAL into the portal vasculature. Frequent (10 min) sampling revealed that rGAL and LHRH were secreted into the portal circulation in a pulsatile manner with a pulse frequency of one pulse per hour. Interestingly, both hormone series depicted a high degree of coincident episodes. In fact, the probability of random coincidence, calculated by the algorithm HYPERGEO, was less than 0.01. Moreover, the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold, when given systemically, was taken up by GAL neurons in the hypothalamus, including a subset of neurons expressing rGAL and LHRH, strengthening the notion of the existence of a GAL neuronal system connected to the hypophyseal portal circulation. These observations reinforce the concept that GAL regulates pituitary hormone secretion. To analyze this in further detail, the effects of rGAL on LH secretion were evaluated under basal and stimulated conditions. rGAL induced a small but dose-dependent increase in LH secretion from cultured, dispersed pituitary cells. Interestingly, rGAL enhanced the ability of LHRH to stimulate LH release. The tight link between GAL and LHRH neuronal systems is strengthened by the observation that during the estrous cycle of the rat

  4. Increasing fatty acid oxidation remodels the hypothalamic neurometabolome to mitigate stress and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W McFadden

    Full Text Available Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1 and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx, exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism.

  5. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically.

  6. Social crowding stress diminishes the pituitary-adrenocortical and hypothalamic histamine response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugajski, J; Gadek-Michalska, A; Borycz, J

    1993-12-01

    Social stress of crowding almost totally reduced the rise in serum corticosterone elicited by intracerebroventricular administration of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, after 3 and 7 day of crowding and substantially diminished that response after 14 and 21 days. Crowding stress totally abolished the increase in hypothalamic histamine induced by isoprenaline in control rats. Crowding also significantly diminished the increase in serum corticosterone evoked by clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, and abolished the clonidine-induced elevation in hypothalamic histamine levels. The stimulatory effect of phenylephrine, an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, on corticosterone secretion was only moderately diminished in crowded rats. Neither phenylephrine nor crowding stress changed significantly the hypothalamic histamine levels. These results indicate that social stress of crowding considerably impairs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical responsiveness to central beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Crowding also abolishes the rise in hypothalamic histamine induced by beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, suggesting a role of hypothalamic histamine in the HPA adaptation to the social stress of crowding.

  7. Adrenalectomy stimulates hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin expression but does not correct diet-induced obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beasley Joe

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated glucocorticoid production and reduced hypothalamic POMC mRNA can cause obese phenotypes. Conversely, adrenalectomy can reverse obese phenotypes caused by the absence of leptin, a model in which glucocorticoid production is elevated. Adrenalectomy also increases hypothalamic POMC mRNA in leptin-deficient mice. However most forms of human obesity do not appear to entail elevated plasma glucocorticoids. It is therefore not clear if reducing glucocorticoid production would be useful to treat these forms of obesity. We hypothesized that adrenalectomy would increase hypothalamic POMC mRNA and reverse obese phenotypes in obesity due to a high-fat diet as it does in obesity due to leptin deficiency. Results Retired breeder male mice were placed on a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet for two weeks, then adrenalectomized or sham-adrenalectomized. The high-fat diet increased body weight, adiposity, and plasma leptin, led to impaired glucose tolerance, and slightly stimulated hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC expression. Adrenalectomy of mice on the high-fat diet significantly reduced plasma corticosterone and strikingly increased both pituitary and hypothalamic POMC mRNA, but failed to reduce body weight, adiposity or leptin, although slight improvements in glucose tolerance and metabolic rate were observed. Conclusion These data suggest that neither reduction of plasma glucocorticoid levels nor elevation of hypothalamic POMC expression is effective to significantly reverse diet-induced obesity.

  8. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Tellez-Zenteno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available José F. Tellez-Zenteno1, Cesar Serrano-Almeida2, Farzad Moien-Afshari11Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.Keywords: epilepsy, gelastic seizures, epilepsy surgery, hypothalamic hamartoma, intractable epilepsy

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J; Park, Sung-Min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  10. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  12. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  13. Dynamic transitions in a model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čupić, Željko; Marković, Vladimir M.; Maćešić, Stevan; Stanojević, Ana; Damjanović, Svetozar; Vukojević, Vladana; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic properties of a nonlinear five-dimensional stoichiometric model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis were systematically investigated. Conditions under which qualitative transitions between dynamic states occur are determined by independently varying the rate constants of all reactions that constitute the model. Bifurcation types were further characterized using continuation algorithms and scale factor methods. Regions of bistability and transitions through supercritical Andronov-Hopf and saddle loop bifurcations were identified. Dynamic state analysis predicts that the HPA axis operates under basal (healthy) physiological conditions close to an Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. Dynamic properties of the stress-control axis have not been characterized experimentally, but modelling suggests that the proximity to a supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation can give the HPA axis both, flexibility to respond to external stimuli and adjust to new conditions and stability, i.e., the capacity to return to the original dynamic state afterwards, which is essential for maintaining homeostasis. The analysis presented here reflects the properties of a low-dimensional model that succinctly describes neurochemical transformations underlying the HPA axis. However, the model accounts correctly for a number of experimentally observed properties of the stress-response axis. We therefore regard that the presented analysis is meaningful, showing how in silico investigations can be used to guide the experimentalists in understanding how the HPA axis activity changes under chronic disease and/or specific pharmacological manipulations.

  14. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Cortés-Campos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons.

  15. Regulation of nucleus accumbens activity by the hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Robert M; Liu, Rong-Jian; Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Sharf, Ruth; Yeckel, Mark F; Laubach, Mark; Aghajanian, George K; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2010-06-16

    The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) are brain regions important for food intake. The AcbSh contains high levels of receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a lateral hypothalamic peptide critical for feeding and metabolism. MCH receptor (MCHR1) activation in the AcbSh increases food intake, while AcbSh MCHR1 blockade reduces feeding. Here biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MCH action in the rodent AcbSh are described. A reduction of phosphorylation of GluR1 at serine 845 (pSer(845)) is shown to occur after both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of MCHR1 activity. These changes depend upon signaling through G(i/o), and result in decreased surface expression of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Electrophysiological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the AcbSh revealed decreased amplitude of AMPAR-mediated synaptic events (mEPSCs) with MCH treatment. In addition, MCH suppressed action potential firing MSNs through K(+) channel activation. Finally, in vivo recordings confirmed that MCH reduces neuronal cell firing in the AcbSh in freely moving animals. The ability of MCH to reduce cell firing in the AcbSh is consistent with a general model from other pharmacological and electrophysiological studies whereby reduced AcbSh neuronal firing leads to food intake. The current work integrates the hypothalamus into this model, providing biochemical and cellular mechanisms whereby metabolic and limbic signals converge to regulate food intake.

  16. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie M King

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  17. Development of the medial hypothalamus: forming a functional hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Caroline Alayne; Placzek, Marysia

    2013-01-01

    The medial hypothalamus is composed of nuclei of the tuberal hypothalamus, the paraventricular nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus, and the neurohypophysis. Its arrangement, around the third ventricle of the brain, above the adenohypophysis, and in direct contact with the vasculature, means that it serves as an interface with circulating systems, providing a key conduit through which the brain can sample, and control, peripheral body systems. Through these interfaces, and interactions with other parts of the brain, the medial hypothalamus centrally governs diverse homeostatic processes, including energy and fluid balance, stress responses, growth, and reproductive behaviors. Here, we summarize recent studies that reveal how the diverse cell types within the medial hypothalamus are assembled in an integrated manner to enable its later function. In particular, we discuss how the temporally protracted operation of signaling pathways and transcription factors governs the appearance and regionalization of the hypothalamic primordium from the prosencephalic territory, the specification and differentiation of progenitors into neurons in organized nuclei, and the establishment of interfaces. Through analyses of mouse, chick, and zebrafish, a picture emerges of an evolutionarily conserved and highly coordinated developmental program. Early indications suggest that deregulation of this program may underlie complex human pathological conditions and dysfunctional behaviors, including stress and eating disorders. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Connie M; Hentges, Shane T

    2011-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  19. Postsynaptic Depolarization Enhances GABA Drive to Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Neurons through Somatodendritic Cholecystokinin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Karen M; Baimoukhametova, Dinara V; Bains, Jaideep S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2015-09-23

    Somatodendritically released peptides alter synaptic function through a variety of mechanisms, including autocrine actions that liberate retrograde transmitters. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide expressed in neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a region implicated in satiety and stress. There are clear demonstrations that exogenous CCK modulates food intake and neuropeptide expression in the DMH, but there is no information on how endogenous CCK alters synaptic properties. Here, we provide the first report of somatodendritic release of CCK in the brain in male Sprague Dawley rats. CCK is released from DMH neurons in response to repeated postsynaptic depolarizations, and acts in an autocrine fashion on CCK2 receptors to enhance postsynaptic NMDA receptor function and liberate the retrograde transmitter, nitric oxide (NO). NO subsequently acts presynaptically to enhance GABA release through a soluble guanylate cyclase-mediated pathway. These data provide the first demonstration of synaptic actions of somatodendritically released CCK in the hypothalamus and reveal a new form of retrograde plasticity, depolarization-induced potentiation of inhibition. Significance statement: Somatodendritic signaling using endocannabinoids or nitric oxide to alter the efficacy of afferent transmission is well established. Despite early convincing evidence for somatodendritic release of neurohypophysial peptides in the hypothalamus, there is only limited evidence for this mode of release for other peptides. Here, we provide the first evidence for somatodendritic release of the satiety peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in the brain. We also reveal a new form of synaptic plasticity in which postsynaptic depolarization results in enhancement of inhibition through the somatodendritic release of CCK.

  20. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans.

  1. Hypothalamic Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Effects on Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyi; Balland, Eglantine; Cowley, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    The central link between obesity and type 2 diabetes is the development of insulin resistance. To date, it is still not clear whether hyperinsulinemia causes insulin resistance, which underlies the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, owing to the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that exist in the periphery and in the brain. In recent years, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the existence of insulin resistance within the hypothalamus. In this review, we have integrated the recent discoveries surrounding both central and peripheral insulin resistance to provide a comprehensive overview of insulin resistance in obesity and the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. In particular, this review will discuss how hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in obesity impair insulin sensitivity in tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the brain. In addition, this review highlights insulin transport into the brain, signaling pathways associated with hypothalamic insulin receptor expression in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and finally the perturbation of systemic glucose homeostasis as a consequence of central insulin resistance. We also suggest future approaches to overcome both central and peripheral insulin resistance to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Study on Correlation between Neuropeptide and Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓燕; 吕淑兰; 曹缵孙; 毛文军; 宋青

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between neuropeptide and functional hypothalam ic amenorrhea (FHA)Materials & Methods The basic and GnRH-stimulated levels of serum FSH, LH and plasma β-endorphin (β-EP), somatostatin (SS) in 33 patients with FHA and 17 women with normal menstrual cycles were tested by RIA.Results β-EP level in FHA group was significantly higher than that in control group and had a negative correlation with FSH and LH. The basic SS level in FHA group had no significant difference compared with the control group, but it had negative correlation with LH and no correlation with FSH. β-EP level in FHA group decreased after being stimulated with GnRH, and reached its minimum value after 15 min, then gradually rose back to the basic level. β-EP level in control group had no regular changes. SS level in both group did not change obviously.Conclusion The increased level of β-EP may play an important role in FHA. GnRH can inhibit β-EP level to some extent, while the effect of SS on FHA deserve further research.

  3. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone's central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1.

  4. Membrane-initiated Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. But it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in the hypothalamus, the nature of receptors involved and how they contribute to homeostatic functions. PMID:18538919

  5. Bacteria, viruses, and hypothalamic inflammation: Potential new players in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wierucka-Rybak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight and obese has become an increasingly serious clinical and socioeconomic problem worldwide. The rapidly rising prevalence of obesity has prompted studies on modifiable, causative factors and novel treatment options for this disorder. Recent evidence indicates that excessive weight gain that leads to being overweight and obese may result from alterations in gut microflora. Studies in humans and animals demonstrated that the composition of gut microbiota may differ in lean and obese subjects, suggesting that these differences result in the increased efficiency of caloric extraction from food, enhanced lipogenesis, and impaired central and peripheral regulation of energy balance. Other studies revealed an excessive increase in body weight in a significant percentage of people infected with human adenoviruses SMAM-1 and Ad-36. Dysregulation of adipocyte function by viruses appears to be the most likely cause of excessive fat accumulation in these individuals. Studies on the pathomechanisms related to the pathogenesis of obesity indicated that a high-fat diet triggers the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, an event that promotes weight gain and further defends elevated body weight through the initiation of central leptin and insulin resistance and impairment of regenerative capacity of hypothalamic neurons. Exposure to a high-calorie diet appears to predispose individuals to obesity not only because of excessive caloric intake but also because of the induction of microbiota- and central inflammatory response-dependent changes that lead to a dysregulation of energy balance.

  6. An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Saeideh; Tabrizi, Nasim; Moein, Houshang; Zare, Mohammad; Barekatain, Majid; Basiratnia, Reza; Rahimian, Elham; Mehvari Habibabadi, Amirali; Moein, Payam

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms. PMID:28246530

  7. Neuronal glucoprivation enhances hypothalamic histamine turnover in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohara, A; Yoshimatsu, H; Kurokawa, M; Oishi, R; Saeki, K; Sakata, T

    1994-08-01

    Histamine (HA) turnover in the rat hypothalamus following insufficient energy supply due to glucoprivation was examined after administration of insulin or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). HA turnover was assessed by accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain HA, following administration of pargyline. Intraperitoneal injection of 1, 2, and 4 U/kg of insulin, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased pargyline-induced accumulation of t-MH. Accumulation of t-MH due to pargyline was inversely related to the concomitant plasma glucose concentration after different doses of insulin. The level of t-MH accumulated by pargyline did not change compared with that of controls, when a euglycemic condition was maintained or insulin at a dose of 6 mU per rat was infused into the third cerebroventricle. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol per rat of 2-DG, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased the level of t-MH enhanced by pargyline. The results indicate that an increase in hypothalamic HA turnover in response to glucoprivation may be involved in homeostatic regulation of energy metabolism in the brain.

  8. An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Badihian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms.

  9. [Clinical and electroencephalogram study of 5 children with hypothalamic hamartoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Eiko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Funatsuka, Makoto; Usugi, Tomoko; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Kitami; Nagaki, Shigeru; Osawa, Makiko; Ono, Yuko; Yamane, Fumitaka; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2005-09-01

    We retrospectively studied 5 children with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) to elucidate the clinical, neuroimaging and electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics of this disorder. In all cases, high resolution MRI scans demonstrated an intrahypothalamic mass protruding into the 3rd ventricle. An initial symptom was epileptic attack in 4 cases and precocious puberty in the remaining one. Gelastic seizures developed in 4 of 5 patients at ranging from 2 days to 11 years of age. The ictal EEGs during the gelastic seizures showed diffuse attenuation of background activity, followed by rhythmic slow discharges either diffusely or in the central area. Gamma-knife radiosurgery was performed on 2 cases whose seizures were resistant to available antiepileptic drugs. One of the 2 patients was responded significantly to this treatment, showing the disappearance of combined attacks and a marked reduction of the generalized spike-waves discharges. A more aggressive therapy, including gamma-knife radiosurgery and surgical treatment, should be considered for patients whose seizures are resistant to the medical treatment and causing deterioration of intelligence and behavioral problem.

  10. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Brain Death: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Northrup, Jesse; Olcese, James

    2016-01-01

    The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) states that an individual is dead when "all functions of the entire brain" have ceased irreversibly. However, it has been questioned whether some functions of the hypothalamus, particularly osmoregulation, can continue after the clinical diagnosis of brain death (BD). In order to learn whether parts of the hypothalamus can continue to function after the diagnosis of BD, we performed 2 separate systematic searches of the MEDLINE database, corresponding to the functions of the posterior and anterior pituitary. No meta-analysis is possible due to nonuniformity in the clinical literature. However, some modest generalizations can reasonably be drawn from a narrative review and from anatomic considerations that explain why these findings should be expected. We found evidence suggesting the preservation of hypothalamic function, including secretion of hypophysiotropic hormones, responsiveness to anterior pituitary stimulation, and osmoregulation, in a substantial proportion of patients declared dead by neurological criteria. We discuss several possible explanations for these findings. We conclude by suggesting that additional clinical research with strict inclusion criteria is necessary and further that a more nuanced and forthright public dialogue is needed, particularly since standard diagnostic practices and the UDDA may not be entirely in accord.

  11. Bacteria, viruses, and hypothalamic inflammation: Potential new players in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wierucka-Rybak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight and obese has become an increasingly serious clinical and socioeconomic problem worldwide. The rapidly rising prevalence of obesity has prompted studies on modifiable, causative factors and novel treatment options for this disorder. Recent evidence indicates that excessive weight gain that leads to being overweight and obese may result from alterations in gut microflora. Studies in humans and animals demonstrated that the composition of gut microbiota may differ in lean and obese subjects, suggesting that these differences result in the increased efficiency of caloric extraction from food, enhanced lipogenesis, and impaired central and peripheral regulation of energy balance. Other studies revealed an excessive increase in body weight in a significant percentage of people infected with human adenoviruses SMAM-1 and Ad-36. Dysregulation of adipocyte function by viruses appears to be the most likely cause of excessive fat accumulation in these individuals. Studies on the pathomechanisms related to the pathogenesis of obesity indicated that a high-fat diet triggers the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, an event that promotes weight gain and further defends elevated body weight through the initiation of central leptin and insulin resistance and impairment of regenerative capacity of hypothalamic neurons. Exposure to a high-calorie diet appears to predispose individuals to obesity not only because of excessive caloric intake but also because of the induction of microbiota- and central inflammatory response-dependent changes that lead to a dysregulation of energy balance.

  12. Melatonin controls seasonal breeding by a network of hypothalamic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revel, Florent G; Masson-Pévet, Mireille; Pévet, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In seasonal species, the photoperiod (i.e. day length) tightly regulates reproduction to ensure that birth occurs at the most favourable time of year. In mammals, a distinct photoneuroendocrine circuit controls this process via the pineal hormone melatonin. This hormone is responsible for the sea......In seasonal species, the photoperiod (i.e. day length) tightly regulates reproduction to ensure that birth occurs at the most favourable time of year. In mammals, a distinct photoneuroendocrine circuit controls this process via the pineal hormone melatonin. This hormone is responsible...... for the seasonal timing of reproduction, but the anatomical substrates and the cellular mechanisms through which melatonin modulates seasonal functions remain imprecise. Recently, several genes have been identified as being regulated by the photoperiod in the brain of seasonal mammals. These genes are thought....../GPR54 system and to the RFamide-related peptides.Interestingly, these systems involve different hypothalamic nuclei, suggesting that several brain loci may be crucial for melatonin to regulate reproduction, and thus represent key starting points to identify the long-sought-after mode and site...

  13. Hypothalamic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, but the strategies for the prevention and treatment of these disorders remain inadequate. Brown adipose tissue (BAT is important for cold protection by producing heat using lipids and glucose as metabolic fuels. This thermogenic action causes increased energy expenditure and significant lipid/glucose disposal. In addition, BAT in white adipose tissue (WAT or beige cells have been found and they also exhibit the thermogenic action similar to BAT. These data provide evidence indicating BAT/beige cells as a potential target for combating obesity and diabetes. Recent discoveries of active BAT and beige cells in adult humans have further highlighted this potential. Growing studies have also shown the importance of central nervous system in the control of BAT thermogenesis and WAT browning using animal models. This review is focused on central neural thermoregulation, particularly addressing our current understanding of the importance of hypothalamic neural signaling in the regulation of BAT/beige thermogenesis and energy homeostasis.

  14. A common allele in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) impacts prosocial temperament and human hypothalamic-limbic structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, Heike; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Hakimi, Shabnam; Lemaitre, Herve; Verchinski, Beth A; Mattay, Venkata S; Weinberger, Daniel R; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2010-08-03

    The evolutionarily highly conserved neuropeptide oxytocin is a key mediator of social and emotional behavior in mammals, including humans. A common variant (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been implicated in social-behavioral phenotypes, such as maternal sensitivity and empathy, and with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with social impairment, but the intermediate neural mechanisms are unknown. Here, we used multimodal neuroimaging in a large sample of healthy human subjects to identify structural and functional alterations in OXTR risk allele carriers and their link to temperament. Activation and interregional coupling of the amygdala during the processing of emotionally salient social cues was significantly affected by genotype. In addition, evidence for structural alterations in key oxytocinergic regions emerged, particularly in the hypothalamus. These neural characteristics predicted lower levels of reward dependence, specifically in male risk allele carriers. Our findings identify sex-dependent mechanisms impacting the structure and function of hypothalamic-limbic circuits that are of potential clinical and translational significance.

  15. Regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptides gene expression in diet induced obesity resistant rats: possible targets for obesity prediction?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cifani, Carlo; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria V; Pucci, Mariangela; Giusepponi, Maria E; Romano, Adele; Di Francesco, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    .... To investigate the individual sensitivity to weight gain/resistance, we here studied gene transcription regulation of several hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the control of energy balance...

  16. Hyperosmotic stimulus induces reversible angiogenesis within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei of the adult rat: a potential role for neuronal vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anne

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, the CNS vasculature is established during the postnatal period via active angiogenesis, providing different brain regions with capillary networks of various densities that locally supply adapted metabolic support to neurons. Thereafter this vasculature remains essentially quiescent excepted for specific pathologies. In the adult rat hypothalamus, a particularly dense network of capillary vessels is associated with the supraoptic (SON and paraventricular (PVN nuclei containing the magnocellular neurons secreting vasopressin and oxytocin, two neurohormones involved in the control of the body fluid homoeostasis. In the seventies, it was reported that proliferation of astrocytes and endothelial cells occurs within these hypothalamic nuclei when strong metabolic activation of the vasopressinergic and oxytocinergic neurons was induced by prolonged hyperosmotic stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether such proliferative response to osmotic stimulus is related to local angiogenesis and to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. Results Our results provide evidence that cell proliferation occurring within the SON of osmotically stimulated adult rats corresponds to local angiogenesis. We show that 1 a large majority of the SON proliferative cells is associated with capillary vessels, 2 this proliferative response correlates with a progressive increase in density of the capillary network within the nucleus, and 3 SON capillary vessels exhibit an increased expression of nestin and vimentin, two markers of newly formed vessels. Contrasting with most adult CNS neurons, hypothalamic magnocellular neurons were found to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, a potent angiogenic factor whose production was increased by osmotic stimulus. When VEGF was inhibited by dexamethasone treatment or by the local application of a blocking antibody, the angiogenic response was strongly

  17. Maternal programming of sexual behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in the female rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Cameron

    Full Text Available Variations in parental care predict the age of puberty, sexual activity in adolescence and the age at first pregnancy in humans. These findings parallel descriptions of maternal effects on phenotypic variation in reproductive function in other species. Despite the prevalence of such reports, little is known about potential biological mechanisms and this especially true for effects on female reproductive development. We examined the hypothesis that parental care might alter hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function and thus reproductive function in the female offspring of rat mothers that vary pup licking/grooming (LG over the first week postpartum. As adults, the female offspring of Low LG mothers showed 1 increased sexual receptivity; 2 increased plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH and progesterone at proestrus; 3 an increased positive-feedback effect of estradiol on both plasma LH levels and gonadotropin releasing-hormone (GnRH expression in the medial preoptic region; and 4 increased estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha expression in the anterioventral paraventricular nucleus, a system that regulates GnRH. The results of a cross-fostering study provide evidence for a direct effect of postnatal maternal care as well as a possible prenatal influence. Indeed, we found evidence for increased fetal testosterone levels at embryonic day 20 in the female fetuses of High compared to Low LG mothers. Finally, the female offspring of Low LG mothers showed accelerated puberty compared to those of High LG mothers. These data suggest maternal effects in the rat on the development of neuroendocrine systems that regulate female sexual behaviour. Together with studies revealing a maternal effect on the maternal behavior of the female offspring, these findings suggest that maternal care can program alternative reproductive phenotypes in the rat through regionally-specific effects on ERalpha expression.

  18. Facilitated thyrotropin release after retrochiasmatic hypothalamic knife cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, C P; Colombo, J A

    1981-03-01

    Diencephalic structures that influence plasma thyrotropin (TSH) in male rats under pentobarbital anesthesia (35 mg/kg, IP) were studied by combining medial preoptic area-suprachiasmatic nucleus (MPOA-Sch) bilateral electrical stimulation (monophasic pulses, 200 microA at 50 Hz, 30 min) with progressive midline lesions produced by a retractable Halász knife. Plasma TSH was measured by radioimmunoassay just before (0 time) and at 30, 60 and 90 min after the beginning of stimulation. Rats that had received only sham surgical procedures 90 days prior to stimulation were characterized by a more than 2-3 fold elevation in basal (0 time) plasma TSH levels when compared to those found in intact control rats and expected elevations in plasma TSH at 30 min after stimulation were eliminated. After a small frontal cut (1.3 FC), 0 time plasma TSH levels increased more tha 4-fold above those of controls in association with a facilitation of stimulated release of TSH. When the knife blade radius was 1.5 mm (1.5 FC) the facilitation of TSH release after stimulation occurred again; however, 0 time plasma TSH concentrations in 1.5 FC rats were not different from control levels. These effects of midline cortical, thalamic and hypothalamic damage on TSH release required the passage of more than 12 days after brain surgery. Collectively, these findings suggest potential neural elements that are inhibitory for 'basal' and 'phasic' TSH release which are in close proximity to a separate excitatory neural system and which can be activated by MPOA-Sch stimulation.

  19. Parasagittal hypothalamic knife cuts in male chicks: advancement of reproductive function and changes in plasma concentrations of luteinising hormone and androgen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzel, W J; Sharp, P J

    1985-04-01

    Advancement of reproductive function occurred in male domestic chicks after lateral hypothalamic deafferentation (bilateral knife cuts extending from the preoptic to the mamillary region) at 2 weeks of age. Five out of 24 chicks showed sexual precocity as shown by accelerated comb growth after surgery. The 5 chicks had significantly higher concentrations of plasma luteinising hormone (LH) and androgen (A) than 5 sham-operated controls. Maximum concentrations of plasma LH and A were observed 3 and 4 weeks respectively after surgery. It is concluded that in the male domestic chick gonadotropin secretion is inhibited by extrahypothalamic influences.

  20. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  1. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone we measured the hypothalamic responsiveness to this chemo-signal in 39 prepubertal and 41 adolescent boys and girls by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. We then investigated whether 36 prepubertal children and 38 adolescents diagnosed with Gender Dysphoria (GD; DSM-5 exhibited sex-atypical (in accordance with their experienced gender, rather than sex-typical (in accordance with their natal sex hypothalamic activations during olfactory stimulation with androstadienone. We found that the sex difference in responsiveness to androstadienone was already present in prepubertal control children and thus likely developed during early perinatal development instead of during sexual maturation. Adolescent girls and boys with GD both responded remarkably like their experienced gender, thus sex-atypical. In contrast, prepubertal girls with GD showed neither a typically male nor female hypothalamic activation pattern and prepubertal boys with GD had hypothalamic activations in response to androstadienone that were similar to control boys, thus sex-typical. We present here a unique data set of boys and girls diagnosed with GD at two different developmental stages, showing that these children possess certain sex-atypical functional brain characteristics and may have undergone atypical sexual differentiation of the brain.

  2. Altered hypothalamic protein expression in a rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na Cong

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by progressive motor impairment and cognitive alterations. Changes in energy metabolism, neuroendocrine function, body weight, euglycemia, appetite function, and circadian rhythm can also occur. It is likely that the locus of these alterations is the hypothalamus. We used the HD transgenic (tg rat model bearing 51 CAG repeats, which exhibits similar HD symptomology as HD patients to investigate hypothalamic function. We conducted detailed hypothalamic proteome analyses and also measured circulating levels of various metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic animals. Our results demonstrate that there are significant alterations in HD rat hypothalamic protein expression such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, heat shock protein-70, the oxidative damage protein glutathione peroxidase (Gpx4, glycogen synthase1 (Gys1 and the lipid synthesis enzyme acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1 (Agpat1. In addition, there are significant alterations in various circulating metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic animals including, insulin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL, before any motor or cognitive alterations are apparent. These early metabolic and lipid alterations are likely prodromal signs of hypothalamic dysfunction. Gaining a greater understanding of the hypothalamic and metabolic alterations that occur in HD, could lead to the development of novel therapeutics for early interventional treatment of HD.

  3. Evaluation of hypothalamic murine and human melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C; Basu, Arunabha; Gardner, Ryan M; Aspelund, Sender; Wen, Xin; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-11-07

    The melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. However, its transcript structure is not well understood. We therefore studied initiation and termination sites for hypothalamic murine Mc3r and human MC3R transcripts. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was performed for the 5' and 3' ends of murine and human hypothalamic RNA. 5' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated mouse hypothalamus expresses two major Mc3r transcription start sites: one with a 5' UTR approximately 368 bases in length and another previously unknown transcript with a 5' UTR approximately 440 bases in length. 5' RACE experiments using human hypothalamic RNA identified a 5' UTR beginning 533 bases upstream of the start codon with a 248 base splice. 3' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 1286 bases after the translational stop codon, with a previously unknown 787 base splice between consensus splice donor and acceptor sites. 3' RACE experiments using human MC3R transcript indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 115-160 bases after the translational stop codon. These data provide insight into melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

  4. Crucial role of zebrafish prox1 in hypothalamic catecholaminergic neurons development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Giacco Luca

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prox1, the vertebrate homolog of prospero in Drosophila melanogaster, is a divergent homeogene that regulates cell proliferation, fate determination and differentiation during vertebrate embryonic development. Results Here we report that, in zebrafish, prox1 is widely expressed in several districts of the Central Nervous System (CNS. Specifically, we evidenced prox1 expression in a group of neurons, already positive for otp1, located in the hypothalamus at the level of the posterior tuberculum (PT. Prox1 knock-down determines the severe loss of hypothalamic catecholaminergic (CA neurons, identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression, and the synergistic prox1/otp1 overexpression induces the appearance of hypothalamic supernumerary TH-positive neurons and ectopic TH-positive cells on the yolk epitelium. Conclusion Our findings indicate that prox1 activity is crucial for the proper development of the otp1-positive hypothalamic neuronal precursors to their terminal CA phenotype.

  5. Hypothalamic function in women with secondary hypogonadism and unresponsive to clomiphene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, C A

    1987-01-01

    Seven women with secondary hypogonadism who had been previously unresponsive to two 5-d courses of clomiphene citrate, were treated with clomiphene citrate 100 mg daily for 10 d. LH and FSH concentrations were measured in serum collected at 15-min intervals for 5 h before and on the 10th day of treatment and oestradiol was measured in the first two samples on each day. Four women responded with an increase in the amplitude of LH pulses and in mean LH values and in three there was a marked increase in serum oestradiol concentrations. Three women who showed no gonadotrophin response were subsequently unresponsive to pulsatile LHRH therapy. These preliminary data are consistent with the hypothesis that hypothalamic hypogonadotrophism may result from hypersensitivity of the hypothalamus to oestrogen negative feedback and that the hypothalamic potential for secretion of LHRH is unimpaired. Prolonged treatment with clomiphene may provide a simple test of hypothalamic function in women with normal pituitary function.

  6. Interactions between hormonal and environmental signals on hypothalamic neurons molecular mechanisms signaling environmental events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y S; Dellovade, T L; Pfaff, D W

    1997-04-01

    It is axiomatic that the central nervous system must manage the integration of several environmental factors with steroid hormonal influences for the biologically adaptive performance of reproductive behavior. Launching from established behavioral investigations and from hormonal influences on gene function in the brain, we review here studies on how synaptic inputs and sex hormone influences codetermine hypothalamic gene expression. A particularly exciting implication of results on the ability of thyroid hormone receptors to interfere with estrogen receptor-dependent neuroendocrine function is that environmentally stimulated changes in thyroid hormone levels could influence hypothalamic transcriptional mechanisms important for behavior. If so, this would unite naturalistic environmental thinking with molecular neurobiological thinking important for the hypothalamic control of reproduction. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:111-115). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  8. DiI tracing of the hypothalamic projection systems during perinatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Georgievna Makarenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is the higher neuroendocrine center of the brain and therefore possesses numerous intrinsic axonal connections and is connected by afferent and efferent fiber systems with other brain structures. These projection systems have been described in detail in the adult but data on their early development is sparse. Here I review studies of the time schedule and features of the development of the major hypothalamic axonal systems. In general, anterograde tracing experiments have been used to analyze short distance projections from the arcuate and anteroventral periventricular nuclei, while hypothalamic projections to the posterior and intermediate pituitary lobes and median eminence, mammillary body tracts and reciprocal septohypothalamic connections have been described with retrograde tracing. The available data demonstrate that hypothalamic connections develop with a high degree of spatial and temporal specificity, innervating each target with a unique developmental schedule which in many cases can be correlated with the functional maturity of the projection system.

  9. DiI tracing of the hypothalamic projection systems during perinatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Irina G

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the higher neuroendocrine center of the brain and therefore possesses numerous intrinsic axonal connections and is connected by afferent and efferent fiber systems with other brain structures. These projection systems have been described in detail in the adult but data on their early development is sparse. Here I review studies of the time schedule and features of the development of the major hypothalamic axonal systems. In general, anterograde tracing experiments have been used to analyze short distance projections from the arcuate and anteroventral periventricular nuclei (Pe), while hypothalamic projections to the posterior and intermediate pituitary lobes (IL) and median eminence, mammillary body tracts and reciprocal septohypothalamic connections have been described with retrograde tracing. The available data demonstrate that hypothalamic connections develop with a high degree of spatial and temporal specificity, innervating each target with a unique developmental schedule which in many cases can be correlated with the functional maturity of the projection system.

  10. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats. PMID:24944903

  11. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats.

  12. Hypothalamic serotonin-insulin signaling cross-talk and alterations in a type 2 diabetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Ioannis; Berthou, Flavien; Vicaire, Nicolas; Rouch, Claude; Markaki, Eirini M; Bailbe, Danielle; Portha, Bernard; Taouis, Mohammed; Gerozissis, Kyriaki

    2012-03-05

    Serotonin and insulin are key regulators of homeostatic mechanisms in the hypothalamus. However, in type 2 diabetes, the hypothalamic responsiveness to serotonin is not clearly established. We used a diabetic model, the Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, to explore insulin receptor expression, insulin and serotonin efficiency in the hypothalamus and liver by means of Akt phosphorylation. Insulin or dexfenfluramine (stimulator of serotonin) treatment induced Akt phosphorylation in Wistar rats but not in GK rats that exhibit down-regulated insulin receptor. Studies in a neuroblastoma cell line showed that serotonin-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3-kinase dependent. Finally, in response to food intake, hypothalamic serotonin release was reduced in GK rats, indicating impaired responsiveness of this neurotransmitter. In conclusion, hypothalamic serotonin as insulin efficiency is impaired in diabetic GK rats. The insulin-serotonin cross-talk and impairment observed is one potential key modification in the brain during the onset of diabetes.

  13. Recent insights into the role of hypothalamic AMPK signaling cascade upon metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eClaret

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, two seminal papers focused on the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the hypothalamus opened new avenues of research in the field of the central regulation of energy homeostasis. Over the following 8 years, hundreds of studies have firmly established hypothalamic AMPK as a key sensor and integrator of hormonal and nutritional signals with neurochemical and neurophysiological responses to regulate whole-body energy balance. In this review article we aim to discuss the most recent findings in this particular area of research, highlighting the function of hypothalamic AMPK in appetite, thermogenesis and peripheral glucose metabolism. The diversity of mechanisms by which hypothalamic AMPK regulates energy homeostasis illustrates the importance of this evolutionary-conserved energy signaling cascade in the control of this complex and fundamental biological process.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not neurotrophin-3 enhances differentiation of somatostatin neurons in hypothalamic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudes, C; Petit, F; Kordon, C; Faivre-Bauman, A

    2000-09-01

    The present work investigated whether neurotrophins could differentially affect in vitro growth and maturation of two related subsets of hypothalamic neurons, hypophysiotropic somatostatin (SRIH) neurons projecting from the periventricular area and arcuate SRIH interneurons. For this purpose, the hypothalamus of 17-day-old rat fetuses was sampled and separated into a ventral and a dorsal fragment containing respectively periventricular and arcuate regions. Each fragment was dissociated and seeded separately in defined medium. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), two important members of the neurotrophin family involved in neuronal differentiation and plasticity, were added to the cultures at seeding time. After 6 or 11 days in vitro, neurons were labeled with an anti-SRIH antiserum and submitted to morphometric analysis. In parallel, SRIH mRNA was estimated by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and neuronal SRIH content, basal and depolarisation-stimulated releases measured by radioimmunoassay. The response of control, non-labeled neurons was estimated by neuronal counts and by assaying glutamic acid decarboxylase, a marker of a large majority of hypothalamic neurons. BDNF markedly increased the size and the branching number of SRIH periventricular cell bodies. Expression of SRIH mRNA, as well as SRIH content and release into the culture medium, were also stimulated by the neurotrophin. Non-SRIH neurons were not affected by the treatment. Under the same conditions, arcuate neurons exhibited a weak, mostly transient response to BDNF. NT-3 was ineffective on either neuronal subset. Immunoneutralization of Trk receptors provided further evidence for BDNF effect specificity. The results indicate that BDNF is a selective activator of the differentiation of hypophysiotropic SRIH neurons in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus.

  15. Synaptic innervation to rat hippocampus by vasopressin-immuno-positive fibres from the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Hernández, V S

    2013-01-03

    The neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) exerts a modulatory role on hippocampal excitability through vasopressin V(1A) and V(1B) receptors. However, the origin and mode of termination of the AVP innervation of the hippocampus remain unknown. We have used light and electron microscopy to trace the origin, distribution and synaptic relationships of AVP-immuno-positive fibres and nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus. Immuno-positive fibres were present in all areas (CA1-3, dentate gyrus) of the whole septo-temporal extent of the hippocampus; they had the highest density in the CA2 region, strongly increasing in density towards the ventral hippocampus. Two types of fibres were identified, both establishing synaptic junctions. Type A had large varicosities packed with immuno-positive large-granulated peptidergic vesicles and few small clear vesicles forming type I synaptic junctions with pyramidal neuron dendrites, dendritic spines and with axonal spines. Type B had smaller varicosities containing mostly small clear vesicles and only a few large-granulated vesicles and established type II synaptic junctions mainly with interneuron dendrites. The AVP-positive axons in stratum oriens appeared to follow and contact metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α)-immuno-positive interneuron dendrites. Fluoro-Gold injection into the hippocampus revealed retrogradely labelled AVP-positive somata in hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Hypothalamo-hippocampal AVP-positive axons entered the hippocampus mostly through a ventral route, also innervating the amygdala and to a lesser extent through the dorsal fimbria fornix, in continuation of the septal AVP innervation. Thus, it appears the AVP-containing neurons of the magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei serve as important sources for hippocampal AVP innervation, although the AVP-expressing neurons located in amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis reported previously may also contribute.

  16. Induction of neuropeptide Y gene expression in the dorsal medial hypothalamic nucleus in two models of the agouti obesity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesterson, R A; Huszar, D; Lynch, C A; Simerly, R B; Cone, R D

    1997-05-01

    Dominant mutations at the agouti locus induce several phenotypic changes in the mouse including yellow pigmentation (phaeomelanization) of the coat and adult-onset obesity. Nonpigmentary phenotypic changes associated with the agouti locus are due to ectopic expression of the agouti-signaling protein (ASP), and the pheomelanizing effects on coat color are due to ASP antagonism of alpha-MSH binding to the melanocyte MC1 receptor. Recently it has been demonstrated that pharmacological antagonism of hypothalamic melanocortin receptors or genetic deletion of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4-R) recapitulates aspects of the agouti obesity syndrome, thus establishing that chronic disruption of central melanocortinergic signaling is the cause of agouti-induced obesity. To learn more about potential downstream effectors involved in these melanocortinergic obesity syndromes, we have examined expression of the orexigenic peptides galanin and neuropeptide Y (NPY), as well as the anorexigenic POMC in lethal yellow (A(y)), MC4-R knockout (MC4-RKO), and leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. No significant changes in galanin or POMC gene expression were seen in any of the obese models. In situ hybridizations using an antisense NPY probe demonstrated that in obese A(y) mice, arcuate nucleus NPY mRNA levels were equivalent to that of their C57BL/6J littermates. However, NPY was expressed at high levels in a new site, the dorsal medial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH). Expression of NPY in the DMH was also seen in obese MC4-RKO homozygous (-/-) mice, but not in lean heterozygous (+/-) or wild type (+/+) control mice. This identifies the DMH as a brain region that is functionally altered by the disruption of melanocortinergic signaling and suggests that this nucleus, possibly via elevated NPY expression, may have an etiological role in the melanocortinergic obesity syndrome.

  17. Photoperiod and acute energy deficits interact on components of the thyroid hormone system in hypothalamic tanycytes of the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Annika; Wilson, Dana; Logie, Tracy J; Boelen, Anita; Morgan, Peter J; Mercer, Julian G; Barrett, Perry

    2009-05-01

    In the Siberian hamster, seasonal weight loss occurs gradually over many weeks during autumn and winter. This is driven by a regulatory mechanism that is able to integrate duration of exposure to short days (SDs) with the size of body energy reserves. After food restriction in SDs, followed by ad libitum refeeding, body weight of the hamster does not return to its former level; rather, it increases to a level defined by the length of time spent in SDs. In this report, we show that components of the thyroid hormone system that are involved in seasonal weight loss change expression in response to 48 h of starvation. Eight weeks in an SD photoperiod induced weight loss in the Siberian hamster. In the hypothalamus of these hamsters, type II deiodinase expression was decreased and type III deiodinase expression was induced, but there was no change in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y or thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression. For the first time, we show that the thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 is expressed in tanycytes and is increased in response to an SD photoperiod. Food restriction (48 h of starvation) reversed the direction of gene expression change for type II and III deiodinase and monocarboxylate transporter 8 induced by SD photoperiods. Furthermore, fasting increased neuropeptide Y expression and decreased thyrotropin-releasing hormone expression. VGF, a gene upregulated in SDs in the dorsal region of the medial posterior area of the arcuate nucleus, was not changed by starvation. These data point to a mechanism whereby energy deprivation can interact with an SD photoperiod on hypothalamic tanycytes to regulate components of the thyroid hormone system involved in photoperiodic regulation of seasonal physiology.

  18. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  19. Research Resource: The Dexamethasone Transcriptome in Hypothalamic Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Krystle A; Peffer, Melanie E; Zhang, Janie Y; Luthra, Soumya; Chakka, Anish B; Couger, Matthew B; Chandran, Uma R; Monaghan, A Paula; DeFranco, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during fetal development has long-lasting physiological and behavioral consequences, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The impact of prenatal glucocorticoids exposure on stress responses in juvenile and adult offspring implicates the developing hypothalamus as a target of adverse prenatal glucocorticoid action. Therefore, primary cultures of hypothalamic neural-progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) derived from mouse embryos (embryonic day 14.5) were used to identify the glucocorticoid transcriptome in both males and females. NPSCs were treated with vehicle or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex; 100nM) for 4 hours and total RNA analyzed using RNA-Sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that primary hypothalamic NPSC cultures expressed relatively high levels of a number of genes regulating stem cell proliferation and hypothalamic progenitor function. Interesting, although these cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), only low levels of sex-steroid receptors are expressed, which suggested that sex-specific differentially regulated genes identified are mediated by genetic and not hormonal influences. We also identified known or novel GR-target coding and noncoding genes that are either regulated equivalently in male and female NPSCs or differential responsiveness in one sex. Using gene ontology analysis, the top functional network identified was cell proliferation and using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation observed a reduction in proliferation of hypothalamic NPSCs after dexamethasone treatment. Our studies provide the first characterization and description of glucocorticoid-regulated pathways in male and female embryonically derived hypothalamic NPSCs and identified GR-target genes during hypothalamic development. These findings may provide insight into potential mechanisms responsible for the long-term consequences of fetal glucocorticoid exposure in adulthood.

  20. The hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the echidna and platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Lajevardi, Shahab-Eddin; Cheng, Gang; Paxinos, George

    2006-01-01

    The monotremes are an intriguing group of mammals that have major differences in their reproductive physiology and lactation from therian mammals. Monotreme young hatch from leathery skinned eggs and are nourished by milk secreted onto areolae rather than through nipples. Parturition and lactation are in part controlled through the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. We have used Nissl staining, enzyme histochemistry, immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase, calbindin, oxytocin, neurophysin and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein, and carbocyanine dye tracing techniques to examine the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and the course of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial tract in two monotremes: the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). In both monotremes, the supraoptic nucleus consisted of loosely packed neurons, mainly in the retrochiasmatic position. In the echidna, the paraventricular nucleus was quite small, but had similar chemoarchitectural features to therians. In the platypus, the paraventricular nucleus was larger and appeared to be part of a stream of magnocellular neurons extending from the paraventricular nucleus to the retrochiasmatic supraoptic nucleus. Immunohistochemistry for non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein and carbocyanine dye tracing suggested that hypothalamo-neurohypophysial tract neurons in the echidna lie mainly in the retrochiasmatic supraoptic and lateral hypothalamic regions, but most neurophysin and oxytocin immunoreactive neurons in the echidna were found in the paraventricular, lateral hypothalamus and supraoptic nuclei and most oxytocinergic neurons in the platypus were distributed in a band from the paraventricular nucleus to the retrochiasmatic supraoptic nucleus. The small size of the supraoptic nucleus in the two monotremes might reflect functional aspects of monotreme lactation.

  1. Hypothalamic Vasopressinergic Projections Innervate Central Amygdala GABAergic Neurons: Implications for Anxiety and Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vito S.; Hernández, Oscar R.; Perez de la Mora, Miguel; Gómora, María J.; Fuxe, Kjell; Eiden, Lee E.; Zhang, Limei

    2016-01-01

    The arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-containing hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (VPMNNs) are known for their role in hydro-electrolytic balance control via their projections to the neurohypophysis. Recently, projections from these same neurons to hippocampus, habenula and other brain regions in which vasopressin infusion modulates contingent social and emotionally-affected behaviors, have been reported. Here, we present evidence that VPMNN collaterals also project to the amygdaloid complex, and establish synaptic connections with neurons in central amygdala (CeA). The density of AVP innervation in amygdala was substantially increased in adult rats that had experienced neonatal maternal separation (MS), consistent with our previous observations that MS enhances VPMNN number in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. In the CeA, V1a AVP receptor mRNA was only observed in GABAergic neurons, demonstrated by complete co-localization of V1a transcripts in neurons expressing Gad1 and Gad2 transcripts in CeA using the RNAscope method. V1b and V2 receptor mRNAs were not detected, using the same method. Water-deprivation (WD) for 24 h, which increased the metabolic activity of VPMNNs, also increased anxiety-like behavior measured using the elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and this effect was mimicked by bilateral microinfusion of AVP into the CeA. Anxious behavior induced by either WD or AVP infusion was reversed by CeA infusion of V1a antagonist. VPMNNs are thus a newly discovered source of CeA inhibitory circuit modulation, through which both early-life and adult stress coping signals are conveyed from the hypothalamus to the amygdala. PMID:27932956

  2. Hypothalamic vasopressinergic projections innervate central amygdala GABAergic neurons: implications for anxiety and stress coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Salvador Hernandez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The arginine-vasopressin (AVP-containing hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (VPMNNs are known for their role in hydro-electrolytic balance control via their projections to neurohypophysis. Recently, projections from these same neurons to hippocampus, habenula, and other brain regions, in which vasopressin infusion modulates contingent social and emotionally-affected behaviors, have been reported. Here, we present evidence that VPMNN collaterals also project to the amygdaloid complex, and establish synaptic connections with neurons in central amygdala (CeA. The density of AVP innervation in amygdala was substantially increased in adult rats that had experienced neonatal maternal separation (MS, consistent with our previous observations that MS enhances VPMNN number in the paraventricular (PVN and supraoptic (SON nuclei of the hypothalamus. In the CeA, V1a AVP receptor mRNA was only observed in GABAergic neurons, demonstrated by complete co-localization of V1a transcripts in neurons expressing Gad1 and Gad2 transcripts in CeA using the RNAscope method. V1b and V2 receptors mRNA were not detected, using the same method. Water-deprivation for 24 hrs, which increased the metabolic activity of VPMNNs, also increased anxiety-like behavior measured using the elevated plus maze test, and this effect was mimicked by bilateral microinfusion of VP into the CeA. Anxious behavior induced by either water deprivation or VP infusion was reversed by CeA infusion of V1a antagonist. VPMNNs are thus a newly discovered source of central amygdala inhibitory circuit modulation, through which both early-life and adult stress coping signals are conveyed from the hypothalamus to the amygdala.

  3. Bang-bang control of feeding: role of hypothalamic and satiety signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Silvano Zanutto

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Rats, people, and many other omnivores eat in meals rather than continuously. We show by experimental test that eating in meals is regulated by a simple bang-bang control system, an idea foreshadowed by Le Magnen and many others, shown by us to account for a wide range of behavioral data, but never explicitly tested or tied to neurophysiological facts. The hypothesis is simply that the tendency to eat rises with time at a rate determined by satiety signals. When these signals fall below a set point, eating begins, in on-off fashion. The delayed sequelae of eating increment the satiety signals, which eventually turn eating off. Thus, under free conditions, the organism eats in bouts separated by noneating activities. We report an experiment with rats to test novel predictions about meal patterns that are not explained by existing homeostatic approaches. Access to food was systematically but unpredictably interrupted just as the animal tried to start a new meal. A simple bang-bang model fits the resulting meal-pattern data well, and its elements can be identified with neurophysiological processes. Hypothalamic inputs can provide the set point for longer-term regulation carried out by a comparator in the hindbrain. Delayed gustatory and gastrointestinal aftereffects of eating act via the nucleus of the solitary tract and other hindbrain regions as neural feedback governing short-term regulation. In this way, the model forges real links between a functioning feedback mechanism, neuro-hormonal data, and both short-term (meals and long-term (eating-rate regulation behavioral data.

  4. Thermoregulatory Instability in Childhood: Linking the Normal Brain to Hypothalamic Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Alves Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central core temperature is tightly controlled by hypothalamic centers, a feature that makes sudden changes in body temperature very unusual. A dysfunction of these hypothalamic pathways leads to Shapiro’s syndrome, comprising spontaneous hypothermia, hyperhidrosis, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Although it may affect any age, usually it presents in childhood. Variants to this syndrome with completely normal brain anatomy have been consistently reported, expanding the clinical spectrum of the syndrome. Herein, we report the case of a 4-year-old girl with Shapiro’s syndrome and unaffected corpus callosum.

  5. Increased concentration of. cap alpha. - and. gamma. -endorphin in post mortem hypothalamic tissue of schizophrenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegant, V.M.; Verhoef, C.J.; Burbach, J.P.H.; de Wied, D.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-endorphin were determined by radioimmunoassay in HPLC fractionated extracts of post mortem hypothalamic tissue obtained from schizophrenic patients and controls. The hypothalamic concentration of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphin was significantly higher in patients than in controls. No difference was found in the concentration of ..beta..-endorphin, the putative precursor of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphins. These results suggest a deviant metabolism of ..beta..-endorphin in the brain of schizophrenic patients. Whether this phenomenon is related to the psychopathology, or is a consequence of ante mortem farmacotherapy, remains to be established.

  6. Hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus probably linked to Rathke's cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Tomoko; Yamada, Hodaka; Yoshida, Masashi; Aoki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Aki; Kusaka, Ikuyo; Toyoshima, Hideo; Kakei, Masafumi; Ishikawa, San-E

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted due to weight loss and generalized malaise. The basal levels of all the anterior pituitary hormones, except for prolactin, were reduced. However, they were all elevated in response to exogenous hypothalamic hormones. After starting hydrocortisone replacement, the patient had polyuria of >5,000 mL/day. T1-weighted MRI depicted a low signal of an oval mass in the sella turcica and an iso-intense signal of another mass at the pituitary stalk. These findings indicate a hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and masked central diabetes insipidus which possibly derived from the atypical occupation of Rathke's cleft cyst at the pituitary stalk.

  7. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Pedersen, Philip J.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    of energy balance.  Methods: Lean male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB or sham surgery. Body weight and food intake were monitored bi-weekly for 60 days post-surgery. In situ hybridization mRNA analysis of hypothalamic AgRP, NPY, CART, POMC and MCH was applied to RYGB and sham animals and compared......Objective: The role of the central nervous system in mediating metabolic effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is poorly understood. Using a rat model of RYGB, we aimed to identify changes in gene expression of key hypothalamic neuropeptides known to be involved in the regulation...

  8. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eElson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT (n=11, TomoTherapy-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT (n=10, or Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS(n=12 were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and postradiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone (GH, thyroid (TSH, adrenal (ACTH, prolactin (PRL, and gonadotropins (FSH/LH were assessed. Results:Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48% patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72% occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50% occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5% occurred in the Gamma Knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, Gamma Knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo, and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 Gy vs. 26.8 Gy p=0.02, DMax (49.8 Gy vs. 39.1 Gy p=0.04, and V12Gy (100% vs. 76% p=0.004.Conclusion:Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using Gamma Knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively.

  9. Insulin directly regulates NPY and AgRP gene expression via the MAPK MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway in mHypoE-46 hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christopher M; Belsham, Denise D

    2009-08-13

    Insulin plays a key role in the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis through central regulation of neuropeptides. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) are vital orexigenic peptides that are regulated by insulin, although the processes utilized are unknown. Using a hypothalamic, clonal cell line, mHypoE-46, which endogenously expresses NPY, AgRP and the insulin receptor, we studied the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the NPY/AgRP neuron by insulin. We determined that insulin has direct actions on the neurons and acts to repress NPY/AgRP gene expression through a MAPK MEK/ERK-dependent pathway. Transient transfection analysis determined that human NPY and AgRP 5' flanking gene regions were not regulated by insulin in the mouse cell line, while sequence comparison analysis indicated only a 50% sequence similarity between human and mouse NPY and AgRP 5' flanking regions. These experiments indicate that insulin acts directly on specific hypothalamic neurons to regulate neuropeptide transcription.

  10. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  11. Feed intake of gilts following intracerebroventicular injection of the novel hypothalamic RFamide (RFa) neuropeptide, 26RFa

    Science.gov (United States)

    RFamide (RFa) peptides have been implicated in a broad spectrum of biological processes including energy expenditure and feed intake. 26RFa is a recently discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide that altered the release of pituitary hormones and stimulated feed intake via a NPY-specific mechanism in rat...

  12. Fluoxetine induces proliferation and inhibits differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available A significant number of children undergo maternal exposure to antidepressants and they often present low birth weight. Therefore, it is important to understand how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs affect the development of the hypothalamus, the key center for metabolism regulation. In this study we investigated the proliferative actions of fluoxetine in fetal hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells and demonstrate that fluoxetine induces the proliferation of these cells, as shown by increased neurospheres size and number of proliferative cells (Ki-67+ cells. Moreover, fluoxetine inhibits the differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells, as demonstrated by decreased number of mature neurons (Neu-N+ cells and increased number of undifferentiated cells (SOX-2+ cells. Additionally, fluoxetine-induced proliferation and maintenance of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells leads to changes in the mRNA levels of appetite regulator neuropeptides, including Neuropeptide Y (NPY and Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART. This study provides the first evidence that SSRIs affect the development of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro with consequent alterations on appetite neuropeptides.

  13. Androgenic anabolic steroid use and severe hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breda, E.; Keizer, H.A.; Kuipers, H.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The data of the present case demonstrate that the abuse of androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) may lead to serious health effects. Although most clinical attention is usually directed towards peripheral side effects, the most serious central side effect, hypothalamic-pituitary-dysfunction, is often o

  14. Cyclophosphamide for Rapid-Onset Obesity, Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Priel, Ido; Cooke, David W.; Chen, Allen R

    2010-01-01

    Patients with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, autonomic dysregulation, and neural crest tumor syndrome have poor long-term outcomes. We report a patient who was treated successfully with high-dose cyclophosphamide immunoablation. This experience offers a novel therapeutic approach and an indirect insight into the underlying pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  15. Mechanisms underlying prorenin actions on hypothalamic neurons implicated in cardiometabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Pitra

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We identified novel neuronal targets and cellular mechanisms underlying PR/PRR actions in critical hypothalamic neurons involved in cardiometabolic regulation. This fundamental mechanistic information regarding central PR/PRR actions is essential for the development of novel RAS-based therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders in obesity and hypertension.

  16. Cultured hypothalamic neurons are resistant to inflammation and insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Kim, Francis; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation induced by high-fat feeding causes insulin and leptin resistance and contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. Since in vitro exposure to saturated fatty acids causes inflammation and insulin resistance in many cultured cell types, we determined how cultured hypothalamic neurons respond to this stimulus. Two murine hypothalamic neuronal cell cultures, N43/5 and GT1-7, were exposed to escalating concentrations of saturated fatty acids for up to 24 h. Harvested cells were evaluated for activation of inflammation by gene expression and protein content. Insulin-treated cells were evaluated for induction of markers of insulin receptor signaling (p-IRS, p-Akt). In both hypothalamic cell lines, inflammation was induced by prototypical inflammatory mediators LPS and TNFalpha, as judged by induction of IkappaBalpha (3- to 5-fold) and IL-6 (3- to 7-fold) mRNA and p-IkappaBalpha protein, and TNFalpha pretreatment reduced insulin-mediated p-Akt activation by 30% (P saturated fatty acids on nonneuronal cells.

  17. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  18. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine

  19. Childhood Craniopharyngioma with Hypothalamic Obesity - No Long-term Weight Reduction due to Rehabilitation Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterkenburg, A. S.; Hoffmann, A.; Gebhardt, U.; Waldeck, E.; Springer, S.; Mueller, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity due to hypothalamic involvement has major impact on prognosis in long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma. The long-term effects of rehabilitation efforts on weight development and obesity in these patients are not analyzed up to now. Patients and Methods: 108

  20. Relationship between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and fatty acid metabolism in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocking, Roel J T; Ruhe, Eric; Assies, Johanna; Lok, Anja; Koeter, Maarten W J; Visser, Ieke; Bockting, Claudi L H; Schene, Aart H

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and fatty acid (FA)-metabolism have been observed in (recurrent) major depressive disorder (MDD). Through the pathophysiological roles of FAs in the brain and cardiovascular system, a hypothesized relationship between HPA-axis activit

  1. Characterization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis in familial longevity under resting conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.W.; Roelfsema, F.; Akintola, A.A.; Oei, N.Y.; Cobbaert, C.M.; Ballieux, B.E.; van der Grond, J.; Westendorp, R.G.; Pijl, H.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis is the most important neuro-endocrine stress response system of our body which is of critical importance for survival. Disturbances in HPA-axis activity have been associated with adverse metabolic and cognitive changes. Humans enriched for lon

  2. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  3. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5beta-reductase....

  4. Exercise in rats does not alter hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Nielsen, Jakob Nis

    2005-01-01

    or ran for 30 or 60 min on a treadmill (22 m/min, 10% slope) were sacrificed immediately after exercise or after 60 min recovery either in the fasted state or after oral gavage with glucose (3 g/kg body weight). Exercise decreased muscle and liver glycogen substantially. Hypothalamic total or a2...

  5. Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates hypothalamic nuclei that regulate food intake and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Milene de Oliveira Lara; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Kawakami, Suzi Emiko; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that prolonged paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) results in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, and in loss of body weight despite an apparent increase of food intake, reflecting increased energy expenditure. The flowerpot technique for PSD is an efficient paradigm for investigating the relationships among metabolic regulation and stress response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the mechanisms involved in the effects of 96 h of PSD on metabolism regulation, feeding behaviour and stress response by studying corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and orexin (ORX) immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei. Once-daily assessments of body weight, twice-daily measurements of (spillage-corrected) food intake, and once-daily determinations of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were made throughout PSD or at corresponding times in control rats (CTL). Immunoreactivity for CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and for ORX in the hypothalamic lateral area was evaluated at the end of the experimental period. PSD resulted in increased diurnal, but not nocturnal, food intake, producing no significant changes in global food intake. PSD augmented the immunoreactivity for CRH and plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, characterizing activation of the HPA axis. PSD also markedly increased the ORX immunoreactivity. The average plasma level of corticosterone correlated negatively with body weight gain throughout PSD. These results indicate that augmented ORX and CRH immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei may underlie some of the metabolic changes consistently described in PSD.

  6. HPG-axis hormones during puberty : A study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, Jiska S.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Schnack, Hugo G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, Rene S.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff

    2010-01-01

    Objective: During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary volum

  7. Childhood craniopharyngioma: greater hypothalamic involvement before surgery is associated with higher homeostasis model insulin resistance index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainte-Rose Christian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity seems to be linked to the hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma. We evaluated the pre-surgery relationship between the degree of this involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and insulin resistance, as evaluated by the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA. As insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R and ghrelin may also be involved, we compared their plasma concentrations and their link to weight change. Methods 27 children with craniopharyngioma were classified as either grade 0 (n = 7, no hypothalamic involvement, grade 1 (n = 8, compression without involvement, or grade 2 (n = 12, severe involvement. Results Despite having similar body mass indexes (BMI, the grade 2 patients had higher glucose, insulin and HOMA before surgery than the grade 0 (P = 0.02, The data for the whole population before and 6–18 months after surgery showed increases in BMI (P Conclusion The hypothalamic involvement by the craniopharyngioma before surgery seems to determine the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of the BMI. The pre-surgery HOMA values were correlated with the post-surgery weight gain. This suggests that obesity should be prevented by reducing inn secretion in those cases with hypothalamic involvement.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms in the hypothalamic pathway in relation to subsequent weight change - the DIOGenes Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huaidong, D.U.; Vimaleswaran, K.S.; Angquist, L.; Hansen, R.D.; A, van der D.L.; Holst, C.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Uhre Jakobsen, M.; Boeing, H.; Meidtner, K.; Palli, D.; Masala, G.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Saris, W.H.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Wareham, N.J.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Loos, R.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects. \\\\ Aim: We conducted a case-cohort study to investigate the associations of SNPs in candidate genes with

  9. Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis Functioning in Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Hajal, Nastassia J.; Felt, Barbara T.; Vazquez, Delia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) reactivity and proactive and reactive aggression in pre-pubertal children. After a 30-min controlled base line period, 73 7-year-old children (40 males and 33 females) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental tasks designed to…

  10. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine st

  11. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm(3) (median 3.1 cm(3)). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  12. Adolescent Survivors of Hurricane Katrina: A Pilot Study of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis constitutes an important biological component of the stress response commonly studied through the measurement of cortisol. Limited research has examined HPA axis dysregulation in youth exposed to disasters. Objective: This study examined HPA axis activation in adolescent Hurricane Katrina…

  13. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Sarah M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Veltman, Dick J; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the hy

  14. Regulation of Energy Balance via BDNF Expressed in Nonparaventricular Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haili; An, Juan Ji; Sun, Chao; Xu, Baoji

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) has been shown to play a key role in regulating energy intake and energy expenditure. BDNF is also expressed in other hypothalamic nuclei; however, the role in the control of energy balance for BDNF produced in these structures remains largely unknown. We found that deleting the Bdnf gene in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) during embryogenesis using the Sf1-Cre transgene had no effect on body weight in mice. In contrast, deleting the Bdnf gene in the adult VMH using Cre-expressing virus led to significant hyperphagia and obesity. These observations indicate that the lack of a hyperphagia phenotype in the Sf1-Cre/Bdnf mutant mice is likely due to developmental compensation. To investigate the role of BDNF expressed in other hypothalamic areas, we employed the hypothalamus-specific Nkx2.1-Cre transgene to delete the Bdnf gene. We found that the Nkx2.1-Cre transgene could abolish BDNF expression in many hypothalamic nuclei, but not in the PVH, and that the resulting mutant mice developed modest obesity due to reduced energy expenditure. Thus, BDNF produced in the VMH plays a role in regulating energy intake. Furthermore, BDNF expressed in hypothalamic areas other than PVH and VMH is also involved in the control of energy expenditure.

  15. Programming of hypothalamic energy balance gene expression in rats by maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cripps, R. L; Martin-Gronert, M. S; Archer, Z. A; Hales, C. N; Mercer, J. G; Ozanne, S. E

    2009-01-01

    .... Expression of hypothalamic energy balance genes was assessed using in situ hybridisation. Recuperated pups were smaller at birth, but caught up with controls by day 21 and gained more weight than controls between weaning and 12 weeks of age (p<0.05...

  16. Association of Obesity-Mediated Insulin Resistance and Hypothalamic Volumes: Possible Sex Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Ha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is important in hunger and metabolism. Although a lot is known about the basic role of the human hypothalamus, less is known about how the in vivo volume is affected in obesity, particularly among adolescents. Based on pediatric body mass index percentiles, 95 participants were assigned to lean or obese groups. All subjects had medical evaluations, including fasting blood tests, to assess insulin sensitivity and circulating CRP and neurotrophins (NGF and BDNF and an MRI of the brain. Hypothalamic volumes were measured by a segmentation method combining manual and automated steps. Overall, obese participants had descriptively smaller hypothalamic volumes, although this difference did not reach statistical significance; however, among obese participants, females had significantly smaller hypothalamic volumes than their male counterparts. There was a significant interaction between insulin resistance and sex on hypothalamus volume; obese females with significant insulin resistance have smaller hypothalamic volumes than obese males. Obese adolescents had higher circulating CRP and neurotrophin levels. Furthermore, among obese females, BDNF concentrations were inversely associated with hypothalamus volumes (r=−0.48. Given this negative association between BDNF and hypothalamus volumes among obese insulin-resistant females, elevated neurotrophin levels may suggest an attempt at protective compensation.

  17. Hypothalamic food intake regulation in a cancer-cachectic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Dijk, van M.; Dijk, F.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Faber, J.; Argiles, J.M.; Laviano, A.; Müller, M.R.; Witkamp, R.F.; Norren, van K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer-cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 tumour have an i

  18. Behavioral and endocrine responses of rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (Brattleboro strain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Wied, D. de

    1975-01-01

    Behavioral and endocrine profiles were established of homozygous (HO-DI) and heterozygous (HE-DI) rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus in comparison to Wistar strain rats. HO-DI rats were inferior in acquiring and maintaining active and passive avoidance behavior. Behavioral deficits

  19. Childhood Craniopharyngioma with Hypothalamic Obesity - No Long-term Weight Reduction due to Rehabilitation Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterkenburg, A. S.; Hoffmann, A.; Gebhardt, U.; Waldeck, E.; Springer, S.; Mueller, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity due to hypothalamic involvement has major impact on prognosis in long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma. The long-term effects of rehabilitation efforts on weight development and obesity in these patients are not analyzed up to now. Patients and Methods: 108 pa

  20. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N. C. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Stek, M. L.; van der Mast, R. C.; Voshaar, R. Oude; Comijs, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were population

  1. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Sarah M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Veltman, Dick J; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the

  2. Gallium-67 breast uptake in a patient with hypothalamic granuloma (sarcoid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, R.; Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.; Fay, J.; Gale, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case is presented of bilateral breast uptake of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate in a patient with a hypothalamic granuloma in the absence of galactorrhea is presented. A possible mechanism for this incidental finding is elevated prolactin levels, as other causes of gallium breast uptake such as drug therapy, and intrinsic breast disease, were not present.

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and early onset of cannabis use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizink, Anja C.; Ferdinand, Robert F.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2006-01-01

    Aims To identify early onset cannabis users by measuring basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, which may be a risk factor for early onset substance use when showing low activity. Design In a prospective cohort study, adolescents who initiated cannabis use at an early age (9-12 ye

  4. Differential requirements for Gli2 and Gli3 in the regional specification of the mouse hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eHaddad-Tóvolli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Secreted protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh ventralizes the neural tube by modulating the crucial balance between activating and repressing functions (GliA, GliR of transcription factors Gli2 and Gli3. This balance—the Shh-Gli code—is species- and context-dependent and has been elucidated for the mouse spinal cord. The hypothalamus, a forebrain region regulating vital functions like homeostasis and hormone secretion, shows dynamic and intricate Shh expression as well as complex regional differentiation. Here we asked if particular combinations of Gli2 and Gli3 and of GliA and GliR functions contribute to the variety of hypothalamic regions, i.e. we wanted to clarify the hypothalamic version of the Shh-Gli code. Based on mouse mutant analysis, we show that: 1 hypothalamic regional heterogeneity is based in part on differentially stringent requirements for Gli2 or Gli3; 2 another source of diversity are differential requirements for Shh of neural vs non-neural origin; 3 Gli2 is indispensable for the specification of a medial progenitor domain generating several essential hypothalamic nuclei plus the pituitary and median eminence; 4 the suppression of Gli3R by neural and non-neural Shh is essential for hypothalamic specification. Finally, we have mapped our results on a recent model which considers the hypothalamus as a transverse region with alar and basal portions. Our data confirm the model and are explained by it.

  5. Expanding indications for the extended endoscopic endonasal approach to hypothalamic gliomas: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoli, Matteo; Mazzatenta, Diego; Valluzzi, Adelaide; Marucci, Gianluca; Acciarri, Nicola; Pasquini, Ernesto; Frank, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Object In the last decade the indications for the endoscopic endonasal approach have been progressively expanded to include lesions that have not been traditionally considered amenable to resection through the transsphenoidal route. In this study, the authors analyze their experience with hypothalamic gliomas treated via the endoscopic endonasal approach. Methods Consecutive cases of hypothalamic gliomas treated since 2007 via an endoscopic endonasal approach were reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative neuroimaging as well as endocrinological, neurological, and visual symptoms were analyzed to assess the surgical outcome. Signs and symptoms of hypothalamic dysfunction including body mass index (BMI), memory, sleep-wake rhythm, and polyphagia were prospectively collected pre- and postoperatively to assess hypothalamic function. Quality of life was evaluated using the Katz scale. Results In the initial phase the endoscopic endonasal approach was adopted in 3 cases with a palliative intent, to obtain a biopsy sample or for debulking of the mass followed by radio- or chemotherapy. In 2 later cases it was successfully adopted to achieve gross-total tumor resection. Complications consisted of 2 postoperative CSF leaks, which required an endoscopic endonasal reintervention. Visual deficit improved in 3 cases and normalized in the other 2. Four patients developed diabetes insipidus, and 3 an anterior panhypopituitarism. All patients had a moderate increase in BMI. No patients presented with any other signs of hypothalamic damage, and their quality of life at follow-up is normal. Conclusions Despite the limitations of a short follow-up and small sample, the authors' early experience with the endoscopic endonasal approach has revealed it to be a direct, straightforward, and safe approach to third ventricle astrocytomas. It allowed the authors to perform tumor resection with the same microsurgical technique: dissecting the tumor with 2 hands, performing a central debulking

  6. Hypothalamic neuronal histamine modulates febrile response but not anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Oka, Kyoko; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of hypothalamic neuronal histamine (HA) to the anorectic and febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an exogenous pyrogen, and the endogenous pyrogens interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of LPS, IL-1beta, or TNF-alpha suppressed 24-hr cumulative food intake and increased rectal temperature in rats. To analyze the histaminergic contribution, rats were pretreated with intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2.44 mmol/kg or ip injection of 244 mmol/kg of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), to deplete neural HA. The depletion of neural HA augmented the febrile response to ip injection of LPS and IL-1beta and alleviated the anorectic response to ip injection of IL-1beta. However, the depletion of neural HA did not modify the LPS-induced anorectic response or TNF-alpha-induced febrile and anorectic responses. Consistent with these results, the rate of hypothalamic HA turnover, assessed by the accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), was elevated with ip injections of LPS and IL-1beta, but unaffected by TNF-alpha at equivalent doses. This suggests that (i) LPS and IL-1beta activate hypothalamic neural HA turnover; (ii) hypothalamic neural HA suppresses the LPS- and IL-1beta-induced febrile responses and accelerates the IL-1beta-induced anorectic response; and (iii) TNF-alpha modulates the febrile and anorectic responses via a neural HA-independent pathway. Therefore, hypothalamic neural HA is involved in the IL-1beta-dominant pathway, rather than the TNF-alpha-dominant pathway, preceding the systemic inflammatory response induced by exogenous pyrogens, such as LPS. Further research on this is needed.

  7. Litter size variation in hypothalamic gene expression determines adult metabolic phenotype in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment. Here we investigated the long-term effects of litter size on metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNA expression involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, using the offspring reared from large (10-12 and small (3-4 litter sizes, of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii, a rodent species from Inner Mongolia grassland in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hypothalamic leptin signaling and neuropeptides were measured by Real-Time PCR. We showed that offspring reared from small litters were heavier at weaning and also in adulthood than offspring from large litters, accompanied by increased food intake during development. There were no significant differences in serum leptin levels or leptin receptor (OB-Rb mRNA in the hypothalamus at weaning or in adulthood, however, hypothalamic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 mRNA in adulthood increased in small litters compared to that in large litters. As a result, the agouti-related peptide (AgRP mRNA increased in the offspring from small litters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support our hypothesis that natural litter size has a permanent effect on offspring metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and suggest central leptin resistance and the resultant increase in AgRP expression may be a fundamental mechanism underlying hyperphagia and the increased risk of overweight in pups of small litters. Thus, we conclude that litter size may be an important and central determinant of metabolic fitness in adulthood.

  8. Hypothalamic inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase stimulates hepatic counter-regulatory response independent of AMPK activation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypothalamic AMPK acts as a cell energy sensor and can modulate food intake, glucose homeostasis, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Intrahypothalamic fatty acid injection is known to suppress liver glucose production, mainly by activation of hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP channels. Since all models employed seem to involve malonyl-CoA biosynthesis, we hypothesized that acetyl-CoA carboxylase can modulate the counter-regulatory response independent of nutrient availability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study employing immunoblot, real-time PCR, ELISA, and biochemical measurements, we showed that reduction of the hypothalamic expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by antisense oligonucleotide after intraventricular injection increased food intake and NPY mRNA, and diminished the expression of CART, CRH, and TRH mRNA. Additionally, as in fasted rats, in antisense oligonucleotide-treated rats, serum glucagon and ketone bodies increased, while the levels of serum insulin and hepatic glycogen diminished. The reduction of hypothalamic acetyl-CoA carboxylase also increased PEPCK expression, AMPK phosphorylation, and glucose production in the liver. Interestingly, these effects were observed without modification of hypothalamic AMPK phosphorylation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Hypothalamic ACC inhibition can activate hepatic counter-regulatory response independent of hypothalamic AMPK activation.

  9. An in vivo animal study assessing long-term changes in hypothalamic cytokines following perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture based on Arctic maternal body burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Nanqin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographic distribution of environmental toxins is generally not uniform, with certain northern regions showing a particularly high concentration of pesticides, heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants. For instance, Northern Canadians are exposed to high levels of persistent organic pollutants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB, organochlorine pesticides (OCs and methylmercury (MeHg, primarily through country foods. Previous studies have reported associations between neuronal pathology and exposure to such toxins. The present investigation assessed whether perinatal exposure (gestation and lactation of rats to a chemical mixture (27 constituents comprised of PCBs, OCs and MeHg based on Arctic maternal exposure profiles at concentrations near human exposure levels, would affect brain levels of several inflammatory cytokines Methods Rats were dosed during gestation and lactation and cytokine levels were measured in the brains of offspring at five months of age. Hypothalamic cytokine protein levels were measured with a suspension-based array system and differences were determined using ANOVA and post hoc statistical tests. Results The early life PCB treatment alone significantly elevated hypothalamic interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels in rats at five months of age to a degree comparable to that of the entire chemical mixture. Similarly, the full mixture (and to a lesser degree PCBs alone elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1b, as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. The full mixture of chemicals also moderately increased (in an additive fashion hypothalamic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. Challenge with bacterial endotoxin at adulthood generally increased hypothalamic levels to such a degree that differences between the perinatally treated chemical groups were no longer detectable. Conclusions These data suggest that exposure at critical

  10. High-fat simple carbohydrate (HFSC) diet impairs hypothalamic and corpus striatal serotonergic metabolic pathway in metabolic syndrome (MetS) induced C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, DSouza Serena; Abraham, Asha

    2017-07-26

    To study the effect of specially formulated high-fat simple carbohydrate diet (HFSC) on the serotonin metabolic pathway in male C57BL/6J mice. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that specially formulated HFSC induces metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6J mice. In the present investigation, 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were analyzed in two brain regions (hypothalamus, corpus striatum), urine and plasma of HFSC-fed mice on a monthly basis up to 5 months using high-performance liquid chromatography fitted with electrochemical detector. The data were analyzed using Graph pad Prism v7.3 by two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test (to assess the effect of time on the serotonergic metabolic pathway). HFSC feed was observed to lower the hypothalamic serotonergic tone as compared to the age-matched control-fed C57BL/6J mice. Although the hypothalamic serotonergic tone was unaltered over time due to consumption of diet per se, hypothalamic 5-HTP levels were observed to be lower on consumption of HFSC feed over duration of 5 months as compared to 1st month of consumption of HFSC feed. The striatal 5-HTP levels were lowered in the HFSC-fed mice after 4 months of feeding as compared to the age-matched control-fed mice. The striatal 5-HTP levels were also lower in both control and HFSC-fed mice due to consumption of the respective diet over a duration of 5 months. Increased plasma 5-HTP levels were observed due to consumption of HFSC feed over duration of 5 months in the HFSC-fed group. However, higher breakdown of serotonin was observed in both the plasma and urine of HFSC-fed C57BL/6J mice as per the turnover studies. The central and peripheral serotonergic pathway is affected differentially by both the type of diet consumed and the duration for which the diet is consumed. The hypothalamic, striatal and plasma serotonergic pathway were altered both by the type of feed consumed and the duration of feeding. The urine serotonergic pathway was

  11. Parvalbumin-Neurons of the Ventrolateral Hypothalamic Parvafox Nucleus Receive a Glycinergic Input: A Gene-Microarray Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabolcsi, Viktoria; Albisetti, Gioele W.; Celio, Marco R.

    2017-01-01

    The ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox (formerly called PV1-Foxb1) nucleus is an anatomical entity of recent discovery and unknown function. With a view to gaining an insight into its putative functional role(s), we conducted a gene-microarray analysis and, armed with the forthcoming data, controlled the results with the Allen databases and the murine BrainStars (B*) database. The parvafox nucleus was specifically sampled by laser-capture microdissection and the transcriptome was subjected to a microarray analysis on Affymetrix chips. Eighty-two relevant genes were found to be potentially more expressed in this brain region than in either the cerebral cortex or the hippocampus. When the expression patterns of these genes were counterchecked in the Allen-Database of in-situ hybridizations and in the B*-microarray database, their localization in the parvafox region was confirmed for thirteen. For nine novel genes, which are particularly interesting because of their possible involvement in neuromodulation, the expression was verified by quantitative real time-PCR. Of particular functional importance may be the occurrence of glycine receptors, the presence of which indicates that the activity of the parvafox nucleus is under ascending inhibitory control. PMID:28167900

  12. Mechanism of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in regulating asthmatic attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Liu; Rong Dong; Jian Xiao; Nina Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUD: It has been confirmed that c-fos expession increased markedly in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus(PVN)during asthmatic attack in rats,and PVN has extensive physiological functions,involving in the regulation of respiratory system,etc.OBJECTIVE: To observe the alteration of electroencephalogram(EEG)and power spectra in PVN during the asthmatic attack,and the alteraiton of lung function and diaphragmatic muscle discharge after bilateral PVN lesion in asthmatic rats.DESIGN:A randomized control study.SETTING: Laboratory of Physiology and Pharmacology,School of Basic Medical Sciences,Southeast University.MATERIALS: Forty-eight male adult SD rats of 260-300g were used.The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups(n=8):control group,asthma group,electrolytic lesion of PVN group,KA-induced lesion of PVN group,sham electrolytic lesion of PVN group and sham kainic acid(KA)-induced lesion of PVN group.KA,chicken ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide were purchased from American Sigma Company.Bordetella pertrssis vaccine (Institute of Biological Products of Shanghai);stereotaxic apparartus (Jianwan Ⅱ,China);Iesion-producing device (YC-2 programmable stimulato,Chengdu Iustrument Company);MD2000 signal processing system(Nanjing Medical School); data acquisition system (RM6240B,Chengdu Instrument Company).METHODS:The experiments were carried out in the Laboratory of Physiology and Pharmacology,School of Basic Medical Sciences,Southeast University from January to August in 2006.①Rats except for control group were sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg chicken ovalbumin and 100 mg aluminum hydroxide and Bordetella pertussis vaccine containing 5×109 heat-killed in 1 mL of sterile saline.From the fifteenth to seventeenth days rats received three times aerosolized ovalbumin challenge. In rats of the control group and asthma group three steel electrodes were placed into the left PVN(AP-1.8 mm,LR 0.4 mm,OH-7.9 mm).parietal cortex and subcutaneous tissue in

  13. Age-related changes in cerebellar and hypothalamic function accompany non-microglial immune gene expression, altered synapse organization, and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Arikkath, Jyothi; Boska, Michael D.; Chaudoin, Tammy R.; DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Evan H.; Hoke, Traci A.; Mojtahedzedah, Vahid; Reyelts, Crystal D.; Sajja, Balasrinivasa; Schenk, A. Katrin; Tecott, Laurence H.; Volden, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe age-related molecular and neuronal changes that disrupt mobility or energy balance based on brain region and genetic background. Compared to young mice, aged C57BL/6 mice exhibit marked locomotor (but not energy balance) impairments. In contrast, aged BALB mice exhibit marked energy balance (but not locomotor) impairments. Age-related changes in cerebellar or hypothalamic gene expression accompany these phenotypes. Aging evokes upregulation of immune pattern recognition receptors and cell adhesion molecules. However, these changes do not localize to microglia, the major CNS immunocyte. Consistent with a neuronal role, there is a marked age-related increase in excitatory synapses over the cerebellum and hypothalamus. Functional imaging of these regions is consistent with age-related synaptic impairments. These studies suggest that aging reactivates a developmental program employed during embryogenesis where immune molecules guide synapse formation and pruning. Renewed activity in this program may disrupt excitatory neurotransmission, causing significant behavioral deficits. PMID:27689748

  14. Different critical perinatal periods and hypothalamic sites of oestradiol action in the defeminisation of luteinising hormone surge and lordosis capacity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, M; Deura, C; Minabe, S; Iwata, Y; Uenoyama, Y; Maeda, K-I; Tsukamura, H

    2013-03-01

    Female rats show a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinising hormone (LH) surge in the presence of a preovulatory level of oestrogen, whereas males do not because of brain defeminisation during the developmental period by perinatal oestrogen converted from androgen. The present study aimed to identify the site(s) of oestrogen action and the critical period for defeminising the mechanism regulating the GnRH/LH surge. Animals given perinatal treatments, such as steroidal manipulations, brain local implantation of oestradiol (E(2) ) or administration of an NMDA antagonist, were examined for their ability to show an E(2) -induced LH surge at adulthood. Lordosis behaviour was examined to compare the mechanisms defeminising the GnRH/LH surge and sexual behaviour. A single s.c. oestradiol-benzoate administration on either the day before birth (E21), the day of birth (D0) or day 5 (D5) postpartum completely abolished the E(2) -induced LH surge at adulthood in female rats, although the same treatment did not inhibit lordosis. Perinatal castration on E21 or D0 partially rescued the E2-induced LH surge in genetically male rats, whereas castration from E21 to D5 totally rescued lordosis. Neonatal E(2) implantation in the anterior hypothalamus including the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV)/preoptic area (POA) abolished the E(2) -induced LH surge in female rats, whereas E(2) implantation in the mid and posterior hypothalamic regions had no inhibitory effect on the LH surge. Lordosis was not affected by neonatal E(2) implantation in any hypothalamic regions. In male rats, neonatal NMDA antagonist treatment rescued lordosis but not the LH surge. Taken together, these results suggest that an anterior hypothalamic region such as the AVPV/POA region is a perinatal site of oestrogen action where the GnRH/LH regulating system is defeminised to abolish the oestrogen-induced surge. The mechanism for defeminisation of the GnRH/LH surge system might be different from

  15. Altered functional resting-state hypothalamic connectivity and abnormal pituitary morphology in children with Prader-Willi syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Lukoshe (Akvile); Van Dijk, S.E. (Suzanne E.); G.E. van den Bosch (Gerbrich); A. van der Lugt (Aad); T.J.H. White (Tonya); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by endocrine problems and hyperphagia, indicating hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. However, few studies have explored the underlying neurobiology of the hypothalamus and its functional conn

  16. Effects of morphine on hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine and dopamine in non-stressed and stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suemaru,Shuso

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of morphine on the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine (NE and dopamine (DA concentrations were investigated in non-stressed and stressed rats. Acutely administered morphine stimulated both the synthesis and release of CRF in the hypothalamus, thereby activating the pituitary-adrenocortical system in non-stressed rats, but inhibited the stress-induced CRF synthesis and ACTH-corticosterone secretion. Either a morphine or ether-laparotomy stress reduced NE and DA concentrations in the hypothalamus. A pretreatment with morphine inhibited the stress-induced reduction in the hypothalamic NE and DA concentrations, and induced a significant increase in the DA concentration. These observations suggest that hypothalamic NE and DA are involved in morphine-induced changes in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA activity and that endogenous opiates have a role in regulating CRF secretion by interacting with hypothalamic biogenic amines.

  17. Hypothalamic neuron projection to autonomic preganglionic levels related with glucose metabolism: a fluorescent labelling study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1996-06-01

    The location of hypothalamic paraventricular neurons projecting to sympathetic preganglionic levels and related to the autonomic regulation of various organs involved in glucose metabolism (OGM) was determined by ipsilateral injections of two fluorescent tracers, Diamidino Yellow into the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fast Blue into the left intermediolateral cell column of the T8-T9 spinal cord. Hypothalamospinal neurons were mainly located in the dorsal part of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) and the hypothalamobulbar neurons were most abundant in the ventral, medial and extreme lateral parts of the PVH. No double-labelled neurons were found in the hypothalamus. These results can help the knowledge of the neural hypothalamic network related with the autonomic hypothalamic control.

  18. The impact of adipose tissue-derived factors on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsanis, Christos; Dermitzaki, Eirini; Avgoustinaki, Pavlina; Malliaraki, Niki; Mytaras, Vasilis; Margioris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue produces factors, including adipokines, cytokines and chemokines which, when released, systemically exert endocrine effects on multiple tissues thereby affecting their physiology. Adipokines also affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis both centrally, at the hypothalamic-pituitary level, and peripherally acting on the gonads themselves. Among the adipokines, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin and the peptide kisspeptin have pleiotropic actions on the HPG axis affecting male and female fertility. Furthermore, adipokines and adipose tissue-produced factors readily affect the immune system resulting in inflammation, which in turn impact the HPG axis, thus evidencing a link between metabolic inflammation and fertility. In this review we provide an overview of the existing extensive bibliography on the crosstalk between adipose tissue-derived factors and the HPG axis, with particular focus on the impact of obesity and the metabolic syndrome on gonadal function and fertility.

  19. Function of hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian system in radiation treatment of patients with cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modnikov, O.P. (Kirgizskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Frunze (USSR))

    1984-08-01

    Radioimmunoassay of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian interrelationships was performed in 87 patients with cervical cancer and 37 practically healthy women. The basal level of the follicle-stimulating hormone (ESH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol as well as their response to the administration of the releasing factor of the hypothalamus (luliberin) were studied. Some disorders that manifested themselves in the decreased level of estradiol, were established in the patients with cervical cancer even before irradiation. Concomitant radiation therapy resulted in pronounced changes in the activities of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian system that manifested themselves in the lowered rate of LH increment in response to the administration of luliberin and the absence of estradiol response to the load. These changes persisted long after the termination of concomitant radiation therapy.

  20. Lateral Hypothalamic Control of the Ventral Tegmental Area: Reward Evaluation and the Driving of Motivated Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Susan M; de Lecea, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) plays an important role in many motivated behaviors, sleep-wake states, food intake, drug-seeking, energy balance, etc. It is also home to a heterogeneous population of neurons that express and co-express multiple neuropeptides including hypocretin (Hcrt), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and neurotensin (NT). These neurons project widely throughout the brain to areas such as the locus coeruleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdala and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Lateral hypothalamic projections to the VTA are believed to be important for driving behavior due to the involvement of dopaminergic reward circuitry. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge regarding the lateral hypothalamic connections to the VTA and the role they play in driving these behaviors.

  1. Lateral Hypothalamic Control of the Ventral Tegmental Area: Reward Evaluation and the Driving of Motivated Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Tyree

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The lateral hypothalamus (LH plays an important role in many motivated behaviors, sleep-wake states, food intake, drug-seeking, energy balance, etc. It is also home to a heterogeneous population of neurons that express and co-express multiple neuropeptides including hypocretin (Hcrt, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART and neurotensin (NT. These neurons project widely throughout the brain to areas such as the locus coeruleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdala and the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Lateral hypothalamic projections to the VTA are believed to be important for driving behavior due to the involvement of dopaminergic reward circuitry. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge regarding the lateral hypothalamic connections to the VTA and the role they play in driving these behaviors.

  2. Microglia Dictate the Impact of Saturated Fat Consumption on Hypothalamic Inflammation and Neuronal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Valdearcos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diets rich in saturated fat produce inflammation, gliosis, and neuronal stress in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH. Here, we show that microglia mediate this process and its functional impact. Although microglia and astrocytes accumulate in the MBH of mice fed a diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs, only the microglia undergo inflammatory activation, along with a buildup of hypothalamic SFAs. Enteric gavage specifically with SFAs reproduces microglial activation and neuronal stress in the MBH, and SFA treatment activates murine microglia, but not astrocytes, in culture. Moreover, depleting microglia abrogates SFA-induced inflammation in hypothalamic slices. Remarkably, depleting microglia from the MBH of mice abolishes inflammation and neuronal stress induced by excess SFA consumption, and in this context, microglial depletion enhances leptin signaling and reduces food intake. We thus show that microglia sense SFAs and orchestrate an inflammatory process in the MBH that alters neuronal function when SFA consumption is high.

  3. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  4. Effect of hypothalamic surgery on prolactin release induced by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgo, S; Kato, Y; Chihara, K; Imura, H; Maeda, K

    1976-12-01

    Intravenous injections of varying doses of 5-HTP (1, 3 and 5 mg/100 g body wt), a precursor of serotonin, caused a significant and dose-related increase in plasma prolactin concentrations in urethane-anesthetized rats. Increases in plasma prolactin concentrations caused by 5-HTP (1 mg/100 g body wt iv) were abolished by the concomitant administration of L-DOPA (2 mg/100 g body wt iv). Plasma prolactin levels were also significantly elevated following the injection of 5-HTP in rats with complete hypothalamic deafferentation, whereas 5-HTP had no significant effect on plasma prolactin levels in rats with extensive hypothalamic ablation. These results suggest that 5-HTP causes prolactin secretion by stimulating the serotoninergic mechanism in the hypothalamus.

  5. Hypothalamic, rectal, and muscle temperatures in exercising dogs - Effect of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanisms of performance prolongation during exercise is presented. Measurements were obtained of the rectal, muscle, and hypothalamic temperature of dogs during treadmill exercise at an ambient temperature of 22 + or - 1 C, with and without cooling by use of ice packs. In comparison with exercise without cooling, exercise with cooling was found to: (1) increase exercise duration from 90 + or - 14 to 145 + or - 15 min; (2) attenuate increases in hypothalamic, rectal and muscle temperature; (3) decrease respiratory and heart rates; and (4) lower blood lactic acid content. It is shown that although significant differences were found between the brain, core, and muscle temperatures during exercise with and without cooling, an inverse relation was observed between muscle temperature and the total duration of exercise. It is suggested that sustained muscle hyperthermia may have contributed to the limitation of working ability in exercise with and without cooling.

  6. Anatomy of melancholia: focus on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis overactivity and the role of vasopressin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinan, Timothy G

    2012-02-03

    Overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis characterized by hypercortisolism, adrenal hyperplasia and abnormalities in negative feedback is the most consistently described biological abnormality in melancholic depression. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are the main secretagogues of the HPA\\/stress system. Produced in the parvicellular division of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus the release of these peptides is influenced by inputs from monoaminergic neurones. In depression, anterior pituitary CRH1 receptors are down-regulated and response to CRH infusion is blunted. By contrast, vasopressin V3 receptors on the anterior pituitary show enhanced response to AVP stimulation and this enhancement plays a key role in maintaining HPA overactivity.

  7. The obesity-associated gene Negr1 regulates aspects of energy balance in rat hypothalamic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boender, Arjen J; van Gestel, Margriet A; Garner, Keith M; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Adan, Roger A H

    2014-07-01

    Neural growth regulator 1 (Negr1) is among the first common variants that have been associated with the regulation of body mass index. Using AAV technology directed to manipulate Negr1 expression in vivo, we find that decreased expression of Negr1 in periventricular hypothalamic areas leads to increases in body weight, presumably via increased food intake. Moreover, we observed that both increased and decreased levels of Negr1 lead to reduced locomotor activity and body temperature. In sum, our results provide further support for a role of hypothalamic expressed Negr1 in the regulation of energy balance. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Methods Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. Results The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. Conclusions This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia. PMID:26909312

  9. Endotoxemia-induced muscle wasting is associated with the change of hypothalamic neuropeptides in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kaipeng; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Bai, Xiaowu; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In critical patients, sepsis-induced muscle wasting is considered to be an important contributor to complications and mortality. Previous work mainly focuses on the peripheral molecular mechanism of muscle degradation, however little evidence exists for the role of central nervous system in the process. In the present study, we, for the first time, characterized the relationship between muscle wasting and central neuropeptide changes in a septic model. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. Twelve, 24 and 48 hrs after injection, skeletal muscle and hypothalamus tissues were harvested. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), as well as 3-methyl-histidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammatory marker expressions were also measured in three time points. LPS injection caused an increase expression of MuRF-1 and MAFbx, and a significant higher release of 3-MH and tyrosine. Hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) presented a dynamic change after LPS injection. Also, hypothalamic inflammatory markers, interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased substantially after LPS administration. Importantly, the expressions of POMC, AgRP and CART were well correlated with muscle atrophy gene, MuRF-1 expression. These findings suggest hypothalamic peptides and inflammation may participate in the sepsis-induced muscle wasting, but the exact mechanism needs further study.

  10. Diagnosis and treatent of hypothalamic amenorrhea%下丘脑性闭经的诊治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白文佩

    2008-01-01

    下丘脑性闭经是闭经的常见类型,需在排除垂体、卵巢或子宫性闭经之后才能作出诊断。下丘脑性闭经分为功能性下丘脑性闭经(functional hypothalamic amenorrhea,FHA)和器质性下丘脑性闭经。

  11. Early spontaneous regression of a hypothalamic/chiasmatic mass in neurofibromatosis type 1: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, G.; Ferrozzi, F.; Bassi, P. [Department of Radiology, University of Parma, V. Gramsci, 14, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Sigorini, M.; Virdis, R. [Department of Paediatrics, University of Parma, V. Gramsci, 14, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Bellomi, M. [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    A patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 was found to have an enhancing mass in the hypothalamus and in the anterior optic pathway. A 3-month MR study showed a reduction in the size and enhancement of the mass. At a 9-month MR follow-up the mass disappeared and ceased to enhance. This report shows the unusual behaviour of a hypothalamic/chiasmatic mass confirming that in such asymptomatic cases the conservative management can be considered the treatment of choice. (orig.)

  12. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present thesis deals with different aspects of population pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling of the male hypothalamic-pituitary-go-nadal (HPG) axis. The thesis consists of a summary report and five scientific research papers. An overview of the main topics covered in the thesis is provided in the summary report including PK/PD modelling in drug development, the pathological, physiological, and pharmacological aspects of the male HPG axis, and a detailed description of the ...

  13. Decreased hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone content and pituitary responsiveness in hypothyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Katakami, H; Downs, T. R.; Frohman, L A

    1986-01-01

    The effects of thyroidectomy (Tx) and thyroxine replacement (T4Rx) on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion and hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) concentration were compared to define the mechanism of hypothyroid-associated GH deficiency. Thyroidectomized rats exhibited a complete loss of pulsatile GH secretion with extensive reduction in GRH responsiveness and pituitary GH content. Cultured pituitary cells from Tx rats exhibited reduced GRH sensitivity, maximal GH responsiveness, and...

  14. Adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary hormones during intensive endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, T; Brechtel, L; Mai, K; Otto, B; Maser-Gluth, C; Pfeiffer, A F H; Spranger, J; Diederich, S

    2005-11-01

    Physical activity leads to changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary hormonal system. However, acute and long-term adaptations have not yet been precisely characterized. In this study, the changes of the hormonal system as a result of marathon training and running a marathon were examined. In particular, we focused on adaptations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, regarding the activation or inactivation of cortisol to cortisone by the 11beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase system (11beta-HSD). Patient measurements: 8 healthy women and 11 healthy men volunteered for this study. Blood samples, 24-h urine and a dexamethasone suppression test were analysed for metabolic and hormonal parameters at five different dates 12 weeks around a marathon. Cortisol and ACTH values decreased significantly 2 days after the marathon, whereas the activity of the whole body 11beta-HSD-1 was up-regulated. An increased suppression of cortisol levels was observed in the dexamethasone suppression test after 6 weeks of reduced training levels. Ghrelin was elevated 2 days after the marathon. Only minor changes in the other hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal axes could be observed. However, the free androgen index increased significantly after 6 weeks of reduced training. The HPA system appeared to become chronically activated by continuous physical training and therefore less sensitive to the dexamethasone suppression test. The acute stress of the marathon led to a central exhaustion of the HPA system with a paracrine counteraction by the activation of the 11beta-HSD system. Changes in the other hypothalamic-pituitary hormonal axes were the result of long-term differences in training levels and were not altered by the marathon.

  15. Hypothalamic effects of neonatal diet: reversible and only partially leptin dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominsky, Luba; Ziko, Ilvana; Nguyen, Thai-Xinh; Quach, Julie; Spencer, Sarah J

    2017-07-01

    Early life diet influences metabolic programming, increasing the risk for long-lasting metabolic ill health. Neonatally overfed rats have an early increase in leptin that is maintained long term and is associated with a corresponding elevation in body weight. However, the immediate and long-term effects of neonatal overfeeding on hypothalamic anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) circuitry, and if these are directly mediated by leptin, have not yet been examined. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal overfeeding on leptin-mediated development of hypothalamic POMC and AgRP/NPY neurons and whether these effects can be normalised by neonatal leptin antagonism in male Wistar rats. Neonatal overfeeding led to an acute (neonatal) resistance of hypothalamic neurons to exogenous leptin, but this leptin resistance was resolved by adulthood. While there were no effects of neonatal overfeeding on POMC immunoreactivity in neonates or adults, the neonatal overfeeding-induced early increase in arcuate nucleus (ARC) AgRP/NPY fibres was reversed by adulthood so that neonatally overfed adults had reduced NPY immunoreactivity in the ARC compared with controls, with no further differences in AgRP immunoreactivity. Short-term neonatal leptin antagonism did not reverse the excess body weight or hyperleptinaemia in the neonatally overfed, suggesting factors other than leptin may also contribute to the phenotype. Our findings show that changes in the availability of leptin during early life period influence the development of hypothalamic connectivity short term, but this is partly resolved by adulthood indicating an adaptation to the metabolic mal-programming effects of neonatal overfeeding. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Differential effects of central fructose and glucose on hypothalamic malonyl–CoA and food intake

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Seung Hun; Wolfgang, Michael; Tokutake, Yuka; Chohnan, Shigeru; Lane, M. Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The American diet, especially that of adolescents, contains highly palatable foods of high-energy content and large amounts of high-fructose sweeteners. These factors are believed to contribute to the obesity epidemic and insulin resistance. Previous investigations revealed that the central metabolism of glucose suppresses food intake mediated by the hypothalamic AMP-kinase/malonyl–CoA signaling system. Unlike glucose, centrally administered fructose increases food intake. Evidence presented ...

  17. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  18. Properties of native P2X receptors in large multipolar neurons dissociated from rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamori, Minoru; Sorimachi, Masaru

    2004-04-16

    ATP, the ligand of P2X receptors, is a candidate of neurotransmitter or co-transmitter in the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Anatomical studies have revealed the wide distribution of P2X receptors in the brain. So far, P2X-mediated small synaptic responses have been recorded in some brain regions. To determine the physiological significance of postsynaptic ATP receptors in the brain, we have investigated the P2X responses in rat dissociated hypothalamic arcuate neurons by using the patch-clamp technique. ATP evoked inward currents in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=42 microM) at a holding potential of -70 mV. The current-voltage relationship showed a marked inward rectification starting around -10 mV. Although neither 300 microM alphabeta-methylene-ATP nor 300 microM betagamma-methylene-ATP induced any currents, 100 microM ATPgammaS and 100 microM 2-methylthio-ATP evoked inward currents of which amplitude was about 60% of the control currents evoked by 100 microM ATP. PPADS, one of P2 receptor antagonists, inhibited the ATP-evoked currents in a time- and a concentration-dependent manners (IC(50)=19 microM at 2 min). Permeant Ca(2+) inhibited the ATP-evoked currents in the range of millimolars (IC(50)=7 mM); however, Cd(2+) (1-300 microM), a broad cation channel blocker, facilitated the currents with slow off-response. Zn(2+) in the range of 1-100 microM facilitated the currents whereas Zn(2+) at the concentrations over 100 microM inhibited the currents. These observations suggest that functional P2X receptors are expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. The most likely subunit combinations of the P2X receptors are P2X(2)-homomultimer and P2X(2)/P2X(6)-heteromultimer.

  19. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  20. Hypothalamic neurogenesis is not required for the improved insulin sensitivity following exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Melissa L; Lemus, Moyra; Reichenbach, Alex; Selathurai, Ahrathy; Oldfield, Brian J; Andrews, Zane B; Watt, Matthew J

    2014-11-01

    Neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) are important regulators of energy balance. Recent studies suggest that neurogenesis in the ARC is an important regulator of body mass in response to pharmacological stressors. Regular exercise training improves insulin action, and is a primary treatment modality for obesity and type 2 diabetes. We examined whether exercise training causes hypothalamic neurogenesis and whether this contributes to exercise-induced improvements in insulin action. Short-term exercise in adult mice induced a proneurogenic transcriptional program involving growth factors, cell proliferation, and neurogenic regulators in the hypothalamus. Daily exercise training for 7 days increased hypothalamic cell proliferation 3.5-fold above that of sedentary mice, and exercise-induced cell proliferation was maintained in diet-induced obese mice. Colocalization studies indicated negligible neurogenesis in the ARC of sedentary or exercise-trained mice. Blocking cell proliferation via administration of the mitotic blocker arabinosylcytosine (AraC) did not affect food intake or body mass in obese mice. While 4 weeks of exercise training improved whole-body insulin sensitivity compared with sedentary mice, insulin action was not affected by AraC administration. These data suggest that regular exercise training induces significant non-neuronal cell proliferation in the hypothalamus of obese mice, but this proliferation is not required for enhanced insulin action.

  1. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuronal circuits: impact on energy balance control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanuja eGali Ramamoorthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased globally at an alarming rate. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that adult obesity and associated metabolic disorders can be programmed by intrauterine and early postnatal environment- a phenomenon known as fetal programming of adult disease. Data from nutritional intervention studies in animals including maternal under- and over-nutrition support the developmental origins of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The hypothalamic neuronal circuits located in the arcuate nucleus controlling appetite and energy expenditure are set early in life and are perturbed by maternal nutritional insults. In this review, we focus on the effects of maternal nutrition in programming permanent changes in these hypothalamic circuits, with experimental evidence from animal models of maternal under- and over-nutrition. We discuss the epigenetic modifications which regulate hypothalamic gene expression as potential molecular mechanisms linking maternal diet during pregnancy to the offspring’s risk of obesity at a later age. Understanding these mechanisms in key metabolic genes may provide insights into the development of preventative intervention strategies.

  2. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  3. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  4. Pivotal role of median eminence tanycytes for hypothalamic function and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoti, Karine; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2017-04-15

    Along with the sub-ventricular zone of the forebrain lateral ventricles and the sub-granular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, the hypothalamus has recently emerged as a third gliogenic and neurogenic niche in the central nervous system. The hypothalamus is the main regulator of body homeostasis because it centralizes peripheral information to regulate crucial physiological functions through the pituitary gland and the autonomic nervous system. Its ability to sense signals originating outside the brain relies on its exposure to blood-born molecules through the median eminence, which is localized outside the blood brain barrier. Within the hypothalamus, a population of specialized radial glial cells, the tanycytes, control exposure to blood-born signals by acting both as sensors and regulators of the hypothalamic input and output. In addition, lineage-tracing experiments have recently revealed that tanycytes represent a population of hypothalamic stem cells, defining them as a pivotal cell type within the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic neurogenesis has moreover been shown to have an important role in feeding control and energy metabolism, which challenges previous knowledge and offers new therapeutic options.

  5. A hypothetic aging pathway from skin to hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus via slow wave sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Jian Cai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Many observations have demonstrated that the hypothalamic neuroendocrine change determines the chronological sequence of aging in mammals. However, it remains uncertain on the mechanism to account for the hypothalamic aging manifestations. In this article, it is pointed out that, as constantly exposed to sunshine and oxygen, the skin would undergo both telomere-shortening and oxidative senescent processes. The senescent alterations of skin, such as attenuation in electrodermal activities, would in turn reduce the emotional responses and memories. Whereas previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep just functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by accumulated emotional memories, especially capable of ameliorating the symptoms of depressed patients. Therefore, the reduction in emotional responses and memories from skin senescence would reduce the requirement for slow wave sleep in many senescent observations. The decrement in slow wave sleep would in further cause functional but not chronological degeneration of suprachiasmatic nucleus rather than paraventricular nucleus in hypothalamus. In these respects, from skin senescence to slow wave sleep, there forms a new degenerative aging pathway able to account for the hypothalamic chronological sequence of aging, specifically addressed to the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  6. A hypothetic aging pathway from skin to hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus via slow wave sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zi-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many observations have demonstrated that the hypothalamic neuroendocrine change determines the chronological sequence of aging in mammals. However, it remains uncertain on the mechanism to account for the hypothalamic aging manifestations. In this article, it is pointed out that, as constantly exposed to sunshine and oxygen, the skin would undergo both telomere-shortening and oxidative senescent processes. The senescent alterations of skin, such as attenuation in electrodermal activities, would in turn reduce the emotional responses and memories. Whereas previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep just functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by accumulated emotional memories, especially capable of ameliorating the symptoms of depressed patients. Therefore, the reduction in emotional responses and memories from skin senescence would reduce the requirement for slow wave sleep in many senescent observations. The decrement in slow wave sleep would in further cause functional but not chronological degeneration of suprachiasmatic nucleus rather than paraventricular nucleus in hypothalamus. In these respects, from skin senescence to slow wave sleep, there forms a new degenerative aging pathway able to account for the hypothalamic chronological sequence of aging, specifically addressed to the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  7. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Prada, Patrícia; Cintra, Dennys E; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Moraes, Juliana C; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pinho, Ricardo A; Carvalheira, José B C; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario A; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2009-05-15

    Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signalling in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats. Thus, we investigated the effects of the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusion of Foxo1-antisense oligonucleotide (Foxo1-ASO) and evaluated the food consumption and weight gain in normal and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Three days of Foxo1-ASO microinfusion reduced the hypothalamic Foxo1 expression by about 85%. i.c.v. infusion of Foxo1-ASO reduced the cumulative food intake (21%), body weight change (28%), epididymal fat pad weight (22%) and fasting serum insulin levels (19%) and increased the insulin sensitivity (34%) in DIO but not in control animals. Collectively, these data showed that the Foxo1-ASO treatment blocked the orexigenic effects of Foxo1 and prevented the hyperphagic response in obese rats. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of Foxo1 may be used to prevent or treat obesity.

  8. A sexually dimorphic hypothalamic response to chronic high-fat diet consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, E; Frank, A P; Palmer, B F; Rodriguez-Navas, C; Criollo, A; Clegg, D J

    2016-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the observations that, following chronic high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, male mice have higher levels of saturated fatty acids (FAs) and total sphingolipids, whereas lower amounts of polyunsaturated FAs in the central nervous system (CNS) than females. Furthermore, males, when compared with female mice, have higher levels of inflammatory markers in the hypothalamus following exposure to HFD. The increase in markers of inflammation in male mice is possibly due to the reductions in proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which is not recapitulated in female mice. Consistently, hypothalamic inflammation is induced both in male and female ERα total-body knockout mice when exposed to a HFD, thus confirming the key role of ERα in the regulation of HFD-induced hypothalamic inflammation. Finally, the HFD-induced depletion of hypothalamic ERα is associated with dysregulation in metabolic homeostasis, as evidenced by reductions in glucose tolerance and decrements in myocardial function.

  9. Exercise training does not enhance hypothalamic responsiveness to leptin or ghrelin in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M L; Andrews, Z B; Watt, M J

    2014-02-01

    The detection of hormone and nutrient signals by the hypothalamus is blunted in obesity and contributes to dysregulated energy homeostasis. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training would improve long-term hypothalamic sensitivity to both leptin and ghrelin, independent of acute exercise-induced signalling. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a chow or high-fat diet for 6 weeks, then remained sedentary on their respective diet, or completed 6 weeks of treadmill exercise training with a progressive increase in exercise volume and intensity. Food intake and hypothalamic signalling were assessed in mice injected with leptin or ghrelin at least 24 h after the last exercise bout. Exercise training reduced body mass, increased daily food intake and improved glucose tolerance. Intraperitoneal leptin administration reduced food intake in lean and obese mice, and this was not enhanced after exercise training. Leptin-mediated activation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus was not enhanced with exercise training. Ghrelin increased food intake and c-Fos positive neurones in the hypothalamus in lean and obese mice, and these physiological and molecular responses were not enhanced with exercise training. This suggests that the previously reported exercise effects on sensitising hypothalamic signalling and food intake responses may be limited to the period immediately after an exercise bout, and are not a result of stable structural or molecular changes that occur with exercise training. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  10. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Jean L

    2004-10-01

    Although the precise abnormalities that lead to failure of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains undefined, evidence exists for defects in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The lack of appropriate cyclic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by the hypothalamus leads to loss of normal pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) release by the pituitary, which results in impaired ovulation in women and reduced testosterone and sperm production in men. The cause of impaired cyclic release of GnRH is unclear, but hyperprolactinemia, elevated endorphins, and high levels of GnRH and LH caused by reduced clearance may contribute. Perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadaotropin axis in CKD lead to high rates of infertility, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and impaired puberty in children. Only through additional study of the complex effects of CKD on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis will the precise abnormalities in hormonal control of reproduction be explained.

  11. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuronal circuits: impact on energy balance control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Begum, Ghazala; Harno, Erika; White, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased globally at an alarming rate. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that adult obesity and associated metabolic disorders can be programmed by intrauterine and early postnatal environment- a phenomenon known as “fetal programming of adult disease.” Data from nutritional intervention studies in animals including maternal under- and over-nutrition support the developmental origins of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The hypothalamic neuronal circuits located in the arcuate nucleus controlling appetite and energy expenditure are set early in life and are perturbed by maternal nutritional insults. In this review, we focus on the effects of maternal nutrition in programming permanent changes in these hypothalamic circuits, with experimental evidence from animal models of maternal under- and over-nutrition. We discuss the epigenetic modifications which regulate hypothalamic gene expression as potential molecular mechanisms linking maternal diet during pregnancy to the offspring's risk of obesity at a later age. Understanding these mechanisms in key metabolic genes may provide insights into the development of preventative intervention strategies. PMID:25954145

  12. RhodamineB increases hypothalamic cell apoptosis and disrupts hormonal balance in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DewiRatnaSulistina; RettyRatnawati; I WayanArsanaWiyasa

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether orally exposure to rhodamineB could be changes the expression ofBax,Bcl-2 of the hypothalamic, and also levels ofFollicleStimulatingHormone (FSH) andLuteinizingHormone(LH) in female rats.Methods:Twenty eight virgin femaleWistar rats were divided into four groups, including control group, group exposed to dose of4.5,9 and18 milligram/200 gram body weight(mg/200 gBW) of rhodamineB daily for36 days.The hypothalamic expressions ofBax andBcl-2 were examined immunohistochemically.The levels of serumFSH andLH were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) technique.Results:The level ofBax was significantly higher in the rhodamineB treatment group compred to control group(P<0.05).Out of the4.5,9, and18 mg/200 gBW doses of rhodamine B treatment, only the two highest doses significantly decreased theBcl-2 levels compared to the control group(P<0.05).The serumFSH andLH levels were significantly lower in all dose's rhodamineB treatment groups compared with the control(P<0.05).Conclusion:In conclusion, rhodamineB increases hypothalamic cell apoptosis and disrupts hormonal balance in rats.

  13. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuronal circuits: impact on energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Begum, Ghazala; Harno, Erika; White, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased globally at an alarming rate. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that adult obesity and associated metabolic disorders can be programmed by intrauterine and early postnatal environment- a phenomenon known as "fetal programming of adult disease." Data from nutritional intervention studies in animals including maternal under- and over-nutrition support the developmental origins of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The hypothalamic neuronal circuits located in the arcuate nucleus controlling appetite and energy expenditure are set early in life and are perturbed by maternal nutritional insults. In this review, we focus on the effects of maternal nutrition in programming permanent changes in these hypothalamic circuits, with experimental evidence from animal models of maternal under- and over-nutrition. We discuss the epigenetic modifications which regulate hypothalamic gene expression as potential molecular mechanisms linking maternal diet during pregnancy to the offspring's risk of obesity at a later age. Understanding these mechanisms in key metabolic genes may provide insights into the development of preventative intervention strategies.

  14. Understanding how discrete populations of hypothalamic neurons orchestrate complicated behavioral states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison eGraebner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A major question in systems neuroscience is how a single population of neurons can interact with the rest of the brain to orchestrate complex behavioral states. The hypothalamus contains many such discrete neuronal populations that individually regulate arousal, feeding, and drinking. For example, hypothalamic neurons that express hypocretin (Hcrt neuropeptides can sense homeostatic and metabolic factors affecting wakefulness and orchestrate organismal arousal. Neurons that express agouti-related protein (AgRP can sense the metabolic needs of the body and orchestrate a state of hunger. The organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT can detect the hypertonicity of blood and orchestrate a state of thirst. Each hypothalamic population is sufficient to generate complicated behavioral states through the combined efforts of distinct efferent projections. The principal challenge to understanding these brain systems is therefore to determine the individual roles of each downstream projection for each behavioral state. In recent years, the development and application of temporally precise, genetically encoded tools have greatly improved our understanding of the structure and function of these neural systems. This review will survey recent advances in our understanding of how these individual hypothalamic populations can orchestrate complicated behavioral states due to the combined efforts of individual downstream projections.

  15. Gene structure and expression of serotonin receptor HTR2C in hypothalamic samples from infanticidal and control sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quilter Claire R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin pathways have been implicated in behavioural phenotypes in a number of species, including human, rat, mouse, dog and chicken. Components of the pathways, including the receptors, are major targets for drugs used to treat a variety of physiological and psychiatric conditions in humans. In our previous studies we have identified genetic loci potentially contributing to maternal infanticide in pigs, which includes a locus on the porcine X chromosome long arm. The serotonin receptor HTR2C maps to this region, and is therefore an attractive candidate for further study based on its function and its position in the genome. Results In this paper we describe the structure of the major transcripts produced from the porcine HTR2C locus using cDNA prepared from porcine hypothalamic and pooled total brain samples. We have confirmed conservation of sites altered by RNA editing in other mammalian species, and identified polymorphisms in the gene sequence. Finally, we have analysed expression and editing of HTR2C in hypothalamus samples from infanticidal and control animals. Conclusions The results confirm that although the expression of the long transcriptional variant of HTR2C is raised in infanticidal animals, the overall patterns of editing in the hypothalamus are similar between the two states. Sequences associated with the cDNA and genomic structures of HTR2C reported in this paper are deposited in GenBank under accession numbers FR720593, FR720594 and FR744452.

  16. ARGININE VASOPRESSIN GENE EXPRESSION IN SUPRAOPTIC NUCLEUS AND PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS OF HYPOTHALAMOUS FOLLOWING CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Background. Our previous studies indicated that the increased arginine vasopressin(AVP) in ischemic brain regions of gerbils could exacerbate the ischemic brain edema. This experiments is further clarify the relation between AVP and cerebral ischemia at the molecular level. Methods. The contents of AVP, AVP mRNA, AVP immunoreactive(ir) neurons in supraoptic nucleus(SON)and paraventricular nucleus(PVN) after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were respectively determined by radioim-munoassay(RIA), immunocytochemistry( Ⅱ C), situ hybridization and computed image pattem analysis. Results. The contents of AVP in SON, PVN were increased, and the AVP ir positive neurons in SON and PVN were also significantly increased as compared with the controls after ischemia and reperfusion. And there were very light staining of AVP ir positive neurons in the other brain areas such as suprachiasmatic nucleus (SC) and periven-tricular hypothalamic nucleus (PE), but these have no significant changes as compared with the controls. During dif-ferent periods of cerebral ischemia (30~ 120 min) and reperfusion (30 min), AVP mRNA expression in SON and PVN were more markedly increased than the controls. Condusions. The transcription of AVP gene elevated, then promoting synthesis and release of AVP in SON,PVN. Under the specific condition of cerebral ischemia and repeffusion, the activity and contents of central AVP in-creased abnormally is one of the important factors which causes ischemia brain damage.

  17. Short photoperiod-induced decrease of histamine H3 receptors facilitates activation of hypothalamic neurons in the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, P; van den Top, M; Wilson, D; Mercer, J G; Song, C K; Bartness, T J; Morgan, P J; Spanswick, D

    2009-08-01

    Nonhibernating seasonal mammals have adapted to temporal changes in food availability through behavioral and physiological mechanisms to store food and energy during times of predictable plenty and conserve energy during predicted shortage. Little is known, however, of the hypothalamic neuronal events that lead to a change in behavior or physiology. Here we show for the first time that a shift from long summer-like to short winter-like photoperiod, which induces physiological adaptation to winter in the Siberian hamster, including a body weight decrease of up to 30%, increases neuronal activity in the dorsomedial region of the arcuate nucleus (dmpARC) assessed by electrophysiological patch-clamping recording. Increased neuronal activity in short days is dependent on a photoperiod-driven down-regulation of H3 receptor expression and can be mimicked in long-day dmpARC neurons by the application of the H3 receptor antagonist, clobenproprit. Short-day activation of dmpARC neurons results in increased c-Fos expression. Tract tracing with the trans-synaptic retrograde tracer, pseudorabies virus, delivered into adipose tissue reveals a multisynaptic neuronal sympathetic outflow from dmpARC to white adipose tissue. These data strongly suggest that increased activity of dmpARC neurons, as a consequence of down-regulation of the histamine H3 receptor, contributes to the physiological adaptation of body weight regulation in seasonal photoperiod.

  18. Nature's food anticipatory experiment: entrainment of locomotor behavior, suprachiasmatic and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei by suckling in rabbit pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, Mario; Tovar, Anibal; Silver, Rae; Mogado, Elvira; Meza, Enrique; Zavaleta, Yael; Juárez, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    In nature and under laboratory conditions, dams nurse rabbit pups once daily for a duration of fewer than 5 min. The present study explored neural mechanisms mediating the timing of nursing in this natural model of food anticipatory activity, focussing on the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the locus of the master circadian clock and on the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a region implicated in timing of food-entrained behavior. Rabbit pups are born in the dark, with eyelids closed. Nursing visits to the litters also occurs during the dark phase. To explore the effect of the timing of feeding, pups were maintained in constant darkness, while females housed in a light-dark cycle were permitted to nurse their pups either during the night (night-fed group) or day (day-fed group). All pups exhibited anticipatory locomotor activity before daily nursing. In the SCN, PER1 and FOS peaked during the night in both groups, with a longer duration of elevated protein expression in the night-fed group. In contrast, DMH peak PER1 expression occurred 8 h after pups were fed, corresponding to the shift in timing of nursing. Comparison of nursed and 48 h fasted pups indicates that the timing of PER1 expression was similar in the SCN and DMH, with fewer PER1-positive cells in the latter group. The results indicate that rabbit pups show food anticipatory activity, and that timing of nursing differentially affects PER1 expression in the SCN and DMH.

  19. Different effects on bone strength and cell differentiation in pre pubertal caloric restriction versus hypothalamic suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R N; Safadi, F F; Barbe, M F; Del Carpio-Cano, Fe; Popoff, S N; Yingling, V R

    2011-10-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea and energy restriction during puberty affect peak bone mass accrual. One hypothesis suggests energy restriction alters hypothalamic function resulting in suppressed estradiol levels leading to bone loss. However, both positive and negative results have been reported regarding energy restriction and bone strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate energy restriction and hypothalamic suppression during pubertal onset on bone mechanical strength and the osteogenic capacity of bone marrow-derived cells in two models: female rats treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRH-a) or 30% energy restriction. At 23 days of age, female Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: control group (C, n=10), GnRH-a group (n=10), and Energy Restriction (ER, n=12) group. GnRH-a animals received daily injections for 27 days. The animals in the ER group received 70% of the control animals' intake. After sacrifice (50 days of age), body weight, uterine and muscle weights were measured. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells were cultured and assayed for proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts. Outcome measures included bone strength, bone histomorphometry and architecture, serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin. GnRH-a suppressed uterine weight, decreased osteoblast proliferation, bone strength, trabecular bone volume and architecture compared to control. Elevated serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin levels and body weight were found. The ER model had an increase in osteoblast proliferation compared to the GnRH-a group, similar bone strength relative to body weight and increased trabecular bone volume in the lumbar spine compared to control. The ER animals were smaller but had developed bone strength sufficient for their size. In contrast, suppressed estradiol via hypothalamic suppression resulted in bone strength deficits and trabecular bone volume loss. In summary, our results support the hypothesis that during periods of

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of oxytocin receptors in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, M L; Petrusz, P; Suzuki, K; Marson, L; Pedersen, C A

    2013-12-03

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) regulates rodent, primate and human social behaviors and stress responses. OT binding studies employing (125)I-d(CH2)5-[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH2(9)] ornithine vasotocin ((125)I-OTA), has been used to locate and quantify OT receptors (OTRs) in numerous areas of the rat brain. This ligand has also been applied to locating OTRs in the human brain. The results of the latter studies, however, have been brought into question because of subsequent evidence that (125)I-OTA is much less selective for OTR vs. vasopressin receptors in the primate brain. Previously we used a monoclonal antibody directed toward a region of the human OTR to demonstrate selective immunostaining of cell bodies and fibers in the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area and ventral septum of a cynomolgus monkey (Boccia et al., 2001). The present study employed the same monoclonal antibody to study the location of OTRs in tissue blocks containing cortical, limbic and brainstem areas dissected from fixed adult, human female brains. OTRs were visualized in discrete cell bodies and/or fibers in the central and basolateral regions of the amygdala, medial preoptic area (MPOA), anterior and ventromedial hypothalamus, olfactory nucleus, vertical limb of the diagonal band, ventrolateral septum, anterior cingulate and hypoglossal and solitary nuclei. OTR staining was not observed in the hippocampus (including CA2 and CA3), parietal cortex, raphe nucleus, nucleus ambiguus or pons. These results suggest that there are some similarities, but also important differences, in the locations of OTRs in human and rodent brains. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) utilizing a monoclonal antibody provides specific localization of OTRs in the human brain and thereby provides opportunity to further study OTR in human development and psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regionalism, Regionalization and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu C. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained development is a concept associating other concepts, in its turn, in the EU practice, e.g. regionalism, regionalizing and afferent policies, here including structural policies. This below text, dedicated to integration concepts, will limit on the other hand to regionalizing, otherwise an aspect typical to Europe and to the EU. On the other hand, two aspects come up to strengthen this field of ideas, i.e. the region (al-regionalism-(regional development triplet has either its own history or precise individual outline of terms.

  2. A difference in hypothalamic structure between heterosexual and homosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVay, S

    1991-08-30

    The anterior hypothalamus of the brain participates in the regulation of male-typical sexual behavior. The volumes of four cell groups in this region [interstitial nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH) 1, 2, 3, and 4] were measured in postmortem tissue from three subject groups: women, men who were presumed to be heterosexual, and homosexual men. No differences were found between the groups in the volumes of INAH 1, 2, or 4. As has been reported previously, INAH 3 was more than twice as large in the heterosexual men as in the women. It was also, however, more than twice as large in the heterosexual men as in the homosexual men. This finding indicates that INAH is dimorphic with sexual orientation, at least in men, and suggests that sexual orientation has a biological substrate.

  3. Dorsomedial hypothalamic GABA regulates anxiety in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, A; Katner, J S

    1995-02-01

    Blockade of GABAA function in the region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of rats is known to elicit a constellation of physiologic responses including increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate, and plasma catecholamine levels, as well as behavioral responses such as increases in locomotor activity and anxiogenic-like effects as measured in a conflict test and the elevated plus-maze test. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of microinjecting GABAA antagonists bicuculline methiodide (BMI) and picrotoxin, as well as the GABAA agonist muscimol, into the DMH of rats placed in the social interaction (SI) test. Muscimol decreased HR and BP but increased SI, whereas the GABA antagonists increased HR and BP but decreased SI time. Blocking the HR changes elicited by GABAergic drugs injected into the DMH with systemic injections of atenolol and atropine methylbromide did not block their effects on SI.

  4. Verbal descriptors influence hypothalamic response to low-calorie drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Maria G.; Nachtigal, Danielle J.; Flammer, Linda J.; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Small, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Messages describing foods constitute a pervasive form of reward cueing. Different descriptions may produce particular appeal depending upon the individual. To examine the extent to which verbal descriptors and individual differences interact to influence food preferences, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain responses to the same low-calorie drinks preceded by the spoken verbal descriptor “treat” or “healthy” in 27 subjects varying in BMI, eating style and reward sensitivity. Subjects also sampled a prototypical milkshake treat. Despite the fact that the verbal descriptor had no influence on pleasantness ratings, preferential responses to the low-calorie drinks labeled “treat” vs. “healthy” were observed in the midbrain and hypothalamus. These same regions were also preferentially responsive to the prototypical treat. These results reveal a previously undocumented influence of verbal descriptors on brain circuits regulating energy homeostasis. PMID:24049739

  5. [Effect of the intermittent hypoxic training on the functioning of peptidergic neurons of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and brain stem neurons in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A V

    1998-03-01

    Internittent hypoxic training (IHT) increased the quantity and secretory activity of peptidergic neurons of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PHN) and activated neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of n.vagus. These structures seem to take part in realisation of the IHT activating effect on condition of the pancreatic delta-cells. The effect involves insulin-stimulating and insuloprotective effects realised via hypothalamic and neuro-conducting ways of regulation of the endocrine pancreas with a direct participation of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

  6. Hypothalamic Non-AgRP, Non-POMC GABAergic Neurons Are Required for Postweaning Feeding and NPY Hyperphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ran; Wu, Zhaofei; Sun, Hao; Xu, Yuanzhong; Mangieri, Leandra R; Xu, Yong; Tong, Qingchun

    2015-07-22

    The hypothalamus is critical for feeding and body weight regulation. Prevailing studies focus on hypothalamic neurons that are defined by selectively expressing transcription factors or neuropeptides including those expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptides (AgRP). The Cre expression driven by the pancreas-duodenum homeobox 1 promoter is abundant in several hypothalamic nuclei but not in AgRP or POMC neurons. Using this line, we generated mice with disruption of GABA release from a major subset of non-POMC, non-AgRP GABAergic neurons in the hypothalamus. These mice exhibited a reduction in postweaning feeding and growth, and disrupted hyperphagic responses to NPY. Disruption of GABA release severely diminished GABAergic input to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). Furthermore, disruption of GABA-A receptor function in the PVH also reduced postweaning feeding and blunted NPY-induced hyperphagia. Given the limited knowledge on postweaning feeding, our results are significant in identifying GABA release from a major subset of less appreciated hypothalamic neurons as a key mediator for postweaning feeding and NPY hyperphagia, and the PVH as one major downstream site that contributes significantly to the GABA action. Significance statement: Prevalent studies on feeding in the hypothalamus focus on well characterized, selective groups neurons [e.g., proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons], and as a result, the role of the majority of other hypothalamic neurons is largely neglected. Here, we demonstrated an important role for GABAergic projections from non-POMC non-AgRP neurons to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in promoting postweaning (mainly nocturnal) feeding and mediating NPY-induced hyperphagia. Thus, these results signify an importance to study those yet to be defined hypothalamic neurons in the regulation of energy balance and reveal a neural basis for postweaning (nocturnal) feeding and

  7. Variations in Phase and Amplitude of Rhythmic Clock Gene Expression across Prefrontal Cortex, Hippocampus, Amygdala, and Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei of Male and Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Lauren E; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Morton, Sarah; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The molecular circadian clock is a self-regulating transcription/translation cycle of positive (Bmal1, Clock/Npas2) and negative (Per1,2,3, Cry1,2) regulatory components. While the molecular clock has been well characterized in the body's master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), only a few studies have examined both the positive and negative clock components in extra-SCN brain tissue. Furthermore, there has yet to be a direct comparison of male and female clock gene expression in the brain. This comparison is warranted, as there are sex differences in circadian functioning and disorders associated with disrupted clock gene expression. This study examined basal clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 mRNA) in the SCN, prefrontal cortex (PFC), rostral agranular insula, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), amygdala, and hippocampus of male and female rats at 4-h intervals throughout a 12:12 h light:dark cycle. There was a significant rhythm of Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the SCN, PFC, insula, PVN, subregions of the hippocampus, and amygdala with a 24-h period, suggesting the importance of an oscillating molecular clock in extra-SCN brain regions. There were 3 distinct clock gene expression profiles across the brain regions, indicative of diversity among brain clocks. Although, generally, the clock gene expression profiles were similar between male and female rats, there were some sex differences in the robustness of clock gene expression (e.g., females had fewer robust rhythms in the medial PFC, more robust rhythms in the hippocampus, and a greater mesor in the medial amygdala). Furthermore, females with a regular estrous cycle had attenuated aggregate rhythms in clock gene expression in the PFC compared with noncycling females. This suggests that gonadal hormones may modulate the expression of the molecular clock.

  8. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy.

  9. Hypothalamic circuits regulating appetite and energy homeostasis: pathways to obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Timper

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ‘obesity epidemic’ represents a major global socioeconomic burden that urgently calls for a better understanding of the underlying causes of increased weight gain and its associated metabolic comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. Improving our understanding of the cellular basis of obesity could set the stage for the development of new therapeutic strategies. The CNS plays a pivotal role in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. Distinct neuronal cell populations, particularly within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, sense the nutrient status of the organism and integrate signals from peripheral hormones including pancreas-derived insulin and adipocyte-derived leptin to regulate calorie intake, glucose metabolism and energy expenditure. The arcuate neurons are tightly connected to other specialized neuronal subpopulations within the hypothalamus, but also to various extrahypothalamic brain regions, allowing a coordinated behavioral response. This At a Glance article gives an overview of the recent knowledge, mainly derived from rodent models, regarding the CNS-dependent regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, and illustrates how dysregulation of the neuronal networks involved can lead to overnutrition and obesity. The potential impact of recent research findings in the field on therapeutic treatment strategies for human obesity is also discussed.

  10. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript is present in hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurones and is released to the hypothalamic-pituitary portal circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P J; Seier, V; Fink-Jensen, A

    2003-01-01

    -opiomelanocortin in the ventrolateral part, but completely absent from neuroendocrine neurones of the dorsomedial part. To assess the possible role of CART as a hypothalamic-releasing factor, immunoreactive CART was measured in blood samples from the long portal vessels connecting the median eminence with the anterior pituitary gland....... Adult male rats were anaesthetized and the infundibular stalk exposed via a transpharyngeal approach. The long portal vessels were transected and blood collected in 30-min periods (one prestimulatory and three poststimulatory periods). Compared to systemic venous plasma samples, baseline concentrations...... of immunoreactive CART were elevated in portal plasma. Exposure to sodium nitroprusside hypotension triggered a two-fold elevation of portal CART42-89 immunoreactivity throughout the 90-min stimulation period. In contrast, the concentration of portal plasma CART immunoreactivity dropped in the vehicle infused rats...

  11. Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal drive is associated with decreased appetite and hypoactivation of food motivation neurocircuitry in anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Elizabeth A.; Holsen, Laura M.; DeSanti, Rebecca; Santin, McKale; Meenaghan, Erinne; Herzog, David B.; Goldstein, Jill M.; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-mediated hypercortisolemia has been demonstrated in anorexia nervosa (anorexia), a psychiatric disorder characterized by food restriction despite low body weight. While CRH is anorexigenic, downstream cortisol stimulates hunger. Using a food-related fMRI paradigm, we have demonstrated hypoactivation of brain regions involved in food motivation in women with anorexia, even after weight-recovery. The relationship between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation and appetite, and the association with food motivation neurocircuitry hypoactivation is unknown in anorexia. We investigated the relationship between HPA activity, appetite and food motivation neurocircuitry hypoactivation in anorexia. Design Cross-sectional study of 36 women [13 anorexia (AN), 10 weight-recovered AN (ANWR), 13 healthy controls (HC)]. Methods Peripheral cortisol and ACTH levels were measured fasting and 30, 60, and 120min after a standardized mixed meal. The Visual Analogue Scale was used to assess homeostatic and hedonic appetite. fMRI was performed during visual processing of food and non-food stimuli to measure brain activation pre- and post-meal. Results In each group, serum cortisol levels decreased following the meal. Mean fasting, 120min post-meal, and nadir cortisol levels were high in AN vs. HC. Mean postprandial ACTH levels were high in ANWR compared to HC and AN. Cortisol levels were associated with lower fasting homeostatic and hedonic appetite, independent of BMI and depressive symptoms. Cortisol levels were also associated with between-group variance in activation in food-motivation brain regions (e.g., hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, OFC and insula). Conclusions HPA activation may contribute to the maintenance of anorexia by suppression of appetitive drive. PMID:23946275

  12. Leptin plasma concentrations, leptin gene expression, and protein localization in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes of the European beaver (Castor fiber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowska, Katarzyna; Czerwinska, Joanna; Kaminski, Tadeusz; Kaminska, Barbara; Kurzynska, Aleksandra; Bogacka, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    The European beaver (Castor fiber) is the largest seasonal free-living rodent in Eurasia. Since the physiology and endocrine system of this species remains unknown, the present study aimed to determine plasma leptin concentrations and the expression of the leptin gene and protein in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPG and HPA) axes of beavers during breeding (April), postbreeding (July), and prebreeding (November) seasons. Leptin plasma concentrations did not change in females, whereas in males, leptin plasma concentrations were higher in July than those in April. The presence of leptin mRNA and protein was found in all examined tissues. In females, leptin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus, pituitary, ovaries, and myometrium was markedly higher in July than that in April. In males, leptin mRNA levels varied across the examined tissues of the HPG and HPA. Leptin synthesis increased in the hypothalamus during breeding and postbreeding seasons, but seasonal changes were not observed in the pituitary. In turn, testicular leptin levels were higher during breeding and prebreeding stages. Seasonal differences in the concentrations of leptin mRNA were also observed in the adrenal cortex. In males, leptin mRNA levels were higher in November than those in April or July. In females, leptin synthesis increased in the adrenal cortex during pregnancy relative to other seasons. This is the first ever study to demonstrate seasonal differences in leptin expression in beaver tissues, and our results could suggest that leptin is involved in the regulation of the HPG and HPA axes during various stages of the reproductive cycle in beavers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Normalization of hypothalamic serotonin (5-HT 1B) receptor and NPY in cancer anorexia after tumor resection: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Irina G; Meguid, Michael M; Gatto, Louis; Chen, Chung; Ramos, Eduardo J B; Goncalves, Carolina G; Ugrumov, Michael V

    2005-08-05

    Tumor growth leads to anorexia and decreased food intake, the regulation of which is via the integrated hypothalamic peptidergic and monoaminergic system. Serotonin (5-HT), an anorectic monoamine acts primarily via 5-HT 1B-receptors in hypothalamic nuclei while neuropeptide Y (NPY) acts an orexigenic peptide. We previously reported that 5-HT 1B-receptors are up regulated while NPY is down regulated in tumor-bearing (TB)-related anorexia, contributing to food intake reduction. In anorectic TB rats we hypothesize that after tumor resection when food intake has reverted to normal, normalization of 5-HT 1B-receptor and NPY will occur. The aim of this study was to demonstrate normalization of these hypothalamic changes compared to Controls. In anorectic tumor-bearing rats after tumor resection (TB-R) and in sham-operated (Control) rats, distribution of 5-HT 1B-receptors and NPY in hypothalamic nuclei was analyzed using peroxidase antiperoxidase immunocytochemical methods. Image analysis of immunostaining was performed and the data were statistically analyzed. Immunostaining specificity was controlled by omission of primary or secondary antibodies and pre-absorption test. Our results show that after TB-R versus Controls a normalization of food intake, 5-H-1B-receptor and NPY expression in the hypothalamus occurs. These data, discussed in context with our previous studies, support the hypothesis that tumor resection results not only in normalization of food intake but also in reversible changes of anorectic and orexigenic hypothalamic modulators.

  14. Deficiency of PTP1B Attenuates Hypothalamic Inflammation via Activation of the JAK2-STAT3 Pathway in Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Tsunekawa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B regulates leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons via the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. PTP1B has also been implicated in the regulation of inflammation in the periphery. However, the role of PTP1B in hypothalamic inflammation, which is induced by a high-fat diet (HFD, remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that STAT3 phosphorylation (p-STAT3 was increased in microglia in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of PTP1B knock-out mice (KO on a HFD, accompanied by decreased Tnf and increased Il10 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus compared to wild-type mice (WT. In hypothalamic organotypic cultures, incubation with TNFα led to increased p-STAT3, accompanied by decreased Tnf and increased Il10 mRNA expression, in KO compared to WT. Incubation with p-STAT3 inhibitors or microglial depletion eliminated the differences in inflammation between genotypes. These data indicate an important role of JAK2-STAT3 signaling negatively regulated by PTP1B in microglia, which attenuates hypothalamic inflammation under HFD conditions.

  15. Electrochemical stimulation of plasma LH and hypothalamic norepinephrine concentrations at short- and long-term intervals after hypothalamic knife cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, C P; Saporta, S

    1985-11-18

    Norepinephrine (NE) concentrations in several diencephalic locations were studied in female rats in conjunction with luteinizing hormone (LH) release after medial preoptic area (MPOA) stimulation at short (7 days) and longer time intervals after surgical interruption of anterior or anterolateral neural connections of mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Concentrations of diencephalic NE were altered in two general ways after brain surgery: (1) transient early postoperative increases in some regions which appeared unrelated to the type of surgery performed; and (2) other specific decreases in NE concentration which were related to the types of surgery performed and whether a particular ascending noradrenergic pathway was interrupted. At 180 days after surgery, these two types of change in NE concentrations were no longer present. Maximum increases in plasma LH concentrations observed after electrochemical stimulation of the MPOA at either 7 or 180 days after MBH deafferentation also varied according to: (1) the postoperative interval studied; and (2) the location of pathway interruption. Interruption of anterior MBH pathways showed only a transient (7 day interval) reduction in LH release after MPOA stimulation, whereas when both lateral and anterior pathways were severed, there was a more nearly permanent (180 day interval) disruption of LH release after stimulation. The results of these studies support the contention that anterolateral MBH neural connections may constitute a dynamic neural substrate contributing to a gradual improvement in neuroendocrine function observed after early surgical disconnections.

  16. Distinct α subunit variations of the hypothalamic GABAA receptor triplets (αβγ are linked to hibernating state in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alò Raffaella

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural arrangement of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR is known to be crucial for the maintenance of cerebral-dependent homeostatic mechanisms during the promotion of highly adaptive neurophysiological events of the permissive hibernating rodent, i.e the Syrian golden hamster. In this study, in vitro quantitative autoradiography and in situ hybridization were assessed in major hypothalamic nuclei. Reverse Transcription Reaction-Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR tests were performed for specific GABAAR receptor subunit gene primers synthases of non-hibernating (NHIB and hibernating (HIB hamsters. Attempts were made to identify the type of αβγ subunit combinations operating during the switching ON/OFF of neuronal activities in some hypothalamic nuclei of hibernators. Results Both autoradiography and molecular analysis supplied distinct expression patterns of all α subunits considered as shown by a strong (p 1 ratio (over total α subunits considered in the present study in the medial preoptic area (MPOA and arcuate nucleus (Arc of NHIBs with respect to HIBs. At the same time α2 subunit levels proved to be typical of periventricular nucleus (Pe and Arc of HIB, while strong α4 expression levels were detected during awakening state in the key circadian hypothalamic station, i.e. the suprachiasmatic nucleus (Sch; 60%. Regarding the other two subunits (β and γ, elevated β3 and γ3 mRNAs levels mostly characterized MPOA of HIBs, while prevalently elevated expression concentrations of the same subunits were also typical of Sch, even though this time during the awakening state. In the case of Arc, notably elevated levels were obtained for β3 and γ2 during hibernating conditions. Conclusion We conclude that different αβγ subunits are operating as major elements either at the onset of torpor or during induction of the arousal state in the Syrian golden hamster. The identification of a brain regional

  17. High ambient temperature reverses hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in an animal model of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, E; Churruca, I; Zárate, J; Carrera, O; Portillo, M P; Cerrato, M; Vázquez, R; Echevarría, E

    2009-04-01

    The potential involvement of the melanocortin system in the beneficial effects of heat application in rats submitted to activity-based anorexia (ABA), an analogous model of anorexia nervosa (AN), was studied. Once ABA rats had lost 20% of body weight, half of the animals were exposed to a high ambient temperature (HAT) of 32 degrees C, whereas the rest were maintained at 21 degrees C. Control sedentary rats yoked to ABA animals received the same treatment. ABA rats (21 degrees C) showed increased Melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptor and Agouti gene Related Peptide (AgRP) expression, and decreased pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels (Real Time PCR), with respect to controls. Heat application increased weight gain and food intake, and reduced running rate in ABA rats, when compared with ABA rats at 21 degrees C. However, no changes in body weight and food intake were observed in sedentary rats exposed to heat. Moreover, heat application reduced MC4 receptor, AgRP and POMC expression in ABA rats, but no changes were observed in control rats. These results indicate that hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression could occur on the basis of the characteristic hyperactivity, weight loss, and self-starvation of ABA rats, and suggest the involvement of hypothalamic melanocortin neural circuits in behavioural changes shown by AN patients. Changes in AgRP and POMC expression could represent an adaptative response to equilibrate energy balance. Moreover, the fact that HAT reversed hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in ABA rats indicates the involvement of brain melanocortin system in the reported beneficial effects of heat application in AN. A combination of MC4 receptor antagonists and heat application could improve the clinical management of AN.

  18. Hypothalamic neuropeptide expression following chronic food restriction in sedentary and wheel-running rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijke, C E; Hillebrand, J J G; Verhagen, L A W; Roeling, T A P; Adan, R A H

    2005-10-01

    When rats are given access to a running-wheel in combination with food restriction, they will become hyperactive and decrease their food intake, a paradoxical phenomenon known as activity-based anorexia (ABA). Little is known about the regulation of the hypothalamic neuropeptides that are involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance during the development of ABA. Therefore, rats were killed during the development of ABA, before they entered a state of severe starvation. Neuropeptide mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR on punches of separate hypothalamic nuclei. As is expected in a state of negative energy balance, expression levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were increased 5-fold in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of food-restricted running ABA rats vs 2-fold in sedentary food-restricted controls. The co-regulated expression of AgRP and NPY strongly correlated with relative body weight and white adipose tissue mass. Arcuate expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was reduced 2-fold in the ABA group. In second-order neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) mRNA expression was upregulated 2-fold in food-restricted running rats, but not in food-restricted sedentary controls. Prepro-orexin, CART and corticotropin-releasing hormone expression levels in the LHA and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were unchanged in both food-restricted groups. From this study it was concluded that during the development of ABA, neuropeptides in first-order neurons in the ARC and MCH in the LHA are regulated in an adequate response to negative energy balance, whereas expression levels of the other studied neuropeptides in secondary neurons of the LHA and PVN are unchanged and are probably regulated by factors other than energy status alone.

  19. Glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Silva, Lilian Eslaine C M; de Castro, Margaret; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2012-06-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency is associated with a decrease of food intake. Orexigenic peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP), and the anorexigenic peptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC), expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), are regulated by meal-induced signals. Orexigenic neuropeptides, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), also control food intake. Thus, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glucocorticoids are required for changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides induced by feeding. Male Wistar rats (230-280 g) were subjected to ADX or sham surgery. ADX animals received 0.9% NaCl in the drinking water, and half of them received corticosterone in the drinking water (B: 25 mg/L, ADX+B). Six days after surgery, animals were fasted for 16 h and they were decapitated before or 2 h after refeeding for brain tissue and blood collections. Adrenalectomy decreased NPY/AgRP and POMC expression in the ARC in fasted and refed animals, respectively. Refeeding decreased NPY/AgRP and increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC of sham and ADX+B groups, with no effects in ADX animals. The expression of MCH and orexin mRNA expression in the LHA was increased in ADX and ADX+B groups in fasted condition, however there was no effect of refeeding on the expression of MCH and orexin in the LHA in the three experimental groups. Refeeding increased plasma leptin and insulin levels in sham and ADX+B animals, with no changes in leptin concentrations in ADX group, and insulin response to feeding was lower in this group. Taken together, these data demonstrated that circulating glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The lower leptin and insulin responses to feeding may contribute to the altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression after adrenalectomy.

  20. Phase II TPDCV protocol for pediatric low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas: 15-year update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Squire, Sarah; Lamborn, Kathleen; Banerjee, Anuradha; Gupta, Nalin; Wara, William M.; Prados, Michael D.; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2010-01-01

    To report long-term results for children with low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas treated on a phase II chemotherapy protocol. Between 1984 and 1992, 33 children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs received TPDCV chemotherapy on a phase II prospective trial. Median age was 3.0 years (range 0.3–16.2). Twelve patients (36%) underwent STRs, 14 (42%) biopsy only, and seven (21%) no surgery. Twenty patients (61%) had pathologic JPAs, nine (27%) grade II gliomas, and four (12%) no surgical sampling. Median f/u for surviving patients was 15.2 years (range 5.3–20.7); 20 of the 23 surviving patients had 14 or more years of follow-up. Fifteen-year PFS and OS were 23.4 and 71.2%, respectively. Twenty-five patients progressed, of whom 13 are NED, two are AWD, and 10 have died. All children who died were diagnosed and first treated at age three or younger. Age at diagnosis was significantly associated with relapse and survival (P = 0.004 for PFS and P = 0.037 for OS). No PFS or OS benefit was seen with STR versus biopsy/no sampling (P = 0.58 for PFS, P = 0.59 for OS). For patients with JPAs and WHO grade II tumors, the 15-year PFS was 18.8 and 22.2% (P = 0.95) and 15-year OS was 73.7 and 55.6% (P = 0.17), respectively. Upfront TPDCV for children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs resulted in 15-year OS of 71.2% and 15-year PFS of 23.4%. No survival benefit is demonstrated for greater extent of resection. Age is a significant prognostic factor for progression and survival. PMID:20221671

  1. Fetal alcohol programming of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin system by epigenetic mechanisms and later life vulnerability to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdash, Rola; Zhang, Changqing; Sarkar, Dipak

    2014-09-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, one of the major regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, immune functions, and energy homeostasis, are vulnerable to the adverse effects of fetal alcohol exposure (FAE). These effects are manifested in POMC neurons by a decrease in Pomc gene expression, a decrement in the levels of its derived peptide β-endorphin and a dysregulation of the stress response in the adult offspring. The HPA axis is a major neuroendocrine system with pivotal physiological functions and mode of regulation. This system has been shown to be perturbed by prenatal alcohol exposure. It has been demonstrated that the perturbation of the HPA axis by FAE is long-lasting and is linked to molecular, neurophysiological, and behavioral changes in exposed individuals. Recently, we showed that the dysregulation of the POMC system function by FAE is induced by epigenetic mechanisms such as hypermethylation of Pomc gene promoter and an alteration in histone marks in POMC neurons. This developmental programming of the POMC system by FAE altered the transcriptome in POMC neurons and induced a hyperresponse to stress in adulthood. These long-lasting epigenetic changes influenced subsequent generations via the male germline. We also demonstrated that the epigenetic programming of the POMC system by FAE was reversed in adulthood with the application of the inhibitors of DNA methylation or histone modifications. Thus, prenatal environmental influences, such as alcohol exposure, could epigenetically modulate POMC neuronal circuits and function to shape adult behavioral patterns. Identifying specific epigenetic factors in hypothalamic POMC neurons that are modulated by fetal alcohol and target Pomc gene could be potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat stress-related diseases in patients with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

  2. Neonatal Nicotine Exposure Leads to Hypothalamic Gliosis in Adult Overweight Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes-Rapozo, V; Moura, E G; Manhães, A C; Pinheiro, C R; Carvalho, J C; Barradas, P C; de Oliveira, E; Lisboa, P C

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes and microglia, the immune competent cells of central nercous system, can be activated in response to metabolic signals such as obesity and hyperleptinaemia. In rats, maternal exposure to nicotine during lactation leads to central obesity, hyperleptinaemia, leptin resistance and alterations in hypothalamic neuropeptides in the offspring during adulthood. In the present study, we studied the activation of astrocytes and microglia, as well as the pattern of inflammatory mediators, in adult offspring of this experimental model. On postnatal day 2 (P2), osmotic minipumps releasing nicotine (NIC) (-6 mg/kg/day) or saline for 14 days were s.c. implanted in dams. Male offspring were killed on P180 and hypothalamic immunohistochemistry, retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT) polymerase chain reaction analysis and multiplex analysis for plasma inflammatory mediators were carried out. At P180, NIC astrocyte cell number was higher in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) (medial: +82%; lateral: +110%), in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) (+144%) and in the lateral hypothalamus (+121%). NIC glial fibrillary acidic protein fibre density was higher in the lateral ARC (+178%) and in the PVN (+183%). Interleukin-6 was not affected in the hypothalamus. NIC monocyte chemotactic protein 1 was only higher in the periventricular nucleus (+287%). NIC microglia (iba-1-positive) cell number was higher (+68%) only in the PVN, as was the chemokine (C-X3-C motif) receptor 1 density (+93%). NIC interleukin-10 was lower in the WAT (-58%) and plasma (-50%). Thus, offspring of mothers exposed to nicotine during lactation present hypothalamic astrogliosis at adulthood and microgliosis in the PVN.

  3. Binge Drinking Induces Whole-Body Insulin Resistance by Impairing Hypothalamic Insulin Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Claudia; Scherer, Thomas; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Filatova, Nika; Fasshauer, Martin; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Puchowicz, Michelle; Buettner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a history of binge drinking have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Whether binge drinking impairs glucose homeostasis and insulin action is unknown. To test this, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats daily with alcohol (3 g/kg) for three consecutive days to simulate human binge drinking and found that these rats developed and exhibited insulin resistance even after blood alcohol concentrations had become undetectable. The animals were resistant to insulin for up to 54 hours after the last dose of ethanol, chiefly a result of impaired hepatic and adipose tissue insulin action. Because insulin regulates hepatic glucose production and white adipose tissue lipolysis, in part through signaling in the central nervous system, we tested whether binge drinking impaired brain control of nutrient partitioning. Rats that had consumed alcohol exhibited impaired hypothalamic insulin action, defined as the ability of insulin infused into the mediobasal hypothalamus to suppress hepatic glucose production and white adipose tissue lipolysis. Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus, as assessed by insulin receptor and AKT phosphorylation, decreased after binge drinking. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed increased hypothalamic inflammation and expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a negative regulator of insulin signaling. Intracerebroventricular infusion of CPT-157633, a small-molecule inhibitor of PTP1B, prevented binge drinking–induced glucose intolerance. These results show that, in rats, binge drinking induces systemic insulin resistance by impairing hypothalamic insulin action and that this effect can be prevented by inhibition of brain PTP1B. PMID:23363978

  4. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduces blood pressure and hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne K. McGavigan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery, such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG, causes remarkable improvements in cardiometabolic health, including hypertension remission. However, the mechanisms responsible remain undefined and poorly studied. Therefore, we developed and validated the first murine model of VSG that recapitulates the blood pressure-lowering effect of VSG using gold-standard radiotelemetry technology. We used this model to investigate several potential mechanisms, including body mass, brain endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling and brain inflammatory signaling, which are all critical contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension. Mice fed on a high-fat diet underwent sham or VSG surgery and radiotelemeter implantation. Sham mice were fed ad libitum or were food restricted to match their body mass to VSG-operated mice to determine the role of body mass in the ability of VSG to lower blood pressure. Blood pressure was then measured in freely moving unstressed mice by radiotelemetry. VSG decreased energy intake, body mass and fat mass. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP was reduced in VSG-operated mice compared with both sham-operated groups. VSG-induced reductions in MAP were accompanied by a body mass-independent decrease in hypothalamic ER stress, hypothalamic inflammation and sympathetic nervous system tone. Assessment of gut microbial populations revealed VSG-induced increases in the relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Enterococcus, and decreases in Adlercreutzia. These results suggest that VSG reduces blood pressure, but this is only partly due to the reduction in body weight. VSG-induced reductions in blood pressure may be driven by a decrease in hypothalamic ER stress and inflammatory signaling, and shifts in gut microbial populations.

  5. Hypothalamic gene expression rapidly changes in response to photoperiod in juvenile Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, A; Petri, I; Barrett, P

    2012-07-01

    Siberian hamsters are seasonal mammals that survive a winter climate by making adaptations in physiology and behaviour. This includes gonadal atrophy, reduced food intake and body weight. The underlying central mechanisms responsible for the physiological adaptations are not fully established but involve reducing hypothalamic tri-iodthyronine (T3) levels. Juvenile Siberian hamsters born or raised in short days (SD) respond in a similar manner, although with an inhibition of gonadal development and growth instead of reversing an established long day (LD) phenotype. Using juvenile male hamsters, the present study aimed to investigate whether the central mechanisms are similar before the establishment of the mature LD phenotype. By in situ hybridisation, we examined the response of genes involved in thyroid hormone (Dio2 and Dio3, which determine hypothalamic T3 levels) and glucose/glutamate metabolism in the ependymal layer, histamine H3 receptor and VGF as representatives of the highly responsive dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus (dmpARC), and somatostatin, a hypothalamic neuropeptide involved in regulating the growth axis. Differential gene expression of type 2 and type 3 deiodinase in the ependymal layer, histamine H3 receptor in the dmpARC and somatostatin in the ARC was established by the eighth day in SD. These changes are followed by alterations in glucose metabolism related genes in the ependymal layer by day 16 and increased secretogranin expression in the dmpARC by day 32. In conclusion, our data demonstrate similar but rapid and highly responsive changes in gene expression in the brain of juvenile Siberian hamsters in response to a switch from LD to SD. The data also provide a temporal definition of gene expression changes relative to physiological adaptations of body weight and testicular development and highlight the likely importance of thyroid hormone availability as an early event in the adaptation of physiology to a winter climate in juvenile

  6. Anti-obesity sodium tungstate treatment triggers axonal and glial plasticity in hypothalamic feeding centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Amigó-Correig

    Full Text Available This study aims at exploring the effects of sodium tungstate treatment on hypothalamic plasticity, which is known to have an important role in the control of energy metabolism.Adult lean and high-fat diet-induced obese mice were orally treated with sodium tungstate. Arcuate and paraventricular nuclei and lateral hypothalamus were separated and subjected to proteomic analysis by DIGE and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging were also performed.Sodium tungstate treatment reduced body weight gain, food intake, and blood glucose and triglyceride levels. These effects were associated with transcriptional and functional changes in the hypothalamus. Proteomic analysis revealed that sodium tungstate modified the expression levels of proteins involved in cell morphology, axonal growth, and tissue remodeling, such as actin, CRMP2 and neurofilaments, and of proteins related to energy metabolism. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies confirmed results for some targets and further revealed tungstate-dependent regulation of SNAP25 and HPC-1 proteins, suggesting an effect on synaptogenesis as well. Functional test for cell activity based on c-fos-positive cell counting also suggested that sodium tungstate modified hypothalamic basal activity. Finally, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed that tungstate treatment can affect neuronal organization in the hypothalamus.Altogether, these results suggest that sodium tungstate regulates proteins involved in axonal and glial plasticity. The fact that sodium tungstate could modulate hypothalamic plasticity and networks in adulthood makes it a possible and interesting therapeutic strategy not only for obesity management, but also for other neurodegenerative illnesses like Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Hypothalamic FTO is associated with the regulation of energy intake not feeding reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomska Katarzyna J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphism in the FTO gene is strongly associated with obesity, but little is known about the molecular bases of this relationship. We investigated whether hypothalamic FTO is involved in energy-dependent overconsumption of food. We determined FTO mRNA levels in rodent models of short- and long-term intake of palatable fat or sugar, deprivation, diet-induced increase in body weight, baseline preference for fat versus sugar as well as in same-weight animals differing in the inherent propensity to eat calories especially upon availability of diverse diets, using quantitative PCR. FTO gene expression was also studied in organotypic hypothalamic cultures treated with anorexigenic amino acid, leucine. In situ hybridization (ISH was utilized to study FTO signal in reward- and hunger-related sites, colocalization with anorexigenic oxytocin, and c-Fos immunoreactivity in FTO cells at initiation and termination of a meal. Results Deprivation upregulated FTO mRNA, while leucine downregulated it. Consumption of palatable diets or macronutrient preference did not affect FTO expression. However, the propensity to ingest more energy without an effect on body weight was associated with lower FTO mRNA levels. We found that 4-fold higher number of FTO cells displayed c-Fos at meal termination as compared to initiation in the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of re-fed mice. Moreover, ISH showed that FTO is present mainly in hunger-related sites and it shows a high degree of colocalization with anorexigenic oxytocin. Conclusion We conclude that FTO mRNA is present mainly in sites related to hunger/satiation control; changes in hypothalamic FTO expression are associated with cues related to energy intake rather than feeding reward. In line with that, neurons involved in feeding termination express FTO. Interestingly, baseline FTO expression appears linked not only with energy intake but also energy metabolism.

  8. The ventral-hypothalamic input route: a common neural network for abstract cognition and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L

    2014-02-01

    Classically, external receptors of the body transmit information from the environment to the cerebral cortex via the thalamus. This review explains and argues that only concrete external information is transmitted from peripheral receptors to the cortex via a thalamic route, while abstract and sexual external information are actually transmitted from peripheral receptors to the cortex through a cognitive hypothalamic route. Sexual function typically implies participation of two distinct partners, ensuring reproduction in many species including humans. Human sexual response involves participation of multiple (environmental, biological, psychological) kinds of stimuli and processing, so the understanding of sexual control and response supposes integration between the classical physiological mechanisms with the more complex processes of our 'mind'. Cognition and sexuality are two relational functions, which are dependent on concrete (colours, sounds, etc.) and/or abstract (gestures, facial expression, how you move, the way you say something seemingly trivial, etc.) environmental cues. Abstract cues are encoded independent of the specific object features of the stimuli, suggesting that such cues should be transmitted and interpreted within the brain through a system different than the classical thalamo-cortical network that operates on concrete (material) information. Indeed, data show that the cerebral cortex is capable of interpreting two distinct (concrete and abstract) formats of information via distinct and non-compatible brain areas. We expand upon this abstract-concrete dichotomy of the brain, positing that the two distinct cortical networks should be uploaded with distinct information from the environment via two distinct informational input routes. These two routes would be represented by the two distinct routes of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), namely the classical/dorsal thalamic input route for concrete information and the ventral

  9. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jereme G. Spiers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure.

  10. Separate populations of neurons within the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus of the rat project to vagal and thoracic autonomic preganglionic levels and express c-Fos protein induced by lithium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1998-03-01

    The role of different hypothalamic nuclei, particularly the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), in the control of food intake and feeding behaviour is well known. It is also well established that lithium chloride (LiCl) causes various disorders in feeding behaviour. In this study, we analyzed the precise distribution of hypothalamic neurons activated by i.p. LiCl administration (LCA neurons) and compared it to that of hypothalamic neurons which project to autonomic preganglionic levels (HAP neurons). We also analysed the possibility that some neurons belong to both populations of nerve cells. To this end, a multiple-labelling technique, using two retrograde fluorescent tracers together with c-Fos-like immunohistochemistry, was performed. Fast Blue was injected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fluorogold (FG) in the thoracic intermedial-lateral cell column, to trace parasympathetic and sympathetic pathways, respectively. LiCl was used as stimulus for c-Fos-like immunohistochemistry. HAP neurons were located mainly in the dorsal, ventral and lateral regions of the parvocellular PVN, while LCA neurons were observed predominantly in the magnocellular region of the PVN rostrally to HAP neurons. A significant number of FG/Fos double-labelled neurons were located in the dorsal parvocellular subnucleus of the PVN (dp) in the LiCl-stimulated rats. We concluded that there is a clear segregation of LCA neurons from HAP neurons within the PVN. The presence of FG/Fos double-labelled neurons in the dp suggests that this nucleus could mediate a sympathetic response after LiCl administration.

  11. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-05

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of human GnIH homologs, RFRP-1 and RFRP-3, and the cognate receptor, GPR147 in the human hypothalamic pituitary axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Ubuka

    Full Text Available The existence of a hypothalamic gonadotropin-inhibiting system has been elusive. A neuropeptide named gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH, SIKPSAYLPLRF-NH(2 which directly inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release from the pituitary was recently identified in quail hypothalamus. Here we identify GnIH homologs in the human hypothalamus and characterize their distribution and biological activity. GnIH homologs were isolated from the human hypothalamus by immunoaffinity purification, and then identified as MPHSFANLPLRF-NH(2 (human RFRP-1 and VPNLPQRF-NH(2 (human RFRP-3 by mass spectrometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed GnIH-immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies in the dorsomedial region of the hypothalamus with axonal projections to GnRH neurons in the preoptic area as well as to the median eminence. RT-PCR and subsequent DNA sequencing of the PCR products identified human GnIH receptor (GPR147 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus as well as in the pituitary. In situ hybridization further identified the expression of GPR147 mRNA in luteinizing hormone producing cells (gonadotropes. Human RFRP-3 has recently been shown to be a potent inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion in cultured sheep pituitary cells by inhibiting Ca(2+ mobilization. It also directly modulates GnRH neuron firing. The identification of two forms of GnIH (RFRP-1 and RFRP-3 in the human hypothalamus which targets human GnRH neurons and gonadotropes and potently inhibit gonadotropin in sheep models provides a new paradigm for the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in man and a novel means for manipulating reproductive functions.

  13. 下丘脑性肥胖临床研究进展%Clinical progress in hypothalamic obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴蔚; 杨叶虹; 李益明

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is defined as the significant polyphagia and rapid weight gain due to a variety of structural or functional damage to the hypothalamic regulatory centers of energy homeostasis.Its clinical characteristics also include reduced energy expenditure,multiple deficits of hypothalamic-pituitary function and metabolic disturbances of blood glucose,lipid profile and blood pressure.Some patients may as well develop abnormal circadian rhythms,impaired regulation of body temperature,thirst perception and mood.The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying hypothalamic obesity include defects in the hypothalamic weightregulating pathways,dysfunction of afferent peripheral humoral signals in the central nervous system,such as leptin,insulin,ghrelin,etc,and autonomic imbalance.The treatment of hypothalamic obesity includes conventional lifestyle modifications,several agents and bariatric surgery.%下丘脑性肥胖是指下丘脑能量稳态调节系统结构或功能损伤引起的食欲亢进和短期内体重显著增加综合征.其临床特征还包括能量消耗下降、合并多种下丘脑-垂体功能减退以及血糖、血脂、血压等代谢改变,部分可合并昼夜节律、体温、渴感及情绪调节异常.发病机制涉及下丘脑能量调节通路受损,胰岛素、瘦素、ghrelin等体液因子在中枢作用异常,自主神经功能紊乱等方面.其治疗包括常规生活方式干预、药物治疗及减重手术等.

  14. Cerebral activations during viewing of food stimuli in adult patients with acquired structural hypothalamic damage: a functional neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C A; Powell, J L; Kemp, G J; Halford, J C G; Wilding, J P; Harrold, J A; Kumar, S V D; Cuthbertson, D J; Cross, A A; Javadpour, M; MacFarlane, I A; Stancak, A A; Daousi, C

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is common following hypothalamic damage due to tumours. Homeostatic and non-homeostatic brain centres control appetite and energy balance but their interaction in the presence of hypothalamic damage remains unknown. We hypothesized that abnormal appetite in obese patients with hypothalamic damage results from aberrant brain processing of food stimuli. We sought to establish differences in activation of brain food motivation and reward neurocircuitry in patients with hypothalamic obesity (HO) compared with patients with hypothalamic damage whose weight had remained stable. In a cross-sectional study at a University Clinical Research Centre, we studied 9 patients with HO, 10 age-matched obese controls, 7 patients who remained weight-stable following hypothalamic insult (HWS) and 10 non-obese controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the fasted state, 1 h and 3 h after a test meal, while subjects were presented with images of high-calorie foods, low-calorie foods and non-food objects. Insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, Peptide YY and ghrelin were measured throughout the experiment, and appetite ratings were recorded. Mean neural activation in the posterior insula and lingual gyrus (brain areas linked to food motivation and reward value of food) in HWS were significantly lower than in the other three groups (P=0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between insulin levels and posterior insula activation (P=0.002). Neural pathways associated with food motivation and reward-related behaviour, and the influence of insulin on their activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of HO.

  15. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide.

  16. Centrally Applied Somatostatin Inhibits the Estrogen-Induced Luteinizing Hormone Surge via Hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Cell Activation in Female Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van H.H.; Swarts, J.J.M.; Heijning, van de H.J.M.; Beek, van der E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) as well as GH-deficiency dramatically impairs reproductive function. Decreased reproductive function as a result of altered GH release is, at least partially, due to changes at the hypothalamic-pituitary level. We hypothesize that hypothalamic somatostatin (SOM)

  17. DMPD: The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation inresponse to endotoxin (LPS). [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1315450 The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in...response to endotoxin (LPS). PubmedID 1315450 Title The role of macrophages in th

  18. Hypothalamic transcriptomic alterations in male and female California mice (Peromyscus californicus) developmentally exposed to bisphenol A or ethinyl estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A; Spollen, William G; Manshack, Lindsey K; Bivens, Nathan J; Givan, Scott A; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S

    2017-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) prevalent in many household items. Rodent models and human epidemiological studies have linked this chemical to neurobehavior impairments. In California mice, developmental exposure to BPA results in sociosexual disorders at adulthood, including communication and biparental care deficits, behaviors that are primarily regulated by the hypothalamus. Thus, we sought to examine the transcriptomic profile in this brain region of juvenile male and female California mice offspring exposed from periconception through lactation to BPA or ethinyl estradiol (EE, estrogen present in birth control pills and considered a positive estrogen control for BPA studies). Two weeks prior to breeding, P0 females were fed a control diet, or this diet supplemented with 50 mg BPA/kg feed weight or 0.1 ppb EE, and continued on the diets through lactation. At weaning, brains from male and female offspring were collected, hypothalamic RNA isolated, and RNA-seq analysis performed. Results indicate that BPA and EE groups clustered separately from controls with BPA and EE exposure leading to unique set of signature gene profiles. Kcnd3 was downregulated in the hypothalamus of BPA- and EE-exposed females, whereas Tbl2, Topors, Kif3a, and Phactr2 were upregulated in these groups. Comparison of transcripts differentially expressed in BPA and EE groups revealed significant enrichment of gene ontology terms associated with microtubule-based processes. Current results show that perinatal exposure to BPA or EE can result in several transcriptomic alterations, including those associated with microtubule functions, in the hypothalamus of California mice. It remains to be determined whether these genes mediate BPA-induced behavioral disruptions. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Recruitment of hypothalamic orexin neurons after formalin injections in adult male rats exposed to a neonatal immune challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Jane Campbell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to early life physiological stressors, such as infection, is thought to contribute to the onset of psychopathology in adulthood. In animal models, injections of the bacterial immune challenge, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, during the neonatal period has been shown to alter both neuroendocrine function and behavioural pain responses in adulthood. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests a role for the lateral hypothalamic peptide orexin in stress and nociceptive processing. However, whether neonatal LPS exposure affects the reactivity of the orexin system to formalin-induced inflammatory pain in later life remains to be determined. Male Wistar rats (n=13 were exposed to either LPS or saline (0.05mg/kg, i.p on postnatal days (PND 3 and 5. On PND 80-97, all rats were exposed to a subcutaneous hindpaw injection of 2.25% formalin. Following behavioural testing, animals were perfused and brains processed for Fos-protein and orexin immunohistochemistry. Rats treated with LPS during the neonatal period exhibited decreased licking behaviours during the interphase of the formalin test, the period typically associated with the active inhibition of pain, and increased grooming responses to formalin in adulthood. Interestingly, these behavioural changes were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of Fos-positive orexin cells in the dorsomedial and perifornical hypothalamus in LPS-exposed animals. Similar increases in Fos-protein were also observed in stress and pain sensitive brain regions that receive orexinergic inputs. These findings highlight a potential role for orexin in the behavioural responses to pain and provide further evidence that early life stress can prime the circuitry responsible for these responses in adulthood.

  20. The decrease in hypothalamic dopamine secretion induced by suckling: comparison of voltammetric and radioisotopic methods of measurement. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotsky, P.M.; Neill, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Previous in situ voltammetric microelectrode measurements of median eminence dopamine release during mammary nerve stimulation of anesthetized lactating rats revealed a transient (1-3 min) 70% decline of dopamine concentrations. This dopamine was believed to be destined for secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation, but direct experimental support for this supposition was lacking. Thus, in the present study, (3H)dopamine release into brief sequential samples of hypophysial portal blood was compared with dopamine release in the median eminence measured by voltammetry. Lactating female rats were urethane anesthetized, and the median eminence pituitary region was exposed. (3H)Tyrosine was injected into a jugular cannula (100 microCi) followed by continuous infusion (5 microCi/min). In a preliminary experiment, this regimen produced a steady state level of (3H)dopamine in the portal blood within 45 min. In subsequent experiments, portal blood was collected as sequential 3-min samples, and electrochemical sampling from a microelectrode placed in the median eminence occurred at 1-min intervals. Electrochemical current resulting from the oxidation of dopamine in the medial median eminence was unvarying throughout the 75-min experiment in control rats (n . 4) and during the 30-min control period preceding mammary nerve stimulation in the other group (n . 4). These results were paralled by (3H) dopamine levels in portal blood during the same periods of time. All animals showed simultaneous decreases in oxidation current and (3H)dopamine levels within 1-4 min after initiation of mammary nerve stimulation. These and earlier results demonstrate that mammary nerve stimulation (and by extension, suckling) induces a momentary, but profound, decrease in hypothalamic dopamine secretion which precedes or accompanies the rise in PRL secretion evoked by the same stimulus.

  1. The binding of [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex to hypothalamic chromatin of male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Burgos, J; Ventanas, J

    1985-01-01

    Histones and masking acidic proteins were removed from hypothalamic chromatin in order to evaluate/measure the number of available acceptor sites for the [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex. This number increases after dehistonizing and unmasking and is lower than published values for comparable preparations. No sex-related difference in [3H]oestradiol-receptor binding to hypothalamic chromatin in vitro was observed. Failure to observe such a difference suggests that sexual differentiation and steroid sensitivity cannot be attributed to marked differences in the degree of chromatin masking.

  2. Neuropeptides and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system: review of recent research strategies in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, M

    2000-04-01

    Depressed patients show a variety of alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system regulation which is reflected by increased pituitary-adrenocortical hormone secretion at baseline and a number of aberrant neuroendocrine function tests. The latter include the combined dexamethasone (DEX) suppression/corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge test, in which CRH was able to override DEX induced suppression of ACTH and cortisol secretion. Whereas the abnormal HPA activation in these patients improved in parallel with clinical remission, persistent HPA dysregulation was associated with an increased risk of relapse. Moreover, healthy subjects at high genetic risk for depression also showed this phenomenon as a trait marker. In consequence, it has been concluded that HPA alteration and development as well as course of depression may be causally related. As evidenced from clinical and preclinical studies, underlying mechanisms of these abnormalities involve impairment of central corticosteroid receptor function which leads to enhanced activity of hypothalamic neurons synthesising and releasing vasopressin and CRH. These neuropeptides mediate not only neuroendocrine but also behavioural effects. Recent research provided evidence that CRH can induce depression-like symptoms in animals and that these signs are mediated through the CRH1 receptor subtype. Hence, therapeutical application of new compounds acting more specifically on the HPA system such as CRH1 receptor antagonists appear to be a promising approach for future treatment options of depression. In conclusion, research in neuroendocrinology provided new insights into the underlying pathophysiology of depression and, in consequence, may lead to the development of new therapeutic tools.

  3. Effects of acute intermittent hypoxia on energy balance and hypothalamic feeding pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J M; Ciriello, J

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to investigate the effects of acute intermittent hypoxia (IH) on metabolic factors associated with energy balance and body weight, and on hypothalamic satiety-inducing pathways. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either 8h IH or normoxic control conditions. Food intake, locomotion and body weights were examined after IH. Additionally, plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin corticosterone, insulin and blood glucose were measured following exposure to IH. Furthermore, adipose tissue was removed and analyzed for leptin and adiponectin content. Finally, the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) was assessed for alterations in protein signaling associated with satiety. IH reduced body weight, food intake and active cycle locomotion without altering adipose tissue mass. Leptin protein content was reduced while adiponectin content was elevated in adipose tissue after IH. Plasma concentration of leptin was significantly increased while adiponectin decreased after IH. No changes were found in plasma corticosterone, insulin and blood glucose. In ARC, phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expression were elevated. In addition, POMC-expressing neurons were activated as determined by immediate early gene FRA-1/2 expression. Finally, ERK1/2 and its phosphorylation were reduced in response to IH. These data suggest that IH induces significant alterations to body energy balance through changes in the secretion of leptin which exert effects on satiety-inducing pathways within the hypothalamus.

  4. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects.

  5. High-fat-diet exposure induces IgG accumulation in hypothalamic microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Xia Yi

    2012-09-01

    The mediobasal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC, with its relatively ‘leaky’ blood-brain barrier that allows more circulating molecules to enter the brain, has emerged as a key sensor of blood-borne signals. In both the ARC and white adipose tissue (WAT, consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD rapidly induces infiltration of microglia (ARC or macrophages (WAT. Animals with HFD-induced obesity (DIO and insulin resistance additionally accumulate B cells in WAT, increasing the local production of pathogenic antibodies. We therefore investigated whether DIO mice or genetically obese ob/ob mice have increased IgG in the ARC, analogous to the recent observations in WAT. Following 16 weeks of exposure to a HFD, wild-type (WT mice had significantly increased IgG-immunoreactivity (ir signaling that was specific to the ARC and was exclusively concentrated in microglia. By contrast, IgG-ir of age-matched obese ob/ob mice fed standard chow had ARC IgG levels comparable with those in chow-fed WT control mice. However, following 2 weeks of HFD exposure, ob/ob mice also had a significant increase of IgG-ir in the ARC. In summary, our findings reveal a novel pathophysiological phenomenon, specific for the hypothalamic ARC, that is induced by exposure to a HFD and can be enhanced, but not caused, by genetic obesity.

  6. Effects of Physical Exercise on the Intestinal Mucosa of Rats Submitted to a Hypothalamic Obesity Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J R; Freitas, J R; Grassiolli, S

    2016-10-01

    The small intestine plays a role in obesity as well as in satiation. However, the effect of physical exercise on the morphology and function of the small intestine during obesity has not been reported to date. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of physical exercise on morphological aspects of the rat small intestine during hypothalamic monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity. The rats were divided into four groups: Sedentary (S), Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), Exercised (E), and Exercised Monosodium Glutamate (EMSG). The MSG and EMSG groups received a daily injection of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg) during the 5 first days after birth. The S and E groups were considered as control groups and received injections of saline. At weaning, at 21 days after birth, the EMSG and E groups were submitted to swimming practice 3 times a week until the 90th day, when all groups were sacrificed and the parameters studied recorded. Exercise significantly reduced fat deposits and the Lee Index in MSG-treated animals, and also reduced the thickness of the intestinal wall, the number of goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity. However, physical activity alone increased the thickness and height of villi, and the depth of the crypts. In conclusion, regular physical exercise may alter the morphology or/and functions of the small intestine, reducing the prejudicial effects of hypothalamic obesity. Anat Rec, 299:1389-1396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Changes in hypothalamic staining for c-Fos following 2G exposure in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.; Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.

    1994-01-01

    The static gravitational field of the earth has been an important selective pressure that has shaped the evolution of biological organisms. This is illustrated by the evolution of tetrapods from a water environment where gravitational force was partially negated to a terrestrial environment where gravity is of greater consequence. Terrestrial invasion resulted in a series of new structural, physiological, and behavioral features. Therefore, it is not surprising that alterations in the gravitational field can cause widespread effects in many physiological systems and behaviors. Our previous studies have demonstrated that both exposure to hyperdynamic fields and the microgravity condition of space flight have significant effects on body temperature, heartrate, activity, feeding, drinking, and circadian rhythms. However, it has not been determined whether these physiological adaptations are associated with changes in neural activity within the hypothalamic nuclei that regulate these functions. This study examined the changes in body temperature, activity, body weight and food and water intake in rats caused by exposure to a hyperdynamic field. In addition, the immediate early gene activation marker, c-Fos, was used to examine potential protein synthesis changes in the hypothalamic nuclei that regulate these functions.

  8. Optogenetic Activation of a Lateral Hypothalamic-Ventral Tegmental Drive-Reward Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Eduardo D; Benaliouad, Faiza; Zamora-Olivencia, Veronica; Wise, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus can motivate feeding or can serve as a reward in its own right. It remains unclear whether the same or independent but anatomically overlapping circuitries mediate the two effects. Electrical stimulation findings implicate medial forebrain bundle (MFB) fibers of passage in both effects, and optogenetic studies confirm a contribution from fibers originating in the lateral hypothalamic area and projecting to or through the ventral tegmental area. Here we report that optogenetic activation of ventral tegmental fibers from cells of origin in more anterior or posterior portions of the MFB failed to induce either reward or feeding. The feeding and reward induced by optogenetic activation of fibers from the lateral hypothalamic cells of origin were influenced similarly by variations in stimulation pulse width and pulse frequency, consistent with the hypothesis of a common substrate for the two effects. There were, however, several cases where feeding but not self-stimulation or self-stimulation but not feeding were induced, consistent with the hypothesis that distinct but anatomically overlapping systems mediate the two effects. Thus while optogenetic stimulation provides a more selective tool for characterizing the mechanisms of stimulation-induced feeding and reward, it does not yet resolve the question of common or independent substrates.

  9. The orexin neuropeptide system: physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Anastasia N.; Perez-Leighton, Claudio Esteban; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1) How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2) What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3) What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes. PMID:25408639

  10. Effects of oral and parenteral quinine on rats with ventromedial hypothalamic knife-cut obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, J; Bray, G A; Fisler, J S

    1984-06-01

    The addition of quinine to the food reversed the obesity in rats with hypothalamic hyperphagia induced by knife cuts. Similarly, the injection of quinine into rats with hypothalamic knife cuts reduced food intake and body weight but the effects were smaller than those observed when quinine was added to the diet. Urinary quinine excretion was similar by the oral and parenteral routes. The food intake of the knife-cut animals receiving quinine gradually fell to the same level as in the sham-operated animals receiving quinine by either route. The weights of retroperitoneal fat pads were related to the weights of the animals and were reduced in the quinine-treated groups. Plasma insulin concentrations were significantly higher in the knife-cut animals and were reduced toward control levels by quinine treatment. Gluconeogenesis, measured by incorporation of radioactivity from labeled bicarbonate into glucose, was unaffected by treatment with quinine or by knife cuts. Lipogenesis from tritiated water in vivo was not different between treatment groups in the liver or retroperitoneal fat pads. However, in vivo lipogenesis was reduced in knife-cut rats fed ad libitum compared with quinine-treated rats. The response of lipogenesis to insulin in vitro was also not different between treatment groups. These data suggest that a major part of the reduction in food intake in hyperphagic rats eating a quinine-adulterated diet is due to postingestional events.

  11. Ventromedial hypothalamic knife-cut lesions in rats resistant to dietary obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, J; Bray, G A; Fisler, J S; Schemmel, R

    1984-06-01

    The effects of ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) knife-cut lesions on food intake and body weight of S 5B/Pl rats, which are normally resistant to obesity when eating a high-fat diet, were examined in two experiments. In the first experiment body weight increased only slightly after VMH knife-cut lesions when animals were fed pelleted laboratory chow or a 10% corn oil diet. When eating the 30% corn oil diet, however, body weight increased in the VMH knife-cut rats. In the second experiment VMH knife-cut lesions produced a small weight gain in rats fed the 10% fat diet; this manipulation also increased food intake and disrupted the normal diurnal feeding pattern. Changes in the weight of the liver, interscapular brown adipose tissue, and white adipose tissue paralleled the changes in body weight. Plasma insulin increased in the rats eating the 30% corn oil diet ad libitum but not in the VMH-lesioned animals pair fed to the sham-operated rats. Incorporation of 3H from 3H2O into lipid was significantly increased in white fat of animals with VMH knife cuts. Similar results were obtained from incubation of adipose tissue in vitro with insulin and radioactively labeled glucose. These studies show that hypothalamic knife-cut lesions can remove the resistance of the S 5B/Pl rats to obesity when they are fed a high-fat diet.

  12. Resistance to adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia in rats. Comparison of ventromedial hypothalamic lesions and mutated leptin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Shimabukuro, M; Chen, G; Wang, M Y; Lee, Y; Kalra, P S; Dube, M G; Kalra, S P; Newgard, C B; Unger, R H

    1998-01-01

    Leptin regulates appetite and body weight via hypothalamic targets, but it can act directly on cultured pancreatic islets to regulate their fat metabolism. To obtain in vivo evidence that leptin may act peripherally as well as centrally, we compared the effect of adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia on food intake, body weight, and islet fat content in ventromedial hypothalamic-lesioned (VMHL) rats, sham-lesioned (SL) controls, and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in which the leptin receptor is mutated. Infusion with recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA increased plasma leptin by approximately 20 ng/ml in VMHL and ZDF rats but had no effect on their food intake, body weight, or fat tissue weight. Caloric matching of hyperphagic VMHL rats to SL controls did not reduce their resistance to hyperleptinemia. Whereas prediabetic ZDF rats had a fourfold elevation in islet fat, in VMHL rats islet fat was normal and none of them became diabetic. Isolated islets from ZDF rats were completely resistant to the lipopenic action of leptin, while VMHL islets exhibited 50% of the normal response; caloric matching of VMHL rats to SL controls increased leptin responsiveness of their islets to 92% of controls. We conclude that leptin regulation of adipocyte fat requires an intact VMH but that islet fat content is regulated independently of the VMH. PMID:9710441

  13. Dynamic localization of glucokinase and its regulatory protein in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdiel Salgado

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK, the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose.

  14. Hypothalamic tanycytes - masters and servants of metabolic, neuroendocrine and neurogenic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy eGoodman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a resurgent interest in tanycytes, a radial glial-like cell population occupying the floor and ventro-lateral walls of the third ventricle (3V. Tanycytes reside in close proximity to hypothalamic neuronal nuclei that regulate appetite and energy expenditure, with a subset sending projection into these nuclei. Moreover, tanycytes are exposed to 3V cerebrospinal fluid and have privileged access to plasma metabolites and hormones, through fenestrated capillaries. Indeed, some tanycytes act as conduits for trafficking of these molecules into the brain parenchyma. Tanycytes can also act as neural stem/ progenitor cells, supplying the postnatal and adult hypothalamus with new neurons. Collectively, these findings suggest that tanycytes regulate and integrate important trophic and metabolic processes and possibly endow functional malleability to neuronal circuits of the hypothalamus. Hence, manipulation of tanycyte biology could provide a valuable tool for modulating hypothalamic functions such as energy uptake and expenditure in order to tackle prevalent eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia.

  15. Putting the diet back into diet-induced obesity: diet-induced hypothalamic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Julian G; Archer, Zoë A

    2008-05-06

    A wealth of detailed mechanistic information relating to obesity and body weight regulation has emerged from study of single gene mutation models, and continues to be generated by engineered rodent models targeting specific genes. However, as an early step in translational research, many researchers are turning to models of diet-induced obesity. Interpretation of data generated from such models is not aided by the variety of diets and rodent strains employed in these studies and a strong case could be made for rationalisation. Differences in experimental protocol, which may deploy a single obligatory solid diet, a choice of solid diets, or liquid/solid combinations, and which may or may not allow a preferred macronutrient composition to be selected, mean that different models of diet-induced obesity achieve that obesity by different routes. The priority should be to mimic the palatability- and choice-driven over-consumption that probably underlies the majority of human obesity. Some of the hypothalamic energy balance genes apparently 'recognise' developing diet-induced obesity as indicated by counter-regulatory changes in expression levels. However, substantial changes in gene expression on long-term exposure to obesogenic diets are not able to prevent weight gain. Forebrain reward systems are widely assumed to be overriding hypothalamic homeostatic energy balance systems under these circumstances. More mechanism-based research at the homeostatic/reward/diet interface may enable diets to be manipulated with therapeutic benefit, or define the contribution of these interactions to susceptibility to diet-induced obesity.

  16. Hypothalamic mTOR signaling mediates the orexigenic action of ghrelin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Martins

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that ghrelin, a stomach derived peptide, exerts its orexigenic action through specific modulation of Sirtuin1 (SIRT1/p53 and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK pathways, which ultimately increase the expression of agouti-related protein (AgRP and neuropeptide Y (NPY in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC. However, there is a paucity of data about the possible action of ghrelin on alternative metabolic pathways at this level. Here, we demonstrate that ghrelin elicits a marked upregulation of the hypothalamic mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway. Of note, central inhibition of mTOR signaling with rapamycin decreased ghrelin's orexigenic action and normalized the mRNA expression of AgRP and NPY, as well as their key downstream transcription factors, namely cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB and forkhead box O1 (FoxO1, total and phosphorylated. Taken together, these data indicate that, in addition to previous reported mechanisms, ghrelin also promotes feeding through modulation of hypothalamic mTOR pathway.

  17. Near-Perfect Synaptic Integration by Nav1.7 in Hypothalamic Neurons Regulates Body Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Tiago; Tozer, Adam; Magnus, Christopher J; Sugino, Ken; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Lee, Albert K; Wood, John N; Sternson, Scott M

    2016-06-16

    Neurons are well suited for computations on millisecond timescales, but some neuronal circuits set behavioral states over long time periods, such as those involved in energy homeostasis. We found that multiple types of hypothalamic neurons, including those that oppositely regulate body weight, are specialized as near-perfect synaptic integrators that summate inputs over extended timescales. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are greatly prolonged, outlasting the neuronal membrane time-constant up to 10-fold. This is due to the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 (Scn9a), previously associated with pain-sensation but not synaptic integration. Scn9a deletion in AGRP, POMC, or paraventricular hypothalamic neurons reduced EPSP duration, synaptic integration, and altered body weight in mice. In vivo whole-cell recordings in the hypothalamus confirmed near-perfect synaptic integration. These experiments show that integration of synaptic inputs over time by Nav1.7 is critical for body weight regulation and reveal a mechanism for synaptic control of circuits regulating long term homeostatic functions.

  18. The effects of dietary saturated fat on basal hypothalamic neuroinflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Tia; Woodside, Barbara; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2014-02-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that consumption of high fat diets can trigger brain inflammation and subsequent injury in the absence of any peripheral inflammatory signaling. Here we sought to investigate whether a link exists between the concentration of highly saturated fats in the diet and the development of inflammation in the brain of rats and, whether the source of the saturated fat was an important factor in this process. Adult male rats had access to diets with a moderate level of total fat (32% of calories as fat) varying in level of saturated fat [low (20%) vs high (>60%)] and its source (butter or coconut oil). After 8 weeks of diet exposure peripheral and central tissues were collected for analysis of inflammatory signals. Neither blood nor white adipose tissue exhibited any changes in inflammatory mediators regardless of the saturated fat content or the source. In the brain however, we observed significant hypothalamic upregulation of the expression of markers of glial activation as well as of interleukin (IL)-1,6 and nuclear factor (NF)-IL-6, which were highest in the group fed the butter-based diets. The increase in these inflammatory mediators had no effect on basal body temperature or the temperature response to systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The present results indicate that hypothalamic inflammation associated with consumption of diets high in fat is directly linked to the saturated fat content as well as the source of that fat. These effects are likely linked to other pathophysiological changes in the regulation of metabolism.

  19. Leptin engages a hypothalamic neurocircuitry to permit survival in the absence of insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Teppei; Berglund, Eric D.; Patel, Vishal R.; Ramadori, Giorgio; Vianna, Claudia R.; Vong, Linh; Thorel, Fabrizio; Chera, Simona; Herrera, Pedro L.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.; Baldi, Pierre; Coppari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary The dogma that life without insulin is incompatible has recently been challenged by results showing viability of insulin-deficient rodents undergoing leptin mono-therapy. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these actions of leptin are unknown. Here, the metabolic outcomes of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of leptin in mice devoid of insulin and lacking or re-expressing leptin receptors (LEPRs) only in selected neuronal groups were assessed. Our results demonstrate that concomitant re-expression of LEPRs only in hypothalamic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons is sufficient to fully mediate the life-saving and anti-diabetic actions of leptin in insulin deficiency. Our analyses indicate that enhanced glucose uptake by brown adipose tissue and soleus muscle, as well as improved hepatic metabolism, underlie these effects of leptin. Collectively, our data elucidate a hypothalamic-dependent pathway enabling life without insulin and hence pave the way for developing better treatments for diseases of insulin deficiency. PMID:24011077

  20. Glut4 expression defines an insulin-sensitive hypothalamic neuronal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Yan, Shijun; Zhang, Baifang; Lu, Taylor Y; Arancio, Ottavio; Accili, Domenico

    2014-07-01

    Insulin signaling in the CNS modulates satiety and glucose metabolism, but insulin target neurons are poorly defined. We have previously shown that ablation of insulin receptors (InsR) in Glut4-expressing tissues results in systemic abnormalities of insulin action. We propose that Glut4 neurons constitute an insulin-sensitive neuronal subset. We determined their gene expression profiles using flow-sorted hypothalamic Glut4 neurons. Gene ontology analyses demonstrated that Glut4 neurons are enriched in olfacto-sensory receptors, M2 acetylcholine receptors, and pathways required for the acquisition of insulin sensitivity. Following genetic ablation of InsR, transcriptome profiling of Glut4 neurons demonstrated impairment of the insulin, peptide hormone, and cAMP signaling pathways, with a striking upregulation of anion homeostasis pathway. Accordingly, hypothalamic InsR-deficient Glut4 neurons showed reduced firing activity. The molecular signature of Glut4 neurons is consistent with a role for this neural population in the integration of olfacto-sensory cues with hormone signaling to regulate peripheral metabolism.

  1. [Changes in the cholecystokinin-synthetizing hypothalamic system during experimental diabetes mellitus in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A V; Kolesnik, Iu M; Trzhetsinskiĭ, S D; Orlovskiĭ, M A

    1998-01-01

    The investigation was performed in 96 Wistar rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by single injection of 50 mg/kg of streptozotocin. Cholecystokinin (CCK) synthesizing neurons were identified in hypothalamic structures using indirect immunofluorescence. In latent period of diabetes (2 wks) number of CCK--immunopositive neurons increases, especially in paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, while in ventrolateral subnucleus of arcuate nucleus and parvicellular subnucleus of paraventricular nucleus areas occupied by immunoreactive material in neurons and their CCK content are reduced. By the end of wk 5 of the disease increase in number of CCK immunopositive neurons was registered only in medial parvicellular subnucleus of paraventricular nucleus whereas in other structures their number was reduced. The administration of CCK to intact animals causes increase of insulin content in endocrinocytes of pancreatic islets, but does not affect the level of hypoglycemia. The administration of the peptide to animals with diabetes leads to destruction of pancreatic islets, decline in endocrinocyte number and insulin content and marked hypoglycemia. Thus, the data obtained indicate the significant role of hypothalamic peptidergic system and CCK in regulation of beta-endocrinocyte function.

  2. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  3. A sweet taste receptor-dependent mechanism of glucosensing in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Heather; Bolborea, Matei; Pollatzek, Eric; Lossow, Kristina; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Liu, Beihui; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Kasparov, Sergey; Dale, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Hypothalamic tanycytes are glial-like glucosensitive cells that contact the cerebrospinal fluid of the third ventricle, and send processes into the hypothalamic nuclei that control food intake and body weight. The mechanism of tanycyte glucosensing remains undetermined. While tanycytes express the components associated with the glucosensing of the pancreatic β cell, they respond to nonmetabolisable glucose analogues via an ATP receptor-dependent mechanism. Here, we show that tanycytes in rodents respond to non-nutritive sweeteners known to be ligands of the sweet taste (Tas1r2/Tas1r3) receptor. The initial sweet tastant-evoked response, which requires the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) , leads to release of ATP and a larger propagating Ca(2+) response mediated by P2Y1 receptors. In Tas1r2 null mice the proportion of glucose nonresponsive tanycytes was greatly increased in these mice, but a subset of tanycytes retained an undiminished sensitivity to glucose. Our data demonstrate that the sweet taste receptor mediates glucosensing in about 60% of glucosensitive tanycytes while the remaining 40% of glucosensitive tanycytes use some other, as yet unknown mechanism. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A sweet taste receptor‐dependent mechanism of glucosensing in hypothalamic tanycytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Heather; Bolborea, Matei; Pollatzek, Eric; Lossow, Kristina; Hermans‐Borgmeyer, Irm; Liu, Beihui; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Kasparov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hypothalamic tanycytes are glial‐like glucosensitive cells that contact the cerebrospinal fluid of the third ventricle, and send processes into the hypothalamic nuclei that control food intake and body weight. The mechanism of tanycyte glucosensing remains undetermined. While tanycytes express the components associated with the glucosensing of the pancreatic β cell, they respond to nonmetabolisable glucose analogues via an ATP receptor‐dependent mechanism. Here, we show that tanycytes in rodents respond to non‐nutritive sweeteners known to be ligands of the sweet taste (Tas1r2/Tas1r3) receptor. The initial sweet tastant‐evoked response, which requires the presence of extracellular Ca2+, leads to release of ATP and a larger propagating Ca2+ response mediated by P2Y1 receptors. In Tas1r2 null mice the proportion of glucose nonresponsive tanycytes was greatly increased in these mice, but a subset of tanycytes retained an undiminished sensitivity to glucose. Our data demonstrate that the sweet taste receptor mediates glucosensing in about 60% of glucosensitive tanycytes while the remaining 40% of glucosensitive tanycytes use some other, as yet unknown mechanism. PMID:28205335

  5. The orexin neuropeptide system: Physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia N Zink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1 How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2 What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3 What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  6. Effects of black cohosh and estrogen on the hypothalamic nuclei of ovariectomized rats at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zhang; Xiaoyan, Ma; Mukun, Yang; Ke, Wang; Liyuan, Yang; Sainan, Zhu; Jing, Jia; Lihua, Qin; Wenpei, Bai

    2012-08-01

    Cimicifuga racemosa (L.) Nutt. (CR), known as black cohosh, has been used in Europe as a medicinal plant for more than a century and its roots have been widely used for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Remifemin, the main ingredient in liquid or tablet medications prepared from isopropyl alcohol extracts of black cohosh rhizome, has also been evaluated in clinical studies. To observe changes in the expression of the c-Fos protein in the hypothalamic nuclei of four groups of rats-sham-operated group (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX) group, ovariectomized group treated with estrogen(OVX+E), and ovariectomized group treated with the isopropanol extract of Cimicifuga racemosa (OVX+ICR)-and to investigate the mechanisms of black cohosh and estrogen that take place in the hypothalamic nuclei of ovariectomized rats. Fifty rats were assigned to each of the four groups and placed in incubators at 4 °C, 10 °C, 25 °C, 33 °C, or 38 °C for 2 h. They were then anesthetized, and their brains were removed after heart perfusion. c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic nuclei was evaluated using immunohistochemical methods. In the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), ventromedial preoptic nucleus (VMPO), and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) of the SHAM group, in the anterior hypothalamic area (AH) and supraoptic nucleus (SO) of all four groups, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the SHAM, OVX and OVX+E groups, the c-Fos-positive cell densities all changed in a similar manner: the cell density decreased when the temperature was less than 25 °C and the density increased when the temperature was greater than 25 °C, demonstrating a V-type curve. The c-Fos density was lowest at 25°C. The other nuclei demonstrated irregular changes. The positive cell densities in the MnPO, AH, and PVN of the SHAM, OVX+E, and OVX+ICR groups were greater than the densities measured in the OVX group at all temperatures, except 25 °C. Positive cell densities in the SHAM, OVX+E, and OVX+ICR groups were

  7. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complications of brain surgery may include: Bleeding Brain damage Death (rarely) Infection Seizures can result from the tumor or from any surgical procedure on the brain. Hydrocephalus can occur with some tumors and ...

  8. Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding%Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In a recent issue of PNAS, Professor Wu Donghai of Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health (GIBH) and his colleagues published a paper titled "Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding". Prof. Wu has receivedsustained support from NSFC since 2006.

  9. Predicting mental disorders from hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning : a 3-year follow-up in the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, E.; van Oort, F. V. A.; Bouma, E. M. C.; Laceulle, O. M.; Oldehinkel, A. J.; Ormel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, with cortisol as its major output hormone, has been presumed to play a key role in the development of psychopathology. Predicting affective disorders from diurnal cortisol levels has been inconclusive, whereas the predictive value of stres

  10. Photoperiod and acute energy deficits interact on components of the thyroid hormone system in hypothalamic tanycytes of the Siberian hamster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Herwig; D. Wilson; T.J. Logie; A. Boelen; P.J. Morgan; J.G. Mercer; P. Barrett

    2009-01-01

    Herwig A, Wilson D, Logie TJ, Boelen A, Morgan PJ, Mercer JG, Barrett P. Photoperiod and acute energy deficits interact on components of the thyroid hormone system in hypothalamic tanycytes of the Siberian hamster. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 296: R1307-R1315, 2009. First published March

  11. Meta-analysis and meta-regression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in functional somatic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, Lineke M; Cleare, Anthony J; Ormel, Johan; Manoharan, Andiappan; Kok, Iris C; Wessely, Simon; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is the most investigated biological risk marker in functional somatic disorders (FSDs), such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia (FM), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Our aim was to assess whether there is an association be

  12. Hypothalamic regulation of thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin release : the role of thyrotrophin-releasing hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.C. van Haasteren (Goedele)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThyrotrophin-releasing-hormone (TRH), a tripeptide, is produced by hypothalamic neurons and transported along their axons to the median eminence (ME). From there it is released at nerve terminals into hypophyseal portal blood. It is then transported to the anterior pituitary gland where

  13. Whey protein effects on energy balance link the intestinal mechanisms of energy absorption with adiposity and hypothalamic neuropeptide gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilaweera, Kanishka N; Cabrera-Rubio, Raul; Speakman, John R; O'Connor, Paula M; McAuliffe, AnneMarie; Guinane, Caitriona M; Lawton, Elaine M; Crispie, Fiona; Aguilera, Mònica; Stanley, Maurice; Boscaini, Serena; Joyce, Susan; Melgar, Silvia; Cryan, John F; Cotter, Paul D

    2017-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dietary whey protein isolate (WPI) affects the intestinal mechanisms related to energy absorption and that the resulting energy deficit is compensated by changes in energy balance to support growth. C57BL/6 mice were provided a diet enriched with WPI with varied sucrose content, and the impact on energy balance-related parameters was investigated. As part of a high-sucrose diet, WPI reduced the hypothalamic expression of pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression and increased energy intake. The energy expenditure was unaffected, but epididymal weight was reduced, indicating an energy loss. Notably, there was a reduction in the ileum gene expression for amino acid transporter SLC6a19, glucose transporter 2, and fatty acid transporter 4. The composition of the gut microbiota also changed, where Firmicutes were reduced. The above changes indicated reduced energy absorption through the intestine. We propose that this mobilized energy in the adipose tissue and caused hypothalamic changes that increased energy intake, acting to counteract the energy deficit arising in the intestine. Lowering the sucrose content in the WPI diet increased energy expenditure. This further reduced epididymal weight and plasma leptin, whereupon hypothalamic ghrelin gene expression and the intestinal weight were both increased. These data suggest that when the intestine-adipose-hypothalamic pathway is subjected to an additional energy loss (now in the adipose tissue), compensatory changes attempt to assimilate more energy. Notably, WPI and sucrose content interact to enable the component mechanisms of this pathway. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. The nutritional induction of COUP-TFII gene expression in ventromedial hypothalamic neurons is mediated by the melanocortin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sabra-Makke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII is an important coordinator of glucose homeostasis. We report, for the first time, a unique differential regulation of its expression by the nutritional status in the mouse hypothalamus compared to peripheral tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and insulinopenic mice, we show that insulin upregulates its expression in the hypothalamus. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that COUP-TFII gene expression is restricted to a subpopulation of ventromedial hypothalamic neurons expressing the melanocortin receptor. In GT1-7 hypothalamic cells, the MC4-R agonist MTII leads to a dose dependant increase of COUP-TFII gene expression secondarily to a local increase in cAMP concentrations. Transfection experiments, using a COUP-TFII promoter containing a functional cAMP responsive element, suggest a direct transcriptional activation by cAMP. Finally, we show that the fed state or intracerebroventricular injections of MTII in mice induce an increased hypothalamic COUP-TFII expression associated with a decreased hepatic and pancreatic COUP-TFII expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations strongly suggest that hypothalamic COUP-TFII gene expression could be a central integrator of insulin and melanocortin signaling pathway within the ventromedial hypothalamus. COUP-TFII could play a crucial role in brain integration of circulating signal of hunger and satiety involved in energy balance regulation.

  15. Epigenetic changes in the hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin gene: a mechanism linking maternal undernutrition to obesity in the offspring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Adam; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne

    2011-06-11

    Maternal undernutrition is associated with programming of obesity in offspring. While previous evidence has linked programming to the hypothalamic, pituitary, and adrenal (HPA) axis it could also affect the hypothalamic neuropeptides which regulate food intake and energy balance. Alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH), a key regulator of these neuronal pathways, is derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) which is therefore a prime target for the programming of obesity. Several models of maternal undernutrition have identified changes in POMC in hypothalami from foetuses or offspring at various ages. These models have also shown that the offspring go on to develop obesity and/or glucose intolerance. It is our hypothesis that programming leads to epigenetic changes in hypothalamic neuropeptide genes. Therefore when there is subsequent increased food availability, the epigenetic changes could cause dysfunctional transcriptional regulation of energy balance. We present evidence of epigenetic changes in the POMC gene promoter in foetal hypothalami after peri-conceptional undernutrition. In this model there are also epigenetic changes in the hypothalamic glucocorticoid receptor with consequent up-regulation of the receptor which could lead to alterations in the regulation of POMC and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus. Thus maternal undernutrition could cause epigenetic changes in the POMC and glucocorticoid receptor genes, in the foetal hypothalamus, which may predispose the offspring to altered regulation of food intake, energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis, later in life. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic effects of chronic T3 administration in the hypothalamic paraventricular and ventromedial nucleus in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z; Foppen, E; Su, Y; Bisschop, P H; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is a key regulator of energy metabolism. Apart from its direct effects on peripheral metabolism, thyroid hormone exerts acute metabolic effects via distinct nuclei within the hypothalamus. Recently, we developed a method for chronic and local intra-hypothalamic triiodothyronine (T3)

  17. Steroidogenic factor 1 directs programs regulating diet-induced thermogenesis and leptin action in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is exclusively expressed in the brain in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and is required for the development of this nucleus. However, the physiological importance of transcriptional programs regulated by SF-1 in the VMH is not wel...

  18. Effects of Parental Depressive Symptoms on Child Adjustment Moderated by Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Activity: Within- and between-Family Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Fisher, Philip A.; Marceau, Kristine; Harold, Gordon T.; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    Child hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity was investigated as a moderator of parental depressive symptom effects on child behavior in an adoption sample ("n" = 210 families). Adoptive parents' depressive symptoms and child internalizing and externalizing were assessed at 18, 27, and 54 months, and child morning and evening HPA…

  19. Short-term caloric restriction normalizes hypothalamic neuronal responsiveness to glucose ingestion in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuwisse, W.M.; Widya, R.L.; Paulides, M.; Lamb, H.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Roos, A. de; Buchem, M.A. van; Pijl, H.; Grond, J. van der

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is critically involved in the regulation of feeding. Previous studies have shown that glucose ingestion inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity. However, this was not observed in patients with type 2 diabetes. Restoring energy balance by reducing caloric intake and losing weight are

  20. Impact of aflatoxin B1 on hypothalamic neuropeptides regulating feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebak, Fatima; Alaoui, Abdelilah; Alexandre, David; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Anouar, Youssef; Chartrel, Nicolas; Magoul, Rabia

    2015-07-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in food is a major problem of public health as they produce immunosuppressive, hepatotoxic and neurotoxic effects. Mycotoxins also induce mutagenic and carcinogenic effects after long exposure. Among mycotoxins that contaminate food are aflatoxins (AF) such as AFB1, which is the most powerful natural carcinogen. The AF poisoning results in symptoms of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, jaundice or anemia that can lead to death, but very few studies have explored the impact of AF on neuroendocrine regulations. To better understand the neurotoxic effects of AF related to anorexia, we explored in rat the impact of AFB1 on the major hypothalamic neuropeptides regulating feeding behavior, either orexigenic (NPY, Orexin, AgRP, MCH) or anorexigenic (α-MSH, CART, TRH). We also studied the effect of AFB1 on a novel neuropeptide, the secretogranin II (SgII)-derived peptide EM66, which has recently been linked to the control of food intake. For this, adult male rats were orally treated twice a week for 5 weeks with a low dose (150 μg/kg) or a high dose (300 μg/kg) of AFB1 dissolved in corn oil. Repeated exposure to AFB1 resulted in reduced body weight gain, which was highly significant for the high dose of AF. Immunocytochemical and quantitative PCR experiments revealed a dose-related decrease in the expression of all the hypothalamic neuropeptides studied in response to AFB1. Such orexigenic and anorexigenic alterations may underlie appetite disorders as they are correlated to a dose-dependent decrease in body weight gain of treated rats as compared to controls. We also found a decrease in the number of EM66-containing neurons in the arcuate nucleus of AFB1-treated animals, which was associated with a lower expression of its precursor SgII. These findings show for the first time that repeated consumption of AFB1 disrupts the hypothalamic regulation of neuropeptides involved in feeding behavior, which may contribute to the lower body weight gain

  1. [Effects of electro-acupuncture on signal transduction pathway of hypothalamic neuroendocrine system in ovariectomized rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Feng; Ma, Shu-Lan; Chen, Bo-Ying

    2009-06-01

    To compare the varieties and contents of the main nerval information molecules in perfusate from hypothalamic medial preoptic area (MPOA) of the rats in different sexual cycles and the ovariectomized rats treated by electro-acupuncture, so as to observe the similarities and differences of hypothalamic neuroendocrine signal transduction pathway under the physiological and pathological status, and to explore the mechanisms of neuroendocrine signal transduction of electro-acupuncture therapeutic effect in perimenopausal syndrome. The stereo localization technique and push-and-pull perfusion of the rat brain nucleus were adopted for collecting the hypothalamic MPOA perfusate of the female rats with normal sexual cycle, and also for collecting the MPOA perfusate of ovariectomized rats after electro-acupuncture treatment as acupuncture perfusate (AP). After being respectively microinjected into MPOA of the ovariectomized rats, the influence of the different perfusates on vagina cytology and serum estradiol (E2) level was observed. The contents of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), dopamine (DA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), aspartate (Asp) and beta-endorphin (beta-EP) in the perfusate of each group were detected by radioimmunoassay or high performance liquid chromatography, and then the varieties and contents of these substances in the perfusate of each group were compared and analyzed. The contents of neural active substances including DA, GABA, Glu, and beta-EP in the perfusate from the rats' MPOA during different stages of sexual cycle showed some regular changes. After the perfusate was microinjected respectively into the MPOA of the ovariectomized rats, the changes of animal vaginal exfoliated cells and serum E2 level showed the similar four-stage cycle characteristics as normal rats; the changes of vaginal exfoliated cells and serum E2 level of the ovariectomized rats without electro-acupuncture treatment showed the acupuncture-like effects

  2. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Pedersen, Philip J.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Jelsing, Jacob; Hansen, Henrik H.; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of the central nervous system in mediating metabolic effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is poorly understood. Using a rat model of RYGB, we aimed to identify changes in gene expression of key hypothalamic neuropeptides known to be involved in the regulation of energy balance. Methods Lean male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB or sham surgery. Body weight and food intake were monitored bi-weekly for 60 days post-surgery. In situ hybridization mRNA analysis of hypothalamic AgRP, NPY, CART, POMC and MCH was applied to RYGB and sham animals and compared with ad libitum fed and food-restricted rats. Furthermore, in situ hybridization mRNA analysis of dopaminergic transmission markers (TH and DAT) was applied in the midbrain. Results RYGB surgery significantly reduced body weight and intake of a highly palatable diet but increased chow consumption compared with sham operated controls. In the arcuate nucleus, RYGB surgery increased mRNA levels of orexigenic AgRP and NPY, whereas no change was observed in anorexigenic CART and POMC mRNA levels. A similar pattern was seen in food-restricted versus ad libitum fed rats. In contrast to a significant increase of orexigenic MCH mRNA levels in food-restricted animals, RYGB did not change MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus. In the VTA, RYGB surgery induced a reduction in mRNA levels of TH and DAT, whereas no changes were observed in the substantia nigra relative to sham surgery. Conclusion RYGB surgery increases the mRNA levels of hunger-associated signaling markers in the rat arcuate nucleus without concomitantly increasing downstream MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus, suggesting that RYGB surgery puts a brake on orexigenic hypothalamic output signals. In addition, down-regulation of midbrain TH and DAT expression suggests that altered dopaminergic activity also contributes to the reduced intake of palatable food in RYGB rats. PMID:27069869

  3. Gene expression analysis and microdialysis suggest hypothalamic triiodothyronine (T3) gates daily torpor in Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Jonathan H H; Cubuk, Ceyda; Wilson, Dana; Rijntjes, Eddy; Kemmling, Julia; Markovsky, Hanna; Barrett, Perry; Herwig, Annika

    2017-07-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in regulating seasonal adaptations of mammals. Several studies suggested that reduced availability of 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) in the hypothalamus is required for the physiological adaptation to winter in Djungarian hamsters. We have previously shown that T3 is involved in the regulation of daily torpor, but it remains unclear, whether T3 affects torpor by central or peripheral mechanisms. To determine the effect of T3 concentrations within the hypothalamus in regulating daily torpor, we tested the hypothesis that low hypothalamic T3 metabolism would favour torpor and high T3 concentrations would not. In experiment 1 gene expression in torpid hamsters was assessed for transporters carrying thyroid hormones between cerebrospinal fluid and hypothalamic cells and for deiodinases enzymes, activating or inactivating T3 within hypothalamic cells. Gene expression analysis suggests reduced T3 in hypothalamic cells during torpor. In experiment 2, hypothalamic T3 concentrations were altered via microdialysis and torpor behaviour was continuously monitored by implanted body temperature transmitters. Increased T3 concentrations in the hypothalamus reduced expression of torpor as well as torpor bout duration and depth. Subsequent analysis of gene expression in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle showed clear up-regulation of T3 inactivating deiodinase 3 but no changes in several other genes related to photoperiodic adaptations in hamsters. Finally, serum analysis revealed that increased total T3 serum concentrations were not necessary to inhibit torpor expression. Taken together, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that T3 availability within the hypothalamus significantly contributes to the regulation of daily torpor via a central pathway.

  4. Ontogenetic studies of tolerance development: effects of chronic morphine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P J; Kuhn, C M

    1995-11-01

    Endogenous opiates are important regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats. Tolerance clearly develops to morphine-induced stimulation of the HPA axis in adult rats (Ignar and Kuhn 1990). The goal of the present study was to determine whether tolerance to morphine-induced stimulation of the HPA axis developed in neonatal and weanling rats treated chronically with morphine. Rats were injected with morphine or saline between days 4-8 postnatal (pups) or days 21-25 (weanlings) and tolerance assessed by determining dose-response curves for ACTH and corticosterone secretion following an acute morphine challenge. Weanlings displayed marked tolerance to the stimulation of ACTH and corticosterone secretion by morphine. Tolerance was also observed in pups to morphine-stimulated ACTH and corticosterone release. These findings suggest that the relative adaptability of the HPA axis to chronic morphine in neonatal and weanling rats is similar.

  5. Update on stress and depression: the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Andrea de Abreu Feijó de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, relationships between stress and the neurobiological changes seen in psychiatric disorders have been well-documented. A major focus of investigations in this area has been the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, both as a marker of stress response and as a mediator of additional downstream pathophysiologic changes. This review examines the emerging literature concerning the relationship between stress, HPA axis function, and depression, as well as the role of early life stress as an important risk factor for HPA axis dysregulation. The more recent studies reviewed suggest that the prominence of HPA axis hyperactivity in adults with depressive and anxiety disorders may constitute a link between the occurrence of adversity in childhood and the development of adult psychopathology

  6. Endothelial HIF-1α Enables Hypothalamic Glucose Uptake to Drive POMC Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Luis; Suyama, Shigetomo; Huang, Yan; Shanabrough, Marya; Tschöp, Matthias H; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Giordano, Frank J; Horvath, Tamas L

    2017-06-01

    Glucose is the primary driver of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. We show that endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) controls glucose uptake in the hypothalamus and that it is upregulated in conditions of undernourishment, during which POMC neuronal activity is decreased. Endothelium-specific knockdown of HIF-1α impairs the ability of POMC neurons to adapt to the changing metabolic environment in vivo, resulting in overeating after food deprivation in mice. The impaired functioning of POMC neurons was reversed ex vivo or by parenchymal glucose administration. These observations indicate an active role for endothelial cells in the central control of metabolism and suggest that central vascular impairments may cause metabolic disorders. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. Heart rate variability in adolescents with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, Monica; Corbetta, Fabiola; Gambera, Alessandro; Nicosia, Franco; Bonini, Luisa; Neri, Francesca; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Nacinovich, Renata

    2014-02-28

    Aim of this study consisted in assessing the 24-h heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance, in 21 adolescents with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA, 11 normogonadotropic, N-FHA, and 10 hypogonadotropic, Hy-FHA) compared to 21 patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 21 controls. As expected, subjects with AN showed a significant dysregulation in multiple HRV parameters, while Hy-FHA patients presented with a dysregulation in a few domains (SDNN, HFr), which was not present in girls with N-FHA, who showed values largely similar to controls. FHA might represent part of the AN biological spectrum, and a link between these two conditions might exist, possibly related to the degree of psychological and/or hormonal dysfunction.

  8. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......% vs 41% (P = 0·003) had an LH/FSH ratio >2 and 19% vs 41% (P = 0·04) had hirsutism and/or elevated total testosterone, free testosterone, and/or androstenedione. The non-PCOM group included significantly more women with secondary infertility. The median AMH in the non-PCOM group was 47 pmol/l, which...... was twofold lower than in the PCOM group but above the upper limit of normo-ovulatory women. CONCLUSIONS: According to a revised threshold of 25 follicles, almost half the anovulatory infertile women do not have PCOM. The characteristics of these women may be compatible with hypothalamic anovulation...

  9. 2-deoxy-D-glucose suppresses food intake through activation of hypothalamic histamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, T; Tamari, Y; Kang, M; Yoshimatsu, H

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this experiment was to demonstrate whether brain histamine contributes to delayed suppression of food intake after administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). Food intake decreased significantly for 48 h after infusion of 2-DG into the rat third cerebroventricle. This delayed decrease in food intake was abolished by depletion of neuronal histamine by intraperitoneal pretreatment with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (160 mumol/rat), a suicide inhibitor of a histamine-synthesizing enzyme. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol 2-DG accelerated turnover rate of hypothalamic histamine. These results indicate that the delayed feeding suppression by 2-DG is modulated through histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamus. This histaminergic response may be related, at least in part, to homeostatic control of energy metabolism in the brain.

  10. Sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal asymmetry in generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jonathan W; Fisher, Aaron J; Newman, Michelle G; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-06-01

    Physiologic investigations of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have skewed toward assessment of the autonomic nervous system, largely neglecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis variables. Although these systems coordinate-suggesting a degree of symmetry-to promote adaptive functioning, most studies opt to monitor either one system or the other. Using a ratio of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) over salivary cortisol, the present study examined symmetry between the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and HPA axis in individuals with GAD (n = 71) and healthy controls (n = 37). Compared to healthy controls, individuals with GAD exhibited greater baseline ratios of sAA/cortisol and smaller ratios of sAA/cortisol following a mental arithmetic challenge. We propose that the present study provides evidence for SNS-HPA asymmetry in GAD. Further, these results suggest that increased SNS suppression in GAD may be partially mediated by cortisol activity.

  11. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  12. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Infants and Children: Protection from Radioiodines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium iodide (KI is recommended as an emergency treatment for exposure to radioiodines, most commonly associated with nuclear detonation or mishaps at nuclear power plants. Protecting the thyroid gland of infants and children remains a priority because of increased incidence of thyroid cancer in the young exposed to radioiodines (such as 131I and 133I. There is a lack of clinical studies for KI and radioiodines in children or infants to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness and safety of KI administration in the young. In this paper, we compare functional aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis in the young and adults and review the limited studies of KI in children. The HPT axis in the infant and child is hyperactive and therefore will respond less effectively to KI treatment compared to adults. Research on the safety and efficacy of KI in infants and children is needed.

  13. Simulated pituitary apoplexy: report of an unusual case due to hemorrhage into hypothalamic astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, W B

    1977-02-01

    An unusual case of acute bilateral loss of vision simulating pituitary apoplexy but due instead to a fatal hemorrhage into a hypothalamic glioma is reported. The clinician dealing with abrupt loss of vision must promptly rule out ocular and orbital causes and then proceed immediately to a consideration of the variety of intracranial lesions which may cause sudden visual loss. Uihlein and Rucker have listed them in descending order of frequency: pituitary adenoma, tumors of the optic nerve and chiasm, supraclinoid aneurysm, parasellar lesion, thrombosis of the carotid artery, hydrocephalus of the third ventricle, chiasmal arachnoiditis, fracture of the anterior cranial fossa, basofrontal tumor of the skull, and pseudotumor cerebri. Neurologic, ophthalmologic, and neuroradiologic evaluations should be obtained without delay and will usually define the lesion and point to the appropriate treatment.

  14. Modelling cholesterol effects on the dynamics of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Vladimir M; Čupić, Željko; Maćešić, Stevan; Stanojević, Ana; Vukojević, Vladana; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-01

    A mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis with cholesterol as a dynamical variable was derived to investigate the effects of cholesterol, the primary precursor of all steroid hormones, on the ultradian and circadian HPA axis activity. To develop the model, the parameter space was systematically examined by stoichiometric network analysis to identify conditions for ultradian oscillations, determine conditions under which dynamic transitions, i.e. bifurcations occur and identify bifurcation types. The bifurcations were further characterized using numerical simulations. Model predictions agree well with empirical findings reported in the literature, indicating that cholesterol levels may critically affect the global dynamics of the HPA axis. The proposed model provides a base for better understanding of experimental observations, it may be used as a tool for designing experiments and offers useful insights into the characteristics of basic dynamic regulatory mechanisms that, when impaired, may lead to the development of some modern-lifestyle-associated diseases.

  15. A Genetic Screen Identifies Hypothalamic Fgf15 as a Regulator of Glucagon Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Picard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, which restores normal blood glucose levels to ensure sufficient provision of glucose to the brain, is critical for survival. To discover underlying brain regulatory systems, we performed a genetic screen in recombinant inbred mice for quantitative trait loci (QTL controlling glucagon secretion in response to neuroglucopenia. We identified a QTL on the distal part of chromosome 7 and combined this genetic information with transcriptomic analysis of hypothalami. This revealed Fgf15 as the strongest candidate to control the glucagon response. Fgf15 was expressed by neurons of the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the perifornical area. Intracerebroventricular injection of FGF19, the human ortholog of Fgf15, reduced activation by neuroglucopenia of dorsal vagal complex neurons, of the parasympathetic nerve, and lowered glucagon secretion. In contrast, silencing Fgf15 in the dorsomedial hypothalamus increased neuroglucopenia-induced glucagon secretion. These data identify hypothalamic Fgf15 as a regulator of glucagon secretion.

  16. Expression profile of hypothalamic neuropeptides in chicken lines selected for high or low residual feed intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintubin, P; Greene, E; Collin, A; Bordas, A; Zerjal, T; Tesseraud, S; Buyse, J; Dridi, S

    2014-08-01

    The R(+) and R(-) chicken lines have been divergently selected for high (R(+)) or low (R(-)) residual feed intake. For the same body weight and egg production, the R(+) chickens consume 40% more food than their counterparts R(-) lines. In the present study we sought to determine the hypothalamic expression profile of feeding-related neuropeptides in these lines maintained under fed or food-deprived conditions. In the fed condition, the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) was 17-fold lower (Pfeeding-related genes that are differently expressed in the hypothalamus of R(+) and R(-) chickens and that might explain the difference in feed intake observed between the two lines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Synaptic contact between median preoptic neurons and subfornical organ neurons projecting to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    It is known that the median preoptic nucleus (POMe) sends dense projections to the subfornical organ (SFO). However, the functional significance of these projections have not been well discussed. In this electron microscopic study, we investigated the presence of synapses between POMe-derived axon terminals and SFO neurons that project to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). After injection of a retrograde tracer, wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase-colloidal gold complex, into the PVN, many labeled neurons were found in the SFO. In contrast, after injection of an anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine, in the POMe, abundant labeled axon varicosities were observed in the SFO. Using electron microscopy, synapses were identified between retrogradely labeled dendrites and cell bodies, and anterogradely labeled axon terminals, indicating that POMe neurons innervate SFO neurons projecting to the PVN. The possibility that POMe neurons play multiple roles in the neuronal circuit responsible for vasopressin release and/or cardiovascular regulation is also discussed.

  18. Lateral Hypothalamic Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia Through Spinally Descending Orexin-A Neurons in Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardach, Jacob; Wagner, Monica; Jeong, Younhee; Holden, Janean E

    2016-03-01

    No evidence to date shows that lateral hypothalamic (LH) stimulation produces orexin-A-mediated antinociception in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in a model of neuropathic pain. We conducted experiments to examine the effect of orexin-A-mediated LH stimulation in female rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) on thermal hyperalgesia. Rats receiving carbachol into the LH demonstrated antinociception on both the left CCI and right nonligated paws (p orexin-1 (OX1) receptor antagonist SB-334867, which blocked LH-induced antinociception compared with control groups (p orexin-A connection between the LH and the SCDH. Identification of this pathway may lead to studies using orexins to manage clinical pain.

  19. Sustained alterations of hypothalamic tanycytes during posttraumatic hypopituitarism in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterstock, Guillaume; El Yandouzi, Taoufik; Romanò, Nicola; Carmignac, Danielle; Langlet, Fanny; Coutry, Nathalie; Guillou, Anne; Schaeffer, Marie; Chauvet, Norbert; Vanacker, Charlotte; Galibert, Evelyne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Robinson, Iain C A F; Prévot, Vincent; Mollard, Patrice; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Méry, Pierre-François

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of hypopituitarism, which compromises patients' recovery, quality of life, and life span. To date, there are no means other than standardized animal studies to provide insights into the mechanisms of posttraumatic hypopituitarism. We have found that GH levels were impaired after inducing a controlled cortical impact (CCI) in mice. Furthermore, GHRH stimulation enhanced GH to lower level in injured than in control or sham mice. Because many characteristics were unchanged in the pituitary glands of CCI mice, we looked for changes at the hypothalamic level. Hypertrophied astrocytes were seen both within the arcuate nucleus and the median eminence, two pivotal structures of the GH axis, spatially remote to the injury site. In the arcuate nucleus, GHRH neurons were unaltered. In the median eminence, injured mice exhibited unexpected alterations. First, the distributions of claudin-1 and zonula occludens-1 between tanycytes were disorganized, suggesting tight junction disruptions. Second, endogenous IgG was increased in the vicinity of the third ventricle, suggesting abnormal barrier properties after CCI. Third, intracerebroventricular injection of a fluorescent-dextran derivative highly stained the hypothalamic parenchyma only after CCI, demonstrating an increased permeability of the third ventricle edges. This alteration of the third ventricle might jeopardize the communication between the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. In conclusion, the phenotype of CCI mice had similarities to the posttraumatic hypopituitarism seen in humans with intact pituitary gland and pituitary stalk. It is the first report of a pathological status in which tanycyte dysfunctions appear as a major acquired syndrome.

  20. Differential flatness properties and adaptive control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos

    2016-12-01

    It is shown that the model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal gland axis is a differentially flat one and this permits to transform it to the so-called linear canonical form. For the new description of the system's dynamics the transformed control inputs contain unknown terms which depend on the system's parameters. To identify these terms an adaptive fuzzy approximator is used in the control loop. Thus an adaptive fuzzy control scheme is implemented in which the unknown or unmodeled system dynamics is approximated by neurofuzzy networks and next this information is used by a feedback controller that makes the state variables (CRH - corticotropin releasing hormone, adenocortocotropic hormone - ACTH, cortisol) of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal gland axis model converge to the desirable levels (setpoints). This adaptive control scheme is exclusively implemented with the use of output feedback, while the state vector elements which are not directly measured are estimated with the use of a state observer that operates in the control loop. The learning rate of the adaptive fuzzy system is suitably computed from Lyapunov analysis, so as to assure that both the learning procedure for the unknown system's parameters, the dynamics of the observer and the dynamics of the control loop will remain stable. The performed Lyapunov stability analysis depends on two Riccati equations, one associated with the feedback controller and one associated with the state observer. Finally, it is proven that for the control scheme that comprises the feedback controller, the state observer and the neurofuzzy approximator, an H-infinity tracking performance can be succeeded.

  1. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Tanida

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb. We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  2. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  3. Effects of increased hypothalamic leptin gene expression on ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M A; Iwaniec, U T; Turner, R T; Wronski, T J; Kalra, S P

    2011-08-01

    Estrogen deficiency results in accelerated bone turnover with a net increase in bone resorption. Subcutaneous administration of leptin attenuates bone loss in ovariectomized (ovx) rats by reducing bone resorption. However, in addition to its direct beneficial effects, leptin has been reported to have indirect (central nervous system-mediated) antiosteogenic effects on bone, which may limit the efficacy of elevated serum leptin to prevent estrogen deficiency-associated bone loss. The present study evaluated the long-term effects of increased hypothalamic leptin transgene expression, using recombinant adeno-associated virus-leptin (rAAV-Lep) gene therapy, on bone mass, architecture, and cellular endpoints in sexually mature ovx Sprague-Dawley rats. Ovx rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP (control vector encoding green fluorescent protein) and maintained for 10 weeks. Additional controls consisted of ovary-intact rats and ovx rats pair-fed to rAAV-Lep rats. Lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by micro-computed tomography and tibiae by histomorphometry. Cancellous bone volume was lower and osteoclast perimeter, osteoblast perimeter, and bone marrow adipocyte density were greater in ovx rats compared to ovary-intact controls. In contrast, differences among ovx groups were not detected for any endpoint evaluated. In conclusion, whereas estrogen deficiency resulted in marked cancellous osteopenia, increased bone turnover and marrow adiposity, increasing hypothalamic leptin transgene expression in ovx rats had neither detrimental nor beneficial effects on bone mass, architecture, or cellular endpoints. These findings demonstrate that the antiresorptive effects of subcutaneous leptin administration in ovx rats are mediated through leptin targets in the periphery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Provocative stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in men with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, W A; La Fountaine, M F; Cirnigliaro, C M; Kirshblum, S C; Spungen, A M

    2016-11-01

    Prospective study. To determine the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in healthy men with spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty healthy men with chronic SCI (37±10 years) and thirty-eight able-bodied (AB) controls (36±10 years) participated. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 100 μg IV) was administered to determine gonadotropin release, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 4000 IU IM) was administered to determine testosterone (T) secretion. Responses to stimulation were categorized as 'responder' or 'non-responder' by clinical criteria. Single factor ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to identify group differences. The proportion of responders to pituitary GnRH stimulation was similar in the SCI group (22 subjects (73%) for the follicular-stimulating hormone (FSH) and 23 subjects (76%) for the luteinizing hormone (LH) to that of the AB group. The SCI-responder group had an increased FSH response after stimulation compared with the AB-responder group (Pstimulation than the AB-responder group (P=0.06). The peak FSH response was at 60 min and the peak LH response at 30 min, regardless of group designation. All groups had similar increases in serum T concentration to hCG stimulation. The pituitary response to stimulation in healthy men with SCI revealed an augmented FSH response; LH response only trended higher. The testicular response to provocative stimulation was similar in hypogonadal and eugondal subjects and in GnRH responders and non-responders. These findings suggest a lack of hypothalamic drive of pituitary gonadotropin release in healthy people with chronic SCI.

  5. Deafferentation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) exaggerates the sympathoadrenal system activity in stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondicova, K; Kvetnansky, R; Mravec, B

    2014-07-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus is a key structure in the regulation of the autonomic and neuroendocrine systems response to acute and chronic stress challenges. In this study, we examined the effect of a mechanical posterolateral deafferentation of the PVN on the activity of sympathoadrenal system (SAS) and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring plasma concentrations of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), and corticosterone (CORT) in rats exposed to acute immobilization (IMO) stress. The surgical posterolateral deafferentation of the PVN (PVN-deaf) was performed by Halasz knife, in brain of the adult male Sprague Dawley rats, according to coordinates of a stereotaxic atlas. Sham-operated (SHAM) animals underwent a craniotomy only. The animals were allowed to recover 14 days. Thereafter, the tail artery was cannulated and the animals exposed to acute IMO for 2 h. The blood samples were collected via cannula at the time points of 0, 5, 30, 60, and 120 min of the IMO. Concentrations of plasma EPI, NE, and CORT were determined by radioimmunoassay. The IMO-induced elevation of plasma EPI concentrations in the PVN-deaf rats reached statistical significance at 60 min of the IMO, when compared to SHAM rats. Similarly, the stress-induced elevation of the NE plasma levels in the PVN-deaf rats was significantly exaggerated at all time intervals of IMO in comparison with SHAM rats, whereas plasma CORT levels were significantly reduced. In contrast to the traditional view of excitatory role of the PVN in response to stress, our data indicate that some projections from the PVN to caudally localized hypothalamic structures, the brainstem or the spinal cord, exert inhibitory effect on the SAS system activity during acute IMO stress. The data indicate that stress-induced activation of the HPA axis is partially dependent on inputs from the brainstem to the PVN.

  6. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  7. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea: a partial and reversible gonadotrophin deficiency of nutritional origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzinet, B; Young, J; Brailly, S; Le Bouc, Y; Chanson, P; Schaison, G

    1999-02-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (FHA) is a consequence of low dietary intake as observed in two major pathophysiological conditions, anorexia nervosa and/or intensive physical exercise. The aim of the present study was to assess in women with FHA and normal body mass index (BMI) and apparently normal daily activities, the degree of impairment of GnRH secretion, its nutritional origin and its reversibility. Twelve women (22-35 years) with FHA not related with exercise and 12 age and BMI matched menstruating controls (NC) were studied. Six women with congenital hypothalamic hypogonadism (CHH), representative of complete gonadotrophin deficiency, were also enrolled for comparison. Plasma oestradiol (E2) and androstenedione (A) levels were measured and the pulsatile profile of LH was studied. A GnRH agonist test, using 100 micrograms S/C of DTrp6 GnRH (Triptorelin) was performed (sampling every 2 h for 24 h). Dietary intake, body composition and nutritional markers (FT3, ferritin, retinol binding protein (RBP), SHBG, IGF-1 and leptin) were measured. All the women with FHA were advised to normalize their diet during four months. The same studies were performed if nutritional markers and body composition were normalized. In FHA, mean plasma E2 and A levels were low. LH pulse frequency and amplitude were significantly reduced compared to NC (P nutritional intake were identified, with altered dietary composition. FHA consumed significantly less fat (P Assessment of nutritional markers allows recognition of mild nutritional insufficiency as a common cause of FHAs. The gonadotrophin deficiency is partial and may be reversible after improvement of nutritional intake and body composition.

  8. Topiramate treatment improves hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling and action and reduces obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricilli, Andrea M; Penteado, Erica; de Abreu, Lélia L; Quaresma, Paula G F; Santos, Andressa C; Guadagnini, Dioze; Razolli, Daniella; Mittestainer, Francine C; Carvalheira, Jose B; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario J A; Prada, Patricia O

    2012-09-01

    Topiramate (TPM) treatment has been shown to reduce adiposity in humans and rodents. The reduction in adiposity is related to decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, the molecular mechanisms through which TPM induces weight loss are contradictory and remain to be clarified. Whether TPM treatment alters hypothalamic insulin, or leptin signaling and action, is not well established. Thus, we investigate herein whether short-term TPM treatment alters energy balance by affecting insulin and leptin signaling, action, or neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed with a high-fat diet. As expected, short-term treatment with TPM diminished adiposity in obese mice mainly due to reduced food intake. TPM increased anorexigenic signaling by enhancing the leptin-induced leptin receptor/Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and the insulin-induced insulin receptor substrate/Akt/forkhead box O1 pathway in parallel to reduced phosphatase protein expression in the hypothalamus of obese mice. These effects were independent of body weight. TPM also raised anorexigenic neuropeptides such as POMC, TRH, and CRH mRNA levels in obese mice. In addition, TPM increased the activation of the hypothalamic MAPK/ERK pathway induced by leptin, accompanied by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator α and uncoupling protein 1 protein levels in brown adipose tissue. Furthermore, TPM increased AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation in peripheral tissues, which may help improve energy metabolism in these tissues. Together, these results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms through which TPM treatment reduces adiposity.

  9. Functional cross-talk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viau, V

    2002-06-01

    Under normal conditions, the adrenal glucocorticoids, the endproduct of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, provide a frontline of defence against threats to homeostasis (i.e. stress). On the other hand, chronic HPA drive and glucocorticoid hypersecretion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several forms of systemic, neurodegenerative and affective disorders. The HPA axis is subject to gonadal influence, indicated by sex differences in basal and stress HPA function and neuropathologies associated with HPA dysfunction. Functional cross-talk between the gonadal and adrenal axes is due in large part to the interactive effects of sex steroids and glucocorticoids, explaining perhaps why several disease states linked to stress are sex-dependent. Realizing the interactive nature by which the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and HPA systems operate, however, has made it difficult to model how these hormones act in the brain. Manipulation of one endocrine system is not without effects on the other. Simultaneous manipulation and assessment of both endocrine systems can overcome this problem. This dual approach in the male rat reveals that testosterone can act and interact on different aspects of basal and stress HPA function. Basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release is regulated by testosterone-dependent effects on arginine vasopressin synthesis, and corticosterone-dependent effects on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) synthesis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. In contrast, testosterone and corticosterone interact on stress-induced ACTH release and drive to the PVN motor neurones. Candidate structures mediating this interaction include several testosterone-sensitive afferents to the HPA axis, including the medial preoptic area, central and medial amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis. All of these relay homeostatic information and integrate reproductive and social behaviour. Because these modalities are affected

  10. Optogenetic identification of hypothalamic orexin neuron projections to paraventricular spinally projecting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Schwartz, Alan R; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Mendelowitz, David

    2017-04-01

    Orexin neurons, and activation of orexin receptors, are generally thought to be sympathoexcitatory; however, the functional connectivity between orexin neurons and a likely sympathetic target, the hypothalamic spinally projecting neurons (SPNs) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) has not been established. To test the hypothesis that orexin neurons project directly to SPNs in the PVN, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was selectively expressed in orexin neurons to enable photoactivation of ChR2-expressing fibers while examining evoked postsynaptic currents in SPNs in rat hypothalamic slices. Selective photoactivation of orexin fibers elicited short-latency postsynaptic currents in all SPNs tested (n = 34). These light-triggered responses were heterogeneous, with a majority being excitatory glutamatergic responses (59%) and a minority of inhibitory GABAergic (35%) and mixed glutamatergic and GABAergic currents (6%). Both glutamatergic and GABAergic responses were present in the presence of tetrodotoxin and 4-aminopyridine, suggesting a monosynaptic connection between orexin neurons and SPNs. In addition to generating postsynaptic responses, photostimulation facilitated action potential firing in SPNs (current clamp configuration). Glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, postsynaptic currents were diminished by application of the orexin receptor antagonist almorexant, indicating orexin release facilitates glutamatergic neurotransmission in this pathway. This work identifies a neuronal circuit by which orexin neurons likely exert sympathoexcitatory control of cardiovascular function.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to establish, using innovative optogenetic approaches in a transgenic rat model, that there are robust heterogeneous projections from orexin neurons to paraventricular spinally projecting neurons, including excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. Endogenous orexin release modulates glutamatergic, but not GABAergic

  11. Defective hypothalamic autophagy directs the central pathogenesis of obesity via the IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta)/NF-kappaB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-09-16

    Autophagy has been recently demonstrated to control cell and tissue homeostasis, including the functions of various metabolic tissues. However, it remains unclear whether autophagy is critical for the central nervous system and particularly the hypothalamus for exerting metabolic regulation. Using autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) as an autophagic marker, this work showed that autophagy was highly active in the mediobasal hypothalamus of normal mice. In contrast, chronic development of dietary obesity was associated with autophagic decline in the mediobasal hypothalamus. To investigate the potential role of autophagy in the hypothalamic control of metabolic physiology, a mouse model was developed with autophagic inhibition in the mediobasal hypothalamus using site-specific delivery of lentiviral shRNA against Atg7. This model revealed that hypothalamic inhibition of autophagy increased energy intake and reduced energy expenditure. These metabolic changes were sufficient to increase body weight gain under normal chow feeding and exacerbate the progression of obesity and whole-body insulin resistance under high-fat diet feeding. To explore the underlying mechanism, this study found that defective hypothalamic autophagy led to hypothalamic inflammation, including the activation of proinflammatory IκB kinase β pathway. Using brain-specific IκB kinase β knockout mice, it was found that the effects of defective hypothalamic autophagy in promoting obesity were reversed by IκB kinase β inhibition in the brain. In conclusion, hypothalamic autophagy is crucial for the central control of feeding, energy, and body weight balance. Conversely, decline of hypothalamic autophagy under conditions of chronic caloric excess promotes hypothalamic inflammation and thus impairs hypothalamic control of energy balance, leading to accelerated development of obesity and comorbidities.

  12. Developmental changes in the hypothalamic mRNA levels of prepro-orexin and orexin receptors and their sensitivity to fasting in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    Orexin, which is also called as hypocretin (Hcrt), a product of the prepro-orexin (pp-orexin//Hcrt) gene, affects various physiological and behavioral functions, such as the sleep-wake cycle and appetite. The developmental changes in the hypothalamic mRNA levels of pp-prexin and the orexin receptors OX1R and OX2R and their sensitivity to fasting were evaluated in both male and female rats. During development, hypothalamic pp-orexin/Hcrt mRNA expression increased in both male and female rats, whereas hypothalamic OX1R mRNA expression decreased in both sexes. In addition, hypothalamic OX2R mRNA expression increased in male rats, but did not change in female rats. Fasting did not affect hypothalamic pp-orexin/Hcrt mRNA expression in either sex. Hypothalamic OX1R mRNA expression was increased by fasting in the prepubertal period (postnatal days 20 and 30) in female rats, but was not affected by fasting in males. In male rats, hypothalamic OX2R mRNA expression was decreased by fasting during the neonatal period (postnatal day 10), but not the prepubertal period (postnatal days 20 and 30). In females, hypothalamic OX2R mRNA expression was also decreased by fasting; however, the fasting-induced downregulation of hypothalamic OX2R expression persisted until postnatal day 20. These results indicate that the developmental patterns of components of the orexin system and their sensitivity to fasting during the neonatal and prepubertal periods only differ slightly between the sexes. These differences might be involved in the development of some physiological and behavioral functions.

  13. Perinatal undernutrition modifies cell proliferation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels during critical time-windows for hypothalamic and hippocampal development in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, B; Dutriez-Casteloot, I; Breton, C; Lefèvre, F; Mairesse, J; Dickes-Coopman, A; Silhol, M; Tapia-Arancibia, L; Lesage, J; Vieau, D

    2009-01-01

    Maternal perinatal undernutrition (MPU) modifies the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sensitises to the development of metabolic and cognitive adult diseases. Because the hypothalamus and hippocampus are involved in the regulation of neuroendocrine activity, energy metabolism and cognition, we hypothesised that a maternal 50% food restriction (FR50) from day 14 of pregnancy (E14) until postnatal day 21 (P21) would affect the development of these structures in male rat offspring. Protein and mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cell proliferation [analysed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation] were compared in both control and FR50 rats from E21 to P22. Although the pattern of the evolution of BDNF concentration and cell proliferation throughout development was not strikingly different between groups, several disturbances at specific developmental stages were observed. FR50 rats exhibited a delayed increase of hippocampal BDNF content whereas, in the hypothalamus, BDNF level was augmented from E21 to P14 and associated, at this latter stage, with an increased mRNA expression of TRkB-T2. In both groups, a correlation between BDNF content and the number of BrdU positive cells was noted in the dentate gyrus, whereas opposite variations were observed in CA1, CA2 and CA3 layers, and in the arcuate and ventromedial nuclei. In the hippocampus, P15-FR50 rats showed an increased number of BrdU positive cells in all regions, whereas, at P22, a decrease was observed in the CA2. In the hypothalamus, between E21 and P8, MPU increases the number of BrdU positive cells in all regions analysed and, until P15, marked differences were noticed in the median eminence, the paraventricular nucleus and the arcuate nucleus. Taken together, the results obtained in the present study show that MPU changes the time course of production of BDNF and cell proliferation in specific hippocampal and hypothalamic areas during sensitive

  14. A Time-course Analysis of Effects of the Steroidogenesis Inhibitor Ketoconazole on Components of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  15. A time-course analysis of effects of the steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole on components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of fathead minnows (Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  16. Whey protein isolate counteracts the effects of a high-fat diet on energy intake and hypothalamic and adipose tissue expression of energy balance-related genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAllan, Liam; Keane, Deirdre; Schellekens, Harriët; Roche, Helen M; Korpela, Riitta; Cryan, John F; Nilaweera, Kanishka N

    2013-01-01

    ...) enriched with either 20 % energy as casein (LFD and HFD) or WPI (high-fat WPI). Metabolic parameters and the hypothalamic and epididymal adipose tissue expression of energy balance-related genes were investigated...

  17. Sex difference in physical activity, energy expenditure and obesity driven by a subpopulation of hypothalamic POMC neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke K. Burke

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: These data provide support for the functional heterogeneity of hypothalamic POMC neurons, revealing that Pomc expression within 5-HT2CR expressing neurons is sufficient to regulate energy intake and insulin sensitivity in male and female mice. However, an unexpected sex difference in the function of this subset of POMC neurons was identified with regard to energy expenditure. We reveal that a large sex difference in physical activity, energy expenditure and the development of obesity is driven by this subpopulation, which constitutes approximately 40% of all POMC neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. This may have broad implications for strategies utilized to combat obesity, which at present largely ignore the sex of the obese individual.

  18. Excess of leptin inhibits hypothalamic KiSS-1 expression in pubertal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Yeon Ahn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; Leptin has been considered a link between metabolic state and reproductive activity. Defective reproductive function can occur in leptin-deficient and leptin-excessive conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of centrally injected leptin on the hypothalamic &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; system in relation to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH action in the initial stage of puberty. &lt;B&gt;Methods:&lt;/B&gt; Leptin (1 μg was injected directly into the ventricle of pubertal female mice. The resultant gene expressions of hypothalamic &lt;I&gt;GnRH&lt;/I&gt; and &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; and pituitary LH, 2 and 4 hours after injection, were compared with those of saline-injected control mice. The changes in the gene expressions after blocking the GnRH action were also analyzed. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/B&gt; The basal expression levels of &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt;, GnRH, and LH were significantly higher in the pubertal mice than in the prepubertal mice. The 1-μg leptin dose significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt;, GnRH, and LH in the pubertal mice. A &lt;I&gt;GnRH&lt;/I&gt; antagonist significantly increased the &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; and GnRH mRNA expression levels, and the additional leptin injection decreased the gene expression levels compared with those in the control group. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; The excess leptin might have suppressed the central reproductive axis in the pubertal mice by inhibiting the &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; expression, and this mechanism is independent of the GnRH-LHestradiol feedback loop.

  19. Hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction in acute nonmycobacterial infections of central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Acute and chronic central nervous system (CNS infections are not uncommon in tropical countries and are associated with high morbidity and mortality if specific targeted therapy is not instituted in time. Effects of tubercular meningitis, a form of chronic meningitis on hypothalamic pituitary axis, are well known both at the time of diagnosis and after few months to years of illness. However, there are few reports of pituitary dysfunction in subjects with acute CNS infections. Therefore, this study was aimed at evaluating the pituitary hormonal profile in patients with nonmycobacterial acute meningitis at the time of presentation. Materials and Methods: This prospective case series study included 30 untreated adult patients with acute meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or encephalitis, due to various nonmycobacterial agents, admitted and registered with Lok Nayak Hospital, Maulana Aazd Medical College, New Delhi, between September 2007 and March 2009. Patients with preexisting endocrine diseases, tubercular meningitis and patients on steroids were carefully excluded from the study. The basal pituitary hormonal profile was measured by the electrochemilumniscence technique for serum cortisol, luetinizing hormone (LH, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH, prolactin (PRL, thyrotropin (TSH, free tri-iodothyronine (fT3, and free thyroxine (fT4. Results: The cases (n = 30 comprised of patients with acute pyogenic meningitis (n = 23, viral meningoencephalitis (n = 4, brain abscess (n = 2, and cryptococcal meningitis (n = 1. The mean age of patients was 28.97 ± 11.306 years. Out of 30 patients, 14 (46.7% were males and 16 (58.1% were females. Adrenal insufficiency both absolute and relative was seen in seven (23.3% and hyperprolactinemia was seen in nine (30.0% of the patients. One study subject had central hypothyroidism and seven (23.3 showed low levels of LH and/or FSH. None of patients showed clinical features suggestive of

  20. Rapid-onset obesity, hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, autonomic dysregulation and neuroendocrine tumor syndrome with a homogenous enlargement of the pituitary gland: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabban, Lama; Kassab, Lina; Bakoura, Nour Alhuda; Alsalka, Mohammad Fayez; Maksoud, Ismaeil

    2016-11-22

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome is a rare pediatric disorder with a variable sequence of clinical presentations, undefined etiology, and high risk of mortality. Our patient presented an unusual course of the disease accompanied by a homogenous mild enlargement of her pituitary gland with an intact pituitary-endocrine axis which, to the best of our knowledge, represents a new finding in rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome. We present a documented case of a 4 years and 8-month-old Syrian Arabic girl with a distinctive course of signs and symptoms of rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome accompanied by mature ganglioneuroma in her chest, a homogenous mild enlargement of her pituitary gland, generalized cortical brain atrophy, and seizures. Three months after her first marked symptoms were noted she had a sudden progression of severe respiratory distress that ended with her death. The findings of this case could increase our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation, and place more emphases on pediatricians to consider rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome whenever early rapid onset of obesity, associated with any malfunction, is observed in children. This knowledge could be lifesaving for children with rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome.

  1. Panic-like defensive behavior but not fear-induced antinociception is differently organized by dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei of Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Biagioni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a forebrain structure critically involved in the organization of defensive responses to aversive stimuli. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic dysfunction in dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei is implicated in the origin of panic-like defensive behavior, as well as in pain modulation. The present study was conducted to test the difference between these two hypothalamic nuclei regarding defensive and antinociceptive mechanisms. Thus, the GABA A antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/0.2 µL or saline (0.9% NaCl was microinjected into the dorsomedial or posterior hypothalamus in independent groups. Innate fear-induced responses characterized by defensive attention, defensive immobility and elaborate escape behavior were evoked by hypothalamic blockade of GABA A receptors. Fear-induced defensive behavior organized by the posterior hypothalamus was more intense than that organized by dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Escape behavior elicited by GABA A receptor blockade in both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus was followed by an increase in nociceptive threshold. Interestingly, there was no difference in the intensity or in the duration of fear-induced antinociception shown by each hypothalamic division presently investigated. The present study showed that GABAergic dysfunction in nuclei of both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus elicit panic attack-like defensive responses followed by fear-induced antinociception, although the innate fear-induced behavior originates differently in the posterior hypothalamus in comparison to the activity of medial hypothalamic subdivisions.

  2. Panic-like defensive behavior but not fear-induced antinociception is differently organized by dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei of Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.F.; Silva, J.A.; Coimbra, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a forebrain structure critically involved in the organization of defensive responses to aversive stimuli. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic dysfunction in dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei is implicated in the origin of panic-like defensive behavior, as well as in pain modulation. The present study was conducted to test the difference between these two hypothalamic nuclei regarding defensive and antinociceptive mechanisms. Thus, the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/0.2 µL) or saline (0.9% NaCl) was microinjected into the dorsomedial or posterior hypothalamus in independent groups. Innate fear-induced responses characterized by defensive attention, defensive immobility and elaborate escape behavior were evoked by hypothalamic blockade of GABAA receptors. Fear-induced defensive behavior organized by the posterior hypothalamus was more intense than that organized by dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Escape behavior elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus was followed by an increase in nociceptive threshold. Interestingly, there was no difference in the intensity or in the duration of fear-induced antinociception shown by each hypothalamic division presently investigated. The present study showed that GABAergic dysfunction in nuclei of both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus elicit panic attack-like defensive responses followed by fear-induced antinociception, although the innate fear-induced behavior originates differently in the posterior hypothalamus in comparison to the activity of medial hypothalamic subdivisions. PMID:22437484

  3. A Rare Case of Primary Amenorrhea with Two Etiologies, Hypothalamic Amenorrhea, Transverse Vaginal Septum, and No Hematocolpos

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We reported a rare case of hypothalamic amenorrhea and transverse vaginal septum. A 28-year-old woman presented with primary amenorrhea and no complaint of abdominal pain. Laparoscopy revealed a small rudimentary uterus with streak ovaries and a vaginal pouch. The patient with diagnosis of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome was subjected to a vaginoplasty in another fertility center. In our institute, after two courses of estrogen and progesterone, sonography revealed hematocolpos...

  4. Serotonin 5-HT2C receptor-mediated inhibition of the M-current in hypothalamic POMC neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Roepke, T. A.; Smith, A W; Rønnekleiv, O. K.; Kelly, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are controlled by many central signals, including serotonin. Serotonin increases POMC activity and reduces feeding behavior via serotonion [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptors by modulating K+ currents. A potential K+ current is the M-current, a noninactivating, subthreshold outward K+ current. Previously, we found that M-current activity was highly reduced in fasted vs. fed states in neuropeptide Y neurons. Because POMC neurons also respond t...

  5. Hair cortisol levels as a retrospective marker of hypothalamic-pituitary axis activity throughout pregnancy: Comparison to salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    D’Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly L.; ROSS, RANDAL G .; Natvig, Crystal L.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal stress during pregnancy is associated with negative maternal/child outcomes. One potential biomarker of the maternal stress response is cortisol, a product of activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This study evaluated cortisol levels in hair throughout pregnancy as a marker of total cortisol release. Cortisol levels in hair have been shown to be easily quantifiable and may be representative of total cortisol release more than single saliva or serum measures. Hair corti...

  6. Hypothalamic kiss1 mRNA and kisspeptin immunoreactivity are reduced in a rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Russell E; Wilkinson, Diane A; Imran, Syed A; Caraty, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2012-07-27

    An intact hypothalamic kiss1/kisspeptin/kiss1r complex is a prerequisite for reproductive competence, and kisspeptin treatment could be a practical therapeutic approach to some problems of infertility. One such disorder is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), a common cause of infertility affecting more than 100 million women. A rodent model of PCOS is the prepubertal female rat treated for a prolonged period with dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which induces many of the metabolic characteristics of the syndrome. We hypothesized that hypothalamic kiss1 mRNA levels, and kisspeptin immunoreactivity (ir), would be abnormal in these rats. Prepubertal female rats were exposed to DHT for 60 days. Rats were killed in two groups: at 26 and 60 days of DHT exposure. Kiss1 mRNA was quantified in hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary and visceral adipose tissue. Separate groups of rats provided brain tissue for immunohistochemical analysis of kisspeptin-ir. At 26 days of DHT exposure, hypothalamic kiss1 mRNA was severely depleted. In contrast DHT had no effect on pituitary kiss1 expression but it significantly increased levels of kiss1 mRNA in fat (+9-fold; povary (+3-fold; povary but remained elevated in fat (+4-fold; ppolycystic ovary syndrome. In hypothalamus, specifically, kiss1 mRNA, and levels of kisspeptin immunoreactivity, are significantly reduced. Since these rats exhibit many of the characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome, we suggest that atypical kiss1 expression may contribute to the multiple tissue abnormalities observed in women with this disorder. However, and of some importance, our data do not appear to be consistent with the elevated levels of LH seen in women with PCOS; i.e. reduced levels of hypothalamic kiss1 mRNA and kisspeptin immunoreactivity observed in DHT-treated rats are unlikely to produce elevated LH secretion.

  7. Maternal deprivation has sexually dimorphic long-term effects on hypothalamic cell-turnover, body weight and circulating hormone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros, María-Paz; Llorente, Ricardo; Díaz, Francisca; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2010-11-01

    Maternal deprivation (MD) has numerous outcomes, including modulation of neuroendocrine functions. We previously reported that circulating leptin levels are reduced and hypothalamic cell-turnover is affected during MD, with some of these effects being sexually dimorphic. As leptin modulates the development of hypothalamic circuits involved in metabolic control, we asked whether MD has long-term consequences on body weight, leptin levels and the expression of neuropeptides involved in metabolism. Rats were separated from their mother for 24h starting on postnatal day (PND) 9 and sacrificed at PNDs 13, 35 and 75. In both sexes MD reduced body weight, but only until puberty, while leptin levels were unchanged at PND 35 and significantly reduced at PND 75. Adiponectin levels were also reduced at PND 75 in females, while testosterone levels were reduced in males. At PND 13, MD modulated cell-turnover markers in the hypothalamus of males, but not females and increased nestin, a marker of immature neurons, in both sexes, with males having higher levels than females and a significantly greater rise in response to MD. There was no effect of MD on hypothalamic mRNA levels of the leptin receptor or metabolic neuropeptides or the mRNA levels of leptin and adiponectin in adipose tissue. Thus, MD has long-term effects on the levels of circulating hormones that are not correlated with changes in body weight. Furthermore, these endocrine outcomes are different between males and females, which could be due to the fact that MD may have sexually dimorphic effects on hypothalamic development.

  8. Changes in the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during the early puerperium may be related to the postpartum 'blues'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keane, V; Lightman, S; Patrick, K; Marsh, M; Papadopoulos, A S; Pawlby, S; Seneviratne, G; Taylor, A; Moore, R

    2011-11-01

    Most women experience time-limited and specific mood changes in the days after birth known as the maternity blues (Blues). The maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis undergoes gradual changes during pregnancy because of an increasing production of placental corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). The abrupt withdrawal of placental CRH at birth results in a re-equilibration of the maternal HPA axis in the days post-delivery. These changes may be involved in the aetiology of the Blues given the central role of the HPA axis in the aetiology of mood disorders in general, and in perinatal depression in particular. We aimed to test the novel hypothesis that the experience of the Blues may be related to increased secretion of hypothalamic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secretagogue peptides, after the reduction in negative-feedback inhibition on the maternal hypothalamus caused by withdrawal of placental CRH. We therefore examined hormonal changes in the HPA axis in the days after delivery in relation to daily mood changes: our specific prediction was that mood changes would parallel ACTH levels, reflecting increased hypothalamic peptide secretion. Blood concentrations of CRH, ACTH, cortisol, progesterone and oestriol were measured in 70 healthy women during the third trimester of pregnancy, and on days 1-6 post-delivery. Blues scores were evaluated during the postpartum days. Oestriol, progesterone and CRH levels fell rapidly from pregnancy up to day 6, whereas cortisol levels fell modestly. ACTH concentrations declined from pregnancy to day 3 post-delivery and thereafter increased up to day 6. Blues scores increased, peaking on day 5, and were positively correlated with ACTH; and negatively correlated with oestriol levels during the postpartum days, and with the reduction in CRH concentrations from pregnancy. These findings give indirect support to the hypothesis that the 'reactivation' of hypothalamic ACTH secretagogue peptides may be involved in the

  9. Diurnal profiles of hypothalamic energy balance gene expression with photoperiod manipulation in the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Claire; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Ross, Alexander W; Morgan, Peter J; Mercer, Julian G

    2008-04-01

    Hypothalamic energy balance genes have been examined in the context of seasonal body weight regulation in the Siberian hamster. Most of these long photoperiod (LD)/short photoperiod (SD) comparisons have been of tissues collected at a single point in the light-dark cycle. We examined the diurnal expression profile of hypothalamic genes in hamsters killed at 3-h intervals throughout the light-dark cycle after housing in LD or SD for 12 wk. Gene expression of neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, proopiomelanocortin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, long-form leptin receptor, suppressor of cytokine signaling-3, melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor, and the clock gene Per1 as control were measured by in situ hybridization in hypothalamic nuclei. Effects of photoperiod on gene expression and leptin levels were generally consistent with previous reports. A clear diurnal variation was observed for Per1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in both photoperiods. Temporal effects on expression of energy balance genes were restricted to long-form leptin receptor in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus, where similar diurnal expression profiles were observed, and melanocortin-4 receptor in the paraventricular nucleus; these effects were only observed in LD hamsters. There was no variation in serum leptin concentration. The 24-h profiles of hypothalamic energy balance gene expression broadly confirm photoperiodic differences that were observed previously, based on single time point comparisons, support the growing consensus that these genes have a limited role in seasonal body weight regulation, and further suggest limited involvement in daily rhythms of food intake.

  10. Negative Regulation of Leptin-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation by Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Martella, Andrea; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-05-29

    The adipocyte-derived, anorectic hormone leptin was recently shown to owe part of its regulatory effects on appetite-regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Leptin is also known to exert a negative regulation on hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels and hence on cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity. Here we investigated the possibility of a negative regulation by CB1 receptors of leptin-mediated ROS formation in the ARC. Through pharmacological and molecular biology experiments we report data showing that leptin-induced ROS accumulation is 1) blunted by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) in a CB1-dependent manner in both the mouse hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-N41 and ARC neuron primary cultures, 2) likewise blocked by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, troglitazone, in a manner inhibited by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist that also inhibited the ACEA effect on leptin, 3) blunted under conditions of increased endocannabinoid tone due to either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation in mHypoE-N41 and primary ARC neuronal cultures from MAGL(-/-) mice, respectively, and 4) associated with reduction of both PPAR-γ and catalase activity, which are reversed by both ACEA and troglitazone. We conclude that CB1 activation reverses leptin-induced ROS formation and hence possibly some of the ROS-mediated effects of the hormone by preventing PPAR-γ inhibition by leptin, with subsequent increase of catalase activity. This mechanism might underlie in part CB1 orexigenic actions under physiopathological conditions accompanied by elevated hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels.

  11. Impact of birth weight and gender on early postnatal hypothalamic energy balance regulatory gene expression in the young lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, C L; Bake, T; Findlay, P A; Milne, J S; Aitken, R P; Wallace, J M

    2013-11-01

    Intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) is involved in developmental metabolic programming and here we test the hypothesis that IUGR affects the developing hypothalamic energy balance regulatory pathways in a sex-specific manner. This experiment investigated early postnatal hypothalamic gene expression for six primary leptin- and insulin-sensitive neuropeptides and receptors in male and female IUGR (n = 8 and 9, respectively) and normal (N) birth weight lambs (n = 8 per gender) gestated and suckled by overnourished mothers. IUGR lambs were smaller at birth, had increased fractional growth rates (FGR), lower final body weight (11 weeks) and similar body fat content compared with N lambs, while males had higher final body weight and insulinemia but lower body fat and leptinemia than females. In situ hybridization revealed greater gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus at 11 weeks for anorexigenic genes in females and orexigenic genes in males, with no effect of IUGR. Leptinemia correlated with gene expression for neuropeptide Y (NPY, negatively) in both sexes and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, positively) in females but with leptin receptor (negatively) only in males. Current FGR for girth correlated negatively with gene expression for NPY in males and POMC in females. Neither IUGR nor gender affected suckling activity (proxy for appetite) assessed at 3 weeks, but final NPY gene expression correlated with suckling weight gain in males. This study has revealed no effect of IUGR on early postnatal hypothalamic energy balance gene expression but a major effect of gender associated with major sex differences in adiposity and leptinemia. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human recombinant factor VIIa may improve heat intolerance in mice by attenuating hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis and damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Yung, Ming-Chi

    2014-10-01

    Intolerance to heat exposure is believed to be associated with hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis impairment [reflected by decreases in blood concentrations of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone]. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of human recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa) on heat intolerance, HPA axis impairment, and hypothalamic inflammation, ischemic and oxidative damage, and apoptosis in mice under heat stress. Immediately after heat stress (41.2 °C for 1 h), mice were treated with vehicle (1 mL/kg of body weight) or rfVIIa (65-270 µg/kg of body weight) and then returned to room temperature (26 °C). Mice still alive on day 4 of heat exposure were considered survivors. Cellular ischemia markers (e.g., glutamate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio), oxidative damage markers (e.g., nitric oxide metabolite, hydroxyl radials), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α) in hypothalamus were determined. In addition, blood concentrations of both ACTH and corticosterone were measured. Hypothalamic cell damage was assessed by determing the neuronal damage scores, whereas the hypothalamic cell apoptosis was determined by assessing the numbers of cells stained with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated αUTP nick-end labeling, caspase-3-positive cells, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecula-1-positive cells in hypothalamus. Compared with vehicle-treated heated mice, rfVIIa-treated heated mice had significantly higher fractional survival (8/10 vs 1/10), lesser thermoregulatory deficit (34.1 vs 24.8 °C), lesser extents of ischemic, oxidative, and inflammatory markers in hypothalamus, lesser neuronal damage scores and apoptosis in hypothalamus, and lesser HPA axis impairment. Human recombinant factor VIIa appears to exert a protective effect against heatstroke by attenuating hypothalamic cell apoptosis (due to ischemic, inflammatory, and oxidative damage

  13. Hypothalamic GPR40 Signaling Activated by Free Long Chain Fatty Acids Suppresses CFA-Induced Inflammatory Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuo Nakamoto; Takashi Nishinaka; Naoya Sato; Mitsumasa Mankura; Yutaka Koyama; Fumiyo Kasuya; Shogo Tokuyama

    2013-01-01

    GPR40 has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, reports studying functional role of GPR40 in the brain are lacking. The present study focused on the relationship between pain regulation and GPR40, investigating the functional roles of hypothalamic GPR40 during chronic pain caused using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory chronic pain mouse model. GPR40 protein expression in the hypothalamus was transiently inc...

  14. Relation of addiction genes to hypothalamic gene changes subserving genesis and gratification of a classic instinct, sodium appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Liedtke, Wolfgang B.; McKinley, Michael J; Walker, Lesley L.; Zhang, Hao; Pfenning, Andreas R.; Drago, John; Hochendoner, Sarah J.; Hilton, Donald L.; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Denton, Derek A.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium appetite is an instinct that involves avid specific intention. It is elicited by sodium deficiency, stress-evoked adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and reproduction. Genome-wide microarrays in sodium-deficient mice or after ACTH infusion showed up-regulation of hypothalamic genes, including dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein 32 kDa (DARPP-32), dopamine receptors-1 and -2, α-2C- adrenoceptor, and striatally enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). Both DARPP-32 ...

  15. Influence of ERβ selective agonism during the neonatal period on the sexual differentiation of the rat hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patisaul Heather B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that sexual differentiation of the rodent hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is principally orchestrated by estrogen during the perinatal period. Here we sought to better characterize the mechanistic role the beta form of the estrogen receptor (ERβ plays in this process. Methods To achieve this, we exposed neonatal female rats to three doses (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg of the ERβ selective agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN using estradiol benzoate (EB as a positive control. Measures included day of vaginal opening, estrous cycle quality, GnRH and Fos co-localization following ovariectomy and hormone priming, circulating luteinizing hormone (LH levels and quantification of hypothalamic kisspeptin immunoreactivity. A second set of females was then neonatally exposed to DPN, the ERα agonist propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT, DPN+PPT, or EB to compare the impact of ERα and ERβ selective agonism on kisspeptin gene expression in pre- and post-pubescent females. Results All three DPN doses significantly advanced the day of vaginal opening and induced premature anestrus. GnRH and Fos co-labeling, a marker of GnRH activation, following ovariectomy and hormone priming was reduced by approximately half at all doses; the magnitude of which was not as large as with EB or what we have previously observed with the ERα agonist PPT. LH levels were also correspondingly lower, compared to control females. No impact of DPN was observed on the density of kisspeptin immunoreactive (-ir fibers or cell bodies in the arcuate (ARC nucleus, and kisspeptin-ir was only significantly reduced by the middle (1 mg/kg DPN dose in the preoptic region. The second experiment revealed that EB, PPT and the combination of DPN+PPT significantly abrogated preoptic Kiss1 expression at both ages but ARC expression was only reduced by EB. Conclusion Our results indicate that selective agonism of ERβ is not sufficient to completely achieve male

  16. Effects of cold stress on hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing and thyrotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA levels in chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jintao; XU Shiwen

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that stress can activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and hypothalamic-pituitarythyroid-axis, and further affect the synthesis and secretion of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). To evaluate the effect of cold stress on the hypothalamic CRH and TRH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in Yisha chickens, male Yisha chickens were subjected to acute (1, 6, 12 h) and chronic (5, 10, 20 d) cold stress (12±1)℃. Hypothalami were collected for assessment of mRNA levels by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Acute stress resulted in a significant decrease of CRH mRNA levels at 6 and 12 h, and a significant increase of TRH mRNA levels at every stress time point. Chronic cold stress resulted in a significant increase of CRH mRNA levels and a significant decrease of TRH mRNA levels compared with the control group at every stress time point. The results suggest that the two genes differently respond to cold stress at the mRNA levels. And the different degrees of cold stress will produce different effects on the identical gene.

  17. Insulin Detemir Causes Lesser Weight Gain in Comparison to Insulin Glargine: Role on Hypothalamic NPY and Galanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ishraq Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Compared with other insulin analogues, insulin detemir induces less weight gain. This study investigated whether this effect was achieved by influencing the hypothalamic appetite regulators neuropeptide Y (NPY and galanin (GAL. Methods. Type  2 diabetic rat models were established with a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of STZ. All rats were divided into NC, DM, DM+DE and DM+GLA groups. Glycemic levels of all study groups were checked at study onset and after 4 weeks of insulin treatment. Food intake and body weight were monitored during treatment. After 4 weeks, the hypothalamus of rats was examined for NPY and GAL mRNA and protein expression. Results. After 4 weeks of treatment, compared with the DM+GLA group, the DM+DE group exhibited less food intake (P<0.05 and less weight gain (P<0.05, but showed similar glycemic control. The expression of hypothalamic NPY and GAL at both mRNA and protein level were significantly lower (P<0.05 in the DM+DE group. Conclusion. Insulin detemir decreased food intake in type 2 diabetic rats, which led to reduced weight gain when compared to insulin glargine treatment. This effect is likely due to downregulation of hypothalamic NPY and GAL.

  18. Crossover of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA, -thyroid (HPT, and -gonadal (HPG axes in testicular development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Castañeda Cortés

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Besides the well-known function of thyroid hormones (THs for regulating metabolism, it has recently been discovered that THs are also involved in testicular development in mammalian and non-mammalian species. THs, in combination with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, lead to androgen synthesis in Denio rerio, which results in the onset of spermatogenesis in the testis, potentially relating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland (HPT to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axes. Furthermore, studies in non-mammalian species have suggested that by stimulating the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, THs can be induced by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH. This suggests that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal gland (HPA axis might influence the HPT axis. Additionally, it was shown that hormones pertaining to both HPT and HPA could also influence the HPG endocrine axis. For example, high levels of androgens were observed in the testis in Odonthestes bonariensis during a period of stress-induced sex determination, which suggests that stress hormones influence the gonadal fate towards masculinization. Thus, this review highlights the hormonal interactions observed between the HPT, HPA and HPG axes using a comparative approach in order to better understand how these endocrine systems could interact with each other to influence the development of testes.

  19. Role of leptin in energy-deprivation states: normal human physiology and clinical implications for hypothalamic amenorrhoea and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jean L; Mantzoros, Christos S

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that plays a key part in energy homoeostasis. Advances in leptin physiology have established that the main role of this hormone is to signal energy availability in energy-deficient states. Studies in animals and human beings have shown that low concentrations of leptin are fully or partly responsible for starvation-induced changes in neuroendocrine axes, including low reproductive, thyroid, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) hormones. Disease states such as exercise-induced hypothalamic amenorrhoea and anorexia nervosa are also associated with low concentrations of leptin and a similar spectrum of neuroendocrine abnormalities. We have recently shown in an interventional, proof-of-concept study that leptin can restore ovulatory menstrual cycles and improve reproductive, thyroid, and IGF hormones and bone markers in hypothalamic amenorrhoea. Further studies are warranted to establish the safety and effectiveness of leptin for the infertility and osteoporosis associated with hypothalamic amenorrhoea, and to clarify its role in anorexia nervosa.

  20. Circadian and estral changes in the hypothalamic prostaglandin e content and [h]prostaglandin e binding in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommelaer-Bayet, M C; Wisner, A; Renard, C A; Levi, F A; Dray, F

    1990-04-01

    Abstract Prostaglandin E(2), (PGE(2)) is involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone surge in female rats and may act via specific membrane receptors. The following studies were performed to determine whether there were any changes in the hypothalamic PGE(2) binding and/or PGE(2) content which were specific to proestrus and not to the rest of the estrous cycle. Groups of female Wistar rats were sacrificed at 3-h intervals throughout the estrous cycle to determine both the circadian and circaestral changes in the hypothalamic PGE(2) content and [(3)H]PGE(2) binding. The hypothalamic PGE(2) content was maximal at 1700 h on each of the 4 consecutive days of the estrous cycle but was independent of the stage of the cycle. [(3)H]PGE(2) binding also displayed a circadian rhythm; the lowest binding occurred near the circadian peak of PGE(2), suggesting that the PGE(2) binding sites were occupied by endogenous PGE(2). Since such circadian rhythms were not observed in the hypothalamus of male rats, they may be under the control of ovarian steroids. Also, since PGE(2) binding and the PGE(2) content both exhibit a diurnal pattern independent of the day of the cycle, there may be changes in the PGE(2) receptor-mediated process coupled to an adenylyl cyclase which could explain the luteinizing hormone surge in proestrus.

  1. Differential expression of hypothalamic fear- and stress-related genes in broiler chickens showing short or long tonic immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Ni, Y; Guo, F; Sun, Z; Ahmed, A; Zhao, R

    2014-04-01

    The serotonin system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis play important roles in modulating fear and stress-coping characteristics. Tonic immobility (TI) is a fear-related phenotype, and previously we have shown that broiler chickens showing short TI (STI) duration experience better growth performance and higher adaptability to stress. Here, we sought to further elucidate the central mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences between chickens showing STI and long TI duration, by comparing the hypothalamic expression of genes in the serotonergic system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis under basal and corticosterone-exposed situations. The STI broilers had significantly lower (P chickens at the level of both mRNA (P chickens, but the protein content was approximately 2 times higher (P chickens. The uncoupled expression of GR mRNA and protein was associated with significantly lower (P chickens. Corticosterone administration reduced the mRNA expression of postsynaptic serotonin receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B (P = 0.059) and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 7 (P stress-related genes.

  2. Intraperitoneal injection of neuropeptide Y (NPY) alters neurotrophin rat hypothalamic levels: Implications for NPY potential role in stress-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfo, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Tirassa, Paola; Croce, Nicoletta; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura; Angelucci, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide which exerts several regulatory actions within peripheral and central nervous systems. Among NPY actions preclinical and clinical data have suggested that the anxiolytic and antidepressant actions of NPY may be related to its antagonist action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons. In addition to this, a possible role of neurotrophins, particularly BDNF, in HPA axis hyperactivation has been proposed. To characterize the effect of NPY on the production of neurotrophins in the hypothalamus we exposed young adult rats to NPY intraperitoneal administration for three consecutive days and then evaluated BDNF and NGF synthesis in this brain region. We found that NPY treatment decreased BDNF and increased NGF production in the hypothalamus. Given the role of neurotrophins in the hypothalamus, these findings, although preliminary, provide evidence for a role of NPY as inhibitor of HPA axis and support the idea that NPY might be involved in pathologies characterized by HPA axis dysfunctions.

  3. The ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata): Afferent and efferent projections in relation to the control of reproductive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J Martin

    2017-08-15

    Sex-specific mating behaviors occur in a variety of mammals, with the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) mediating control of male and female sexual behavior, respectively. In birds, likewise, POM is predominantly involved in the control of male reproductive behavior, but the degree to which VMH is involved in female reproductive behavior is unclear. Here, in male and female zebra finches, a combination of aromatase immunohistochemistry and conventional tract tracing facilitated the definition of two separate but adjacent nuclei in the basal hypothalamus: an oblique band of aromatase-positive (AR+) neurons, and ventromedial to this, an ovoid, aromatase-negative (AR-) nucleus. The AR- nucleus, but not the AR+ nucleus, was here shown to receive a projection from rostral parts of the thalamic auditory nucleus ovoidalis and from the nucleus of the tractus ovoidalis. The AR- nucleus also receives an overlapping, major projection from previously uncharted regions of the medial arcopallium and a minor projection from the caudomedial nidopallium. Both the AR- and the AR+ nuclei project to the intercollicular nucleus of the midbrain. No obvious sex differences in either the pattern of AR immunoreactivity or of the afferent projections to the AR- nucleus were observed. The significance of these results in terms of the acoustic control of avian reproductive behavior is discussed, and a comparison with the organization of VMH afferents in lizards suggests a homologous similarity of the caudal telencephalon in sauropsids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Sex-Specific Control of Fat Mass and Counterregulation by Hypothalamic Glucokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbusch, Laura K M; Picard, Alexandre; Bonnet, Marion S; Basco, Davide; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Thorens, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    Glucokinase (Gck) is a critical regulator of glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells. It has been suggested to also play an important role in glucose signaling in neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN), a brain nucleus involved in the control of glucose homeostasis and feeding. To test the role of Gck in VMN glucose sensing and physiological regulation, we studied mice with genetic inactivation of the Gck gene in Sf1 neurons of the VMN (Sf1Gck(-/-) mice). Compared with control littermates, Sf1Gck(-/-) mice displayed increased white fat mass and adipocyte size, reduced lean mass, impaired hypoglycemia-induced glucagon secretion, and a lack of parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activation by neuroglucopenia. However, these phenotypes were observed only in female mice. To determine whether Gck was required for glucose sensing by Sf1 neurons, we performed whole-cell patch clamp analysis of brain slices from control and Sf1Gck(-/-) mice. Absence of Gck expression did not prevent the glucose responsiveness of glucose-excited or glucose-inhibited Sf1 neurons in either sex. Thus Gck in the VMN plays a sex-specific role in the glucose-dependent control of autonomic nervous activity; this is, however, unrelated to the control of the firing activity of classical glucose-responsive neurons.

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses of horses to therapeutic riding program: effects of different riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Esterina; Medica, Pietro; Cravana, Cristina; Ferlazzo, Adriana

    2013-06-13

    In order to determine whether therapeutic riding could result in higher levels of stress than recreational riding, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response was evaluated in six horses by monitoring circulating β-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Horses were already accustomed to be trained both for therapy and riding school activity since 2004. Intervention consisted of 60-minute therapeutic sessions, two times per week for 6weeks with different riders: disabled and recreational riders (session A and B respectively). The therapeutic riders' group (A) consisted of six children with psychomotor disabilities; the recreational riders' group (B) consisted of six healthy children without any previous horse riding experience. Horses were asked to perform the same gaits and exercises at all sessions, both with disabled and healthy users. The statistical analysis showed that during both sessions the mean basal β-endorphin and ACTH levels of horses did not show any significant changes, while the one way RM-ANOVA showed significant effects of sessions A on the cortisol (F=11.50; PHorses submitted to sessions A showed lower cortisol levels both at 5min (Phorses and for the variables settled, HPA axis was less responsive to disabled than healthy, recreational riders. Among the endocrine responses, cortisol was one of the indicators of HPA axis stress response.

  6. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in patients with pathological gambling and internet use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisel, Olga; Panneck, Patricia; Hellweg, Rainer; Wiedemann, Klaus; Müller, Christian A

    2015-03-30

    Alterations in secretion of stress hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have repeatedly been found in substance-related addictive disorders. It has been suggested that glucocorticoids might contribute to the development and maintenance of substance use disorders by facilitatory effects on behavioral responses to substances of abuse. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate HPA axis activity in patients with non-substance-related addictive disorders, i.e. pathological gambling and internet use disorder. We measured plasma levels of copeptin, a vasopressin surrogate marker, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in male patients with pathological gambling (n=14), internet use disorder (n=11) and matched healthy controls for pathological gambling (n=13) and internet use disorder (n=10). Plasma levels of copeptin, ACTH and cortisol in patients with pathological gambling or internet use disorder did not differ among groups. However, cortisol plasma levels correlated negatively with the severity of pathological gambling as measured by the PG-YBOCS. Together with our findings of increased serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in pathological gambling but not internet use disorder, these results suggest that the pathophysiology of pathological gambling shares some characteristics with substance-related addictive disorders on a neuroendocrinological level, whereas those similarities could not be observed in internet use disorder.

  7. Neuropeptide co-expression in hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons of laboratory animals and the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin eSkrapits

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic peptidergic neurons using kisspeptin (KP and its co-transmitters for communication are critically involved in the regulation of mammalian reproduction and puberty. This article provides an overview of neuropeptides present in KP neurons, with a focus on the human species. Immunohistochemical studies reveal that large subsets of human KP neurons synthesize neurokinin B, as also shown in laboratory species. In contrast, dynorphin described in KP neurons of rodents and sheep is found rarely in KP cells of human males and postmenopausal females. Similarly, galanin is detectable in mouse, but not human, KP cells, whereas substance P, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript and proenkephalin-derived opioids are expressed in varying subsets of KP neurons in humans, but not reported in ARC of other species. Human KP neurons do not contain neurotensin, cholecystokinin, proopiomelanocortin-derivatives, agouti-related protein, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin or tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine. These data identify the possible co-transmitters of human KP cells. Neurochemical properties distinct from those of laboratory species indicate that humans use considerably different neurotransmitter mechanisms to regulate fertility.

  8. Psoriasis severity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function: results from the CALIPSO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Brunoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that significantly impacts life quality, being associated with stress and mental disorders. We investigated whether the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis was associated with psoriasis severity, daily life stress and anxiety, and depressive symptoms. In this ancillary study, which was part of the CALIPSO (coronary artery calcium in psoriasis study, saliva was collected from 102 patients with psoriasis immediately upon awakening, 30, and 60 min after awakening, at 2:00 pm and at bedtime (five time points to determine salivary cortisol levels. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to evaluate the association of clinical and psychopathological variables with HPA activity. We found a direct correlation between bedtime cortisol and psoriasis severity evaluated by the psoriasis area severity index (PASI; r=0.39, P<0.001. No correlations between other clinical and psychopathological variables or with other cortisol assessments were observed. The findings indicated that HPA dysfunction may be present in psoriasis, as bedtime cortisol was correlated with psoriasis severity. Our study is limited by the lack of a control group; therefore, we were not able to explore whether these cortisol values were different compared with a concurrent, healthy sample.

  9. Food and the circadian activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.O. Leal

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal organization is an important feature of biological systems and its main function is to facilitate adaptation of the organism to the environment. The daily variation of biological variables arises from an internal time-keeping system. The major action of the environment is to synchronize the internal clock to a period of exactly 24 h. The light-dark cycle, food ingestion, barometric pressure, acoustic stimuli, scents and social cues have been mentioned as synchronizers or" zeitgebers". The circadian rhythmicity of plasma corticosteroids has been well characterized in man and in rats and evidence has been accumulated showing daily rhythmicity at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. Studies of restricted feeding in rats are of considerable importance because they reveal feeding as a major synchronizer of rhythms in HPA axis activity. The daily variation of the HPA axis stress response appears to be closely related to food intake as well as to basal activity. In humans, the association of feeding and HPA axis activity has been studied under physiological and pathological conditions such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus and Cushing's syndrome. Complex neuroanatomical pathways and neurochemical circuitry are involved in feeding-associated HPA axis modulation. In the present review we focus on the interaction among HPA axis rhythmicity, food ingestion, and different nutritional and endocrine states

  10. Recent advances in understanding the role of the hypothalamic circuit during aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret L Falkner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus was first implicated in the classic fight or flight response nearly a century ago, and since then, many important strides have been made in understanding both the circuitry and the neural dynamics underlying the generation of these behaviors. In this review, we will focus specifically on the role of the hypothalamus in aggression, paying particular attention to recent advances in the field that have allowed for functional identification of relevant hypothalamic subnuclei. Recent progress in this field has been aided by the development of new techniques for functional manipulation including optogenetics and pharmacogenetics, as well as advances in technology used for chronic in vivo recordings during complex social behaviors. We will examine the role of the hypothalamus through the complimentary lenses of 1 loss of function studies, including pharmacology and pharmacogenetics, 2 gain of function studies, including specific comparisons between results from classic electrical stimulation studies and more recent work using optogenetics, and 3 neural activity, including both immediate early gene and awake-behaving recordings. Lastly, we will outline current approaches to identifying the precise role of the hypothalamus in promoting aggressive motivation and aggressive action.

  11. Anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate reduces hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Jonas; Kindlundh, Anna M S; Nyberg, Fred; Bergström, Lena; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2003-10-03

    Supratherapeutical doses of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) have dramatic effects on metabolism in humans, and also inhibit feeding and reduce the rate of body weight gain in rats. In order to test the hypothesis that the AAS metabolic syndrome is accompanied by alterations in the central melanocortin system, we evaluated body weight, food intake and hypothalamic agouti-related protein (AgRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels following administration of different doses of the anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate. In order to distinguish changes induced by the steroid treatment per se from those resulting from the reduced food intake and growth rate, we also compared the effect of nandrolone decanoate on AgRP and POMC mRNA expression with both normally fed, and food restricted control groups. We here report that administration of nandrolone specifically reduces arcuate nucleus POMC mRNA levels while not affecting the expression level of AgRP. The effect on POMC expression was not observed in the food restricted controls, excluding the possibility that the observed effect was a mere response to the reduced food intake and body weight. These results raise the possibility that some of the metabolic and behavioural consequences of AAS abuse may be the result of alterations in the melanocortin system.

  12. To Ingest or Rest? Specialized Roles of Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurons in Coordinating Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette A. Brown

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH or orexins/hypocretins (OX are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders.

  13. Unimpaired thermogenic response to noradrenaline in genetic (ob/ob) and hypothalamic (MSG) obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duloo, A G; Miller, D S

    1984-04-01

    The thermogenic response to noradrenaline administration was investigated at 25 degrees C in two models of obese mice (genetic ob/ob obesity of the ' QEC ' strain and monosodium-glutamate-induced obesity) and in their respective lean littermates. Subcutaneous injections of a low dose of noradrenaline (100 micrograms/kg body wt.) elevated metabolic rate by about 30% in both obese models but not in their respective lean counterparts. In contrast, the increase in metabolic rate after injections of a high dose of noradrenaline (600 micrograms/kg body wt.) was of a similar magnitude in both lean and obese animals: metabolic rate was increased by 70-80%. These results indicate that the overall whole body thermogenic capacity is unimpaired at room temperature in this ' QEC ' strain of ob/ob mice and in the hypothalamic damaged obese mice. Obesity in these models is therefore not associated with a reduced ability to respond to noradrenaline but could rather be due to a failure to release noradrenaline.

  14. Mutations of the Sonic Hedgehog Pathway Underlie Hypothalamic Hamartoma with Gelastic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Griffin, Nicole G; Damiano, John A; Cops, Elisa J; Burgess, Rosemary; Ozturk, Ezgi; Jones, Nigel C; Leventer, Richard J; Freeman, Jeremy L; Harvey, A Simon; Sadleir, Lynette G; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Major, Heather; Darbro, Benjamin W; Allen, Andrew S; Goldstein, David B; Kerrigan, John F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy is a well-recognized drug-resistant epilepsy syndrome of early life.(1) Surgical resection allows limited access to the small deep-seated lesions that cause the disease. Here, we report the results of a search for somatic mutations in paired hamartoma- and leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 38 individuals which we conducted by using whole-exome sequencing (WES), chromosomal microarray (CMA), and targeted resequencing (TRS) of candidate genes. Somatic mutations were identified in genes involving regulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway in 14/38 individuals (37%). Three individuals had somatic mutations in PRKACA, which encodes a cAMP-dependent protein kinase that acts as a repressor protein in the Shh pathway, and four subjects had somatic mutations in GLI3, an Shh pathway gene associated with HH. In seven other individuals, we identified two recurrent and three single brain-tissue-specific, large copy-number or loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) variants involving multiple Shh genes, as well as other genes without an obvious biological link to the Shh pathway. The Shh pathway genes in these large somatic lesions include the ligand itself (SHH and IHH), the receptor SMO, and several other Shh downstream pathway members, including CREBBP and GLI2. Taken together, our data implicate perturbation of the Shh pathway in at least 37% of individuals with the HH epilepsy syndrome, consistent with the concept of a developmental pathway brain disease.

  15. Kisspeptin and the hypothalamic control of reproduction: lessons from the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jyothis T; Seminara, Stephanie B

    2012-11-01

    The hypothalamic hormone GnRH is a central driver of pituitary gonadotropin secretion, controlling pulsatile gonadotropin secretion, modulating gonadal steroid feedback, and bringing about full fertility in the adult. Thus, understanding GnRH neuronal regulation is essential to understanding the neurohumoral control of human reproduction. Genetic tools were used in patients with GnRH deficiency (i.e. idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism), a clinical syndrome that results from the failure of a normal pattern of pulsatile GnRH, to discover upstream modulators of GnRH secretion (1). In 2003, homozygosity mapping of two consanguineous pedigrees led to the identification of loss of function mutations in KISS1R (a G protein coupled receptor) by two groups (2, 3). In parallel, the Kiss1r(-/-) mouse was shown to be a phenocopy of the human GnRH-deficient state, demonstrating that the function of KISS1R/Kiss1r is conserved across mammalian species (4). Just before these human genetic discoveries, the ligand for kisspeptin-1 receptor [KISS1R; also known as G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54)], was discovered to be kisspeptin. Soon thereafter a large array of experimental studies began assembling genetic, expression, physiologic, transgenic, knockdown, and electrophysiological data to characterize the physiology of kisspeptin and its seminal role in modulating GnRH release.

  16. Anorexia and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice With Hypothalamic Ablation of Glut4 Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y.; McGraw, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin–mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron–ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism. PMID:25187366

  17. Endocannabinoid signaling in hypothalamic circuits regulates arousal from general anesthesia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Haixing; Tong, Li; Gu, Ning; Gao, Fang; Lu, Yacheng; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xin; Bergeron, Richard; Pomeranz, Lisa E.; Wang, Feng; Luo, Chun-Xia; Ren, Yan; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Lin; Li, Jinlian; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2017-01-01

    Consciousness can be defined by two major attributes: awareness of environment and self, and arousal, which reflects the level of awareness. The return of arousal after general anesthesia presents an experimental tool for probing the neural mechanisms that control consciousness. Here we have identified that systemic or intracerebral injection of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM281 into the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) — but not the adjacent perifornical area (Pef) or the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (VLPO) — accelerates arousal in mice recovering from general anesthesia. Anesthetics selectively activated endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling at DMH glutamatergic but not GABAergic synapses, leading to suppression of both glutamatergic DMH-Pef and GABAergic DMH-VLPO projections. Deletion of CB1R from widespread cerebral cortical or prefrontal cortical (PFC) glutamatergic neurons, including those innervating the DMH, mimicked the arousal-accelerating effects of AM281. In contrast, CB1R deletion from brain GABAergic neurons or hypothalamic glutamatergic neurons did not affect recovery time from anesthesia. Inactivation of PFC-DMH, DMH-VLPO, or DMH-Pef projections blocked AM281-accelerated arousal, whereas activation of these projections mimicked the effects of AM281. We propose that decreased eCB signaling at glutamatergic terminals of the PFC-DMH projection accelerates arousal from general anesthesia through enhancement of the excitatory DMH-Pef projection, the inhibitory DMH-VLPO projection, or both. PMID:28463228

  18. Vasopressin Impairment During Sepsis Is Associated with Hypothalamic Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway and Microglial Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Luis Henrique Angenendt; Júnior, Nilton Nascimento Dos Santos; Catalão, Carlos Henrique Rocha; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice; da Rocha, Maria José Alves

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that in the early phase of sepsis, the plasma concentration of arginine vasopressin (AVP) is increased, but in the late phase, its levels remain inadequately low, despite of persistent hypotension. One hypothesis suggested for this relative deficiency is apoptosis of vasopressinergic neurons. Here, we investigated apoptosis pathways in the hypothalamus during sepsis, as well as mechanisms underlying this process. Male Wistar rats were submitted to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or nonmanipulated (naive) as control. After 6 and 24 h, the animals were decapitated and brain and blood were collected to assess hypothalamic apoptotic markers, IFN-γ plasma levels, and evidence for breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sepsis caused a decrease in mitochondrial antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL) in the hypothalamus, but had no effect on markers of cell death mediated by death receptors or immune cells. In the supraoptic nuclei of these animals, microglia morphology was consistent with activation, associated with an increase in plasma IFN-γ. A transitory breakdown of BBB in the hypothalamus was seen at 6 h following CLP. The results indicate that the intrinsic but not extrinsic apoptosis pathway is involved in the cell death observed in vasopressinergic neurons, and that this condition is temporally associated with microglial activation and BBB leaking.

  19. Effects of cysteamine on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComb, D.J.; Cairns, P.D.; Kovacs, K.; Szabo, S.

    1985-06-01

    The effects of cysteamine (CSH) on hypothalamic concentrations of neuropeptides were reviewed and correlated with available information on changes in pituitary hormone content and circulating pituitary hormone levels. In our study, we found notable changes in the morphology of lactotropes from female Long-Evans rats treated for 7 days with CSH (300 mg/(kg X day) per os). Forming granules increased in number, and crinophagy, which is the augmented incorporation of these granules into lysosomes, was evident. Storage granules were reduced in number. These changes were not suppressed by simultaneous administration of 17 beta-estradiol (50 micrograms/day s.c.) for 7 days. CSH administration failed to prevent estrogen-induced lactotrope hyperplasia. Serum prolactin levels were unaffected by CSH treatment. The morphological changes in the adenohypophysis did not resemble those observed when rats were treated with bromocriptine. The rough endoplasmic reticulum luminal density was reduced in gonadotropes from intact CSH-treated rats after 1 wk. CSH treatment suppressed the development of castration cells and significantly reduced serum luteinizing hormone levels in ovariectomized rats. The morphological effects of CSH appeared to be confined to lactotropes and gonadotropes.

  20. Knockdown of hypothalamic RFRP3 prevents chronic stress-induced infertility and embryo resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Zhao, Sheng; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-12

    Whereas it is well established that chronic stress induces female reproductive dysfunction, whether stress negatively impacts fertility and fecundity when applied prior to mating and pregnancy has not been explored. In this study, we show that stress that concludes 4 days prior to mating results in persistent and marked reproductive dysfunction, with fewer successful copulation events, fewer pregnancies in those that successfully mated, and increased embryo resorption. Chronic stress exposure led to elevated expression of the hypothalamic inhibitory peptide, RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3), in regularly cycling females. Remarkably, genetic silencing of RFRP3 during stress using an inducible-targeted shRNA completely alleviates stress-induced infertility in female rats, resulting in mating and pregnancy success rates indistinguishable from non-stress controls. We show that chronic stress has long-term effects on pregnancy success, even post-stressor, that are mediated by RFRP3. This points to RFRP3 as a potential clinically relevant single target for stress-induced infertility.

  1. Contribution of adaptive thermogenesis to the hypothalamic regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Ricardo; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2016-11-15

    Obesity and its related disorders are among the most pervasive diseases in contemporary societies, and there is an urgent need for new therapies and preventive approaches. Given (i) our poor social capacity to correct unhealthy habits, and (ii) our evolutionarily genetic predisposition to store excess energy as fat, the current environment of caloric surplus makes the treatment of obesity extremely difficult. During the last few decades, an increasing number of methodological approaches have increased our knowledge of the neuroanatomical basis of the control of energy balance. Compelling evidence underlines the role of the hypothalamus as a homeostatic integrator of metabolic information and its ability to adjust energy balance. A greater understanding of the neural basis of the hypothalamic regulation of energy balance might indeed pave the way for new therapeutic targets. In this regard, it has been shown that several important peripheral signals, such as leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogens and bone morphogenetic protein 8B, converge on common energy sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase to modulate sympathetic tone on brown adipose tissue. This knowledge may open new ways to counteract the chronic imbalance underlying obesity. Here, we review the current state of the art on the role of hypothalamus in the regulation of energy balance with particular focus on thermogenesis. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Translational relevance of rodent models of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and stressors in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl M. McCormick

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Elevations in glucocorticoids that result from environmental stressors can have programming effects on brain structure and function when the exposure occurs during sensitive periods that involve heightened neural development. In recent years, adolescence has gained increasing attention as another sensitive period of development, a period in which pubertal transitions may increase the vulnerability to stressors. There are similarities in physical and behavioural development between humans and rats, and rats have been used effectively as an animal model of adolescence and the unique plasticity of this period of ontogeny. This review focuses on benefits and challenges of rats as a model for translational research on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA function and stressors in adolescence, highlighting important parallels and contrasts between adolescent rats and humans, and we review the main stress procedures that are used in investigating HPA stress responses and their consequences in adolescence in rats. We conclude that a greater focus on timing of puberty as a factor in research in adolescent rats may increase the translational relevance of the findings.

  3. Augmented vagal heart rate modulation in active hypoestrogenic pre-menopausal women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Emma; Goodman, Jack M; Morris, Beverly L; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J

    2015-11-01

    Compared with eumenorrhoeic women, exercise-trained women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (ExFHA) exhibit low heart rates (HRs) and absent reflex renin-angiotensin-system activation and augmentation of their muscle sympathetic nerve response to orthostatic stress. To test the hypothesis that their autonomic HR modulation is altered concurrently, three age-matched (pooled mean, 24 ± 1 years; mean ± S.E.M.) groups of women were studied: active with either FHA (ExFHA; n=11) or eumenorrhoeic cycles (ExOv; n=17) and sedentary with eumenorrhoeic cycles (SedOv; n=17). Blood pressure (BP), HR and HR variability (HRV) in the frequency domain were determined during both supine rest and graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10, -20 and -40 mmHg). Very low (VLF), low (LF) and high (HF) frequency power spectra (ms(2)) were determined and, owing to skewness, log10-transformed. LF/HF ratio and total power (VLF + LF + HF) were calculated. At baseline, HR and systolic BP (SBP) were lower (P0.05). At each stage, HR correlated inversely (Ppost-menopausal women.

  4. Effects of photoperiod and hypothalamic knife cuts on the timing of FSH surges in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, L L; Sisk, C L; Nunez, A A

    1991-02-01

    The timing of the proestrous surge of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was examined in female hamsters with hypothalamic knife cuts that prevented reproductive responses to photoperiod. All animals received either a horizontal knife cut aimed between the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and the paraventricular nuclei (PVN), or sham surgery, and were housed in long (16 h of light/24 h) or short (6 h of light/24 h) photoperiods. Following exposure to either photo-period for 11-12 weeks, a subset of the animals was fitted with an indwelling jugular cannula. Blood samples were taken hourly over a 24-h period and plasma levels of FSH were determined by RIA. Knife cuts placed ventral to or through the ventral portions of the PVN prevented short day-induced anestrus. On the day of proestrus, peak elevations of FSH in cycling animals with knife cuts in both photoperiods, as well as in sham-operated females in long days, occurred 4-5 h before lights out. In contrast, sham-operated anestrous females in short days showed peak elevations of FSH approximately 3-4 h after lights out. The present results support the view that neural connections between the SCN and the PVN mediate the effects of short days on reproductive physiology, including changes in the timing of the FSH surge.

  5. Neurochemical and behavioral analyses of the lateral hypothalamic syndrome: a look back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Edward M

    2012-06-01

    Philip Teitelbaum is one of the great physiological psychologists of his generation. His early research clarified key issues regarding the effects of electrolytic lesions of the ventromedial or ventrolateral hypothalamus on food intake in rats, a subject of paramount interest during the 1950s and 1960s. Perhaps best known were his extensive studies of the lateral hypothalamic syndrome in rats, which focused on the complex and changing array of symptoms after experimental brain damage. It soon became clear from later work that his research interests were not in the brain's control of food intake but in the effects of lesions to fragment behavior and thereby allow investigators to view its components. He was the foremost proponent of the use of exquisite behavioral analysis to reveal details in movement that allowed insights into brain function, and that approach - old fashioned physiological psychology made modern and at its finest - has infiltrated the entire field of experimental psychology, including studies of ingestive behavior, even while the new field of behavioral neuroscience emerged. He extended his analytic approach to neurological issues such as autism in humans, a promising arena that fully occupied his attention during the later phases of his career. But his influence on his scientific colleagues went well beyond his careful and powerful thinking; his articles and books have been models of clarity and concision. I write in behalf of a grateful field to salute his many great contributions.

  6. Early regulation of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus CART gene expression by short photoperiod in the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Julian G; Ellis, Claire; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Morgan, Peter J; Adam, Clare L

    2003-03-28

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA is expressed in a number of hypothalamic nuclei including the arcuate nucleus (ARC). An increase in CART gene expression in the ARC of juvenile female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod at weaning and prior to major divergence of body weight trajectory in this seasonal mammal implicates CART in the induction of programmed weight change. In the current series of experiments, elevated CART mRNA in short photoperiod juvenile female animals relative to long photoperiod controls was apparent throughout the caudal-rostral extent of the ARC after 14 days, but was not observed when short photoperiod exposure was limited to 4-7 days. Elevated CART gene expression was also observed in juvenile males 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod at weaning, in adult female hamsters 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod and in adult male hamsters 21 days after transfer to short photoperiod. There were no consistent trends in expression levels of other energy balance-related genes with these relatively short duration photoperiod manipulations, suggesting that CART may be involved in short photoperiod-programmed body weight regulation.

  7. Lipoprotein Lipase is an Important Modulator of Lipid Uptake and Storage in Hypothalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Andrew E.; Wang, Hong; Mittal, Richa; Sungelo, Mitchell; Potma, Eric; Eckel, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    LPL is the rate-limiting enzyme for uptake of TG-derived FFA in peripheral tissues, and the enzyme is expressed in the brain and CNS. We previously created a mouse which lacks neuronal LPL. This animal becomes obese on a standard chow, and we observed reduced lipid uptake in the hypothalamus at 3 months preceding obesity. In our present study, we replicated the animal phenotype in an immortalized mouse hypothalamic cell line (N41) to examine how LPL affects expression of AgRP as well as entry and storage of lipids into neurons. We show that LPL is able to modulate levels of the orexigenic peptide AgRP. LPL also exerts effects on lipid uptake into culture neurons, and that uptake of neutral lipid can be enhanced even by mutant LPL lacking catalytic activity. N41 cells also accumulate neutral lipid in droplets, and this is at least in part regulated by LPL. These data in addition to those published in mice with neuron-specific deletion of LPL suggest that neuronal LPL is an important regulator of lipid homeostasis in neurons and that alterations in LPL levels may have important effects on systemic metabolism and neuronal lipid biology. PMID:26265042

  8. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on salsolinol (SAL)-induced prolactin (PRL) secretion in male goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Hara, Sayaka; Sawai, Ken; Fülöp, Ferenc; Nagy, György Miklos; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on salsolinol (SAL)-induced prolactin (PRL) release in goats. The PRL-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of SAL was examined after treatment with augmentation of central DA using carbidopa (carbi) and L-dopa in male goats under 8-h (8 h light, 16 h dark) or 16-h (16 h light, 8 h dark) photoperiod conditions. The carbi and L-dopa treatments reduced basal PRL concentrations in the 16-h photoperiod group (P PRL concentration in the control group for the 8-h photoperiod was lower than that for the 16-h photoperiod (P PRL promptly after the injection in both the 8- and 16-h photoperiod groups (P PRL-releasing responses for the 16-h photoperiod were greater than those for the 8-h photoperiod (P PRL release in both the 8- and 16-h photoperiods (P PRL in male goats, regardless of the photoperiod, which suggests that both SAL and DA are involved in regulating the secretion of PRL in goats.

  9. Sex-specific associations between sleep problems and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Kajantie, Eero; Heinonen, Kati; Pyhälä, Riikka; Lahti, Jari; Jones, Alexander; Matthews, Karen A; Eriksson, Johan G; Strandberg, Timo; Räikkönen, Katri

    2012-02-01

    Sleep problems are associated with reduced physical and mental health. Altered function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA) may be one underlying mechanism. We studied the associations between sleep problems and HPAA activity in children. A cross-sectional epidemiological cohort study. Salivary cortisol was sampled throughout one day at home and during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) in clinic. Sleep disorders were measured with a parent-rated Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children, and sleep duration measured by actigraphy for one week. 284 (51% girls) 8-year-old children. Boys with sleep problems (≥ 85 th percentile in any of the sleep-wake transition, arousal, excessive daytime somnolence or sleep hyperhydrosis subscales) had lower diurnal salivary cortisol levels and salivary cortisol responses to TSST-C stress in comparison to boys without sleep problems. Girls with sleep problems (≥ 85 th percentile in disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep) displayed a higher overall level of salivary cortisol during the TSST-C. Salivary cortisol responses to stress were lower in boys and higher in girls with more than one sleep problem. Sleep problems in children are associated with altered HPAA function, after controlling for actual sleep quantity measured by actigraphy. Boys with sleep problems had lower HPAA activity and girls with sleep problems had higher HPAA activity, compared to children without sleep problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Maternal prenatal licorice consumption alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis function in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räikkönen, Katri; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heinonen, Kati; Pyhälä, Riikka; Feldt, Kimmo; Jones, Alexander; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Phillips, David I W; Lahti, Jari; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G; Matthews, Karen A; Strandberg, Timo E; Kajantie, Eero

    2010-11-01

    Overexposure to glucocorticoids has been proposed as a mechanism by which prenatal adversity 'programs' the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA), thereby increasing the risk of adult diseases. Glycyrrhizin, a natural constituent of licorice, potently inhibits 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, the feto-placental barrier to the higher maternal cortisol levels. We studied if maternal consumption of glycyrrhizin in licorice associates with HPAA function in children. Diurnal salivary cortisol and salivary cortisol during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) were measured in children (n=321, mean age=8.1, SD=0.3 years) whose mothers consumed varying levels of glycyrrhizin in licorice during pregnancy; exposure-level groups were labeled high (≥500 mg/week), moderate (250-499 mg/week) and zero-low (0-249 mg/week). In comparison to the zero-low exposure group, children in the high exposure group had 19.2% higher salivary cortisol awakening peak, 33.1% higher salivary cortisol awakening slope, 15.4% higher salivary cortisol awakening area under the curve (AUC), 30.8% higher baseline TSST-C salivary cortisol levels, and their salivary cortisol levels remained high throughout the TSST-C protocol (P-values HPAA function by overexposure to glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Yin and Yang of hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling in regulating white adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Thomas; Buettner, Christoph

    2011-09-01

    Fatty acids released from white adipose tissue (WAT) provide important energy substrates during fasting. However, uncontrolled fatty acid release from WAT during non-fasting states causes lipotoxicity and promotes inflammation and insulin resistance, which can lead to and worsen type 2 diabetes (DM2). WAT is also a source for insulin sensitizing fatty acids such as palmitoleate produced during de novo lipogenesis. Insulin and leptin are two major hormonal adiposity signals that control energy homeostasis through signaling in the central nervous system. Both hormones have been implicated to regulate both WAT lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis through the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in an opposing fashion independent of their respective peripheral receptors. Here, we review the current literature on brain leptin and insulin action in regulating WAT metabolism and discuss potential mechanisms and neuro-anatomical substrates that could explain the opposing effects of central leptin and insulin. Finally, we discuss the role of impaired hypothalamic control of WAT metabolism in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, metabolic inflexibility and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea: leptin treatment, dietary intervention and counselling as alternatives to traditional practice - systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakidis, M; Caetano, L; Anastasiadou, N; Karasu, T; Lashen, H

    2016-03-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (FHA) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by an energy deficit and characterized by low leptin levels. Based on this, previous studies have suggested that leptin administration may play a crucial role in FHA treatment. However, FHA is also associated with abnormal psychosocial and dietary behaviour that needs to be addressed. In this context, this systematic review examined the efficacy of leptin treatment, non-pharmacological therapy and nutritional interventions in FHA. PubMed, Medline and Cochrane Library databases were searched in order to find relevant papers, including randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, prospective studies and case reports. The effects of different treatments on reproductive function, hormonal status and bone markers were recorded. Studies regarding other forms of treatment were excluded. In total, 111 papers were retrieved. After the removal of 29 duplicate papers, the abstracts and titles of 82 papers were examined. Subsequently, 53 papers were excluded based on title, and seven papers were omitted based on abstract. The remaining 11 papers were used: three based on leptin treatment, three regarding non-pharmacological treatment and five regarding dietary intervention. This literature review indicates that all of these treatment strategies improved reproductive function and hormonal status significantly, although conclusive results could not be drawn on bone markers. While leptin may be a promising new treatment, social aspects of FHA should also be addressed. As a result, a multifaceted therapeutic approach should be applied to treat affected women.

  13. Mouse hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin responses to probes of signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-01-01

    Signal transduction mechanisms involved in mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) release were investigated using an in vitro perifusion system. Hypothalamic fragments were exposed to depolarizing agents, protein kinase A and C activators, and a calcium ionophore. The depolarizing agents, KCl (60 mM) and veratridine (50 microM), induced similar patterns of GRH and SRIH release. Somatostatin release in response to both agents was twofold greater than that of GRH. Forskolin (10 microM and 100 microM), an adenylate cyclase activator, stimulated both GRH and SRIH release, though with different secretory profiles. The SRIH response was prolonged and persisted beyond removal of the drug from the system, while the GRH response was brief, ending even prior to forskolin removal. Neither GRH nor SRIH were stimulated by 1,9-dideoxy-forskolin (100 microM), a forskolin analog with cAMP-independent actions. A23187 (5 microM), a calcium ionophore, stimulated the release of SRIH to a much greater extent than that of GRH. The GRH and SRIH secretory responses to PMA (1 microM), a protein kinase C activator, were similar, though delayed. The results suggest that 1) GRH and SRIH secretion are regulated by both protein kinase A and C pathways, and 2) depolarizing agents are important for the release of both hormones.

  14. Anorexia and impaired glucose metabolism in mice with hypothalamic ablation of Glut4 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron-ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism.

  15. Hypothalamic delivery of doxycycline-inducible leptin gene allows for reversible transgene expression and physiological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, J; Zolotukhin, S; Prima, V; Shek, E W; Matheny, M K; Scarpace, P J

    2002-11-01

    Our purpose was to incorporate regulation into the recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding leptin by introducing a tet-inducible promotor. This system, TET-Ob, allows for control of leptin gene expression via doxycycline in drinking water. F344XBN rats (aged 4 months) were given a hypothalamic injection of TET-Ob or control virus. During 34 days of doxycycline (doxy) administration to all rats (STAGE 1), TET-Ob rats gained 50.7% less mass, ate 10.4% less food, and had a 77.5% reduction in serum leptin as compared with controls. Doxy was then withdrawn from half of the TET-Ob rats for 32 days (TET-Ob-OFF), while half continued to receive doxy (TET-Ob-ON) (stage 2). During stage 2, TET-Ob-ON rats gained 44.8% less mass than TET-Ob-OFF and ate significantly less food than both TET-Ob-OFF and controls. Serum leptin increased to 83.4% of control values in TET-Ob-OFF, but remained very low in the in TET-Ob-ON. At death, visceral adiposity was 14.5% of controls in TET-Ob-ON animals, but had risen to 76.9% of controls in TET-Ob-OFF. A reversible increase in both leptin signal transduction in the hypothalamus and uncoupling protein expression in brown adipose was recorded. This system allows for more precise regulation of gene therapy-mediated fat loss.

  16. Hypothalamic Neuropeptide 26RFa Acts as an Incretin to Regulate Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, Gaëtan; Jeandel, Lydie; Arabo, Arnaud; Coëffier, Moïse; El Ouahli, Mariama; Picot, Marie; Alexandre, David; Gobet, Françoise; Leprince, Jérôme; Berrahmoune, Hind; Déchelotte, Pierre; Malagon, Maria; Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Chigr, Fatiha; Lefebvre, Hervé; Anouar, Youssef; Chartrel, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    26RFa is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that promotes food intake. 26RFa is upregulated in obese animal models, and its orexigenic activity is accentuated in rodents fed a high-fat diet, suggesting that this neuropeptide might play a role in the development and maintenance of the obese status. As obesity is frequently associated with type 2 diabetes, we investigated whether 26RFa may be involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In the current study, we show a moderate positive correlation between plasma 26RFa levels and plasma insulin in patients with diabetes. Plasma 26RFa concentration also increases in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. In addition, we found that 26RFa and its receptor GPR103 are present in human pancreatic β-cells as well as in the gut. In mice, 26RFa attenuates the hyperglycemia induced by a glucose load, potentiates insulin sensitivity, and increases plasma insulin concentrations. Consistent with these data, 26RFa stimulates insulin production by MIN6 insulinoma cells. Finally, we show, using in vivo and in vitro approaches, that a glucose load induces a massive secretion of 26RFa by the small intestine. Altogether, the present data indicate that 26RFa acts as an incretin to regulate glucose homeostasis. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Ventromedial hypothalamic mediation of photoperiodic gonadal responses in male Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, H H; Mangels, R A; Cho, B S; Dark, J; Yellon, S M; Zucker, I

    1999-10-01

    Short day lengths induce testicular regression in seasonally breeding Syrian hamsters. To test whether the ventromedial hypothalamus is necessary to maintain reproductive quiescence once testicular regression has been achieved, photoregressed male hamsters were subjected to lesions of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHx), pinealectomy (Pinx), or sham operation (Sham). VMHx hamsters underwent accelerated gonadal recrudescence compared to Pinx and Sham hamsters. Recovery of prolactin concentrations (PRL) to values characteristic of long-day hamsters was hastened in the VMHx animals compared to Sham hamsters. Concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) increased prematurely in both the VMHx and Pinx animals, beginning a few weeks after surgery. By the time the gonads had undergone recrudescence and the hamsters were refractory to melatonin, PRL and FSH concentrations had returned to baseline long-day values in all groups; there was no evidence of hypersecretion of either hormone in any of the animals with lesions. Melatonin concentrations of VMHx hamsters did not differ from those of sham-operated animals, but because only a single determination was made, it remains possible that VMH damage altered the duration of nightly melatonin secretion. An intact VMH appears to be essential for the continued maintenance of reproductive suppression induced by exposure to short day lengths; these and earlier findings suggest that the VMH-dorsomedial hypothalamic complex mediates regression of the reproductive apparatus during decreasing day lengths of late summer and early autumn and also is necessary to sustain regression during the winter months.

  18. Neuroanatomy of melanocortin-4 receptor pathway in the lateral hypothalamic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Huxing; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Gautron, Laurent; Funahashi, Hisayuki; Williams, Kevin W; Elmquist, Joel K; Lutter, Michael

    2012-12-15

    The central melanocortin system regulates body energy homeostasis including the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R). The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) receives dense melanocortinergic inputs from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and regulates multiple processes including food intake, reward behaviors, and autonomic function. By using a mouse line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed under control of the MC4R gene promoter, we systemically investigated MC4R signaling in the LHA by combining double immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, and retrograde tracing techniques. We found that LHA MC4R-GFP neurons coexpress neurotensin as well as the leptin receptor but do not coexpress other peptide neurotransmitters found in the LHA including orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, and nesfatin-1. Furthermore, electrophysiological recording demonstrated that leptin, but not the MC4R agonist melanotan II, hyperpolarizes the majority of LHA MC4R-GFP neurons in an ATP- sensitive potassium channel-dependent manner. Retrograde tracing revealed that LHA MC4R-GFP neurons do not project to the ventral tegmental area, dorsal raphe nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and spinal cord, and only limited number of neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract and parabrachial nucleus. Our findings provide new insights into MC4R signaling in the LHA and its potential implications in homeostatic regulation of body energy balance.

  19. Sex difference in physical activity, energy expenditure and obesity driven by a subpopulation of hypothalamic POMC neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Luke K; Doslikova, Barbora; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Georgescu, Teodora; Chianese, Raffaella; Martinez de Morentin, Pablo B; Ogunnowo-Bada, Emmanuel; Cansell, Celine; Valencia-Torres, Lourdes; Garfield, Alastair S; Apergis-Schoute, John; Lam, Daniel D; Speakman, John R; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J; Rochford, Justin J; Myers, Martin G; Evans, Mark L; Heisler, Lora K

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is one of the primary healthcare challenges of the 21st century. Signals relaying information regarding energy needs are integrated within the brain to influence body weight. Central among these integration nodes are the brain pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, perturbations of which disrupt energy balance and promote severe obesity. However, POMC neurons are neurochemically diverse and the crucial source of POMC peptides that regulate energy homeostasis and body weight remains to be fully clarified. Given that a 5-hydroxytryptamine 2c receptor (5-HT2CR) agonist is a current obesity medication and 5-HT2CR agonist's effects on appetite are primarily mediated via POMC neurons, we hypothesized that a critical source of POMC regulating food intake and body weight is specifically synthesized in cells containing 5-HT2CRs. To exclusively manipulate Pomc synthesis only within 5-HT2CR containing cells, we generated a novel 5-HT 2C R (CRE) mouse line and intercrossed it with Cre recombinase-dependent and hypothalamic specific reactivatable Pomc (NEO) mice to restrict Pomc synthesis to the subset of hypothalamic cells containing 5-HT2CRs. This provided a means to clarify the specific contribution of a defined subgroup of POMC peptides in energy balance and body weight. Here we transform genetically programed obese and hyperinsulinemic male mice lacking hypothalamic Pomc with increased appetite, reduced physical activity and compromised brown adipose tissue (BAT) into lean, healthy mice via targeted restoration of Pomc function only within 5-HT2CR expressing cells. Remarkably, the same metabolic transformation does not occur in females, who despite corrected feeding behavior and normalized insulin levels remain physically inactive, have lower energy expenditure, compromised BAT and develop obesity. These data provide support for the functional heterogeneity of hypothalamic POMC neurons, revealing that Pomc expression within 5-HT2CR expressing neurons is sufficient

  20. Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal drive is associated with decreased appetite and hypoactivation of food-motivation neurocircuitry in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Holsen, Laura M; Desanti, Rebecca; Santin, McKale; Meenaghan, Erinne; Herzog, David B; Goldstein, Jill M; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-11-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)-mediated hypercortisolemia has been demonstrated in anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder characterized by food restriction despite low body weight. While CRH is anorexigenic, downstream cortisol stimulates hunger. Using a food-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm, we have demonstrated hypoactivation of brain regions involved in food motivation in women with AN, even after weight recovery. The relationship between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation and appetite and the association with food-motivation neurocircuitry hypoactivation are unknown in AN. We investigated the relationship between HPA activity, appetite, and food-motivation neurocircuitry hypoactivation in AN. Cross-sectional study of 36 women (13 AN, ten weight-recovered AN (ANWR), and 13 healthy controls (HC)). Peripheral cortisol and ACTH levels were measured in a fasting state and 30, 60, and 120 min after a standardized mixed meal. The visual analog scale was used to assess homeostatic and hedonic appetite. fMRI was performed during visual processing of food and non-food stimuli to measure the brain activation pre- and post-meal. In each group, serum cortisol levels decreased following the meal. Mean fasting, 120 min post-meal, and nadir cortisol levels were high in AN vs HC. Mean postprandial ACTH levels were high in ANWR compared with HC and AN subjects. Cortisol levels were associated with lower fasting homeostatic and hedonic appetite, independent of BMI and depressive symptoms. Cortisol levels were also associated with between-group variance in activation in the food-motivation brain regions (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula). HPA activation may contribute to the maintenance of AN by the suppression of appetitive drive.

  1. Hyperandrogenism in female athletes with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea: a distinct phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asma Javed,1 Rahul Kashyap,2 Aida N Lteif1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Objective: To compare the reproductive, metabolic, and skeletal profiles of young athletic women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA as well as clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism (FHA-EX+HA with body mass index matched women with FHA due to exercise (FHA-EX or anorexia nervosa (FHA-AN alone.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Setting: Tertiary care teaching hospital.Population: Adolescents and young women, 15–30 years of age, diagnosed with FHA along with concurrent signs of hyperandrogenism (n=22 and body mass index matched control groups consisting of 22 women in each group of FHA-EX and FHA-AN. Main outcomes: 1 Reproductive hormone profile: luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, total testosterone, pelvic ultrasound features. 2 Metabolic function and skeletal health markers: fasting glucose, cholesterol, number of stress fractures and bone mineral density as assessed by spine dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry z scores. Results: FHA-EX+HA group was older at diagnosis compared to the other groups with a median (interquartile range [IQR] age of 22 (18.75–25.25 years versus (vs 17.5 (15.75–19 for FHA-EX; (P<0.01 and 18 (16–22.25 years for FHA-AN (P=0.01. There were no differences among the groups based on number of hours of exercise per week, type of physical activity or duration of amenorrhea. Median (IQR LH/FSH ratio was higher in FHA-EX+HA than both other groups, 1.44 (1.03–1.77 vs 0.50 (0.20–0.94 for FHA-EX and 0.67 (0.51–0.87 for FHA-AN (P<0.01 for both. Total testosterone concentrations were not different among the groups. Median (IQR fasting serum glucose concentration was higher in FHA-EX+HA vs FHA-EX, 88.5 mg/dL (82.8–90 mg/dL vs 83.5 mg/dL (78.8–86.3 mg

  2. Leptin differentially regulates NPY secretion in hypothalamic cell lines through distinct intracellular signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Sandeep S; Belsham, Denise D

    2011-04-11

    Leptin acts as a key peripheral hormone in distinct neurons in the hypothalamus to modulate both reproductive function and energy homeostasis. The control of neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion is an example of a process that can be differentially regulated by leptin. In order to further understand these distinct modulatory effects, we have used immortalized, neuronal hypothalamic cell lines expressing NPY, mHypoE-38 and mHypoE-46. We found that these cell lines express the endogenous leptin receptor, ObRb, and secrete detectable levels of NPY. We exposed the neurons to 100nM leptin for 1h and determined that the basal levels of NPY in the cell lines were differentially regulated: NPY secretion was inhibited in mHypoE-46 neurons, whereas NPY secretion was induced in the mHypoE-38 neurons. In order to determine the mechanisms involved in the divergent regulation of NPY release, we analyzed the activity of a number of signaling components using phospho-specific antibodies directed towards specific proteins in the MAP kinase, PI3K, and AMPK pathways, among others. We found that leptin activated a different combination of second messengers in each cell line. Importantly, we could link the regulation of NPY secretion to different signaling pathways, AMPK in the mHypoE-46 and both MAPK and PI3K in the mHypoE-38 neurons. This is the first demonstration that leptin can specifically regulate individual NPY neuron secretory responses through distinct signaling pathways.

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stress in male DUI recidivists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Sophie; Brown, Thomas G; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Gianoulakis, Christina; Tremblay, Jacques; Carbonneau, René

    2008-01-01

    Cortisol is a stress hormone mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and a psychobiological marker of genetic risk for alcoholism and other high-risk behavioural characteristics. In previous work with driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) recidivists, we uncovered a significant inverse relationship between the frequency of past DUI convictions and salivary cortisol, whose strength surpassed those observed between DUI frequency and measures of alcohol abuse and other DUI-related characteristics. This finding emerged using a methodology not specifically contrived to test this relationship. The goals of this follow-up study were to (a) examine if a standardized stress-induction protocol would produce a significant inverse relationship between cortisol response and number of DUI offences; and (b) clarify whether HPA axis dysregulation could be linked to particular DUI-related behavioural correlates, such as alcohol use severity, sensation seeking, and antisocial features. Thirty male DUI recidivists were recruited as well as 11 male non-DUI drivers as a comparison group. Results indicated an inverse relationship between DUI frequency and cortisol response (r(39)=-0.36, p=0.021), as well as a lower cortisol response in DUI offenders than the comparison group (F(1,39)=5.71, p=0.022). Finally, for recidivists, hierarchical regression analyses indicated that experience seeking (R(2)=0.23, p=0.008), followed by number of cigarettes smoked daily ((Delta)R(2)=0.12, p=0.031), combined to explain 35% of the variance in cortisol (F(2,29)=7.26, p=0.003). These findings indicate that severe recidivism may have psychobiological underpinnings, and that HPA axis dysregulation appears to be a mechanism common to high-risk behaviours including DUI recidivism, sensation seeking, and cigarette smoking.

  4. Peripheral injection of ghrelin induces Fos expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelt, Peter; Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Inhoff, Tobias; Noetzel, Steffen; Veh, Rüdiger W.; Bannert, Norbert; van der Voort, Ivo; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Taché, Yvette; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral ghrelin has been shown to act as a gut–brain peptide exerting a potent orexigenic effect on food intake. The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) is innervated by projections from other brain areas being part of the network of nuclei controlling energy homeostasis, among others NPY/AgRP-positive fibers arising from the arcuate nucleus (ARC). The aim of the study was to determine if peripherally administered ghrelin affects neuronal activity in the DMH, as assessed by Fos expression. The number of Fos positive neurons was determined in the DMH, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), ARC, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and in the area postrema(AP) in non-fasted Sprague–Dawley rats in response to intraperitoneally (ip) injected ghrelin (3 nmol/rat) or vehicle (0.15 M NaCl). Peripheral ghrelin induced a significant increase in the number of Fos-ir positive neurons/section compared with vehicle in the ARC (mean±SEM: 49±2 vs. 23±2 neurons/section, p=0.001), PVN (69±5 vs. 34±3, p=0.001), and DMH (142±5 vs. 83±5, p<0.001). Fos-ir positive neurons were mainly localized within the ventral part of the DMH. No change in Fos expression was observed in the VMH (53±8 vs. 48±6, p=0.581), NTS (42±2 vs.40±3, p=0.603), and in the AP (7±1 vs. 5±1, p=0.096). Additional double-labelling with anti-Fos and anti-AgRP revealed that Fos positive neurons in the DMH were encircled by a network of AgRP-ir positive fibers. These data indicate that peripheral ghrelin activates DMH neurons and that NPY-/AgRP-positive fibers may be involved in the response. PMID:18329635

  5. Dietary magnesium restriction reduces amygdala-hypothalamic GluN1 receptor complex levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, Maryam; Whittle, Nigel; Miklósi, András G; Kotlowski, Caroline; Kotlowsky, Caroline; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Berger, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Singewald, Nicolas; Lubec, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Reduced daily intake of magnesium (Mg(2+)) is suggested to contribute to depression. Indeed, preclinical studies show dietary magnesium restriction (MgR) elicits enhanced depression-like behaviour establishing a causal relationship. Amongst other mechanisms, Mg(2+) gates the activity of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) receptors; however, it is not known whether reduced dietary Mg(2+) intake can indeed affect brain NMDA receptor complexes. Thus, the aim of the current study was to reveal whether MgR induces changes in brain NMDA receptor subunit composition that would indicate altered NMDA receptor regulation. The results revealed that enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR was associated with reduced amygdala-hypothalamic protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA complexes. No change in GluN1 mRNA levels was observed indicating posttranslational changes were induced by dietary Mg(2+) restriction. To reveal possible protein interaction partners, GluN1 immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays were carried out revealing the expected GluN1 subunit association with GluN2A, GluN2B, but also novel interactions with GluA1, GluA2 in addition to known downstream signalling proteins. Chronic paroxetine treatment in MgR mice normalized enhanced depression-like behaviour, but did not alter protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptors, indicating targets downstream of the NMDA receptor. Collectively, present data demonstrate that dietary MgR alters brain levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptor complexes, containing GluN2A, GluN2B, AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2 and several protein kinases. These data indicate that the modulation of dietary Mg(2+) intake may alter the function and signalling of this receptor complex indicating its involvement in the enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR.

  6. Study of hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis in patients of membranous nephropathy receiving modified Ponticelli regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ramachandran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse methyl prednisolone followed by oral prednisolone and abrupt switch to chlorambucil/cyclophosphamide (Ponticelli/modified Ponticelli regimen is used in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. This therapy where steroids are stopped abruptly is unphysiologic and expected to have